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Sample records for intraoperative warming comparison

  1. Comparison study of intraoperative surface acquisition methods for surgical navigation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Amber L; Burgner, Jessica; Glisson, Courtenay L; Herrell, S Duke; Ma, Burton; Pheiffer, Thomas S; Webster, Robert J; Miga, Michael I

    2013-04-01

    Soft-tissue image-guided interventions often require the digitization of organ surfaces for providing correspondence from medical images to the physical patient in the operating room. In this paper, the effect of several inexpensive surface acquisition techniques on target registration error and surface registration error (SRE) for soft tissue is investigated. A systematic approach is provided to compare image-to-physical registrations using three different methods of organ spatial digitization: 1) a tracked laser-range scanner (LRS), 2) a tracked pointer, and 3) a tracked conoscopic holography sensor (called a conoprobe). For each digitization method, surfaces of phantoms and biological tissues were acquired and registered to CT image volume counterparts. A comparison among these alignments demonstrated that registration errors were statistically smaller with the conoprobe than the tracked pointer and LRS (p<0.01). In all acquisitions, the conoprobe outperformed the LRS and tracked pointer: for example, the arithmetic means of the SRE over all data acquisitions with a porcine liver were 1.73 ± 0.77 mm, 3.25 ± 0.78 mm, and 4.44 ± 1.19 mm for the conoprobe, LRS, and tracked pointer, respectively. In a cadaveric kidney specimen, the arithmetic means of the SRE over all trials of the conoprobe and tracked pointer were 1.50 ± 0.50 mm and 3.51 ± 0.82 mm, respectively. Our results suggest that tissue displacements due to contact force and attempts to maintain contact with tissue, compromise registrations that are dependent on data acquired from a tracked surgical instrument and we provide an alternative method (tracked conoscopic holography) of digitizing surfaces for clinical usage. The tracked conoscopic holography device outperforms LRS acquisitions with respect to registration accuracy.

  2. Comparison of Intraoperative Portable CT Scanners in Skull Base and Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: Single Center Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Conley, David B.; Tan, Bruce; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Chandra, Rakesh; Sidle, Douglas; Rahme, Rudy J.; Adel, Joseph G.; Fishman, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Precise and safe management of complex skull base lesions can be enhanced by intraoperative computed tomography (CT) scanning. Surgery in these areas requires real-time feedback of anatomic landmarks. Several portable CT scanners are currently available. We present a comparison of our clinical experience with three portable scanners in skull base and craniofacial surgery. We present clinical case series and the participants were from the Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Three scanners are studied: one conventional multidetector CT (MDCT), two digital flat panel cone-beam CT (CBCT) devices. Technical considerations, ease of use, image characteristics, and integration with image guidance are presented for each device. All three scanners provide good quality images. Intraoperative scanning can be used to update the image guidance system in real time. The conventional MDCT is unique in its ability to resolve soft tissue. The flat panel CBCT scanners generally emit lower levels of radiation and have less metal artifact effect. In this series, intraoperative CT scanning was technically feasible and deemed useful in surgical decision-making in 75% of patients. Intraoperative portable CT scanning has significant utility in complex skull base surgery. This technology informs the surgeon of the precise extent of dissection and updates intraoperative stereotactic navigation. PMID:22470270

  3. Perioperative normothermia depends on intraoperative warming procedure, extent of the surgical intervention and age of the experimental animal.

    PubMed

    Felies, Melanie; Poppendieck, Sonja; Nave, Heike

    2005-11-04

    The maintenance of a physiological body temperature during and early after surgical interventions in experimental animals such as rodents is often neglected. Therefore the positive influence of an adequate use of warming blankets (WB) on the rectal body temperature in rats was investigated during two different surgical interventions, with a special focus on possible differences between young adult (2.5+/-0.14 months) and adult animals (9.3+/-0.13 months). Anesthesia was induced with isoflurane short inhalation and maintained with ketamine and domitor intramuscularly. Animals were divided into ten groups according to (a) the age of the animals, (b) the temperature of the WB and (c) the kind of surgical intervention (either an intravenous [i.v.] cannulation of the right external jugular vein or an intra-aortal implantation of a telemetric transmitter or both). Results clearly show that the surface temperature of the WB has a major impact on the perioperative thermoregulation. The rectal body temperature of animals operated on a cooler WB dramatically decreased depending on the age of the rat and also on the extent of the surgical intervention. The opening of the abdominal cavity in older rats resulted in a severe hypothermia: they lost 5.6 degrees C compared to 3.2 degrees C in the young adult rats. The implantation of the i.v. catheter had no serious effect on the thermoregulation. In conclusion, the results clearly show that an adequate perioperative warming system positively influences the postoperative outcome in young adult and most notably in adult rats and thus enables early postoperative experiments without effects on measured parameters.

  4. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  5. Comparison of forced-air warming and electric heating pad for maintenance of body temperature during total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Ng, V; Lai, A; Ho, V

    2006-11-01

    We conducted a randomised controlled trial to compare the efficacy of forced-air warming (Bair Hugger(trade mark), Augustine Medical model 500/OR, Prairie, MN) with that of an electric heating pad (Operatherm 202, KanMed, Sweden) for maintenance of intra-operative body temperature in 60 patients undergoing total knee replacement under combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia. Intra-operative tympanic and rectal temperatures and verbal analogue score for thermal comfort were recorded. There were no differences in any measurements between the two groups, with mean (SD) final rectal temperatures of 36.8 (0.4) degrees C with forced-air warming and 36.9 (0.4) degrees C with the electric pad. The heating pad is as effective as forced-air warming for maintenance of intra-operative body temperature.

  6. Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seed Gun Applicator Technique Using Real-Time Intraoperative Planning for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zauls, A. Jason; Ashenafi, Michael S.; Onicescu, Georgiana; Clarke, Harry S.; Marshall, David T.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report our dosimetric results using a novel push-button seed delivery system that constructs custom links of seeds intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2007, 43 patients underwent implantation using a gun applicator (GA), and from 2007 to 2008, 48 patientsunderwent implantation with a novel technique allowing creation of intraoperatively built custom links of seeds (IBCL). Specific endpoint analyses were prostate D90% (pD90%), rV100% > 1.3 cc, and overall time under anesthesia. Results: Final analyses included 91 patients, 43 GA and 48 IBCL. Absolute change in pD90% ({Delta}pD90%) between intraoperative and postoperative plans was evaluated. Using GA method, the {Delta}pD90% was -8.1Gy and -12.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. Similarly, the IBCL technique resulted in a {Delta}pD90% of -8.7Gy and -9.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. No statistically significant difference in {Delta}pD90% was found comparing methods. The GA method had two intraoperative and 10 postoperative rV100% >1.3 cc. For IBCL, five intraoperative and eight postoperative plans had rV100% >1.3 cc. For GA, the mean time under anesthesia was 75 min and 87 min for Pd-103 and I-125 implants, respectively. For IBCL, the mean time was 86 and 98 min for Pd-103 and I-125. There was a statistical difference between the methods when comparing mean time under anesthesia. Conclusions: Dosimetrically relevant endpoints were equivalent between the two methods. Currently, time under anesthesia is longer using the IBCL technique but has decreased over time. IBCL is a straightforward brachytherapy technique that can be implemented into clinical practice as an alternative to gun applicators.

  7. Intra-Operative Tissue Oxygen Tension Is Increased by Local Insufflation of Humidified-Warm CO2 during Open Abdominal Surgery in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jean K.; Lindner, Pernilla; Tait, Noel; Maddocks, Tracy; Riepsamen, Angelique; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maintenance of high tissue oxygenation (PtO2) is recommended during surgery because PtO2 is highly predictive of surgical site infection and colonic anastomotic leakage. However, surgical site perfusion is often sub-optimal, creating an obstructive hurdle for traditional, systemically applied therapies to maintain or increase surgical site PtO2. This research tested the hypothesis that insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity would increase sub-peritoneal PtO2 during open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods 15 Wistar rats underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. Three sets of randomized cross-over experiments were conducted in which the abdominal cavity was subjected to alternating exposure to 1) humidified-warm CO2 & ambient air; 2) humidified-warm CO2 & dry-cold CO2; and 3) dry-cold CO2 & ambient air. Sub-peritoneal PtO2 and tissue temperature were measured with a polarographic oxygen probe. Results Upon insufflation of humidified-warm CO2, PtO2 increased by 29.8 mmHg (SD 13.3; p<0.001), or 96.6% (SD 51.9), and tissue temperature by 3.0°C (SD 1.7 p<0.001), in comparison with exposure to ambient air. Smaller, but significant, increases in PtO2 were seen in experiments 2 and 3. Tissue temperature decreased upon exposure to dry-cold CO2 compared with ambient air (-1.4°C, SD 0.5, p = 0.001). Conclusions In a rat model, insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity during open abdominal surgery causes an immediate and potentially clinically significant increase in PtO2. The effect is an additive result of the delivery of CO2 and avoidance of evaporative cooling via the delivery of the CO2 gas humidified at body temperature. PMID:25835954

  8. Intraoperative ultrasonographic localization of islet cell tumors. A prospective comparison to palpation.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, J A; Cromack, D T; Shawker, T H; Doppman, J L; Comi, R; Gorden, P; Maton, P N; Gardner, J D; Jensen, R T

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate prospectively the value of intraoperative ultrasound scanning (IOUS) in localizing islet cell tumors by comparing results of IOUS to those of palpation during 44 consecutive laparotomies for gastrinoma (36) or insulinoma (8). All patients had preoperative radiographic imaging studies and selective venous sampling for hormones, which guided the subsequent laparotomy. Any suspicious finding by palpation and/or IOUS was resected. Pathologic evidence of islet cell neoplasm served as the reference standard. Five patients were excluded from analysis because neither palpation nor IOUS had suspicious findings and no islet cell tumor was found. Seven pancreatic insulinomas were found in seven patients. IOUS was as sensitive as palpation at localizing insulinomas. Twenty-three pancreatic gastrinomas were found in 19 patients. IOUS was equal to palpation in the ability to localize gastrinomas. Gastrinomas that were successfully imaged by IOUS were significantly larger than gastrinomas that were not imaged. Twelve extrapancreatic gastrinomas were found in nine patients, and palpation was more sensitive than IOUS at localizing these small duodenal wall tumors. Five patients (11%) had their surgical management changed by IOUS. Two patients had pancreatic tumors (one gastrinoma and insulinoma) enucleated that would not have been found without IOUS, and three patients had resections of pathologically proven malignant islet cell tumors based on sonographic findings. All five patients were cured with short follow-up. The present results demonstrate that palpation and IOUS are complementary because IOUS can image tumors that are not palpable and IOUS can provide additional information concerning malignant potential not detected by palpation. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2829761

  9. The Ahmed Baerveldt Comparison Study: Methodology, Baseline Patient Characteristics, and Intraoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Keith; Gedde, Steven J.; Budenz, Donald L.; Feuer, William J.; Schiffman, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The Ahmed Baerveldt Comparative (ABC) Study compares the long-term outcomes and complications of the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve (AGV), model FP7, and the Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant (BGI), model 101–350. Design Multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial. Participants 276 glaucoma patients at 16 clinical centers worldwide, aged 18–85 years with inadequately controlled intraocular pressure (IOP ≥ 18 mm Hg) in whom placement of an aqueous shunt was planned. Methods Study patients were randomized to undergo implantation of an AGV or a BGI. Main Outcome Measure Failure, defined as IOP > 21 mm Hg or not reduced by 20% below baseline IOP ≤ 5 mm Hg (2 consecuteive visits after 3 months), additional glaucoma surgery, removal of the implant or loss of light perception vision Results A total of 276 patients were enrolled between October 2006 and April 2008, including 143 in the AGV group and 133 in the BGI group. The age of patients enrolled was 63 ± 14 years (mean ± standard deviation, SD), and 52% were male. The baseline IOP was 31.5 ± 11.8 mmHg (mean ± SD). Except for a 13% higher prevalence of hypertension in the AGV group, no significant differences in baseline demographic or ocular characteristics were observed between the study groups. Intraoperative complications occurred in 11 (8%) patients in the AGV group and 16 (12%) patients in the BGI group (p = 0.31). Conclusions The ABC study should yield valuable prospective data comparing two commonly used aqueous shunts in clinical practice. PMID:20932581

  10. Comparison of effects of intraoperative nefopam and ketamine infusion on managing postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy administered remifentanil

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Kwan; Choi, Jung Il; Kim, Woong Mo; Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Keun Seok; Song, Ji A

    2016-01-01

    Background Although intraoperative opioids provide more comfortable anesthesia and reduce the use of postoperative analgesics, it may cause opioid induced hyperalgesia (OIH). OIH is an increased pain response to opioids and it may be associated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. This study aimed to determine whether intraoperative nefopam or ketamine, known being related on NMDA receptor, affects postoperative pain and OIH after continuous infusion of intraoperative remifentanil. Methods Fifty-four patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into three groups. In the nefopam group (N group), patients received nefopam 0.3 mg/kg at the induction of anesthesia followed by a continuous infusion of 0.065 mg/kg/h. In the ketamine group (K group), patients received ketamine 0.3 mg/kg at the induction of anesthesia followed by a continuous infusion of 3 µg/kg/min. The control group did not received any other agents except for the standard anesthetic regimen. Postoperative pain score, first time and number of demanding rescue analgesia, OIH and degrees of drowsiness/sedation scale were examined. Results Co-administrated nefopam or ketamine significantly reduced the total amount of intraoperative remifentanil and postoperative supplemental morphine. Nefopam group showed superior property over control and ketamine group in the postoperative VAS score and recovery index (alertness and respiratory drive), respectively. Nefopam group showed lower morphine consumption than ketamine group, but not significant. Conclusions Both nefopam and ketamine infusion may be useful in managing in postoperative pain control under concomitant infusion of remifentanil. However, nefopam may be preferred to ketamine in terms of sedation. PMID:27703629

  11. Intraoperative endovascular ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eton, Darwin; Ahn, Samuel S.; Baker, J. D.; Pensabene, Joseph; Yeatman, Lawrence S.; Moore, Wesley S.

    1991-05-01

    The early experience using intra-operative endovascular ultrasonography (EU) is reported in eight patients undergoing lower extremity revasularization. In four patients, intra-operative EU successfully characterized inflow stenoses that were inadequately imaged with pre- operative arteriography. Two patients were found to have hemodynamically significant inflow stenoses, and were treated with intra-operative balloon angioplasty followed by repeat EU. The other two patients were found to have non-hemodynamically significant inflow stenoses requiring no treatment. Additional outflow procedures were required in all four patients. In the remaining four patients, EU was used to evaluate the completeness of TEC rotary atherectomy, of Hall oscillatory endarterectomy, of thrombectomy of the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries, and of valve lysis during in situ saphenous vein grafting, respectively. In the latter case, the valve leaflets were not clearly seen. In the other cases, EU assisted the surgeon. Angioscopy and angiography were available for comparison. In one case, angioscopy failed because of inability to clear the field while inspecting retrograde the limb of an aorto-bi-femoral graft. EU however was possible. No complications of EU occurred. EU is a safe procedure indicated when characterization of a lesion is needed prior to an intervention or when evaluation of the intervention's success is desired. We did not find it useful in valve lysis for in-site grafting.

  12. Comparison of electron transport calculations in warm dense matter using the Ziman formula

    DOE PAGES

    Burrill, D. J.; Feinblum, D. V.; Charest, M. R. J.; ...

    2016-02-10

    The Ziman formulation of electrical conductivity is tested in warm and hot dense matter using the pseudo-atom molecular dynamics method. Several implementation options that have been widely used in the literature are systematically tested through a comparison to the accurate, but expensive Kohn–Sham density functional theory molecular dynamics (KS-DFT-MD) calculations. As a result, the comparison is made for several elements and mixtures and for a wide range of temperatures and densities, and reveals a preferred method that generally gives very good agreement with the KS-DFT-MD results, but at a fraction of the computational cost.

  13. Posterior spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with or without intraoperative cell salvage system: a retrospective comparison.

    PubMed

    Ersen, Omer; Ekıncı, Safak; Bılgıc, Serkan; Kose, Ozkan; Oguz, Erbil; Sehırlıoglu, Ali

    2012-08-01

    This study investigates efficacy and safety of routine cell salvage system use in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients undergoing primary posterior spinal fusion surgery with segmental spinal instrumentation. Forty-five consecutive adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion by two surgeons at a single hospital were studied. Intraoperative cell salvage system was used in 23 patients, and the control group was 22 patients who underwent surgery without cell salvage system. The cell salvage system was the Haemonetics Cell Saver 5. The primary outcome measures were intraoperative and perioperative allogeneic transfusion rate, difference between preoperative and discharge Hg and Hct levels. Average patient age was 14.65 ± 1.49 in cell saver group and 13.86 ± 2.0 in control group. In cell saver group, average intraoperative autotransfusion was 382.1 ± 175 ml. Average perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion need was 1.04 ± 0.7 unit in cell saver group and 2.5 ± 1.14 unit in control group. No transfusion reactions occurred in either group. Average hemoglobin level in cell saver group was 10.7 ± 0.86 and average hemoglobin level in control group was 10.7 ± 0.82 on discharge. Cell saver reduces perioperative transfusion rate in patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  14. Simulations of the February 1979 stratospheric sudden warming: Model comparisons and three-dimensional evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Manney, G.L. ); Farrara, J.D.; Mechoso, C.R. )

    1994-06-01

    The evolution of the stratospheric flow during the major stratospheric sudden warming of February 1979 is studied using two primitive equation models of the stratosphere and mesosphere. The United Kingdom Meteorological Office Stratosphere-Mesosphere Model (SMM) uses log pressure as a vertical coordinate. A spectral, entropy coordinate version of the SMM (entropy coordinate model, or ECM) that has recently been developed is also used. The ECM produces a more realistic recombination and recovery of the polar vortex in the midstratosphere after the warming. Comparison of SMM simulations with forecasts performed using the University of California, Los Angeles general circulation model confirms the previously noted sensitivity of stratospheric forecasts to tropospheric forecast and emphasizes the importance of adequate vertical resolution in modeling the stratosphere. The ECM simulations provide a schematic description of the three-dimensional evolution of the polar vortex and the motion of air through it. During the warming, the two cyclonic vortices tilt westward and equatorward with height. Strong upward velocities develop in the lower stratosphere on the west (cold) side of a baroclinic zone as it forms over Europe and Asia. Strong downward velocities appear in the upper stratosphere on the east (warm) side, strengthening the temperature gradients. After the peak of the warming, vertical velocities decrease, downward velocities move into the lower stratosphere, and upward velocities move into the upper stratosphere. Transport calculations show that air with high ozone mixing ratios is advected toward the pole from low latitudes during the warming, and air with low ozone mixing ratios is transported to the midstratosphere from both higher and lower altitudes along the baroclinic zone in the polar regions. 32 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Simulations of the February 1979 stratospheric sudden warming: Model comparisons and three-dimensional evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Farrara, J. D.; Mechoso, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of the stratopsheric flow during the major stratospheric sudden warming of February 1979 is studied using two primitive equation models of the stratosphere and mesosphere. The United Kingdom Meteorological Office Stratosphere-Mesosphere Model (SMM) uses log pressure as a vertical coordinate. A spectral, entropy coordinate version of the SMM (entropy coordinate model, or ECM) that has recently been developed is also used. Comparison of SMM simulations with forecasts performed using the University of California, Los Angeles general circulation model confirms the previously noted sensitivity of stratospheric forecasts to tropospheric forecasts and emphasizes the importance of adequate vertical resolution in modeling the stratosphere. The ECM simulations provide a schematic description of the three-dimensional evolution of the polar vortex and the motion of air through it. During the warming, the two cyclonic vortices tilt westward and equatorward with height. Strong upward velocities develop in the lower stratosphere on the west (cold) side of a baroclinic zone as it forms over Europe and Asia. Strong downward velocities appear in the upper stratosphere on the east (warm) side, strengthening the temperature gradients. After the peak of the warming, vertical velocities decrease, downward velocities move into the lower stratosphere, and upward velocities move into the upper stratosphere.

  16. Comparison of computational fluid dynamics findings with intraoperative microscopy findings in unruptured intracranial aneurysms- An initial analysis

    PubMed Central

    Talari, Sandeep; Kato, Yoko; Shang, Hanbing; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Yamashiro, Kei; Suyama, Daisuke; Kawase, Tsukasa; Balik, Vladimir; Rile, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Context: The increase in the detection of unruptured cerebral aneurysms has led to management dilemma. Prediction of risk based on the size of the aneurysm is not always accurate. There is no objective way of predicting rupture of aneurysm so far. Computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) was proposed as a tool to identify the rupture risk. Aims: To know the correlation of CFD findings with intraoperative microscopic findings and to know the relevance of CFD in the prediction of rupture risk and in the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Settings and Design: A prospective study involving nine cases over a period of 6 months as an initial analysis. Subjects and Methods: Both males and females were included in the study. Preoperative analysis was performed using computed tomography angiogram, magnetic resonance imaging in all cases and digital substraction angiogram in some cases. Intraoperatively microscopic examination of the aneurysm wall was carried out and images recorded. The correlation was done between microscopic and CFD images. Results: Seven cases were found intraoperatively to have a higher risk of rupture based on the thinning of the wall. Two cases had an atherosclerotic wall. All cases had low wall shear stress (WSS).Only two cases with atherosclerotic wall had a correlation with low WSS. Conclusions: While the pressure measured with CFD technique is a good predictor of rupture risk, the WSS component is controversial. Multicentric trials involving a larger subset of population are needed before drawing any definite conclusions. On-going development in the CFD analysis may help to predict the rupture chances accurately in future. PMID:27695537

  17. How warm was the last interglacial? New model-data comparisons.

    PubMed

    Otto-Bliesner, Bette L; Rosenbloom, Nan; Stone, Emma J; McKay, Nicholas P; Lunt, Daniel J; Brady, Esther C; Overpeck, Jonathan T

    2013-10-28

    A Community Climate System Model, Version 3 (CCSM3) simulation for 125 ka during the Last Interglacial (LIG) is compared to two recent proxy reconstructions to evaluate surface temperature changes from modern times. The dominant forcing change from modern, the orbital forcing, modified the incoming solar insolation at the top of the atmosphere, resulting in large positive anomalies in boreal summer. Greenhouse gas concentrations are similar to those of the pre-industrial (PI) Holocene. CCSM3 simulates an enhanced seasonal cycle over the Northern Hemisphere continents with warming most developed during boreal summer. In addition, year-round warming over the North Atlantic is associated with a seasonal memory of sea ice retreat in CCSM3, which extends the effects of positive summer insolation anomalies on the high-latitude oceans to winter months. The simulated Arctic terrestrial annual warming, though, is much less than the observational evidence, suggesting either missing feedbacks in the simulation and/or interpretation of the proxies. Over Antarctica, CCSM3 cannot reproduce the large LIG warming recorded by the Antarctic ice cores, even with simulations designed to consider observed evidence of early LIG warmth in Southern Ocean and Antarctica records and the possible disintegration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Comparisons with a HadCM3 simulation indicate that sea ice is important for understanding model polar responses. Overall, the models simulate little global annual surface temperature change, while the proxy reconstructions suggest a global annual warming at LIG (as compared to the PI Holocene) of approximately 1(°)C, though with possible spatial sampling biases. The CCSM3 SRES B1 (low scenario) future projections suggest high-latitude warmth similar to that reconstructed for the LIG may be exceeded before the end of this century.

  18. Comparison of the pro-postoperative analgesia of intraoperative dexmedetomidine with and without loading dose following general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Yang, Haikou; Sun, Yong; Zhang, Jun; Li, Guangming; Zheng, Ying; Liu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Intraoperative dexemdetomidine (DEX) with or without loading dose is well-established to improve postoperative pain control in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). This study was designed to compare the pro-analgesia effect between the 2 in patients received general anesthesia. Seventy patients shceduced abdominal surgery under general anesthesia were randomly assigned into 3 groups which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/Ringer solution (PRR), propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine with (PRDw) or without (PRDo) a loading dose of dexmedetomidine before induction. PRDw/o patients displayed a greater Romsay sedation score measured immediately after surgery. When compared with PRR patients, those from the PRDw/o group had an increased time to first request of postoperative morphine and decreased 24 hours total morphine consumption. No significant difference was observed between patients from the PRDw and PRDo groups with respect to these parameters. The present study suggests that the administration of a DEX loading dose does not affect the pro-analgesic effect of intraoperative use of DEX on morphine-based PCA. PMID:28207529

  19. A comparison of SAGE I data during the stratospheric warming of February-March, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagatani, R. M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The fine scale vertical structure of SAGE I ozone and aerosol data during a stratospheric warming is investigated using meteorological and SBUV ozone data. By stratifying the ozone and aerosol data for a limited time period, a comparison of the structure of profiles becomes possible under different meteorological conditions. For example, the cold air region shows more laminated structures than the other regions. In addition, vertical motions calculated at the same locations as the SAGE profiles show that they are consistent with variances found in the ozone and aerosol data.

  20. Biomechanical comparison of two intraoperative mobilization techniques for maxillary distraction osteogenesis: Down-fracture versus non-down-fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lili; Suzuki, Eduardo Yugo; Suzuki, Boonsiva

    2014-01-01

    Purposes: The purpose of this study was to compare the distraction forces and the biomechanical effects between two different intraoperative surgical procedures (down-fracture [DF] and non-DF [NDF]) for maxillary distraction osteogenesis. Materials and Methods: Eight patients were assigned into two groups according to the surgical procedure: DF, n = 6 versus NDF, n = 2. Lateral cephalograms taken preoperatively (T1), immediately after removal of the distraction device (T2), and after at least a 6 months follow-up period (T3) were analyzed. Assessment of distraction forces was performed during the distraction period. The Mann–Whitney U-test was used to compare the difference in the amount of advancement, the maximum distraction force and the amount of relapse. Results: Although a significantly greater amount of maxillary movement was observed in the DF group (median 9.5 mm; minimum-maximum 7.9-14.1 mm) than in the NDF group (median 5.9 mm; minimum-maximum 4.4-7.6 mm), significantly lower maximum distraction forces were observed in the DF (median 16.4 N; minimum-maximum 15.1-24.6 N) than in the NDF (median 32.9 N; minimum-maximum 27.6-38.2 N) group. A significantly greater amount of dental anchorage loss was observed in the NDF group. Moreover, the amount of relapse observed in the NDF group was approximately 3.5 times greater than in the DF group. Conclusions: In this study, it seemed that, the use of the NDF procedure resulted in lower levels of maxillary mobility at the time of the maxillary distraction, consequently requiring greater amounts of force to advance the maxillary bone. Moreover, it also resulted in a reduced amount of maxillary movement, a greater amount of dental anchorage loss and poor treatment stability. PMID:25593865

  1. A Prospective Quasi-Randomized Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom-Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seeds for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kawakami, Shogo; Tsumura, Hideyasu; Komori, Shouko; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Sekiguchi, Akane; Takahashi, Ryo; Soda, Itaru; Takenaka, Kouji; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric parameters, seed migration rates, operation times, and acute toxicities of intraoperatively built custom-linked (IBCL) seeds with those of loose seeds for prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Participants were 140 patients with low or intermediate prostate cancer prospectively allocated to an IBCL seed group (n=74) or a loose seed group (n=66), using quasirandomization (allocated by week of the month). All patients underwent prostate brachytherapy using an interactive plan technique. Computed tomography and plain radiography were performed the next day and 1 month after brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was detection of a 5% difference in dose to 90% of prostate volume on postimplant computed tomography 1 month after treatment. Seed migration was defined as a seed position >1 cm from the cluster of other seeds on radiography. A seed dropped into the seminal vesicle was also defined as a migrated seed. Results: Dosimetric parameters including the primary endpoint did not differ significantly between groups, but seed migration rate was significantly lower in the IBCL seed group (0%) than in the loose seed group (55%; P<.001). Mean operation time was slightly but significantly longer in the IBCL seed group (57 min) than in the loose seed group (50 min; P<.001). No significant differences in acute toxicities were seen between groups (median follow-up, 9 months). Conclusions: This prospective quasirandomized control trial showed no dosimetric differences between IBCL seed and loose seed groups. However, a strong trend toward decreased postimplant seed migration was shown in the IBCL seed group.

  2. Comparison of Two Types of Warm-Up Upon Repeated-Sprint Performance in Experienced Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    van den Tillaar, Roland; von Heimburg, Erna

    2016-08-01

    van den Tillaar, R and von Heimburg, E. Comparison of two types of warm-up upon repeated-sprint performance in experienced soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2258-2265, 2016-The aim of the study was to compare the effects of a long warm-up and a short warm-up upon repeated-sprint performance in soccer players. Ten male soccer players (age, 21.9 ± 1.9 years; body mass, 77.7 ± 8.3 kg; body height, 1.85 ± 0.03 m) conducted 2 types of warm-ups with 1 week in between: a long warm-up (20 minutes: LWup) and a short warm-up (10 minutes: SWup). Each warm-up was followed by a repeated-sprint test consisting of 8 × 30 m sprints with a new start every 30th second. The best sprint time, total sprinting time, and % decrease in time together with heart rate, lactate, and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured. No significant differences in performance were found for the repeated-sprint test parameters (total sprint time: 35.99 ± 1.32 seconds [LWup] and 36.12 ± 0.96 seconds [SWup]; best sprint time: 4.32 ± 0.13 seconds [LWup] and 4.30 ± 0.10 seconds [SWup]; and % sprint decrease: 4.16 ± 2.15% [LWup] and 5.02 ± 2.07% [SWup]). No differences in lactate concentration after the warm-up and after the repeated-sprint test were found. However, RPE and heart rate were significantly higher after the long warm-up and the repeated-sprint test compared with the short warm-up. It was concluded that a short warm-up is as effective as a long warm-up for repeated sprints in soccer. Therefore, in regular training, less warm-up time is needed; the extra time could be used for important soccer skill training.

  3. A comparison of observed and simulated properties of sudden stratospheric warmings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Miller, A. J.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Review of observational data and dynamical numerical simulations of stratospheric warmings. Classes of warmings, major and minor (major if poleward movement of planetary-scale thermal systems entails reversal of polar circulation at 10 mb or below), trajectories of warm cells, vertical and horizontal scale of warm-air systems, the time-scale of warming, initial zonal flow conditions prior to a warming, circulation reversals, and details of the energy budget before and after a warming are discussed. The 1963 and 1973 types of warmings are contrasted: the strong baroclinic conversion of eddy potential to eddy kinetic energy was not repeated in the latter, but both events were preceded by very large fluxes from the troposphere. Numerical model simulations by various authors are compared and evaluated.

  4. [Intraoperative colonoscopy: current indications].

    PubMed

    Stroppa, I; D'Antini, P; Rossi, L; Farinon, A M

    1993-01-01

    From January 1987 to December 1991, 37 patients underwent intraoperative colonoscopy for several indications; these latter can be summarized in the need to define the site or extension of the lesions treated or detected by endoscopy before surgery. This procedure is therefore necessary in those cases in whom intraoperative endoscopy is likely to be useful in planning the surgical treatment. The use of intraoperative colonoscopy should be however considered complementary, but not substitutive, of the preoperative colonoscopy.

  5. Multimodel comparison of the ionosphere variability during the 2009 sudden stratosphere warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Fang, T.-W.; Jin, H.; Sassi, F.; Schmidt, H.; Chau, J. L.; Siddiqui, T. A.; Goncharenko, L.

    2016-07-01

    A comparison of different model simulations of the ionosphere variability during the 2009 sudden stratosphere warming (SSW) is presented. The focus is on the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere simulated by the Ground-to-topside model of the Atmosphere and Ionosphere for Aeronomy (GAIA), Whole Atmosphere Model plus Global Ionosphere Plasmasphere (WAM+GIP), and Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model eXtended version plus Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (WACCMX+TIMEGCM). The simulations are compared with observations of the equatorial vertical plasma drift in the American and Indian longitude sectors, zonal mean F region peak density (NmF2) from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites, and ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) total electron content (TEC) at 75°W. The model simulations all reproduce the observed morning enhancement and afternoon decrease in the vertical plasma drift, as well as the progression of the anomalies toward later local times over the course of several days. However, notable discrepancies among the simulations are seen in terms of the magnitude of the drift perturbations, and rate of the local time shift. Comparison of the electron densities further reveals that although many of the broad features of the ionosphere variability are captured by the simulations, there are significant differences among the different model simulations, as well as between the simulations and observations. Additional simulations are performed where the neutral atmospheres from four different whole atmosphere models (GAIA, HAMMONIA (Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere), WAM, and WACCMX) provide the lower atmospheric forcing in the TIME-GCM. These simulations demonstrate that different neutral atmospheres, in particular, differences in the solar migrating semidiurnal tide, are partly responsible for the differences in the simulated

  6. Comparison of contact endoscopy and frozen section histopathology in the intra-operative diagnosis of laryngeal pathology.

    PubMed

    Cikojević, D; Gluncić, I; Pesutić-Pisac, V

    2008-08-01

    Andrea et al. were the first to use contact endoscopy in the diagnosis of laryngeal disease, in 1995. This method enables in vivo microscopy of laryngeal mucosa. In the present study, comparison of contact endoscopy with frozen section histopathology was performed in 142 patients with various diseases of the larynx. Paraffin section histopathology diagnosed 70 benign lesions, 23 precancerous lesions and 49 malignant lesions. Frozen section histopathology showed a sensitivity of 89.8 per cent, a specificity of 98.9 per cent and an accuracy of 95.7 per cent (chi2 = 1.5; p = 0.18). Frozen histopathology diagnosed 45 malignant lesions, including one false positive and five false negative results. Contact endoscopy yielded a sensitivity of 79.59 per cent, a specificity of 100 per cent and an accuracy of 92.95 per cent (chi2 = 8.1; p = 0.002). All malignant lesions diagnosed by contact endoscopy were confirmed by histopathology; contact endoscopy failed to recognise malignant lesions in 10 patients. Contact endoscopy is preferable to frozen section histopathology as it is noninvasive, provides information on microscopic diagnosis and laryngeal lesion margins, and enables visualisation of the laryngeal mucosa microvasculature. The use of contact endoscopy along with frozen section histopathology improves diagnostic accuracy and allows for operative (or other) therapy to continue according to the results obtained.

  7. Comparison of isokinetic muscle strength and muscle power by types of warm-up.

    PubMed

    Sim, Young-Je; Byun, Yong-Hyun; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of static stretching at warm-up on the isokinetic muscle torque (at 60°/sec) and muscle power (at 180°/sec) of the flexor muscle and extensor muscle of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 10 healthy students with no medically specific findings. The warm-up group and warm-up with stretching group performed their respective warm-up prior to the isokinetic muscle torque evaluation of the knee joint. One-way ANOVA was performed by randomized block design for each variable. [Results] The results were as follows: First, the flexor peak torque and extensor peak torque of the knee joint tended to decrease at 60°/sec in the warm-up with stretching group compared with the control group and warm-up group, but without statistical significance. Second, extensor power at 180°/sec was also not statistically significant. However, it was found that flexor power increased significantly in the warm-up with stretching group at 180°/sec compared with the control group and warm-up group in which stretching was not performed. [Conclusion] Therefore, it is considered that in healthy adults, warm-up including two sets of stretching for 20 seconds per muscle group does not decrease muscle strength and muscle power.

  8. Comparison of isokinetic muscle strength and muscle power by types of warm-up

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Young-Je; Byun, Yong-Hyun; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of static stretching at warm-up on the isokinetic muscle torque (at 60°/sec) and muscle power (at 180°/sec) of the flexor muscle and extensor muscle of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 10 healthy students with no medically specific findings. The warm-up group and warm-up with stretching group performed their respective warm-up prior to the isokinetic muscle torque evaluation of the knee joint. One-way ANOVA was performed by randomized block design for each variable. [Results] The results were as follows: First, the flexor peak torque and extensor peak torque of the knee joint tended to decrease at 60°/sec in the warm-up with stretching group compared with the control group and warm-up group, but without statistical significance. Second, extensor power at 180°/sec was also not statistically significant. However, it was found that flexor power increased significantly in the warm-up with stretching group at 180°/sec compared with the control group and warm-up group in which stretching was not performed. [Conclusion] Therefore, it is considered that in healthy adults, warm-up including two sets of stretching for 20 seconds per muscle group does not decrease muscle strength and muscle power. PMID:26157247

  9. A congeneric comparison shows that experimental warming enhances the growth of invasive Eupatorium adenophorum.

    PubMed

    He, Wei-Ming; Li, Jing-Ji; Peng, Pei-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Rising air temperatures may change the risks of invasive plants; however, little is known about how different warming timings affect the growth and stress-tolerance of invasive plants. We conducted an experiment with an invasive plant Eupatorium adenophorum and a native congener Eupatorium chinense, and contrasted their mortality, plant height, total biomass, and biomass allocation in ambient, day-, night-, and daily-warming treatments. The mortality of plants was significantly higher in E. chinense than E. adenophorum in four temperature regimes. Eupatorium adenophorum grew larger than E. chinense in the ambient climate, and this difference was amplified with warming. On the basis of the net effects of warming, daily-warming exhibited the strongest influence on E. adenophorum, followed by day-warming and night-warming. There was a positive correlation between total biomass and root weight ratio in E. adenophorum, but not in E. chinense. These findings suggest that climate warming may enhance E. adenophorum invasions through increasing its growth and stress-tolerance, and that day-, night- and daily-warming may play different roles in this facilitation.

  10. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Sensitivity Comparisons for Warm Season Convective Initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Hoeth, Brian; Blottman, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    options within each core, provides SMG and NWS MLB with a lot of flexibility. It also creates challenges, such as determining which configuration options are best to address specific forecast concerns. The goal of this project is to assess the different configurations available and to determine which configuration will best predict warm season convective initiation in East-Central Florida. Four different combinations of WRF initializations will be run (ADAS-ARW, ADAS-NMM, LAPS-ARW, and LAPS-NMM) at a 4-km resolution over the Florida peninsula and adjacent coastal waters. Five candidate convective initiation days using three different flow regimes over East-Central Florida will be examined, as well as two null cases (non-convection days). Each model run will be integrated 12 hours with three runs per day, at 0900, 1200, and 1500 UTe. ADAS analyses will be generated every 30 minutes using Level II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) data from all Florida radars to verify the convection forecast. These analyses will be run on the same domain as the four model configurations. To quantify model performance, model output will be subjectively compared to the ADAS analyses of convection to determine forecast accuracy. In addition, a subjective comparison of the performance of the ARW using a high-resolution local grid with 2-way nesting, I-way nesting, and no nesting will be made for select convective initiation cases. The inner grid will cover the East-Central Florida region at a resolution of 1.33 km. The authors will summarize the relative skill of the various WRF configurations and how each configuration behaves relative to the others, as well as determine the best model configuration for predicting warm season convective initiation over East-Central Florida.

  11. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  12. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nason, Katie S

    2015-08-01

    Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk, and immediate management options by the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical.

  13. A comparison of polar vortex response to Pacific and Indian Ocean warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuanglin

    2010-05-01

    During recent decades, the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean has become increasingly warmer. Meanwhile, both the northern and southern hemispheric polar vortices (NPV and SPV) have exhibited a deepening trend in boreal winter. Although previous studies have revealed that the tropical Indian Ocean warming (IOW) favors an intensifying NPV and a weakening SPV, how the tropical Pacific Ocean warming (POW) influences the NPV and SPV remains unclear. In this study, a comparative analysis has been conducted through ensemble atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) experiments. The results show that, for the Northern Hemisphere, the two warmings exerted opposite impacts in boreal winter, in that the IOW intensified the NPV while the POW weakened the NPV. For the Southern Hemisphere, both the IOW and POW warmed the southern polar atmosphere and weakened the SPV. A diagnostic analysis based on the vorticity budget revealed that such an interhemispheric difference in influences from the IOW and POW in boreal winter was associated with different roles of transient eddy momentum flux convergence between the hemispheres. Furthermore, this difference may have been linked to different strengths of stationary wave activity between the hemispheres in boreal winter.

  14. A comparison of polar vortex trend response to Pacific and Indian Ocean warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.

    2009-12-01

    During the past decades the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean has become warmer than before. Meanwhile, both the northern and the southern hemispheric polar vortex (NPV and SPV) exhibit a deepening trend in boreal winter-half year. Although previous studies reveal that the tropical Indian Ocean Warming (IOW) favors intensifying the NPV and weakening the SPV, how the tropical Pacific Ocean Warming (POW) influences the NPV and the SPV is unclear. In this study, a comparative analysis is conducted through ensemble atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) experiments. The results show that, for the northern hemisphere, the two warming exert an opposite impact in boreal winter, in that the IOW intensifies the NPV while the POW weakens the NPV. For the southern hemisphere, both the IOW and POW warm the southern polar atmosphere and weaken the SPV. A diagnostic analysis based on vorticity budget reveals that such an interhemispheric different influence in boreal winter between the IOW and the POW is associated with the different roles of transient eddy momentum flux convergence. Furthermore, this difference may be linked to the different strength of stationary wave activity between the hemispheres in boreal winter.

  15. Ecohydrological Consequences of Grasses Invading Shrublands: A Comparison of Cold and Warm Deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, B. P.; Turnbull, L.; Young, M.; Williams, C. J.; Ravi, S.; Seyfried, M. S.; Bowling, D. R.; Scott, R. L.; Caldwell, T. G.; Wainwright, J.; Germino, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Exotic grasses are altering native savannas and woodlands across the globe. In this paper, we summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the ecohydrological consequences of native-shrubland-to-grassland conversion. Our objectives are to understand ecohydrological changes at the local scale, such as soil-water content or hillslope erosion; and whether these small-scale changes have consequences for larger-scale phenomena such as flooding, sedimentation in rivers, groundwater recharge, energy budgets, and weather patterns. In addition, we are interested in identifying gaps in our knowledge and research priorities. Our analysis is based on a synthesis of relevant literature complemented by simulation modeling using HYDRUS-1D and MAHLERAN. In terms of runoff and erosion, we find that the influence of grass invasion on surface runoff and erosion is different for the cold and warm deserts. For cold deserts, runoff and erosion will increase while for the warm deserts the opposite is likely to occur. In particular, erosion the erosion hazard will be greatly amplified on steep slopes (>20%) following burning. In warm deserts, grass invasion may actually reduce runoff and erosion. In terms of the vertical fluxes of evaporation and soil water recharge we find that grass invasion will likely lead to higher soil water recharge in cold deserts but not to the extent that groundwater will be affected for many, many decades and then likely not very much. In warm deserts grass invasion likely has little affect on evapotranspiration fluxes or soil water.

  16. Prototype hybrid systems for neonatal warming: in vitro comparisons to standard of care devices.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Terrence L; Lindemann, Rolf; Wu, Jichuan; Agnew, Catherine; Shaffer, Thomas H; Wolfson, Marla R

    2010-01-01

    Preterm infants lack necessary thermoregulation. An ideal incubator should maintain a uniform and constant thermal environment. We compared the effectiveness of a supplemental heating blanket to improve the heating characteristics of two different incubator warming devices using assessment of their respective function alone as controls. Device A and device B, with and without a heating blanket (Harvard Apparatus), were instrumented with a distribution matrix of multiple temperature (n = 11) and humidity probes. These data were serially measured during warm up to 37.5 °C and through a series of open-door perturbations. The time constant, temperature variation, and change in air temperature were calculated. Data were analyzed for significance by 2-factor ANOVA for each respective incubator either turned on or off with either the heating blanket turned on or off. Device A warms faster (33.87% ; p < 0.05) than device B, but has a greater (37.27% ; p < 0.05) temperature variation during warmup. The heating blanket enhances the thermal response of device A during warmup, but does not alter those of device B. With the side door open, device A shows a smaller (-16.5% ; p < 0.05) temperature variation than device B; the heating blanket attenuates the temperature change in both devices. These results demonstrate that the use of a supplemental heating blanket, as well as device-related differences, may impact clinical control of a thermal environment.

  17. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Sensitivity Comparisons for Warm Season Convective Initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in assessing the success of different model configurations in predicting warm season convection over East-Central Florida. The Weather Research and Forecasting Environmental Modeling System (WRF EMS) software allows users to choose among two dynamical cores - the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM). There are also data assimilation analysis packages available for the initialization of the WRF model - the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS). Besides model core and initialization options, the WRF model can be run with one- or two-way nesting. Having a series of initialization options and WRF cores, as well as many options within each core, creates challenges for local forecasters, such as determining which configuration options are best to address specific forecast concerns. This project assessed three different model intializations available to determine which configuration best predicts warm season convective initiation in East-Central Florida. The project also examined the use of one- and two-way nesting in predicting warm season convection.

  18. A Comparison of Variable Total and Ultraviolet Solar Irradiance Inputs to 20 th Century Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, P. V.

    2002-05-01

    Analysis of spaceborne radiometry has shown that the total solar irradiance variation over the past two activity cycles was approximately proportional to the weighted difference between areas of dark spots and bright faculae and enhanced network. Empirical models of ultraviolet irradiance variation indicate that its behavior is dominated by changes in area of the bright component alone, whose photometric contrast increases at shorter wavelength.This difference in time behavior of total and UV irradiances could help to discriminate between their relative importance in forcing of global warming. Our recent digitization of archival Ca K images from Mt Wilson and NSO provides the first direct measurement of variations in area of the bright component, extending between 1915 and 1999 (previous models have relied on the sunspot number or other proxies to estimate the bright - component contribution). We use these more direct measurements to derive the time behavior of solar total and UV irradiance variation, over this period .We find that they are significantly different;the total irradiance variation accounts for over 80 percent of the variance in global temperature during this period, while the ultraviolet irradiance variation accounts for only about 20 percent. The amplitude of total irradiance variation in our model is smaller than required to influence global warming,in current climate models.Also, the impact of sulfate aerosol variations on the extended cooling between the 1940's and 1970's must be better understood before the significance of correlations between 20 th century global warming, and any solar activity index can be properly assessed. Despite these caveats, the lower correlation we find between global temperature and UV,compared to total, irradiance requires consideration in the search for physical mechanisms linking solar activity and climate. This work was supported in part under NASA grant NAG5-7607 to CRI, Inc., and NAG5-10998 to the Applied Physics

  19. What is "good reasoning" about global warming? A comparison of high school students and specialists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Stephen Thomas

    This study compares the knowledge and reasoning about global warming of 10 twelfth grade students and 6 specialists, including scientists and policy analysts. The study uses global warming as a context for addressing the broad objective of formulating goals for scientific literacy. Subjects evaluated a set of articles about global warming and evaluated policies proposed to ameliorate global warming, including a gasoline tax and a "feebate" system of fees and rebates on automobiles. All students and one scientist participated in a full treatment involving interviews and activities with a computer program (discussed below), averaging about 3.75 hours. In addition, five specialists participated in interviews only, averaging one hour. One line of analysis focuses on knowledge content, examining how subjects applied perspectives from both natural and social sciences. This analysis is positioned as an empirical component to the movement to develop content standards for science education, as exemplified by the recommendations of Science for All Americans (SFAA). Some aspects of competent performance in the present study hinged upon knowledge and skills advocated by SFAA (e.g., fluency with themes of science such as scale). Other aspects involved such skills as evaluating economic interests behind a scientific argument in the media or considering hidden costs in a policy area. By characterizing a range of approaches to how students and specialists performed the experimental tasks, the present study affords a view of scientific literacy not possible without this type of information. Another line of analysis investigates a measure of coherent argumentation from a computer program, Convince Me, in relation to policy reasoning. The program is based on a connectionist model, ECHO. Subjects used the program to create arguments about the aforementioned policies. The study compares Convince Me's Model's Fit argumentation measure to other measures, including ratings of 6 human

  20. Comparison of intestinal warm ischemic injury in PACAP knockout and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Ferencz, Andrea; Kiss, Peter; Weber, Gyorgy; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Shintani, Norihito; Baba, Akemichi; Reglodi, Dora

    2010-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is present in the gastrointestinal tract and plays a central role in the intestinal physiology, mainly in the secretion and motility. The aim of our study was to compare the ischemic injury in wild-type and PACAP-38 knockout mice following warm mesenteric small bowel ischemia. Warm ischemia groups were designed with occlusion of superior mesenteric artery for 1, 3, and 6 h in wild-type (n = 10 in each group) and PACAP-38 knockout (n = 10 in each group) mice. Small bowel biopsies were collected after laparotomy (control) and at the end of the ischemia periods. To determine oxidative stress parameters, malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. Tissue damage was analyzed by qualitative and quantitative methods on hematoxylin/eosin-stained sections. In PACAP-38 knockout animals, tissue MDA increased significantly after 3 and 6 h ischemia (133.97 ± 6,2; 141.86 ± 5,8) compared to sham-operated (100.92 ± 3,6) and compared to wild-type results (112.8 ± 2,1; 118.4 ± 1.03 μmol/g, p < 0.05). Meanwhile, tissue concentration of GSH and activity of SOD decreased significantly in knockout mice compared to wild-type form (GSH, 795.97 ± 10.4; 665.1 ± 8,8 vs. 893.23 ± μmol/g; SOD, 94.4 ± 1.4; 81.2 ± 3.9 vs. 208.09 ± 3,7 IU/g). Qualitative and quantitative histological results showed destruction of the mucous, submucous layers, and crypts in knockout mice compared to wild-type tissues. These processes correlated with the warm ischemia periods. Our present results propose an important protective effect of endogenous PACAP-38 against intestinal warm ischemia, which provides basis for further investigation to elucidate the mechanism of this protective effect.

  1. Do cities simulate climate change? A comparison of herbivore response to urban and global warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dale, Adam G.; Terando, Adam; Dunn, Robert R.; Frank, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Cities experience elevated temperature, CO2, and nitrogen deposition decades ahead of the global average, such that biological response to urbanization may predict response to future climate change. This hypothesis remains untested due to a lack of complementary urban and long-term observations. Here, we examine the response of an herbivore, the scale insect Melanaspis tenebricosa, to temperature in the context of an urban heat island, a series of historical temperature fluctuations, and recent climate warming. We survey M. tenebricosa on 55 urban street trees in Raleigh, NC, 342 herbarium specimens collected in the rural southeastern United States from 1895 to 2011, and at 20 rural forest sites represented by both modern (2013) and historical samples. We relate scale insect abundance to August temperatures and find that M. tenebricosa is most common in the hottest parts of the city, on historical specimens collected during warm time periods, and in present-day rural forests compared to the same sites when they were cooler. Scale insects reached their highest densities in the city, but abundance peaked at similar temperatures in urban and historical datasets and tracked temperature on a decadal scale. Although urban habitats are highly modified, species response to a key abiotic factor, temperature, was consistent across urban and rural-forest ecosystems. Cities may be an appropriate but underused system for developing and testing hypotheses about biological effects of climate change. Future work should test the applicability of this model to other groups of organisms.

  2. Do cities simulate climate change? A comparison of herbivore response to urban and global warming.

    PubMed

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dale, Adam G; Terando, Adam J; Dunn, Robert R; Frank, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Cities experience elevated temperature, CO2 , and nitrogen deposition decades ahead of the global average, such that biological response to urbanization may predict response to future climate change. This hypothesis remains untested due to a lack of complementary urban and long-term observations. Here, we examine the response of an herbivore, the scale insect Melanaspis tenebricosa, to temperature in the context of an urban heat island, a series of historical temperature fluctuations, and recent climate warming. We survey M. tenebricosa on 55 urban street trees in Raleigh, NC, 342 herbarium specimens collected in the rural southeastern United States from 1895 to 2011, and at 20 rural forest sites represented by both modern (2013) and historical samples. We relate scale insect abundance to August temperatures and find that M. tenebricosa is most common in the hottest parts of the city, on historical specimens collected during warm time periods, and in present-day rural forests compared to the same sites when they were cooler. Scale insects reached their highest densities in the city, but abundance peaked at similar temperatures in urban and historical datasets and tracked temperature on a decadal scale. Although urban habitats are highly modified, species response to a key abiotic factor, temperature, was consistent across urban and rural-forest ecosystems. Cities may be an appropriate but underused system for developing and testing hypotheses about biological effects of climate change. Future work should test the applicability of this model to other groups of organisms.

  3. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Sensitivity Comparisons for Warm Season Convective Initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Hoeth, Brian; Blottman, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    Mesoscale weather conditions can significantly affect the space launch and landing operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). During the summer months, land-sea interactions that occur across KSC and CCAFS lead to the formation of a sea breeze, which can then spawn deep convection. These convective processes often last 60 minutes or less and pose a significant challenge to the forecasters at the National Weather Service (NWS) Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG). The main challenge is that a "GO" forecast for thunderstorms and precipitation at the Shuttle Landing Facility is required at the 90 minute deorbit decision for End Of Mission (EOM) and at the 30 minute Return To Launch Site (RTLS) decision. Convective initiation, timing, and mode also present a forecast challenge for the NWS in Melbourne, FL (MLB). The NWS MLB issues such tactical forecast information as Terminal Aerodrome Forecasts (TAF5), Spot Forecasts for fire weather and hazardous materials incident support, and severe/hazardous weather Watches, Warnings, and Advisories. Lastly, these forecasting challenges can also affect the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), which provides comprehensive weather forecasts for shuttle launch, as well as ground operations, at KSC and CCAFS. The need for accurate mesoscale model forecasts to aid in their decision making is crucial. This study specifically addresses the skill of different model configurations in forecasting warm season convective initiation. Numerous factors influence the development of convection over the Florida peninsula. These factors include sea breezes, river and lake breezes, the prevailing low-level flow, and convergent flow due to convex coastlines that enhance the sea breeze. The interaction of these processes produces the warm season convective patterns seen over the Florida peninsula. However, warm season convection remains one of the most poorly forecast meteorological parameters. To determine which

  4. Comparison between real-time intra-operative ultrasound-based dosimetry and CT-based dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy using cesium-131.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, B L; Gibbons, E P; Smith, R P; Beriwal, S; Komanduri, K; Benoit, R M

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between real-time intra-operative ultrasound-based dosimetry (USD) and day 0 post-implant CT dosimetry (CTD) (131)Cs permanent prostate brachytherapy. Fifty-two consecutive patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy with (131)Cs were evaluated. Real time operating room planning was performed using VariSeed 7.1 software. Post-needle placement prostate volume was used for real-time planning. Targets for dosimetry were D(90) >110%, V(100) >90%, V(150) <50%, and V(200) <20%. The CT scan for post-operative dosimetry was obtained on day 0. The mean values for USD, CTD, and the linear correlation, respectively, were, for D(90): 114.0%, 105.61%, and 0.15; for V(100): 95.1%, 91.6%, and 0.22; for V(150): 51.5%, 46.4%, and 0.40; and for V(200): 15.8%, 17.9%, and 0.42. The differences between the mean values for USD and CTD for D(90) (p<0.01), V(100) (p<0.01), and V(150) (p<0.05) were statistically significant. For D(90), 30.8% of patients had a >15% difference between USD and CTD and 51.9% of patients had a >10% difference between these values. In contrast, the USD and CTD for V(100) were within 5% in 55.8% of patients and within 10% in 86.5% of patients. This study demonstrates a correlation between the mean intra-operative USD and post-implant day 0 CTD values only for V(200). Significant variation in D(90), V(150), and V(200) values existed for individual patients between USD and CTD. These results suggest that real-time intra-operative USD does not serve as a surrogate for post-operative CTD, and that post-operative CTD is still necessary.

  5. Advantages of new technologies in oral mucosal surgery: an intraoperative comparison among Nd:YAG laser, quantic molecular resonance scalpel, and cold blade.

    PubMed

    Ilaria, Giovannacci; Marco, Meleti; Elisabetta, Merigo; Giovanni, Mergoni; Carlo, Fornaini; Maddalena, Manfredi; Mauro, Bonanini; Paolo, Vescovi

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the possible intraoperative advantages of Nd:YAG laser and quantic molecular resonance (QMR) scalpel in oral soft tissue surgery. One hundred sixty-three interventions were evaluated. Group 1 (G1) included 77 interventions performed with Nd:YAG laser, group 2 (G2) 45 with QMR scalpel, and group 3 (G3) 41 with cold blade. Parameters analyzed were as follows: speed of incision, time of intervention, intraoperative bleeding, number of stitches, patient compliance, and operator comfort. Data were analyzed using software STATA 12 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX, USA). Mean speed of incision was 0.54 mm/s in G1, 2.83 mm/s in G2, and 1.58 mm/s in G3, Nd:YAG laser being the slowest. However, no significant differences among times of intervention were found. In particular, interventions in G1 (221.15 ± 220.89 s) have a mean duration lower than G2 (280.56 ± 248.31 s) and G3 (316.10 ± 248.69 s). Intraoperative bleeding occurred in 29.9 % (n = 23/77) of interventions in G1, 97.8 % (n = 44/45) in G2, and 97.6 % (n = 40/41) in G3 (p < 0.0001). Mean number of stitches in G1 was statistically lower (G1, 0.10; G2, 2.07; G3, 2.29; p < 0.0001). No differences with regard to patient compliance were detected. Operator comfort was higher in G1 (p < 0.0003). Nd:YAG laser and QMR scalpel give several advantages in oral mucosal surgery: Nd:YAG laser cuts tissue slowly, but it provides a good visibility and excellent hemostasis. QMR scalpel allows a very rapid cutting with no considerable temperature increase, but there is major risk of bleeding and need for sutures with lower operator comfort.

  6. Intraoperative virtual brain counseling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaowei; Grosky, William I.; Zamorano, Lucia J.; Muzik, Otto; Diaz, Fernando

    1997-06-01

    Our objective is to offer online real-tim e intelligent guidance to the neurosurgeon. Different from traditional image-guidance technologies that offer intra-operative visualization of medical images or atlas images, virtual brain counseling goes one step further. It can distinguish related brain structures and provide information about them intra-operatively. Virtual brain counseling is the foundation for surgical planing optimization and on-line surgical reference. It can provide a warning system that alerts the neurosurgeon if the chosen trajectory will pass through eloquent brain areas. In order to fulfill this objective, tracking techniques are involved for intra- operativity. Most importantly, a 3D virtual brian environment, different from traditional 3D digitized atlases, is an object-oriented model of the brain that stores information about different brain structures together with their elated information. An object-oriented hierarchical hyper-voxel space (HHVS) is introduced to integrate anatomical and functional structures. Spatial queries based on position of interest, line segment of interest, and volume of interest are introduced in this paper. The virtual brain environment is integrated with existing surgical pre-planning and intra-operative tracking systems to provide information for planning optimization and on-line surgical guidance. The neurosurgeon is alerted automatically if the planned treatment affects any critical structures. Architectures such as HHVS and algorithms, such as spatial querying, normalizing, and warping are presented in the paper. A prototype has shown that the virtual brain is intuitive in its hierarchical 3D appearance. It also showed that HHVS, as the key structure for virtual brain counseling, efficiently integrates multi-scale brain structures based on their spatial relationships.This is a promising development for optimization of treatment plans and online surgical intelligent guidance.

  7. Comparison of Oxidation and Microstructure of Warm-Sprayed and Cold-Sprayed Titanium Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, KeeHyun; Kuroda, Seiji; Watanabe, Makoto; Huang, RenZhong; Fukanuma, Hirotaka; Katanoda, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Thick titanium coatings were prepared by the warm spraying (WS) and cold spraying (CS) processes to investigate the oxidation and microstructure of the coating layers. Prior to the coating formations, the temperature and velocity of in-flight titanium powder particles were numerically calculated. Significant oxidation occurred in the WS process using higher gas temperature conditions with low nitrogen flow rate, which is mixed to the flame jet of a high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray gun in order to control the temperature of the propellant gas. Oxidation, however, decreased strikingly as the nitrogen flow rate increased. In the CS process using nitrogen or helium as a propellant gas, little oxidation was observed. Even when scanning electron microscopy or an x-ray diffraction method did not detect oxides in the coating layers produced by WS using a high nitrogen flow rate or by CS using helium, the inert gas fusion method revealed minor increases of oxygen content from 0.01 to 0.2 wt.%. Most of the cross-sections of the coating layers prepared by conventional mechanical polishing looked dense. However, the cross-sections prepared by an ion-milling method revealed the actual microstructures containing small pores and unbounded interfaces between deposited particles.

  8. Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials of perfluorocarbons: Comparison between experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, IváN.; Aranda, Alfonso; Hurley, Michael D.; Marston, George; Nutt, David R.; Shine, Keith P.; Smith, Kevin; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2010-12-01

    Experimentally and theoretically determined infrared spectra are reported for a series of straight-chain perfluorocarbons: C2F6, C3F8, C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, and C8F18. Theoretical spectra were determined using both density functional (DFT) and ab initio methods. Radiative efficiencies (REs) were determined using the method of Pinnock et al. (1995) and combined with atmospheric lifetimes from the literature to determine global warming potentials (GWPs). Theoretically determined absorption cross sections were within 10% of experimentally determined values. Despite being much less computationally expensive, DFT calculations were generally found to perform better than ab initio methods. There is a strong wavenumber dependence of radiative forcing in the region of the fundamental C-F vibration, and small differences in wavelength between band positions determined by theory and experiment have a significant impact on the REs. We apply an empirical correction to the theoretical spectra and then test this correction on a number of branched chain and cyclic perfluoroalkanes. We then compute absorption cross sections, REs, and GWPs for an additional set of perfluoroalkenes.

  9. Comparison of the Effects on Dynamic Balance Ability of Warming up in Water Versus on the Ground.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyoung Il; Hwnagbo, Gak; Nam, Hyung Chun; Cho, Yong Ho

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] This research was designed to find out how the so-called "dynamic balance" is affected by doing different types of warm up exercises. In particular, the research is focused on the difference in the effect on dynamic Balance of warming up in water versus on the ground. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were the subjects of this study, with 10 people assigned each to two groups, one warming up in water and another warming up on the ground. The dynamic balance was measured for all subjects before the warming up. The group warming up on the ground conducted active stretching on the ground, and the group warming up in water conducted stretching in water by using water as resistance. [Results] The results indicate that warming up in water has a more powerful effect on a subject's dynamic balance than warming up on the ground. [Conclusion] The group warming up in water, who made use of the viscosity and flow of the water, showed better balance than the group warming up on the ground. Warming up in water, which entails an element of resistance, should be implemented in warm-up routines in the future.

  10. History of intraoperative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Makuuchi, M; Torzilli, G; Machi, J

    1998-11-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) using A-mode or non-real-time B-mode imaging started in the 1960s; however, it was not widely accepted mainly because of difficulty in image interpretation. In the late 1970s, IOUS became one of the topics in the surgical communities upon the introduction of high-frequency real-time B-mode ultrasound. Special probes for operative use were developed. In the 1980s, all over the world the use of IOUS spread to a variety of surgical fields, such as hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery, neurosurgery, and cardiovascular surgery. IOUS changed hepatic surgery dramatically because IOUS was the only modality that was capable of delineating and examining the interior of the liver during surgery. After 1990, color Doppler imaging and laparoscopic ultrasound were incorporated into IOUS. Currently, IOUS is considered an indispensable operative procedure for intraoperative decision-making and guidance of surgical procedures. For better surgical practice, education of surgeons in the use of ultrasound is the most important issue.

  11. SU-E-T-537: Comparison of Intra-Operative Soft X-Rays to Low Energy Electron Beams for Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Chinsky, B; Diak, A; Gros, S; Sethi

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Superficial soft x-ray applicators have recently been designed for use with existing intra-operative radiotherapy systems. These applicators may be used in treating superficial lesions which are conventionally treated with electron beams. The purpose of this abstract is to compare dose distributions of an intra-operative 50kV x-ray unit with low energy electrons for the treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: Dosimetric parameters for 1 and 3-cm diameter Intrabeam superficial x-ray applicators were measured with EBT3 Gafchromic film in a solid water phantom. Depth dose distributions and profiles (d=2, 5, 10 and 15mm) were obtained by prescribing a dose of 400cGy at 5mm depth below the phantom surface. Corresponding dose profiles for 6-MeV electrons were acquired from a Varian Clinac 21EX at 100 SSD. H and D calibration curves were generated for each modality for 0-800cGy. Results: Dose coverage, penumbra, dose uniformity, surface dose, and dose fall-off were examined. Compared to electrons, Intrabeam lateral dose coverage at 5mm depth was 70% larger with a much sharper (1/4) penumbra. Electron isodose levels bulged with depth, whereas Intrabeam isodose levels exhibited a convex cone shape. The Intrabeam dose profiles demonstrated horns in the dose distribution up to a 5mm depth and an exponential dose fall-off. Relative surface dose was higher for the Intrabeam applicators. Treatment times were comparable for both modalities. Conclusions: The very small penumbra of Intrabeam at shallow depths could be useful in treating superficial lesions adjacent to critical structures. The exponential dose fall-off of Intrabeam makes it appealing in the sparing of structures beyond the lesion. However, for lesions past a depth of 5mm, electrons would be desirable as they penetrate farther and provide skin sparing. Intrabeam may be preferable for sites that are difficult to treat with electrons due to mechanical and physical limitations.

  12. Comparison of surgical outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: does the intra-operative use of a microscope improve surgical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Elsamadicy, Aladine; Reiser, Elizabeth; Ziegler, Cole; Freischlag, Kyle; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary aim of this study was to assess and compare the complications profile as well as long-term clinical outcomes between patients undergoing an Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) procedure with and without the use of an intra-operative microscope. Methods One hundred and forty adult patients (non-microscope cohort: 81; microscope cohort: 59) undergoing ACDF at a major academic medical center were included in this study. Enrollment criteria included available demographic, surgical and clinical outcome data. All patients had prospectively collected patient-reported outcomes measures and a minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients completed the neck disability index (NDI), short-form 12 (SF-12) and visual analog pain scale (VAS) before surgery, then at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Clinical outcomes and complication rates were compared between both patient cohorts. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between both cohorts. The mean ± standard deviation duration of surgery was longer in the microscope cohort (microscope: 169±34 minutes vs. non-microscope: 98±42 minutes, P<0.001). There was no significant difference between cohorts in the incidence of nerve root injury (P=0.99) or incidental durotomy (P=0.32). At 3 months post-operatively, both cohorts demonstrated similar improvement in VAS-neck pain (P=0.69), NDI (P=0.86), SF-12 PCS (P=0.84) and SF-12 MCS (P=0.75). At 2-year post-operatively, both the microscope and non-microscope cohorts demonstrated similar improvement from base line in NDI (microscope: 13.52±25.77 vs. non-microscope: 19.51±27.47, P<0.18), SF-12 PCS (microscope: 4.15±26.39 vs. non-microscope: 11.98±22.96, P<0.07), SF-12 MCS (microscope: 9.47±32.38 vs. non-microscope: 16.19±30.44, P<0.21). Interestingly at 2 years, the change in VAS neck pain score was significantly different between cohorts (microscope: 2.22±4.00 vs. non-microscope: 3.69±3.61, P<0.02). Conclusions Our study demonstrates that the

  13. Microwave ablation of liver malignancies: comparison of effects and early outcomes of percutaneous and intraoperative approaches with different liver conditions : New advances in interventional oncology: state of the art.

    PubMed

    De Cobelli, Francesco; Marra, Paolo; Ratti, Francesca; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Colombo, Michele; Damascelli, Anna; Sallemi, Claudio; Gusmini, Simone; Salvioni, Marco; Diana, Pietro; Cipriani, Federica; Venturini, Massimo; Aldrighetti, Luca; Del Maschio, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Liver thermal ablation is an alternative treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and secondary liver malignancies. Microwave ablation (MWA) produces large ablation zones (AZ) in short time; however, AZ prediction is based on preclinical ex vivo models, rising concerns about reproducibility and safety in humans. We aimed to investigate the effects produced by a new-generation MWA system on human liver in vivo with different approaches (percutaneous or intraoperative) and liver conditions (cirrhosis or previous chemotherapy treatment), in comparison with manufacturer-provided predictions based on ex vivo animal models. Complete tumor ablation (CA) and early clinical outcomes were also assessed. From October 2014, 60 consecutive patients (cirrhotic = 31; non-cirrhotic = 10; chemotherapy-treated = 19) with 81 liver nodules (HCC = 31; mets = 50) underwent MWA procedures (percutaneous = 30; laparotomic = 18; laparoscopic = 12), with a 2450 MHz/100 W generator with Thermosphere™ Technology (Emprint™, Medtronic). A contrast-enhanced CT or MR was performed after one month to assess CA and measure AZ. A linear correlation between AZ volumes and ablation times was observed in vivo, without differences from manufacturer-provided ex vivo predictions in all operative approaches and liver conditions. Other independent variables (sex, age, nodule location) showed no relationship when added to the model. Median (IQR) longitudinal and transverse roundness-indexes of the AZs were, respectively, 0.77(0.13) and 0.93(0.11). CA at 1 month was 93% for percutaneous and 100% for intraoperative procedures (p = 0.175). Thirty-day morbidity and mortality were 3% and 0%. MWA with Thermosphere™ Technology produces predictable AZs on human liver in vivo, according to manufacturer-provided ex vivo predictions. In our experience, this new-generation MWA system is effective and safe to treat liver malignancies in different operative and clinical settings.

  14. Comparison of metabolic and biomechanic responses to active vs. passive warm-up procedures before physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Brunner-Ziegler, Sophie; Strasser, Barbara; Haber, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Active warm-up before physical exercise is a widely accepted practice to enhance physical performance, whereas data on modalities to passively raise tissue temperature are rare. The study compared the effect of active vs. passive warm-up procedures before exercise on energy supply and muscle strength performance. Twenty young, male volunteers performed 3 spiroergometer-test series without prior warm-up and after either an active or passive warm-up procedure. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), pH value, and lactate were determined at 80% of individual VO2max values and during recovery. Comparing no prior warm-up with passive warm-up, pH values were lower at the fourth test minute (p < 0.004), and lactate values were higher at the sixth and third minutes of recovery (p < 0.01 and p < 0.010, respectively), after no prior warm-up. Comparing active with passive warm-up, HR was lower, and VO2 values were higher at the fourth and sixth test minutes (p < 0.033 and p < 0.011, respectively, and p < 0.015 and p < 0.022, respectively) after active warm-up. Differentiation between active and passive warm-up was more pronounced than between either warm-up or no warm-up. Conditions that may promote improved performance were more present after active vs. passive warm-up. Thus, athletes may reach the metabolic steady state faster after active warm-up.

  15. [Intraoperative floppy iris syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mazal, Z

    2007-04-01

    In the year 2005, Chang and Cambell described unusual reaction of the iris during the cataract surgery in patients treated with tamsulosine. This was named as IFIS, an acronym for the Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome. In its advanced stage, the syndrome is characterized by insufficient mydfiasis before the surgery, narrowing of the pupil during the surgery, its impossible dilatation during the surgery by means of stretching, unusual elasticity of the pupilar margin, surging and fluttering iris with tendency to prolapse. The same manifestations we observed in our patients and we confirm the direct connection with tamsulosine hydrochloride treatment. Tamsulosine is the antagonist of alpha 1A adrenergic receptors whose are present, except in the smooth musculature of the prostate gland and the urinary bladder, in the iris dilator as well. At the same time we observed this syndrome rarely in some patients not using tamsulosine. In most cases, these patients were treated with antipsychotic drugs.

  16. Formation and evolution of periglacial landforms in context of global warming: Comparison Earth-Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séjourné, A.; Costard, F.; Gargani, J.; Marmo, C.

    2012-04-01

    potential ice-wedges and subsequent subsidence of the ground producing pits. The scalloped depressions are similar in shape and size to thermokarst lakes. They are thought to be due to degradation of ground-ice by melting or sublimation of ground-ice and subsidence of the ground. Our results show that the assemblage of landforms in Utopia Planitia indicates the presence of an ice-rich permafrost like on Earth. We suggest that this permafrost were formed during cold climatic periods and then were degraded during a relatively recent global warming. Our results show that the permafrost was degraded during a high obliquity periods of Mars. But the question is how major climate-changes could occur on Mars. Mars is thought to have undergone important variations in the orbital parameters during the last 10 Myr dramatically changing the climate. Therefore, Utopia Planitia is probably a marker of one of the last major climate change that occurred on Mars.

  17. Comparison of density functional approximations and the finite-temperature Hartree-Fock approximation in warm dense lithium.

    PubMed

    Karasiev, Valentin V; Sjostrom, Travis; Trickey, S B

    2012-11-01

    We compare the behavior of the finite-temperature Hartree-Fock model with that of thermal density functional theory using both ground-state and temperature-dependent approximate exchange functionals. The test system is bcc Li in the temperature-density regime of warm dense matter (WDM). In this exchange-only case, there are significant qualitative differences in results from the three approaches. Those differences may be important for Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics studies of WDM with ground-state approximate density functionals and thermal occupancies. Such calculations require reliable regularized potentials over a demanding range of temperatures and densities. By comparison of pseudopotential and all-electron results at T=0 K for small Li clusters of local bcc symmetry and bond lengths equivalent to high density bulk Li, we determine the density ranges for which standard projector augmented wave (PAW) and norm-conserving pseudopotentials are reliable. Then, we construct and use all-electron PAW data sets with a small cutoff radius that are valid for lithium densities up to at least 80 g/cm{3}.

  18. Comparison between natural Rain drop size distributions and corresponding models near equilibrium state during warm rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Laurent; Mallet, Cécile

    2010-05-01

    fragments droplets produced when small drops and large drops collide is overestimate. As new parameterization of LL82 is not possible due to the lack of new sufficient large experimental dataset, we have simply tried in the present study to 'compensate' the problem previously mentioned by replacing the coalescence/breakup model proposed in LL82 by another one in which the breakup process is less dominant. In order to evaluate the relevance of this modification, some of the DSD parameters such as slope, mean volume diameter, and relation between moments are calculated, and comparisons with experimental DSD are made. Simulations at equilibrium lead to a DSD tail with a slope of 23 cm-1 and a mean volume diameter equal to 2.5 mm. These values are in good agreements with experimental data. Similarly, the linear relationship between No* and the rainfall rate is also in good agreement. In the last part, the modified parameterization is then used to study the evolution of an initially gamma-like DSD in a 1D vertical rain shaft. References Barros, A. P., O. P. Prat, P. Shrestha, F. Y. Testik, and L. F. Bliven, 2008. Revisiting Low and List (1982): evaluation of raindrop collision using laboratory observations and modeling. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. Vol. 65(9), pp. 2983-2993. Hu, Z., and R. C. Srivastava: 1995: Evolution of raindrop size distribution by coalescence, breakup, and evaporation: Theory and observations. J. Atmos. Sci., 52, 1761-1783. Low, T. B. and R. List, 1982a: Collision, coalescence, and breakup of raindrops. Part I: Experimentally established coalescence efficiencies and fragment size distributions in breakup. J. Atmos. Sci., 39, 1591-1606. ___ 1982b: Collision, coalescence, and breakup of raindrops. Part II: Parameterization of fragment size distributions. J. Atmos. Sci., 39, 1607-1618. McFarquhar, G. M, 2004: A new representation of collision-induced breakup of raindrops and its implications for the shapes of raindrop size distributions, J. Atmos. Sci

  19. Global Warming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hileman, Bette

    1989-01-01

    States the foundations of the theory of global warming. Describes methodologies used to measure the changes in the atmosphere. Discusses steps currently being taken in the United States and the world to slow the warming trend. Recognizes many sources for the warming and the possible effects on the earth. (MVL)

  20. Sea surface temperatures of the mid-Piacenzian Warm Period: A comparison of PRISM3 and HadCM3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Haywood, A.M.; Valdes, P.J.; Robinson, M.M.; Lunt, D.J.; Hill, D.J.; Stoll, D.K.; Foley, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    It is essential to document how well the current generation of climate models performs in simulating past climates to have confidence in their ability to project future conditions. We present the first global, in-depth comparison of Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) estimates from a coupled ocean–atmosphere climate model experiment and a SST reconstruction based on proxy data. This enables the identification of areas in which both the climate model and the proxy dataset require improvement.In general, the fit between model-produced SST anomalies and those formed from the available data is very good. We focus our discussion on three regions where the data–model anomaly exceeds 2 °C. 1) In the high latitude North Pacific, a systematic model error may result in anomalies that are too cold. Also, the deeper Pliocene thermocline may cause disagreement along the California margin; either the upwelling in the model is too strong or the modeled thermocline is not deep enough. 2) In the North Atlantic, the model predicts cooling in the center of a data-based warming trend that steadily increases with latitude from + 1.5 °C to >+ 6 °C. The discrepancy may arise because the modeled North Atlantic Current is too zonal compared to reality, which is reinforced by the lowering of the altitude of the Pliocene Western Cordillera Mountains. In addition, the model's use of modern bathymetry in the higher latitudes may have led the model to underestimate the northward penetration of warmer surface water into the Arctic. 3) Finally, though the data and model show good general agreement across most of the Southern Ocean, a few locations show offsets due to the modern land–sea mask used in the model.Additional considerations could account for many of the modest data–model anomalies, such as differences between calibration climatologies, the oversimplification of the seasonal cycle, and differences between SST proxies (i.e. seasonality and water depth). New SST

  1. Intraoperative fracture of phacoemulsification tip.

    PubMed

    Angmo, Dewang; Khokhar, Sudarshan K; Ganguly, Anasua

    2014-01-01

    Phacoemulsification (phaco) is an established procedure for cataract extraction and has undergone a significant advances in techniques, machines and phaco tips. The Aspiration Bypass System (ABS) phaco tip was introduced for phacoemulsification in 1998. The ABS tip allows fluid to be drawn through the opening when the phaco tip is occluded by nuclear material. The ABS tip allowed the safe use of high vacuum and flow rates and improved chamber stability by decreasing surge and therefore reducing intraoperative complications. To date, no disadvantages of ABS tips have been reported. We report a unique case of an intraoperative break of an ABS phaco tip during routine cataract surgery.

  2. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. Methods. We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month period in 2013. Results. The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone initiated only 8.5% of transfusions. The Hb concentration [mean (sd)] just before transfusion was 8.1 (1.7) g dl−1 and increased to 9.8 (1.8) g dl−1 after transfusion. The mean number of intraoperatively transfused pRBC units was 2.5 (2.7) units (median 2). Conclusion. Although European Society of Anaesthesiology transfusion guidelines are moderately implemented in Europe with respect to Hb threshold for transfusion (7–9 g dl−1), there is still an urgent need for further educational efforts that focus on the number of pRBC units to be transfused at this threshold. Clinical trial registration. NCT 01604083. PMID:26787795

  3. Comparison of net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity affected by management practices in two dryland cropping sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the effect of management practices on net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) that account for all sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in dryland cropping systems. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of a combinat...

  4. Comparison through a LCA evaluation analysis of food waste disposal options from the perspective of global warming and resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hyung; Kim, Jung-Wk

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated feed manufacturing including dry feeding and wet feeding, composting, and landfilling for food waste disposal options from the perspective of global warming and resource recovery. The method of the expanded system boundaries was employed in order to compare different by-products. The whole stages of disposal involved in the systems such as separate discharge, collection, transportation, treatment, and final disposal, were included in the system boundary and evaluated. The Global Warming Potential generated from 1tonne of food wastes for each disposal system was analyzed by the life cycle assessment method. The results showed that 200kg of CO(2)-eq could be produced from dry feeding process, 61kg of CO(2)-eq from wet feeding process, 123kg of CO(2)-eq from composting process, and 1010kg of CO(2)-eq from landfilling. Feed manufacturing and composting, the common treatment methods currently employed, have been known to be environment friendlier than other methods. However, this study shows that they can negatively affect the environment if their by-products are not appropriately utilized as intended.

  5. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  6. Early experience of intraoperative autotransfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A J; Cuddigan, B J; Wyatt, A P

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative autotransfusion of whole blood was performed using the Solcotrans device in 45 patients undergoing major vascular surgery or other procedures in which there was a clean operative field. Overall, 60% of the blood shed during these operations was reinfused. Approximately 50% of patients avoided the potential complications of homologous transfusion. There were no complications attributable to the use of this device although in a sample of 13 patients, 30% of the erythrocytes were haemolysed and there were other minor haematological abnormalities. In conclusion this device provides a simple method of autotransfusing 2 or 3 litres of blood aspirated from an uncontaminated operative field. PMID:3411587

  7. Comparison of the morphine-sparing effect of intraoperative dexmedetomidine with and without loading dose following general anesthesia in multiple-fracture patients: A prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-Ning; Kong, Min; Qi, Bin; Ge, Dong-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Intraoperative dexmedetomidine (DEX) with or without loading dose both promote morphine-sparing effect in patient-controlled analgesia on postoperative acute pain. However, the contribution of the loading dose to this effect is largely unknown, especially in long-lasting surgeries. The present study was designed to investigate the role of a loading dose of DEX in this morphine-sparing effect in multiple-fracture patients following general anesthesia.Eighty-six patients scheduled multiple-fracture surgeries under general anesthesia were allocated into 3 groups which were maintained with propofol/remifentanil/Ringer solution (PRR), propofol/remifentanil/DEX with (PRDw), or without (PRDo) DEX loading dose before induction, respectively. Time to first morphine request and 24-hour morphine consumption was monitored. Pain intensity was evaluated with visual analog scale.During the first 24 hours following surgery, patients in the PRDw/o group showed increased time to first request of postoperative morphine and decreased total morphine consumption as compared with PRR patients. There was no significant difference with respect to these parameters between patients from the PRDw and PRDo groups. More patients from the PRDw groups experienced intraoperative bradycardia when compared to those from the PRR or PRDo group.This randomized controlled trial indicates that the morphine-sparing effect of intraoperative DEX was not affected by a loading dose in long-time surgeries.

  8. Comparison of different cooling regimes within a shortened liquid cooling/warming garment on physiological and psychological comfort during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, Gloria R.; Koscheyev, Victor S.; Coca, Aitor; List, Nathan

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of different cooling regime intensities to maintain physiological and subjective comfort during physical exertion levels comparable to that engaged in during extravehicular activities (EVA) in space. We studied eight subjects (six males, two females) donned in our newly developed physiologically based shortened liquid cooling/warming garment (SLCWG). Rigorous (condition 1) and mild (condition 2) water temperature cooling regimes were compared at physical exertion levels comparable to that performed during EVA to ascertain the effectiveness of a lesser intensity of cooling in maintaining thermal comfort, thus reducing energy consumption in the portable life support system. Exercise intensity was varied across stages of the session. Finger temperature, rectal temperature, and subjective perception of overall body and hand comfort were assessed. Finger temperature was significantly higher in the rigorous cooling condition and showed a consistent increase across exercise stages, likely due to the restriction of heat extraction because of the intensive cold. In the mild cooling condition, finger temperature exhibited an overall decline with cooling, indicating greater heat extraction from the body. Rectal temperature was not significantly different between conditions, and showed a steady increase over exercise stages in both rigorous and mild cooling conditions. Ratings of overall comfort were 30% higher (more positive) and more stable in mild cooling (p<0.001). The mild cooling regime was more effective than rigorous cooling in allowing the process of heat exchange to occur, thus maintaining thermal homeostasis and subjective comfort during physical exertion.

  9. Influence of Grape Composition on Red Wine Ester Profile: Comparison between Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz Cultivars from Australian Warm Climate.

    PubMed

    Antalick, Guillaume; Šuklje, Katja; Blackman, John W; Meeks, Campbell; Deloire, Alain; Schmidtke, Leigh M

    2015-05-13

    The relationship between grape composition and subsequent red wine ester profile was examined. Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz, from the same Australian very warm climate vineyard, were harvested at two different stages of maturity and triplicate wines were vinified. Grape analyses focused on nitrogen and lipid composition by measuring 18 amino acids by HPLC-FLD, 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and 6 C6-compounds derived from lipid degradation by GC-MS. Twenty esters and four higher alcohols were analyzed in wines by HS-SPME-GC-MS. Concentrations of the ethyl esters of branched acids were significantly affected by grape maturity, but the variations were inconsistent between cultivars. Small relative variations were observed between wines for ethyl esters of fatty acids, whereas higher alcohol acetates displayed the most obvious differences with concentrations ranging from 1.5- to 26-fold higher in Shiraz than in Cabernet Sauvignon wines regardless of the grape maturity. Grape analyses revealed the variations of wine ester composition might be related to specific grape juice nitrogen composition and lipid metabolism. To the authors' knowledge the present study is the first to investigate varietal differences in the ester profiles of Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon wines made with grapes harvested at different maturity stages.

  10. Comparison greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and global warming potential (GWP) effect of energy use in different wheat agroecosystems in Iran.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Mohammad; Mahdavi Damghani, Abdolmajid; Khoramivafa, Mahmud

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine energy requirement and global warming potential (GWP) in low and high input wheat production systems in western of Iran. For this purpose, data were collected from 120 wheat farms applying questionnaires via face-to-face interviews. Results showed that total energy input and output were 60,000 and 180,000 MJ ha(-1) in high input systems and 14,000 and 56,000 MJ ha(-1) in low input wheat production systems, respectively. The highest share of total input energy in high input systems recorded for electricity power, N fertilizer, and diesel fuel with 36, 18, and 13 %, respectively, while the highest share of input energy in low input systems observed for N fertilizer, diesel fuel, and seed with 32, 31, and 27 %. Energy use efficiency in high input systems (3.03) was lower than of low input systems (3.94). Total CO2, N2O, and CH4 emissions in high input systems were 1981.25, 31.18, and 1.87 kg ha(-1), respectively. These amounts were 699.88, 0.02, and 0.96 kg ha(-1) in low input systems. In high input wheat production systems, total GWP was 11686.63 kg CO2eq ha(-1) wheat. This amount was 725.89 kg CO2eq ha(-1) in low input systems. The results show that 1 ha of high input system will produce greenhouse effect 17 times of low input systems. So, high input production systems need to have an efficient and sustainable management for reducing environmental crises such as change climate.

  11. Global Warming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichman, Julia Christensen; Brown, Jeff A.

    1994-01-01

    Presents information and data on an experiment designed to test whether different atmosphere compositions are affected by light and temperature during both cooling and heating. Although flawed, the experiment should help students appreciate the difficulties that researchers face when trying to find evidence of global warming. (PR)

  12. Intraoperative magnification: Who uses it?

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Paul Max

    2004-01-01

    Surgeons over recent decades have made increasing use of intraoperative magnification to enhance the outcome of surgical procedures, yet no published information exists regarding the extent of magnification use within surgical specialties. A sample of surgeons consisting of 148 specialists and senior surgical trainees in the west of Scotland was surveyed by postal questionnaire regarding their frequency and types of magnification use. Patterns of use were similar within each specialty, but varied markedly between specialties. Otolaryngologists and plastic, maxillofacial, and ophthalmic surgeons use both loupes and microscopes frequently. Cardiothoracic and pediatric surgeons tend only to utilize loupes, whereas neurosurgeons tend only to use microscopes. General surgeons, urologists, orthopedic surgeons, and gynecologists are infrequent users or nonusers of magnification, and when required will utilize loupes rather than microscopes. As a clear pattern of magnification use exists, it should be possible to anticipate the equipment needs of surgeons when providing theater services.

  13. Intraoperative OCT in Surgical Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Fredrick A.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    The global incidence of cancer is rising, putting an increasingly heavy burden upon health care. The need to effectively detect and treat cancer is one of the most significant problems faced in health care today. Effective cancer treatment typically depends upon early detection and, for most solid tumors, successful removal of the cancerous tumor tissue via surgical procedures. Difficulties arise when attempting to differentiate between normal and tumor tissue during surgery. Unaided visual examination of the tissue provides only superficial, low-resolution information and often with little visual contrast. Many imaging modalities widely used for cancer screening and diagnostics are of limited use in the operating room due to low spatial resolution. OCT provides cellular resolution allowing for more precise localization of the tumor tissue. It is also relatively inexpensive and highly portable, making it well suited for intraoperative applications.

  14. Intraoperative management of critical arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of intraoperative arrhythmia is extremely high, and some arrhythmias require clinical attention. Therefore, it is essential for the anesthesiologist to evaluate risk factors for arrhythmia and understand their etiology, electrophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Anesthetic agents reportedly affect normal cardiac electrical activity. In the normal cardiac cycle, the sinoatrial node initiates cardiac electrical activity through intrinsic autonomous pacemaker activity. Sequential atrial and ventricular contractions result in an effective cardiac pumping mechanism. Arrhythmia occurs due to various causes, and the cardiac pumping mechanism may be affected. A severe case may result in hemodynamic instability. In this situation, the anesthesiologist should eliminate the possible causes of arrhythmia and manage the condition, creating hemodynamic stability under proper electrocardiographic monitoring. PMID:28367281

  15. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  16. Comparison of Obturation Quality in Modified Continuous Wave Compaction, Continuous Wave Compaction, Lateral Compaction and Warm Vertical Compaction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Namjou, Sara; Kharazifard, Mohamad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce modified continuous wave compaction (MCWC) technique and compare its obturation quality with that of lateral compaction (LC), warm vertical compaction (WVC) and continuous wave compaction techniques (CWC). The obturation time was also compared among the four techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four single-rooted teeth with 0–5° root canal curve and 64 artificially created root canals with 15° curves in acrylic blocks were evaluated. The teeth and acrylic specimens were each divided into four subgroups of 16 for testing the obturation quality of four techniques namely LC, WVC, CWC and MCWC. Canals were prepared using the Mtwo rotary system and filled with respect to their group allocation. Obturation time was recorded. On digital radiographs, the ratio of area of voids to the total area of filled canals was calculated using the Image J software. Adaptation of the filling materials to the canal walls was assessed at three cross-sections under a stereomicroscope (X30). Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc HSD test, the Kruskal Wallis test and t-test. Results: No significant difference existed in adaptation of filling materials to canal walls among the four subgroups in teeth samples (P ≥ 0.139); but, in artificially created canals in acrylic blocks, the frequency of areas not adapted to the canal walls was significantly higher in LC technique compared to MCWC (P ≤ 0.02). The void areas were significantly more in the LC technique than in other techniques in teeth (P < 0.001). The longest obturation time belonged to WVC technique followed by LC, CW and MCWC techniques (P<0.05). The difference between the artificially created canals in blocks and teeth regarding the obturation time was not significant (P = 0.41). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, MCWC technique resulted in better adaptation of gutta-percha to canal walls than LC at all cross-sections with

  17. Global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, John

    2005-06-01

    'Global warming' is a phrase that refers to the effect on the climate of human activities, in particular the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) and large-scale deforestation, which cause emissions to the atmosphere of large amounts of 'greenhouse gases', of which the most important is carbon dioxide. Such gases absorb infrared radiation emitted by the Earth's surface and act as blankets over the surface keeping it warmer than it would otherwise be. Associated with this warming are changes of climate. The basic science of the 'greenhouse effect' that leads to the warming is well understood. More detailed understanding relies on numerical models of the climate that integrate the basic dynamical and physical equations describing the complete climate system. Many of the likely characteristics of the resulting changes in climate (such as more frequent heat waves, increases in rainfall, increase in frequency and intensity of many extreme climate events) can be identified. Substantial uncertainties remain in knowledge of some of the feedbacks within the climate system (that affect the overall magnitude of change) and in much of the detail of likely regional change. Because of its negative impacts on human communities (including for instance substantial sea-level rise) and on ecosystems, global warming is the most important environmental problem the world faces. Adaptation to the inevitable impacts and mitigation to reduce their magnitude are both necessary. International action is being taken by the world's scientific and political communities. Because of the need for urgent action, the greatest challenge is to move rapidly to much increased energy efficiency and to non-fossil-fuel energy sources.

  18. The basics of intraoperative diagnosis in neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han S; Tihan, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative pathologic consultation continues to be an essential tool during neurosurgical procedures, helping to ensure adequacy of material for achieving a pathologic diagnosis and to guide surgeons. For pathologists, successful consultation with central nervous system lesions involves not only a basic familiarity with the pathologic features of such lesions but also an understanding of their clinical and radiologic context. This review discusses a basic approach to intraoperative diagnosis for practicing pathologists, including preparation for, performance of, and interpretation of an intraoperative neuropathologic evaluation. The cytologic and frozen section features of select examples of common pathologic entities are described.

  19. Intraoperative scintigraphy for active small intestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, A.; Palestro, C.; Lewis, B.S.; Katz, L.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Localizing active sites of bleeding within the small intestine remains a difficult task. Endoscopic, angiographic or scintigraphic studies may point to the small intestine as the site of blood loss, but at operation, without a palpable lesion, the exact site of bleeding remains elusive. Patients are managed at laparotomy with intraoperative endoscopy, angiography, multiple enterotomies, blind resections, or placement of an enterostomy. We describe two patients in whom intraoperative scintigraphy accurately identified active sites of bleeding in the small intestine when other modalities failed. Intraoperative scintigraphy is rapid, easy to perform and is an effective means of identifying active sites of bleeding within the small intestine.

  20. Global warming potentials of Hydrofluoroethers.

    PubMed

    Blowers, Paul; Moline, Dena Marie; Tetrault, Kyle Franklin; Wheeler, R'nld Ruth; Tuchawena, Shane Lee

    2008-02-15

    Global warming potentials are estimated for hydrofluoroethers, which are an emerging class of compounds for industrial use. Comparisons are made to the limited data previously available before observations about molecular design are discussed. We quantify how molecular structure can be manipulated to reduce environmental impacts due to global warming. We further highlight the need for additional research on this class of compounds so environmental performance can be assessed for green design.

  1. Virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-07-01

    A virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy at 1064 nm wavelength (VISPAM) system was designed and fabricated by integrating a commercial type surgical microscope and laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) with a 1064 nm pulsed laser. Based on simple augmented reality device, VISPAM could simultaneously provide 2D depth-resolved photoacoustic and magnified microscope images of surgery regions on the same vision of surgeon via an eyepiece of the microscope. The invisible 1064 nm laser removed the interruption of surgical sight due to visible laser scanning of previous report, and decreased the danger of tissue damage caused by over irradiated laser. In addition, to approach the real practical surgery application, a needle-type transducer was utilized without a water bath for PA signal coupling. In order to verify our system's performance, we conducted needle guiding as ex vivo phantom study and needle guiding and injection of carbon particles mixtures into a melanoma tumor region as in vivo study. We expect that VISPAM can be essential tool of brain and ophthalmic microsurgery.

  2. Practical intraoperative stereo camera calibration.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Philip; Bergeles, Christos; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Many of the currently available stereo endoscopes employed during minimally invasive surgical procedures have shallow depths of field. Consequently, focus settings are adjusted from time to time in order to achieve the best view of the operative workspace. Invalidating any prior calibration procedure, this presents a significant problem for image guidance applications as they typically rely on the calibrated camera parameters for a variety of geometric tasks, including triangulation, registration and scene reconstruction. While recalibration can be performed intraoperatively, this invariably results in a major disruption to workflow, and can be seen to represent a genuine barrier to the widespread adoption of image guidance technologies. The novel solution described herein constructs a model of the stereo endoscope across the continuum of focus settings, thereby reducing the number of degrees of freedom to one, such that a single view of reference geometry will determine the calibration uniquely. No special hardware or access to proprietary interfaces is required, and the method is ready for evaluation during human cases. A thorough quantitative analysis indicates that the resulting intrinsic and extrinsic parameters lead to calibrations as accurate as those derived from multiple pattern views.

  3. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Childhood Malignant Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sohail R.; Haddy, Theresa B.; Ashayeri, Ebrahim; Goldson, Alfred L.

    1984-01-01

    A 12-year-old black male patient with glioblastoma multiforme was treated with intraoperative radiotherapy followed by conventional external beam radiation and chemotherapy. The authors' clinical experience with these therapeutic measures is discussed. PMID:6330375

  4. Intraoperative Anaphylactic Reaction: Is it the Floseal?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David; Schloss, Brian; Beebe, Allan; Samora, Walter; Klamar, Jan; Stukus, David; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    When hemodynamic or respiratory instability occurs intraoperatively, the inciting event must be determined so that a therapeutic plan can be provided to ensure patient safety. Although generally uncommon, one cause of cardiorespiratory instability is anaphylactic reactions. During anesthetic care, these most commonly involve neuromuscular blocking agents, antibiotics, or latex. Floseal is a topical hemostatic agent that is frequently used during orthopedic surgical procedures to augment local coagulation function and limit intraoperative blood loss. As these products are derived from human thrombin, animal collagen, and animal gelatin, allergic phenomenon may occur following their administration. We present 2 pediatric patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion who developed intraoperative hemodynamic and respiratory instability following use of the topical hemostatic agent, Floseal. Previous reports of such reactions are reviewed, and the perioperative care of patients with intraoperative anaphylaxis is discussed. PMID:27713677

  5. Value of Intraoperative Sonography in Pancreatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Stefanie; Morgan, Tara; Poder, Liina; Shin, Lewis; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Aslam, Rizwan; Yee, Judy

    2015-07-01

    The utility of intraoperative sonography for pancreatic disease has been well described for detection and evaluation of neoplastic and inflammatory pancreatic disease. Intraoperative sonography can help substantially reduce surgical time as well as decrease potential injury to tissues and major structures. Imaging with sonography literally at the point of care--the surgeon's scalpel--can precisely define the location of pancreatic lesions and their direct relationship with surrounding structures in real time during surgery. This article highlights our experience with intraoperative sonography at multiple institutional sites for both open and laparoscopic surgical procedures. We use intraoperative sonography for a wide range of pancreatic disease to provide accurate localization and staging of disease, provide guidance for enucleation of nonpalpable, nonvisible tumors, and in planning the most direct and least invasive surgical approach, avoiding injury to the pancreatic duct or other vital structures.

  6. Intraoperative ultrasound control of surgical margins during partial nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Feras M.; Chahwan, Charles K.; Le Gal, Sophie G.; Guleryuz, Kerem M.; Tillou, Xavier P.; Doerfler, Arnaud P.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate a simple and fast technique to ensure negative surgical margins on partial nephrectomies, while correlating margin statuses with the final pathology report. Subjects and Methods: This study was conducted for patients undergoing partial nephrectomy (PN) with T1–T2 renal tumors from January 2010 to the end of December 2015. Before tumor removal, intraoperative ultrasound (US) localization was performed. After tumor removal and before performing hemostasis of the kidney, the specimens were placed in a saline solution and a US was performed to evaluate if the tumor's capsule were intact, and then compared to the final pathology results. Results: In 177 PN(s) (147 open procedures and 30 laparoscopic procedures) were performed on 147 patients. Arterial clamping was done for 32 patients and the mean warm ischemia time was 19 ± 6 min. The mean US examination time was 41 ± 7 s. The US analysis of surgical margins was negative in 172 cases, positive in four, and in only one case it was not possible to conclude. The final pathology results revealed one false positive surgical margin and one false negative surgical margin, while all other margins were in concert with US results. The mean tumor size was 3.53 ± 1.43 cm, and the mean surgical margin was 2.8 ± 1.5 mm. Conclusions: The intraoperative US control of resection margins in PN is a simple, efficient, and effective method for ensuring negative surgical margins with a small increase in warm ischemia time and can be conducted by the operating urologist. PMID:28057986

  7. Anesthesia for intraoperative radiation therapy in children

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R.H.; Morrison, J.E. Jr.; Verbrugge, J.J.; Daniel, W.E.; Aarestad, N.O.; Burrington, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is a relatively new mode of cancer treatment which is being used with increasing frequency. IORT presents several challenges to the anesthesiologist, including patients who are debilitated from their disease or chemotherapy, operations involving major tumor resections, intraoperative interdepartmental transport of patients, and remote monitoring of patients during electron beam therapy. This report discusses the anesthetic management of ten children undergoing IORT. With adequate preparation and interdepartmental communication, complications can be avoided during these challenging cases.

  8. Pediatric urological complications with intraoperative radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchey, M.L.; Gunderson, L.L.; Smithson, W.A.; Kelalis, P.P.; Kaufman, B.H.; Telander, R.L.; Evans, R.G.; Kramer, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy with variable energy electrons has been used as a supplemental boost to treat 6 children with locally advanced retroperitoneal malignancies. Of the patients 4 had treatment-related injuries to portions of the urinary tract within the intraoperative and external radiation fields. Three patients had significant renal impairment requiring surgical correction. The pathogenesis and management of treatment-induced injury to the urinary tract are discussed.

  9. Mapping of Autogenous Saphenous Veins as an Imaging Adjunct to Peripheral MR Angiography in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease and Peripheral Bypass Grafting: Prospective Comparison with Ultrasound and Intraoperative Findings

    PubMed Central

    Jah-Kabba, Ann-Marie Bintu Munda; Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Hadizadeh, Dariusch Reza; Träber, Frank; Koscielny, Arne; Kabba, Mustapha Sundifu; Verrel, Frauke; Schild, Hans Heinz; Willinek, Winfried Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background Mapping of the great saphenous vein is very important for planning of peripheral and coronary bypass surgery. This study investigated mapping of the great saphenous vein as an adjunct to peripheral MR angiography using a blood pool contrast agent in patients who were referred for evaluation of peripheral arterial occlusive disease and bypass surgery. Methods 38 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (21 men; mean age: 71 years, range, 44–88 years) underwent peripheral MR angiography using the blood pool contrast agent Gadofosveset trisodium. Apart from primary arterial assessment images were evaluated in order to determine great saphenous vein diameters at three levels: below the saphenofemoral junction, mid thigh and 10 cm above the knee joint (usability: diameter range: >3 and <10 mm at one level and >3.5 and <10 mm at a neighboring level). Duplex ultrasound was performed by an independent examiner providing diameter measurements at the same levels. Additionally, vessel usability was determined intraoperatively by the vascular surgeon during subsequent bypass surgery. Results Mean venous diameters for MR angiography/duplex ultrasound were 5.4±2.6/5.5±2.8 mm (level 1), 4.7±2.7/4.6±2.9 mm (level 2) and 4.4±2.2/4.5±2.3 mm (level 3), respectively, without significant differences between the modalities (P = 0.207/0.806/0.518). Subsequent surgery was performed in 27/38 patients. A suitable saphenous vein was diagnosed in 25 and non-usability was diagnosed in 2 of the 27 patients based on MR angiography/duplex ultrasound, respectively. Usability was confirmed by intraoperative assessment in all of the 24 patients that received a venous bypass graft in subsequent bypass surgery. In 1 case, in which the great saphenous vein was assessed as useable by both MR angiography and duplex ultrasound, it was not used during subsequent bypass surgery due to the patients clinical condition and comorbidities. Conclusion Simultaneous mapping of the

  10. Comparison of clinical outcomes following vitrified warmed day 5/6 blastocyst transfers using solid surface methodology with fresh blastocyst transfers

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, K; Kamath, Mohan S; Mangalaraj, Ann M; Aleyamma, TK; Chandy, Achamma; George, Korula

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The literature regarding clinical outcomes following day 5/6 vitrified warmed blastocysts transfer has been conflicting. We decided to evaluate and compare the clinical outcomes following vitrified warmed day 5/6 blastocyst transfer using a solid surface vitrification protocol with fresh blastocyst transfers. SETTINGS: University teaching hospital. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 249 women were retrospectively analyzed: 146 fresh day 5 blastocyst (group 1), 57 day 5 vitrified warmed blastocyst (group 2), and 46 vitrified warmed day 6 blastocyst (group 3) transfer cycles. Vitrification was done using solid surface methodology (non immersion protocol). The main outcomes were implantation rates, clinical pregnancy, and live birth rate per embryo transfer. RESULTS: The baseline clinical characteristics were similar among all three groups. The implantation and clinical pregnancy rates following vitrified warmed day 6 blastocyst transfers (20.9% and 32.6%) were significantly lower as compared to day 5 fresh and vitrified warmed day 5 blastocyst transfers (40.3% and 56.1%, 36.3%, and 52.6%). However, there was no significant difference in the live birth rates across the three groups (group 1: 37.6%, group 2: 40.3%, and group 3: 28.2%). CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference was observed in live birth rates between fresh day 5 blastocyst transfers and vitrified warmed day 5/6 blastocyst transfers. Vitrification of blastocysts using solid surface methodology is an efficient method of cryopreservation. PMID:23869154

  11. [Intraoperative crisis and surgical Apgar score].

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Masakatsu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Intraoperative crisis is an inevitable event to anesthesiologists. The crisis requires effective and coordinated management once it happened but it is difficult to manage the crises properly under extreme stressful situation. Recently, it is reported that the use of surgical crisis checklists is associated with significant improvement in the management of operating-room crises in a high-fidelity simulation study. Careful preoperative evaluation, proper intraoperative management and using intraoperative crisis checklists will be needed for safer perioperative care in the future. Postoperative complication is a serious public health problem. It reduces the quality of life of patients and raises medical cost. Careful management of surgical patients is required according to their postoperative condition for preventing postoperative complications. A 10-point surgical Apgar score, calculated from intraoperative estimated blood loss, lowest mean arterial pressure, and lowest heart rate, is a simple and available scoring system for predicting postoperative complications. It undoubtedly predicts higher than average risk of postoperative complications and death within 30 days of surgery. Surgical Apgar score is a bridge between proper intraoperative and postoperative care. Anesthesiologists should make effort to reduce the postoperative complication and this score is a tool for it.

  12. An evaluation of liquid-crystal thermometry as a screening device for intraoperative hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Lees, D E; Schuette, W; Bull, J M; Whang-Peng, J; Atkinson, E R; Macnamara, T E

    1978-01-01

    Disposable liquid-crystal temperature-trend indicators were evaluated under clinical conditions that simulated the development of intraoperative hyperthermia during anesthesia. Comparison was made to forehead thermistors for rapidity, accuracy, and linearity of response as well as correlation with esophageal and rectal thermistor recordings. The liquid-crystal monitors were comparable to the forehead thermistors in both rapidity and linearity or response, but not in accuracy. A linear correlation existed with the esophageal thermistor temperatures. Correlation with the rectal temperatures was not as exact. It is concluded that liquid-crystal thermometers may adequately serve as screening devices for intraoperative hyperthermia.

  13. Intraoperative Period and Breast Cancer: Review

    PubMed Central

    Akan, Arzu; Şimsek, Şerife

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy in breast cancer (IORT) delivers a concentrated dose of radiation therapy to a tumor bed during surgery. IORT offers some of the following advantages with typically fewer complications like; maximum effect, sparing healthy tissues and organs, to help the patients finish treatment and get back to their normal activities. The goal of IORT is to improve local tumor control and survival rates for patients with breast cancer. IORT can both be performed with electron beams (ELIOT) and X-rays. Two main randomised trials testing intraoperative partial breast radiotherapy are TARGIT trial and the ELIOT (intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons) trial, but the techniques are fundamentally different. Whereas TARGIT delivers radiation from within the undisturbed tumour bed, for ELIOT, the mammary gland is mobilised, a prepectoral lead shield is inserted, the edges of the tumour bed are apposed, and radiation is delivered from without.

  14. Near-Infrared Intraoperative Chemiluminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Büchel, Gabriel E; Carney, Brandon; Shaffer, Travis M; Tang, Jun; Austin, Christine; Arora, Manish; Zeglis, Brian M; Grimm, Jan; Eppinger, Jörg; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-09-20

    Intraoperative imaging technologies recently entered the operating room, and their implementation is revolutionizing how physicians plan, monitor, and perform surgical interventions. In this work, we present a novel surgical imaging reporter system: intraoperative chemiluminescence imaging (ICI). To this end, we have leveraged the ability of a chemiluminescent metal complex to generate near-infrared light upon exposure to an aqueous solution of Ce(4+) in the presence of reducing tissue or blood components. An optical camera spatially resolves the resulting photon flux. We describe the construction and application of a prototype imaging setup, which achieves a detection limit as low as 6.9 pmol cm(-2) of the transition-metal-based ICI agent. As a proof of concept, we use ICI for the in vivo detection of our transition metal tracer following both systemic and subdermal injections. The very high signal-to-noise ratios make ICI an interesting candidate for the development of new intraoperative imaging technologies.

  15. Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography Guided Bleb Needling.

    PubMed

    Dada, Tanuj; Angmo, Dewang; Midha, Neha; Sidhu, Talvir

    2016-01-01

    Two patients with history of trabeculectomy presented with uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) postoperatively. The first patient had a flat and vasularized bleb 10 weeks after the surgery, and the second subject developed encapsulated bleb 3 months postoperatively. Both patients were taken to the operating room and intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT) guided bleb needling was performed to restore aqueous egress into the subconjunctival space. Postoperatively, IOP of the operated eyes ranged 14-18 mmHg at week 6 and month 3. None of the eyes had any intraoperative or postoperative complications. This novel application of the intraoperative OCT for bleb needling facilitates precision surgery under direct visualization and reduces the risk of complications.

  16. Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography Guided Bleb Needling

    PubMed Central

    Dada, Tanuj; Angmo, Dewang; Midha, Neha; Sidhu, Talvir

    2016-01-01

    Two patients with history of trabeculectomy presented with uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) postoperatively. The first patient had a flat and vasularized bleb 10 weeks after the surgery, and the second subject developed encapsulated bleb 3 months postoperatively. Both patients were taken to the operating room and intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT) guided bleb needling was performed to restore aqueous egress into the subconjunctival space. Postoperatively, IOP of the operated eyes ranged 14-18 mmHg at week 6 and month 3. None of the eyes had any intraoperative or postoperative complications. This novel application of the intraoperative OCT for bleb needling facilitates precision surgery under direct visualization and reduces the risk of complications. PMID:27994819

  17. Intraoperative cerebral blood flow imaging of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangdao; Li, Yao; Yuan, Lu; Wu, Caihong; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-09-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of interest to neuroscience researchers, which offers the assessment of hemodynamic responses throughout the process of neurosurgery and provides an early biomarker for surgical guidance. However, intraoperative CBF imaging has been challenging due to animal's motion and position change during the surgery. In this paper, we presented a design of an operation bench integrated with laser speckle contrast imager which enables monitoring of the CBF intraoperatively. With a specially designed stereotaxic frame and imager, we were able to monitor the CBF changes in both hemispheres during the rodent surgery. The rotatable design of the operation plate and implementation of online image registration allow the technician to move the animal without disturbing the CBF imaging during surgery. The performance of the system was tested by middle cerebral artery occlusion model of rats.

  18. Pediatric Spinal Ultrasound: Neonatal and Intraoperative Applications.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Enrique; Leach, James; Caré, Marguerite; Mangano, Francesco; O Hara, Sara

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the use of ultrasound as a screening tool for spinal diseases in neonates and infants and its intraoperative value in selected pediatric neurosurgical disorders. A review of spinal embryology followed by a description of common spinal diseases in neonates assessed with ultrasound is presented. Indications for spinal ultrasound in neonates, commonly identified conditions, and the importance of magnetic resonance imaging in selected cases are emphasized. Additionally, the use of ultrasound in selected neurosurgical spinal diseases in pediatric patients is presented with magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative correlation. Technique, limitations, and pitfalls are discussed.

  19. Consistent leaf respiratory response to experimental warming of three North American deciduous trees: a comparison across seasons, years, habitats and sites.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaorong; Sendall, Kerrie M; Stefanski, Artur; Zhao, Changming; Hou, Jihua; Rich, Roy L; Montgomery, Rebecca A; Reich, Peter B

    2016-12-14

    Most vascular plants acclimate respiration to changes in ambient temperature, but explicit tests of these responses in field settings are rare, and how acclimation responses vary in space and time is relatively unstudied, hindering our ability to predict respiratory release of carbon under future climatic conditions. We measured temperature response curves of leaf respiration for three deciduous tree species from 2009 to 2012 in a field warming experiment (+3.4 °C above ambient) in both open and understory conditions at two sites in the southern boreal forest in Minnesota, USA. We analyzed the effects of warming on leaf respiration, and how the effects varied among species, times of season (early, middle and late parts of the growing season), sites, habitats (understory, open) and years. We hypothesized that the respiration exponent (Q10) of the short-term temperature response curve and the degree of acclimation would be smaller under conditions where plants were more likely to be substrate limited, such as in the understory or the margins of the growing season. However, in contrast to these predictions, stable Q10 and strong respiratory acclimation were consistently observed. For each species, the Q10 did not vary with experimental warming, nor was its response to warming influenced by time of season, year, site or habitat. Strong leaf respiratory acclimation to warming occurred in each species and was consistent across most sources of variation. Most of the leaf traits studied were not affected by warming, while the Q10-leaf nitrogen and R25-soluble carbohydrate relationships were observed, and shifted with warming, implying that acclimation may be associated with the adjustment in respiratory capacity and its relation to leaf nitrogen and soluble carbohydrate content. Consistent Q10 and acclimation across habitats, sites, times of season and years suggest that modeling of temperature acclimation may be possible with relatively simple functions.

  20. Intraoperative imaging in orbital and midface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Frank; Schramm, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The orbit is very often affected by injuries which can leave patients not only with esthetic deficits, but also with functional impairments if reconstruction is inadequate. Computer-assisted surgery helps to achieve predictable outcomes in reconstruction. Today, intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) imaging is an important element in the workflow of computer-assisted orbital surgery. Clinical and radiological diagnosis by means of computed tomography is followed by preoperative computer-assisted planning to define and simulate the desired outcome of reconstruction. In difficult cases, intraoperative navigation helps in the implementation of procedure plans at the site of surgery. Intraoperative 3D imaging then allows an intraoperative final control to be made and the outcome of the surgery to be validated. Today, this is preferably done using 3D C-arm devices based on cone beam computed tomography. They help to avoid malpositioning of bone fragments and/or inserted implants assuring the quality of complex operations and reducing the number of secondary interventions necessary.

  1. Intraoperative BiPAP in OSA Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhavna P

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete upper airway obstructions during sleep. Severe OSA presents with a number of challenges to the anesthesiologist, the most life threatening being loss of the airway. We are reporting a case where we successfully used intraoperative bi level positive pressure ventilation (BiPAP) with moderate sedation and a regional technique in a patient with severe OSA posted for total knee replacement (TKR). A 55-year-old lady with osteoarthritis of right knee joint was posted for total knee replacement. She had severe OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index of 35. She also had moderate pulmonary hypertension due to her long standing OSA. We successfully used in her a combined spinal epidural technique with intraoperative BiPAP and sedation. She had no complications intraoperatively or post operatively and was discharged on day 5. Patients with OSA are vulnerable to sedatives, anaesthesia and analgesia which even in small doses can cause complete airway collapse. The problem, with regional techniques is that it requires excellent patient cooperation. We decided to put our patient on intraoperative BiPAP hoping that this would allow us to sedate her adequately for the surgery. As it happened we were able to successfully sedate her with slightly lesser doses of the commonly used sedatives without any episodes of desaturation, snoring or exacerbation of pulmonary hypertension. Many more trials are required before we can conclusively say that intraoperative BiPAP allows us to safely sedate OSA patients but we hope that our case report draws light on this possibility. Planning ahead and having a BiPAP machine available inside the operating may allow us to use sedatives in these patients to keep them comfortable under regional anaesthesia. PMID:26023625

  2. A synoptic comparison of fishes and crustaceans from a warm-core eddy, the East Australian Current, the Coral Sea and the Tasman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, F. B.; Wadley, V. A.

    1986-11-01

    Mesopelagic fishes and crustaceans inside a newly formed, warm-core eddy off eastern Australia were similar in composition and abundance of species to those from the more northerly Coral Sea and East Australian Current (EAC) source waters of the eddy. The crustaceans inside the eddy were a mixture of warm-water and cold-water species and were dissimilar to the crustacean fauna on either the Tasman Sea or the Coral Sea-EAC sampling sites. In contrast, of the fishes collected (all from the family Myctophidae), only warm-water or widespread species were present in the eddy. A zoogeographic transect along 155° between 16°S and 32°S showed cold-water crustaceans were present between 24°S and 32°S whereas cold-water fishes were absent. The crustacean fauna of a new eddy was distinct from both the fauna of the source region and of the Tasman Sea because sufficient cold-water species were already present in the geographical location where a new eddy forms. The myctophid fauna of a new warm-core eddy was essentially identical to the Coral Sea fauna because cold-water species do not penetrate into the warmer waters of the source of the eddies. A temperature of 15°C at 250 m depth may be a useful oceanographic marker separating subtropical from temperate myctophids in the Coral and Tasman seas.

  3. Virtual Intraoperative Cholangiogram Using WebCL

    PubMed Central

    YU, Alexander; DEMIREL, Doga; HALIC, Tansel; KOCKARA, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a Virtual Intraoperative Cholangiogram (VIC) training platform. Intraoperative Cholangiogram (IC) is an imaging technique of biliary anatomy with using fluorescent fluids sensitive to the X-Rays. The procedure is often employed to diagnose the difficult cases such as abnormal anatomy or choledocholithiasis during the laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The major challenge in cholangiogram is accurate interpretation of the X-Ray image, which requires extensive case training. However, the training platforms that support generation of various IC cases have been lacking. In this study, we developed a web based platform to generate IC images from any virtual bile duct anatomy. As the generation of X-Ray image from 3D scene is a computationally intensive task, we utilized WebCL technology to parallelize the computation for achieving real-time rates. In this work, we present details of our WebCL IC generation algorithm and benchmark results. PMID:27046623

  4. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zoe Z.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Sun, David A.; Zhang, Yi Ping; Hunt, Matthew A.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    A major dilemma in brain-tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture, which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of (1) image-based navigation, (2) intraoperative sampling, (3) electrophysiological monitoring, and (4) enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease. PMID:26284196

  5. Virtual Intraoperative Cholangiogram Using WebCL.

    PubMed

    Yu, Alexander; Demirel, Doga; Halic, Tansel; Kockara, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a Virtual Intraoperative Cholangiogram (VIC) training platform. Intraoperative Cholangiogram (IC) is an imaging technique of biliary anatomy with using fluorescent fluids sensitive to the X-Rays. The procedure is often employed to diagnose the difficult cases such as abnormal anatomy or choledocholithiasis during the laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The major challenge in cholangiogram is accurate interpretation of the X-Ray image, which requires extensive case training. However, the training platforms that support generation of various IC cases have been lacking. In this study, we developed a web based platform to generate IC images from any virtual bile duct anatomy. As the generation of X-Ray image from 3D scene is a computationally intensive task, we utilized WebCL technology to parallelize the computation for achieving real-time rates. In this work, we present details of our WebCL IC generation algorithm and benchmark results.

  6. Fluorescence goggle for intraoperative breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Bauer, Adam Q.; Akers, Walter; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Charanya, Tauseef; Mondal, Suman; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a fluorescence goggle device for intraoperative oncologic imaging. With our system design, the surgeon can directly visualize the fluorescence information from the eyepieces in real time without any additional monitor, which can improve one's coordination and surgical accuracy. In conjunction with targeting fluorescent dyes, the goggle device can successfully detect tumor margins and small nodules that are not obvious to naked eye. This can potentially decrease the incidence of incomplete resection.

  7. Intraoperative molecular imaging to identify lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Andrew D.; Kennedy, Gregory T.; Predina, Jarrod D.; Low, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative molecular imaging is a promising new technology with numerous applications in lung cancer surgery. Accurate identification of small nodules and assessment of tumor margins are two challenges in pulmonary resections for cancer, particularly with increasing use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). One potential solution to these problems is intraoperative use of a fluorescent contrast agent to improve detection of cancer cells. This technology requires both a targeted fluorescent dye that will selectively accumulate in cancer cells and a specialized imaging system to detect the cells. In several studies, we have shown that intraoperative imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) can be used to accurately identify indeterminate pulmonary nodules. The use of a folate-tagged fluorescent molecule targeted to the folate receptor-α (FRα) further improves the sensitivity and specificity of detecting lung adenocarcinomas. We have demonstrated this technology can be used as an “optical biopsy” to differentiate adenocarcinoma versus other histological subtypes of pulmonary nodules. This strategy has potential applications in assessing bronchial stump margins, identifying synchronous or metachronous lesions, and rapidly assessing lymph nodes for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:28066672

  8. Intraoperative lung ultrasound: A clinicodynamic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based medicine, ultrasonography has emerged as an important and indispensable tool in clinical practice in various specialties including critical care. Lung ultrasound (LUS) has a wide potential in various surgical and clinical situations for timely and easy detection of an impending crisis such as pulmonary edema, endobronchial tube migration, pneumothorax, atelectasis, pleural effusion, and various other causes of desaturation before it clinically ensues to critical level. Although ultrasonography is frequently used in nerve blocks, airway handling, and vascular access, LUS for routine intraoperative monitoring and in crisis management still necessitates recognition. After reviewing the various articles regarding the use of LUS in critical care, we found, that LUS can be used in various intraoperative circumstances similar to Intensive Care Unit with some limitations. Except for few attempts in the intraoperative detection of pneumothorax, LUS is hardly used but has wider perspective for routine and crisis management in real-time. If anesthesiologists add LUS in their routine monitoring armamentarium, it can assist to move a step ahead in the dynamic management of critically ill and high-risk patients. PMID:27625474

  9. Intraoperative lung ultrasound: A clinicodynamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based medicine, ultrasonography has emerged as an important and indispensable tool in clinical practice in various specialties including critical care. Lung ultrasound (LUS) has a wide potential in various surgical and clinical situations for timely and easy detection of an impending crisis such as pulmonary edema, endobronchial tube migration, pneumothorax, atelectasis, pleural effusion, and various other causes of desaturation before it clinically ensues to critical level. Although ultrasonography is frequently used in nerve blocks, airway handling, and vascular access, LUS for routine intraoperative monitoring and in crisis management still necessitates recognition. After reviewing the various articles regarding the use of LUS in critical care, we found, that LUS can be used in various intraoperative circumstances similar to Intensive Care Unit with some limitations. Except for few attempts in the intraoperative detection of pneumothorax, LUS is hardly used but has wider perspective for routine and crisis management in real-time. If anesthesiologists add LUS in their routine monitoring armamentarium, it can assist to move a step ahead in the dynamic management of critically ill and high-risk patients.

  10. Intraoperative anterior cruciate ligament graft contamination.

    PubMed

    Pasque, Charles B; Geib, Timothy M

    2007-03-01

    Intraoperative anterior cruciate ligament graft contamination is a rare but potentially devastating occurrence for any surgeon to encounter. Most instances in our experience have happened when a surgeon first enters practice or is operating in a new environment with new staff. Based on the currently available literature and the senior author's personal experience with 3 cases, intraoperative cleansing of the graft followed by implantation is a reasonable option. The protocol used successfully in these 3 cases includes getting the graft off of the floor immediately, removing any suture material in the graft, cleansing the graft for 15 to 30 minutes each in chlorohexidine and triple antibiotic solution, followed by a normal saline rinse. All graft sutures should then be replaced. The graft should then be resized and the tibial and femoral tunnels adjusted if needed. After implantation of the graft, additional intraoperative and postoperative intravenous antibiotic and/or oral antibiotic administration is also recommended for the first 1 to 2 weeks. Close clinical follow-up is also very important the first 6 weeks postoperatively and should include candid communication with the patient and family.

  11. Comparison of Shoulder Range of Motion, Strength, and Playing Time in Uninjured High School Baseball Pitchers Who Reside in Warm- and Cold-Weather Climates

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Kevin M.; ElAttrache, Neal S.; Jobe, Frank W.; Morrey, Bernard F.; Kaufman, Kenton R.; Hurd, Wendy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an assumption that baseball athletes who reside in warm-weather climates experience larger magnitude adaptations in throwing shoulder motion and strength compared with their peers who reside in cold-weather climates. Hypotheses (1) The warm-weather climate (WWC) group would exhibit more pronounced shoulder motion and strength adaptations than the cold-weather climate (CWC) group, and (2) the WWC group would participate in pitching activities for a greater proportion of the year than the CWC group, with the time spent pitching predicting throwing shoulder motion and strength in both groups. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods One hundred uninjured high school pitchers (50 each WWC, CWC) were recruited. Rotational shoulder motion and isometric strength were measured and participants reported the number of months per year they pitched. To identify differences between groups, t tests were performed; linear regression was used to determine the influence of pitching volume on shoulder motion and strength. Results The WWC group pitched more months per year than athletes from the CWC group, with the number of months spent pitching negatively related to internal rotation motion and external rotation strength. The WWC group exhibited greater shoulder range of motion in all planes compared with the CWC group, as well as significantly lower external rotation strength and external/internal rotation strength ratios. There was no difference in internal rotation strength between groups, nor a difference in the magnitude of side-to-side differences for strength or motion measures. Conclusion Athletes who reside in cold- and warm-weather climates exhibit differences in throwing shoulder motion and strength, related in part to the number of months spent participating in pitching activities. The amount of time spent participating in pitching activities and the magnitude of range of motion and strength adaptations in athletes who reside

  12. Estimations of global warming potentials from computational chemistry calculations for CH(2)F(2) and other fluorinated methyl species verified by comparison to experiment.

    PubMed

    Blowers, Paul; Hollingshead, Kyle

    2009-05-21

    In this work, the global warming potential (GWP) of methylene fluoride (CH(2)F(2)), or HFC-32, is estimated through computational chemistry methods. We find our computational chemistry approach reproduces well all phenomena important for predicting global warming potentials. Geometries predicted using the B3LYP/6-311g** method were in good agreement with experiment, although some other computational methods performed slightly better. Frequencies needed for both partition function calculations in transition-state theory and infrared intensities needed for radiative forcing estimates agreed well with experiment compared to other computational methods. A modified CBS-RAD method used to obtain energies led to superior results to all other previous heat of reaction estimates and most barrier height calculations when the B3LYP/6-311g** optimized geometry was used as the base structure. Use of the small-curvature tunneling correction and a hindered rotor treatment where appropriate led to accurate reaction rate constants and radiative forcing estimates without requiring any experimental data. Atmospheric lifetimes from theory at 277 K were indistinguishable from experimental results, as were the final global warming potentials compared to experiment. This is the first time entirely computational methods have been applied to estimate a global warming potential for a chemical, and we have found the approach to be robust, inexpensive, and accurate compared to prior experimental results. This methodology was subsequently used to estimate GWPs for three additional species [methane (CH(4)); fluoromethane (CH(3)F), or HFC-41; and fluoroform (CHF(3)), or HFC-23], where estimations also compare favorably to experimental values.

  13. Delivery of stents to target lesions: techniques of intraoperative stent implantation and intraoperative angiograms.

    PubMed

    Ing, F F

    2005-01-01

    Mullins et al. [6] reported the first use of stent implantation to treat stenotic branch pulmonary arteries in 1988. In the early to mid-1990s, numerous reports confirmed its safety and efficacy, but there were limited stent and balloon designs and stent implantations were performed using relatively large delivery systems (10- to 12-Fr sheaths) [7, 8]. The general accepted patient size was limited to those weighing 12 kg or greater. Intraoperative stent implantation for branch pulmonary artery stenosis was reported in the early to mid-1990s [1-3, 5, 9]. Indications in these early reports included small patient size or difficult anatomy or patients who had additional cardiac lesions and needed surgery independent of the branch stenosis. The idea was to take advantage of the open-heart exposure provided in the operating room to permit direct access to the stenotic segment. Hence, all intraoperative stent implants were performed under direct visualization on bypass. There were no discussions on advantages over the routine percutaneous approach. Currently, with advances in stent and balloon technology as well as increased operator experience, many of those reported cases probably would have undergone cardiac catheterization for a percutaneous stent implant rather than open-heart surgery. The purpose of this report is to review the current indications, advantages, and disadvantages of intraoperative stent implantation as well as to discuss the techniques that are helpful to optimize intraoperative stent positioning. The role and advantages of intraoperative angiography will also be presented.

  14. Impact of decreasing sea ice cover and warming Arctic surface temperature on the Northern mid-latitude climate - comparison of coupled with uncoupled EC-Earth simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmler, T.; Gleeson, E.; McGrath, R.; Jung, T.

    2012-04-01

    Idealized atmosphere-only simulations with reduced and removed Arctic sea-ice cover and increased Arctic surface temperatures are compared with fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice simulations for 1850-2100 including increases in greenhouse gas and aerosol concentrations. While the uncoupled simulations only contain surface forcing in the areas of Arctic sea-ice of the reference simulation, the coupled simulations show warming over the whole globe although in the Arctic the strongest signal occurs in all seasons but summer. A warming of more than 21 °C over the northern Barents Sea in winter 2001-2100 compared to winter 1851-1950 is simulated according to the strong RCP 8.5 scenario. The weakest warming within the area north of 40 °N can be seen south of Greenland and Iceland with even a slight cooling simulated in spring according to the moderate RCP 4.5 scenario, due to a weakened Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Over the Central Arctic a baroclinic response, i.e. sea level pressure decrease and 500 hPa geopotential increase, can be seen in both the uncoupled and the coupled simulations. Barotropic responses with sea level pressure and 500 hPa geopotential increases occur in the uncoupled simulations over Eastern Europe and in the coupled simulations south of Iceland and over the west coast of the US.

  15. Intraoperative thermal imaging in esophageal replacement: its use in the assessment of gastric tube viability.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Katsunori; Matsudaira, Hideki; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Mizuno, Ryouji; Hanyuu, Nobuyoshi; Iwabuchi, Shuuichi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2006-01-01

    We examined the use of intraoperative thermal imaging to assess the gastric vascularization and gastric tube viability during esophagectomy. The surface temperatures of the intact stomach, devascularized stomach, and gastric tube were measured in 13 patients from the proximal end to the pylorus longitudinally along the greater curvature or along the entire gastric tube during esophagectomy. Thermal images clearly demonstrated a surface temperature decline in the proximal region of the gastric tube. The mean decline rate in the surface temperature in the proximal region of the gastric tube in comparison to the intact stomach was 17.7% (P < 0.001). One patient who developed gastric tube necrosis exhibited a prominent drop in the surface temperature in the proximal region of 20.6% in comparison to that in the distal region, compared to that of 12.5% in other patients. Intraoperative thermal imaging is a noninvasive and reliable technique for the assessment of the gastric tube viability.

  16. Warm Up with Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyle, R. J.; Smith, Robert F.

    1989-01-01

    Too little time is often spent on warm-up activities in the school or recreation class. Warm-ups are often perfunctory and unimaginative. Several suggestions are made for warm-up activities that incorporate both previously learned and new skills, while preparing the body for more vigorous activity. (IAH)

  17. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Changho; Kim, Sehui; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2013-11-01

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  18. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seunghoon Kim, Sehui Kim, Jeehyun E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu; Lee, Changho Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  19. Brain mapping in tumors: intraoperative or extraoperative?

    PubMed

    Duffau, Hugues

    2013-12-01

    In nontumoral epilepsy surgery, the main goal for all preoperative investigation is to first determine the epileptogenic zone, and then to analyze its relation to eloquent cortex, in order to control seizures while avoiding adverse postoperative neurologic outcome. To this end, in addition to neuropsychological assessment, functional neuroimaging and scalp electroencephalography, extraoperative recording, and electrical mapping, especially using subdural strip- or grid-electrodes, has been reported extensively. Nonetheless, in tumoral epilepsy surgery, the rationale is different. Indeed, the first aim is rather to maximize the extent of tumor resection while minimizing postsurgical morbidity, in order to increase the median survival as well as to preserve quality of life. As a consequence, as frequently seen in infiltrating tumors such as gliomas, where these lesions not only grow but also migrate along white matter tracts, the resection should be performed according to functional boundaries both at cortical and subcortical levels. With this in mind, extraoperative mapping by strips/grids is often not sufficient in tumoral surgery, since in essence, it allows study of the cortex but cannot map subcortical pathways. Therefore, intraoperative electrostimulation mapping, especially in awake patients, is more appropriate in tumor surgery, because this technique allows real-time detection of areas crucial for cerebral functions--eloquent cortex and fibers--throughout the resection. In summary, rather than choosing one or the other of different mapping techniques, methodology should be adapted to each pathology, that is, extraoperative mapping in nontumoral epilepsy surgery and intraoperative mapping in tumoral surgery.

  20. Intraoperative blood salvage: a new artificial organ?

    PubMed

    Valbonesi, M; Frisoni, R; Florio, G; Ferrari, M

    1995-03-01

    Optimal blood supply is critical to modern medical practice. Among the different possibilities of improving the quality and safety of blood, it is generally felt that autologous donation has played an important role and has contributed to changing transfusional practices, mainly since the appearance of HIV and HCV on the blood transfusion scene. At the San Martino Hospital Immunohematology Service, the autotransfusion era began in 1985. Autologous predeposit donation was the first to be introduced, followed by intentional perioperative hemodilution, intraoperative blood salvage with DFC apparatuses and lastly post-operative blood salvage. From about 200 autologous donations in 1985 we reached 5,372 in 1993 and more than 6,000 autologous donations are expected for 1994. Only 189 intraoperative blood salvages, were carried out in 1986, 593 in 1989, 1,207 in 1993 and more than 1,500 blood salvage sessions are anticipated for 1994. In the meantime, the total number of homologous RBC units employed in the Hospital dropped from 45,000 in 1985 to 18,000 in 1994, with the Onco-hematological Divisions using approximately 10,000 units of packed RBC.

  1. Self-inflicted nail-gun injury with cranial penetration and use of intraoperative computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Carnevale, Joseph A.; Morrison, John F.; Choi, David B.; Klinge, Petra M.; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Oyelese, Adetokunbo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of penetrating cranial trauma remains a high acuity and imaging intense neurosurgical disorder. Imaging of vital structures, including angiography, is typically conducted to understand the proximity of vital structures in comparison to a foreign body and prepare for intraoperative complications such as hemorrhage. Preservation of function following initial injury in cases where minimal neurological deficit exists is essential. Case Description: Here, we present a case using intraoperative computed tomography to assist in early detection and resolution of hemorrhage in the surgical management of an intact patient with self-inflicted penetrating cranial trauma. Conclusions: This method may aid in early detection of hemorrhage and prevention of consequential neurological deterioration or emergent need for secondary surgery. PMID:27213112

  2. Improved Visualization of Intracranial Vessels with Intraoperative Coregistration of Rotational Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intraoperative 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Podlesek, Dino; Meyer, Tobias; Morgenstern, Ute; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound can visualize and update the vessel status in real time during cerebral vascular surgery. We studied the depiction of parent vessels and aneurysms with a high-resolution 3D intraoperative ultrasound imaging system during aneurysm clipping using rotational digital subtraction angiography as a reference. Methods We analyzed 3D intraoperative ultrasound in 39 patients with cerebral aneurysms to visualize the aneurysm intraoperatively and the nearby vascular tree before and after clipping. Simultaneous coregistration of preoperative subtraction angiography data with 3D intraoperative ultrasound was performed to verify the anatomical assignment. Results Intraoperative ultrasound detected 35 of 43 aneurysms (81%) in 39 patients. Thirty-nine intraoperative ultrasound measurements were matched with rotational digital subtraction angiography and were successfully reconstructed during the procedure. In 7 patients, the aneurysm was partially visualized by 3D-ioUS or was not in field of view. Post-clipping intraoperative ultrasound was obtained in 26 and successfully reconstructed in 18 patients (69%) despite clip related artefacts. The overlap between 3D-ioUS aneurysm volume and preoperative rDSA aneurysm volume resulted in a mean accuracy of 0.71 (Dice coefficient). Conclusions Intraoperative coregistration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound data with preoperative rotational digital subtraction angiography is possible with high accuracy. It allows the immediate visualization of vessels beyond the microscopic field, as well as parallel assessment of blood velocity, aneurysm and vascular tree configuration. Although spatial resolution is lower than for standard angiography, the method provides an excellent vascular overview, advantageous interpretation of 3D-ioUS and immediate intraoperative feedback of the vascular status. A prerequisite for understanding vascular intraoperative ultrasound is image quality and a successful match with preoperative

  3. Brain tumors in eloquent areas: A European multicenter survey of intraoperative mapping techniques, intraoperative seizures occurrence, and antiepileptic drug prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Spena, Giannantonio; Schucht, Philippe; Seidel, Kathleen; Rutten, Geert-Jan; Freyschlag, Christian Franz; D'Agata, Federico; Costi, Emanule; Zappa, Francesca; Fontanella, Marco; Fontaine, Denys; Almairac, Fabien; Cavallo, Michele; De Bonis, Pasquale; Conesa, Gerardo; Foroglou, Nicholas; Gil-Robles, Santiago; Mandonnet, Emanuel; Martino, Juan; Picht, Thomas; Viegas, Catarina; Wager, Michel; Pallud, Johan

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative mapping and monitoring techniques for eloquent area tumors are routinely used world wide. Very few data are available regarding mapping and monitoring methods and preferences, intraoperative seizures occurrence and perioperative antiepileptic drug management. A questionnaire was sent to 20 European centers with experience in intraoperative mapping or neurophysiological monitoring for the treatment of eloquent area tumors. Fifteen centers returned the completed questionnaires. Data was available on 2098 patients. 863 patients (41.1%) were operated on through awake surgery and intraoperative mapping, while 1235 patients (58.8%) received asleep surgery and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring or mapping. There was great heterogeneity between centers with some totally AW oriented (up to 100%) and other almost totally ASL oriented (up to 92%) (31% SD). For awake surgery, 79.9% centers preferred an asleep-awake-asleep anesthesia protocol. Only 53.3% of the centers used ECoG or transcutaneous EEG. The incidence of intraoperative seizures varied significantly between centers, ranging from 2.5% to 54% (p < 0.001). It there appears to be a statistically significant link between the mastery of mapping technique and the risk of intraoperative seizures. Moreover, history of preoperative seizures can significantly increase the risk of intraoperative seizures (p < 0.001). Intraoperative seizures occurrence was similar in patients with or without perioperative drugs (12% vs. 12%, p = 0.2). This is the first European survey to assess intraoperative functional mapping and monitoring protocols and the management of peri- and intraoperative seizures. This data can help identify specific aspects that need to be investigated in prospective and controlled studies.

  4. Comparison of protective effects of trimetazidine against experimental warm ischemia of different durations: early and long-term effects in a pig kidney model.

    PubMed

    Jayle, Christophe; Favreau, Frederic; Zhang, Kequiang; Doucet, Carole; Goujon, Jean Michel; Hebrard, William; Carretier, Michel; Eugene, Michel; Mauco, Gerard; Tillement, Jean Paul; Hauet, Thierry

    2007-03-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is often the consequence of an ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and associated with high mortality. Warm ischemia (WI) is a crucial factor of tissue damage, and tissue destruction led by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) can impact the early and long-term functional outcome. Trimetazidine (TMZ) is an anti-ischemic drug. Previously, we already verified its protective effect on a cold-ischemic pig kidney model by directly adding TMZ into the preservation solution (Faure JP, Baumert H, Han Z, Goujon JM, Favreau F, Dutheil D, Petit I, Barriere M, Tallineau C, Tillement JP, Carretier M, Mauco G, Papadopoulos V, Hauet T. Biochem Pharmacol 66: 2241-2250, 2003; Faure JP, Petit I, Zhang K, Dutheil D, Doucet C, Favreau F, Eugene M, Goujon JM, Tillement JP, Mauco G, Vandewalle A, Hauet T. Am J Transplant 4: 495-504, 2004). In this study, we aimed to study the potential effect of TMZ pretreatment (5 mg/kg iv 24 h before WI) on the injury caused by WI for 45, 60, and 90 min and reperfusion in a WI pig kidney model. Compared with sham-operated (control) and uninephrectomized animals (UNX), TMZ pretreatment significantly reduced deleterious effects after 45 min, and particularly 60 and 90 min, of WI by improving the recovery of renal function and minimizing the inflammatory response commonly prevalent in ischemic kidney injury. Compared with controls (control group and UNX group), it was observed that 1) hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1alpha) expression occurred earlier and with a higher intensity in the TMZ-treated groups; 2) the reduction of IRI during the first week following reperfusion was correlated with an earlier and greater expression of stathmin, which is involved in the process of tubular repair; and 3) the tubulointerstitial fibrosis was reduced, particularly after 60 and 90 min of WI. In conclusion, TMZ made the warm-ischemic kidneys more resistant to the deleterious impact of a single episode of I/R and reduced early and long-term subsequent

  5. WWTP design in warm climates - guideline comparison and parameter adaptation for a full-scale activated sludge plant using mass balancing.

    PubMed

    Walder, C; Lindtner, S; Proesl, A; Klegraf, F; Weissenbacher, N

    2013-01-01

    The ATV-A-131 guideline and the design approach published in 'Wastewater Engineering, Treatment and Reuse (WE)' are widely used for the design of activated sludge plants. They are both based on simplified steady-state assumptions tailored to the boundary conditions of temperate climates. Using design guidelines beyond the designated temperature range may lead to inappropriate results. The objectives of this paper are (1) to summarise temperature relevant differences between ATV-A-131 and WE; (2) to show the related design components; and (3) to demonstrate a procedure for design parameter adaptation for a full-scale activated sludge plant located in a warm climate region. To gain steady-state data required for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) design according to ATV-A-131 and WE, full-scale plant data were acquired for a period of 6 months as a basis for analyses and adaptation. Mass balances were calculated for the verification of the measurements and for analysing excess sludge production. The two approaches showed relevant temperature related differences. WE default application resulted in lower deviation in the mass balance results for excess sludge production. However, with the adaptation of the heterotrophic decay rates for both approaches and the inert organic and mineral solids fraction additionally for ATV-A-131, a good fit to the observed excess sludge production could be achieved.

  6. High-global warming potential F-gas emissions in California: comparison of ambient-based versus inventory-based emission estimates, and implications of refined estimates.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Glenn; Zhan, Tao; Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Gupta, Pamela; Pederson, James; Croes, Bart; Blake, Donald R; Barletta, Barbara; Meinardi, Simone; Ashford, Paul; Vetter, Arnie; Saba, Sabine; Slim, Rayan; Palandre, Lionel; Clodic, Denis; Mathis, Pamela; Wagner, Mark; Forgie, Julia; Dwyer, Harry; Wolf, Katy

    2014-01-21

    To provide information for greenhouse gas reduction policies, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventories annual emissions of high-global-warming potential (GWP) fluorinated gases, the fastest growing sector of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally. Baseline 2008 F-gas emissions estimates for selected chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-12), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC-22), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-134a) made with an inventory-based methodology were compared to emissions estimates made by ambient-based measurements. Significant discrepancies were found, with the inventory-based emissions methodology resulting in a systematic 42% under-estimation of CFC-12 emissions from older refrigeration equipment and older vehicles, and a systematic 114% overestimation of emissions for HFC-134a, a refrigerant substitute for phased-out CFCs. Initial, inventory-based estimates for all F-gas emissions had assumed that equipment is no longer in service once it reaches its average lifetime of use. Revised emission estimates using improved models for equipment age at end-of-life, inventories, and leak rates specific to California resulted in F-gas emissions estimates in closer agreement to ambient-based measurements. The discrepancies between inventory-based estimates and ambient-based measurements were reduced from -42% to -6% for CFC-12, and from +114% to +9% for HFC-134a.

  7. Optical technologies for intraoperative neurosurgical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, Pablo A.; Roberts, David W.; Lu, Fa-Ke; Golby, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical optics is a broadly interdisciplinary field at the interface of optical engineering, biophysics, computer science, medicine, biology, and chemistry, helping us understand light–tissue interactions to create applications with diagnostic and therapeutic value in medicine. Implementation of biomedical optics tools and principles has had a notable scientific and clinical resurgence in recent years in the neurosurgical community. This is in great part due to work in fluorescence-guided surgery of brain tumors leading to reports of significant improvement in maximizing the rates of gross-total resection. Multiple additional optical technologies have been implemented clinically, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and imaging, optical coherence tomography, Raman spectroscopy and imaging, and advanced quantitative methods, including quantitative fluorescence and lifetime imaging. Here we present a clinically relevant and technologically informed overview and discussion of some of the major clinical implementations of optical technologies as intraoperative guidance tools in neurosurgery. PMID:26926066

  8. [Intraoperative frozen sections of the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Synoracki, S; Ting, S; Siebolts, U; Dralle, H; Koperek, O; Schmid, K W

    2015-07-01

    The goal of evaluation of intraoperative frozen sections of the thyroid gland is to achieve a definitive diagnosis which determines the subsequent surgical management as fast as possible; however, due to the specific methodological situation of thyroid frozen sections evaluation a conclusive diagnosis can be made in only some of the cases. If no conclusive histological diagnosis is possible during the operation, subsequent privileged processing of the specimen allows a final diagnosis at the latest within 48 h in almost all remaining cases. Applying this strategy, both pathologists and surgeons require a high level of communication and knowledge regarding the specific diagnostic and therapeutic peculiarities of thyroid malignancies because different surgical strategies must be employed depending on the histological tumor subtype.

  9. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy for larynx carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukatch, Erwin V.; Latyshevska, Galina; Fekeshgazi, Ishtvan V.

    1995-05-01

    We made an experimental and clinical researches to examine Intraoperative Photodynamic Therapy (IPT) as a method to prevent the recidives of tumors. In experimental researches on models with radio-inducated fibrosarcomas and Erlich carcinomas of mice the best method of IPT was worked out. The therapeutic effect was studied also on patients with laryngeal cancer. In researches on C3H mice the antirecidive effect of IPT established with local administration of methylene blue and Ar-laser. We found that IPT (He-Ne laser combined with methylene blue administration) was endured by patients with laryngeal cancers without problems. We got good results of treatment 42 patients with laryngeal cancers with middle localization during three years with using IPT method. This can show the perspectives of using this method in treatment of other ENT-oncological diseases.

  10. Optical technologies for intraoperative neurosurgical guidance.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Pablo A; Roberts, David W; Lu, Fa-Ke; Golby, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    Biomedical optics is a broadly interdisciplinary field at the interface of optical engineering, biophysics, computer science, medicine, biology, and chemistry, helping us understand light-tissue interactions to create applications with diagnostic and therapeutic value in medicine. Implementation of biomedical optics tools and principles has had a notable scientific and clinical resurgence in recent years in the neurosurgical community. This is in great part due to work in fluorescence-guided surgery of brain tumors leading to reports of significant improvement in maximizing the rates of gross-total resection. Multiple additional optical technologies have been implemented clinically, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and imaging, optical coherence tomography, Raman spectroscopy and imaging, and advanced quantitative methods, including quantitative fluorescence and lifetime imaging. Here we present a clinically relevant and technologically informed overview and discussion of some of the major clinical implementations of optical technologies as intraoperative guidance tools in neurosurgery.

  11. [Intraoperative sonography to exclude thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Jakab, Ferenc; Szabó, Gyozo János

    2007-08-12

    The authors present the case of a 29-year-old female with stab wound to the abdomen. After the initial fluid resuscitation and preliminary radiographic examinations immediate laparotomy was indicated due to hypovolaemic circulatory collapse. Splenectomy and gastric suture were necessary. Following the urgent interventions a wound of the left diaphragm was noticed during the extended abdominal exploration. According to the prior examinations and the operative situation it was not clear whether the injury is penetrating. In order to avoid explorative thoracotomy intraoperative ultrasonography was performed: the transducer and the acoustic gel were placed into sterile plastic bag and the organs above the diaphragm were examined from the abdominal cavity. With this method intrathoracic injury close to the diaphragm could be clearly excluded.

  12. [Intra-operative cholangiography in laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Neufeld, D; Jessel, J; Freund, U

    1994-01-16

    Intraoperative cholangiography (IC) in laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a controversial issue. According to traditional teaching, the purpose of cholangiography in gallbladder surgery is to discover previously undiscovered common bile duct stones. This examination was extremely important in the era before ERCP. IC enabled surgeons to find stones and remove them at the same operation. With progress in ERCP, the importance of intraoperative cholangiography has diminished. A stone missed during surgery can most often be dealt with by the less invasive ERCP and papillotomy. There has been a difference of opinion in the literature as to whether to perform cholangiography routinely during gallbladder operations or only in cases in which there is a specific indication, such as an enlarged common bile duct, a history of pancreatitis, or elevated enzymes. Routine operative cholangiography prolongs operative time and carries its own inherent risks, such as injury to the bile ducts. The likelihood of stones is not high and over-diagnosis of stones would result in unwarranted common bile duct exploration and the danger of complications from the procedure. The tendency today is towards a more selective approach. In this era of laparoscopic gallbladder surgery, the controversy has come to the fore again, and there is now an additional aspect. In laparoscopic gallbladder surgery there is greater significance to the "road map" provided by X-rays. We rely mainly on the visual sense and have forgone the tactile sense. Therefore, any added visual input in this operation helps avoid the danger of injuring the main bile ducts. It is our contention that the indications for operative cholangiography in laparoscopic cholecystectomy should again be broadened.

  13. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  14. Safety, efficacy, and cost of intraoperative indocyanine green angiography compared to intraoperative catheter angiography in cerebral aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Douglas A; Thind, Harjot; Zabramski, Joseph M; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Intraoperative angiography in cerebrovascular neurosurgery can drive the repositioning or addition of aneurysm clips. Our institution has switched from a strategy of intraoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) universally, to a strategy of indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography with DSA on an as-needed basis. We retrospectively evaluated whether the rates of perioperative stroke, unexpected postoperative aneurysm residual, or parent vessel stenosis differed in 100 patients from each era (2002, "DSA era"; 2007, "ICG era"). The clip repositioning rate for neck residual or parent vessel stenosis did not differ significantly between the two eras. There were no differences in the rate of perioperative stroke or rate of false-negative studies. The per-patient cost of intraoperative imaging within the DSA era was significantly higher than in the ICG era. The replacement of routine intraoperative DSA with ICG videoangiography and selective intraoperative DSA in cerebrovascular aneurysm surgery is safe and effective.

  15. A comparison of the climates of the Medieval Climate Anomaly, Little Ice Age, and Current Warm Period reconstructed using coral records from the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wenfeng; Liu, Xi; Chen, Xuefei; Wei, Gangjian; Zeng, Ti; Xie, Luhua; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2017-01-01

    For the global oceans, the characteristics of high-resolution climate changes during the last millennium remain uncertain because of the limited availability of proxy data. This study reconstructs climate conditions using annually resolved coral records from the South China Sea (SCS) to provide new insights into climate change over the last millennium. The results indicate that the climate of the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, AD 900-1300) was similar to that of the Current Warm Period (CWP, AD 1850-present), which contradicts previous studies. The similar warmth levels for the MCA and CWP have also been recorded in the Makassar Strait of Indonesia, which suggests that the MCA was not warmer than the CWP in the western Pacific and that this may not have been a globally uniform change. Hydrological conditions were drier/saltier during the MCA and similar to those of the CWP. The drier/saltier MCA and CWP in the western Pacific may be associated with the reduced precipitation caused by variations in the Pacific Walker Circulation. As for the Little Ice Age (LIA, AD 1550-1850), the results from this study, together with previous data from the Makassar Strait, indicate a cold and wet period compared with the CWP and the MCA in the western Pacific. The cold LIA period agrees with the timing of the Maunder sunspot minimum and is therefore associated with low solar activity. The fresher/wetter LIA in the western Pacific may have been caused by the synchronized retreat of both the East Asian Summer Monsoon and the Australian Monsoon.

  16. Comparison of scarab grub populations and associated pathogens and parasitoids in warm- or cool-season grasses used on transitional zone golf courses.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Carl T; Williams, David W; Potter, Daniel A

    2012-08-01

    Seven different turfgrass species or mixes used on golf courses in the United States' transitional climatic zone were maintained as randomized and replicated plots in separate stands mowed at fairway (1.6 cm) or rough (6.4 cm) cutting heights and sampled in autumn to assess the density and species composition of scarab grubs; incidence of disease and parasitism thereof; and extent of turf damage from foraging insectivorous skunks, Mephitis mephitis. Influence of grass species on parasitism by spring or autumn-active tiphiid wasps was further assessed on implanted grubs in open enclosures. Masked chafers (Cyclocephala spp.) were three-fold more abundant than Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman, grubs in plots of Zoysia and Cynodon sp. mowed at fairway height, and P. japonica were five-fold more abundant than masked chafer grubs in cool-season turf plots mowed at rough height. Phyllophaga spp. accounted for <1% of grubs in the samples. Milky disease bacteria (Paenibacillus sp.) were the predominant pathogens of Cyclocephala spp., followed by Serratia sp. bacteria and gregarines (Stictospora cf. villani). Cyclocephala grub densities, milky disease incidence (25%), and parasitism by the native tiphiid Tiphia pygidialis Alien (10-12%) were especially high in zoysiagrass. Japanese beetle grubs were infected by Paenibacillus, Serratia, Stictospora, and microsporidia (Ovavesicula sp.), but incidence of individual pathogens was relatively low (<6%) and similar among grasses within each stand. Few nematode-infected grubs were found. Skunk damage was mainly in the cool-season fairway-height grasses, probably reflecting difficulty in foraging in the much tougher stolons and rhizomes of the warm season turfgrasses. The degree of natural suppression of scarab grubs provided by endemic pathogens or parasitoids is unlikely to be compromised by the grass species used on a particular site.

  17. Warm-Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingguang, Yang

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how warm-up activities can help to make the English-as-a-foreign-language classroom a lively and interesting place. Warm-up activities are games carried out at the beginning of each class to motivate students to make good use of class time. (Author/VWL)

  18. Global Warming Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Philip D.; Wigley, Tom M. L.

    1990-01-01

    Results from the analysis of land and marine records from the past century are presented. It is indicated that the planet earth has warmed about one-half of a degree celsius. The uncertainty of these measurements and future warming trends are discussed. (CW)

  19. Intraoperative use of a tablet computer to aid rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Tsounis, M; Papadopoulou, D; Faris, C

    2017-01-01

    Open septorhinoplasty enables excellent exposure to the structural components of the nasal tip. Nevertheless, it runs the risk of weakening its support mechanisms, which can lead to notable changes to tip projection and rotation as well as to the nasolabial angle. It is therefore paramount that the surgeon reconstructs the nose to the desired endpoint at the end of the operation. Currently, the gold standard of care in rhinoplasty uses preoperative photographs with the patient sitting or standing. However, this is not a true representation of the face in the operative position as the patient is placed supine and so gravity affects the appearance of the nose in a different way. Other factors such as head drapes and traction on the endotracheal tube can also cause subtle changes. We therefore advocate additional intraoperative profile view photographs to improve the accuracy of nasal tip positioning. In our department, in addition to standard preoperative photographs, immediate preoperative profile photos are taken with the patient supine, intubated and draped. Images are captured using a tablet computer at a distance of 1 meter from the patient. We ensure that the Frankfort plane is perpendicular to the floor. The picture is enlarged so that the image is full scale and the tablet is subsequently placed immediately behind the patient for direct comparison. This is then used during the procedure to check tip projection and rotation as well as at the end of the procedure following closure of the columellar incision to ensure correct placement of the nasal tip.

  20. Intraoperative monitoring technician: a new member of the surgical team.

    PubMed

    Brown, Molly S; Brown, Debra S

    2011-02-01

    As surgery needs have increased, the traditional surgical team has expanded to include personnel from radiology and perfusion services. A new surgical team member, the intraoperative monitoring technician, is needed to perform intraoperative monitoring during procedures that carry a higher risk of central and peripheral nerve injury. Including the intraoperative monitoring technician on the surgical team can create challenges, including surgical delays and anesthesia care considerations. When the surgical team members, including the surgeon, anesthesia care provider, and circulating nurse, understand and facilitate this new staff member's responsibilities, the technician is able to perform monitoring functions that promote the smooth flow of the surgical procedure and positive patient outcomes.

  1. Goal-directed therapy in intraoperative fluid and hemodynamic management

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria Cristina; Moore, Peter G.; Liu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative fluid management is pivotal to the outcome and success of surgery, especially in high-risk procedures. Empirical formula and invasive static monitoring have been traditionally used to guide intraoperative fluid management and assess volume status. With the awareness of the potential complications of invasive procedures and the poor reliability of these methods as indicators of volume status, we present a case scenario of a patient who underwent major abdominal surgery as an example to discuss how the use of minimally invasive dynamic monitoring may guide intraoperative fluid therapy. PMID:24086168

  2. Belmont Hyperthermia Pump in the conduct of intra-operative heated chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Riley, W

    2009-03-01

    Intra-operative heated chemotherapy (IOHC) has been performed in the Thoracic surgical department of Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH, Boston, MA, USA) for over a decade. A "home-grown" system was developed for this purpose with limited improvements made to it through the years. This technology is used for neo-adjuvant therapy in the conduct of extra-pleural pneumonectomy and pleurectomy for treatment of mesothelioma. Improvements to the traditional BWH system were sought due to the hazardous nature of the chemotherapy solution and the relative complexity of the IOHC circuit. Belmont Instrument (Belmont Instrument Corporation, Billerica, MA, USA) applied their proprietary infusion/warming technology to develop the Belmont Hyperthermia Pump. The Hyperthermia Pump was designed to recirculate large volumes of fluid while maintaining perfusate temperatures up to 46oC at a flow rate of up to 750 ml/min. Approval from the FDA for clinical use of this device was granted June 2007. Parameters were defined and investigated to determine if the Hyperthermia Pump would meet or exceed the performance characteristics of the traditional BWH system. Our investigation resulted in the replacement of the traditional BWH circuit. The Belmont Hyperthermia Pump is a compact, easy to use, extremely safe means to deliver intra-operative hyperthermic chemotherapy in the conduct of surgical treatment of mesothelioma.

  3. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  4. Intraoperative knee anthropometrics: correlation with cartilage wear.

    PubMed

    Rooney, N; Fitzpatrick, D P; Beverland, D E

    2006-08-01

    Accurate knee morphology is of value in determining the correct sizing of prosthetic implants. Intraoperative measurement of key linear dimensional variables was carried out on 196 Caucasian knees (osteoarthritic patients: 68 male and 128 female). Of the 196 knees measured, 70 had extensive cartilage degeneration. Statistical analysis was carried out on this large sample size of data. Summary statistics and correlation coefficients between variables were determined and compared between subgroups. Male knees were on average larger than female knees. Higher correlation was found between variables for males than between variables for females. Overall, the patellar dimensions were seen to correlate least well with other anatomical variables. High correlation between femoral variables supports current femoral sizing procedure, although routine patellar resection practices are called into question. Average values for the 70 knees with extensive cartilage degeneration were significantly smaller (P < 0.01) than their counterparts for the other 126 knees. For a measurement not containing cartilage, such as femoral epicondylar width, this difference cannot be accounted for by the loss of cartilage owing to wear. This suggests that, for similar height and weight, a naturally narrower femoral epicondylar width may be associated with severe osteoarthritis.

  5. Intraoperative anaphylaxis: verba volant, scripta manent!

    PubMed

    Bilò, M B; Cinti, B; Chiarello, M; Bonifazi, F; Moneret-Vautrin, D A

    2005-11-01

    We describe a case of intraoperative gelatine-induced anaphylaxis whose diagnosis was delayed as the use of gelatine during surgical procedures was omitted for two times in patient's medical records. The subject is a 66-year old woman, with a negative medical history of atopy, food and drug allergy, with arterial hypertension on a course of beta-blockers and with bladder carcinoma requiring surgery. The patient had tolerated both general and local anaesthesia on several previous occasions. On the first occasion she experienced arterial fibrillation secondary to a severe episode of hypotension following local anaesthesia, while on a course of beta-blockers. On the second occasion she developed a very severe episode of hypotension followed by the outbreak of a generalised rash during general anaesthesia. The tryptase sera level was 109 mg/L one hour after the reaction had subsided, while the basal values were normal. On the third occasion the patient redeveloped severe hypotension and a generalised rash during general anaesthesia. The allergological work-up was negative, except for intradermal test with gelatine. A study of the intra-cellular cytokines in blood lymphocytes showed a production of IL4 from CD4+ lymphocytes after stimulation by gelatine. The patient underwent a successive surgical procedure without any adverse event.

  6. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  7. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  8. Using intraoperative MRI to assess bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Hall, Walter A.; Martin, Alastair J.; Truwit, Charles L.

    2001-05-01

    Immediate detector of any surgically induced hemorrhage prior to the closure is important for minimizing the unnecessary post surgical complications. In the case of hemorrhage, the surgical site of interests often involves hemorrhagic blood in the presence of CSF as well as air pockets. It is known that the hemorrhagic blood or air has a different magnetic susceptibility from its surrounding tissue, and CSF has long T1 and T2. Based on these differences, a set of complimentary imaging techniques (T2, FLAIR, and GE) were optimized to reveal the existence of surgically induced acute hemorrhage. Among 330 neurosurgical cases, one relatively severe hemorrhage has been successfully found intra-operatively using the concept. During the case, a new hyperintense area close to the primary motor cortex was initially noticed on T2 weighted HASTE images. As soon as it was found to increase in size rapidly, the patient was treated immediately via craniotomy for aspiration of the intra-parenchymal blood. Owing to early detection and treatment, the patient was completely free of motor deficits. Besides, there were ten much less severe hemorrhages have been noticed using the method. The proper post-surgical care was planned to closely follow-up the patient for any sign of hemorrhage.

  9. Perspectives in Intraoperative Diagnostics of Human Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Tyurikova, O.; Dembitskaya, Y.; Yashin, K.; Mishchenko, M.; Vedunova, M.; Medyanik, I.; Kazantsev, V.

    2015-01-01

    Amongst large a variety of oncological diseases, malignant gliomas represent one of the most severe types of tumors. They are also the most common type of the brain tumors and account for over half of the astrocytic tumors. According to different sources, the average life expectancy of patients with various glioblastomas varies between 10 and 12 months and that of patients with anaplastic astrocytic tumors between 20 and 24 months. Therefore, studies of the physiology of transformed glial cells are critical for the development of treatment methods. Modern medical approaches offer complex procedures, including the microsurgical tumor removal, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, supplemented with photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy. The most radical of them is surgical resection, which allows removing the largest part of the tumor, reduces the intracranial hypertension, and minimizes the degree of neurological deficit. However, complete removal of the tumor remains impossible. The main limitations are insufficient visualization of glioma boundaries, due to its infiltrative growth, and the necessity to preserve healthy tissue. This review is devoted to the description of advantages and disadvantages of modern intraoperative diagnostics of human gliomas and highlights potential perspectives for development of their treatment. PMID:26543495

  10. A non-docking intraoperative electron beam applicator system.

    PubMed

    Palta, J R; Suntharalingam, N

    1989-08-01

    A non-docking intraoperative radiation therapy electron beam applicator system for a linear accelerator has been designed to minimize the mechanical, electrical, and tumor visualization problems associated with a docking system. A number of technical innovations have been used in the design of this system. These include: (a) a new intraoperative radiation therapy cone design that gives a better dose uniformity in the treatment volume at all depths; (b) a collimation system which reduces the leakage radiation dose to tissues outside the intraoperative radiation therapy cone; (c) a non-docking system with a translational accuracy of 2 mm and a rotational accuracy of 0.5 degrees; and (d) a rigid clamping system for the cones. A comprehensive set of dosimetric characteristics of the intraoperative radiation therapy applicator system is presented.

  11. [ANALYSIS OF THE INTRAOPERATIVE PROPHYLAXIS EFFICACY OF THE ABDOMINAL CAVITY ADHESIVE DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Yevtushenko, D A

    2015-09-01

    Results of treatment of 152 patients, operated on for various diseases of the abdominal cavity, were analyzed. In 72 of them (the main group) intraoperatively a Defensal was used as an antiadhesive barrier preparation for the abdominal adhesions prophylaxis, and in 80 (a comparison group)--antiadhesive measures were not conducted. Application of antiadhesive sterile solution have promoted a reduction of period, which is necessary for the gut motor-evacuation function restoration--by 1.5 days, stationary treatment--by 2.5 days, postoperative morbidity rate--in 2.7 times.

  12. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  13. Reconciling Warming Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.; Shindell, Drew T.; Tsigaridis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Climate models projected stronger warming over the past 15 years than has been seen in observations. Conspiring factors of errors in volcanic and solar inputs, representations of aerosols, and El NiNo evolution, may explain most of the discrepancy.

  14. Intraoperative Ultrasound to Assess for Pancreatic Duct Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    cholecystocholangiopancreatography is often nondiagnostic, gastroenterologists may not be available for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP...10MHz.We use the SonoSite MicroMaxx SLT 10-5 MHz 52mm broadband linear array intraoperative US probe ( FUJIFILM SonoSite, Inc., Bothell, WA). The duct...Intraoperative US Availability Is gastroenterology available? Is the fluoroscopic and endoscopic equipment available? Is MRCP available? Is a

  15. Polar Warming Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDunn, T. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Mischna, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Polar warming is a dynamically induced temperature enhancement over mid-to-high latitudes that results in a reversed (poleward) meridional temperature gradient. This phenomenon was recently characterized over the 40-90 km altitude region [1] based on nearly three martian years of Mars Climate Sounder observations [2, 3]. Here we investigate which forcing mechanisms affect the magnitude and distribution of the observed polar warming by conducting simulations with the Mars Weather Research and Forecasting General Circulation Model [4, 5]. We present simulations confirming the influence topography [6] and dust loading [e.g., 7] have upon polar warming. We then present simulations illustrating the modulating influence gravity wave momentum deposition exerts upon polar warming, consistent with previous modeling studies [e.g., 8]. The results of this investigation suggest the magnitude and distribution of polar warming in the martian middle atmosphere is modified by gravity wave activity and that the characteristics of the gravity waves that most significantly affect polar warming vary with season. References: [1] McDunn, et al., 2012 (JGR), [2]Kleinböhl, et al., 2009 (JGR), [3] Kleinböhl, et al., 2011 (JQSRT), [4] Richardson, et al., 2007 (JGR), [5] Mischna, et al., 2011 (Planet. Space Sci.), [6] Richardson and Wilson, 2002 (Nature), [7] Haberle, et al., 1982 (Icarus), [8] Barnes, 1990 (JGR).

  16. Role of intra-operative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, Ahmad N; Karim, Omer

    2015-03-01

    This review examines studies of intra-operative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and its emerging role and advantages in robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a technology that combines the use of second-generation contrast agents consisting of microbubbles with existent ultrasound techniques. Until now, this novel technology has aided surgeons with procedures involving the liver. However, with recent advances in the CEUS technique and the introduction of robotics in nephron-sparing surgery, CEUS has proven to be efficacious in answering several clinical questions with respect to the kidneys. In addition, the introduction of the microbubble-based contrast agents has increased the image quality and signal uptake by the ultrasound probe. This has led to better, enhanced scanning of the macro and microvasculature of the kidneys, making CEUS a powerful diagnostic modality. This imaging method is capable of further lowering the learning curve and warm ischemia time (WIT) during robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery, with its increased level of capillary perfusion and imaging. CEUS has the potential to increase the sensitivity and specificity of intra-operative images, and can significantly improve the outcome of robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery by increasing the precision and diagnostic insight of the surgeon. The purpose of this article is to review the practical and potential uses of CEUS as an intra-operative imaging technique during robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery.

  17. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 {+-} 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 {+-} 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 {+-} 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 {+-} 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  18. Intraoperative value of the thompson test.

    PubMed

    Cuttica, Daniel J; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the validity of the Thompson sign and determine whether the deep flexors of the foot can produce a falsely intact Achilles tendon.Ten unmatched above-the-knee lower extremity cadaveric specimens were studied. In group 1, the Achilles tendon was sectioned into 25% increments. The Thompson maneuver was performed after each sequential sectioning of the Achilles tendon, including after it had been completely sectioned. If the Thompson sign was still intact after complete release of the Achilles tendon, we proceeded to release the tendon, and tendon flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and posterior tibial tendons. The Thompson test was performed after the release of each tendon. In group 2, the tendon releases were performed in a reverse order to that of group 1, with the Thompson test performed after each release. In group 1, the Thompson sign remained intact in all specimens after sectioning of 25%, 50%, and 75% of the tendon. After complete (100%) release of the tendon, the Thompson sign was absent in all specimens. In group 2, the Thompson sign remained intact after sectioning of the posterior tibial, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus tendons in all specimens. The Thompson sign remained intact in all specimens after sectioning of 25%, 50%, and 75% of the Achilles tendon. After complete release of the tendon, the Thompson sign was absent in all specimens.The Thompson test is an accurate clinical test for diagnosing complete Achilles tendon ruptures. However, it might not be a useful test for diagnosing partial Achilles tendon ruptures. Our findings also call into question the usefulness of the Thompson test in the intraoperative setting.

  19. Our intraoperative boost radiotherapy experience and applications

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Semra; Alan, Ömür; Yalçın, Orhan; Türkmen, Aygen; Dizdar, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present our experience since November 2013, and case selection criteria for intraoperative boost radiotherapy (IObRT) that significantly reduces the local recurrence rate after breast conserving surgery in patients with breast cancer. Material and Methods: Patients who were suitable for IObRT were identified within the group of patients who were selected for breast conserving surgery at our breast council. A MOBETRON (mobile linear accelerator for IObRT) was used for IObRt during surgery. Results: Patients younger than 60 years old with <3 cm invasive ductal cancer in one focus (or two foci within 2 cm), with a histologic grade of 2–3, and a high possibility of local recurrence were admitted for IObRT application. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. Lumpectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed and advancement flaps were prepared according to the size and inclination of the conus following evaluation of tumor size and surgical margins by pathology. Distance to the thoracic wall was measured, and a radiation oncologist and radiation physicist calculated the required dose. Anesthesia was regulated with slower ventilation frequency, without causing hypoxia. The skin and incision edges were protected, the field was radiated (with 6 MeV electron beam of 10 Gy) and the incision was closed. In our cases, there were no major postoperative surgical or early radiotherapy related complications. Conclusion: The completion of another stage of local therapy with IObRT during surgery positively effects sequencing of other treatments like chemotherapy, hormonotherapy and radiotherapy, if required. IObRT increases disease free and overall survival, as well as quality of life in breast cancer patients. PMID:26985156

  20. Global warming on trial

    SciTech Connect

    Broeker, W.S.

    1992-04-01

    Jim Hansen, a climatologist at NASA's Goddard Space Institute, is convinced that the earth's temperature is rising and places the blame on the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Unconvinced, John Sununu, former White House chief of staff, doubts that the warming will be great enough to produce serious threat and fears that measures to reduce the emissions would throw a wrench into the gears that drive the Unites States' troubled economy. During his three years at the White House, Sununu's view prevailed, and although his role in the debate has diminished, others continue to cast doubt on the reality of global warming. A new lobbying group called the Climate Council has been created to do just this. Burning fossil fuels is not the only problem; a fifth of emissions of carbon dioxide now come from clearing and burning forests. Scientists are also tracking a host of other greenhouse gases that emanate from a variety of human activities; the warming effect of methane, chlorofluorocarbons and nitrous oxide combined equals that of carbon dioxide. Although the current warming from these gases may be difficult to detect against the background noise of natural climate variation, most climatologists are certain that as the gases continue to accumulate, increases in the earth's temperature will become evident even to skeptics. If the reality of global warming were put on trial, each side would have trouble making its case. Jim Hansen's side could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have warmed the planet. But neither could John Sununu's side prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the warming expected from greenhouse gases has not occurred. To see why each side would have difficulty proving its case, this article reviews the arguments that might be presented in such a hearing.

  1. The Effects of Local Warming on Surgical Site Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, E. Patchen; Weber, James; Swenson, Ron Edward; Kent, Christopher D.; Swanson, Paul E.; Harmon, Kurt; Perrin, Margot

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) account for a major proportion of hospital-acquired infections. They are associated with longer hospital stay, readmissions, increased costs, mortality, and morbidity. Reducing SSI is a goal of the Surgical Care Improvement Project and identifying interventions that reduce SSI effectively is of interest. In a single-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) we evaluated the effect of localized warming applied to surgical incisions on SSI development and selected cellular (immune, endothelial) and tissue responses (oxygenation, collagen). Methods: After Institutional Review Board approval and consent, patients having open bariatric, colon, or gynecologic-oncologic related operations were enrolled and randomly assigned to local incision warming (6 post-operative treatments) or non-warming. A prototype surgical bandage was used for all patients. The study protocol included intra-operative warming to maintain core temperature ≥36°C and administration of 0.80 FIO2. Patients were followed for 6 wks for the primary outcome of SSI determined by U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria and ASEPSIS scores (additional treatment; presence of serous discharge, erythema, purulent exudate, and separation of the deep tissues; isolation of bacteria; and duration of inpatient stay). Tissue oxygen (PscO2) and samples for cellular analyses were obtained using subcutaneous polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) tubes and oxygen micro-electrodes implanted adjacent to the incision. Cellular and tissue ePTFE samples were evaluated using flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and Sircol™ collagen assay (Biocolor Ltd., Carrickfergus, United Kingdom). Results: One hundred forty-six patients participated (n=73 per group). Study groups were similar on demographic parameters and for intra-operative management factors. The CDC defined rate of SSI was 18%; occurrence of SSI between groups did not differ (p=0.27). At 2 wks, warmed

  2. Intraoperative Flap Complications in LASIK Surgery Performed by Ophthalmology Residents

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Diaz-de-Leon, Lorena; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Navas, Alejandro; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O.; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the rate of flap-related complications in LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmology residents and to analyze the risk factors for these complications. Methods: We analyzed 273 flap dissections in 145 patients from March 2013 to February 2014. We included all LASIK surgeries performed by 32 ophthalmology residents using a Moria M2 microkeratome. All the flap-related complications were noted. Comparison between both groups with and without complications was performed with an independent Student's t-test and relative risks were calculated. Results: There were 19 flap-related complications out of the 273 flap dissections (6.95%). The most common complication was incomplete flap dissection (n = 10; 3.66%), followed by free-cap (n = 5; 1.83%), and flap-buttonhole (n = 2; 0.73%). There was no significant difference between the complicated and uncomplicated cases in terms of the right versus the left eye, pachymetry results, white-to-white diameter, and spherical equivalent. But this difference was significant for mean keratometry (P = 0.008), K-min (P = 0.01), and K-max (P = 0.03) between these groups. Final visual acuity after rescheduling laser treatment was similar in both groups. Relative risks for flap-related complications were 2.03 for the first LASIK surgery (CI 95% 0.64 to 6.48; P = 0.22) and 1.26 (CI 95% 0.43 to 3.69; P = 0.66) for the surgeon's flap-related complications. Female gender presented an odds ratio of 2.48 (CI 95% 0.68 to 9.00; P = 0.16) for complications. Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye. PMID:27621782

  3. Climate change between the Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age: Model-data comparison between CMIP5/PMIP3 last millennium simulations and available temperature proxy records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier Ljungqvist, Fredrik; Zhang, Qiong; Sundqvist, Hanna S.; Brattström, Gudrun; Moberg, Anders

    2014-05-01

    We present a model-data comparison between the CMIP5/PMIP3 last millennium simulations and available individual temperature proxy records from across the globe. Our focus is to investigate the agreement in amplitude of the simulated and the reconstructed temperature difference between the Medieval Warm Period (MWP, here defined as AD 950-1250) and the Little Ice Age (LIA, here defined as AD 1400-1700). An emphasis is placed on analysing to what extent the high latitude and continental amplification of the temperature signal is the same in the model simulations as in the proxies. We further discuss to what extent the models have captured the spatial signatures that is shown in the proxy data. We have collected 125 calibrated proxy records - representing either annual mean, winter or summer temperature - extending back to at least AD 950. The proxies include data from a wide range of archives: ice-cores, marine and terrestrial sediments, tree-rings, speleothems and historical records. Only proxies with at least two observations per century were included. We calculated the amplitude of change between the MWP and the LIA in the individual proxy records using the temperature calibrations by the original authors. The last millennium simulations from 8 different models in CMIP5 database are used to compare with the proxy records. This model-data comparison reveals that the ensemble mean and median of the models mostly underestimate the amplitude of temperature difference between the MWP and the LIA as estimated from the proxy records at those locations where proxy records exist. The relative lack of proxy data from the tropics and the Southern Hemisphere, however, precludes a fully comprehensive model-data comparison. We also note large differences between the model simulations both in amplitude of the temperature change and in their spatial patterns. The use of an ensemble mean or median of the model simulations emphasizes the averaged signature within the model ensemble

  4. The use of intraoperative computed tomography navigation in pituitary surgery promises a better intraoperative orientation in special cases

    PubMed Central

    Linsler, Stefan; Antes, Sebastian; Senger, Sebastian; Oertel, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The safety of endoscopic skull base surgery can be enhanced by accurate navigation in preoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we report our initial experience of real-time intraoperative CT-guided navigation surgery for pituitary tumors in childhood. Materials and Methods: We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with a huge growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with supra- and perisellar extension. Furthermore, the skull base was infiltrated. In this case, we performed an endonasal transsphenoidal approach for debulking the adenoma and for chiasma decompression. We used an MRI neuronavigation (Medtronic Stealth Air System) which was registered via intraoperative CT scan (Siemens CT Somatom). Preexisting MRI studies (navigation protocol) were fused with the intraoperative CT scans to enable three-dimensional navigation based on MR and CT imaging data. Intraoperatively, we did a further CT scan for resection control. Results: The intraoperative accuracy of the neuronavigation was excellent. There was an adjustment of <1 mm. The navigation was very helpful for orientation on the destroyed skull base in the sphenoid sinus. After opening the sellar region and tumor debulking, we did a CT scan for resection control because the extent of resection was not credible evaluable in this huge infiltrating adenoma. Thereby, we were able to demonstrate a sufficient decompression of the chiasma and complete resection of the medial part of the adenoma in the intraoperative CT images. Conclusions: The use of intraoperative CT/MRI-guided neuronavigation for transsphenoidal surgery is a time-effective, safe, and technically beneficial technique for special cases. PMID:27695249

  5. Use of intraoperative ultrasonography in canine spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Nanai, Beatrix; Lyman, Ronald; Bichsel, Pierre S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the intraoperative appearance of various spinal cord conditions, and to investigate how intraoperative ultrasonography assisted in modification of surgical and postoperative treatment plans. Intraoperative ultrasonography (B-mode, and power Doppler mode) was used in 25 dogs undergoing spinal surgery. The neurologic conditions included cervical spondylomyelopathy, intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion, IVD extrusion, spinal tumors, nerve sheath mass, granulomatous myelitis, and discospondylitis. All of these diagnoses were supported by histopathologic and/or cytologic evaluation. It was possible to visualize the spinal cord and the abnormal spinal tissue in all of the patients. Power Doppler imaging allowed assessment of the spinal cord microcirculation, and assisted in judgment of the degree of decompression. Ultrasound imaging directly impacted the surgical and the medical treatment plans in four patients. Owing to the intraoperative imaging, two hemilaminectomies were extended cranially and caudally, and additional disc spaces were fenestrated, one hemilaminectomy site was extended dorsally to retrieve the disc material from the opposite side, and one intramedullary cervical spinal cord lesion was discovered, aspirated, and consequently diagnosed as granulomatous inflammation, which altered the long-term medication protocol in that dog. This study suggests that intraoperative sonographic spinal cord imaging is a useful and viable technique.

  6. [Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood-flow and condition of cerebral at open and endovascular interventions in carotid system].

    PubMed

    Kuntsevich, G I; Tanashian, M M; Skrylev, S I; Krotenkova, M V; Shchipakin, V L; Koshcheev, A Iu; Lagoda, O V; Gemdzhian, E G; Medvedev, R B; Kulikova, S N

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our research is to study hemodynamic and embolic situation during the carotid endarterectomy (CEA), carotid angioplastic and stenting (CAS), and to reveal the prognostic significance of the data provided by intraoperative monitoring of the brain blood flow in exposing acute ischemic lesions in brain. Intraoperative monitoring of blood flow in artery ophthalmic vas carried out with 60% of patients, in the middle cerebral artery-with 40% during the main stages of CEA, and with 64 patients in the middle cerebral artery during CAS. The comparison of the data of intraoperative monitoring of blood flow in middle cerebral artery with the result of brain diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) 24 hours after the operation shows, that solid microembolic signals and vasospasm are prognostic signals (sensibility and specifics make up 95%) in the development of acute ischemic cerebral lesions. The monitoring of blood flow in artery ophthalmic is of the greatest diagnostic value in estimation of the hemodynamic situation, but it is of the lowest practical value in detecting microembolic signals. According to the data of the intraoperative blood flow monitoring in middle cerebral artery in group CEA the development of acute ischemic cerebral lesions were predicted with 11,1% of patients and the cause of postoperative stroke, developed by 2,9% of the patients, was specified. According to the result of DW-MRI, acute ischemic cerebral lesions were diagnosed with 21% of patients, that is, 18% of ischemic cerebral lesions were asymptomatic. In group CAS ischemic cerebral lesions were prognosed with 30% of patients, actually they were later detected with 40,6% of cases by means of DW-MRI. According to the data of intraoperative of blood flow monitoring the cause of the development of postoperative stroke was specified in 6,2% of cause; in 34,4% of cause the acute ischemic cerebral lesions were asymptomatic.

  7. Development of a semi-automated method for subspecialty case distribution and prediction of intraoperative consultations in surgical pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Raul S.; Long, Daniel; Hameed, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Background: In many surgical pathology laboratories, operating room schedules are prospectively reviewed to determine specimen distribution to different subspecialty services and to predict the number and nature of potential intraoperative consultations for which prior medical records and slides require review. At our institution, such schedules were manually converted into easily interpretable, surgical pathology-friendly reports to facilitate these activities. This conversion, however, was time-consuming and arguably a non-value-added activity. Objective: Our goal was to develop a semi-automated method of generating these reports that improved their readability while taking less time to perform than the manual method. Materials and Methods: A dynamic Microsoft Excel workbook was developed to automatically convert published operating room schedules into different tabular formats. Based on the surgical procedure descriptions in the schedule, a list of linked keywords and phrases was utilized to sort cases by subspecialty and to predict potential intraoperative consultations. After two trial-and-optimization cycles, the method was incorporated into standard practice. Results: The workbook distributed cases to appropriate subspecialties and accurately predicted intraoperative requests. Users indicated that they spent 1–2 h fewer per day on this activity than before, and team members preferred the formatting of the newer reports. Comparison of the manual and semi-automatic predictions showed that the mean daily difference in predicted versus actual intraoperative consultations underwent no statistically significant changes before and after implementation for most subspecialties. Conclusions: A well-designed, lean, and simple information technology solution to determine subspecialty case distribution and prediction of intraoperative consultations in surgical pathology is approximately as accurate as the gold standard manual method and requires less time and effort to

  8. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  9. Warming Up to Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Lucia Caycedo; Rusch, Debbie

    Daily warm-up exercises are advocated as a means of bridging the gap between previously unrelated activities outside the classroom and immersion into the second language, relaxing the class, and establishing a mood for communication. Variety, careful preparation, assuring that the students understand the activity, feeling free to discontinue an…

  10. Global warming 'confirmed'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    In October, the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project, funded in part by climate sceptics, concluded that the Earth is warming based on the most comprehensive review of the data yet. Nature Climate Change talks to the project's director, physicist Richard Muller.

  11. The Use of Optical Coherence Tomography in Intraoperative Ophthalmic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Paul; Migacz, Justin; O’Connell, Rachelle; Maldonado, Ramiro S.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed diagnostic ophthalmic imaging but until recently has been limited to the clinic setting. The development of spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT), with its improved speed and resolution, along with the development of a handheld OCT scanner, enabled portable imaging of patients unable to sit in a conventional tabletop scanner. This handheld SD-OCT unit has proven useful in examinations under anesthesia and, more recently, in intraoperative imaging of preoperative and postoperative manipulations. Recently, several groups have pioneered the development of novel OCT modalities, such as microscope-mounted OCT systems. Although still immature, the development of these systems is directed toward real-time imaging of surgical maneuvers in the intraoperative setting. This article reviews intraoperative imaging of the posterior and anterior segment using the handheld SD-OCT and recent advances toward real-time microscope-mounted intrasurgical imaging. PMID:21790116

  12. [Intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure: Applications in vascular neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Torne, Ramon; Chocron, Ivette; Rodriguez-Tesouro, Ana; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic lesions related to surgical procedures are a major cause of postoperative morbidity in patients with cerebral vascular disease. There are different systems of neuromonitoring to detect intraoperative ischemic events, including intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure (PtiO2). The aim of this article was to describe, through the discussion of 4 cases, the usefulness of intraoperative PtiO2 monitoring during vascular neurosurgery. In presenting these cases, we demonstrate that monitoring PtiO2 is a reliable way to detect early ischemic events during surgical procedures. Continuous monitoring of PtiO2 in an area at risk allows the surgeon to resolve the cause of the ischemic event before it evolves to an established cerebral infarction.

  13. Intraoperative irradiation: precision medicine for quality cancer control promotion.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Felipe A

    2017-02-02

    Intraoperative irradiation was implemented 4 decades ago, pioneering the efforts to improve precision in local cancer therapy by combining real-time surgical exploration/resection with high single dose radiotherapy (Gunderson et al., Intraoperative irradiation: techniques and results, 2011). Clinical and technical developments have led to very precise radiation dose deposit. The ability to deliver a very precise dose of radiation is an essential element of contemporary multidisciplinary individualized oncology.This issue of Radiation Oncology contains a collection of expert review articles and updates with relevant data regarding intraoperative radiotherapy. Technology, physics, biology of single dose and clinical results in a variety of cancer sites and histologies are described and analyzed. The state of the art for advanced cancer care through medical innovation opens a significant opportunity for individualize cancer management across a broad spectrum of clinical practice. The advantage for tailoring diagnostic and treatment decisions in an individualized fashion will translate into precise medical treatment.

  14. Robust endoscopic pose estimation for intraoperative organ-mosaicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Daniel; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Suwelack, Stefan; Wagner, Martin; Kenngott, Hannes; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie

    2016-03-01

    The number of minimally invasive procedures is growing every year. These procedures are highly complex and very demanding for the surgeons. It is therefore important to provide intraoperative assistance to alleviate these difficulties. For most computer-assistance systems, like visualizing target structures with augmented reality, a registration step is required to map preoperative data (e.g. CT images) to the ongoing intraoperative scene. Without additional hardware, the (stereo-) endoscope is the prime intraoperative data source and with it, stereo reconstruction methods can be used to obtain 3D models from target structures. To link reconstructed parts from different frames (mosaicking), the endoscope movement has to be known. In this paper, we present a camera tracking method that uses dense depth and feature registration which are combined with a Kalman Filter scheme. It provides a robust position estimation that shows promising results in ex vivo and in silico experiments.

  15. Intra-operative neurophysiology during microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Conejero, I; Ulkatan, S; Sen, C; Deletis, V

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that primary hemifacial spasm (HFS) in the majority of patients is related to a vascular compression of the facial nerve at its root exit zone (REZ). As a consequence, the hyperexcitability of facial nerve generates spasms of the facial muscles. Microvascular decompression (MVD) of the facial nerve near its REZ has been established as an effective treatment of HFS. Intra-operative disappearance of abnormal muscle responses (lateral spread) elicited by stimulating one of the facial nerve branches has been used as a method to predict MVD effectiveness. Other neurophysiologic techniques, such as facial F-wave, blink reflex and facial corticobulbar motor evoked potentials (FCoMEP), are feasible to intra-operatively study changes in excitability of the facial nerve and its nucleus during MVDs. Intra-operative neuromonitoring with the mentioned techniques allows a better understanding of HFS pathophysiology and helps to optimise the MVD.

  16. Intraoperative Hypothermia During Surgical Fixation of Hip Fractures.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Jildeh, Toufic R; Shaw, Jonathan; Guthrie, Trent; Silverton, Craig

    2016-11-01

    Hip fractures are common orthopedic injuries and are associated with significant morbidity/mortality. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended by national guidelines to minimize additional morbidity/mortality, but limited evidence exists regarding hypothermia's effect on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in patients with operatively treated hip fractures and evaluate its effect on complications and outcomes. Retrospective chart review was performed on clinical records from 1541 consecutive patients who sustained a hip fracture and underwent operative fixation at the authors' institution between January 2005 and October 2013. A total of 1525 patients were included for analysis, excluding those with injuries requiring additional surgical intervention. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis with univariate and multivariate logistic regression modeling evaluated associations with hypothermia and effect on complications/outcomes. The incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in operatively treated hip fractures was 17.0%. Hypothermia was associated with an increase in the rate of deep surgical-site infection (odds ratio, 3.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-9.14; P=.022). Lower body mass index and increasing age demonstrated increased association with hypothermia (P=.004 and P=.005, respectively). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first and largest study analyzing the effect of intraoperative hypothermia in orthopedic patients. In patients with hip fractures, the study's findings confirm evidence found in other surgical specialties that hypothermia may be associated with an increased risk of deep surgical-site infection and that lower body mass index and increasing age are risk factors

  17. Plant community responses to experimental warming across the tundra biome.

    PubMed

    Walker, Marilyn D; Wahren, C Henrik; Hollister, Robert D; Henry, Greg H R; Ahlquist, Lorraine E; Alatalo, Juha M; Bret-Harte, M Syndonia; Calef, Monika P; Callaghan, Terry V; Carroll, Amy B; Epstein, Howard E; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg S; Klein, Julia A; Magnússon, Borgthór; Molau, Ulf; Oberbauer, Steven F; Rewa, Steven P; Robinson, Clare H; Shaver, Gaius R; Suding, Katharine N; Thompson, Catharine C; Tolvanen, Anne; Totland, Ørjan; Turner, P Lee; Tweedie, Craig E; Webber, Patrick J; Wookey, Philip A

    2006-01-31

    Recent observations of changes in some tundra ecosystems appear to be responses to a warming climate. Several experimental studies have shown that tundra plants and ecosystems can respond strongly to environmental change, including warming; however, most studies were limited to a single location and were of short duration and based on a variety of experimental designs. In addition, comparisons among studies are difficult because a variety of techniques have been used to achieve experimental warming and different measurements have been used to assess responses. We used metaanalysis on plant community measurements from standardized warming experiments at 11 locations across the tundra biome involved in the International Tundra Experiment. The passive warming treatment increased plant-level air temperature by 1-3 degrees C, which is in the range of predicted and observed warming for tundra regions. Responses were rapid and detected in whole plant communities after only two growing seasons. Overall, warming increased height and cover of deciduous shrubs and graminoids, decreased cover of mosses and lichens, and decreased species diversity and evenness. These results predict that warming will cause a decline in biodiversity across a wide variety of tundra, at least in the short term. They also provide rigorous experimental evidence that recently observed increases in shrub cover in many tundra regions are in response to climate warming. These changes have important implications for processes and interactions within tundra ecosystems and between tundra and the atmosphere.

  18. Plant community responses to experimental warming across the tundra biome

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Marilyn D.; Wahren, C. Henrik; Hollister, Robert D.; Henry, Greg H. R.; Ahlquist, Lorraine E.; Alatalo, Juha M.; Bret-Harte, M. Syndonia; Calef, Monika P.; Callaghan, Terry V.; Carroll, Amy B.; Epstein, Howard E.; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg S.; Klein, Julia A.; Magnússon, Borgþór; Molau, Ulf; Oberbauer, Steven F.; Rewa, Steven P.; Robinson, Clare H.; Shaver, Gaius R.; Suding, Katharine N.; Thompson, Catharine C.; Tolvanen, Anne; Totland, Ørjan; Turner, P. Lee; Tweedie, Craig E.; Webber, Patrick J.; Wookey, Philip A.

    2006-01-01

    Recent observations of changes in some tundra ecosystems appear to be responses to a warming climate. Several experimental studies have shown that tundra plants and ecosystems can respond strongly to environmental change, including warming; however, most studies were limited to a single location and were of short duration and based on a variety of experimental designs. In addition, comparisons among studies are difficult because a variety of techniques have been used to achieve experimental warming and different measurements have been used to assess responses. We used metaanalysis on plant community measurements from standardized warming experiments at 11 locations across the tundra biome involved in the International Tundra Experiment. The passive warming treatment increased plant-level air temperature by 1-3°C, which is in the range of predicted and observed warming for tundra regions. Responses were rapid and detected in whole plant communities after only two growing seasons. Overall, warming increased height and cover of deciduous shrubs and graminoids, decreased cover of mosses and lichens, and decreased species diversity and evenness. These results predict that warming will cause a decline in biodiversity across a wide variety of tundra, at least in the short term. They also provide rigorous experimental evidence that recently observed increases in shrub cover in many tundra regions are in response to climate warming. These changes have important implications for processes and interactions within tundra ecosystems and between tundra and the atmosphere. PMID:16428292

  19. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  20. Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury in colorectal surgery. An update.

    PubMed

    Colsa Gutiérrez, Pablo; Viadero Cervera, Raquel; Morales-García, Dieter; Ingelmo Setién, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury during colorectal surgery procedures is a potentially serious complication that is often underestimated. The Trendelenburg position, use of inappropriately padded armboards and excessive shoulder abduction may encourage the development of brachial plexopathy during laparoscopic procedures. In open colorectal surgery, nerve injuries are less common. It usually involves the femoral plexus associated with lithotomy position and self-retaining retractor systems. Although in most cases the recovery is mostly complete, treatment consists of physical therapy to prevent muscular atrophy, protection of hypoesthesic skin areas and analgesics for neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study is to review the incidence, prevention and management of intraoperative peripheral nerve injury.

  1. Greenhouse warming still coming

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1986-05-02

    The growing store of carbon dioxide in the earth's atmosphere from the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation is a far larger and more pervasive problem than acid rain. The predictions of the latest models that have been applied to the problem, called GCM-mixed-layer ocean models, predict a global temperature increase between 3.5 and 4.2 degrees Celsius. They predict that the warming will be larger near the poles than near the equator. They also predict increases and decreases in precipitation depending on location, the largest changes being between 30/sup 0/N and 30/sup 0/S. If CO/sub 2/ and trace gas concentrations continue to rise as projected and model calculations are essentially correct, the increasing global scale warming should become much more evident over the next few decades. 1 figure.

  2. Warm Little Inflaton.

    PubMed

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Ramos, Rudnei O; Rosa, João G

    2016-10-07

    We show that inflation can naturally occur at a finite temperature T>H that is sustained by dissipative effects, when the inflaton field corresponds to a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson of a broken gauge symmetry. Similar to the Little Higgs scenarios for electroweak symmetry breaking, the flatness of the inflaton potential is protected against both quadratic divergences and the leading thermal corrections. We show that, nevertheless, nonlocal dissipative effects are naturally present and are able to sustain a nearly thermal bath of light particles despite the accelerated expansion of the Universe. As an example, we discuss the dynamics of chaotic warm inflation with a quartic potential and show that the associated observational predictions are in very good agreement with the latest Planck results. This model constitutes the first realization of warm inflation requiring only a small number of fields; in particular, the inflaton is directly coupled to just two light fields.

  3. Warm Little Inflaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Ramos, Rudnei O.; Rosa, João G.

    2016-10-01

    We show that inflation can naturally occur at a finite temperature T >H that is sustained by dissipative effects, when the inflaton field corresponds to a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson of a broken gauge symmetry. Similar to the Little Higgs scenarios for electroweak symmetry breaking, the flatness of the inflaton potential is protected against both quadratic divergences and the leading thermal corrections. We show that, nevertheless, nonlocal dissipative effects are naturally present and are able to sustain a nearly thermal bath of light particles despite the accelerated expansion of the Universe. As an example, we discuss the dynamics of chaotic warm inflation with a quartic potential and show that the associated observational predictions are in very good agreement with the latest Planck results. This model constitutes the first realization of warm inflation requiring only a small number of fields; in particular, the inflaton is directly coupled to just two light fields.

  4. Military Implications of Global Warming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    U.S. environmental issues also have important global implications. This paper analyzes current U.S. Policy as it pertains to global warming and climate...for military involvement to reduce global warming . Global warming and other environmental issues are important to the U.S. military. As the United

  5. Fusion of intraoperative force sensoring, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhl, S.; Bodenstedt, S.; Küderle, C.; Suwelack, S.; Kenngott, H.; Müller-Stich, B. P.; Dillmann, R.; Speidel, S.

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is medically complex and can heavily benefit from computer assistance. One way to help the surgeon is to integrate preoperative planning data into the surgical workflow. This information can be represented as a customized preoperative model of the surgical site. To use it intraoperatively, it has to be updated during the intervention due to the constantly changing environment. Hence, intraoperative sensor data has to be acquired and registered with the preoperative model. Haptic information which could complement the visual sensor data is still not established. In addition, biomechanical modeling of the surgical site can help in reflecting the changes which cannot be captured by intraoperative sensors. We present a setting where a force sensor is integrated into a laparoscopic instrument. In a test scenario using a silicone liver phantom, we register the measured forces with a reconstructed surface model from stereo endoscopic images and a finite element model. The endoscope, the instrument and the liver phantom are tracked with a Polaris optical tracking system. By fusing this information, we can transfer the deformation onto the finite element model. The purpose of this setting is to demonstrate the principles needed and the methods developed for intraoperative sensor data fusion. One emphasis lies on the calibration of the force sensor with the instrument and first experiments with soft tissue. We also present our solution and first results concerning the integration of the force sensor as well as accuracy to the fusion of force measurements, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling.

  6. Intraoperative in situ radial artery conduit flow assessment.

    PubMed

    Canver, Charles C; Yousafzai, Sajjad M

    2008-01-01

    A technique is described for simple flow assessment of the in situ radial artery conduit during coronary bypass via a small incision. This technique allows morphologic and physiologic direct intraoperative assessment of radial artery quality and expands the use of radial artery during coronary artery surgery.

  7. Intraoperative sonography-guided removal of radiolucent foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Leung, A; Patton, A; Navoy, J; Cummings, R J

    1998-01-01

    This article reports our use of intraoperative sonography to guide in real time, the removal of radiolucent foreign bodies from five patients. Two of these patients had undergone previous unsuccessful attempts at surgical removal in the operating room. The technique is cost effective, readily available, and can be very helpful in locating difficult-to-find radiolucent foreign bodies at the time of surgery.

  8. Intraoperative monitoring of flash visual evoked potential under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hironobu; Kawaguchi, Masahiko

    2017-04-01

    In neurosurgical procedures that may cause visual impairment in the intraoperative period, the monitoring of flash visual evoked potential (VEP) is clinically used to evaluate visual function. Patients are unconscious during surgery under general anesthesia, making flash VEP monitoring useful as it can objectively evaluate visual function. The flash stimulus input to the retina is transmitted to the optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, lateral geniculate body, optic radiation (geniculocalcarine tract), and visual cortical area, and the VEP waveform is recorded from the occipital region. Intraoperative flash VEP monitoring allows detection of dysfunction arising anywhere in the optic pathway, from the retina to the visual cortex. Particularly important steps to obtain reproducible intraoperative flash VEP waveforms under general anesthesia are total intravenous anesthesia with propofol, use of retinal flash stimulation devices using high-intensity light-emitting diodes, and a combination of electroretinography to confirm that the flash stimulus has reached the retina. Relatively major postoperative visual impairment can be detected by intraoperative decreases in the flash VEP amplitude.

  9. High-accuracy registration of intraoperative CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oentoro, A.; Ellis, R. E.

    2010-02-01

    Image-guided interventions using intraoperative 3D imaging can be less cumbersome than systems dependent on preoperative images, especially by needing neither potentially invasive image-to-patient registration nor a lengthy process of segmenting and generating a 3D surface model. In this study, a method for computer-assisted surgery using direct navigation on intraoperative imaging is presented. In this system the registration step of a navigated procedure was divided into two stages: preoperative calibration of images to a ceiling-mounted optical tracking system, and intraoperative tracking during acquisition of the 3D medical image volume. The preoperative stage used a custom-made multi-modal calibrator that could be optically tracked and also contained fiducial spheres for radiological detection; a robust registration algorithm was used to compensate for the very high false-detection rate that was due to the high physical density of the optical light-emitting diodes. Intraoperatively, a tracking device was attached to plastic bone models that were also instrumented with radio-opaque spheres; A calibrated pointer was used to contact the latter spheres as a validation of the registration. Experiments showed that the fiducial registration error of the preoperative calibration stage was approximately 0.1 mm. The target registration error in the validation stage was approximately 1.2 mm. This study suggests that direct registration, coupled with procedure-specific graphical rendering, is potentially a highly accurate means of performing image-guided interventions in a fast, simple manner.

  10. [Minimally invasive intraoperative CT-guided correction of calcaneal osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Mayr, E; Häuser, H; Rüter, A; Bohndorf, K

    1999-03-01

    This article describes the CT-guided osteosynthesis of calcaneus fractures. This procedure is minimal invasive and offers the opportunity to reduce and to stabilize such fractures very exactly under intraoperative CT-controll only by stab-incisions. A running study will define the ranking of this method.

  11. Intraoperative monitoring of flash visual evoked potential under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hironobu

    2017-01-01

    In neurosurgical procedures that may cause visual impairment in the intraoperative period, the monitoring of flash visual evoked potential (VEP) is clinically used to evaluate visual function. Patients are unconscious during surgery under general anesthesia, making flash VEP monitoring useful as it can objectively evaluate visual function. The flash stimulus input to the retina is transmitted to the optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, lateral geniculate body, optic radiation (geniculocalcarine tract), and visual cortical area, and the VEP waveform is recorded from the occipital region. Intraoperative flash VEP monitoring allows detection of dysfunction arising anywhere in the optic pathway, from the retina to the visual cortex. Particularly important steps to obtain reproducible intraoperative flash VEP waveforms under general anesthesia are total intravenous anesthesia with propofol, use of retinal flash stimulation devices using high-intensity light-emitting diodes, and a combination of electroretinography to confirm that the flash stimulus has reached the retina. Relatively major postoperative visual impairment can be detected by intraoperative decreases in the flash VEP amplitude. PMID:28367282

  12. Volumetric Intraoperative Brain Deformation Compensation: Model Development and Phantom Validation

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Papademetris, Xenophon; Staib, Lawrence H.; Vives, Kenneth P.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Duncan, James S.

    2012-01-01

    During neurosurgery, nonrigid brain deformation may affect the reliability of tissue localization based on preoperative images. To provide accurate surgical guidance in these cases, preoperative images must be updated to reflect the intraoperative brain. This can be accomplished by warping these preoperative images using a biomechanical model. Due to the possible complexity of this deformation, intraoperative information is often required to guide the model solution. In this paper, a linear elastic model of the brain is developed to infer volumetric brain deformation associated with measured intraoperative cortical surface displacement. The developed model relies on known material properties of brain tissue, and does not require further knowledge about intraoperative conditions. To provide an initial estimation of volumetric model accuracy, as well as determine the model’s sensitivity to the specified material parameters and surface displacements, a realistic brain phantom was developed. Phantom results indicate that the linear elastic model significantly reduced localization error due to brain shift, from >16 mm to under 5 mm, on average. In addition, though in vivo quantitative validation is necessary, preliminary application of this approach to images acquired during neocortical epilepsy cases confirms the feasibility of applying the developed model to in vivo data. PMID:22562728

  13. Physics-based shape matching for intraoperative image guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Suwelack, Stefan Röhl, Sebastian; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Reichard, Daniel; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie; Santos, Thiago dos; Maier-Hein, Lena; Wagner, Martin; Wünscher, Josephine; Kenngott, Hannes; Müller, Beat P.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Soft-tissue deformations can severely degrade the validity of preoperative planning data during computer assisted interventions. Intraoperative imaging such as stereo endoscopic, time-of-flight or, laser range scanner data can be used to compensate these movements. In this context, the intraoperative surface has to be matched to the preoperative model. The shape matching is especially challenging in the intraoperative setting due to noisy sensor data, only partially visible surfaces, ambiguous shape descriptors, and real-time requirements. Methods: A novel physics-based shape matching (PBSM) approach to register intraoperatively acquired surface meshes to preoperative planning data is proposed. The key idea of the method is to describe the nonrigid registration process as an electrostatic–elastic problem, where an elastic body (preoperative model) that is electrically charged slides into an oppositely charged rigid shape (intraoperative surface). It is shown that the corresponding energy functional can be efficiently solved using the finite element (FE) method. It is also demonstrated how PBSM can be combined with rigid registration schemes for robust nonrigid registration of arbitrarily aligned surfaces. Furthermore, it is shown how the approach can be combined with landmark based methods and outline its application to image guidance in laparoscopic interventions. Results: A profound analysis of the PBSM scheme based on in silico and phantom data is presented. Simulation studies on several liver models show that the approach is robust to the initial rigid registration and to parameter variations. The studies also reveal that the method achieves submillimeter registration accuracy (mean error between 0.32 and 0.46 mm). An unoptimized, single core implementation of the approach achieves near real-time performance (2 TPS, 7–19 s total registration time). It outperforms established methods in terms of speed and accuracy. Furthermore, it is shown that the

  14. Intraoperative monitoring during surgery for acoustic neuroma: benefits of an extratympanic intrameatal electrode

    PubMed Central

    Mullatti, N; Coakham, H; Maw, A; Butler, S; Morgan, M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the utility of an extratympanic intrameatal electrode for intraoperative monitoring during acoustic neuroma and other cerebellopontine angle tumour surgery and to define the neurophysiological and surgical factors which influence hearing preservation.
METHODS—Twenty two patients, 18 with acoustic neuromas and four with other cerebellopontine angle tumours, underwent intraoperative monitoring during tumour excision. The extratympanic intrameatal electrode (IME) was used to record the electrocochleogram (ECoG) and surface electrodes to record the brainstem auditory evoked response (ABR).
RESULTS—The compound action potential (CAP) of the ECoG was two and a half times greater in amplitude than wave I of the ABR and was easily monitored. Virtually instant information was available as minimal averaging was required. Continuous monitoring was possible from the commencement of anaesthesia to skin closure. The IME was easy to place, non-invasive, and did not interfere with the operative field. Operative procedures which affected CAP or wave V latency or amplitude were drilling around the internal auditory meatus, tumour dissection, nerve section, and brainstem and cerebellar retraction. Hearing was achieved in 59% of patients.
CONCLUSIONS—The IME had significant benefits in comparison with other methods of monitoring. The technique provided information beneficial to preservation of hearing.

 PMID:10209169

  15. Global Warming And Meltwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratu, S.

    2012-04-01

    In order to find new approaches and new ideas for my students to appreciate the importance of science in their daily life, I proposed a theme for them to debate. They had to search for global warming information and illustrations in the media, and discuss the articles they found in the classroom. This task inspired them to search for new information about this important and timely theme in science. I informed my students that all the best information about global warming and meltwater they found would be used in a poster that would help us to update the knowledge base of the Physics laboratory. I guided them to choose the most eloquent images and significant information. Searching and working to create this poster, the students arrived to better appreciate the importance of science in their daily life and to critically evaluate scientific information transmitted via the media. In the poster we created, one can find images, photos and diagrams and some interesting information: Global warming refers to the rising average temperature of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans and its projected evolution. In the last 100 years, the Earth's average surface temperature increased by about 0.8 °C with about two thirds of the increase occurring over just the last three decades. Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and scientists are more than 90% certain most of it is caused by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases produced by human activities such as deforestation and burning fossil fuel. They indicate that during the 21st century the global surface temperature is likely to rise a further 1.1 to 2.9 °C for the lowest emissions scenario and 2.4 to 6.4 °C for the highest predictions. An increase in global temperature will cause sea levels to rise and will change the amount and pattern of precipitation, and potentially result in expansion of subtropical deserts. Warming is expected to be strongest in the Arctic and would be associated with continuing decrease of

  16. Does ultrasongraphy predict intraoperative findings at cholecystectomy? An institutional review

    PubMed Central

    Stogryn, Shannon; Metcalfe, Jennifer; Vergis, Ashley; Hardy, Krista

    2016-01-01

    Background Ultrasonography (US) is the mainstay of biliary tract imaging, but few recent studies have tested its ability to diagnose acute cholecystitis (AC). Our objective was to determine how well a US diagnosis of AC correlates with the intraoperative diagnosis. We hypothesize that US underestimates this diagnosis, potentially leading to unexpected findings in the operating room (OR). Methods This retrospective review included all patients admitted to the acute care surgical service of a tertiary hospital in 2011 with suspected biliary pathology who underwent US and subsequent cholecystectomy. We determined the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of US using the intraoperative diagnosis as the gold standard. Further analysis identified which US findings were most predictive of an intraoperative diagnosis of AC. We used a recursive partitioning method with random forests to identify unique combinations of US findings that, together, are most predictive of AC. Results In total, 254 patients underwent US for biliary symptoms; 152 had AC diagnosed, and 143 (94%) of them underwent emergency surgery (median time to OR 23.03 hr). Ultrasonography predicted intraoperative findings with a sensitivity of 73.2%, specificity of 85.5% and PPV of 93.7%. The NPV (52.0%) was quite low. The US indicators most predictive of AC were a thick wall, a positive sonographic Murphy sign and cholelithiasis. Recursive partitioning demonstrated that a positive sonographic Murphy sign is highly predictive of intraoperative AC. Conclusion Ultrasonography is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing AC. The poor NPV confirms our hypothesis that US can underestimate AC. PMID:26574703

  17. Approach to the intraoperative consultation for neurosurgical specimens.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Hilary Lynch; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, Bette Kay

    2011-11-01

    Intraoperative consultation remains an invaluable tool in the initial evaluation of surgically excised specimens. Good communication is required between the pathologist and surgeon to obtain the best care for their mutual patient. Intraoperative consultation (frozen section, FS) provides a preliminary diagnosis for the surgeon and aids in guiding his/her subsequent surgical approach. For the pathologist, it serves to assess tissue adequacy in the context of the clinical and imaging features of the patient. FS can guarantee that the surgeon is in the desired anatomic location, but most often serves to ensure that adequate amounts of abnormal, and likely diagnostic, tissue will be available to the pathologist to render a final diagnosis on permanent sections. The preliminary evaluation of tissue at the time of intraoperative FS also guides the pathologist in the ordering of ancillary studies, some of which need to be performed on fresh or frozen tissues and must be sent at the time of the intraoperative consultation. This brief review will specifically focus on the role of the pathologist who is called to perform a FS for a neurosurgical specimen. We will discuss (1) the goals of the neurosurgeon for the intraoperative consultation, (2) how to achieve optimal communication between neurosurgeon and pathologist at the time of the FS, (3) what constitutes reasonable and unreasonable expectations by the neurosurgeon for the FS, (4) choices of techniques that can be used by the pathologist, (5) what tissue should be triaged, and (6) common discrepancies between FS and permanent section diagnoses in central nervous system disorders. The published literature on FS and permanent section discrepancies will be briefly reviewed so that pathologists will understand that some difficulties are inherent in neurosurgical specimens and are not specific to their practice, or to a given pathologist. Hopefully, this knowledge will enhance pathologists' confidence as they negotiate how

  18. Abrupt warming of the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitsos, D. E.; Hoteit, I.; Prihartato, P. K.; Chronis, T.; Triantafyllou, G.; Abualnaja, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Coral reef ecosystems, often referred to as “marine rainforests,” concentrate the most diverse life in the oceans. Red Sea reef dwellers are adapted in a very warm environment, fact that makes them vulnerable to further and rapid warming. The detection and understanding of abrupt temperature changes is an important task, as ecosystems have more chances to adapt in a slowly rather than in a rapid changing environment. Using satellite derived sea surface and ground based air temperatures, it is shown that the Red Sea is going through an intense warming initiated in the mid-90s, with evidence for an abrupt increase after 1994 (0.7°C difference pre and post the shift). The air temperature is found to be a key parameter that influences the Red Sea marine temperature. The comparisons with Northern Hemisphere temperatures revealed that the observed warming is part of global climate change trends. The hitherto results also raise additional questions regarding other broader climatic impacts over the area.

  19. Warm climate surprises

    SciTech Connect

    Overpeck, J.T.

    1996-03-29

    Over the last decade, paleoclimatic data from ice cores and sediments have shown that the climate system is capable of switching between significantly different modes, suggesting that climatic surprises may lie ahead. Most attention in the growing area of abrupt climatic change research continues to be focused on large changes observed during glacial periods. The weight of paleoclimatic evidence now suggests that conforting conclusions of benign warm climate variability may be incorrect. The article goes on to discuss the evidence for this. 17 refs.

  20. Intraoperative /sup 99m/Tc bone imaging in the treatment of benign osteoblastic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.; Simons, G.

    1982-05-01

    Benign bone tumors can be successfully treated by local resection with the use of intraoperative bone imaging. Intraoperative bone imaging provided accurate localization of an osteoid osteoma in a patella of a 16-year-old girl when standard radiographs failed to demonstrate the lesion. In a case of osteoblastoma of the sacrum in a 12-year old girl, intraoperative scanning was used repeatedly to guide completeness of resection. In these cases in which routine intraoperative radiographs would have failed, intraoperative scanning proved to be essential for success.

  1. Is Global Warming Accelerating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, J.; Delsole, T. M.; Tippett, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    A global pattern that fluctuates naturally on decadal time scales is identified in climate simulations and observations. This newly discovered component, called the Global Multidecadal Oscillation (GMO), is related to the Atlantic Meridional Oscillation and shown to account for a substantial fraction of decadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature. IPCC-class climate models generally underestimate the variance of the GMO, and hence underestimate the decadal fluctuations due to this component of natural variability. Decomposing observed sea surface temperature into a component due to anthropogenic and natural radiative forcing plus the GMO, reveals that most multidecadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature can be accounted for by these two components alone. The fact that the GMO varies naturally on multidecadal time scales implies that it can be predicted with some skill on decadal time scales, which provides a scientific rationale for decadal predictions. Furthermore, the GMO is shown to account for about half of the warming in the last 25 years and hence a substantial fraction of the recent acceleration in the rate of increase in global average sea surface temperature. Nevertheless, in terms of the global average “well-observed” sea surface temperature, the GMO can account for only about 0.1° C in transient, decadal-scale fluctuations, not the century-long 1° C warming that has been observed during the twentieth century.

  2. Patient warming in surgery and the enhanced recovery.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Helena

    Perioperative hypothermia is associated with poor outcomes for patients, yet it is preventable in most cases (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), 2011a). NICE guideline 65 (2008) provides clear recommendations for avoiding perioperative hypothermia in surgical patients at each stage of their surgical journey, preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively. This article describes the risks for patients at each of the three stages and disseminates the most recent NICE recommendations on how both patients and health professionals can work together to avoid perioperative hypothermia. The Enhanced Recovery after Surgery programme (ERAS) considers patient warming to maintain perioperative normothermia to be a key component in accelerating patient recovery. This article looks at how the NICE guidelines on inadvertent perioperative hypothermia and the ERAS programme complement each other to successfully and significantly improve patient recovery.

  3. Evaluation of bacterial contamination on surgical drapes following use of the Bair Hugger(®) forced air warming system.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Lindsay L; Hauptman, Joe G; Greco, Justin J; Mehler, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    This pilot study determined the rate of bacterial contamination on surgical drapes of small animal patients warmed intra-operatively with the Bair Hugger(®) forced air warming system compared to a control method. Surgical drapes of 100 patients undergoing clean surgical procedures were swabbed with aerobic culturettes at the beginning and end of surgery. Samples were cultured on Trypticase soy agar. Contamination of the surgical drapes was identified in 6/98 cases (6.1%). There was no significant difference in the number of contaminated surgical drapes between the Bair Hugger(®) and control groups (P = 0.47).

  4. Trajectory optimization for intra-operative nuclear tomographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Jakob; Lasser, Tobias; Gardiazabal, José; Navab, Nassir

    2013-10-01

    Diagnostic nuclear imaging modalities like SPECT typically employ gantries to ensure a densely sampled geometry of detectors in order to keep the inverse problem of tomographic reconstruction as well-posed as possible. In an intra-operative setting with mobile freehand detectors the situation changes significantly, and having an optimal detector trajectory during acquisition becomes critical. In this paper we propose an incremental optimization method based on the numerical condition of the system matrix of the underlying iterative reconstruction method to calculate optimal detector positions during acquisition in real-time. The performance of this approach is evaluated using simulations. A first experiment on a phantom using a robot-controlled intra-operative SPECT-like setup demonstrates the feasibility of the approach.

  5. Intraoperative perfluorocarbon liquids in the management of proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Ozmert, E; Zimmerman, N J

    1988-12-15

    Three low-viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids were used intraoperatively for hydrokinetic manipulation of the retina during vitreous surgery for retinal detachment with advanced proliferative vitreoretinopathy. All 23 patients had massive proliferative vitreoretinopathy (Grade D, Retina Society classification), and 16 (69.6%) had Grade D-3 with a closed-funnel configuration. In 21 eyes the retina could be flattened intraoperatively by perfluorocarbon liquids without requiring posterior retinotomy for internal drainage of subretinal fluid. The temporary mechanical fixation of the retina provided by this tool facilitated the removal of epiretinal membranes and release of traction. Fifteen eyes (65.2%) maintained long-term retinal reattachment with follow-up of six months or more. These liquids are useful adjuncts in the management of retinal detachment with severe proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  6. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia in Patients After Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia following abdominal colectomy surgeries. Eighty patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy surgery under general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score right after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had a lower score in the visual analog scale (VAS) testing than their controls from the PRS group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appears to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based PCA in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26376397

  7. Segmentation-Based Registration of Organs in Intraoperative Video Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Gee, Timothy Felix; Wang, Hengliang; Gorbach, Alexander M

    2006-01-01

    Intraoperative optical imaging of exposed organs in visible, near-infrared, and infrared (IR) wavelengths in the body has the potential to be use-ful for real-time assessment of organ viability and image guidance during surgical intervention. However, the motion of the internal organs presents significant challenges for fast analysis of recorded 2D video sequences. The movement observed during surgery, due to respiration, cardiac motion, blood flow, and mechanical shift accompanying the surgical intervention, causes organ reflection in the image sequence, making optical measurements for further analysis challenging. Correcting alignment is difficult in that the motion is not uniform over the image. This paper describes a Canny edge-based method for segmentation of the specific organ or region under study, along with a moment-based registration method for the segmented region. Experimental results are provided for a set of intraoperative IR image sequences.

  8. The usefulness of intraoperative drip infusion cholangiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Nagai, K; Matsumoto, S; Kanemaki, T; Ooshima, T; Mori, K; Funabiki, T

    1992-12-01

    Intraoperative cholangiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy has been considered to be a necessary examination because incidental injury to the common bile duct must be avoided. We performed 93 intraoperative drip infusion cholangiographies among 103 laparoscopic cholecystectomized patients as simple examinations by using iotroxic acid. The best drip infusion time was determined to be 20 min and good pictures were obtained from 10 to 60 min after the end of the drip. Nine patients with liver dysfunction and a poor radiograph had poor cholangiograms. Clear cholangiograms were obtained in 79 patients: four had a long remnant cystic duct and, in one case, a common bile duct stenosis was found by endoclip. The findings in these five cases helped us to correct failures during operation.

  9. Transsphenoidal pituitary resection with intraoperative MR guidance: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergolizzi, Richard S., Jr.; Schwartz, Richard B.; Hsu, Liangge; Wong, Terence Z.; Black, Peter M.; Martin, Claudia; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    1999-05-01

    The use of intraoperative MR image guidance has the potential to improve the precision, extent and safety of transsphenoidal pituitary resections. At Brigham and Women's Hospital, an open-bore configuration 0.5T MR system (SIGNA SP, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) has been used to provide image guidance for nine transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resections. The intraoperative MR system allowed the radiologist to direct the surgeon toward the sella turcica successfully while avoiding the cavernous sinus, optic chiasm and other sensitive structures. Imaging performed during the surgery monitored the extent of resection and allowed for removal of tumor beyond the surgeon's view in five cases. Dynamic MR imaging was used to distinguish residual tumor from normal gland and postoperative changes permitting more precise tumor localization. A heme-sensitive long TE gradient echo sequence was used to evaluate for the presence of hemorrhagic debris. All patients tolerated the procedure well without significant complications.

  10. Intraoperative Functional Mapping and Monitoring during Glioma Surgery

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Taiichi; MURAGAKI, Yoshihiro; MARUYAMA, Takashi; TAMURA, Manabu; NITTA, Masayuki; OKADA, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Glioma surgery represents a significant advance with respect to improving resection rates using new surgical techniques, including intraoperative functional mapping, monitoring, and imaging. Functional mapping under awake craniotomy can be used to detect individual eloquent tissues of speech and/or motor functions in order to prevent unexpected deficits and promote extensive resection. In addition, monitoring the patient’s neurological findings during resection is also very useful for maximizing the removal rate and minimizing deficits by alarming that the touched area is close to eloquent regions and fibers. Assessing several types of evoked potentials, including motor evoked potentials (MEPs), sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs), is also helpful for performing surgical monitoring in patients under general anesthesia (GA). We herein review the utility of intraoperative mapping and monitoring the assessment of neurological findings, with a particular focus on speech and the motor function, in patients undergoing glioma surgery. PMID:25744346

  11. Macular Surgery Using Intraoperative Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Khademi, Mohammad Reza; Mazloumi, Mehdi; Khodabandeh, Alireza; Riazi-Esfahani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the use of intraoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for detecting anatomical changes during macular surgery. Methods: In a consecutive case series, 32 eyes of 32 patients undergoing concurrent pars plana vitrectomy and intraoperative SD-OCT for macular hole (MH), epiretinal membrane (ERM) and vitreomacular traction (VMT) were enrolled. Intraoperative changes in retinal thickness and dimensions of the macular hole were measured in patients with ERM and VMT following surgical manipulation using a hand-held SD-OCT device (iVue, Optovue Inc., Fremont, CA, USA). Results: SD-OCT images of sixteen eyes with macular hole were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. All MH dimensions remained stable during consecutive stages of surgery except for MH apex diameter, which showed a significant decrease after internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling (P=0.025). Quantitative analysis of ten patients with ERM showed a significant decrease in retinal thickness after membrane removal (P=0.018) which did not remain significant until the end of the procedure (P=0.8). In three cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Quantitative analysis of five patients with VMT showed a decrease in retinal thickness during consecutive steps of the surgery, although these changes were not significant. In two cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Conclusion: Intraoperative SD-OCT is a useful imaging technique which provides vitreoretinal surgeons with rapid awareness of changes in macular anatomy during surgery and may therefore result in better anatomical and visual outcomes. PMID:26730318

  12. Conservative management of intraoperative tracheal injury during cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Kayatta, Michael O; Vasquez, Julio C; DeLaRosa, Jacob

    2014-04-01

    Iatrogenic intraoperative tracheal injuries are rare in cardiac operations. Management of this complication is not well described because of the low incidence and lack of reported cases. We present an 82-year-old woman who sustained a tracheal injury during aortic valve replacement. Soft tissue coverage of the trachea was obtained, the original cardiac operation was completed, and she was otherwise managed conservatively. She recovered without further complication and was discharged home 1 week after the surgical procedure.

  13. Intraoperative Manipulation for Flexion Contracture During Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshio; Minoda, Yukihide; Fumiaki, Inori; Nakagawa, Sigeru; Okajima, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Akio

    2016-11-01

    Joint gap balancing during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is important for ensuring postoperative joint stability and range of motion. Although the joint gap should be balanced to ensure joint stability, it is not easy to achieve perfect balancing during TKA. In particular, relative extension gap shortening can induce flexion contracture. Intraoperative manipulation is often empirically performed. This study evaluated the tension required for this manipulation and investigated the influence of intraoperative manipulation on the joint gap in cadaveric knees. Total knee arthroplasty was performed in 6 cadaveric knees from whole body cadavers. Flexion contracture was induced using an insert that was 4 mm thicker than the extension gap, and intraoperative manipulation was performed. Study measurements included the changes in the joint gap after manipulation at 6 positions, with the knee bending from extension to 120° flexion, and the manipulation tension that was required to create a 4-mm increase in the gap. The manipulation tension needed to create a 4-mm increase in the extension gap was 303±17 N. The changes in the joint gap after manipulation were 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.2 mm, -0.2 mm, -0.4 mm, and -0.6 mm at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°, and 120° flexion, respectively. Therefore, the joint gap was not significantly changed by the manipulation. Intraoperative manipulation does not resolve flexion contracture. Therefore, if flexion contracture occurs during TKA, treatment with additional bone cutting and soft tissue release is likely more appropriate than manipulation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1070-e1074.].

  14. A geometric analysis of mastectomy incisions: Optimizing intraoperative breast volume

    PubMed Central

    Chopp, David; Rawlani, Vinay; Ellis, Marco; Johnson, Sarah A; Buck, Donald W; Khan, Seema; Bethke, Kevin; Hansen, Nora; Kim, John YS

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The advent of acellular dermis-based tissue expander breast reconstruction has placed an increased emphasis on optimizing intraoperative volume. Because skin preservation is a critical determinant of intraoperative volume expansion, a mathematical model was developed to capture the influence of incision dimension on subsequent tissue expander volumes. METHODS: A mathematical equation was developed to calculate breast volume via integration of a geometrically modelled breast cross-section. The equation calculates volume changes associated with excised skin during the mastectomy incision by reducing the arc length of the cross-section. The degree of volume loss is subsequently calculated based on excision dimensions ranging from 35 mm to 60 mm. RESULTS: A quadratic relationship between breast volume and the vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision exists, such that incrementally larger incisions lead to a disproportionally greater amount of volume loss. The vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision – more so than the horizontal dimension – is of critical importance to maintain breast volume. Moreover, the predicted volume loss is more profound in smaller breasts and primarily occurs in areas that affect breast projection on ptosis. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to model the relationship between the vertical dimensions of the mastectomy incision and subsequent volume loss. These geometric principles will aid in optimizing intra-operative volume expansion during expander-based breast reconstruction. PMID:22654531

  15. Intraoperative diagnostics and elimination of residual microtumours with plasmonic nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Belatsarkouski, Ihor; Gillenwater, Ann M.; O'Neill, Brian E.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2016-06-01

    Failure of cancer surgery to intraoperatively detect and eliminate microscopic residual disease (MRD) causes lethal recurrence and metastases, and the removal of important normal tissues causes excessive morbidity. Here, we show that a plasmonic nanobubble (PNB), a non-stationary laser pulse-activated nanoevent, intraoperatively detects and eliminates MRD in the surgical bed. PNBs were generated in vivo in head and neck cancer cells by systemically targeting tumours with gold colloids and locally applying near-infrared, low-energy short laser pulses, and were simultaneously detected with an acoustic probe. In mouse models, between 3 and 30 residual cancer cells and MRD (undetectable with current methods) were non-invasively detected up to 4 mm deep in the surgical bed within 1 ms. In resectable MRD, PNB-guided surgery prevented local recurrence and delivered 100% tumour-free survival. In unresectable MRD, PNB nanosurgery improved survival twofold compared with standard surgery. Our results show that PNB-guided surgery and nanosurgery can rapidly and precisely detect and remove MRD in simple intraoperative procedures.

  16. Intraoperative echocardiographic detection of regurgitant jets after valve replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, A. J.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J.; Armstrong, G.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paravalvular jets, documented by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography, have prompted immediate valve explantation by others, yet the significance of these jets is unknown. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients had intraoperative transesophageal two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography, performed to assess the number and area of regurgitant jets after valve replacement, before and after protamine. Patients were grouped by first time versus redo operation, valve position and type. RESULTS: Before protamine, 55 jets were identified (2.04+/-1.4 per patient) versus 29 jets after (1.07+/-1.2 per patient, p = 0.0002). Total jet area improved from 2.0+/-2.2 cm2 to 0.86+/-1.7 cm2 with protamine (p<0.0001). In all patients jet area decreased (average decrease, 70.7%+/-27.0%). First time and redo operations had similar improvements in jet number and area (both p>0.6). Furthermore, mitral and mechanical valves each had more jets and overall greater jet area when compared to aortic and tissue valves, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Following valve replacement, multiple jets are detected by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. They are more common and larger in the mitral position and with mechanical valves. Improvement occurs with reversal of anticoagulation.

  17. Intraoperative administration of inhaled carbon monoxide reduces delayed graft function in kidney allografts in Swine.

    PubMed

    Hanto, D W; Maki, T; Yoon, M H; Csizmadia, E; Chin, B Y; Gallo, D; Konduru, B; Kuramitsu, K; Smith, N R; Berssenbrugge, A; Attanasio, C; Thomas, M; Wegiel, B; Otterbein, L E

    2010-11-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury and delayed graft function (DGF) following organ transplantation adversely affect graft function and survival. A large animal model has not been characterized. We developed a pig kidney allograft model of DGF and evaluated the cytoprotective effects of inhaled carbon monoxide (CO). We demonstrate that donor warm ischemia time is a critical determinant of DGF as evidenced by a transient (4-6 days) increase in serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen following transplantation before returning to baseline. CO administered to recipients intraoperatively for 1 h restored kidney function more rapidly versus air-treated controls. CO reduced acute tubular necrosis, apoptosis, tissue factor expression and P-selectin expression and enhanced proliferative repair as measured by phosphorylation of retinol binding protein and histone H3. Gene microarray analyses with confirmatory PCR of biopsy specimens showed that CO blocked proinflammatory gene expression of MCP-1 and heat shock proteins. In vitro in pig renal epithelial cells, CO blocks anoxia-reoxygenation-induced cell death while promoting proliferation. This large animal model of DGF can be utilized for testing therapeutic strategies to reduce or prevent DGF in humans. The efficacy of CO on improving graft function posttransplant validates the model and offers a potentially important therapeutic strategy to improve transplant outcomes.

  18. Warm waters, bleached corals

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1990-10-12

    Two researchers, Tom Goreau of the Discovery Laboratory in Jamaica and Raymond Hayes of Howard University, claim that they have evidence that nearly clinches the temperature connection to the bleached corals in the Caribbean and that the coral bleaching is an indication of Greenhouse warming. The incidents of scattered bleaching of corals, which have been reported for decades, are increasing in both intensity and frequency. The researchers based their theory on increased temperature of the seas measured by satellites. However, some other scientists feel that the satellites measure the temperature of only the top few millimeters of the water and that since corals lie on reefs perhaps 60 to 100 feet below the ocean surface, the elevated temperatures are not significant.

  19. Global warming challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Hengeveld, H. )

    1994-11-01

    Global warming will necessitate significant adjustments in Canadian society and its economy. In 1979, the Canadian federal government created its Canadian Climate Program (CCP) in collaboration with other agencies, institutions, and individuals. It sought to coordinate national efforts to understand global and regional climate, and to promote better use of the emerging knowledge. Much of the CCP-coordinated research into sources and sinks of greenhouse gases interfaces with other national and international programs. Other researchers have become involved in the Northern Wetlands Study, a cooperative United States-Canada initiative to understand the role of huge northern bogs and muskegs in the carbon cycle. Because of the need to understand how the whole, linked climate system works, climate modeling emerged as a key focus of current research. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Competent and Warm?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Karolina; Rakić, Tamara; Steffens, Melanie C

    2017-01-01

    Most research on ethnicity has focused on visual cues. However, accents are strong social cues that can match or contradict visual cues. We examined understudied reactions to people whose one cue suggests one ethnicity, whereas the other cue contradicts it. In an experiment conducted in Germany, job candidates spoke with an accent either congruent or incongruent with their (German or Turkish) appearance. Based on ethnolinguistic identity theory, we predicted that accents would be strong cues for categorization and evaluation. Based on expectancy violations theory we expected that incongruent targets would be evaluated more extremely than congruent targets. Both predictions were confirmed: accents strongly influenced perceptions and Turkish-looking German-accented targets were perceived as most competent of all targets (and additionally most warm). The findings show that bringing together visual and auditory information yields a more complete picture of the processes underlying impression formation.

  1. Global Warming on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.; McDonald, S. W.; Person, M. J.; Olkin, C. B.; Dunham, E. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.; Buie, M. W.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; McConnochie, T. H.

    1998-01-01

    Triton, Neptune's largest moon, has been predicted to undergo significant seasonal changes that would reveal themselves as changes in its mean frost temperature. But whether this temperature should at the present time be increasing, decreasing or constant depends on a number of parameters (such as the thermal properties of the surface, and frost migration patterns) that are unknown. Here we report observations of a recent stellar occultation by Triton which, when combined with earlier results, show that Triton has undergone a period of global warming since 1989. Our most conservative estimates of the rate of temperature and surface-pressure increase during this period imply that the atmosphere is doubling in bulk every 10 years, significantly faster than predicted by any published frost model for Triton. Our result suggests that permanent polar caps on Triton play a c dominant role in regulating seasonal atmospheric changes. Similar processes should also be active on Pluto.

  2. Interacting warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo E-mail: guillermo.palma@usach.cl E-mail: avelino@fisica.ugto.mx

    2013-05-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ{sub m}{sup α}ρ{sub e}{sup β} form, where ρ{sub m} and ρ{sub e} are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w{sub m} and w{sub e} of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used.

  3. Local warming: daily temperature change influences belief in global warming.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Johnson, Eric J; Zaval, Lisa

    2011-04-01

    Although people are quite aware of global warming, their beliefs about it may be malleable; specifically, their beliefs may be constructed in response to questions about global warming. Beliefs may reflect irrelevant but salient information, such as the current day's temperature. This replacement of a more complex, less easily accessed judgment with a simple, more accessible one is known as attribute substitution. In three studies, we asked residents of the United States and Australia to report their opinions about global warming and whether the temperature on the day of the study was warmer or cooler than usual. Respondents who thought that day was warmer than usual believed more in and had greater concern about global warming than did respondents who thought that day was colder than usual. They also donated more money to a global-warming charity if they thought that day seemed warmer than usual. We used instrumental variable regression to rule out some alternative explanations.

  4. Blodgett Forest Warming Experiment 1

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pries, Caitlin Hicks (ORCID:0000000308132211); Castanha, Cristina; Porras, Rachel; Torn, Margaret

    2017-03-24

    Carbon stocks and density fractions from soil pits used to characterize soils of the Blodgett warming experiment as well as gas well CO2, 13C, and 14C data from experimental plots. The experiment consisted of 3 control and heated plot pairs. The heated plots are warmed +4°C above the control from 10 to 100 cm.

  5. Powerful H2 Line Cooling in Stephan’s Quintet. II. Group-wide Gas and Shock Modeling of the Warm H2 and a Comparison with [C II] 157.7 μm Emission and Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, P. N.; Guillard, P.; Togi, A.; Alatalo, K.; Boulanger, F.; Cluver, M.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P.; Xu, C. K.

    2017-02-01

    We map for the first time the two-dimensional H2 excitation of warm intergalactic gas in Stephan's Quintet on group-wide (50 × 35 kpc2) scales to quantify the temperature, mass, and warm H2 mass fraction as a function of position using Spitzer. Molecular gas temperatures are seen to rise (to T > 700 K) and the slope of the power-law density–temperature relation flattens along the main ridge of the filament, defining the region of maximum heating. We also performed MHD modeling of the excitation properties of the warm gas, to map the velocity structure and energy deposition rate of slow and fast molecular shocks. Slow magnetic shocks were required to explain the power radiated from the lowest-lying rotational states of H2, and strongly support the idea that energy cascades down to small scales and low velocities from the fast collision of NGC 7318b with group-wide gas. The highest levels of heating of the warm H2 are strongly correlated with the large-scale stirring of the medium as measured by [C ii] spectroscopy with Herschel. H2 is also seen associated with a separate bridge that extends toward the Seyfert nucleus in NGC 7319, from both Spitzer and CARMA CO observations. This opens up the possibility that both galaxy collisions and outflows from active galactic nuclei can turbulently heat gas on large scales in compact groups. The observations provide a laboratory for studying the effects of turbulent energy dissipation on group-wide scales, which may provide clues about the heating and cooling of gas at high z in early galaxy and protogalaxy formation.

  6. Consistency of warm k -inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhi-Peng; Yu, Jia-Ning; Zhu, Jian-Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Min

    2016-11-01

    We extend k -inflation which is a type of kinetically driven inflationary model under the standard inflationary scenario to a possible warm inflationary scenario. The dynamical equations of this warm k -inflation model are obtained. We rewrite the slow-roll parameters which are different from the usual potential driven inflationary models and perform a linear stability analysis to give the proper slow-roll conditions in warm k -inflation. Two cases, a power-law kinetic function and an exponential kinetic function, are studied, when the dissipative coefficient Γ =Γ0 and Γ =Γ (ϕ ), respectively. A proper number of e-folds is obtained in both concrete cases of warm k -inflation. We find a constant dissipative coefficient (Γ =Γ0) is not a workable choice for these two cases while the two cases with Γ =Γ (ϕ ) are self-consistent warm inflationary models.

  7. Explaining Warm Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Patsourakos, Spiros

    2008-01-01

    One of the great mysteries of coronal physics that has come to light in the last few years is the discovery that warn (- 1 INK) coronal loops are much denser than expected for quasi-static equilibrium. Both the excess densities and relatively long lifetimes of the loops can be explained with bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively to very high temperatures. Since neighboring strands are at different stages of cooling, the composite loop bundle is multi-thermal, with the distribution of temperatures depending on the details of the "nanoflare storm." Emission hotter than 2 MK is predicted, but it is not clear that such emission is always observed. We consider two possible explanations for the existence of over-dense warm loops without corresponding hot emission: (1) loops are bundles of nanoflare heated strands, but a significant fraction of the nanoflare energy takes the form of a nonthermal electron beam rather then direct plasma heating; (2) loops are bundles of strands that undergo thermal nonequilibrium that results when steady heating is sufficiently concentrated near the footpoints. We present numerical hydro simulations of both of these possibilities and explore the observational consequences, including the production of hard X-ray emission and absorption by cool material in the corona.

  8. Warm dense crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  9. Protocol for intraoperative assessment of the human cerebrovascular glycocalyx

    PubMed Central

    Haeren, R H L; Vink, H; Staals, J; van Zandvoort, M A M J; Dings, J; van Overbeeke, J J; Hoogland, G; Rijkers, K; Schijns, O E M G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Adequate functioning of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is important for brain homoeostasis and normal neuronal function. Disruption of the BBB has been described in several neurological diseases. Recent reports suggest that an increased permeability of the BBB also contributes to increased seizure susceptibility in patients with epilepsy. The endothelial glycocalyx is coating the luminal side of the endothelium and can be considered as the first barrier of the BBB. We hypothesise that an altered glycocalyx thickness plays a role in the aetiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common type of epilepsy. Here, we propose a protocol that allows intraoperative assessment of the cerebrovascular glycocalyx thickness in patients with TLE and assess whether its thickness is decreased in patients with TLE when compared with controls. Methods and analysis This protocol is designed as a prospective observational case–control study in patients who undergo resective brain surgery as treatment for TLE. Control subjects are patients without a history of epileptic seizures, who undergo a craniotomy or burr hole surgery for other indications. Intraoperative glycocalyx thickness measurements of sublingual, cortical and hippocampal microcirculation are performed by video microscopy using sidestream dark-field imaging. Demographic details, seizure characteristics, epilepsy risk factors, intraoperative haemodynamic parameters and histopathological evaluation are additionally recorded. Ethics and dissemination This protocol has been ethically approved by the local medical ethical committee (ID: NL51594.068.14) and complies with the Declaration of Helsinki and principles of Good Clinical Practice. Informed consent is obtained before study enrolment and only coded data will be stored in a secured database, enabling an audit trail. Results will be submitted to international peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences. Trial registration number

  10. Intraoperative Hypothermia in Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Rooney, Edward; Silverton, Craig

    2016-10-25

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are common and successful orthopedic procedures, and as their frequency continues to increase substantially, the focus on limiting perioperative complications heightens. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended to minimize additional complications, but limited evidence exists regarding the effect of hypothermia on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of perioperative hypothermia in the setting of TKA and THA, and to evaluate its impact on complications and outcomes. The clinical records of 2580 consecutive patients who underwent TKA or THA at a single institution between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013 were reviewed. After excluding patients with complex or revision procedures, a total of 2397 patients comprised the study population. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis evaluated associations with hypothermia and the effect on complications and outcomes. The incidence of mean intraoperative hypothermia was 37%, 43.9%, and 32.6% for arthroplasty, THA, and TKA, respectively. General anesthesia was significantly associated with hypothermia (P<.001). Women and THA patients were at higher risk for hypothermia. In the arthroplasty and THA cohorts, longer operating room time and re-warmer use were associated with hypothermia (P=.010). Overall, hypothermia was associated with increased estimated blood loss, but no increase in associated transfusion was demonstrated (P=.006). Hypothermia was not associated with postoperative complications. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  11. Pediatric awake craniotomy and intra-operative stimulation mapping.

    PubMed

    Balogun, James A; Khan, Osaama H; Taylor, Michael; Dirks, Peter; Der, Tara; Carter Snead Iii, O; Weiss, Shelly; Ochi, Ayako; Drake, James; Rutka, James T

    2014-11-01

    The indications for operating on lesions in or near areas of cortical eloquence balance the benefit of resection with the risk of permanent neurological deficit. In adults, awake craniotomy has become a versatile tool in tumor, epilepsy and functional neurosurgery, permitting intra-operative stimulation mapping particularly for language, sensory and motor cortical pathways. This allows for maximal tumor resection with considerable reduction in the risk of post-operative speech and motor deficits. We report our experience of awake craniotomy and cortical stimulation for epilepsy and supratentorial tumors located in and around eloquent areas in a pediatric population (n=10, five females). The presenting symptom was mainly seizures and all children had normal neurological examinations. Neuroimaging showed lesions in the left opercular (n=4) and precentral or peri-sylvian regions (n=6). Three right-sided and seven left-sided awake craniotomies were performed. Two patients had a history of prior craniotomy. All patients had intra-operative mapping for either speech or motor or both using cortical stimulation. The surgical goal for tumor patients was gross total resection, while for all epilepsy procedures, focal cortical resections were completed without any difficulty. None of the patients had permanent post-operative neurologic deficits. The patient with an epileptic focus over the speech area in the left frontal lobe had a mild word finding difficulty post-operatively but this improved progressively. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 27 months. Pediatric awake craniotomy with intra-operative mapping is a precise, safe and reliable method allowing for resection of lesions in eloquent areas. Further validations on larger number of patients will be needed to verify the utility of this technique in the pediatric population.

  12. How the West Was Warmed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerling, M.; Eischeid, J.

    2006-05-01

    Is the West getting warmer? To be sure, the summer of 2005 was one of record heat in the West, and recent period of western US drought during 1998-2004 was also accompanied by unusual warmth. But warm conditions accompanied the Dust Bowl era of the 1930s and the 1950s. The question remains open whether recent western warming has been part of a externally forced climate trend, or whether other processes have been at play like urbanization or the inherent natural fluctuations of climate paterns? We perform analysis of the Fourth Assessment coupled ocean-atmosphere models for the period 1895-2005, together with atmospheric general circulation model experiments. These reveal that the recent warming of the West has very likely been a consequence of increasing greenhouse gases. In fact, no single member of 40 availabl GHG-forced simulations failed to warm the West during the past century. We further show that a warming of the tropical oceanic warm pool regions, itself a greenhouse gas forced response, has been a major contributor to the warming of the West since 1970.

  13. Recent warming of lake Kivu.

    PubMed

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A; Crowe, Sean A; Hecky, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient.

  14. Recent Warming of Lake Kivu

    PubMed Central

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A.; Crowe, Sean A.; Hecky, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient. PMID:25295730

  15. Shyness Trajectories in Slow-to-Warm-Up Infants: Relations with Child Sex and Maternal Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Jessica Stoltzfus; Karraker, Katherine; Metzger, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about slow-to-warm-up temperament in infancy. This study examined the trajectory of shyness in children who were slow-to-warm-up in infancy in comparison to children with other temperament profiles in infancy. Participants were 996 mothers and children in the NICHD SECC studied from 6 months to first grade. Latent growth curve…

  16. Intraoperative neuropathology of glioma recurrence: cell detection and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abas, Fazly S.; Gokozan, Hamza N.; Goksel, Behiye; Otero, Jose J.; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative neuropathology of glioma recurrence represents significant visual challenges to pathologists as they carry significant clinical implications. For example, rendering a diagnosis of recurrent glioma can help the surgeon decide to perform more aggressive resection if surgically appropriate. In addition, the success of recent clinical trials for intraoperative administration of therapies, such as inoculation with oncolytic viruses, may suggest that refinement of the intraoperative diagnosis during neurosurgery is an emerging need for pathologists. Typically, these diagnoses require rapid/STAT processing lasting only 20-30 minutes after receipt from neurosurgery. In this relatively short time frame, only dyes, such as hematoxylin and eosin (H and E), can be implemented. The visual challenge lies in the fact that these patients have undergone chemotherapy and radiation, both of which induce cytological atypia in astrocytes, and pathologists are unable to implement helpful biomarkers in their diagnoses. Therefore, there is a need to help pathologists differentiate between astrocytes that are cytologically atypical due to treatment versus infiltrating, recurrent, neoplastic astrocytes. This study focuses on classification of neoplastic versus non-neoplastic astrocytes with the long term goal of providing a better neuropathological computer-aided consultation via classification of cells into reactive gliosis versus recurrent glioma. We present a method to detect cells in H and E stained digitized slides of intraoperative cytologic preparations. The method uses a combination of the `value' component of the HSV color space and `b*' component of the CIE L*a*b* color space to create an enhanced image that suppresses the background while revealing cells on an image. A composite image is formed based on the morphological closing of the hue-luminance combined image. Geometrical and textural features extracted from Discrete Wavelet Frames and combined to classify

  17. Intracavernosal metaraminol for treatment of intraoperative penile erection.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S. K.; Hong, C. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Four patients developed penile erection when regional anaesthesia was induced with spinal block. In another patient, penile erection developed during fentanyl-induced general anaesthesia. Injection of metaraminol into corpus cavernosum successfully achieved detumescence in all these patients. The dose of metaraminol ranged from 10 to 25 micrograms, much less than that required for the treatment of vasodilator-induced priapism. Intracavernosal injection of metaraminol is a simple, effective and safe method for immediate relief of intraoperative penile erection. It is most useful when urogenital operation would be delayed by penile tumescence. PMID:2099422

  18. Intraoperative Optical Imaging and Tissue Interrogation During Urologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mark; Gupta, Mohit; Su, Li-Ming; Liao, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review optical imaging technologies in urologic surgery aimed to facilitate intraoperative imaging and tissue interrogation. Recent findings Emerging new optical imaging technologies can be integrated in the operating room environment during minimally invasive and open surgery. These technologies include macroscopic fluorescence imaging that provides contrast enhancement between normal and diseased tissue and microscopic imaging that provides tissue characterization. Summary Optical imaging technologies that have reached the clinical arena in urologic surgery are reviewed, including photodynamic diagnosis, near infrared fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. PMID:24240512

  19. A smart method of intraoperative explantation of an aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Can C; Park, Soon J

    2009-01-01

    Structural prosthetic valve deterioration and nonstructural dysfunction are two common causes of nonfatal valve events following implantation of a bioprosthetic valve. Using caution and skill, implantation of a bioprosthesis is relatively easy. On the other hand, explantation of a bioprosthesis is a challenging and time-consuming procedure. We have developed a surgical technique by which we were able to ameliorate this troublesome situation in a 79-year-old man with aortic stenosis in whom we had to intraoperatively explant the bioprosthesis that we have put in initially. Another bioprosthesis of the same kind was used to replace the old prosthesis with the rest of his postoperative course until dismissal being eventless.

  20. Effectivity of intraoperative adjustable suture technique in horizontal strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Altintas, Ayse Gul Kocak; Arifoglu, Hasan Basri; Midillioglu, Inci Kocak; Gungor, Elif Damar; Simsek, Saban

    2013-01-01

    AIM To compare the long-term effectivity of intraoperative adjustable suture technique with traditional non-adjustable strabismus surgery. METHODS Two hundred and thirty-three patients, who underwent strabismus surgery either with traditional procedures or one-stage intraoperative adjustable suture technique, were included in our long-term follow-up study. One hundred and eighteen patients were evaluated in traditional surgery group (TSG) and 115 who underwent adjustable suture were in the one-stage intraoperative adjustable surgery group (ASG). In this group 9 patients had paralytic strabismus and 16 had reoperations, 2 patients had restrictive strabismus related to thyroid eye disease. The mean follow up in the TSG was 26.2 months and it was 24.8 months in the ASG group. RESULTS In patients with exotropia (XT) the mean correction of deviation for near fixation in ASG (32.4±13.2PD) and in TSG (26.4±8.2PD) were similar (P=0.112). The correction for distant fixation in ASG (33.2±11.4PD) and TSG (30.9±7.2PD) were not significantly different (P=0.321). In patients with esotropia (ET) even the mean correction of deviation for both near (31±12PD) and distant (30.6±12.8PD) fixations were higher in ASG than in TSG, for both near (28.27±14.2PD) and distant (28.9±12.9PD) fixations, the differences were not significant (P=0.346, 0.824 respectively). The overall success rate of XT patient was 78.9% in TSG and 78.78% in ASG, the difference was not significant (P=0.629). The success rates were 78.75% in TSG and 75.51% in ASG in ET patient, which was also not significantly different (P=0.821). CONCLUSION Although patients in ASG had more complex deviation such as paralysis, reoperations and restrictive strabismus, success rates of this tecnique was as high as TSG which did not contain complicated deviation. One-stage intraoperative adjustable suture technique is a safe and effective method for cooperative patient who has complex deviation. PMID:23991385

  1. Dense deformation field estimation for brain intraoperative images registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Craene, Mathieu S.; du Bois d'Aische, Aloys; Talos, Ion-Florin; Ferrant, Matthieu; Black, Peter M.; Jolesz, Ferenc; Kikinis, Ron; Macq, Benoit; Warfield, Simon K.

    2004-05-01

    A new fast non rigid registration algorithm is presented. The algorithm estimates a dense deformation field by optimizing a criterion that measures image similarity by mutual information and regularizes with a linear elastic energy term. The optimal deformation field is found using a Simultaneous Perturbation Stochastic Approximation to the gradient. The implementation is parallelized for symmetric multi-processor architectures. This algorithm was applied to capture non-rigid brain deformations that occur during neurosurgery. Segmentation of the intra-operative data is not required but preoperative segmentation of the brain allows the algorithm to be robust to artifacts due to the craniotomy.

  2. Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong; Bader, Jürgen; Rolph, Rebecca; Kwon, Minho

    2015-05-12

    Phytoplankton have attracted increasing attention in climate science due to their impacts on climate systems. A new generation of climate models can now provide estimates of future climate change, considering the biological feedbacks through the development of the coupled physical-ecosystem model. Here we present the geophysical impact of phytoplankton, which is often overlooked in future climate projections. A suite of future warming experiments using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model that interacts with a marine ecosystem model reveals that the future phytoplankton change influenced by greenhouse warming can amplify Arctic surface warming considerably. The warming-induced sea ice melting and the corresponding increase in shortwave radiation penetrating into the ocean both result in a longer phytoplankton growing season in the Arctic. In turn, the increase in Arctic phytoplankton warms the ocean surface layer through direct biological heating, triggering additional positive feedbacks in the Arctic, and consequently intensifying the Arctic warming further. Our results establish the presence of marine phytoplankton as an important potential driver of the future Arctic climate changes.

  3. Weird Warm Spot on Exoplanet

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates an unexpected warm spot on the surface of a gaseous exoplanet. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope discovered that the hottest part of the planet, shown here as bright, orange...

  4. Intraoperative passive knee kinematics during total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Young, Kathryn L; Dunbar, Michael J; Richardson, Glen; Astephen Wilson, Janie L

    2015-11-01

    Surgical navigation systems for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery are capable of capturing passive three-dimensional (3D) angular joint movement patterns intraoperatively. Improved understanding of patient-specific knee kinematic changes between pre and post-implant states and their relationship with post-operative function may be important in optimizing TKA outcomes. However, a comprehensive characterization of the variability among patients has yet to be investigated. The objective of this study was to characterize the variability within frontal plane joint movement patterns intraoperatively during a passive knee flexion exercise. Three hundred and forty patients with severe knee osteoarthritis (OA) received a primary TKA using a navigation system. Passive kinematics were captured prior to (pre-implant), and after prosthesis insertion (post-implant). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to capture characteristic patterns of knee angle kinematics among patients, to identify potential patient subgroups based on these patterns, and to examine the subgroup-specific changes in these patterns between pre- and post-implant states. The first four extracted patterns explained 99.9% of the diversity within the frontal plane angle patterns among the patients. Post-implant, the magnitude of the frontal plane angle shifted toward a neutral mechanical axis in all phenotypes, yet subtle pattern (shape of curvature) features of the pre-implant state persisted.

  5. Mini gamma cameras for intra-operative nuclear tomographic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Philipp; Gardiazabal, José; Okur, Aslı; Vogel, Jakob; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear imaging modalities like PET or SPECT are in extensive use in medical diagnostics. In a move towards personalized therapy, we present a flexible nuclear tomographic imaging system to enable intra-operative SPECT-like 3D imaging. The system consists of a miniaturized gamma camera mounted on a robot arm for flexible positioning, while spatio-temporal localization is provided by an optical tracking system. To facilitate statistical tomographic reconstruction of the radiotracer distribution using a maximum likelihood approach, a precise model of the mini gamma camera is generated by measurements. The entire system is evaluated in a series of experiments using a hot spot phantom, with a focus on criteria relevant for the intra-operative workflow, namely the number of required imaging positions as well as the required imaging time. The results show that high quality reconstructed images of simple hot spot configurations with positional errors of less than one millimeter are possible within acquisition times as short as 15s.

  6. Simulated microsurgery monitoring using intraoperative multimodal surgical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghyun; Lee, Changho; Kim, Sehui; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an intraoperative multimodal surgical microscopy system that provides simultaneous real-time enlarged surface views and subsurface anatomic information during surgeries by integrating spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and conventional surgical microscopy. By sharing the same optical path, both OCT and PAM images were simultaneously acquired. Additionally, the custom-made needle-type transducer received the generated PA signals enabling convenient surgical operation without using a water bath. Using a simple augmented device, the OCT and PAM images were projected on the view plane of the surgical microscope. To quantify the performance of our system, we measured spatial resolutions of our system. Then, three microsurgery simulation and analysis were processed: (1) ex vivo needle tracking and monitoring injection of carbon particles in biological tissues, (2) in vivo needle tracking and monitoring injection of carbon particles in tumor-bearing mice, and (3) in vivo guiding of melanoma removal in melanoma-bearing mice. The results indicate that this triple modal system is useful for intraoperative purposes, and can potentially be a vital tool in microsurgeries.

  7. Intra-operative implantation errors during Austin Moore Hemiarthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Zohaib Gulzar; Markhand, Javed Ali; Ahmed, Syed Kamran; Chinoy, Amin; Khan, Mansoor Ali

    2016-10-01

    Austin Moore hemiarthroplasty is an established treatment in elderly patients with neck of femur fractures. Being commonly performed, it is also associated with several technical errors of implantation which results in complications and failure requiring revision surgery. This retrospective pre- and post-operative radiographic study to determine the frequency of technical errors was conducted at the Indus Hospital, Karachi, and comprised data of 50 patients who underwent Austin Moore hemiarthroplasty between January and November 2016. Of the total, 29(58%%) patients had no error of implantation. Overhanging of prosthesis was observed in 21(42%) patients, followed by inadequate length of the neck remnant in 18(36%). Moreover, 8(16%) patients sustained intra-operative periprosthetic fractures managed with cerclage wire. Also, 33(66%) patients had a Dorr type-Afemur morphologic pattern. Hemiarthroplasty was found to be a technically demanding procedure associated with avoidable intra-operative implantation errors by proper preoperative planning, careful patient selection, proper training of surgeons, hence avoiding failure.

  8. Prevention of intraoperative wound contamination with chlorhexidine shower and scrub.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, R A

    1988-04-01

    In a prospective, controlled, clinical trial, we found that preoperative showering and scrubbing with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate was more effective than povidone-iodine or triclocarban medicated soap in reducing skin colonization at the site of surgical incision. Mean log colony counts of the incision site were one half to one log lower for patients who showered with chlorhexidine compared to those who showered with the other regimens. No growth was observed on 43% of the post shower skin cultures from patients in the chlorhexidine group compared with 16% of the cultures from patients who had povidone-iodine showers and 5% of those from patients who used medicated soap and water. The frequency of positive intraoperative wound cultures was 4% with chlorhexidine, 9% with povidone-iodine and 14% with medicated soap and water. This study demonstrates that chlorhexidine gluconate is a more effective skin disinfectant than either povidone-iodine or triclocarban soap and water and that its use is associated with lower rates of intraoperative wound contamination.

  9. Intraoperative radiation therapy in malignant glioma: early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Ortiz de Urbina, D; Santos, M; Garcia-Berrocal, I; Bustos, J C; Samblas, J; Gutierrez-Diaz, J A; Delgado, J M; Donckaster, G; Calvo, F A

    1995-08-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) with high energy electron beams is a treatment modality that has been included in multimodal programs in oncology to improve local tumor control. From August 1991 to December 1993, 17 patients with primary (8) or recurrent (9) high grade malignant gliomas, anaplastic astrocytoma (4), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (6) and glioblastoma multiforme (7), underwent surgical resection and a single dose of 10-20 Gy intraoperative radiation therapy was delivered in tumor bed. Fourteen patients received either pre-operative (8) or post-operative (6) external beam radiation therapy. Primary gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate has been 56% (range: 1-21+ months) and the median survival time has not yet been achieved. Four patients developed tumor progression (median time to tumor progression: 9 months). Recurrent gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate and median survival time has been 47% and 13 months (range: 6-32+ months) respectively. The median time to tumor progression was 11 months. No IORT related mortality has been observed. IORT is an attractive, tolerable and feasible treatment modality as antitumoral intensification procedure in high grade malignant gliomas.

  10. Risk factors for intraoperative floppy iris syndrome: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Chatziralli, I P; Peponis, V; Parikakis, E; Maniatea, A; Patsea, E; Mitropoulos, P

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate risk factors for intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS) in patients undergoing phacoemulsification.MethodsParticipants in the study were 1274 consecutive patients, who underwent routine phacoemulsification cataract surgery. The following data were recorded and evaluated as possible risk factors: ophthalmological conditions, axial length of the eye, sociodemographic features, clinical data (hypertension and diabetes mellitus), medications being taken at the time of surgery, and duration of their intake. Cases were characterized intraoperatively as IFIS and non-IFIS. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed.ResultsIFIS was observed in 63/1274 eyes (4.9%, 95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Current use of tamsulosin, alfuzosin, terazosin, benzodiazepines, quetiapine, and finasteride, as well as hypertension, were all independently associated with IFIS. Significant associations were noted for male sex, rivastigmine, and short axial length, which did not reach significance at the multivariate analysis. Duration of α-blockers intake was not found to be associated with IFIS.ConclusionApart from the well-established associations with α-blockers, this prospective study points to benzodiazepines, quetiapine, finasteride, and hypertension as potential risk factors for IFIS. Short axial length and rivastigmine were significantly associated with IFIS only at the univariate analysis.

  11. Lightweight distributed computing for intraoperative real-time image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwelack, Stefan; Katic, Darko; Wagner, Simon; Spengler, Patrick; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Röhl, Sebastian; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie

    2012-02-01

    In order to provide real-time intraoperative guidance, computer assisted surgery (CAS) systems often rely on computationally expensive algorithms. The real-time constraint is especially challenging if several components such as intraoperative image processing, soft tissue registration or context aware visualization are combined in a single system. In this paper, we present a lightweight approach to distribute the workload over several workstations based on the OpenIGTLink protocol. We use XML-based message passing for remote procedure calls and native types for transferring data such as images, meshes or point coordinates. Two different, but typical scenarios are considered in order to evaluate the performance of the new system. First, we analyze a real-time soft tissue registration algorithm based on a finite element (FE) model. Here, we use the proposed approach to distribute the computational workload between a primary workstation that handles sensor data processing and visualization and a dedicated workstation that runs the real-time FE algorithm. We show that the additional overhead that is introduced by the technique is small compared to the total execution time. Furthermore, the approach is used to speed up a context aware augmented reality based navigation system for dental implant surgery. In this scenario, the additional delay for running the computationally expensive reasoning server on a separate workstation is less than a millisecond. The results show that the presented approach is a promising strategy to speed up real-time CAS systems.

  12. Intraoperative esophageal Doppler hemodynamic monitoring in free perforator flap surgery.

    PubMed

    Figus, Andrea; Wade, Ryckie G; Oakey, Stephen; Ramakrishnan, Venkat V

    2013-03-01

    Goal-directed fluid therapy optimizes cardiac output and flap perfusion during anesthesia. Intraoperative esophageal Doppler (ED) monitoring has been reported as more accurate and reliable, demonstrating improved surgical outcomes compared with central venous pressure and arterial catheter monitoring. A prospective study of patients undergoing free perforator (deep inferior epigastric artery perforator/anterolateral thigh) flap surgery with intraoperative ED monitoring (51 patients) or central venous pressure monitoring (53 patients) was undertaken. Fluid input included crystalloids, colloids, or blood products. Fluid output included urine, blood, or suctioned fluid. Postoperative fluid balance was calculated as fluid input - output. Fluid input between groups was not different. Fluid output was greater in the ED group (P = 0.008). The ED group showed less fluid balance (P = 0.023), less anesthetic time (P = 0.001), less hospital stay (mean 1.9 days; P = 0.147), less monitoring and flap complications (P = 0.062). ED monitoring demonstrated no monitoring complications, provides a favorable postoperative fluid balance, and may reduce flap complications and hospital stay.

  13. Intraoperative multi-exposure speckle imaging of cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Richards, Lisa M; Kazmi, Sm Shams; Olin, Katherine E; Waldron, James S; Fox, Douglas J; Dunn, Andrew K

    2017-01-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has high potential to be a valuable cerebral blood flow monitoring technique during neurosurgery. However, the quantitative accuracy and sensitivity of LSCI is limited, and highly dependent on the exposure time. An extension to LSCI called multi-exposure speckle imaging (MESI) overcomes these limitations, and was evaluated intraoperatively in patients undergoing brain tumor resection. This clinical study ( n = 8) recorded multiple exposure times from the same cortical tissue area spanning 0.5-20 ms, and evaluated images individually as single-exposure LSCI and jointly using the MESI model. This study demonstrated that the MESI estimates provided the broadest flow sensitivity for sampling the flow magnitude in the human brain, closely followed by the shorter exposure times. Conservation of flow analysis on vascular bifurcations was used to validate physiological accuracy, with highly conserved flow estimates (<10%) from both MESI and 1 ms LSCI ( n = 14 branches). The MESI model had high goodness-of-fit with proper image calibration and acquisition, and was used to monitor blood flow changes after tissue cautery. Results from this study demonstrate that intraoperative MESI can be performed with high quantitative accuracy and sensitivity for cerebral blood flow monitoring.

  14. Feasibility assessment of the interactive use of a Monte Carlo algorithm in treatment planning for intraoperative electron radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Pedro; Udías, José M.; Herranz, Elena; Santos-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Herraiz, Joaquín L.; Valdivieso, Manlio F.; Rodríguez, Raúl; Calama, Juan A.; Pascau, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A.; Illana, Carlos; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J.; Santos, Andrés

    2014-12-01

    This work analysed the feasibility of using a fast, customized Monte Carlo (MC) method to perform accurate computation of dose distributions during pre- and intraplanning of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) procedures. The MC method that was implemented, which has been integrated into a specific innovative simulation and planning tool, is able to simulate the fate of thousands of particles per second, and it was the aim of this work to determine the level of interactivity that could be achieved. The planning workflow enabled calibration of the imaging and treatment equipment, as well as manipulation of the surgical frame and insertion of the protection shields around the organs at risk and other beam modifiers. In this way, the multidisciplinary team involved in IOERT has all the tools necessary to perform complex MC dosage simulations adapted to their equipment in an efficient and transparent way. To assess the accuracy and reliability of this MC technique, dose distributions for a monoenergetic source were compared with those obtained using a general-purpose software package used widely in medical physics applications. Once accuracy of the underlying simulator was confirmed, a clinical accelerator was modelled and experimental measurements in water were conducted. A comparison was made with the output from the simulator to identify the conditions under which accurate dose estimations could be obtained in less than 3 min, which is the threshold imposed to allow for interactive use of the tool in treatment planning. Finally, a clinically relevant scenario, namely early-stage breast cancer treatment, was simulated with pre- and intraoperative volumes to verify that it was feasible to use the MC tool intraoperatively and to adjust dose delivery based on the simulation output, without compromising accuracy. The workflow provided a satisfactory model of the treatment head and the imaging system, enabling proper configuration of the treatment planning

  15. Intraoperative diagnosis of sentinel lymph node metastases in breast cancer treatment with one-step nucleic acid amplification assay (OSNA)

    PubMed Central

    Szychta, Paweł; Westfal, Bogusław; Maciejczyk, Rafał; Smolarz, Beata; Romanowicz, Hanna; Krawczyk, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of a one-step nucleic acid amplification assay (OSNA) for intraoperative detection of metastases to sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in comparison to examination of frozen sections, and to summarize the results of previous studies. Material and methods We enrolled 98 patients aged 58.13 ±10.74 years treated surgically for breast cancer, and 99 biopsies of SLNs were followed by analysis of 105 SLNs. The central 1 mm slice of SLN was used for examination of frozen sections, whereas 2 outer slices of SLNs were analyzed intraoperatively with OSNA. Detection of isolated tumor cells (ITC), micrometastases or macrometastases with OSNA extended surgery to axillary lymph node dissection. Congruency of results was assessed between OSNA and examination of frozen sections. Results One-step nucleic acid amplification assay detected metastases in 29/105 SLNs in surgery of 27/99 breasts, including ITC in 3/29 SLNs, micrometastases in 12/29 and macrometastases in 14/29. One-step nucleic acid amplification assay detected significantly more metastases to SLNs than examination of frozen sections (p < 0.0001). All 8 inconsistent results were positive in OSNA and negative in examination of frozen sections; ITC were identified in 2/8 SLNs and micrometastases in 6/8 SLNs. Sensitivity for OSNA was calculated as 100%, specificity as 90.47%, and κ was 79.16%. Conclusions One-step nucleic acid amplification assay analysis allows rapid and quantitative detection of mRNA CK19 with high specificity and a low rate of false positives. One-step nucleic acid amplification assay is a reliable tool for intraoperative diagnosis of whole SLNs during surgery of breast cancer. One-step nucleic acid amplification assay minimizes the need for secondary surgery and avoids delays in the adjuvant treatment. PMID:27904514

  16. Feasibility assessment of the interactive use of a Monte Carlo algorithm in treatment planning for intraoperative electron radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Pedro; Udías, José M; Herranz, Elena; Santos-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Herraiz, Joaquín L; Valdivieso, Manlio F; Rodríguez, Raúl; Calama, Juan A; Pascau, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Illana, Carlos; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Santos, Andrés

    2014-12-07

    This work analysed the feasibility of using a fast, customized Monte Carlo (MC) method to perform accurate computation of dose distributions during pre- and intraplanning of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) procedures. The MC method that was implemented, which has been integrated into a specific innovative simulation and planning tool, is able to simulate the fate of thousands of particles per second, and it was the aim of this work to determine the level of interactivity that could be achieved. The planning workflow enabled calibration of the imaging and treatment equipment, as well as manipulation of the surgical frame and insertion of the protection shields around the organs at risk and other beam modifiers. In this way, the multidisciplinary team involved in IOERT has all the tools necessary to perform complex MC dosage simulations adapted to their equipment in an efficient and transparent way. To assess the accuracy and reliability of this MC technique, dose distributions for a monoenergetic source were compared with those obtained using a general-purpose software package used widely in medical physics applications. Once accuracy of the underlying simulator was confirmed, a clinical accelerator was modelled and experimental measurements in water were conducted. A comparison was made with the output from the simulator to identify the conditions under which accurate dose estimations could be obtained in less than 3 min, which is the threshold imposed to allow for interactive use of the tool in treatment planning. Finally, a clinically relevant scenario, namely early-stage breast cancer treatment, was simulated with pre- and intraoperative volumes to verify that it was feasible to use the MC tool intraoperatively and to adjust dose delivery based on the simulation output, without compromising accuracy. The workflow provided a satisfactory model of the treatment head and the imaging system, enabling proper configuration of the treatment planning

  17. A randomised controlled trial of the electric heating pad vs forced-air warming for preventing hypothermia during laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Leung, K K; Lai, A; Wu, A

    2007-06-01

    A randomised controlled trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of upper body forced-air warming (Bair Hugger, Augustine Medical model 500/OR, Prairie, MN) with that of an electric heating pad (Operatherm 202, KanMed, Bromma, Sweden) for maintenance of intra-operative body temperature in 60 patients undergoing laparotomy under general anaesthesia. The nasopharyngeal temperature was recorded throughout the operative period. The mean (SD) final temperatures were 36.2 (0.4) degrees C with forced-air warming and 35.5 (1.0) degrees C with electric heating pad (p < 0.01). Upper body forced-air warming is more effective than the heating pad for maintenance of body temperature during laparotomy.

  18. Negative effect of static stretching restored when combined with a sport specific warm-up component.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kristie-Lee; Sheppard, Jeremy M; Lee, Hamilton; Plummer, Norma

    2009-11-01

    There is substantial evidence that static stretching may inhibit performance in strength and power activities. However, most of this research has involved stretching routines dissimilar to those practiced by athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the decline in performance normally associated with static stretching pervades when the static stretching is conducted prior to a sport specific warm-up. Thirteen netball players completed two experimental warm-up conditions. Day 1 warm-up involved a submaximal run followed by 15 min of static stretching and a netball specific skill warm-up. Day 2 followed the same design; however, the static stretching was replaced with a 15 min dynamic warm-up routine to allow for a direct comparison between the static stretching and dynamic warm-up effects. Participants performed a countermovement vertical jump and 20m sprint after the first warm-up intervention (static or dynamic) and also after the netball specific skill warm-up. The static stretching condition resulted in significantly worse performance than the dynamic warm-up in vertical jump height (-4.2%, 0.40 ES) and 20m sprint time (1.4%, 0.34 ES) (p<0.05). However, no significant differences in either performance variable were evident when the skill-based warm-up was preceded by static stretching or a dynamic warm-up routine. This suggests that the practice of a subsequent high-intensity skill based warm-up restored the differences between the two warm-up interventions. Hence, if static stretching is to be included in the warm-up period, it is recommended that a period of high-intensity sport-specific skills based activity is included prior to the on-court/field performance.

  19. The Great Warming Brian Fagan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Great Warming is a journey back to the world of a thousand years ago, to the Medieval Warm Period. Five centuries of irregular warming from 800 to 1250 had beneficial effects in Europe and the North Atlantic, but brought prolonged droughts to much of the Americas and lands affected by the South Asian monsoon. The book describes these impacts of warming on medieval European societies, as well as the Norse and the Inuit of the far north, then analyzes the impact of harsh, lengthy droughts on hunting societies in western North America and the Ancestral Pueblo farmers of Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. These peoples reacted to drought by relocating entire communities. The Maya civilization was much more vulnerable that small-scale hunter-gatherer societies and subsistence farmers in North America. Maya rulers created huge water storage facilities, but their civilization partially collapsed under the stress of repeated multiyear droughts, while the Chimu lords of coastal Peru adapted with sophisticated irrigation works. The climatic villain was prolonged, cool La Niñalike conditions in the Pacific, which caused droughts from Venezuela to East Asia, and as far west as East Africa. The Great Warming argues that the warm centuries brought savage drought to much of humanity, from China to Peru. It also argues that drought is one of the most dangerous elements in today’s humanly created global warming, often ignored by preoccupied commentators, but with the potential to cause over a billion people to starve. Finally, I use the book to discuss the issues and problems of communicating multidisciplinary science to the general public.

  20. Intraoperative image updating for brain shift following dural opening.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W; Schaewe, Timothy J; Ji, Songbai; Holton, Leslie H; Simon, David A; Paulsen, Keith D

    2016-09-09

    OBJECTIVE Preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR) are typically coregistered to provide intraoperative navigation, the accuracy of which can be significantly compromised by brain deformation. In this study, the authors generated updated MR images (uMR) in the operating room (OR) to compensate for brain shift due to dural opening, and evaluated the accuracy and computational efficiency of the process. METHODS In 20 open cranial neurosurgical cases, a pair of intraoperative stereovision (iSV) images was acquired after dural opening to reconstruct a 3D profile of the exposed cortical surface. The iSV surface was registered with pMR to detect cortical displacements that were assimilated by a biomechanical model to estimate whole-brain nonrigid deformation and produce uMR in the OR. The uMR views were displayed on a commercial navigation system and compared side by side with the corresponding coregistered pMR. A tracked stylus was used to acquire coordinate locations of features on the cortical surface that served as independent positions for calculating target registration errors (TREs) for the coregistered uMR and pMR image volumes. RESULTS The uMR views were visually more accurate and well aligned with the iSV surface in terms of both geometry and texture compared with pMR where misalignment was evident. The average misfit between model estimates and measured displacements was 1.80 ± 0.35 mm, compared with the average initial misfit of 7.10 ± 2.78 mm between iSV and pMR, and the average TRE was 1.60 ± 0.43 mm across the 20 patients in the uMR image volume, compared with 7.31 ± 2.82 mm on average in the pMR cases. The iSV also proved to be accurate with an average error of 1.20 ± 0.37 mm. The overall computational time required to generate the uMR views was 7-8 minutes. CONCLUSIONS This study compensated for brain deformation caused by intraoperative dural opening using computational model-based assimilation of iSV cortical surface displacements. The u

  1. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging during robotic operations.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Antonio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Schraibman, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The intraoperative identification of certain anatomical structures because they are small or visually occult may be challenging. The development of minimally invasive surgery brought additional difficulties to identify these structures due to the lack of complete tactile sensitivity. A number of different forms of intraoperative mapping have been tried. Recently, the near-infrared fluorescence imaging technology with indocyanine green has been added to robotic platforms. In addition, this technology has been tested in several types of operations, and has advantages such as safety, low cost and good results. Disadvantages are linked to contrast distribution in certain clinical scenarios. The intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging is new and promising addition to robotic surgery. Several reports show the utility of this technology in several different procedures. The ideal dose, time and site for dye injection are not well defined. No high quality evidence-based comparative studies and long-term follow-up outcomes have been published so far. Initial results, however, are good and safe. RESUMO A identificação intraoperatória de certas estruturas anatômicas, por seu tamanho ou por elas serem ocultas à visão, pode ser desafiadora. O desenvolvimento da cirurgia minimamente invasiva trouxe dificuldades adicionais, pela falta da sensibilidade tátil completa. Diversas formas de detecção intraoperatória destas estruturas têm sido tentadas. Recentemente, a tecnologia de fluorescência infravermelha com verde de indocianina foi associada às plataformas robóticas. Além disso, essa tecnologia tem sido testada em uma variedade de cirurgias, e suas vantagens parecem estar ligadas a baixo custo, segurança e bons resultados. As desvantagens estão associadas à má distribuição do contraste em determinados cenários. A imagem intraoperatória por fluorescência infravermelha é uma nova e promissora adição à cirurgia robótica. Diversas séries mostram

  2. How warm days increase belief in global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaval, Lisa; Keenan, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, Eric J.; Weber, Elke U.

    2014-02-01

    Climate change judgements can depend on whether today seems warmer or colder than usual, termed the local warming effect. Although previous research has demonstrated that this effect occurs, studies have yet to explain why or how temperature abnormalities influence global warming attitudes. A better understanding of the underlying psychology of this effect can help explain the public's reaction to climate change and inform approaches used to communicate the phenomenon. Across five studies, we find evidence of attribute substitution, whereby individuals use less relevant but available information (for example, today's temperature) in place of more diagnostic but less accessible information (for example, global climate change patterns) when making judgements. Moreover, we rule out alternative hypotheses involving climate change labelling and lay mental models. Ultimately, we show that present temperature abnormalities are given undue weight and lead to an overestimation of the frequency of similar past events, thereby increasing belief in and concern for global warming.

  3. Distinguishing warming-induced drought from drought-induced warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, M. L.; Yin, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is usually observed that temperatures, especially maximum temperatures are higher during drought. A very widely held public perception is that the increase in temperature is a cause of drought. This represents the warming-induced drought scenario. However, the agricultural and hydrologic scientific communities have a very different interpretation with drought being the cause of increasing temperature. In essence, those communities assume the warming is a surface feedback and their interpretation is for drought-induced warming. This is a classic cause-effect problem that has resisted definitive explanation due to the lack of radiative observations at suitable spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation we first summarise the observations and then use theory to untangle the cause-effect relationships that underlie the competing interpretations. We then show how satellite data (CERES, NASA) can be used to disentangle the cause-effect relations.

  4. Active Movement Warm-Up Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Teri; Quint, Ashleigh; Fischer, Kim; Kiger, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents warm-ups that are designed to physiologically and psychologically prepare students for vigorous physical activity. An active movement warm-up routine is made up of three parts: (1) active warm-up movement exercises, (2) general preparation, and (3) the energy system. These warm-up routines can be used with all grade levels…

  5. Warm Up to a Good Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tovey, David C.

    1977-01-01

    Most choral directors in schools today have been exposed to a variety of warm-up procedures. Yet, many do not use the warm-up time effectively as possible. Considers the factors appropriate to a warm-up exercise and three basic warm-up categories. (Author/RK)

  6. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOEBRT) for carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Konski, A.A.; Merrick, H.W. III; Bronn, D.G.; Schifeling, D.; Kamen, C. )

    1991-01-01

    The abdominal cavities of 50 patients were explored in a specially constructed intraoperative radiotherapy operating amphitheater at the Medical College of Ohio. Twenty-six patients were treated with intraoperative and postoperative precision high dose external beam therapy, 12 with intraoperative irradiation but no external beam therapy, and 12 with palliative surgery alone. All but two patients completed the postoperative external beam radiation therapy as initially prescribed. The median survival time for patients treated with palliative surgery alone was 4 months, and that for patients treated with intraoperative radiotherapy without external beam therapy was 3.5 months. Patients undergoing intraoperative irradiation and external beam radiation therapy had a median survival time of 10.5 months. Four patients died within 30 days of surgery and two patients died of gastrointestinal hemorrhage 5 months posttreatment.

  7. Global warming and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Khasnis, Atul A; Nettleman, Mary D

    2005-01-01

    Global warming has serious implications for all aspects of human life, including infectious diseases. The effect of global warming depends on the complex interaction between the human host population and the causative infectious agent. From the human standpoint, changes in the environment may trigger human migration, causing disease patterns to shift. Crop failures and famine may reduce host resistance to infections. Disease transmission may be enhanced through the scarcity and contamination of potable water sources. Importantly, significant economic and political stresses may damage the existing public health infrastructure, leaving mankind poorly prepared for unexpected epidemics. Global warming will certainly affect the abundance and distribution of disease vectors. Altitudes that are currently too cool to sustain vectors will become more conducive to them. Some vector populations may expand into new geographic areas, whereas others may disappear. Malaria, dengue, plague, and viruses causing encephalitic syndromes are among the many vector-borne diseases likely to be affected. Some models suggest that vector-borne diseases will become more common as the earth warms, although caution is needed in interpreting these predictions. Clearly, global warming will cause changes in the epidemiology of infectious diseases. The ability of mankind to react or adapt is dependent upon the magnitude and speed of the change. The outcome will also depend on our ability to recognize epidemics early, to contain them effectively, to provide appropriate treatment, and to commit resources to prevention and research.

  8. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; ...

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ionmore » dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.« less

  9. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ion dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.

  10. Cytology of bone lesions by intraoperative sampling during fracture treatment.

    PubMed

    Kinias, Ioannis S; Rammou-Kinia, Rea

    2002-03-01

    Cytology was performed on 314 patients who were treated by surgery for hip joint fracture, to determine and evaluate the role, accuracy, and perspective of intraoperative bone sampling. Specimens were collected from bone lesions during surgery by imprints or driller washing in normal saline. The results were compared with those of subsequent biopsies or clinical follow-up. All 13 neoplastic cases (malignant or benign) were identified by cytology. An accuracy rate of 69.2% was achieved by this method when the type and origin of the neoplasms were to be conclusive. There were no false-positive diagnoses, and all benign conditions showed negative results on cytology (specificity and sensitivity of 100%). Cytology can play a valuable role in the diagnosis of bone lesions. The morphologic diagnostic criteria allow for a high level of diagnostic accuracy of cytologic assessments in most cases of bone lesions, no matter the sampling technique.

  11. Computerized intraoperative calculation of instantaneous prosthetic aortic valve area.

    PubMed

    DiSesa, V J; Lachman, P; Collins, J J; Cohn, L H

    1988-01-01

    Improved assessment of valve area is essential to understanding the performance of prosthetic valves. The authors studied six patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using mechanical (ME) or porcine (PO) prostheses. Instantaneous cardiac output (CO) (L/min) was measured in the aorta using an ultrasonic flow probe. Left ventricular and aortic pressures (mmHg) were measured using Millar catheters. Data were analyzed using an IBM PC-AT. Valve area (cm2) was determined using Gorlin's formula (AG) and a new formula for instantaneous area derived mathematically and using a theoretic constant. AG, mean (AI) and peak (Apk) instantaneous areas were compared to geometric measures of area (Aactual) in vitro. Peak instantaneous area correlates best with measured area. Intraoperative assessment using the ultrasonic flow probe and computer analysis is helpful in understanding the dynamic properties of prosthetic valves in vivo.

  12. Intraoperative Proximal Femoral Fracture in Primary Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Shahi, Alisina; Park, Andrew G; Purtill, James J

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative proximal femoral fracture is a complication of primary cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) at rates of 2.95-27.8%. A retrospective review of 2423 consecutive primary cementless THA cases identified 102 hips (96 patients) with fracture. Multivariate analysis compared fracture incidences between implants, Accolade (Stryker Orthopaedics) and Tri-Lock (DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc.), and evaluated potential risk factors using a randomized control group of 1150 cases without fracture. The fracture incidence was 4.4% (102/2423), 3.7% (36/1019) using Accolade and 4.9% using Tri-Lock (66/1404) (P=0.18). Female gender (OR=1.96; 95% CI 1.19-3.23; P=0.008) and smaller stem size (OR=1.64; 95% CI 1.04-2.63; P=0.03) predicted increased odds of fracture. No revisions of the femoral component were required in the fracture cohort.

  13. Intraoperative raster photogrammetry--the PAR Corneal Topography System.

    PubMed

    Belin, M W

    1993-01-01

    The PAR Corneal Topography System (CTS) is a computer-driven corneal imaging system that uses close-range raster photogrammetry to measure and produce a topographic map of the corneal surface. The CTS determines distortion in a projected two-dimensional grid. Unlike Placido-disc-based videokeratoscopes, the PAR CTS produces a true topographic map (elevation map) and requires neither a smooth reflective surface nor precise spatial alignment for accurate imaging. Because the system uses two noncoaxial optical paths, it can be integrated into other optical devices. A modified CTS was integrated into an experimental erbium: YAG photoablative laser. The CTS successfully imaged corneas before, after, and during laser photoablation. Its ability to image nonreflective surfaces and to be integrated into other optical systems may make it suitable for intraoperative refractive monitoring.

  14. Compact intraoperative imaging device for sentinel lymph node mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Bauer, Adam Q.; Akers, Walter; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Shen, Duanwen; Berezin, Mikhail; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a novel real-time intraoperative fluorescence imaging device that can detect near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and map sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). In contrast to conventional imaging systems, this device is compact, portable, and battery-operated. It is also wearable and thus allows hands-free operation of clinicians. The system directly displays the fluorescence in its goggle eyepiece, eliminating the need for a remote monitor. Using this device in murine lymphatic mapping, the SLNs stained with indocyanine green (ICG) can be readily detected. Fluorescence-guided SLN resection under the new device was performed with ease. Ex vivo examination of resected tissues also revealed high fluorescence level in the SLNs. Histology further confirmed the lymphatic nature of the resected SLNs.

  15. Intraoperative hypertensive crisis due to a catecholamine-secreting esthesioneuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Salmasi, Vafi; Schiavi, Adam; Binder, Zev A.; Ruzevick, Jacob; Orr, Brent A.; Burger, Peter C.; Ball, Douglas W.; Blitz, Ari M.; Koch, Wayne M.; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although uncommon, esthesioneuroblastomas may produce clinically significant amounts of catecholamines. Methods We report a patient with a catecholamine-secreting esthesioneuroblastoma who developed intraoperative hypertensive crisis. Results A patient with history of hypertension was referred to our skull base center for management of a residual esthesioneuroblastoma. A staged endonasal endoscopic approach was planned. At the conclusion of the first stage, a hypertensive crisis occurred. Work-up revealed elevated levels of serum and urinary catecholamines. The patient was treated with alpha adrenoceptor blockade prior to the second stage. Serum catecholamine levels following this second stage were normal. On immunohistochemical analysis, the tumor cells were found to be positive for tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme in cathecholamine synthesis, and achaete-scute homologue 1, a transcription factor essential in the development of olfactory and sympathetic neurons. Conclusion Catecholamine production should be considered in the differential of unexpected extreme hypertension during surgical resection of esthesioneuroblastoma. PMID:25352487

  16. Modified Surgical Techniques for Managing Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charukamnoetkanok, Puwat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a modified surgical strategy in the management of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome-associated iris prolapse. Methods. Prolapsed iris is left as is and a new corneal incision near the original wound but at a different site is created. Depending on the location of the original incision and the surgeon's preference, this additional incision can be used as a new port for phacoemulsification tip or can be the new site for the iris to securely prolapse, allowing for the surgery to proceed safely. Results. We present 2 cases of iris prolapse and inadequate pupil dilation in patients with IFIS. Along with our modified technique, additional iris retractors were placed to increase the workspace for the phacoemulsification tip. The cataract surgery was performed successfully without further complications in both cases. Conclusion. This surgical technique could be an adjunct to allow the surgeons to expand the armamentarium for the management of IFIS-associated iris prolapse. PMID:27999697

  17. Intraoperative Periprosthetic Femur Fracture: A Biomechanical Analysis of Cerclage Fixation.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Charters, Michael A; Sikora-Klak, Jakub; Banglmaier, Richard F; Oravec, Daniel J; Silverton, Craig D

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative periprosthetic femur fracture is a known complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and a variety of cerclage systems are available to manage these fractures. The purpose of this study was to examine the in situ biomechanical response of cerclage systems for fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures that occur during cementless THA. We compared cobalt chrome (CoCr) cables, synthetic cables, monofilament wires and hose clamps under axial compressive and torsional loading. Metallic constructs with a positive locking system performed the best, supporting the highest loads with minimal implant subsidence (both axial and angular) after loading. Overall, the CoCr cable and hose clamp had the highest construct stiffness and least reduction in stiffness with increased loading. They were not demonstrably different from each other.

  18. Is current clinical practice modified about intraoperative breast irradiation?

    PubMed

    Massa, Michela; Franchelli, Simonetta; Panizza, Renzo; Massa, Tiberio

    2016-04-01

    After the results obtained in the two randomized clinical trial, the ELIOT trial and the TARGIT-A trial, a heated debate is going on concerning the question of applying intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) instead of postoperative whole breast irradiation (WBI) after breast conservative treatment. Currently, many centers are applying the IORT following the strict selection criteria dictated by the working groups American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) and monitoring the oncological outcome together with radiation toxicity on breast tissue. The clinical experience of the Geneva University Hospital regarding the use of the Intrabeam system is evaluated and compared with current evidences.

  19. Is current clinical practice modified about intraoperative breast irradiation?

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Michela; Franchelli, Simonetta; Panizza, Renzo; Massa, Tiberio

    2016-01-01

    After the results obtained in the two randomized clinical trial, the ELIOT trial and the TARGIT-A trial, a heated debate is going on concerning the question of applying intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) instead of postoperative whole breast irradiation (WBI) after breast conservative treatment. Currently, many centers are applying the IORT following the strict selection criteria dictated by the working groups American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) and monitoring the oncological outcome together with radiation toxicity on breast tissue. The clinical experience of the Geneva University Hospital regarding the use of the Intrabeam system is evaluated and compared with current evidences. PMID:27199511

  20. Fatal intraoperative hemorrhage during spinal fusion surgery for osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Sperry, K

    1989-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an uncommon inherited systemic disorder of the connective tissues characterized primarily by varying degrees of bony fragility. Consequently, individuals affected by this condition frequently suffer severe skeletal injuries from otherwise innocuous traumatic events. This syndrome has other associated abnormalities, including hydrocephalus and brain stem compression on the basis of cranial developmental defects (platybasia), cardiac and vascular problems, respiratory disease from spinal deformities, vascular fragility, a bleeding disorder caused by an apparent platelet function abnormality, and anesthesia-related hyperpyrexia. A case is presented here of a young girl with advanced OI in whom intraoperative death occurred as a consequence of inadvertent rib fractures, with subsequent uncontrollable hemorrhage. OI may also potentially be mistaken for child abuse by an inexperienced examiner.

  1. Intraoperative blood loss and gestational age at pregnancy termination.

    PubMed

    Marchiano; Thomas; Lapinski; Balwan; Patel

    1998-07-01

    Objective: To establish the relationship of measured intraoperative blood loss to gestational age at pregnancy termination, and to determine which factors, if any, affect the risk of bleeding.Methods: A single-operator series of 363 consecutive women undergoing pregnancy termination between 5 and 24 weeks gestational age, as dated by ultrasound, was prospectively evaluated. All pregnancies under 13 weeks gestation were terminated by mechanical dilation and suction curettage without preoperative cervical ripening. All pregnancies between 13 and 24 weeks gestation were terminated by preoperative osmotic cervical dilation with laminaria tents and subsequent uterine evacuation by a combination of suction curettage, sharp curettage, and Bierer forceps extraction. All patients over 12 weeks gestation received a postoperative oxytocin infusion. Whenever possible, amniotic fluid and blood were collected and measured separately. Patients were excluded from the data analysis for pregnancy demise, PPROM, Potter's syndrome, or inability to separate blood establish their relationship. After adjustment for gestational age, the results were analyzed to determine if blood loss was related to maternal age, smoking history, body habitus, or operative indication.Results: A curvilinear relationship between blood loss and gestational age was observed. Mean blood loss at 24 weeks exceeded 800 mL. After adjustment for gestational age, no factors significantly affected blood loss at dilation and aspiration of first trimester pregnancies. In those patients undergoing dilation and evacuation in the second trimester, both simple and stepwise regression analyses showed obesity (BMI >/=32.3) to be significantly associated with increased blood loss (P <.05). Neither age, parity, previous cesarean section, nor smoking history were significantly associated with increased blood loss at dilation and evacuation.Conclusions: With advancing gestational age, intraoperative blood loss increases in

  2. Intraoperative measurement of limb lengthening during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios Vasileiou; Koulouvaris, Panagiotis; Aggelidakis, Georgios Charalambos; Tsantes, Andreas Georgios; Lykissas, Marios Georgios; Mavrodontidis, Alexandros

    2017-01-01

    Background: Limb length discrepancy (LLD) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a common problem which cannot be completely resolved. Many techniques have been described in order to minimize postoperative LLD, but most of these techniques are difficult to apply. Ideal technique must be simple and accurate. The most simple technique using a suture tied on the skin has well-known limitations, but its accuracy has not been evaluated before. Materials and Methods: Sixty THAs in sixty patients (mean age 71 years, 1:1 male to female ratio) with hip osteoarthritis (37 cases in the right, and 23 cases in the left side) were studied in this prospective study. In all surgeries, the intraoperataive measurement of limb lengthening was performed using a suture tied on the skin of the lateral pelvis. The accuracy of this technique and correlation between intraoperative and postoperative radiological measurements of lengthening were evaluated. Results: The mean preoperative LLD was –7.5 mm while the mean postoperative LLD was 1.58 mm. The accuracy of this technique, defined as the mean difference between the intraoperative and postoperative measurements was 1.8 mm. A strong correlation between these two measurements was noticed (r = 0.86). Conclusion: The accuracy and correlation index of this simple technique were similar to those of other techniques. The studied technique is quite accurate when attention is given to certain details, such as the amount of tension applied on the suture, the position of the tied point on the skin, and the position of the leg during measurements.

  3. Treatment of symptomatic intraosseous pneumatocyst using intraoperative navigation.

    PubMed

    Formby, Peter M; Kang, Daniel G; Potter, Benjamin K; Forsberg, Jonathan A

    2015-03-01

    Intraosseous pneumatocysts are benign air-containing lesions that are most often found in the spine and pelvis and are nearly always treated nonoperatively. Although rarely clinically symptomatic, studies have shown pneumatocysts to be present in up to 10% of computed tomography (CT) scans of the pelvis and spine. Radiographic characteristics of these lesions include a localized collection of gas with a thin sclerotic rim, no bony destruction, no soft tissue masses, and no medullary abnormalities. Computed tomography is the diagnostic study of choice, with Hounsfield units ranging from -580 to -950, showing a gas-containing lesion. Few studies have described the management of symptomatic pneumatocysts, and all reported cases concern underwater divers, presumably because of greater pressure cycling and barotrauma encountered while underwater diving. The goal of this report is to describe the intraoperative CT-guided navigation and percutaneous injection of calcium sulfate-calcium phosphate composite bone graft substitute material for the treatment of a symptomatic pneumatocyst in the ilium of a Navy dive instructor. The patient reported a 1-year history of increasing buttock pain with increased depth of diving, consistently reproduced by diving past a depth of 20 to 30 feet. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description in the English literature of the operative treatment of an intraosseous pneumatocyst of the ilium. The use of intraoperative CT guidance permitted accurate percutaneous localization, decompression, and filling of the lesion with synthetic bone graft substitute, with complete early relief of symptoms. At 6-month follow up, the patient had reached diving depths of 170 feet without pain.

  4. A quantitative microscopic approach to predict local recurrence based on in vivo intraoperative imaging of sarcoma tumor margins

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Jenna L.; Fu, Henry L.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Whitley, Melodi J.; Chitalia, Rhea; Erkanli, Alaattin; Dodd, Leslie; Cardona, Diana M.; Geradts, Joseph; Willett, Rebecca M.; Kirsch, David G.; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2015-01-01

    The goal of resection of soft tissue sarcomas located in the extremity is to preserve limb function while completely excising the tumor with a margin of normal tissue. With surgery alone, one-third of patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity will have local recurrence due to microscopic residual disease in the tumor bed. Currently, a limited number of intraoperative pathology-based techniques are used to assess margin status; however, few have been widely adopted due to sampling error and time constraints. To aid in intraoperative diagnosis, we developed a quantitative optical microscopy toolbox, which includes acriflavine staining, fluorescence microscopy, and analytic techniques called sparse component analysis and circle transform to yield quantitative diagnosis of tumor margins. A series of variables were quantified from images of resected primary sarcomas and used to optimize a multivariate model. The sensitivity and specificity for differentiating positive from negative ex vivo resected tumor margins was 82% and 75%. The utility of this approach was tested by imaging the in vivo tumor cavities from 34 mice after resection of a sarcoma with local recurrence as a bench mark. When applied prospectively to images from the tumor cavity, the sensitivity and specificity for differentiating local recurrence was 78% and 82%. For comparison, if pathology was used to predict local recurrence in this data set, it would achieve a sensitivity of 29% and a specificity of 71%. These results indicate a robust approach for detecting microscopic residual disease, which is an effective predictor of local recurrence. PMID:25994353

  5. A quantitative microscopic approach to predict local recurrence based on in vivo intraoperative imaging of sarcoma tumor margins.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jenna L; Fu, Henry L; Mito, Jeffrey K; Whitley, Melodi J; Chitalia, Rhea; Erkanli, Alaattin; Dodd, Leslie; Cardona, Diana M; Geradts, Joseph; Willett, Rebecca M; Kirsch, David G; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2015-11-15

    The goal of resection of soft tissue sarcomas located in the extremity is to preserve limb function while completely excising the tumor with a margin of normal tissue. With surgery alone, one-third of patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity will have local recurrence due to microscopic residual disease in the tumor bed. Currently, a limited number of intraoperative pathology-based techniques are used to assess margin status; however, few have been widely adopted due to sampling error and time constraints. To aid in intraoperative diagnosis, we developed a quantitative optical microscopy toolbox, which includes acriflavine staining, fluorescence microscopy, and analytic techniques called sparse component analysis and circle transform to yield quantitative diagnosis of tumor margins. A series of variables were quantified from images of resected primary sarcomas and used to optimize a multivariate model. The sensitivity and specificity for differentiating positive from negative ex vivo resected tumor margins was 82 and 75%. The utility of this approach was tested by imaging the in vivo tumor cavities from 34 mice after resection of a sarcoma with local recurrence as a bench mark. When applied prospectively to images from the tumor cavity, the sensitivity and specificity for differentiating local recurrence was 78 and 82%. For comparison, if pathology was used to predict local recurrence in this data set, it would achieve a sensitivity of 29% and a specificity of 71%. These results indicate a robust approach for detecting microscopic residual disease, which is an effective predictor of local recurrence.

  6. In situ observations of diurnal warming at the ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentemann, C. L.; Minnett, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    Observations of diurnal temperature variability at the ocean surface have been primarily available only from satellite SST retrievals themselves. Since most satellite observations revisit the same location only infrequently, determining how the ocean surface diurnal heating responds to variability in forcing (mainly insolation and wind speed) has been primarily addressed through theoretical modeling or extrapolation of results from in situ (buoy) observations measured 0.5 m to 1.5 m below the skin layer. Diurnal heating in the skin layer may be quite different than heating at 0.5 m as this layer responds very rapidly to changes in heat and momentum. The Explorer of the Seas, a cruise ship, makes weekly cruises on two alternating tracks through the Caribbean Sea. Measurements from the Marine Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI) carried on the Explorer of the Seas provide one of the few skin SST data sets, along with ancillary measurements necessary for diurnal investigations. Initial analyses show that the surface signature of diurnal warming in the skin layer is chiefly controlled by the wind speed. The daily peak in diurnal warming is directly related to the minimum wind speed during the day, causing the time of the peak to shift depending on when the minimum winds occur. Fluctuations in wind speed can result in multiple peaks in diurnal heating during a single afternoon. Wind speed is negatively lag-correlated with diurnal warming while insolation is positively lag-correlated. The maximum lag-correlation of wind speed (insolation) with diurnal warming is at a time lag of 30 (50) minutes. Several models of diurnal variability exist. A comparison of several models with each other reveals considerable differences in estimates of diurnal warming. Further validation of the models using M-AERI observed diurnal warming again reveals considerable differences in estimates of warming related to model forcing parameterizations.

  7. Evaluating the Dominant Components of Warming in Pliocene Climate Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. J.; Haywood, A. M.; Lunt, D. J.; Hunter, S. J.; Bragg, F. J.; Contoux, C.; Stepanek, C.; Sohl, L.; Rosenbloom, N. A.; Chan, W.-L.; Kamae, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Chandler, M. A.; Jost, A.; Lohmann, G.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Ramstein, G.; Ueda, H.

    2014-01-01

    The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) is the first coordinated climate model comparison for a warmer palaeoclimate with atmospheric CO2 significantly higher than pre-industrial concentrations. The simulations of the mid-Pliocene warm period show global warming of between 1.8 and 3.6 C above pre-industrial surface air temperatures, with significant polar amplification. Here we perform energy balance calculations on all eight of the coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations within PlioMIP Experiment 2 to evaluate the causes of the increased temperatures and differences between the models. In the tropics simulated warming is dominated by greenhouse gas increases, with the cloud component of planetary albedo enhancing the warming in most of the models, but by widely varying amounts. The responses to mid-Pliocene climate forcing in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes are substantially different between the climate models, with the only consistent response being a warming due to increased greenhouse gases. In the high latitudes all the energy balance components become important, but the dominant warming influence comes from the clear sky albedo, only partially offset by the increases in the cooling impact of cloud albedo. This demonstrates the importance of specified ice sheet and high latitude vegetation boundary conditions and simulated sea ice and snow albedo feedbacks. The largest components in the overall uncertainty are associated with clouds in the tropics and polar clear sky albedo, particularly in sea ice regions. These simulations show that albedo feedbacks, particularly those of sea ice and ice sheets, provide the most significant enhancements to high latitude warming in the Pliocene.

  8. [Passive nighttime warming (PNW) system, its design and warming effect].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Bin; Tian, Yun-lu; Dong, Wen-jun; Zhang, Wei-jian

    2010-09-01

    Based on the technique of passive nighttime warming (PNW), a convenient and energy-saving PNW facility was designed for a rice-wheat cropping system in Danyang, Jiangsu Province. The facility could guarantee 15.75 m2 effective sampling area, with a homogeneous amplitude of increased temperature, and making the nighttime canopy temperature during whole rice growth season increased averagely by 1.1 degrees C and the nighttime canopy temperature and 5 cm soil temperature during whole winter wheat growth period increased averagely by 1.3 degrees C and 0.8 degrees C, respectively. During the operation period of the facility, the variation trends of the canopy temperature and 5 cm soil temperature during the whole growth periods of rice and winter wheat in the warming plots were similar to those of the control. Though the facility slightly decreased the soil moisture content during winter wheat growth period, wheat growth was less impacted. The application of this facility in our main production areas of rice and winter wheat showed that the facility could advance the initial blossoming stages of rice and winter wheat averagely by 3 d and 5 d, respectively. In despite of the discrepancy in the warming effect among different regions and seasons, this energy-saving facility was reliable for the field research on crop responses to climate warming, when the homogeneity of increased temperature, the effective area, and the effects on crop growth period were taken into comprehensive consideration.

  9. Global warming at the summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    During the recent summit meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Bill Clinton, the two leaders reaffirmed their concerns about global warming and the need to continue to take actions to try to reduce the threat.In a June 4 joint statement, they stressed the need to develop flexibility mechanisms, including international emissions trading, under the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. They also noted that initiatives to reduce the risk of greenhouse warming, including specific mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol, could potentially promote economic growth.

  10. Warming up to solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, B.

    1996-07-01

    Increasingly alarmed by threats to their financial security posed by an escalating number of weather-related catastrophes, major insurance companaies, particularly those in Europe and Asia, are starting to support a variety of measures that would slowe the production of grenhouse gases worlwide. As the insurance and banking industries turn their attention to global warming, investments in solar energy take on growing appeal.

  11. Intraoperative Imaging Guidance for Sentinel Node Biopsy in Melanoma Using a Mobile Gamma Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Dengel, Lynn T; Judy, Patricia G; Petroni, Gina R; Smolkin, Mark E; Rehm, Patrice K; Majewski, Stan; Williams, Mark B; Slingluff Jr., Craig L

    2011-04-01

    The objective is to evaluate the sensitivity and clinical utility of intraoperative mobile gamma camera (MGC) imaging in sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in melanoma. The false-negative rate for SLNB for melanoma is approximately 17%, for which failure to identify the sentinel lymph node (SLN) is a major cause. Intraoperative imaging may aid in detection of SLN near the primary site, in ambiguous locations, and after excision of each SLN. The present pilot study reports outcomes with a prototype MGC designed for rapid intraoperative image acquisition. We hypothesized that intraoperative use of the MGC would be feasible and that sensitivity would be at least 90%. From April to September 2008, 20 patients underwent Tc99 sulfur colloid lymphoscintigraphy, and SLNB was performed with use of a conventional fixed gamma camera (FGC), and gamma probe followed by intraoperative MGC imaging. Sensitivity was calculated for each detection method. Intraoperative logistical challenges were scored. Cases in which MGC provided clinical benefit were recorded. Sensitivity for detecting SLN basins was 97% for the FGC and 90% for the MGC. A total of 46 SLN were identified: 32 (70%) were identified as distinct hot spots by preoperative FGC imaging, 31 (67%) by preoperative MGC imaging, and 43 (93%) by MGC imaging pre- or intraoperatively. The gamma probe identified 44 (96%) independent of MGC imaging. The MGC provided defined clinical benefit as an addition to standard practice in 5 (25%) of 20 patients. Mean score for MGC logistic feasibility was 2 on a scale of 1-9 (1 = best). Intraoperative MGC imaging provides additional information when standard techniques fail or are ambiguous. Sensitivity is 90% and can be increased. This pilot study has identified ways to improve the usefulness of an MGC for intraoperative imaging, which holds promise for reducing false negatives of SLNB for melanoma.

  12. Predicting Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome Following Superficial Temporal Artery to Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass based on Intraoperative Perfusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Defeng; Zhu, Fengping; Fung, Ka Ming; Zhu, Wei; Luo, Yishan; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Mok, Vincent Chung Tong; Wu, Jinsong; Shi, Lin; Ahuja, Anil T; Mao, Ying

    2015-09-14

    Moyamoya disease leads to the formation of stenosis in the cerebrovasculature. A superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass is an effective treatment for the disease, yet it is usually associated with postoperative cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS). This study aimed to evaluate cerebral hemodynamic changes immediately after surgery and assess whether a semiquantitative analysis of an intraoperative magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted image (PWI) is useful for predicting postoperative CHS. Fourteen patients who underwent the STA-MCA bypass surgery were included in this study. An atlas-based registration method was employed for studying hemodynamics in different cerebral regions. Pre- versus intraoperative and group-wise comparisons were conducted to evaluate the hemodynamic changes. A postoperative increase in relative cerebral blood flow (CBF) at the terminal MCA territory (P = 0.035) and drop in relative mean-time-transit at the central MCA territory (P = 0.012) were observed in all patients. However, a significant raise in the increasing ratio of relative-CBF at the terminal MCA territory was only found in CHS patients (P = 0.023). The cerebrovascular changes of the patients after revascularization treatment were confirmed. Intraoperative PWI might be helpful in predicting the change in relative-CBF at MCA terminal territory which might indicate a risk of CHS.

  13. Equatorial refuge amid tropical warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnauskas, Kristopher B.; Cohen, Anne L.

    2012-07-01

    Upwelling across the tropical Pacific Ocean is projected to weaken in accordance with a reduction of the atmospheric overturning circulation, enhancing the increase in sea surface temperature relative to other regions in response to greenhouse-gas forcing. In the central Pacific, home to one of the largest marine protected areas and fishery regions in the global tropics, sea surface temperatures are projected to increase by 2.8°C by the end of this century. Of critical concern is that marine protected areas may not provide refuge from the anticipated rate of large-scale warming, which could exceed the evolutionary capacity of coral and their symbionts to adapt. Combining high-resolution satellite measurements, an ensemble of global climate models and an eddy-resolving regional ocean circulation model, we show that warming and productivity decline around select Pacific islands will be mitigated by enhanced upwelling associated with a strengthening of the equatorial undercurrent. Enhanced topographic upwelling will act as a negative feedback, locally mitigating the surface warming. At the Gilbert Islands, the rate of warming will be reduced by 0.7+/-0.3°C or 25+/-9% per century, or an overall cooling effect comparable to the local anomaly for a typical El Niño, by the end of this century. As the equatorial undercurrent is dynamically constrained to the Equator, only a handful of coral reefs stand to benefit from this equatorial island effect. Nevertheless, those that do face a lower rate of warming, conferring a significant advantage over neighbouring reef systems. If realized, these predictions help to identify potential refuges for coral reef communities from anticipated climate changes of the twenty-first century.

  14. How perioperative nurses define, attribute causes of, and react to intraoperative nursing errors.

    PubMed

    Chard, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Errors in nursing practice pose a continuing threat to patient safety. A descriptive, correlational study was conducted to examine the definitions, circumstances, and perceived causes of intraoperative nursing errors; reactions of perioperative nurses to intraoperative nursing errors; and the relationships among coping with intraoperative nursing errors, emotional distress, and changes in practice made as a result of error. The results indicate that strategies of accepting responsibility and using self-control are significant predictors of emotional distress. Seeking social support and planful problem solving emerged as significant predictors of constructive changes in practice. Most predictive of defensive changes was the strategy of escape/avoidance.

  15. Intraoperative methods to stage and localize pancreatic and duodenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Norton, J A

    1999-01-01

    Intraoperative methods to stage and localize tumors have dramatically improved. Advances include less invasive methods to obtain comparable results and precise localization of previously occult tumors. The use of new technology including laparoscopy and ultrasound has provided some of these advances, while improved operative techniques have provided others. Laparoscopy with ultrasound has allowed for improved staging of patients with pancreatic cancer and exclusion of patients who are not resectable for cure. We performed laparoscopy with ultrasound on 50 consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas or liver who appeared to have resectable tumors based on preoperative computed tomography. 22 patients (44%) were found to be unresectable because of tumor nodules on the liver and/or peritoneal surfaces or unsuspected distant nodal or liver metastases. The site of disease making the patient unresectable was confirmed by biopsy in each case. Of the 28 remaining patients in whom laparoscopic ultrasound predicted to be resectable for cure, 26 (93%) had all tumor removed. Thus laparoscopy with ultrasound was the best method to select patients for curative surgery. Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) has been a critical method to identify insulinomas that are not palpable. Nonpalpable tumors are most commonly in the pancreatic head. Because the pancreatic head is thick and insulinomas are small, of 9 pancreatic head insulinomas only 3 (33%) were palpable. However, IOUS precisely identified each (100%). Others have recommended blind distal pancreatectomy for individuals with insulinoma in whom no tumor can be identified. However, our data suggest that this procedure is contraindicated as these occult tumors are usually within the pancreatic head. Recent series suggest that previously missed gastrinomas are commonly in the duodenum. IOUS is not able to identify these tumors, but other methods can. Of 27 patients with 31 duodenal gastrinomas, palpation identified 19

  16. Polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere dynamics: 2. Response to sudden stratospheric warmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, Andrew J.; Vincent, Robert A.; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Igarashi, Kiyoshi; Murayama, Yasuhiro; Singer, Werner; Murphy, Damian J.; Riggin, D. M.

    2007-09-01

    The dynamical response of the polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) to sudden stratospheric warmings is investigated using MF radars at Davis (69°S, 78°E), Syowa (69°S, 40°E) and Rothera (68°S, 68°W) in the Antarctic and Poker Flat (65°N, 147°W) and Andenes (69°N, 16°E) in the Arctic. Mean winds, gravity waves and planetary waves are investigated during sudden stratospheric warmings, and comparisons are made with climatological means. The available MF radar data set includes six major sudden stratospheric warmings in the Northern Hemisphere and the unprecedented 2002 Southern Hemisphere major stratospheric warming. Three of the six northern events are relatively weak and could almost be classed as minor warmings, while the larger three have similar characteristics to the event in the Southern Hemisphere. Zonal wind reversals associated with the major warmings in both hemispheres are generally weaker and earlier by several days in the mesosphere than in the stratosphere. There are, however, significant differences between locations in their response to stratospheric warmings. The zonal winds are remarkably weaker than average during both winter and spring around the time of the southern major warming of 2002, but these effects are not observed for the Northern Hemisphere events. Gravity wave activity is found to vary significantly between individual stratospheric warming events and also between individual locations.

  17. Versions of the Waste Reduction Model (WARM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides a brief chronology of changes made to EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM), organized by WARM version number. The page includes brief summaries of changes and updates since the previous version.

  18. Arctic climate change: Greenhouse warming unleashed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Human activity alters the atmospheric composition, which leads to global warming. Model simulations suggest that reductions in emission of sulfur dioxide from Europe since the 1970s could have unveiled rapid Arctic greenhouse gas warming.

  19. Waste Reduction Model (WARM) Resources for Students

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides a brief overview of how EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) can be used by students. The page includes a brief summary of uses of WARM for the audience and links to other resources.

  20. Global warming: Clouds cooled the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten

    2016-12-01

    The slow instrumental-record warming is consistent with lower-end climate sensitivity. Simulations and observations now show that changing sea surface temperature patterns could have affected cloudiness and thereby dampened the warming.

  1. Warming trends: Adapting to nonlinear change

    SciTech Connect

    Jonko, Alexandra K.

    2015-01-28

    As atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rise, some regions are expected to warm more than others. Research suggests that whether warming will intensify or slow down over time also depends on location.

  2. Documentation for the Waste Reduction Model (WARM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page describes the WARM documentation files and provides links to all documentation files associated with EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM). The page includes a brief summary of the chapters documenting the greenhouse gas emission and energy factors.

  3. Trophic mismatch requires seasonal heterogeneity of warming.

    PubMed

    Straile, Dietmar; Kerimoglu, Onur; Peeters, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Climate warming has been shown to advance the phenology of species. Asynchronous changes in phenology between interacting species may disrupt feeding interactions (phenological mismatch), which could have tremendous consequences for ecosystem functioning. Long-term field observations have suggested asynchronous shifts in phenology with warming, whereas experimental studies have not been conclusive. Using proxy-based modeling of three trophic levels (algae, herbivores, and fish), we .show that asynchronous changes in phenology only occur if warming is seasonally heterogeneous, but not if warming is constant throughout the year. If warming is seasonally heterogeneous, the degree and even direction of asynchrony depends on the specific seasonality of the warming. Conclusions about phenological mismatches in food web interactions may therefore produce controversial results if the analyses do not distinguish between seasonally constant and seasonal specific warming. Furthermore, our results suggest that predicting asynchrony between interacting species requires reliable warming predictions that resolve sub-seasonal time scales.

  4. Intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy (IS-PAM) using augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Han, Seunghoon; Kim, Sehui; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2014-03-01

    We have developed an intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy (IS-PAM) system by integrating an optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) and conventional surgical microscope. Based on the common optical path in the OR-PAM and microscope system, we can acquire the PAM and microscope images at the same time. Furthermore, by utilizing a mini-sized beam projector, 2D PAM images are back-projected onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality. Thus, both the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are displayed on the plane through an eyepiece lens of the microscope. In our method, additional image display tool is not required to show the PAM image. Therefore, it potentially offers significant convenience to surgeons without movement of their sights during surgeries. In order to demonstrate the performance of our IS-PAM system, first, we successfully monitored needle intervention in phantoms. Moreover, we successfully guided needle insertion into mice skins in vivo by visualizing surrounding blood vessels from the PAM images and the magnified skin surfaces from the conventional microscopic images simultaneously.

  5. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kyrgias, George; Hajiioannou, Jiannis; Tolia, Maria; Kouloulias, Vassilios; Lachanas, Vasileios; Skoulakis, Charalambos; Skarlatos, Ioannis; Rapidis, Alexandros; Bizakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Multimodality therapy constitutes the standard treatment of advanced and recurrent head and neck cancer. Since locoregional recurrence comprises a major obstacle in attaining cure, the role of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) as an add-on in improving survival and local control of the disease has been investigated. IORT allows delivery of a single tumoricidal dose of radiation to areas of potential residual microscopic disease while minimizing doses to normal tissues. Advantages of IORT include the conformal delivery of a large dose of radiation in an exposed and precisely defined tumor bed, minimizing the risk of a geographic miss creating the potential for subsequent dose reduction of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). This strategy allows for shortening overall treatment time and dose escalation. The aim of this review is to summarize recent published work on the use of IORT as an adjuvant modality to treat common head and neck cancer in the primary or recurrent setting. Methods: We searched the Medline, Scopus, Ovid, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases for articles published from 1980 up to March 2016. Results: Based on relevant publications it appears that including IORT in the multimodal treatment may contribute to improved local control. However, the benefit in overall survival is not so clear. Conclusion: IORT seems to be a safe, promising adjunct in the management of head and neck cancer and yet further well organized clinical trials are required to determine its role more precisely. PMID:27977569

  6. Intraoperative visualization and assessment of electromagnetic tracking error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harish, Vinyas; Ungi, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; MacDonald, Andrew; Nanji, Sulaiman; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Electromagnetic tracking allows for increased flexibility in designing image-guided interventions, however it is well understood that electromagnetic tracking is prone to error. Visualization and assessment of the tracking error should take place in the operating room with minimal interference with the clinical procedure. The goal was to achieve this ideal in an open-source software implementation in a plug and play manner, without requiring programming from the user. We use optical tracking as a ground truth. An electromagnetic sensor and optical markers are mounted onto a stylus device, pivot calibrated for both trackers. Electromagnetic tracking error is defined as difference of tool tip position between electromagnetic and optical readings. Multiple measurements are interpolated into the thin-plate B-spline transform visualized in real time using 3D Slicer. All tracked devices are used in a plug and play manner through the open-source SlicerIGT and PLUS extensions of the 3D Slicer platform. Tracking error was measured multiple times to assess reproducibility of the method, both with and without placing ferromagnetic objects in the workspace. Results from exhaustive grid sampling and freehand sampling were similar, indicating that a quick freehand sampling is sufficient to detect unexpected or excessive field distortion in the operating room. The software is available as a plug-in for the 3D Slicer platforms. Results demonstrate potential for visualizing electromagnetic tracking error in real time for intraoperative environments in feasibility clinical trials in image-guided interventions.

  7. Response of canine esophagus to intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, W.F.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Barnes, M.; DeLuca, A.M.; Tochner, Z.; Pass, H.I.; Kranda, K.C.; Terrill, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    Tolerance of esophagus to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated in dogs. Thirteen adult foxhounds were subjected to right thoractomy, mobilization of the intrathoracic esophagus, and IORT to a 6 cm full-thickness esophageal segment using 9 MeV electrons at doses of 0, 2,000, or 3,000 cGy. Dogs were followed clinically and were evaluated at regular intervals after treatment with fiberoptic esophagoscopy, barium swallows, and postmortem histologic evaluations. One sham-irradiated control dog showed no abnormalities during follow-up of 24 months. Seven dogs receiving 2,000 cGy IORT showed transient mild dysphagia and mild esophagitis, but no clinically or pathologically significant complications. Five dogs receiving 3,000 cGy demonstrated severe ulcerative esophagitis within 6 weeks of treatment which progressed to chronic ulcerative esophagitis with stricture formation by 9 months following IORT. One 3,000 cGy dog died at 13 months from an esophageal perforation. On the basis of a pilot experience using 13 experimental animals, it was concluded that intact canine esophagus tolerates IORT well to doses of 2,000 cGy, but doses of 3,000 cGy pose serious and potentially lethal risks. The clinical application of IORT to the treatment of human intrathoracic neoplasms requiring esophageal irradiation should be approached with caution, particularly at doses exceeding 2,000 cGy.

  8. Echocardiographic detection and treatment of intraoperative air embolism.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Toya, S; Ohira, T; Mine, T; Greig, N H

    1986-03-01

    A real-time two-dimensional echocardiogram was used to detect the presence of an air embolism in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures in the sitting position. The technique could with good sensitivity detect the appearance of a single air bubble intraoperatively, thus allowing early intervention to prevent development of further air emboli. Two types of air embolism could be differentiated; the single-bubble type and the "stormy-bubble" type. The single-bubble type was observed during skin and muscle incisions, craniotomy, and brain lesion excision. Further embolism development was prevented by electrocoagulation and application of bone wax. The stormy-bubble type occurred during dura and muscle incisions and was prevented by electrocoagulation, reflection of the dura, or suturing the affected muscle. The routine use of a Swan-Ganz catheter for removal of air embolism by suction proved effective for the treatment of the stormy-bubble type of air embolism. Masking the operative field with saline-soaked cotton strips was of moderate benefit in the stabilization of the single-bubble type of air influx, but proved to be of little value in controlling the entrance of the stormy-bubble type.

  9. Intra-operative probe for brain cancer: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu Thi, M. H.; Charon, Y.; Duval, M. A.; Lefebvre, F.; Menard, L.; Pitre, S.; Pinot, L.; Siebert, R.

    2007-07-01

    The present work aims a new medical probe for surgeons devoted to brain cancers, in particular glioblastoma multiforme. Within the last years, our group has started the development of a new intra-operative beta imaging probe. More recently, we took an alternative approach for the same application: a fluorescence probe. In both cases the purpose is to differentiate normal from tumor brain tissue. In a first step, we developed set-ups capable to measure autofluorescence. They are based on a dedicated epi-fluorescence design and on specific fiber optic probes. Relative signal amplitude, spectral shape and fluorescence lifetime measurements are foreseen to distinguish normal and cancer tissue by analyzing fluorophores like NADH, lipopigments and porphyrines. The autofluorescence spectra are recorded in the 460-640 nm range with a low resolution spectrometer. For lifetime measurements a fast detector (APD) is used together with a TCSPC-carte. Intrinsic wavelength- and time-resolutions are a few nm and 200 ps, respectively. Different samples have been analyzed to validate our new detection system and to allow a first configuration of our medical fluorescence probe. First results from the tissue measurements are shown.

  10. Multimodal correlation and intraoperative matching of virtual models in neurosurgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceresole, Enrico; Dalsasso, Michele; Rossi, Aldo

    1994-01-01

    The multimodal correlation between different diagnostic exams, the intraoperative calibration of pointing tools and the correlation of the patient's virtual models with the patient himself, are some examples, taken from the biomedical field, of a unique problem: determine the relationship linking representation of the same object in different reference frames. Several methods have been developed in order to determine this relationship, among them, the surface matching method is one that gives the patient minimum discomfort and the errors occurring are compatible with the required precision. The surface matching method has been successfully applied to the multimodal correlation of diagnostic exams such as CT, MR, PET and SPECT. Algorithms for automatic segmentation of diagnostic images have been developed to extract the reference surfaces from the diagnostic exams, whereas the surface of the patient's skull has been monitored, in our approach, by means of a laser sensor mounted on the end effector of an industrial robot. An integrated system for virtual planning and real time execution of surgical procedures has been realized.

  11. The Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol: a valid linguistic approach to awake brain surgery.

    PubMed

    De Witte, E; Satoer, D; Robert, E; Colle, H; Verheyen, S; Visch-Brink, E; Mariën, P

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES) is increasingly used in patients operated on for tumours in eloquent areas. Although a positive impact of DES on postoperative linguistic outcome is generally advocated, information about the neurolinguistic methods applied in awake surgery is scarce. We developed for the first time a standardised Dutch linguistic test battery (measuring phonology, semantics, syntax) to reliably identify the critical language zones in detail. A normative study was carried out in a control group of 250 native Dutch-speaking healthy adults. In addition, the clinical application of the Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol (DuLIP) was demonstrated by means of anatomo-functional models and five case studies. A set of DuLIP tests was selected for each patient depending on the tumour location and degree of linguistic impairment. DuLIP is a valid test battery for pre-, intraoperative and postoperative language testing and facilitates intraoperative mapping of eloquent language regions that are variably located.

  12. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-07-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation.

  13. Importance of a arteriography for intraoperative quality control during carotid artery surgery.

    PubMed

    Sala, Florent; Hassen-Khodja, Reda; Bouillanne, Pierre Jean; Hussein, Hassan; Semlali, Chakir; Planchard, Pierre; Declemy, Serge; Batt, Michel

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of intraoperative quality control using arteriography on the conduct and immediate outcome of carotid artery surgery. This retrospective study included 623 carotid artery repair procedures performed between January 1993 and January 2000. There were 427 men and 159 women (37 bilateral procedures) with a mean age of 71.6 years. The repair technique consisted of conventional endarterectomy alone in 353 cases, conventional endarterectomy with patch closure in 95 cases, eversion in 44 cases, and vein (n = 105) or prosthetic (n = 26) grafting in 131 cases. Findings of intraoperative arteriography, which is used routinely in our department, were reviewed and analyzed in all cases. Our findings indicate that intraoperative quality control with arteriography is an important part of carotid artery surgery. In 11.7% of cases in this study, intraoperative arteriography revealed significant defects that are the main cause of postoperative neurological complications.

  14. Intraoperative squash cytology and histology of giant cell ependymoma: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Ebru; Kucuk, Ulku; Ersen, Ayca; Pala, Emel E; Senoglu, Mehmet; Binatli, Ali O; Yildirim, Zubeyde

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell ependymomas (GCE) are extremely rare tumors, with 24 cases described in the literature. Squash cytology is a rapid, reliable, simple technique for intraoperative consultation in neurosurgical practice. We describe a rare case of GCE arising at level of L4-L5 in a 66-year-old woman and discuss the cytologic/histologic features. Intraoperative smears were highly cellular with a prominent fibrillary background and exhibited papillary structures and sheets composed of highly atypical and bizarre cells. Some of the cells showed nuclear pseudoinclusions and rarely formed pseudorosette-like arrays. Intraoperative diagnosis was high grade glial tumor. On paraffin sections, besides extensive polymorphism, there were no microvascular proliferation, necrosis, and mitosis and the final diagnosis was WHO grade II GCE. GCE may be a diagnostic challenge on intraoperative smears, frozen, and paraffin sections. It must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of giant cell exhibiting benign and malignant tumors of brain. PMID:28182061

  15. Repeated sugammadex reversal of muscle relaxation during lumbar spine surgery with intraoperative neurophysiological multimodal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Errando, C L; Blanco, T; Díaz-Cambronero, Ó

    2016-11-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during spine surgery is usually acomplished avoiding muscle relaxants. A case of intraoperative sugammadex partial reversal of the neuromuscular blockade allowing adequate monitoring during spine surgery is presented. A 38 year-old man was scheduled for discectomy and vertebral arthrodesis throughout anterior and posterior approaches. Anesthesia consisted of total intravenous anesthesia plus rocuronium. Intraoperatively monitoring was needed, and the muscle relaxant reverted twice with low dose sugammadex in order to obtain adequate responses. The doses of sugammadex used were conservatively selected (0.1mg/kg boluses increases, total dose needed 0.4mg/kg). Both motor evoqued potentials, and electromyographic responses were deemed adequate by the neurophysiologist. If muscle relaxation was needed in the context described, this approach could be useful to prevent neurological sequelae. This is the first study using very low dose sugammadex to reverse rocuronium intraoperatively and to re-establish the neuromuscular blockade.

  16. Multidecadal warming of Antarctic waters.

    PubMed

    Schmidtko, Sunke; Heywood, Karen J; Thompson, Andrew F; Aoki, Shigeru

    2014-12-05

    Decadal trends in the properties of seawater adjacent to Antarctica are poorly known, and the mechanisms responsible for such changes are uncertain. Antarctic ice sheet mass loss is largely driven by ice shelf basal melt, which is influenced by ocean-ice interactions and has been correlated with Antarctic Continental Shelf Bottom Water (ASBW) temperature. We document the spatial distribution of long-term large-scale trends in temperature, salinity, and core depth over the Antarctic continental shelf and slope. Warming at the seabed in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas is linked to increased heat content and to a shoaling of the mid-depth temperature maximum over the continental slope, allowing warmer, saltier water greater access to the shelf in recent years. Regions of ASBW warming are those exhibiting increased ice shelf melt.

  17. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  18. MCCB warm adjustment testing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdei, Z.; Horgos, M.; Grib, A.; Preradović, D. M.; Rodic, V.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation in to operating of thermal protection device behavior from an MCCB (Molded Case Circuit Breaker). One of the main functions of the circuit breaker is to assure protection for the circuits where mounted in for possible overloads of the circuit. The tripping mechanism for the overload protection is based on a bimetal movement during a specific time frame. This movement needs to be controlled and as a solution to control this movement we choose the warm adjustment concept. This concept is meant to improve process capability control and final output. The warm adjustment device design will create a unique adjustment of the bimetal position for each individual breaker, determined when the testing current will flow thru a phase which needs to trip in a certain amount of time. This time is predetermined due to scientific calculation for all standard types of amperages and complies with the IEC 60497 standard requirements.

  19. Lagrangian description of warm plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.

    1970-01-01

    Efforts are described to extend the averaged Lagrangian method of describing small signal wave propagation and nonlinear wave interaction, developed by earlier workers for cold plasmas, to the more general conditions of warm collisionless plasmas, and to demonstrate particularly the effectiveness of the method in analyzing wave-wave interactions. The theory is developed for both the microscopic description and the hydrodynamic approximation to plasma behavior. First, a microscopic Lagrangian is formulated rigorously, and expanded in terms of perturbations about equilibrium. Two methods are then described for deriving a hydrodynamic Lagrangian. In the first of these, the Lagrangian is obtained by velocity integration of the exact microscopic Lagrangian. In the second, the expanded hydrodynamic Lagrangian is obtained directly from the expanded microscopic Lagrangian. As applications of the microscopic Lagrangian, the small-signal dispersion relations and the coupled mode equations are derived for all possible waves in a warm infinite, weakly inhomogeneous magnetoplasma, and their interactions are examined.

  20. Effect of donor pneumoperitoneum on early allograft perfusion following renal transplantation in pediatric patients: an intraoperative Doppler ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Dave, S; Farhat, W; Pace, K; Navarro, O; Hebert, D; Khoury, A E

    2008-08-01

    Decreased perfusion and trauma during laparoscopic harvesting are proposed causative factors for DGF and rejection in children following renal transplantation with laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) allograft. We performed a retrospective review of 11 children who underwent LDN transplant and 11 preceding patients who underwent ODN transplant. Intraoperative DUS findings, creatinine values and clearance, time to nadir creatinine and AR episodes were compared. There were no significant differences in the BMI, vascular anatomy, side of nephrectomy, or warm ischemia time in the two groups. Mean follow-up duration was 11.4 and 30.4 months in LDN and ODN groups. DUS showed initial turbulent flow in five of the LDN and four of the ODN group with an average RI of 0.59 and 0.66 in the ODN and LDN groups, respectively (NS). Three patients in the ODN group had an abnormal RI compared to none in the LDN group (p = 0.034). The creatinine values, creatinine clearances (at 24 h, one, four wk and last follow-up) and AR episodes were similar in both groups. Pneumoperitoneum during LDN does not appear to have an adverse impact on early graft reperfusion.

  1. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F. )

    1991-04-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy.

  2. Transumbilical approach to intraoperative enteroscopy in a child with intussusception and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chui, Chan Hon; Jacobsen, Anette Sundfor

    2006-10-01

    Intraoperative enteroscopy has been known to reduce reoperation rates in complicated Peutz- Jeghers polyposis. It is usually performed during a laparotomy. This case report illustrates the feasibility of performing intraoperative transenterotomy enteroscopy together with extracorporeal ileal resection using the transumbilical approach after successfully reducing an intussusception laparoscopically in a 10-year-old child with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. This technique obviates the need for a laparotomy.

  3. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging during surgery for pituitary adenomas: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Buchfelder, Michael; Schlaffer, Sven-Martin

    2012-12-01

    Surgery for pituitary adenomas still remains a mainstay in their treatment, despite all advances in sophisticated medical treatments and radiotherapy. Total tumor excision is often attempted, but there are limitations in the intraoperative assessment of the radicalism of tumor resection by the neurosurgeon. Standard postoperative imaging is usually performed with a few months delay from the surgical intervention. The purpose of this report is to review briefly the facilities and kinds of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for all physician and surgeons involved in the management of pituitary adenomas on the basis of current literature. To date, there are several low- and high-field magnetic resonance imaging systems available for intraoperative use and depiction of the extent of tumor removal during surgery. Recovery of vision and the morphological result of surgery can be largely predicted from the intraoperative images. A variety of studies document that depiction of residual tumor allows targeted attack of the remnant and extent the resection. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging offers an immediate feedback to the surgeon and is a perfect quality control for pituitary surgery. It is also used as a basis of datasets for intraoperative navigation which is particularly useful in any kind of anatomical variations and repeat operations in which primary surgery has distorted the normal anatomy. However, setting up the technology is expensive and some systems even require extensive remodeling of the operation theatre. Intraoperative imaging prolongs the operation, but may also depict evolving problems, such as hematomas in the tumor cavity. There are several artifacts in intraoperative MR images possible that must be considered. The procedures are not associated with an increased complication rate.

  4. Intraoperative radiotherapy in early stage breast cancer: potential indications and evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, A M

    2015-01-01

    Following early results of recent studies of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with early breast cancer, the clinical utility of IORT is a subject of much recent debate within the breast oncology community. This review describes the intraoperative techniques available, the potential indications and the evidence to date pertaining to local control and toxicity. We also discuss any implications for current practice and future research. PMID:25734489

  5. Intraoperative Mapping of Expressive Language Cortex Using Passive Real-Time Electrocorticography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-26

    Epilepsy & Behavior Case Reports 5 (2016) 46–51 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Epilepsy & Behavior Case Reports j ourna l homepage: www.e...lsev ie r .com/ locate /ebcrCase ReportIntraoperative mapping of expressive language cortex using passive real-time electrocorticographyAmiLyn M...case report, we investigated the utility and practicality of passive intraoperative functional mapping of expressive language cortex using high

  6. Method for quantitative validation of image-based correction for intraoperative brain shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Lisa M.; Goerss, Stephan J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-04-01

    Stereotactic neuronavigational systems use pre-operatively acquired 3D images for procedural planning and also are employed in intraoperative navigations to help localize and resect brain lesions. Intraoperatively, multiple factors contribute to anatomic changes that limit the accuracy of navigation based solely on pre-operative images. Loss of CSF, cortical swelling, and the effect of gravity relative to the craniotomy locations are some of the factors that contribute to errors in navigation.

  7. Custom-made, 3D, intraoperative surgical guides for nasal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Babar; Byrne, Patrick J

    2011-11-01

    This article presents the use of an intraoperative surgical guide created by 3D laser surface scanning and rapid prototyping. The authors present outcomes of 3 patients in whom the nasal surgical guide was used intraoperatively for reconstruction of full-thickness, complex nasal defects. This effort highlights the multidisciplinary approach involving a surgeon and anaplastologist integrated with the latest technology to provide patients with the best possible outcomes.

  8. Analysis of data from spacecraft (stratospheric warmings)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The details of the stratospheric warming processes as to time, area, and intensity were established, and the warmings with other terrestrial and solar phenomena occurring at satellite platform altitudes, or observable from satellite platforms, were correlated. Links were sought between the perturbed upper atmosphere (mesosphere and thermosphere) and the stratosphere that might explain stratospheric warmings.

  9. Global warming: Economic policy responses

    SciTech Connect

    Dornbusch, R.; Poterba, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of a conference that brought together economic experts from Europe, the US, Latin America, and Japan to evaluate key issues in the policy debate in global warming. The following issues are at the center of debates on alternative policies to address global warming: scientific evidence on the magnitude of global warming and the extent to which it is due to human activities; availability of economic tools to control the anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, and how vigorously should they be applied; and political economy considerations which influence the design of an international program for controlling greenhouse gases. Many perspectives are offered on the approaches to remedying environmental problems that are currently being pursued in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Deforestation in the Amazon is discussed, as well as ways to slow it. Public finance assessments are presented of both the domestic and international policy issues raised by plans to levy a tax on the carbon emissions from various fossil fuels. Nine chapters have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  10. The threat of global warming

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-15

    If the scientific predictions of global warming hold true, there`s trouble ahead for much of the world`s fresh water - and for people living in low-lying areas. The phenomenon, first described in the 1980`s, attributes projected rises in global temperatures to the emission of carbon dioxide and other {open_quotes}greenhouse gases,{close_quotes} so called because they trap the sun`s solar energy close to the Earth`s surface, much as a glass roof helps keep a greenhouse warm. The overwhelming source of these emission is the burning of fossil fuels such as oil, gasoline, coal and natural gas, the principal power sources of modern industry and transportation. In 1988, the United Nations set up the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to study the validity and potential effects of global warming. The panel, composed of an international group of climate scientists, issued a report in June 1990 predicting a nearly two-degree rise in the globe`s average temperature by 2020. At that unprecedented rate of increase, the panel found, humankind would be living in a hotter environment that ever before.

  11. The Discovery of Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCracken, Michael C.

    2004-07-01

    At the beginning of the twentieth century, the prospect of ``global warming'' as a result of human activities was thought to be far off, and in any case, likely to be beneficial. As we begin the twenty-first century, science adviser to the British government, Sir David King, has said that he considers global warming to be the world's most important problem, including terrorism. Yet, dealing with it has become the subject of a contentious international protocol, numerous conferences of international diplomats, and major scientific assessments and research programs. Spencer Weart, who is director of the Center for History of Physics of the American Institute of Physics, has taken on the challenge of explaining how this came to be. In the tradition of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which was established in 1988 to evaluate and assess the state of global warming science, this book is roughly equivalent to the Technical Summary, in terms of its technical level, being quite readable, but with substantive content about the main lines of evidence. Underpinning this relatively concise presentation, there is a well-developed-and still developing-Web site that, like the detailed chapters of the full IPCC assessment reports, provides vastly more information and linkages to a much wider set of reference materials (see http://www.aip.org/history/climate).

  12. Intraoperative Clinical Decision Support for Anesthesia: A Narrative Review of Available Systems.

    PubMed

    Nair, Bala G; Gabel, Eilon; Hofer, Ira; Schwid, Howard A; Cannesson, Maxime

    2017-02-01

    With increasing adoption of anesthesia information management systems (AIMS), there is growing interest in utilizing AIMS data for intraoperative clinical decision support (CDS). CDS for anesthesia has the potential for improving quality of care, patient safety, billing, and compliance. Intraoperative CDS can range from passive and post hoc systems to active real-time systems that can detect ongoing clinical issues and deviations from best practice care. Real-time CDS holds the most promise because real-time alerts and guidance can drive provider behavior toward evidence-based standardized care during the ongoing case. In this review, we describe the different types of intraoperative CDS systems with specific emphasis on real-time systems. The technical considerations in developing and implementing real-time CDS are systematically covered. This includes the functional modules of a CDS system, development and execution of decision rules, and modalities to alert anesthesia providers concerning clinical issues. We also describe the regulatory aspects that affect development, implementation, and use of intraoperative CDS. Methods and measures to assess the effectiveness of intraoperative CDS are discussed. Last, we outline areas of future development of intraoperative CDS, particularly the possibility of providing predictive and prescriptive decision support.

  13. Utility of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring during Minimally Invasive Fusion of the Sacroiliac Joint.

    PubMed

    Woods, Michael; Birkholz, Denise; MacBarb, Regina; Capobianco, Robyn; Woods, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Retrospective case series. Objective. To document the clinical utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion for patients diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction (as a direct result of sacroiliac joint disruptions or degenerative sacroiliitis) and determine stimulated electromyography thresholds reflective of favorable implant position. Summary of Background Data. Intraoperative neuromonitoring is a well-accepted adjunct to minimally invasive pedicle screw placement. The utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion using a series of triangular, titanium porous plasma coated implants has not been evaluated. Methods. A medical chart review of consecutive patients treated with minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion was undertaken at a single center. Baseline patient demographics and medical history, intraoperative electromyography thresholds, and perioperative adverse events were collected after obtaining IRB approval. Results. 111 implants were placed in 37 patients. Sensitivity of EMG was 80% and specificity was 97%. Intraoperative neuromonitoring potentially avoided neurologic sequelae as a result of improper positioning in 7% of implants. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that intraoperative neuromonitoring may be a useful adjunct to minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion in avoiding nerve injury during implant placement.

  14. Utility of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring during Minimally Invasive Fusion of the Sacroiliac Joint

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Michael; Birkholz, Denise; MacBarb, Regina; Capobianco, Robyn; Woods, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Retrospective case series. Objective. To document the clinical utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion for patients diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction (as a direct result of sacroiliac joint disruptions or degenerative sacroiliitis) and determine stimulated electromyography thresholds reflective of favorable implant position. Summary of Background Data. Intraoperative neuromonitoring is a well-accepted adjunct to minimally invasive pedicle screw placement. The utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion using a series of triangular, titanium porous plasma coated implants has not been evaluated. Methods. A medical chart review of consecutive patients treated with minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion was undertaken at a single center. Baseline patient demographics and medical history, intraoperative electromyography thresholds, and perioperative adverse events were collected after obtaining IRB approval. Results. 111 implants were placed in 37 patients. Sensitivity of EMG was 80% and specificity was 97%. Intraoperative neuromonitoring potentially avoided neurologic sequelae as a result of improper positioning in 7% of implants. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that intraoperative neuromonitoring may be a useful adjunct to minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion in avoiding nerve injury during implant placement. PMID:25544898

  15. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities. The conclusion of this

  16. Intraoperative hemodialysis during liver transplantation: a decade of experience.

    PubMed

    Nadim, Mitra K; Annanthapanyasut, Wanwarat; Matsuoka, Lea; Appachu, Kari; Boyajian, Mark; Ji, Lingyun; Sedra, Ashraf; Genyk, Yuri S

    2014-07-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) for patients with renal dysfunction is frequently complicated by major fluid shifts, acidosis, and electrolyte and coagulation abnormalities. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has been previously shown to ameliorate these problems. We describe the safety and clinical outcomes of intraoperative hemodialysis (IOHD) during LT for a group of patients with high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores. We performed a retrospective study at our institution of patients who underwent IOHD from 2002 to 2012. Seven hundred thirty-seven patients underwent transplantation, and 32% received IOHD. The mean calculated MELD score was 37, with 38% having a MELD score ≥ 40. Preoperatively, 61% were in the intensive care unit, 19% were mechanically ventilated, 43% required vasopressor support, and 80% were on some form of renal replacement therapy at the time of transplantation, the majority being on CRRT. Patients on average received 35 U of blood products and 4.8 L of crystalloids without significant changes in hemodynamics or electrolytes. The average urine output was 450 ml, and the average amount of fluid removal with dialysis was 1.8 L. The 90-day patient and dialysis-free survival rates were 90% and 99%, respectively. One-year patient survival rates based on the pretransplant renal replacement status and the MELD status were not statistically different. This is the first large study to demonstrate the safety and feasibility of IOHD in a cohort of critically ill patients with high MELD scores undergoing LT with good patient and renal outcomes.

  17. Intraoperative positioning of mobile C-arms using artificial fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Philipp; Wang, Lejing; Kutter, Oliver; Traub, Joerg; Heining, Sandro-Michael; Navab, Nassir

    2010-02-01

    In trauma and orthopedic surgery, imaging through X-ray fluoroscopy with C-arms is ubiquitous. This leads to an increase in ionizing radiation applied to patient and clinical staff. Placing these devices in the desired position to visualize a region of interest is a challenging task, requiring both skill of the operator and numerous X-rays for guidance. We propose an extension to C-arms for which position data is available that provides the surgeon with so called artificial fluoroscopy. This is achieved by computing digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from pre- or intraoperative CT data. The approach is based on C-arm motion estimation, for which we employ a Camera Augmented Mobile C-arm (CAMC) system, and a rigid registration of the patient to the CT data. Using this information we are able to generate DRRs and simulate fluoroscopic images. For positioning tasks, this system appears almost exactly like conventional fluoroscopy, however simulating the images from the CT data in realtime as the C-arm is moved without the application of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, preoperative planning can be done on the CT data and then visualized during positioning, e.g. defining drilling axes for pedicle approach techniques. Since our method does not require external tracking it is suitable for deployment in clinical environments and day-to-day routine. An experiment with six drillings into a lumbar spine phantom showed reproducible accuracy in positioning the C-arm, ranging from 1.1 mm to 4.1 mm deviation of marker points on the phantom compared in real and virtual images.

  18. Intraoperative bleeding control by uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery†.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Stupnik, Tomaz; Fernandez, Ricardo; de la Torre, Mercedes; Velasco, Carlos; Yang, Yang; Lee, Wentao; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Owing to advances in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), the majority of pulmonary resections can currently be performed by VATS in a safe manner with a low level of morbidity and mortality. The majority of the complications that occur during VATS can be minimized with correct preoperative planning of the case as well as careful pulmonary dissection. Coordination of the whole surgical team is essential when confronting an emergency such as major bleeding. This is particularly important during the VATS learning curve, where the occurrence of intraoperative complications, particularly significant bleeding, usually ends in a conversion to open surgery. However, conversion should not be considered as a failure of the VATS approach, but as a resource to maintain the patient's safety. The correct assessment of any bleeding is of paramount importance during major thoracoscopic procedures. Inadequate management of the source of bleeding may result in major vessel injury and massive bleeding. If bleeding occurs, a sponge stick should be readily available to apply pressure immediately to control the haemorrhage. It is always important to remain calm and not to panic. With the bleeding temporarily controlled, a decision must be made promptly as to whether a thoracotomy is needed or if the bleeding can be solved through the VATS approach. This will depend primarily on the surgeon's experience. The operative vision provided with high-definition cameras, specially designed or adapted instruments and the new sealants are factors that facilitate the surgeon's control. After experience has been acquired with conventional or uniportal VATS, the rate of complications diminishes and the majority of bleeding events are controlled without the need for conversion to thoracotomy.

  19. Intra-Operative Vertebroplasty Combined with Posterior Cord Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Luca; Mavilio, Nicola; Fiaschi, Pietro; Bragazzi, Roberto; Pacetti, Mattia; Castelletti, Lara; Saitta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Percutaneous vertebroplasty (VP) is a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of vertebral pathology providing early vertebral stabilization and pain relief. In cases of vertebral pathology complicated by spinal cord compression with associated neurological deficits, VP alone cannot be performed free of risks. We describe a combined approach in which decompressive laminectomy and intra-operative vertebroplasty (IVP) are performed during a single session. Among the 252 VP performed in our centre in the past three years, 12 patients (12 vertebral levels) with different pathologies (six symptomatic haemangiomas, two metastatic fractures, four osteoporotic fractures) were treated with an open procedure combined with surgery. All cases were treated with decompressive laminectomy and IVP (mono/bipeduncular or median-posterior trans-somatic access). Five patients with symptomatic haemangiomas were treated with endovascular embolization prior to the combined approach. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was applied to assess pain intensity before and after surgery. The neurological deficits were evaluated with an ASIA impairment scale. In all cases benefit from pain and neurological deficits was observed. The mean VAS score decreased from 7.8 to 2.5 after surgery. The ASIA score improved in all cases (five cases from D to E and five cases from C to D). No clinical complications were observed. In one case a CT scan performed after the procedure showed a foraminal accumulation of PMMA, but the patient referred no symptoms. IVP can be successfully applied in different pathologies affecting the vertebrae. In our limited series this approach proved safe and efficient to provide decompression of spinal cord and dural sac and vertebral body stabilization in a single session. PMID:25363261

  20. Radical Pleurectomy and Intraoperative Photodynamic Therapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Joseph S.; Culligan, Melissa J.; Mick, Rosemarie; Stevenson, James; Hahn, Stephen M.; Sterman, Daniel; Punekar, Salman; Glatstein, Eli; Cengel, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Background Radical pleurectomy (RP) for mesothelioma is often considered either technically infeasible or an operation limited to patients who would not tolerate a pneumonectomy. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using RP and intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) for mesothelioma. Methods 38 patients (42–81 years) underwent RP-PDT. 35/38 (92%) patients also received systemic therapy. Standard statistical techniques were employed for analysis. Results 37/38 (97%) patients had Stage III/IV (AJCC) cancer and 7/38 (18%) patients had nonepithelial subtypes. Macroscopic complete resection was achieved in 37/38 (97%) patients. There was one postoperative mortality (stroke). At a median follow-up of 34.4 months, the median survival was 31.7 months for all 38 patients, 41.2 months for the 31/38 (82%) epithelial patients and 6.8 months for the 7/38 (18%) nonepithelial patients. The median progression free survivals were 9.6, 15.1 and 4.8 months, respectively. The median and progression free survivals for the 20/31 (64%) epithelial patients with N2 disease were 31.7 and 15.1 months, respectively. Conclusions It was possible to achieve a macroscopic complete resection utilizing lung-sparing surgery in 97% of these stage III/IV patients. The survival we observed with this approach was unusually long for the epithelial subtype patients but, interestingly, the progression free survival was not. The reason for this prolonged survival in spite of recurrence is not clear, but is potentially related to preservation of the lung and/or some PDT-induced effect. We conclude that the results of this lung-sparing approach are safe, encouraging and warrant further investigation. PMID:22541196

  1. Intraoperative electrophysiological evaluations of macular function during peripheral scleral indentation

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Goichi; Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Terauchi, Gaku; Matsumoto, Harue; Watanabe, Emiko; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi; Miyake, Yozo

    2016-01-01

    Scleral indentation is widely used to examine the peripheral fundus, however it can increase the intraocular pressure (IOP) to high levels which can then affect retinal function. We evaluated the effects of scleral indentation on the macular function electrophysiologically. Intraoperative focal macular electroretinograms (iFMERGs) were recorded with and without controlling the IOP in 7 eyes. Without IOP control, the IOP increased from 21.7 ± 4.9 to 92.7 ± 20.2 mmHg significantly (P = 0.020) and the amplitudes of the b-wave (from 6.29 ± 1.160 to 3.71 ± 1.98 uV, P = 0.007), on-photopic negative response (from 2.29 ± 0.99 to 0.72 ± 0.47 uV, on-PhNR, P = 0.005), and d-wave (from 2.57 ± 0.41 to 1.64 ± 0.69 uV, P = 0.007) decreased significantly soon after beginning the indentation. All values returned to the baseline levels after releasing the indentation. In the eyes with IOP controlled, the IOP and the amplitude of all components did not change significantly during and after the indentation except the on-PhNR amplitude which was significantly reduced during the indentation. The changes in the iFMERGs and macular function caused by scleral indentation were transient and reversible. The changes can be minimized by controlling the IOP. PMID:27762313

  2. Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for the Management of Aggressive Fibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, Falk; Timke, Carmen; Oertel, Susanne; Hensley, Frank W.; Bischof, Marc; Muenter, Marc W.; Weitz, Juergen; Buchler, Markus W.; Lehner, Burkhard; Debus, Juergen; Krempien, Robert

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) followed by moderate doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after organ-sparing surgery in patients with primary or recurrent aggressive fibromatosis. Methods and Materials: Indication for IOERT and postoperative EBRT as an individual treatment approach to avoid mutilating surgical procedures was seen when complete surgical removal seemed to be unlikely or impossible. A total of 31 lesions in 30 patients were treated by surgery and IOERT with a median dose of 12 Gy. Median age was 31 years (range, 13-59 years). Resection status was close margin in six lesions, microscopically positive in 13, and macroscopically positive in 12. Median tumor size was 9 cm. In all, 25 patients received additional EBRT, with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 36-54 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 3-139 months), no disease-related deaths occurred. A total of five local recurrences were seen, resulting in actuarial 3-year local control rates of 82% overall and 91% inside the IOERT areas. Trends to improved local control were seen for older age (>31 years) and negative margins, but none of these factors reached significance. Perioperative complications were found in six patients, in particular as wound healing disturbances in five patients and venous thrombosis in one patient. Late toxicity was seen in five patients. Conclusion: Introduction of IOERT into a multimodal treatment approach in patients with aggressive fibromatosis is feasible with low toxicity and yielded good local control rates even in patients with microscopical or gross residual disease.

  3. Intraoperative electron beam irradiation for patients with unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, W.U.; Wood, W.C.; Tepper, J.E.; Warshaw, A.L.; Orlow, E.L.; Kaufman, S.D.; Battit, G.E.; Nardi, G.L.

    1984-09-01

    Since 1978 we have used electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) to deliver higher radiation doses to pancreatic tumors than are possible with external beam techniques while minimizing the dose to the surrounding normal tissues. Twenty-nine patients with localized, unresectable, pancreatic carcinoma were treated by electron beam IORT in combination with conventional external radiation therapy (XRT). The primary tumor was located in the head of the pancreas in 20 patients, in the head and body in six patients, and in the body and tail in three. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given in 23 of the 29 patients. The last 13 patients have received misonidazole (3.5 mg/M2) just prior to IORT (20 Gy). At present 14 patients are alive and 11 are without evidence of disease from 3 to 41 months after IORT. The median survival is 16.5 months. Eight patients have failed locally in the IORT field and two others failed regionally. Twelve patients have developed distant metastases, including five who failed locally or regionally. We have seen no local recurrences in the 12 patients who have been treated with misonidazole and have completed IORT and XRT while 10 of 15 patients treated without misonidazole have recurred locally. Because of the shorter follow-up in the misonidazole group, this apparent improvement is not statistically significant. Fifteen patients (52%) have not had pain following treatment and 22 (76%) have had no upper gastrointestinal or biliary obstruction subsequent to their initial surgical bypasses and radiation treatments. Based on the good palliation generally obtained, the 16.5-month median survival, and the possible added benefit from misonidazole, we are encouraged to continue this approach.

  4. Quantification of tumor fluorescence during intraoperative optical cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Judy, Ryan P; Keating, Jane J; DeJesus, Elizabeth M; Jiang, Jack X; Okusanya, Olugbenga T; Nie, Shuming; Holt, David E; Arlauckas, Sean P; Low, Phillip S; Delikatny, E James; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-11-13

    Intraoperative optical cancer imaging is an emerging technology in which surgeons employ fluorophores to visualize tumors, identify tumor-positive margins and lymph nodes containing metastases. This study compares instrumentation to measure tumor fluorescence. Three imaging systems (Spectropen, Glomax, Flocam) measured and quantified fluorescent signal-to-background ratios (SBR) in vitro, murine xenografts, tissue phantoms and clinically. Evaluation criteria included the detection of small changes in fluorescence, sensitivity of signal detection at increasing depths and practicality of use. In vitro, spectroscopy was superior in detecting incremental differences in fluorescence than luminescence and digital imaging (Ln[SBR] = 6.8 ± 0.6, 2.4 ± 0.3, 2.6 ± 0.1, p = 0.0001). In fluorescent tumor cells, digital imaging measured higher SBRs than luminescence (6.1 ± 0.2 vs. 4.3 ± 0.4, p = 0.001). Spectroscopy was more sensitive than luminometry and digital imaging in identifying murine tumor fluorescence (SBR = 41.7 ± 11.5, 5.1 ± 1.8, 4.1 ± 0.9, p = 0.0001), and more sensitive than digital imaging at detecting fluorescence at increasing depths (SBR = 7.0 ± 3.4 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5, p = 0.03). Lastly, digital imaging was the most practical and least time-consuming. All methods detected incremental differences in fluorescence. Spectroscopy was the most sensitive for small changes in fluorescence. Digital imaging was the most practical considering its wide field of view, background noise filtering capability, and sensitivity to increasing depth.

  5. Intraoperative Sac Pressure Measurement During Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ohta, Takashi; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Iwata, Hirohide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tadakoshi, Masao; Hida, Noriyuki; Orimoto, Yuki; Kamei, Seiji

    2010-10-15

    PurposeIntraoperative sac pressure was measured during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) to evaluate the clinical significance of sac pressure measurement.MethodsA microcatheter was placed in an aneurysm sac from the contralateral femoral artery, and sac pressure was measured during EVAR procedures in 47 patients. Aortic blood pressure was measured as a control by a catheter from the left brachial artery.ResultsThe systolic sac pressure index (SPI) was 0.87 {+-} 0.10 after main-body deployment, 0.63 {+-} 0.12 after leg deployment (P < 0.01), and 0.56 {+-} 0.12 after completion of the procedure (P < 0.01). Pulse pressure was 55 {+-} 21 mmHg, 23 {+-} 15 mmHg (P < 0.01), and 16 {+-} 12 mmHg (P < 0.01), respectively. SPI showed no significant differences between the Zenith and Excluder stent grafts (0.56 {+-} 0.13 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.10, NS). Type I endoleak was found in seven patients (15%), and the SPI decreased from 0.62 {+-} 0.10 to 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (P = 0.10) after fixing procedures. Type II endoleak was found in 12 patients (26%) by completion angiography. The SPI showed no difference between type II endoleak positive and negative (0.58 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.55 {+-} 0.12, NS). There were no significant differences between the final SPI of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter decreased in the follow-up and that of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter did not change (0.53 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.57 {+-} 0.12, NS).ConclusionsSac pressure measurement was useful for instant hemodynamic evaluation of the EVAR procedure, especially in type I endoleaks. However, on the basis of this small study, the SPI cannot be used to reliably predict sac growth or regression.

  6. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidan, Youssef H.; Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel; Johnstone, Peter A.; Terry, Colin; Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod; Yeh, Alex

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  7. Preoperative characteristics predicting intraoperative hypotension and hypertension among hypertensives and diabetics undergoing noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, M E; MacKenzie, C R; Gold, J P; Ales, K L; Topkins, M; Shires, G T

    1990-01-01

    We prospectively studied patients with hypertension and diabetes undergoing elective noncardiac surgery with general anesthesia to test the hypothesis that patients at high risk for prognostically significant intraoperative hemodynamic instability could be identified by their preoperative characteristics. Specifically we hypothesized that patients with a low functional capacity, decreased plasma volume, or significant cardiac comorbidity would be at high risk for intraoperative hypotension and those with a history of severe hypertension would be at risk for intraoperative hypertension. Patients who had a preoperative mean arterial pressure (MAP) greater than or equal to 110, a walking distance of less than 400 m, or a plasma volume less than 3000 cc were at increased risk of intraoperative hypotension (i.e., more than 1 hour of greater than or equal to 20 mmHg decreases in the MAP). Hypotension was also more common among patients having intra-abdominal or vascular surgery, and among those who had operations longer than 2 hours. Patients older than 70 years or with a decreased plasma volume were at increased risk of having more than 15 minutes of intraoperative elevations of greater than or equal to 20 mmHg over the preoperative MAP in combination with intraoperative hypotension; this was also more common when surgery lasted more than 2 hours. Patients who had intraoperative hypotension tended to have an immediate decrease in MAP at the onset of anesthesia and were often purposefully maintained at MAPs less than their usual level during surgery with fentanyl and neuromuscular blocking agents. Patients who had intraoperative hyper/hypotension tended to have repeated elevations in MAP above their preoperative levels during the course of surgery, and such elevations precipitated interventions with neuromuscular blocking agents and/or fentanyl. Neither pattern was more common among patients who developed net intraoperative negative fluid balances. Both hypotension and

  8. Comparative effect of intraoperative propacetamol versus placebo on morphine consumption after elective reduction mammoplasty under remifentanil-based anesthesia: a randomized control trial [ISRCTN71723173

    PubMed Central

    Binhas, Michèle; Decailliot, François; Rezaiguia-Delclaux, Saïda; Suen, Powen; Dumerat, Marc; François, Véronique; Combes, Xavier; Duvaldestin, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    Background Postoperative administration of paracetamol or its prodrug propacetamol has been shown to decrease pain with a morphine sparing effect. However, the effect of propacetamol administered intra-operatively on post-operative pain and early postoperative morphine consumption has not been clearly evaluated. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of analgesic protocols in the management of post-operative pain, a standardized anesthesia protocol without long-acting opioids is crucial. Thus, for ethical reasons, the surgical procedure under general anesthesia with remifentanil as the only intraoperative analgesic must be associated with a moderate predictable postoperative pain. Methods We were interested in determining the postoperative effect of propacetamol administered intraoperatively after intraoperative remifentanil. Thirty-six adult women undergoing mammoplasty with remifentanil-based anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive propacetamol 2 g or placebo one hour before the end of surgery. After remifentanil interruption and tracheal extubation in recovery room, pain was assessed and intravenous titrated morphine was given. The primary end-point was the cumulative dose of morphine administered in the recovery room. The secondary end-points were the pain score after tracheal extubation and one hour after, the delay for obtaining a Simplified Numerical Pain Scale (SNPS) less than 4, and the incidence of morphine side effects in the recovery room. For intergroup comparisons, categorical variables were compared using the chi-squared test and continuous variables were compared using the Student t test or Mann-Whitney U test, as appropriate. A p value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results In recovery room, morphine consumption was lower in the propacetamol group than in the placebo group (p = 0.01). Pain scores were similar in both groups after tracheal extubation and lower in the propacetamol group (p = 0.003) one hour after tracheal

  9. Intraoperative evaluation of device placement in spine surgery using known-component 3D-2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Uneri, A; De Silva, T; Goerres, J; Jacobson, M W; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Khanna, A J; Osgood, G M; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2017-04-21

    Intraoperative x-ray radiography/fluoroscopy is commonly used to assess the placement of surgical devices in the operating room (e.g. spine pedicle screws), but qualitative interpretation can fail to reliably detect suboptimal delivery and/or breach of adjacent critical structures. We present a 3D-2D image registration method wherein intraoperative radiographs are leveraged in combination with prior knowledge of the patient and surgical components for quantitative assessment of device placement and more rigorous quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. The algorithm is based on known-component registration (KC-Reg) in which patient-specific preoperative CT and parametric component models are used. The registration performs optimization of gradient similarity, removes the need for offline geometric calibration of the C-arm, and simultaneously solves for multiple component bodies, thereby allowing QA in a single step (e.g. spinal construct with 4-20 screws). Performance was tested in a spine phantom, and first clinical results are reported for QA of transpedicle screws delivered in a patient undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery. Simultaneous registration of ten pedicle screws (five contralateral pairs) demonstrated mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.1  ±  0.1 mm at the screw tip and 0.7  ±  0.4° in angulation when a prior geometric calibration was used. The calibration-free formulation, with the aid of component collision constraints, achieved TRE of 1.4  ±  0.6 mm. In all cases, a statistically significant improvement (p  <  0.05) was observed for the simultaneous solutions in comparison to previously reported sequential solution of individual components. Initial application in clinical data in spine surgery demonstrated TRE of 2.7  ±  2.6 mm and 1.5  ±  0.8°. The KC-Reg algorithm offers an independent check and quantitative QA of the surgical product using radiographic/fluoroscopic views

  10. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer: 30-Year Experience in a Single Institution in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Jingu, Keiichi; Tanabe, Takaya; Nemoto, Kenji; Ariga, Hisanori; Umezawa, Rei; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Ken; Koto, Masashi; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Kubozono, Masaki; Shimizu, Eiji; Abe, Keiko; Yamada, Shogo

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with or without external beam radiotherapy ({+-} EBRT) for localized pancreatic cancer in the past three decades and to analyze prognostic factors by multivariate analysis. Methods and Materials: Records for 322 patients with pancreatic cancer treated by IORT {+-} EBRT in Tohoku University Hospital between 1980 and 2009 were reviewed. One hundred ninety-two patients who had no distant organ metastases or dissemination at the time of laparotomy were enrolled in the present study. Results: Eighty-three patients underwent gross total resection (R0: 48 patients, R1: 35 patients), and 109 patients underwent only biopsy or palliative resection. Fifty-five patients underwent adjuvant EBRT, and 124 underwent adjuvant chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 and 40 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up period was 37.5 months. At the time of the analysis, 166 patients had disease recurrence, and 35 patients had local failure. The 2-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rates were 71.0% and 16.9%, respectively. Comparison of the results for each decade showed that OS was significantly improved decade by decade (2-year: 25.0% vs. 18.8% vs. 4.2%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that degree of resection (R0-1 vs. R2, hazard ratio = 1.97, p = 0.001) and adjuvant chemotherapy (yes vs. no, hazard ratio = 1.54, p = 0.028) had significant impacts on OS. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grade 4 or 5 was observed in four patients. Conclusion: Excellent local control for pancreatic cancer with few cases of severe late toxicity was achieved by using IORT. OS of patients with pancreatic cancer treated by IORT {+-} EBRT improved significantly decade by decade. Multivariate analysis showed that degree of resection and adjuvant chemotherapy had significant impacts on OS.

  11. Cochlear Implantation in Inner Ear Malformations: Systematic Review of Speech Perception Outcomes and Intraoperative Findings.

    PubMed

    Farhood, Zachary; Nguyen, Shaun A; Miller, Stephen C; Holcomb, Meredith A; Meyer, Ted A; Rizk, And Habib G

    2017-03-01

    Objective (1) To analyze reported speech perception outcomes in patients with inner ear malformations who undergo cochlear implantation, (2) to review the surgical complications and findings, and (3) to compare the 2 classification systems of Jackler and Sennaroglu. Data Sources PubMed, Scopus (including Embase), Medline, and CINAHL Plus. Review Methods Fifty-nine articles were included that contained speech perception and/or intraoperative data. Cases were differentiated depending on whether the Jackler or Sennaroglu malformation classification was used. A meta-analysis of proportions examined incidences of complete insertion, gusher, and facial nerve aberrancy. For speech perception data, weighted means and standard deviations were calculated for all malformations for short-, medium-, and long-term follow-up. Speech tests were grouped into 3 categories-closed-set words, open-set words, and open-set sentences-and then compared through a comparison-of-means t test. Results Complete insertion was seen in 81.8% of all inner ear malformations (95% CI: 72.6-89.5); gusher was reported in 39.1% of cases (95% CI: 30.3-48.2); and facial nerve anomalies were encountered in 34.4% (95% CI: 20.1-50.3). Significant improvements in average performance were seen for closed- and open-set tests across all malformation types at 12 months postoperatively. Conclusions Cochlear implantation outcomes are favorable for those with inner ear malformations from a surgical and speech outcome standpoint. Accurate classification of anatomic malformations, as well as standardization of postimplantation speech outcomes, is necessary to improve understanding of the impact of implantation in this difficult patient population.

  12. Global warming and biological diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.L.; Lovejoy, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    This book is based on presentations given at the World Wildlife Fund's Conference on Consequences of the Greenhouse Effect for Biological Diverisity in 1988, and includes updated literature citations. The general topics covered in the book include the following: overview; summary of past responses of plants to climatic change; general ecological and physiological responses; ecosystems in 4 specific regions (arctic marine, Alaskan North Slope, NW US forests, and Mediterranean); global warming's implications for conservation. Ideas and data from many ecosystems and information about the relationships between biodiversity and climatic change are brought together with a balance of factual information and defensible scientific prognostication.

  13. Warm/cold cloud processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Technical assistance continued in support of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory is discussed. A study of factors affecting warm cloud formation showed that the time of formation during an arbitrary expansion is independent of carrier gas composition for ideal gases and independent of aerosol concentration for low concentrations of very small aerosols. Equipment and procedures for gravimetric evaluation of a precision saturator were laboratory tested. A numerical feasibility study was conducted for the stable levitation of charged solution droplets by an electric field in a one-g static diffusion chamber. The concept, operating principles, applications, limits, and sensitivity of the levitation technique are discussed.

  14. Predisposing Factors for Intraoperative Endplate Injury of Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kanemura, Tokumi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Segi, Naoki; Ouchida, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare intraoperative endplate injury cases and no injury cases in consecutive series and to identify predisposing factors for intraoperative endplate injury. Overview of Literature Unintended endplate violation and subsequent cage subsidence is an intraoperative complication of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF). It is still unknown whether it is derived from inexperienced surgical technique or patients' inherent problems. Methods Consecutive patients (n=102; mean age, 69.0±0.8 years) underwent XLIF at 201 levels at a single institute. Preoperative and immediately postoperative radiographs were compared and cases with intraoperative endplate injury were identified. Various parameters were reviewed in each patient and compared between the injury and no injury groups. Results Twenty one levels (10.4%) had signs of intraoperative endplate injury. The injury group had a significantly higher rate of females (p=0.002), lower bone mineral density (BMD) (p=0.02), higher rate of polyetheretherketone as cage material (p=0.04), and taller cage height (p=0.03) compared with the no injury group. Multivariate analysis indicated that a T-score of BMD as a negative (odds ratio, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.27–0.93; p=0.03) and cage height as a positive (odds ratio, 1.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–3.17; p=0.03) were predisposing factors for intraoperative endplate injury. Conclusions Intraoperative endplate injury is correlated significantly with reduced BMD and taller cage height. Precise evaluation of bone quality and treatment for osteoporosis might be important and care should be taken not to choose excessively taller cage. PMID:27790319

  15. First intraoperative experience with three-dimensional (3D) high-definition (HD) nasal endoscopy for lacrimal surgeries.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Javed; Naik, Milind N

    2017-02-02

    The aim of this study is to report our preliminary experiences with regard to safety and feasibility of three-dimensional (3D) endoscopic lacrimal surgeries with a recently launched latest generation 3D endoscope. A 4-mm rigid three-dimensional (3D) endoscope (TIPCAM 1S 3D ORL(R), Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany) was used. Fifteen patients who underwent various endoscopic lacrimal procedures by a single surgeon (MJA) were included. The procedures included probing with nasolacrimal intubation, cruciate marsupialization of intranasal cysts for congenital dacryoceles, powered endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy, post-operative stent removal with ostium granuloma excision. The implementation, visualization, optical performance, ease of tissue handling and complications were noted. Ten surgical observers filled a questionnaire to rate their experiences. Enhanced depth perception was found to be very beneficial intraoperatively. Greater anatomical delineation facilitated improved hand-eye coordination and dexterity. Intraoperative assessment and handling of tissues and surgical manoeuvring were precise and did not require the additional spatial cues that the surgeon derives from a two-dimensional image. These benefits were more appreciated in the complex cases. The setup was easy on previous endoscopic platforms and did not consume any additional time. All the surgical procedures were completed successfully without any complications. The surgical observers unanimously noted enhanced anatomical understanding and surgical learning as compared to the routine 2D planes. Operating in 3D planes enhances depth perception, dexterity and precision. Although initial results are promising, further randomized studies with head-on comparisons between 3D and 2D would help formulate specific guidelines.

  16. Simulated sudden stratospheric warming - Synoptic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackshear, W. T.; Grose, W. L.; Turner, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis is presented of a sudden stratospheric warming event which occurred spontaneously during a general circulation model simulation of the global atmospheric circulation. Two separate warming pulses exhibit the same dynamical evolution with a 'cycle' of about two weeks. Two distinct phases of the warming cycle are apparent: (1) the generation of an intense localized warm cell in conjunction with significant adiabatic heating associated with cross-isobar flow which has been induced by vertically propagating long wave disturbances; and (2) the northward transport of that warm cell via advection by the essentially geostrophic windfield corresponding to an intense, offset polar cyclone, in conjunction with a strong Aleutian anticyclone. During the first warming pulse in January, a moderate Aleutian anticyclone was in place prior to the warming cycle and was intensified by interaction with an eastward traveling anticyclone induced by the differential advection of the warm cell. The second warming pulse occurred in early February with a strong Aleutian anticyclone already established. In contrast to the January event, the warming in February culminated with reversal of the zonal westerlies to easterlies over a significant depth of the stratosphere.

  17. Primordial non-Gaussianity in noncanonical warm inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Min; Zhu, Jian-Yang

    2015-03-01

    We study the bispectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation on uniform density hypersurfaces generated by a kind of the noncanonical warm inflation, wherein the inflation is provided by a noncanonical scalar inflaton field that is coupled to radiation through a thermal dissipation effect. We obtain an analytic form for the nonlinear parameter fNL that describes the non-Gaussianity in first-order cosmological perturbation theory and analyze the magnitude of this nonlinear parameter. We make a comparison between our result and those of the standard inflation and the canonical warm inflation. We also discuss when the contribution to the non-Gaussianity due to the second-order perturbation theory becomes more important and what the observations predict. We take the Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation as a concrete example to find how the sound speed and the thermal dissipation strength to decide the non-Gaussianity and get a lower bound of the sound speed constrained by Planck.

  18. Warm gas TVC design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, S. B., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A warm gas thrust vector control system was studied to optimize the injection geometry for a specific engine configuration, and an injection valve was designed capable of meeting the base line requirements. To optimize injection geometry, studies were made to determine the performance effects of varying injection location, angle, port size, and port configuration. Having minimized the injection flow rate required, a warm gas valve was designed to handle the required flow. A direct drive hydraulic servovalve capable of operating with highly contaminated hydraulic fluid was designed. The valve is sized to flow 15 gpm at 3000 psia and the direct drive feature is capable of applying a spool force of 200 pounds. The baseline requirements are the development of 6 deg of thrust vector control utilizing 2000 F (total temperature) gas for 180 seconds on a 1.37 million pound thrust engine burning LOX and RP-1 at a chamber pressure of 250 psia with a 155 inch long conical nozzle having a 68 inch diameter throat and a 153 inch diameter exit.

  19. Population growth and global warming.

    PubMed

    Short, R V

    2009-01-01

    When I was born in 1930, the human population of the world was a mere 2 billion. Today, it has already reached 6.8 billion, and is projected to reach 9.1 billion by 2050. That is unsustainable. It is slowly beginning to dawn on us that Global Warming is the result of increasing human CO2 emissions, and the more people there are in the world, the worse it will become. Ultimately, it is the sky that will prove to be the limit to our numbers. The developed countries of the world are the most affluent, and also the most effluent, so we must lead by example and contain our own population growth and per capita emissions. We also have a big debt to repay to former colonial territories in Africa, Asia and South America, who desperately need our help to contain their excessive rates of population growth. Belgian and Dutch obstetricians and gynaecologists can play a critical role in this endeavour. After all, we already have a pill that will stop global warming - the oral contraceptive pill.

  20. A sudden stratospheric warming compendium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Amy H.; Sjoberg, Jeremiah P.; Seidel, Dian J.; Rosenlof, Karen H.

    2017-02-01

    Major, sudden midwinter stratospheric warmings (SSWs) are large and rapid temperature increases in the winter polar stratosphere are associated with a complete reversal of the climatological westerly winds (i.e., the polar vortex). These extreme events can have substantial impacts on winter surface climate, including increased frequency of cold air outbreaks over North America and Eurasia and anomalous warming over Greenland and eastern Canada. Here we present a SSW Compendium (SSWC), a new database that documents the evolution of the stratosphere, troposphere, and surface conditions 60 days prior to and after SSWs for the period 1958-2014. The SSWC comprises data from six different reanalysis products: MERRA2 (1980-2014), JRA-55 (1958-2014), ERA-interim (1979-2014), ERA-40 (1958-2002), NOAA20CRv2c (1958-2011), and NCEP-NCAR I (1958-2014). Global gridded daily anomaly fields, full fields, and derived products are provided for each SSW event. The compendium will allow users to examine the structure and evolution of individual SSWs, and the variability among events and among reanalysis products. The SSWC is archived and maintained by NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI, doi:10.7289/V5NS0RWP).

  1. SOFIA Observations of S106: Dynamics of the Warm Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, R.; Schneider, N.; Stutzki, J.; Gusten, R.; Graf, U. U.; Hartogh, P.; Guan, X.; Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Context The H II region/PDR/molecular cloud complex S106 is excited by a single O-star. The full extent of the warm and dense gas close to the star has not been mapped in spectrally resolved high-J CO or [C II] lines, so the kinematics of the warm. partially ionized gas, are unknown. Whether the prominent dark lane bisecting the hourglass-shaped nebula is due solely to the shadow cast by a small disk around the exciting star or also to extinction in high column foreground gas was an open question until now. Aims. To disentangle the morphology and kinematics of warm neutral and ionized gas close to the star, study their relation to the bulk of the molecular gas. and to investigate the nature of the dark lane. Methods. We use the heterodyne receiver GREAT on board SOFIA to observe velocity resolved spectral lines of [C II] and CO 11 yields 10 in comparison with so far unpublished submm continuum data at 350 micron (8HARC-Il) and complementary molecular line data. Results. The high angular and spectral resolution observations show a very complex morphology and kinematics of the inner S106 region, with many different components at different excitation conditions contributing to the observed emission. The [C II] lines are found to be bright and very broad. tracing high velocity gas close to the interface of molecular cloud and H II region. CO 11 yields 10 emission is more confined.. both spatially and in velocity, to the immediate surroundings of S 106 IR showing the presence of warm, high density (clumpy) gas. Our high angular resolution submm continuum observations rule out the scenario where the dark lane separating the two lobes is due solely to the shadow cast by a small disk close to the star. The lane is clearly seen also as warm, high column density gas at the boundary of the molecular cloud and H II region.

  2. Variability of intraoperative electrostimulation parameters in conscious individuals: language cortex.

    PubMed

    Roux, Franck-Emmanuel; Durand, Jean-Baptiste; Djidjeli, Imène; Moyse, Emmanuel; Giussani, Carlo

    2016-07-15

    OBJECTIVE Electrostimulation in awake brain mapping is widely used to guide tumor removal, but methodologies can differ substantially across institutions. The authors studied electrostimulation brain mapping data to characterize the variability of the current intensity threshold across patients and the effect of its variations on the number, type, and surface area of the essential language areas detected. METHODS Over 7 years, the authors prospectively studied 100 adult patients who were undergoing intraoperative brain mapping during resection of left hemisphere tumors. In all 100 cases, the same protocol of electrostimulation brain mapping (a controlled naming task-bipolar stimulation with biphasic square wave pulses of 1-msec duration and 60-Hz trains, maximum train duration 6 sec) and electrocorticography was used to detect essential language areas. RESULTS The minimum positive thresholds of stimulation varied from patient to patient; the mean minimum intensity required to detect interference was 4.46 mA (range 1.5-9 mA), and in a substantial proportion of sites (13.5%) interference was detected only at intensities above 6 mA. The threshold varied within a given patient for different naming areas in 22% of cases. Stimulation of the same naming area with greater intensities led to slight changes in the type of response in 19% of cases and different types of responses in 4.5%. Naming sites detected were located in subcentimeter cortical areas (50% were less than 20 mm(2)), but their extent varied with the intensity of stimulation. During a brain mapping session, the same intensity of stimulation reproduced the same type of interference in 94% of the cases. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean stimulation intensities required to produce interfereince in the left inferior frontal lobe (Broca's area), the supramarginal gyri, and the posterior temporal region. CONCLUSIONS Intrasubject and intersubject variations of the minimum thresholds

  3. Electrical Noise in the Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Setting

    PubMed Central

    Dzwonczyk, Roger; Fujii, Jeffrey T; Simonetti, Orlando; Nieves-Ramos, Ricardo; Bergese, Sergio D

    2013-01-01

    Background Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) is a tool now commonly used in neurosurgery. Safe and reliable patient care in this (or any other) operating room setting depends on an environment where electrical noise (EN) does not interfere with the operation of the electronic monitoring or imaging equipment. In this investigation, we evaluated the EN generated by the iMRI system and the anesthesia patient monitor used at this institution that impacts the performance of these 2 devices. Methods We measured the EN generated by our iMRI-compatible anesthesia patient monitor as detected by the EN analysis algorithm in our iMRI system. We measured the EN generated by our iMRI system during scanning as detected in the electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform of our patient monitor. We analyzed the effects on EN reduction and signal quality of the ECG noise filters provided in our iMRI-compatible anesthesia patient monitor. Results Our patient monitor generated EN that was detectable by the iMRI EN analysis algorithm; however, this interference was within the iMRI manufacturer’s acceptable limits for an iMRI scan (<10% more than background system level noise). In the clinical case analyzed, the iMRI generated a narrow-band low-frequency (20Hz) relatively high-energy EN that interfered with the ECG signal of our patient monitor during an iMRI scan. This EN was correlated with the acoustic noise from the iMRI system during the scan and was associated with the radio frequency and magnetic gradient pulsations of the iMRI system. The integrity of the ECG waveform was nearly entirely lost during a scan. The filters of the ECG monitor diminished but did not entirely eliminate this 20Hz interference. We found that the filters alter the morphology of the ECG signal, which may make it difficult to identify clinically relevant ECG changes. Conclusion The EN generated by our anesthesia patient monitor is within acceptable limits for the iMRI system. The iMRI generates EN

  4. Bone necrosis and tumor induction following experimental intraoperative irradiation.

    PubMed

    Powers, B E; Gillette, E L; McChesney, S L; LeCouteur, R A; Withrow, S J

    1989-09-01

    The bone of the lumbar vertebrae of 153 dogs was examined 2 and 5 years after intraoperative irradiation (IORT), fractionated external beam irradiation (EBRT), or the combination. Groups of dogs received 15 to 55 Gy IORT only, 10 to 47.5 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions or 60 to 80 Gy EBRT in 30 fractions. Six MeV electrons were used for IORT, and EBRT was done using photons from a 6 MV linear accelerator. The paraaortic region was irradiated and the ventral part of the lumbar vertebrae was in the 90% isodose level. Two years after irradiation, the dose causing significant bone necrosis as determined by at least 50% empty lacunae in the vertebral cortex was 38.2 Gy IORT alone and 32.5 Gy IORT combined with EBRT. Five years after irradiation, the dose causing 50% empty lacunae was 28.5 Gy IORT only and 14.4 Gy IORT combined with EBRT. The ED50 for lesions of the ventral vertebral artery was 21.7 Gy IORT only and 20.1 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT 2 years after irradiation and 27.0 Gy IORT only and 20.0 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT 5 years after irradiation. All lesions after EBRT only were mild. Eight dogs developed osteosarcomas 4 to 5 years after irradiation, one at 47.5 Gy IORT only and the remainder at 25.0 Gy IORT and above combined with 50 Gy EBRT. In conclusion, the extent of empty lacunae, indicating bone necrosis, was more severe 5 years after irradiation than after 2 years. The effect of 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions was equivalent to about 6 Gy IORT 2 years after irradiation and to about 14 Gy 5 years after irradiation. Based on these estimates, IORT doses of 10 to 15 Gy have an effect 5 times or greater than the amount given in 2 Gy fractions. Osteosarcomas occurred in 21% of dogs which received doses greater than 25 Gy IORT. Doses of 15 to 20 Gy IORT in combination with 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions may be near the tolerance level for late developing bone injury.

  5. Relation between Birth Weight and Intraoperative Hemorrhage during Cesarean Section in Pregnancy with Placenta Previa

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Hiroki; Takano, Masashi; Sasa, Hidenori; Furuya, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Placenta previa, one of the most severe obstetric complications, carries an increased risk of intraoperative massive hemorrhage. Several risk factors for intraoperative hemorrhage have been identified to date. However, the correlation between birth weight and intraoperative hemorrhage has not been investigated. Here we estimate the correlation between birth weight and the occurrence of intraoperative massive hemorrhage in placenta previa. Materials and Methods We included all 256 singleton pregnancies delivered via cesarean section at our hospital because of placenta previa between 2003 and 2015. We calculated not only measured birth weights but also standard deviation values according to the Japanese standard growth curve to adjust for differences in gestational age. We assessed the correlation between birth weight and the occurrence of intraoperative massive hemorrhage (>1500 mL blood loss). Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to determine the cutoff value of intraoperative massive hemorrhage. Results Of 256 pregnant women with placenta previa, 96 (38%) developed intraoperative massive hemorrhage. Receiver-operating characteristic curves revealed that the area under the curve of the combination variables between the standard deviation of birth weight and intraoperative massive hemorrhage was 0.71. The cutoff value with a sensitivity of 81.3% and specificity of 55.6% was −0.33 standard deviation. The multivariate analysis revealed that a standard deviation of >−0.33 (odds ratio, 5.88; 95% confidence interval, 3.04–12.00), need for hemostatic procedures (odds ratio, 3.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.79–6.25), and placental adhesion (odds ratio, 12.68; 95% confidence interval, 2.85–92.13) were independent risk of intraoperative massive hemorrhage. Conclusion In patients with placenta previa, a birth weight >−0.33 standard deviation was a significant risk indicator of massive hemorrhage during cesarean section. Based on

  6. Intraoperative cholangiography. A review of indications and analysis of age-sex groups.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, S B; Lerner, H J; Leifer, E D; Lindheim, S R

    1983-01-01

    A retrospective review was performed of patients who had biliary tract stone formation as the primary diagnosis for hospitalization and indication for surgery. Five hundred and eighty-nine consecutive charts were reviewed of patients admitted between 1975 and 1979. Intraoperative cholangiography was performed in 166 patients of whom 22 had common duct exploration. Choledochotomy in this series was performed in 63 cases without utilizing pre-exploratory cholangiography. A normal intraoperative cholangiogram was found to be 100% accurate; however, an abnormal cholangiogram was associated with a 16% false positive rate of exploration of the common duct. The incidence of unsuspected common duct stones detected only by intraoperative cholangiography was 2.3%. Age-sex analysis confirms a 10-year mean age difference between men and women within the population of this study (p less than 0.001). This age-sex difference is maintained in patients without common duct pathology as well as in patients with sterile bile. However, the mean age difference between male and female patients with either demonstrable common duct obstruction by stones or infected bile as determined by routine intraoperative culture is not statistically significant. A review of the role of intraoperative cholangiography, and the experience at Northeastern Hospital is discussed. PMID:6639173

  7. Model-Updated Image-Guided Neurosurgery: Preliminary Analysis Using Intraoperative MR.

    PubMed

    Miga, Michael I; Staubert, Andreas; Paulsen, Keith D; Kennedy, Francis E; Tronnier, Volker M; Roberts, David W; Hartov, Alex; Platenik, Leah A; Lunn, Karen E

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, initial clinical data from an intraoperative MR system are compared to calculations made by a three-dimensional finite element model of brain deformation. The preoperative and intraoperative MR data was collected on a patient undergoing a resection of an astrocytoma, grade 3 with non-enhancing and enhancing regions. The image volumes were co-registered and cortical displacements as well as subsurface structure movements were measured retrospectively. These data were then compared to model predictions undergoing intraoperative conditions of gravity and simulated tumor decompression. Computed results demonstrate that gravity and decompression effects account for approximately 40% and 30%, respectively, totaling a 70% recovery of shifting structures with the model. The results also suggest that a non-uniform decompressive stress distribution may be present during tumor resection. Based on this preliminary experience, model predictions constrained by intraoperative surface data appear to be a promising avenue for correcting brain shift during surgery. However, additional clinical cases where volumetric intraoperative MR data is available are needed to improve the understanding of tissue mechanics during resection.

  8. Intraoperative culture positive allograft bone and subsequent postoperative infections: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Laura; Kulyk, Paul; Woo, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Background Obtaining intraoperative cultures of allograft bone just before use in orthopedic procedures is standard practice in many centres; however, the association between positive cultures and subsequent surgical infections is unknown. Our study had 3 goals: to determine the prevalence of positive intraoperative allograft culture and subsequent infection; to determine if, in cases of subsequent infection, organisms isolated at reoperation were the same as those cultured from the allograft at the time of the index procedure; and to assess the costs associated with performing intraoperative allograft cultures. Methods In this retrospective case series, we obtained data on patients receiving allograft bone between 2009 and 2012. Patients receiving allograft with positive cultures were reviewed to identify cases of significant infection. Organisms isolated at reoperation were compared with the allograft culture taken at the time of implantation, and we performed a cost assessment. Results Of the 996 allograft bone grafts used, 43 (4.3%) had positive intraoperative cultures and significant postoperative infections developed in 2, requiring reoperation. Antibiotics based on culture results were prescribed in 24% of cases. Organisms cultured at the time of reoperation differed from those isolated initially. The cost of performing 996 allograft cultures was $169 320. Conclusion This series suggests that rates of positive intraoperative bone allograft culture are low, and subsequent infection is rare. In cases of postoperative infection, primary allograft culture and secondary tissue cultures isolated different organisms. Costs associated with performing cultures are high. Eliminating initial culture testing could save $42 500 per year in our health region. PMID:28234217

  9. Resuscitation of Intraoperative Hypovolemia: Comparison of Normal Saline and Hyperosmotic/Hyperoncotic Solutions in Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    isotonic crystalloid solutions. Blood derivatives have limited availability and high cost, and when used in large volumes can induce such disturbances as...next 45 minutes, mean arterial pressure was further reduced to 45 mmHg and maintained at that level with additional bleeding as needed. No shed blood ...resuscitation we also measured mixed venous blood gases, lactate and colloid osmotic pressure (Wescor 4100 colloid osmometer, Logan, UT). Plasma volume

  10. Seed based registration for intraoperative brachytherapy dosimetry: a comparison of methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi; Davis, Brian J.; Herman, Michael G.; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Several approaches for registering a subset of imaged points to their true origins were analyzed and compared for seed based TRUS-fluoroscopy registration. The methods include the Downhill Simplex method (DS), the Powell's method (POW), the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) method, the Robust Point Matching method (RPM) and variants of RPM. Several modifications were made to the standard RPM method to improve its performance. One hundred simulations were performed for each combination of noise level, seed detection rate and spurious points and the registration accuracy was evaluated and compared. The noise level ranges from 0 to 5mm, the seed detection ratio ranges from 0.2 to 0.6, and the number of spurious points ranges from 0 to 20. An actual clinical post-implant dataset from permanent prostate brachytherapy was used for the simulation study. The experiments provided evidence that our modified RPM method is superior to other methods, especially when there are many outliers. The RPM based method produced the best results at all noise levels and seed detection rates. The DS based method performed reasonably well, especially at low noise levels without spurious points. There was no significant performance difference between the standard RPM and our modified RPM methods without spurious points. The modified RPM methods outperformed the standard RPM method with large number of spurious points. The registration error was within 2mm, even with 20 outlier points and a noise level of 3mm.

  11. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-01-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming. PMID:28317914

  12. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-03-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  13. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-12-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  14. Warm-Ring Structures in Intense Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, F. I.; Gonzalez, A. O.; Slocum, C. J.; Schubert, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Typical hurricanes have a warm-core structure such that the warmest temperatures occur in the center of the hurricane. However, weather reconnaissance aircraft data has observed warm-rings in intense hurricanes. A warm-ring structure results when the warmest temperature anomalies occur on the outer edge of the eye. Schubert et al. (2007) suggests the Eliassen transverse circulation equation can model intense hurricanes with a warm-core structure in the upper troposphere and also a warm-ring structure in the lower. Although the thermal wind equation was used in the derivation of the transverse circulation equation, the thermal wind equation has not been used explicitly in an attempt to create such a temperature field. This study derives the thermal wind equation from the hydrostatic and the gradient wind equations to analyze the temperature, tangential velocity, and the absolute vorticity fields. Using observed hurricanes, a warm-ring structure is simulated with the thermal wind equation as the basis. With a prescribed temperature profile, the calculated tangential velocity and absolute vorticity fields resemble those of a realistic hurricane. Thus, the thermal wind equation can be used to create a realistic, intense hurricane with a warm ring structure. Schubert et al. (2007) discusses subsidence as a mechanism that leads to the warm-ring but the tangential velocity and absolute vorticity fields suggest some influence of boundary layer processes that should be explored in future research for a further understanding of warm-rings.

  15. Estimation of intra-operative brain shift using a tracked laser range scanner.

    PubMed

    Ding, Siyi; Miga, Michael I; Thompson, Reid C; Dumpuri, Prashanth; Cao, Aize; Dawant, Benoit M

    2007-01-01

    Intra-operative brain shift limits the usefulness of image-guided neurosurgery systems (IGNS), which are based on pre-operative images. Methods that are being developed to address this problem need intra-operative measurements as input. In this work, we present an intra-operative surface shift measurement technique that relies on a tracked 3D laser range scanner. This scanner acquires both 3D range data and 2D images, which are co-registered. We compare two methods to derive displacements at every point in the field of view. The first one relies on the registration of the 2D images; the second relies on the direct 3D registration of the 3D range data. Our results, based on five data sets, show that the 2D method is preferable.

  16. Treatment of cancer of the pancreas by intraoperative electron beam therapy: physical and biological aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Bagne, F.R.; Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Milligan, A.J.; Bronn, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation therapy has had a significant and an expanded role in the management of cancer of the pancreas during the last decade. In particular, for locally advanced disease, radiation therapy has improved the median survival of patients to 1 year. Intraoperative electron beam therapy has been applied to unresectable and resectable pancreatic cancer in an attempt to enhance local control of disease and to improve patient survival. This paper presents a survey of the role of radiation therapy in treatment of cancer of the pancreas, provides information on the radiobiological aspects of this treatment modality and details the physical and dosimetric characteristics of intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons. Presented are the design specifics of an applicator system, central axis beam data, applicator parameters, dose distribution data, shielding, treatment planning and means of verification. Emphasis is placed on the collaboration and cooperation necessary for all members of the intraoperative radiation therapy team including surgeons, radiation therapists, medical physicists, anesthesiologists, technologists, and nurses.29 references.

  17. Usefulness of Intraoperative Computer Tomography-Assisted Thoracoscopic Segmentectomy for Small-Sized Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Takayuki; Okamoto, Taku

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who had synchronous primary lung cancers in the left upper lobe (S1+2a, S1+2c), and underwent S1+2 segmentectomy. The lesion in S1+2c was non-palpable, and the location was confirmed using intraoperative computed tomography (CT) scan. After A1+2 and B1+2 had been cut, the intersegmental border was marked with clips and intraoperative CT was performed. After confirming the correct anatomical intersegmental border and the resection margin was sufficient, we cut the intersegmental border. The two lesions were both adenocarcinomas. Intraoperative CT was useful for confirming the locations of non-palpable lesions and anatomical intersegmental borders. PMID:26499906

  18. Intraoperative transillumination with water-filling of lumen for localizing lesions in occult small bowel bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangheng; Cao, Yuning; Yang, Daogui; Li, Senlin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Occult small bowel bleeding is always difficult to locate by either radiological examination or endoscopy. When the site of bleeding cannot be found by nonsurgical measures, exploratory laparotomy becomes necessary. Patient concerns: A 63-year-old woman with a half-month history of occult gastrointestinal bleeding failed to many conservative therapies. Interventions: Intraoperative transillumination with water-filling of lumen was performed. Diagnoses: Small bowel bleeding was diagnosed intraoperatively. Outcomes: Segmental resection of the diseased small bowel with side-to-side anastomosis was performed while the histology showed no significant abnormality. Lessons: The technique of intraoperative transillumination with water-filling of lumen allows simple, accurate, and rapid localization of lesions in occult small bowel bleeding and facilitates precise and definitive surgery. PMID:28151907

  19. Intra-operative femoral neck fracture during attempted dislocation of a reduced hemi-arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ling, Samuel Ka Kin; Ma, Chun Man; Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-05-01

    Fragility hip fractures are increasingly common and hemiarthroplasty is one of the standard treatments. Although a common surgery, it should be performed with great caution because of the poor premorbid and bone quality in this demographic. Intra-operative fractures can occur while attempting press fit of the femoral implant. However; vigilance often steps down once the implant is secured and the hip reduced. This case report reminds surgeons that a large amount of torque can be transmitted during intra-operative positioning, such as during an attempt of hip dislocation. This torque, in addition to the risk factor of osteoporotic bone, can result in iatrogenic fractures. Published literature regarding management of an intra-operative fracture while the prosthetic hip is still reduced is lacking. The authors propose that temporary prophylactic cerclage wiring is a prudent and safe procedure prior to hip dislocation.

  20. End Calorimeter Warm Tube Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Primdahl, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-08-06

    The Tevatron accelerator beam tube must pass through the End Calorimeter cryostats of the D-Zero Collider Detector. Furthermore, the End Calorimeter cryostats must be allowed to roll back forty inches without interruption of the vacuum system; hence, the Tev tube must slide through the End Calorimeter cryostat as it is rolled back. The Tev pass through the End Calorimeter can actually be thought of as a cluster of concentric tubes: Tev tube, warm (vacuum vessel) tube, IS layers of superinsulation, cold tube (argon vessel), and Inner Hadronic center support tube. M. Foley generated an ANSYS model to study the heat load. to the cryostat. during collider physics studies; that is, without operation of the heater. A sketch of the model is included in the appendix. The vacuum space and superinsulation was modeled as a thermal solid, with conductivity derived from tests performed at Fermilab. An additional estimate was done. by this author, using data supplied by NR-2. a superinsulation manufacturer. The ANSYS result and hand calculation are in close agreement. The ANSYS model was modified. by this author. to incorporate the effect of the heater. Whereas the earlier model studied steady state operation only. the revised model considers the heater-off steady state mode as the initial condition. then performs a transient analysis with a final load step for time tending towards infinity. Results show the thermal gradient as a function of time and applied voltage. It should be noted that M. Foley's model was generated for one half the warm tube. implying the tube to be symmetric. In reality. the downstream connection (relative to the collision point) attachment to the vacuum shell is via several convolutions of a 0.020-inch wall bellows; hence. a nearly adiabatic boundary condition. Accordingly. the results reported in the table reflect extrapolation of the curves to the downstream end of the tube. Using results from the ANSYS analysis, that is, tube temperature and

  1. DPIS for warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  2. Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring in spine surgery. Developments and state of the art in France in 2011.

    PubMed

    Gavaret, M; Jouve, J L; Péréon, Y; Accadbled, F; André-Obadia, N; Azabou, E; Blondel, B; Bollini, G; Delécrin, J; Farcy, J-P; Fournet-Fayard, J; Garin, C; Henry, P; Manel, V; Mutschler, V; Perrin, G; Sales de Gauzy, J

    2013-10-01

    Intraoperative spinal cord monitoring consists in a subcontinuous evaluation of spinal cord sensory-motor functions and allows the reduction the incidence of neurological complications resulting from spinal surgery. A combination of techniques is used: somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), neurogenic motor evoked potentials (NMEP), D waves, and pedicular screw testing. In absence of intraoperative neurophysiological testing, the intraoperative wake-up test is a true form of monitoring even if its latency long and its precision variable. A 2011 survey of 117 French spinal surgeons showed that only 36% had neurophysiological monitoring available (public healthcare facilities, 42%; private facilities, 27%). Monitoring can be performed by a neurophysiologist in the operating room, remotely using a network, or directly by the surgeon. Intraoperative alerts allow real-time diagnosis of impending neurological injury. Use of spinal electrodes, moved along the medullary canal, can determine the lesion level (NMEP, D waves). The response to a monitoring alert should take into account the phase of the surgical intervention and does not systematically lead to interruption of the intervention. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring, in presence of a neurophysiologist, in collaboration with the anesthesiologist, is the most reliable technique available. However, no monitoring technique can predict a delayed-onset paraplegia that appears after the end of surgery. In cases of preexisting neurological deficit, monitoring contributes little. Monitoring of the L1-L4 spinal roots also shows low reliability. Therefore, monitoring has no indication in discal and degenerative surgery of the spinal surgery. However, testing pedicular screws can be useful. All in all, thoracic and thoracolumbar vertebral deviations, with normal preoperative neurological examination are currently the essential indication for spinal cord monitoring. Its absence in this

  3. Intraoperative detection of radiolabeled compounds using a hand held gamma probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Marcel

    2001-02-01

    Scintillation cameras in Nuclear Medicine allow external detection of cancerous lesions after administration of a specific radiopharmaceutical to the patient. In some particular cases the affinity of the tracer is sufficient to consider the use of an intraoperative probe which enables the surgeon to identify radioactive tissues. A radiopharmaceutical consists of a radioisotope bound to a carrier molecule. The radioactive emissions must represent certain criteria in terms of half-life and energy to be detected during an operation. In the field of intraoperative detection radionuclides like 99mTc, 111In, 125I and 131I fall into this category. Their energy, which ranges from some 10 to 364 keV, cannot be properly detected by a single type of detector. Two technologies have been developed to yield detectors which are handy and sufficiently sensitive: semiconductor CdTe or CdZnTe to detect low energies and scintillator CsI(Tl) for higher energies. Today the intraoperative detection has been evaluated in the case of several pathologies such as osteoid osteoma, colorectal cancer, neuroblastoma, reoperation of differentiated thyroid carcinoma and localization of sentinel node in breast cancer and cutaneous melanoma. Obviously, the results obtained are not comparable from one indication to the other. Nevertheless, the surgeons have noted a considerable advantage in using the intraoperative probe in the case of neuroblastoma and thyroid surgery, especially when the reoperation is difficult or the localizations are ectopic or unusual. As regards the sentinel node, this concept represents a major new opportunity in the field of intraoperative detection and the results actually reported in the literature demonstrate that, when it is detected, elective node excision renders the staging of the disease more accurate. In conclusion, intraoperative detection supplies the surgeon with additional knowledge to be used in correlation with the patient's medical history.

  4. Safety, effectiveness and economic evaluation of intra-operative radiation therapy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Najafipour, Farshad; Hamouzadeh, Pejman; Arabloo, Jalal; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Norouzi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT) is the transfer of a single large radiation dose to the tumor bed during surgery with the final goal of improving regional tumor control. This study aimed to investigate the safety, effectiveness and economic evaluation of intra-operative radiation therapy. Methods: The scientific literature was searched in the main biomedical databases (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Cochrane Library and PubMed) up to March 2014. Two independent reviewers selected the papers based on pre-established inclusion criteria, with any disagreements being resolved by consensus. Data were then extracted and summarized in a structured form. Results from studies were analyzed and discussed within a descriptive synthesis. Results: Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. It seems that outcomes from using intraoperative radiation therapy can be considered in various kinds of cancers like breast, pancreatic and colorectal cancers. The application of this method may provide significant survival increase only for colorectal cancer, but this increase was not significant for other types of cancer. This technology had low complications; and it is relatively safe. Using intra-operative radiation therapy could potentially be accounted as a cost-effective strategy for controlling and managing breast cancer. Conclusion: According to the existing evidences, that are the highest medical evidences for using intra-operative radiation therapy, one can generally conclude that intra-operative radiation therapy is considered as a relatively safe and cost-effective method for managing early-stage breast cancer and it can significantly increase the survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Also, the results of this study have policy implications with respect to the reimbursement of this technology. PMID:26793649

  5. "Subclinoid" carotid aneurysm with erosion of the anterior clinoid process and fatal intraoperative rupture.

    PubMed

    Korosue, K; Heros, R C

    1992-08-01

    We present the case of a patient with an aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The aneurysm had resulted in erosion of the anterior clinoid process, but this was not recognized preoperatively. Intraoperative rupture during drilling of the clinoid necessitated vigorous packing that led to unintended carotid occlusion with subsequent fatal cerebral infarction. Preoperative recognition of the clinoid erosion may have prevented this catastrophe. To call attention to the potential for intraoperative rupture during exposure, we suggest the term subclinoid aneurysm to refer to aneurysms of the internal carotid artery that grow superolaterally and remain confined under the anterior clinoid process.

  6. [What is the role of intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment?].

    PubMed

    Aumont, M

    2016-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast postoperative irradiation is considered to be the current standard treatment for patients with early stage breast cancer. It allows an excellent local tumour control with 6% of local recurrence. Over the last years, partial breast radiotherapy has been developed to reduce treatment volume and duration. Intraoperative radiotherapy is one of the techniques. It offers an excellent delineation of the tumour bed and high normal tissue sparing. This purpose of this review is to describe the different intraoperative radiotherapy techniques available, to assess their potential clinical efficiency and tolerance, the recommendations for new practice with a selected population of patients and for future research.

  7. Histopathological effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on pancreas and adjacent tissues: a postmortem analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, H.J.; Restrepo, C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1988-02-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) has been utilized in the treatment of resectable and unresectable pancreatic carcinoma at the National Cancer Institute. Detailed autopsy analyses of the radiation effects on the pancreas and adjacent tissues were performed on 13 patients dying at various times following therapy. IORT can induce a progressive retroperitoneal fibrosis and fibrosis of the porta hepatis in patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma. In unresectable pancreatic carcinoma, the major expression of intraoperative irradiation with external beam irradiation is a progressive fibrosis of the pancreas with vascular sclerosis, nerve degeneration, atrophy of acinar cells, and atypical changes in the ducts of the pancreas, as well as degenerative changes of the pancreatic tumor.

  8. Utilization of intraoperative 3D navigation for delayed reconstruction of orbitozygomatic complex fractures.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Clinton S; Taylor, Helena O; Sullivan, Stephen R

    2013-05-01

    Reconstructive goals for orbitozygomaticomaxillary complex fractures include restoration of orbital volume, facial projection, and facial width. Delayed reconstruction is made more difficult by malunion, nonunion, bony absorption, loss of the soft tissue envelope, and scar. Three-dimensional intraoperative navigation, widely used in neurosurgery and sinus surgery, can improve the accuracy with which bony reduction is performed. This is particularly useful in the setting of bony absorption and comminution. We report a case of delayed reconstruction of an orbitozygomaticomaxillary complex fracture using intraoperative navigation and review this technology's utility in this setting.

  9. Design and performance of combined infrared canopy and belowground warming in the B4WarmED (Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger) experiment.

    PubMed

    Rich, Roy L; Stefanski, Artur; Montgomery, Rebecca A; Hobbie, Sarah E; Kimball, Bruce A; Reich, Peter B

    2015-06-01

    Conducting manipulative climate change experiments in complex vegetation is challenging, given considerable temporal and spatial heterogeneity. One specific challenge involves warming of both plants and soils to depth. We describe the design and performance of an open-air warming experiment called Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger (B4WarmED) that addresses the potential for projected climate warming to alter tree function, species composition, and ecosystem processes at the boreal-temperate ecotone. The experiment includes two forested sites in northern Minnesota, USA, with plots in both open (recently clear-cut) and closed canopy habitats, where seedlings of 11 tree species were planted into native ground vegetation. Treatments include three target levels of plant canopy and soil warming (ambient, +1.7°C, +3.4°C). Warming was achieved by independent feedback control of voltage input to aboveground infrared heaters and belowground buried resistance heating cables in each of 72-7.0 m(2) plots. The treatments emulated patterns of observed diurnal, seasonal, and annual temperatures but with superimposed warming. For the 2009 to 2011 field seasons, we achieved temperature elevations near our targets with growing season overall mean differences (∆Tbelow ) of +1.84°C and +3.66°C at 10 cm soil depth and (∆T(above) ) of +1.82°C and +3.45°C for the plant canopies. We also achieved measured soil warming to at least 1 m depth. Aboveground treatment stability and control were better during nighttime than daytime and in closed vs. open canopy sites in part due to calmer conditions. Heating efficacy in open canopy areas was reduced with increasing canopy complexity and size. Results of this study suggest the warming approach is scalable: it should work well in small-statured vegetation such as grasslands, desert, agricultural crops, and tree saplings (<5 m tall).

  10. Warming infusion improves perioperative outcomes of elderly patients who underwent bilateral hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ma, He; Lai, Bingjie; Dong, Shanshan; Li, Xinyu; Cui, Yunfeng; Sun, Qianchuang; Liu, Wenhua; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Feng; Lv, Hui; Han, Hongyu; Pan, Zhenxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This prospective, randomized, and controlled study was performed to determine the benefits of prewarmed infusion in elderly patients who underwent bilateral hip replacement. Methods: Between September 2015 and April 2016, elderly patients who underwent bilateral hips replacement that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. After inclusion, patients were randomized into one of the study groups: in the control group, patients received an infusion of fluid kept at room temperature (22–23°C); in the warming infusion group, patients received an infusion of fluid warmed using an infusion fluid heating apparatus (35°C). Postoperative outcomes, including recovery time, length of hospital stay, visual analogue scale (VAS) score, and postoperative complications rate of patients from both groups, were compared. Results: A total of 64 patients were included in our study (71.2 ± 7.6 years, 53.1% males), with 32 patients in the control group and 32 patients in warming infusion group. No significant difference was found in terms of demographic data and intraoperative blood transfusion rate between 2 groups (P > 0.05). Patients receiving a prewarmed infusion had a significantly shorter time to spontaneous breath, eye opening, consciousness recovery, and extubation than the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, significant differences were found in Steward score and VAS score between 2 groups (P < 0.05). Moreover, warming infusion group also showed an obviously decreased incidence of shivering and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (P < 0.05). Conclusion: A prewarmed infusion could reduce the incidence of perioperative hypothermia and improve outcomes in the elderly during bilateral hip replacement. PMID:28353593

  11. Warming: mechanism and latitude dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yury

    2010-05-01

    Introduction. In the work it is shown, that in present warming of climate of the Earth and in style of its display a fundamental role the mechanism of the forced swing and relative oscillations of eccentric core of the Earth and its mantle plays. Relative displacements of the centers of mass of the core and the mantle are dictated by the features of orbital motions of bodies of solar system and nonineriality of the Earth reference frame (or ot the mantle) at the motion of the Earth with respect to a baricenter of solar system and at rotation of the planet. As a result in relative translational displacements of the core and the mantle the frequencies characteristic for orbital motion of all bodies of solar system, and also their combination are shown. Methods of a space geodesy, gravimetry, geophysics, etc. unequivocally and clearly confirm phenomenon of drift of the center of mass of the Earth in define northern direction. This drift is characterized by the significant velocity in about 5 mm/yr. The unique opportunity of its explanation consists in the natural assumption of existence of the unidirectional relative displacement (drift) the center of mass of the core and the center of mass of the mantle of the Earth. And this displacement (at superfluous mass of the core in 16.7 % from the mass of full the Earth) is characterized still more significant velocity in 2.6 cm/yr and occurs on our geodynamic studies in a direction to Taimyr peninsula. The dynamic explanation to century drift for today does not exist. It is possible to note, however, that data of observations of last years, indirectly testifying that similar drifts of the centers of mass in present epoch occur on other bodies of Solar system have been obtain: the Sun, Mars, the Titan, Enceladus, the Neptune, etc. We connect with mentioned phenomena the observed secular variations of natural processes on this celestial bodies. I.e. it is possible to assume, that observable eccentric positions of the centers

  12. Efficient Warm-ups: Creating a Warm-up That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffenburger, Sandra Kay

    1992-01-01

    Proper warm-up is important for any activity, but designing an effective warm-up can be time consuming. An alternative approach is to take a cue from Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) and consider movement design from the perspective of space and planes of motion. Efficient warm-up exercises using LMA are described. (SM)

  13. A preliminary study of the clinical application of optic pathway diffusion tensor tractography in suprasellar tumor surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative assessment.

    PubMed

    Hajiabadi, Mohamadreza; Samii, Madjid; Fahlbusch, Rudolf

    2016-09-01

    OBJECT Visual impairments are the most common objective manifestations of suprasellar lesions. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a noninvasive MRI modality that depicts the subcortical white matter tracts in vivo. In this study the authors tested the value of visual pathway tractography in comparison with visual field and visual acuity analyses. METHODS This prospective study consisted of 25 patients with progressive visual impairment due to suprasellar mass lesions and 6 control patients with normal vision without such lesions. Visual acuity, visual field, and the optic fundus were examined preoperatively and repeated 1 week and 3 months after surgery. Visual pathway DTI tractography was performed preoperatively, intraoperatively immediately after tumor resection, and 1 week and 3 months after surgery. RESULTS In the control group, pre- and postoperative visual status were normal and visual pathway tractography revealed fibers crossing the optic chiasm without any alteration. In patients with suprasellar lesions, vision improved in 24 of 25. The mean distance between optic tracts in tractography decreased after tumor resection and detectable fibers crossing the optic chiasm increased from 12% preoperatively to 72% postoperatively 3 months after tumor resection, and undetectable fibers crossing the optic chiasm decreased from 88% preoperatively to 27% postoperatively 3 months after tumor resection. Visual improvement after tumor removal 1 week and 3 months after surgery was significantly correlated with the distance between optic tracts in intraoperative tractography (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Visual pathway DTI tractography appears to be a promising adjunct to the standard clinical and paraclinical visual examinations in patients with suprasellar mass lesions. The intraoperative findings, in particular the distance between optic tract fibers, can predict visual outcome after tumor resection. Furthermore, postoperative application of this technique may be useful in

  14. Global Warming: How Much and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanouette, William

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the history of the study of global warming and includes a discussion of the role of gases, like carbon dioxide, methane, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). Discusses modern research on the global warming, including computer modelling and the super-greenhouse effect. (YP)

  15. Global Warming: Understanding and Teaching the Forecast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Bill

    1994-01-01

    A resource for the teaching of the history and causes of climate change. Discusses evidence of climate change from the Viking era, early ice ages, the most recent ice age, natural causes of climate change, human-made causes of climate change, projections of global warming, and unequal warming. (LZ)

  16. Global Warming: Understanding and Teaching the Forecast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Bill

    1995-01-01

    A resource for teaching about the consequences of global warming. Discusses feedback from the temperature increase, changes in the global precipitation pattern, effects on agriculture, weather extremes, effects on forests, effects on biodiversity, effects on sea levels, and actions which will help the global community cope with global warming. (LZ)

  17. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  18. Exploring the Sociopolitical Dimensions of Global Warming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Troy D.; Klosterman, Michelle L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present an activity to help high school students conceptualize the sociopolitical complexity of global warming through an exploration of varied perspectives on the issue. They argue that socioscientific issues such as global warming present important contexts for learning science and that the social and political dimensions of these…

  19. Greenhouse warming and the tropical water budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Alan K.

    1990-01-01

    The present work takes issue with some of the theses of Lindzen's (1990) work on global warming, arguing in particular that Lindzen's work is hampered by the use of oversimplified models. Lindzen then presents a detailed reply to these arguments, emphasizing the fundamental importance of the upper tropospheric water-vapor budget to the question of global warming.

  20. Turkish Students' Ideas about Global Warming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilinc, Ahmet; Stanisstreet, Martin; Boyes, Edward

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to explore the prevalence of ideas about global warming in Year 10 (age 15-16 years) school students in Turkey. The frequencies of individual scientific ideas and misconceptions about the causes, consequences and "cures" of global warming were identified. In addition, several general findings emerged from this…

  1. Cryosphere: Warming ocean erodes ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusahara, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic ice sheets are a key player in sea-level rise in a warming climate. Now an ice-sheet modelling study clearly demonstrates that an Antarctic ice sheet/shelf system in the Atlantic Ocean will be regulated by the warming of the surrounding Southern Ocean, not by marine-ice-sheet instability.

  2. Warming of Water in a Glass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulins, Paulis; Krauze, Armands; Ozolinsh, Maris; Muiznieks, Andris

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the process of water warming from 0 °C in a glass. An experiment is performed that analyzes the temperature in the top and bottom layers of water during warming. The experimental equipment is very simple and can be easily set up using devices available in schools. The temperature curves obtained from the experiment help us…

  3. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  4. Warm Disks from Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In the process of searching for exoplanetary systems, weve discovered tens of debris disks close around distant stars that are especially bright in infrared wavelengths. New research suggests that we might be looking at the late stages of terrestrial planet formation in these systems.Forming Terrestrial PlanetsAccording to the widely-accepted formation model for our solar-system, protoplanets the size of Mars formed within a protoplanetary disk around our Sun. Eventually, the depletion of the gas in the disk led the orbits of these protoplanets to become chaotically unstable. Finally, in the giant impact stage, many of the protoplanets collided with each other ultimately leading to the formation of the terrestrial planets and their moons as we know them today.If giant impact stages occur in exoplanetary systems, too leading to the formation of terrestrial exoplanets how would we detect this process? According to a study led by Hidenori Genda of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, we might be already be witnessing this stage in observations of warm debris disks around other stars. To test this, Genda and collaborators model giant impact stages and determine what we would expect to see from a system undergoing this violent evolution.Modeling CollisionsSnapshots of a giant impact in one of the authors simulations. The collision causes roughly 0.05 Earth masses of protoplanetary material to be ejected from the system. Click for a closer look! [Genda et al. 2015]The collaborators run a series of simulations evolving protoplanetary bodies in a solar system. The simulations begin 10 Myr into the lifetime of the solar system, i.e., after the gas from the protoplanetary disk has had time to be cleared and the protoplanetary orbits begin to destabilize. The simulations end when the protoplanets are done smashing into each other and have again settled into stable orbits, typically after ~100 Myr.The authors find that, over an average giant impact stage, the total amount of

  5. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect

    Low, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  6. Urban warming reduces aboveground carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Emily; Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dunn, Robert R; Frank, Steven D

    2016-10-12

    A substantial amount of global carbon is stored in mature trees. However, no experiments to date test how warming affects mature tree carbon storage. Using a unique, citywide, factorial experiment, we investigated how warming and insect herbivory affected physiological function and carbon sequestration (carbon stored per year) of mature trees. Urban warming increased herbivorous arthropod abundance on trees, but these herbivores had negligible effects on tree carbon sequestration. Instead, urban warming was associated with an estimated 12% loss of carbon sequestration, in part because photosynthesis was reduced at hotter sites. Ecosystem service assessments that do not consider urban conditions may overestimate urban tree carbon storage. Because urban and global warming are becoming more intense, our results suggest that urban trees will sequester even less carbon in the future.

  7. Early global warming in the period 1850 to 1920

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf; Brandsma, Theo; Auchmann, Renate; Esper, Jan; Haustein, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    The current global temperature datasets show no warming in the land surface temperature and the sea surface temperature for the period between 1850 and 1920. However, several lines of evidence suggest that the Earth's surface was warming during this period. Every line of evidence by itself is currently not compelling, but the consilience of evidence at least makes a good case for further research. This period is characterized by the introduction of Stevenson screens, which reduce radiation errors more than the monitoring methods used before. As a consequence, Stevenson screens typically observe cooler temperatures than earlier observations. Recent analyses of parallel measurements suggest that this cooling bias is larger than previously thought. Physical reasoning suggests this bias to be largest in sub-tropical and tropic regions; this pattern is also found in the limited number of parallel measurements available. We are missing information from continental climates. The Global Historical Climate Network (GHCNv3) does not change the trend between 1870 and 1920 and adjust 0.1°C between 1850 and 1970. This small adjustment seems to be less than needed for this transition compared to the size of this jump estimated from the limited evidence we have from parallel measurements Further evidence for warming during this period can be found in lake and river freeze and breakup times, which show a clear shortening of the freezing period between 1850 and 1920. Most of the glaciers for which we have data from this period show reductions in their lengths, which signals clear warming. Also temperature reconstructions from proxies show warming. The CMIP model ensemble shows 0.2°C warming in the global mean temperature. We will be looking at well-homogenized national datasets and compare them to the national averages from the global collections. For this period we have up to now 3 such comparisons (Austria, Italy and Spain), these have too much scatter relative to the BEST

  8. Experimental soil warming at the treeline shifts fungal communities species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solly, Emily; Lindahl, Björn; Dawes, Melissa; Peter, Martina; Rixen, Christian; Hagedorn, Frank

    2016-04-01

    substantial reduction in fine root biomass (-40%) in warmed soils. In comparison, CO2 enrichment had a weaker effect on the composition of the fungal community. Collectively, our results show that soil warming alters fungal communities both directly, by higher temperature, and indirectly, by an improved nitrogen availability associated with an enhanced SOM cycling. These changes may have a vital effect on several ecosystem processes and, in particular, may alter the rate at which soil organic matter is formed and decomposed.

  9. Warm storage for arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboni, Mélanie; Boehnke, Patrick; Schmitt, Axel K.; Harrison, T. Mark; Shane, Phil; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas

    2016-12-01

    Felsic magmatic systems represent the vast majority of volcanic activity that poses a threat to human life. The tempo and magnitude of these eruptions depends on the physical conditions under which magmas are retained within the crust. Recently the case has been made that volcanic reservoirs are rarely molten and only capable of eruption for durations as brief as 1,000 years following magma recharge. If the “cold storage” model is generally applicable, then geophysical detection of melt beneath volcanoes is likely a sign of imminent eruption. However, some arc volcanic centers have been active for tens of thousands of years and show evidence for the continual presence of melt. To address this seeming paradox, zircon geochronology and geochemistry from both the frozen lava and the cogenetic enclaves they host from the Soufrière Volcanic Center (SVC), a long-lived volcanic complex in the Lesser Antilles arc, were integrated to track the preeruptive thermal and chemical history of the magma reservoir. Our results show that the SVC reservoir was likely eruptible for periods of several tens of thousands of years or more with punctuated eruptions during these periods. These conclusions are consistent with results from other arc volcanic reservoirs and suggest that arc magmas are generally stored warm. Thus, the presence of intracrustal melt alone is insufficient as an indicator of imminent eruption, but instead represents the normal state of magma storage underneath dormant volcanoes.

  10. Global warming: The complete briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, J.

    1994-12-31

    John Houghton has drawn on the exhaustive efforts of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to produce a notably compact, impeccably complete and authoritative, meticulously balanced, and lucidly presented guide to the complex yet vital issue of global warming. Its subtitle is not mere hyperbole: this truly is a complete briefing. Certainly, one could not ask for a more authoritative brief: Houghton has led an imposing series of national and international efforts relating to climate, including the most recent scientific assessments of the IPCC. Citing many concrete examples, Houghton begins by convincing that climate truly is important to humankind and that climate is far from constant. He then elucidates the mechanisms that maintain the benign climate of our planet, providing in the process, for example, the most accurate explanation of the natural greenhouse effect that has yet appeared in print. He then treats the individual greenhouse gases responsible for maintaining the earth`s warmth and presents projections of their probable future concentrations as influenced by human activities. Further chapters deal with conclusions drawn from climate models, estimates of the impacts on human activities, and possible policies and actions to mitigate or alleviate the changes and their consequences.

  11. Warm storage for arc magmas.

    PubMed

    Barboni, Mélanie; Boehnke, Patrick; Schmitt, Axel K; Harrison, T Mark; Shane, Phil; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas

    2016-12-06

    Felsic magmatic systems represent the vast majority of volcanic activity that poses a threat to human life. The tempo and magnitude of these eruptions depends on the physical conditions under which magmas are retained within the crust. Recently the case has been made that volcanic reservoirs are rarely molten and only capable of eruption for durations as brief as 1,000 years following magma recharge. If the "cold storage" model is generally applicable, then geophysical detection of melt beneath volcanoes is likely a sign of imminent eruption. However, some arc volcanic centers have been active for tens of thousands of years and show evidence for the continual presence of melt. To address this seeming paradox, zircon geochronology and geochemistry from both the frozen lava and the cogenetic enclaves they host from the Soufrière Volcanic Center (SVC), a long-lived volcanic complex in the Lesser Antilles arc, were integrated to track the preeruptive thermal and chemical history of the magma reservoir. Our results show that the SVC reservoir was likely eruptible for periods of several tens of thousands of years or more with punctuated eruptions during these periods. These conclusions are consistent with results from other arc volcanic reservoirs and suggest that arc magmas are generally stored warm. Thus, the presence of intracrustal melt alone is insufficient as an indicator of imminent eruption, but instead represents the normal state of magma storage underneath dormant volcanoes.

  12. Global warming and reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Potts, Malcolm; Henderson, Courtney E

    2012-10-01

    The largest absolute numbers of maternal deaths occur among the 40-50 million women who deliver annually without a skilled birth attendant. Most of these deaths occur in countries with a total fertility rate of greater than 4. The combination of global warming and rapid population growth in the Sahel and parts of the Middle East poses a serious threat to reproductive health and to food security. Poverty, lack of resources, and rapid population growth make it unlikely that most women in these countries will have access to skilled birth attendants or emergency obstetric care in the foreseeable future. Three strategies can be implemented to improve women's health and reproductive rights in high-fertility, low-resource settings: (1) make family planning accessible and remove non-evidenced-based barriers to contraception; (2) scale up community distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage and, where it is legal, for medical abortion; and (3) eliminate child marriage and invest in girls and young women, thereby reducing early childbearing.

  13. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible un...

  14. Neurophysiological criteria for intraoperative prediction of pure motor hemiplegia during aneurysm surgery. Case report.

    PubMed

    Szelényi, Andrea; Bueno de Camargo, Adauri; Flamm, Eugene; Deletis, Vedran

    2003-09-01

    The value of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) as an intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring tool for detecting selective subcortical ischemia of the motor pathways during intracerebral aneurysm repair is described and the use of such measures to predict postoperative motor status is discussed. The authors present the case of a 64-year-old woman in whom there was an incidental finding of two right middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms. During the aneurysm clipping procedure, an intraoperative MEP loss in the left abductor pollicis brevis and tibial anterior muscles occurred during an attempt at permanent clip placement. There were no concurrent changes in somatosensory evoked potentials. Postoperatively, the patient demonstrated a left hemiplegia with intact sensation. A computerized tomography scan revealed an infarct in the anterior division of the MCA territory, including the posterior limb of the internal capsule. In this patient, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring with MEPs has been shown to be a sensitive tool for indicating subcortical ischemia affecting selective motor pathways in the internal capsule. Therefore, intraoperative loss of MEPs can be used to predict postoperative motor deficits.

  15. Clinical toxicity of peripheral nerve to intraoperative radiotherapy in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, P.A.S.; DeLuca, A.M.; Terrill, R.E.

    1995-07-15

    The clinical late effects of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on peripheral nerve were investigated in a foxhound model. Between 1982 and 1987, 40 animals underwent laparotomy with intraoperative radiotherapy of doses from 0-75 Gy administered to the right lumbosacral plexus. Subsequently, all animals were monitored closely and sacrificed to assess clinical effects to peripheral nerve. This analysis reports final clinical results of all animals, with follow-up to 5 years. All animals treated with {>=} 25 Gy developed ipsilateral neuropathy. An inverse relationship was noted between intraoperative radiotherapy dose and time to neuropathy, with an effective dose for 50% paralysis (ED{sub 50}) of 17.2 Gy. One of the animals treated with 15 Gy IORT developed paralysis, after a much longer latency than the other animals. Doses of 15 Gy delivered intraoperatively may be accompanied by peripheral neuropathy with long-term follow-up. This threshold is less than that reported with shorter follow-up. The value of ED{sub 50} determined here is in keeping with data from other animal trials, and from clinical trials in humans. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Intraoperative radioimmunodetection of colorectal tumor with a hand-held radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.T.; Hinkle, G.H.; Tuttle, S.; Olsen, J.; Nabi, H.; Houchens, D.; Thurston, M.; Martin, E.W. Jr.

    1985-12-01

    A hand-held gamma detection probe was used intraoperatively to localize primary and recurrent colorectal tumors in 28 patients 48 to 72 hours after they received an intravenous injection of 2.2 mCi of iodine-131 labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen polyclonal baboon antibody. Preoperative evaluation included determination of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, barium enema, colonoscopy, chest film, computerized axial tomography, liver, spleen, and bone scans, and endoscopy when indicated. Preoperative whole-body imaging correctly localized primary tumors in only 33 percent of the patients, whereas it correctly demonstrated tumor in 64 percent of those with recurrent disease. Intraoperative tumor-to-background ratios derived from the detector probe were elevated in all patients, averaging 3.97:1 in primary lesions and 4.18:1 in recurrent tumors. Postoperatively, carcinoembryonic antigen was localized in tissues with the avidin-biotin peroxidase staining technique to confirm intraoperative readings. Variations in stain uptake in a patient could be correlated with variations in radiation detector readings in the same patient. Results support our previous work in nude mice, demonstrating the improved sensitivity and specificity of the hand-held gamma detection device over whole-body imaging for intraoperative localization of immunoradiolabeled tumors.

  17. Proposal of an optimized strategy for intraoperative testing of speech and language during awake mapping.

    PubMed

    Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Sarubbo, Silvio; Duffau, Hugues

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we review the literature about the definitions of errors observed by direct electrical stimulation during language testing. As a practical application, we propose an optimized strategy for differentiating accurately motor arrest, speech arrest, and anomia in the context of intraoperative mapping. Finally, we also discuss the anatomical correlates of the networks sustaining these different errors, both cortically and axonally.

  18. Intraoperative magnesium infusion during carotid endarterectomy: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mack, William J.; Kellner, Christopher P.; Sahlein, Daniel H.; Ducruet, Andrew F.; Kim, Grace H.; Mocco, J; Zurica, Joseph; Komotar, Ricardo J.; Haque, Raqeeb; Sciacca, Robert; Quest, Donald O.; Solomon, Robert A.; Connolly, E. Sander; Heyer, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Object Recent data from both experimental and clinical studies have supported the use of intravenous magnesium as a potential therapy in the setting of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed whether intraoperative magnesium therapy improves neuropsychometric testing (NPT) following carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Methods One hundred eight patients undergoing CEA were randomly assigned to receive placebo infusion or 1 of 3 magnesium-dosing protocols. Neuropsychometric testing was performed 1 day after surgery and compared with baseline performance. Assessment was also performed on a set of 35 patients concurrently undergoing lumbar laminectomy to serve as a control group for NPT. A forward stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of magnesium therapy on NPT. A subgroup analysis was then performed, analyzing the impact of each intraoperative dose on NPT. Results Patients treated with intravenous magnesium infusion demonstrated less postoperative neurocognitive impairment than those treated with placebo (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10–0.74, p = 0.01). When stratified according to dosing bolus and intraoperative magnesium level, those who were treated with low-dose magnesium had less cognitive decline than those treated with placebo (OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.02-0.50, p < 0.01). Those in the high-dose magnesium group demonstrated no difference from the placebo-treated group. Conclusions Low-dose intraoperative magnesium therapy protects against neurocognitive decline following CEA. PMID:19199498

  19. Virtual slide telepathology with scanner systems for intraoperative frozen-section consultation.

    PubMed

    Ribback, Silvia; Flessa, Steffen; Gromoll-Bergmann, Katrin; Evert, Matthias; Dombrowski, Frank

    2014-06-01

    Telepathology provides pathology services over a distance using digital imaging and telecommunication for primary diagnostic practice, including intraoperative frozen sections. Virtual slide technology provides digitizing of histological slides by scanner systems and improved remote assessment substantially. In this retrospective study, diagnostic accuracy of intraoperative frozen sections assessed as virtual slide was determined. Tissue assessment was mainly requested for urological, gynecological and dermatological resections. Issues of time consumption, cost and cost effectiveness of this diagnostic method are discussed. 1204 intraoperative frozen sections were conducted in the course of this study at our department over a period of 2.5 years. 98.59% of all intraoperative frozen sections were accurately diagnosed in the initial telepathological assessment. Tumor affection was present in 15.6% of frozen sections, in 174 instances already assessed in the initial slides (sensitivity 92.6%). Discrepant diagnoses compared to the final diagnosis occurred in 1.41%. Our determined averaged time for virtual slide technology of 10.58±8.19min can be ranged in well. Our study did not allow a full economic assessment, but some preliminary insights are pointed out. The quality of services is highly acceptable and the investment costs and the labor cost of virtual slide technology are lower than those of robotic microscopy.

  20. Effect of different types of anesthesia on intraoperative blood glucose of diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueqiong; Wang, Jinjing; Chen, Kang; Li, Yijun; Wang, Haibin; Mu, Yiming; Chen, Yaolong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Systematic review which analyzes the impact of different anesthesia on intraoperative blood glucose levels of diabetes patients. Methods: We searched Medline (via PubMed), Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Wangfang, CNKI, and CBM database through June 2016, included in randomized controlled trial (RCT), about different anesthesia on intraoperative blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. Two researchers in 1 group independently screened literatures with eligibility criteria, extracted information, and used RevMan5.3 software to perform meta-analysis. Results: We included 11 trials and performed the meta-analysis with 10 trials. The meta-analysis results suggested that compared with general anesthesia, the combined general-epidural anesthesia has a better glycemic control in intraoperative blood glucose levels (WMD −1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] −1.77 to 0.76), the epidural anesthesia had no significant effects compared with general anesthesia (WMD −0.74, 95% CI 4.41–2.92), and the combined spinal-epidural anesthesia had no significant effects compared with epidural anesthesia (WMD −0.28, 95% CI −1.02 to 0.46). One study suggested that compared with epidural anesthesia, the combined general-epidural anesthesia can lower blood glucose levels Conclusion: Existing evidence showed that compared with general anesthesia, the combined general-epidural anesthesia has a better glycemic control in intraoperative blood glucose levels. PMID:28353577

  1. Risk factors for intraoperative perforation during endoscopic submucosal dissection of superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Masaaki; Yano, Tomonori; Kato, Tomoji; Kadota, Tomohiro; Imajoh, Maomi; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Osera, Shozo; Yagishita, Atsushi; Odagaki, Tomoyuki; Yoda, Yusuke; Oono, Yasuhiro; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify the risk factors and clarify the subsequent clinical courses. METHODS This study retrospectively analyzed consecutive patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) treated using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) between April 2008 and October 2012. We divided the ESCC lesions into perforation cases and non-perforation cases, and compared characteristics and endoscopic findings between the two groups. "Intraoperative perforation" was defined as the detection of a perforation site during ESD and the presence of mediastinal emphysema. RESULTS In total, 147 patients with 156 ESCC lesions were treated by ESD. Intraoperative perforation was recorded for nine lesions (5.8%) from nine patients. Multivariate analysis identified mucosal deficiency larger than 75% of the circumference of the esophagus as an independent risk factor for intraoperative perforation (OR = 7.37, 95%CI: 1.45-37.4, P = 0.016). The predominant site of perforation was the left wall [6/9 (67%)]. Six of nine perforation sites were successfully closed by clips during the procedures. Two of nine cases required drainage for pleural effusions; however, all nine cases recovered with conservative treatment and without surgical intervention. At the median follow up of 42 mo after ESD, no cases of local recurrence or distant organ metastasis had been observed. CONCLUSION This study suggests that mucosal deficiency larger than 75% of the luminal circumference is a risk factor for intraoperative perforation during ESD for ESCC. PMID:28210084

  2. The use of an intraoperative molding device for the reconstruction of a female breast after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Dirnberger, F; Bruck, H G

    1980-09-01

    A temporary intraoperative molding device for the reconstruction of a breast after mastectomy is presented. It is a low-cost, throw-away Silastic rubber product. It follows the principle of a tailor's wooden model, to allow an easier forming of a breast.

  3. Can intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring during cervical spine decompression predict post-operative segmental C5 palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Blaskiewicz, Donald J.; Ramirez, Bertha; Zhang, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background C5 nerve root palsy is a known complication after cervical laminectomy or laminoplasty, characterized by weakness of the deltoid and bicep brachii muscles. The efficacy of intraoperative monitoring of these muscles is currently unclear. In the current prospective study, intraoperative monitoring through somatosensory (SSEPs), motor (TcMEPs) evoked potentials and real-time electromyography activity (EMG) were analyzed for their ability to detect or prevent deltoid muscle weakness after surgery. Methods One hundred consecutive patients undergoing laminectomy/laminoplasty with or without fusion were enrolled. Intraoperative SSEPs, TcMEPs and EMGs from each patient were studied and analyzed. Results Intraoperative EMG activity of the C5 nerve root was detected in 34 cases, 10 of which demonstrated a sustained and repetitive EMG activity lasting 5 or more minutes. Paresis of the unilateral deltoid muscle developed in 5 patients, all from the group with sustained C5 EMG activity. None of the patients with weakness of deltoid muscle after surgery demonstrated any abnormal change in TcMEP or SSEP. Conclusions Real-time EMG recordings were sensitive to C5 nerve root irritation, whilst SSEPs and TcMEPs were not. Sustained EMG activity of the C5 nerve root during surgery is a possible warning sign of irritation or injury to the nerve. PMID:27757428

  4. Dissociation of Subtraction and Multiplication in the Right Parietal Cortex: Evidence from Intraoperative Cortical Electrostimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Xiaodan; Chen, Chuansheng; Pu, Song; Wu, Chenxing; Li, Yongnian; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Xinlin

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has consistently shown that the left parietal cortex is critical for numerical processing, but the role of the right parietal lobe has been much less clear. This study used the intraoperative cortical electrical stimulation approach to investigate neural dissociation in the right parietal cortex for subtraction and…

  5. Comparing the dosimetric characteristics of the electron beam from dedicated intraoperative and conventional radiotherapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Baghani, Hamid Reza; Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmoud Reza; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabi; Akbari, Mohammad Esmail; Mirzaei, Hamid Reza

    2015-03-08

    The specific design of the mobile dedicated intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) accelerators and different electron beam collimation system can change the dosimetric characteristics of electron beam with respect to the conventional accelerators. The aim of this study is to measure and compare the dosimetric characteristics of electron beam produced by intraoperative and conventional radiotherapy accelerators. To this end, percentage depth dose along clinical axis (PDD), transverse dose profile (TDP), and output factor of LIAC IORT and Varian 2100C/D conventional radiotherapy accelerators were measured and compared. TDPs were recorded at depth of maximum dose. The results of this work showed that depths of maximum dose, R90, R50, and RP for LIAC beam are lower than those of Varian beam. Furthermore, for all energies, surface doses related to the LIAC beam are substantially higher than those of Varian beam. The symmetry and flatness of LIAC beam profiles are more desirable compared to the Varian ones. Contrary to Varian accelerator, output factor of LIAC beam substantially increases with a decrease in the size of the applicator. Dosimetric characteristics of beveled IORT applicators along clinical axis were different from those of the flat ones. From these results, it can be concluded that dosimetric characteristics of intraoperative electron beam are substantially different from those of conventional clinical electron beam. The dosimetric characteristics of the LIAC electron beam make it a useful tool for intraoperative radiotherapy purposes.

  6. Intraoperative rapid diagnosis of primary central nervous system lymphomas: advantages and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yasuo; Terasaki, Mizuhiko; Nakashima, Shinji; Ohshima, Koichi; Morioka, Motohiro; Abe, Hideyuki

    2014-10-01

    To study the advantages and pitfalls of intraoperative rapid diagnosis (IRD) of primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL), pathology reports and frozen sections in our institution were reviewed. We examined 27 cases of PCNSL, one case of anaplastic glioma, and one case of metastatic brain tumor that were diagnosed on neuroimaging. Fifteen cases of intraoperative cytological preparations were also reviewed in a correlative manner. Among the 27 cases initially diagnosed as PCNSL, 18 were also diagnosed as PCNSL by IRD. However, IRD identified four of the 27 cases as gliosis, two as demyelination, one as atypical epithelial cells, one as malignant glioma and anaplastic astrocytoma. In addition, the case identified as metastatic brain tumor on neuroimaging was corrected to a diagnosis of PCNSL based on IRD. The final accuracy of IRD in the present study was 89.6% (26/29). After postoperative definitive diagnosis, two cases of anaplastic astrocytoma and one case of PCNSL by IRD were corrected to PCNSL, anaplastic oligodendroglioma and demyelination, respectively. PCNSL were sometimes histologically indistinguishable from malignant gliomas or demyelinating diseases in the present study, particularly in frozen sections. Notably, all cases for which both intraoperative cytology and frozen section were performed concomitantly were correctly diagnosed in the present study. In particular, lymphoglandular bodies were highly characteristic cytological findings of PCNSL. Both intraoperative cytology and frozen sections should therefore be performed concomitantly when PCNSL are suspected.

  7. Initial experience of using high field strength intraoperative MRI for neurosurgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Raheja, Amol; Tandon, Vivek; Suri, Ashish; Sarat Chandra, P; Kale, Shashank S; Garg, Ajay; Pandey, Ravindra M; Kalaivani, Mani; Mahapatra, Ashok K; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2015-08-01

    We report our initial experience to optimize neurosurgical procedures using high field strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (IOMRI) in 300 consecutive patients as high field strength IOMRI rapidly becomes the standard of care for neurosurgical procedures. Three sequential groups (groups A, B, C; n=100 each) were compared with respect to time management, complications and technical difficulties to assess improvement in these parameters with experience. We observed a reduction in the number of technical difficulties (p<0.001), time to induction (p<0.001) and total anesthesia time (p=0.007) in sequential groups. IOMRI was performed for neuronavigation guidance (n=252) and intraoperative validation of extent of resection (EOR; n=67). Performing IOMRI increased the EOR over and beyond the primary surgical attempt in 20.5% (29/141) and 18% (11/61) of patients undergoing glioma and pituitary surgery, respectively. Overall, EOR improved in 59.7% of patients undergoing IOMRI (40/67). Intraoperative tractography and real time navigation using re-uploaded IOMRI images (accounting for brain shift) helps in intraoperative planning to reduce complications. IOMRI is an asset to neurosurgeons, helping to augment the EOR, especially in glioma and pituitary surgery, with no significant increase in morbidity to the patient.

  8. Intraoperative modification of a supracricoid laryngectomy to a subtotal laryngectomy with tracheohyoidoepiglottopexy.

    PubMed

    Marchese-Ragona, Rosario; Calgaro, Nicola; Tregnaghi, Alberto; Marioni, Gino; Ottaviano, Giancarlo; Staffieri, Claudia; Staffieri, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    In recent decades, with the widespread diffusion of the supracricoid laryngectomy in the treatment of selected advanced laryngeal neoplasm, the indications to non-conservative surgery are less frequent than in past. We report the case of a patient in whom a planned supracricoid laryngectomy was intraoperatively converted in an extended partial laryngectomy with tracheohyoidoepiglottopexy for a tumor involving the cricoid cartilage.

  9. 3D monitoring of the intraoperative brainshift by means of photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Apuzzo, Nicola; Verius, Michael

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of applying multi image photogrammetric techniques for the three-dimensional monitoring of the intraoperative brainshift. The "brainshift" is the motion of cerebral structures occurring in neurosurgery after the craniotomy (opening of the skull in order to access the brain for surgical repair). The causes of this effect are mainly the changes of pressure and loss of cerebrospinal liquid. The phenomenon of brainshift can influence negatively the planning and execution of neurosurgical intervention. A research project at the Clinic of Neuroradiology and Neurosurgery of the Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria) aims at the quantification of the intraoperative brainshift by means of photogrammetry. The goals of the project are: (i) the development of a multi-image photogrammetric system for the quantitative monitoring of intraoperative brainshift by means of 3D measurements performed on the surface of the brain during neurosurgery after craniotomy, (ii) transformation of the pre-operative performed MR and CT datasets in function of the quantified intra-operative brainshift. This paper presents the proposed multi-image photogrammetric system, as well as, the first results achieved, in collaboration with Hometrica Consulting, for the automatic 3D measurement and tracking of selected points on the surface of the brain.

  10. Persistent and automatic intraoperative 3D digitization of surfaces under dynamic magnifications of an operating microscope.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ankur N; Miga, Michael I; Pheiffer, Thomas S; Chambless, Lola B; Thompson, Reid C; Dawant, Benoit M

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges impeding advancement in image-guided surgical (IGS) systems is the soft-tissue deformation during surgical procedures. These deformations reduce the utility of the patient's preoperative images and may produce inaccuracies in the application of preoperative surgical plans. Solutions to compensate for the tissue deformations include the acquisition of intraoperative tomographic images of the whole organ for direct displacement measurement and techniques that combines intraoperative organ surface measurements with computational biomechanical models to predict subsurface displacements. The later solution has the advantage of being less expensive and amenable to surgical workflow. Several modalities such as textured laser scanners, conoscopic holography, and stereo-pair cameras have been proposed for the intraoperative 3D estimation of organ surfaces to drive patient-specific biomechanical models for the intraoperative update of preoperative images. Though each modality has its respective advantages and disadvantages, stereo-pair camera approaches used within a standard operating microscope is the focus of this article. A new method that permits the automatic and near real-time estimation of 3D surfaces (at 1 Hz) under varying magnifications of the operating microscope is proposed. This method has been evaluated on a CAD phantom object and on full-length neurosurgery video sequences (∼1 h) acquired intraoperatively by the proposed stereovision system. To the best of our knowledge, this type of validation study on full-length brain tumor surgery videos has not been done before. The method for estimating the unknown magnification factor of the operating microscope achieves accuracy within 0.02 of the theoretical value on a CAD phantom and within 0.06 on 4 clinical videos of the entire brain tumor surgery. When compared to a laser range scanner, the proposed method for reconstructing 3D surfaces intraoperatively achieves root mean square

  11. Relative roles of differential SST warming, uniform SST warming and land surface warming in determining the Walker circulation changes under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Most of CMIP5 models projected a weakened Walker circulation in tropical Pacific, but what causes such change is still an open question. By conducting idealized numerical simulations separating the effects of the spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST) warming, extra land surface warming and differential SST warming, we demonstrate that the weakening of the Walker circulation is attributed to the western North Pacific (WNP) monsoon and South America land effects. The effect of the uniform SST warming is through so-called "richest-get-richer" mechanism. In response to a uniform surface warming, the WNP monsoon is enhanced by competing moisture with other large-scale convective branches. The strengthened WNP monsoon further induces surface westerlies in the equatorial western-central Pacific, weakening the Walker circulation. The increase of the greenhouse gases leads to a larger land surface warming than ocean surface. As a result, a greater thermal contrast occurs between American Continent and equatorial Pacific. The so-induced zonal pressure gradient anomaly forces low-level westerly anomalies over the equatorial eastern Pacific and weakens the Walker circulation. The differential SST warming also plays a role in driving low-level westerly anomalies over tropical Pacific. But such an effect involves a positive air-sea feedback that amplifies the weakening of both east-west SST gradient and Pacific trade winds.

  12. Global metabolic impacts of recent climate warming.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Michael E; Wang, George; Huey, Raymond B

    2010-10-07

    Documented shifts in geographical ranges, seasonal phenology, community interactions, genetics and extinctions have been attributed to recent global warming. Many such biotic shifts have been detected at mid- to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere-a latitudinal pattern that is expected because warming is fastest in these regions. In contrast, shifts in tropical regions are expected to be less marked because warming is less pronounced there. However, biotic impacts of warming are mediated through physiology, and metabolic rate, which is a fundamental measure of physiological activity and ecological impact, increases exponentially rather than linearly with temperature in ectotherms. Therefore, tropical ectotherms (with warm baseline temperatures) should experience larger absolute shifts in metabolic rate than the magnitude of tropical temperature change itself would suggest, but the impact of climate warming on metabolic rate has never been quantified on a global scale. Here we show that estimated changes in terrestrial metabolic rates in the tropics are large, are equivalent in magnitude to those in the north temperate-zone regions, and are in fact far greater than those in the Arctic, even though tropical temperature change has been relatively small. Because of temperature's nonlinear effects on metabolism, tropical organisms, which constitute much of Earth's biodiversity, should be profoundly affected by recent and projected climate warming.

  13. Relative roles of differential SST warming, uniform SST warming and land surface warming in determining the Walker circulation changes under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Most of CMIP5 models projected a weakened Walker circulation in tropical Pacific, but what causes such change is still an open question. By conducting idealized numerical simulations separating the effects of the spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST) warming, extra land surface warming and differential SST warming, we demonstrate that the weakening of the Walker circulation is attributed to the western North Pacific (WNP) monsoon and South America land effects. The effect of the uniform SST warming is through so-called "richest-get-richer" mechanism. In response to a uniform surface warming, the WNP monsoon is enhanced by competing moisture with other large-scale convective branches. The strengthened WNP monsoon further induces surface westerlies in the equatorial western-central Pacific, weakening the Walker circulation. The increase of the greenhouse gases leads to a larger land surface warming than ocean surface. As a result, a greater thermal contrast occurs between American Continent and equatorial Pacific. The so-induced zonal pressure gradient anomaly forces low-level westerly anomalies over the equatorial eastern Pacific and weakens the Walker circulation. The differential SST warming also plays a role in driving low-level westerly anomalies over tropical Pacific. But such an effect involves a positive air-sea feedback that amplifies the weakening of both east-west SST gradient and Pacific trade winds.

  14. Climatic warming destabilizes forest ant communities

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Sarah E.; Nichols, Lauren M.; Pelini, Shannon L.; Penick, Clint A.; Barber, Grace W.; Cahan, Sara Helms; Dunn, Robert R.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Sanders, Nathan J.; Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    How will ecological communities change in response to climate warming? Direct effects of temperature and indirect cascading effects of species interactions are already altering the structure of local communities, but the dynamics of community change are still poorly understood. We explore the cumulative effects of warming on the dynamics and turnover of forest ant communities that were warmed as part of a 5-year climate manipulation experiment at two sites in eastern North America. At the community level, warming consistently increased occupancy of nests and decreased extinction and nest abandonment. This consistency was largely driven by strong responses of a subset of thermophilic species at each site. As colonies of thermophilic species persisted in nests for longer periods of time under warmer temperatures, turnover was diminished, and species interactions were likely altered. We found that dynamical (Lyapunov) community stability decreased with warming both within and between sites. These results refute null expectations of simple temperature-driven increases in the activity and movement of thermophilic ectotherms. The reduction in stability under warming contrasts with the findings of previous studies that suggest resilience of species interactions to experimental and natural warming. In the face of warmer, no-analog climates, communities of the future may become increasingly fragile and unstable. PMID:27819044

  15. High STOP-BANG questionnaire scores predict intraoperative and early postoperative adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Seet, Edwin; Chua, Maureen; Liaw, Chen Mei

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common sleep-related breathing disorder associated with multisystemic organ involvement. The STOP-BANG questionnaire is a concise, validated questionnaire that is used to screen for OSA. This study aimed to establish the use of the STOP-BANG questionnaire for perioperative patient risk stratification. METHODS In this retrospective cohort study, we extracted the demographic, medical and perioperative outcome data of all patients who underwent elective surgery, excluding ophthalmic surgeries, from January to December 2011. Multivariate regression analysis was used to predict independent risk factors for intraoperative and early postoperative adverse events. RESULTS Of the 5,432 patients analysed, 7.4% had unexpected intraoperative and early postoperative adverse events. We found that the risk of unexpected intraoperative and early postoperative adverse events was greater in patients with STOP-BANG scores ≥ 3 compared to those with a STOP-BANG score of 0 (score 3: odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1–6.3, p < 0.001; score 4: OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.8–6.5, p < 0.001; score 5: OR 6.4, 95% CI 2.7–15.0, p < 0.001; score ≥ 6: OR 5.6, 95% CI 2.1–15.4, p < 0.001). Patients with STOP-BANG scores ≥ 5 had a fivefold increased risk of unexpected intraoperative and early postoperative adverse events, while patients with STOP-BANG scores ≥ 3 had a ‘one in four’ chance of having an adverse event. Other independent predictors included older age (p < 0.001), American Society of Anesthesiologists class ≥ 2 (p < 0.003) and uncontrolled hypertension (p = 0.028). CONCLUSION STOP-BANG score may be used as a preoperative risk stratification tool to predict the risk of intraoperative and early postoperative adverse events. PMID:25917473

  16. Intraoperative Spectroscopy with Ultrahigh Sensitivity for Image-Guided Surgery of Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kairdolf, Brad A; Bouras, Alexandros; Kaluzova, Milota; Sharma, Abhinav K; Wang, May Dongmei; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G; Nie, Shuming

    2016-01-05

    Intraoperative cancer imaging and fluorescence-guided surgery have attracted considerable interest because fluorescence signals can provide real-time guidance to assist a surgeon in differentiating cancerous and normal tissues. Recent advances have led to the clinical use of a natural fluorophore called protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) for image-guided surgical resection of high-grade brain tumors (glioblastomas). However, traditional fluorescence imaging methods have only limited detection sensitivity and identification accuracy and are unable to detect low-grade or diffuse infiltrating gliomas (DIGs). Here we report a low-cost hand-held spectroscopic device that is capable of ultrasensitive detection of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence in vivo, together with intraoperative spectroscopic data obtained from both animal xenografts and human brain tumor specimens. The results indicate that intraoperative spectroscopy is at least 3 orders of magnitude more sensitive than the current surgical microscopes, allowing ultrasensitive detection of as few as 1000 tumor cells. For detection specificity, intraoperative spectroscopy allows the differentiation of brain tumor cells from normal brain cells with a contrast signal ratio over 100. In vivo animal studies reveal that protoporphyrin IX fluorescence is strongly correlated with both MRI and histological staining, confirming that the fluorescence signals are highly specific to tumor cells. Furthermore, ex vivo spectroscopic studies of excised brain tissues demonstrate that the hand-held spectroscopic device is capable of detecting diffuse tumor margins with low fluorescence contrast that are not detectable with current systems in the operating room. These results open new opportunities for intraoperative detection and fluorescence-guided resection of microscopic and low-grade glioma brain tumors with invasive or diffusive margins.

  17. Detection and identification of oral anaerobes in intraoperative bronchial fluids of patients with pulmonary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Ayako; Sato, Takuichi; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Ishida, Naoko; Tanda, Naoko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2014-07-01

    Postoperative pneumonia may occur when upper respiratory tract protective reflexes such as cough and/or swallowing reflexes are impaired; thus, silent aspiration of oral bacteria may be a causative factor in postoperative pneumonia. This study aimed to quantify and identify bacteria in intraoperative bronchial fluids and to evaluate the relationship between impairment of cough/swallowing reflexes and silent aspiration of oral bacteria in elderly patients. After obtaining informed consent, cough and swallowing reflexes were assessed using an ultrasonic nebulizer and a nasal catheter, respectively. Using a micro-sampling probe, intraoperative bronchial fluids were collected from nine subjects with pulmonary carcinoma and cultured anaerobically on blood agar plates. After 7 days, CFUs were counted and isolated bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Four subjects (aged 71.0 ± 8.4 years) had impaired swallowing reflexes with normal cough reflexes, whereas five subjects (73.6 ± 6.5 years) had normal cough and swallowing reflexes. The bacterial counts (mean CFU ± SD) tended to be higher in intraoperative bronchial fluids of subjects with impaired swallowing reflexes ([5.1 ± 7.7] × 10(5)) than in those of subjects with normal reflexes ([1.2 ± 1.9] × 10(5)); however, this difference was not statistically significant. Predominant isolates from intraoperative bronchial fluids were Streptococcus (41.8%), Veillonella (11.4%), Gemella (8.9%), Porphyromonas (7.6%), Olsenella (6.3%) and Eikenella (6.3%). These findings indicate that intraoperative bronchial fluids contain bacteria, probably derived from the oral microbiota, and suggest that silent aspiration of oral bacteria occurs in elderly patients irrespective of impairment of swallowing reflex.

  18. A Smart Tool for Intraoperative Leg Length Targeting in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Paul; Snider, Matthew; Muir, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leg length discrepancies following total hip arthroplasty (THA) may necessitate subsequent interventions, from heel lifts to revision surgery. Current intraoperative methods of determining leg length are either inaccurate or expensive and invasive. Objective: The objective of the current study was to investigate the ability of a novel, intraoperative smart tool (Intellijoint HIP®, Intellijoint Surgical®, Inc., Waterloo, ON) to provide accurate, real-time leg length measurements during THA. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 25 patients who underwent THA utilizing the Intellijoint HIP smart tool between February and August 2014. Intraoperative leg length data was compared with radiographic leg length calculations. Two observers blinded to the Intellijoint HIP findings independently assessed all post-procedure radiographs. Results: The mean difference between smart tool and radiographic measurements was 1.3 mm [CI: -0.1, 2.7]. 88% (22/25) of intraoperative measurements were within 5 mm of radiographic measurements; 100% (25/25) were within 10 mm. A Bland-Altman analysis showed excellent agreement, with 96% (24/25) of measurements within the statistical limit for acceptable agreement, and 84% (21/25) within the clinically acceptable range (± 5 mm). Removal of the first 13 procedures (surgeon training) decreased the mean difference between methods to 0.6 mm [-0.6, 1.9]. All post-training procedures were associated with a difference of <5 mm. There were no reported adverse events related to the use of the smart tool. Conclusion: The Intellijoint HIP smart tool is a safe and accurate tool for providing intraoperative measurements of leg length in real-time. PMID:27843511

  19. Tailoring Adjuvant Radiation Therapy by Intraoperative Imaging to Detect Residual Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Melodi J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    For many solid cancers, radiation therapy is offered as an adjuvant to surgical resection in order to lower rates of local recurrence and improve survival. However, a subset of patients treated with surgery alone will not have a local recurrence. Currently, there is no way to accurately determine which patients have microscopic residual disease in the tumor bed after surgery and therefore are most likely to benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy. To address this problem, a number of technologies have been developed to try to improve margin assessment of resected tissue and to detect residual cancer in the tumor bed. Moreover, some of these approaches have been translated from the preclinical arena into clinical trials. Here, we review different types of intraoperative molecular imaging systems for cancer. Optical imaging techniques like epi-illumination, fluorescence molecular tomography and optoacoustic imaging can be coupled with exogenous fluorescent imaging probes that accumulate in tumors passively via the enhanced permeability and retention effect or are targeted to tumor tissues based on affinity or enzyme activity. In these approaches, detection of fluorescence in the tumor bed may indicate residual disease. Protease activated probes have generated great interest because of their potential for leading to high tumor to normal contrast. Recently, the first Phase I clinical trial to assess the safety and activation of a protease activated probe was conducted. Spectroscopic methods like radiofrequency spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, which are based on energy absorption and scattering respectively, have also been tested in humans and are able to distinguish between normal and tumors tissues intraoperatively. Most recently, multi-modal contrast agents have been developed that target tumors and contain both fluorescent dyes and MRI contrast agents, allowing for preoperative planning and intraoperative margin assessment with a single contrast agent. Further

  20. Research on intraoperative iris behavior in rabbits treated with tamsulosin and finasteride

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, K; Vultur, F; Simon, V; Voidazan, S; Mühlfay, Gh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate intraoperative iris behavior during some phacoemulsification maneuvers in rabbits treated with tamsulosin or finasteride. Material and Method: An experimental study was conducted on 26 Metis male rabbits aged 1.5 - 2 years, body weight between 3.4 and 5.6 kg, divided into three groups: Group 1 - Control, 6 rabbits; Group 2 - tamsulosin, 10 rabbits; Group 3 - finasteride, 10 rabbits. Dose calculation was performed according to body surface area ratio man/rabbit, taking into account the median lethal dose LD50. Surgery study in rabbits was done over two days by the same specialist using an adapted protocol. He was not informed before or during surgeries which group the animal belonged to, the order being random with a quasi-uniform distribution. Valid results for a modified iris behavior were obtained from two steps of the procedure (cannula irrigation maneuver and irrigation-aspiration). The iris billowing was graded from 0 to 3, according to severity. Results: The risk of intraoperative iris billowing was higher in rabbits included in tamsulosin group [OR=8.33 (CI 95% 0.63-110.09)], but insignificant statistically compare with control group (p= 0.13). In rabbits treated with finasteride the risk of intraoperative iris billowing is increased compared with those without treatment [OR=11.6 (CI 95% 0.92-147.6)], but insignificant statistically (p= 0.11). Conclusion: In our research, we showed an increased risk of intraoperative iris billowing in rabbits treated with finasteride, almost similar with those obtained in rabbits treated with tamsulosin. Further experimental or clinical studies to confirm the role of finasteride in the etiology of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome in humans are needed. Hippokratia 2015, 19 (1): 20-24. PMID:26435641

  1. Strategy of Surgical Resection for Glioma Based on Intraoperative Functional Mapping and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Manabu; MURAGAKI, Yoshihiro; SAITO, Taiichi; MARUYAMA, Takashi; NITTA, Masayuki; TSUZUKI, Shunsuke; ISEKI, Hiroshi; OKADA, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of papers have pointed out the relationship between aggressive resection of gliomas and survival prognosis. For maximum resection, the current concept of surgical decision-making is in “information-guided surgery” using multimodal intraoperative information. With this, anatomical information from intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and navigation, functional information from brain mapping and monitoring, and histopathological information must all be taken into account in the new perspective for innovative minimally invasive surgical treatment of glioma. Intraoperative neurofunctional information such as neurophysiological functional monitoring takes the most important part in the process to acquire objective visual data during tumor removal and to integrate these findings as digitized data for intraoperative surgical decision-making. Moreover, the analysis of qualitative data and threshold-setting for quantitative data raise difficult issues in the interpretation and processing of each data type, such as determination of motor evoked potential (MEP) decline, underestimation in tractography, and judgments of patient response for neurofunctional mapping and monitoring during awake craniotomy. Neurofunctional diagnosis of false-positives in these situations may affect the extent of resection, while false-negatives influence intra- and postoperative complication rates. Additionally, even though the various intraoperative visualized data from multiple sources contribute significantly to the reliability of surgical decisions when the information is integrated and provided, it is not uncommon for individual pieces of information to convey opposing suggestions. Such conflicting pieces of information facilitate higher-order decision-making that is dependent on the policies of the facility and the priorities of the patient, as well as the availability of the histopathological characteristics from resected tissue. PMID:26185825

  2. Significant warming of the Antarctic winter troposphere.

    PubMed

    Turner, J; Lachlan-Cope, T A; Colwell, S; Marshall, G J; Connolley, W M

    2006-03-31

    We report an undocumented major warming of the Antarctic winter troposphere that is larger than any previously identified regional tropospheric warming on Earth. This result has come to light through an analysis of recently digitized and rigorously quality controlled Antarctic radiosonde observations. The data show that regional midtropospheric temperatures have increased at a statistically significant rate of 0.5 degrees to 0.7 degrees Celsius per decade over the past 30 years. Analysis of the time series of radiosonde temperatures indicates that the data are temporally homogeneous. The available data do not allow us to unambiguously assign a cause to the tropospheric warming at this stage.

  3. Global Warming Estimation from MSU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, Robert; Yoo, Jung-Moon

    1998-01-01

    Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometer observations in Ch 2 (53.74 GHz) from sequential, sun-synchronous, polar-orbiting NOAA satellites contain small systematic errors. Some of these errors are time-dependent and some are time-independent. Small errors in Ch 2 data of successive satellites arise from calibration differences. Also, successive NOAA satellites tend to have different Local Equatorial Crossing Times (LECT), which introduce differences in Ch 2 data due to the diurnal cycle. These two sources of systematic error are largely time independent. However, because of atmospheric drag, there can be a drift in the LECT of a given satellite, which introduces time-dependent systematic errors. One of these errors is due to the progressive chance in the diurnal cycle and the other is due to associated chances in instrument heating by the sun. In order to infer global temperature trend from the these MSU data, we have eliminated explicitly the time-independent systematic errors. Both of the time-dependent errors cannot be assessed from each satellite. For this reason, their cumulative effect on the global temperature trend is evaluated implicitly. Christy et al. (1998) (CSL). based on their method of analysis of the MSU Ch 2 data, infer a global temperature cooling trend (-0.046 K per decade) from 1979 to 1997, although their near nadir measurements yield near zero trend (0.003 K/decade). Utilising an independent method of analysis, we infer global temperature warmed by 0.12 +/- 0.06 C per decade from the observations of the MSU Ch 2 during the period 1980 to 1997.

  4. In vivo intra-operative breast tumor margin detection using a portable OCT system with a handheld surgical imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson-Bhatt, Sarah J.; Nolan, Ryan; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Adie, Steven G.; Putney, Jeffrey; Darga, Donald; McCormick, Daniel T.; Cittadine, Andrew; Marjanovic, Marina; Chaney, Eric J.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; South, Fredrick; Carney, P. Scott; Cradock, Kimberly A.; Liu, Z. George; Ray, Partha S.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-02-01

    Breast-conserving surgery is a frequent option for women with stage I and II breast cancer, and with radiation treatment, can be as effective as a mastectomy. However, adequate margin detection remains a challenge, and too often additional surgeries are required. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides a potential method for real-time, high-resolution imaging of breast tissue during surgery. Intra-operative OCT imaging of excised breast tissues has been previously demonstrated by several groups. In this study, a novel handheld surgical probe-based OCT system is introduced, which was used by the surgeon to image in vivo, within the tumor cavity, and immediately following tumor removal in order to detect the presence of any remaining cancer. Following resection, study investigators imaged the excised tissue with the same probe for comparison. We present OCT images obtained from over 15 patients during lumpectomy and mastectomy surgeries. Images were compared to post-operative histopathology for diagnosis. OCT images with micron scale resolution show areas of heterogeneity and disorganized features indicative of malignancy, compared to more uniform regions of normal tissue. Video-rate acquisition shows the inside of the tumor cavity as the surgeon sweeps the probe along the walls of the surgical cavity. This demonstrates the potential of OCT for real-time assessment of surgical tumor margins and for reducing the unacceptably high re-operation rate for breast cancer patients.

  5. Direct evidence from intraoperative electrocortical stimulation indicates shared and distinct speech production center between Chinese and English languages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinsong; Lu, Junfeng; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Jie; Yao, Chengjun; Zhuang, Dongxiao; Qiu, Tianming; Guo, Qihao; Hu, Xiaobing; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2015-12-01

    Chinese processing has been suggested involving distinct brain areas from English. However, current functional localization studies on Chinese speech processing use mostly "indirect" techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography, lacking direct evidence by means of electrocortical recording. In this study, awake craniotomies in 66 Chinese-speaking glioma patients provide a unique opportunity to directly map eloquent language areas. Intraoperative electrocortical stimulation was conducted and the positive sites for speech arrest, anomia, and alexia were identified separately. With help of stereotaxic neuronavigation system and computational modeling, all positive sites elicited by stimulation were integrated and a series of two- and three-dimension Chinese language probability maps were built. We performed statistical comparisons between the Chinese maps and previously derived English maps. While most Chinese speech arrest areas located at typical language production sites (i.e., 50% positive sites in ventral precentral gyrus, 28% in pars opercularis and pars triangularis), which also serve English production, an additional brain area, the left middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 6/9), was found to be unique in Chinese production (P < 0.05). Moreover, Chinese speakers' inferior ventral precentral gyrus (Brodmann's area 6) was used more than that in English speakers. Our finding suggests that Chinese involves more perisylvian region (extending to left middle frontal gyrus) than English. This is the first time that direct evidence supports cross-cultural neurolinguistics differences in human beings. The Chinese language atlas will also helpful in brain surgery planning for Chinese-speakers.

  6. Clinical Trial Research on Mongolian Medical Warm Acupuncture in Treating Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Bo, Agula; Si, Lengge; Wang, Yuehong; Xiu, Lan; Wu, Rihan; Li, Yutang; Mu, Rigenjiya; Ga, Latai; Miao, Mei; Shuang, Fu; Wu, Yunhua; Jin, Qiu; Tong, Suocai; Wuyun, Gerile; Guan, Wurihan; Mo, Rigen; Hu, Sileng; Zhang, Lixia; Peng, Rui; Bao, Lidao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Insomnia is one of the most common sleep disorders. Hypnotics have poor long-term efficacy. Mongolian medical warm acupuncture has significant efficacy in treating insomnia. The paper evaluates the role of Mongolian medical warm acupuncture in treating insomnia by investigating the Mongolian medicine syndromes and conditions, Pittsburgh sleep quality index, and polysomnography indexes. Method. The patients were diagnosed in accordance with International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2). The insomnia patients were divided into the acupuncture group (40 cases) and the estazolam group (40 cases). The patients underwent intervention of Mongolian medical warm acupuncture and estazolam. The indicators of the Mongolian medicine syndromes and conditions, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), and polysomnography indexes (PSG) have been detected. Result. Based on the comparison of the Mongolian medicine syndrome scores between the warm acupuncture group and the drug treatment group, the result indicated P < 0.01. The clinical efficacy result showed that the effective rate (85%) in the warm acupuncture group was higher than that (70%) in the drug group. The total scores of PSQI of both groups were approximated. The sleep quality indexes of both groups decreased significantly (P < 0.05). The sleep quality index in the Mongolian medical warm acupuncture group decreased significantly (P < 0.01) and was better than that in the estazolam group. The sleep efficiency and daytime functions of the patients in the Mongolian medical warm acupuncture group improved significantly (P < 0.01). The sleep time was significantly extended (P < 0.01) in the Mongolian medical warm acupuncture group following PSG intervention. The sleep time during NREM in the Mongolian warm acupuncture group increased significantly (P < 0.01). The sleep time exhibited a decreasing trend during REM and it decreased significantly in the Mongolian warm acupuncture group (P < 0.01). The

  7. Clinical Trial Research on Mongolian Medical Warm Acupuncture in Treating Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Si, Lengge; Wang, Yuehong; Xiu, Lan; Wu, Rihan; Li, Yutang; Mu, Rigenjiya; Ga, Latai; Miao, Mei; Shuang, Fu; Wu, Yunhua; Jin, Qiu; Tong, Suocai; Wuyun, Gerile; Guan, Wurihan; Mo, Rigen; Hu, Sileng; Zhang, Lixia; Peng, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Insomnia is one of the most common sleep disorders. Hypnotics have poor long-term efficacy. Mongolian medical warm acupuncture has significant efficacy in treating insomnia. The paper evaluates the role of Mongolian medical warm acupuncture in treating insomnia by investigating the Mongolian medicine syndromes and conditions, Pittsburgh sleep quality index, and polysomnography indexes. Method. The patients were diagnosed in accordance with International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2). The insomnia patients were divided into the acupuncture group (40 cases) and the estazolam group (40 cases). The patients underwent intervention of Mongolian medical warm acupuncture and estazolam. The indicators of the Mongolian medicine syndromes and conditions, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), and polysomnography indexes (PSG) have been detected. Result. Based on the comparison of the Mongolian medicine syndrome scores between the warm acupuncture group and the drug treatment group, the result indicated P < 0.01. The clinical efficacy result showed that the effective rate (85%) in the warm acupuncture group was higher than that (70%) in the drug group. The total scores of PSQI of both groups were approximated. The sleep quality indexes of both groups decreased significantly (P < 0.05). The sleep quality index in the Mongolian medical warm acupuncture group decreased significantly (P < 0.01) and was better than that in the estazolam group. The sleep efficiency and daytime functions of the patients in the Mongolian medical warm acupuncture group improved significantly (P < 0.01). The sleep time was significantly extended (P < 0.01) in the Mongolian medical warm acupuncture group following PSG intervention. The sleep time during NREM in the Mongolian warm acupuncture group increased significantly (P < 0.01). The sleep time exhibited a decreasing trend during REM and it decreased significantly in the Mongolian warm acupuncture group (P < 0.01). The

  8. Studies of temperature disturbances of lower and middle atmosphere during stratospheric warmings 2006-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Andrey; Medvedeva, Irina; Ratovsky, Konstantin; Tolstikov, Maxim

    This paper was devoted to study of sudden winter stratospheric warmings 2006-2013. Initial data were vertical temperature profiles obtained by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the spacecraft EOS Aura. Shown that the temperature disturbances, propagated during stratospheric warmings are result of interference of at least two waves. Two-wave interference model of stratospheric warming was developed. Characteristics of planetary waves were obtained by using this model. Periods of disturbances vary from 5 to 45 days. Vertical wave numbers range is 20-150 km. Amplitudes and horizontal wave numbers obtained by the two-wave model vary smoothly in space and time, forming vorticity-like structure. We compared warmings 2006-2013 by using global amplitude. Comparison of variations of ionospheric parameters and characteristics of planetary waves in the stratosphere during warmings was done. On the basis of regular, continuous observations of the Irkutsk ionosonde DSP-4, was shown that number of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) tend to increase during stratospheric warmings. Found correlations between the amount of traveling ionospheric disturbances and the temperature at 80 km, between the daily maximum electron concentration and global amplitude of wave with upward phase velocity between the ion temperature and the amplitude of wave with downward phase velocity over Irkutsk. The work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research Grant 13-05-00153 and RF President Grant of Public Support for RF Leading Scientific Schools (NSh-2942.2014.5).

  9. Chamberless residential warm air furnace design

    SciTech Connect

    Godfree, J.

    1996-07-01

    This brief paper is an introduction to the concept of designing residential warm air furnaces without combustion chambers. This is possible since some small burners do not require the thermal support of a combustion chamber to complete the combustion process.

  10. Carbon cycle: Global warming then and now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A rapid warming event 55.8 million years ago was caused by extensive carbon emissions. The rate of change of carbon and oxygen isotopes in marine shelf sediments suggests that carbon emission rates were much slower than anthropogenic emissions.

  11. Scaling Potential Evapotranspiration with Greenhouse Warming (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheff, J.; Frierson, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is a supply-independent measure of the evaporative demand of a terrestrial climate, of basic importance in climatology, hydrology, and agriculture. Future increases in PET from greenhouse warming are often cited as key drivers of global trends toward drought and aridity. The present work computes recent and business-as-usual-future Penman-Monteith (i.e. physically-based) PET fields at 3-hourly resolution in 14 modern global climate models. The %-change in local annual-mean PET over the upcoming century is almost always positive, modally low double-digit in magnitude, usually increasing with latitude, yet quite divergent between models. These patterns are understood as follows. In every model, the global field of PET %-change is found to be dominated by the direct, positive effects of constant-relative-humidity warming (via increasing vapor pressure deficit and increasing Clausius-Clapeyron slope.) This direct-warming term very accurately scales as the PET-weighted (warm-season daytime) local warming, times 5-6% per degree (related to the Clausius-Clapeyron equation), times an analytic factor ranging from about 0.25 in warm climates to 0.75 in cold climates, plus a small correction. With warming of several degrees, this product is of low double-digit magnitude, and the strong temperature dependence gives the latitude dependence. Similarly, the inter-model spread in the amount of warming gives most of the spread in this term. Additional spread in the total change comes from strong disagreement on radiation, relative-humidity, and windspeed changes, which make smaller yet substantial contributions to the full PET %-change fields.

  12. Should we be concerned about global warming?

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H

    2006-01-01

    Accurate scientific predictions of the true human health outcomes of global climate change are significantly confounded by several effect modifiers that cannot be adjusted for analytically. Nevertheless, with the documented increase in average global surface temperature of 0.6 C. since 1975, there is uniform consensus in the international scientific community that the earth is warming from a variety of climatic effects, including cyclical re-warming and the cascading effects of greenhouse gas emissions to support human activities.

  13. The Tropical Western Hemisphere Warm Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Enfield, D. B.

    2002-12-01

    The paper describes and examines variability of the tropical Western Hemisphere warm pool (WHWP) of water warmer than 28.5oC. The WHWP is the second-largest tropical warm pool on Earth. Unlike the Eastern Hemisphere warm pool in the western Pacific, which straddles the equator, the WHWP is entirely north of the equator. At various stages of development the WHWP extends over parts of the eastern North Pacific, the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean, and the western tropical North Atlantic. It has a large seasonal cycle and its interannual fluctuations of area and intensity are significant. Surface heat fluxes warm the WHWP through the boreal spring to an annual maximum of SST and WHWP area in the late summer/early fall, associated with eastern North Pacific and Atlantic hurricane activities and rainfall from northern South America to the southern tier of the United States. Observations suggest that a positive ocean-atmosphere feedback operating through longwave radiation and associated cloudiness seems to operate in the WHWP. During winter preceding large warm pool, there is an alteration of the Walker and Hadley circulation cells that serves as a "tropospheric bridge" for transferring Pacific ENSO effects to the Atlantic sector and inducing initial warming of warm pool. Associated with the warm SST anomalies is a decrease in sea level pressure anomalies and an anomalous increase in atmospheric convection and cloudiness. The increase in convective activity and cloudiness results in less net longwave radiation loss from the sea surface, which then reinforces SST anomalies.

  14. Global warming: a vicious circle.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, J

    1991-01-01

    The problem of global warming (GW) is larger than it was originally suspected. The release of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (ME), and nitrous oxide (NO2) by the activities of humans will do more than simply raise the global temperature. It will also trigger a variety of feedback loops that will accelerate the GW process. The extent of these feedback loops is currently impossible to incorporate into the computer models because they are not fully understood. But, from what we do know, it is clear that reductions in greenhouse gas (GG) emissions must be halted immediately. We are already committed to regional droughts, storms, water shortages, fishery disruptions and plant and animal extinctions. But the response of the oceans, forest, and ice masses has not yet been incorporated into our predictions. Almost all the feedbacks identified promise to increase GG concentrations. The carbon cycle is going to be affected in a variety of ways. Plants and soil store almost 3 times the CO2 as found in the atmosphere. Increased temperatures will increase plant respiration, thus increasing CO2 emissions. Forests will die, permafrost will melt and the result will be increased releases of CO2 and ME. The oceans and plankton can not absorb as much CO2 as the water temperature rises. At present levels GG concentrations will double by 2025. Thus scientists are calling for an immediate 60-80% reduction in CO2 and other GG emissions. It is up to the industrialized nations to solve this problem since they are the ones who created it. 75% of all human made CO2 comes from these countries. They also have the ability to help developing nations to do the same. 20 nations have already announced plans to stabilize or reduce their GG emissions, but it is attitudes and lifestyles that must be changed. This is the largest problem to ever face the human race and never before have we acted as we now must act in order to avoid a worldwide catastrophe.

  15. Global warming and nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    -fold reduction might be attained. Even the first such halving of carbon intensivity of stationary-source energy production world-wide might permit continued slow power-demand growth in the highly developed countries and rapid development of the other 80% of the world, both without active governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage - while also stabilizing carbon input-rates into the Earth`s atmosphere. The second two-fold reduction might obviate most global warming concerns.

  16. Analysis of warm prestress data

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, B.D.; Embley, G.T.; Irizarry-Quinones, H.; Smith, P.D.; Wuthrich, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.; McCabe, D.E.

    1995-06-01

    Loading a cracked structure at elevated temperature, or warm prestressing (WPS), enhances its fracture resistance at a lower temperature. Five data sets, comprising 119 unclad pressure vessel steel specimens, were combined to derive correlations for WPS-enhanced fracture toughness (K{sub Ifrac}) in the absence of ductile tearing. New WPS test results for 27 surface flawed specimens, eight subclad flawed specimens, and five strain-aged specimens are discussed. K{sub Ifrac} exceeded non-WPS fracture toughness, K{sub Ic}, for all experiments. The WPS data showed that no specimens failed while K was decreasing, and that at least an additional seven percent additional reloading from the minimum value of applied K{sub I} took place prior to final fracture. The data included complete and partial unloading after WPS prior to final fracture. Crack tip 3-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element (3DEPFE) analysis was performed to support statistical analysis of the data. Regression models were compared with the Chell WPS model. Crack tip 3DEPFE analysis indicated that partially unloaded and completely unloaded data should be treated separately, and that the amount of unloading is unimportant for partially unloaded data. The regression models, which use K{sub I} at WPS (K{sub Iwps}) and K{sub Ic} as independent variables, better represented the WPS benefit than did the more complicated Chell model. An adequate accounting was made for constraint in the WPS experiments. The subclad flaw data support the use of the partial unload regression model, provided that some care is taken to represent the effect of intact cladding if present. The effect of strain aging at or below 260 C (500 F) on WPS benefit was of no consequence for the pressure vessel steels and WPS temperatures used to derive the regression models. The presence of ductile tearing precludes the use of the regression models. The regression model for partial unloading accurately predicted the behavior of full scale

  17. Progression to macula-off tractional retinal detachment after a contralateral intraoperative intravitreal bevacizumab injection for proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zlotcavitch, Leonid; Flynn, Harry W; Avery, Robert L; Rachitskaya, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient with progression to a macula-off tractional retinal detachment in a fellow eye after a contralateral intraoperative intravitreal bevacizumab injection. A 32-year-old diabetic man noted decreased vision in his left eye 1 week following 25 gauge pars plana vitrectomy, gas tamponade, and intraoperative injection of bevacizumab in his right eye. Left eye visual acuity decreased from 20/80 to 20/200, and macula-off tractional retinal detachment was seen on clinical exam and imaging. Progression of tractional retinal detachment associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy in a fellow eye after a contralateral intraoperative intravitreal bevacizumab injection may occur.

  18. An Intelligent Decision System for Intraoperative Somatosensory Evoked Potential Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fan, Bi; Li, Han-Xiong; Hu, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) is a useful, noninvasive technique widely used for spinal cord monitoring during surgery. One of the main indicators of a spinal cord injury is the drop in amplitude of the SEP signal in comparison to the nominal baseline that is assumed to be constant during the surgery. However, in practice, the real-time baseline is not constant and may vary during the operation due to nonsurgical factors, such as blood pressure, anaesthesia, etc. Thus, a false warning is often generated if the nominal baseline is used for SEP monitoring. In current practice, human experts must be used to prevent this false warning. However, these well-trained human experts are expensive and may not be reliable and consistent due to various reasons like fatigue and emotion. In this paper, an intelligent decision system is proposed to improve SEP monitoring. First, the least squares support vector regression and multi-support vector regression models are trained to construct the dynamic baseline from historical data. Then a control chart is applied to detect abnormalities during surgery. The effectiveness of the intelligent decision system is evaluated by comparing its performance against the nominal baseline model by using the real experimental datasets derived from clinical conditions.

  19. Is global warming harmful to health?

    PubMed

    Epstein, P R

    2000-08-01

    Projections from computer models predict that global warming will expand the incidence and distribution of many serious medical disorders. Global warming, aside from indirectly causing death by drowning or starvation, promotes by various means the emergence, resurgence, and spread of infectious diseases. This article addresses the health effects of global warming and disrupted climate patterns in detail. Among the greatest health concerns are diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, and several kinds of encephalitis. Such disorders are projected to become increasingly prevalent because their insect carriers are very sensitive to meteorological conditions. In addition, floods and droughts resulting from global warming can each help trigger outbreaks by creating breeding grounds for insects whose desiccated eggs remain viable and hatch in still water. Other effects of global warming on health include the growth of opportunist populations and the increase of the incidence of waterborne diseases because of lack of clean water. In view of this, several steps are cited in order to facilitate the successful management of the dangers of global warming.

  20. Could cirrus clouds have warmed early Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kasting, James F.

    2017-01-01

    The presence of the ancient valley networks on Mars indicates that the climate at 3.8 Ga was warm enough to allow substantial liquid water to flow on the martian surface for extended periods of time. However, the mechanism for producing this warming continues to be debated. One hypothesis is that Mars could have been kept warm by global cirrus cloud decks in a CO2sbnd H2O atmosphere containing at least 0.25 bar of CO2 (Urata and Toon, 2013). Initial warming from some other process, e.g., impacts, would be required to make this model work. Those results were generated using the CAM 3-D global climate model. Here, we use a single-column radioactive-convective climate model to further investigate the cirrus cloud warming hypothesis. Our calculations indicate that cirrus cloud decks could have produced global mean surface temperatures above freezing, but only if cirrus cloud cover approaches ∼75 - 100% and if other cloud properties (e.g., height, optical depth, particle size) are chosen favorably. However, at more realistic cirrus cloud fractions, or if cloud parameters are not optimal, cirrus clouds do not provide the necessary warming, suggesting that other greenhouse mechanisms are needed.

  1. Metagenomics-Enabled Understanding of Soil Microbial Feedbacks to Climate Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Wu, L.; Zhili, H.; Kostas, K.; Luo, Y.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Cole, J. R.; Tiedje, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the response of biological communities to climate warming is a central issue in ecology and global change biology, but it is poorly understood microbial communities. To advance system-level predictive understanding of the feedbacks of belowground microbial communities to multiple climate change factors and their impacts on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling processes, we have used integrated metagenomic technologies (e.g., target gene and shotgun metagenome sequencing, GeoChip, and isotope) to analyze soil microbial communities from experimental warming sites in Alaska (AK) and Oklahoma (OK), and long-term laboratory incubation. Rapid feedbacks of microbial communities to warming were observed in the AK site. Consistent with the changes in soil temperature, moisture and ecosystem respiration, microbial functional community structure was shifted after only 1.5-year warming, indicating rapid responses and high sensitivity of this permafrost ecosystem to climate warming. Also, warming stimulated not only functional genes involved in aerobic respiration of both labile and recalcitrant C, contributing to an observed 24% increase in 2010 growing season and 56% increase of decomposition of a standard substrate, but also functional genes for anaerobic processes (e.g., denitrification, sulfate reduction, methanogenesis). Further comparisons by shotgun sequencing showed significant differences of microbial community structure between AK and OK sites. The OK site was enriched in genes annotated for cellulose degradation, CO2 production, denitrification, sporulation, heat shock response, and cellular surface structures (e.g., trans-membrane transporters for glucosides), while the AK warmed plots were enriched in metabolic pathways related to labile C decomposition. Together, our results demonstrate the vulnerability of permafrost ecosystem C to climate warming and the importance of microbial feedbacks in mediating such vulnerability.

  2. Incidence, influencing factors, and prognostic impact of intraoperative massive blood loss in adolescents with neuromuscular scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Rui; Li, Na; Xu, Bi-Yun; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Xiao-ping; Ma, Zheng-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Factors influencing massive blood loss for neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS) patients. Despite advances in surgical and anesthetic techniques, scoliosis surgery is still associated with intraoperative massive blood loss, which can result in postoperative mortality and morbidity. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, influencing factors, and prognostic impact of intraoperative massive blood loss in adolescents with NMS. A retrospective review of adolescents who underwent posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion for NMS was performed. Perioperative variables and data were recorded. Massive blood loss was defined as an estimated blood loss that exceeds 30% of total blood volume. We obtained data for 114 patients, of whom 63 (55%) had intraoperative massive blood loss. Compared with those without, patients with massive blood loss were more likely to be older, have lower body mass indexes (BMIs), larger Cobb angles, more fused levels, more osteotomy procedures, and prolonged duration of operation. Logistic regression analysis identified the number of fused levels to be more than 12 (P = 0.003, odds ratio = 6.614, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.891–23.131), BMI lower than 16.8 kg/m2 (P = 0.025, odds ratio = 3.293, 95% CI: 1.159–9.357), age greater than 15 years (P = 0.014, odds ratio = 3.505, 95% CI: 1.259–9.761), and duration of operation longer than 4.4 hours (P = 0.016, odds ratio = 3.746, 95% CI: 1.428–9.822) as influencing factors. Patients with massive blood loss are associated with more intraoperative colloids infusion and blood transfusions (red blood cell and fresh frozen plasma), as well as postoperative drainage volume. In adolescents with NMS who underwent posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion operations, intraoperative massive blood loss is common. The number of fused levels, BMI, age, and duration of operation are factors influencing intraoperative massive blood loss. PMID:28296737

  3. The importance of warm season warming to western U.S. streamflow changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Das, T.; Pierce, D.W.; Cayan, D.R.; Vano, J.A.; Lettenmaier, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Warm season climate warming will be a key driver of annual streamflow changes in four major river basins of the western U.S., as shown by hydrological model simulations using fixed precipitation and idealized seasonal temperature changes based on climate projections with SRES A2 forcing. Warm season (April-September) warming reduces streamflow throughout the year; streamflow declines both immediately and in the subsequent cool season. Cool season (October-March) warming, by contrast, increases streamflow immediately, partially compensating for streamflow reductions during the subsequent warm season. A uniform warm season warming of 3C drives a wide range of annual flow declines across the basins: 13.3%, 7.2%, 1.8%, and 3.6% in the Colorado, Columbia, Northern and Southern Sierra basins, respectively. The same warming applied during the cool season gives annual declines of only 3.5%, 1.7%, 2.1%, and 3.1%, respectively. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Warming shifts `worming': effects of experimental warming on invasive earthworms in northern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Stefanski, Artur; Fisichelli, Nicholas A.; Rice, Karen; Rich, Roy; Reich, Peter B.

    2014-11-01

    Climate change causes species range shifts and potentially alters biological invasions. The invasion of European earthworm species across northern North America has severe impacts on native ecosystems. Given the long and cold winters in that region that to date supposedly have slowed earthworm invasion, future warming is hypothesized to accelerate earthworm invasions into yet non-invaded regions. Alternatively, warming-induced reductions in soil water content (SWC) can also decrease earthworm performance. We tested these hypotheses in a field warming experiment at two sites in Minnesota, USA by sampling earthworms in closed and open canopy in three temperature treatments in 2010 and 2012. Structural equation modeling revealed that detrimental warming effects on earthworm densities and biomass could indeed be partly explained by warming-induced reductions in SWC. The direction of warming effects depended on the current average SWC: warming had neutral to positive effects at high SWC, whereas the opposite was true at low SWC. Our results suggest that warming limits the invasion of earthworms in northern North America by causing less favorable soil abiotic conditions, unless warming is accompanied by increased and temporally even distributions of rainfall sufficient to offset greater water losses from higher evapotranspiration.

  5. Warming shifts 'worming': effects of experimental warming on invasive earthworms in northern North America.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Stefanski, Artur; Fisichelli, Nicholas A; Rice, Karen; Rich, Roy; Reich, Peter B

    2014-11-03

    Climate change causes species range shifts and potentially alters biological invasions. The invasion of European earthworm species across northern North America has severe impacts on native ecosystems. Given the long and cold winters in that region that to date supposedly have slowed earthworm invasion, future warming is hypothesized to accelerate earthworm invasions into yet non-invaded regions. Alternatively, warming-induced reductions in soil water content (SWC) can also decrease earthworm performance. We tested these hypotheses in a field warming experiment at two sites in Minnesota, USA by sampling earthworms in closed and open canopy in three temperature treatments in 2010 and 2012. Structural equation modeling revealed that detrimental warming effects on earthworm densities and biomass could indeed be partly explained by warming-induced reductions in SWC. The direction of warming effects depended on the current average SWC: warming had neutral to positive effects at high SWC, whereas the opposite was true at low SWC. Our results suggest that warming limits the invasion of earthworms in northern North America by causing less favorable soil abiotic conditions, unless warming is accompanied by increased and temporally even distributions of rainfall sufficient to offset greater water losses from higher evapotranspiration.

  6. Can Global Warming be Stopped?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luria, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier this year, the CO2 levels exceeded the 400 ppm level and there is no sign that the 1-2 ppm annual increase is going to slow down. Concerns regarding the danger of global warming have been reported in numerous occasions for more than a generation, ever since CO2 levels reached the 350 ppm range in the mid 1980's. Nevertheless, all efforts to slow down the increase have showed little if any effect. Mobile sources, including surface and marine transportation and aviation, consist of 20% of the global CO2 emission. The only realistic way to reduce the mobile sources' CO2 signature is by improved fuel efficiency. However, any progress in this direction is more than compensated by continuous increased demand. Stationary sources, mostly electric power generation, are responsible for the bulk of the global CO2 emission. The measurements have shown, that the effect of an increase in renewable sources, like solar wind and geothermal, combined with conversion from coal to natural gas where possible, conservation and efficiency improvement, did not compensate the increased demand mostly in developing countries. Increased usage of nuclear energy can provide some relief in carbon emission but has the potential of even greater environmental hazard. A major decrease in carbon emission can be obtained by either significant reduction in the cost of non-carbon based energy sources or by of carbon sequestration. The most economical way to make a significant decrease in carbon emission is to apply carbon sequestration technology at large point sources that use coal. Worldwide there are about 10,000 major sources that burn >7 billion metric tons of coal which generate the equivalent of 30 trillion kwh. There is a limited experience in CO2 sequestration of such huge quantities of CO2, however, it is estimated that the cost would be US$ 0.01-0.1 per kwh. The cost of eliminating this quantity can be estimated at an average of 1.5 trillion dollars annually. The major emitters, US

  7. A Case of Large Anterior Paraclinoid Aneurysm with Intraoperative Premature Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Shinya; Inaba, Makoto; Kagami, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We report here troubleshooting of intraoperative premature rupture with large anterior paraclinoid aneurysm, which was successfully clipped. A 61-year-old woman with left nasal hemianopia was referred to our institute. Preoperative three-dimensional computed tomography angiography and a left internal carotid artery angiogram showed a large left anterior clinoid aneurysm adjacent to the anterior clinoid process. Aneurysm was ruptured prematurely and tentative clipping of the dome of the aneurysm was done incidentally to stop bleeding and to reduce the volume of the aneurysm. The anterior clinoid process and superior wall of the orbit were drilled out safely, since the tentative clipping had created sufficient space between the aneurysm and the anterior clinoid process to perform the procedure. The proximal neck was observed and tandem clipping was applied to the aneurysm. Intraoperative and postoperative angiography revealed complete disappearance of the aneurysm. PMID:23946926

  8. An extraordinary mechanism causing intraoperative migration of the Kirschner-wire.

    PubMed

    Eroğlu, Mehmet; Özcan, Özal; Şentürk, İhsan; Yücehan, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Migration of Kirschner wires (K-wires) postoperatively and with use of cannulated implants intraoperatively is a well-known complication. In this article, we present an extraordinary mechanism causing intraoperative migration of a K-wire. A K-wire which was used for temporary fixation of fracture fragments migrated forwardly due to its contact with the drill bit while drilling a hole for a screw. The interaction between the K-wire and the drill bit simulated a gear wheel effect and thus the rotating K-wire advanced. Although no complications occurred in this case, we believe that the mentioned mechanism may be of importance particularly in osteoporotic patients and may cause damage to vital structures.

  9. Evaluating the effect of intraoperative peritoneal lavage on bacterial culture in dogs with suspected septic peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Swayne, Seanna L; Brisson, Brigitte; Weese, J Scott; Sears, William

    2012-09-01

    This pilot study describes the effect of intraoperative peritoneal lavage (IOPL) on bacterial counts and outcome in clinical cases of septic peritonitis. Intraoperative samples were cultured before and after IOPL. Thirty-three dogs with presumed septic peritonitis on the basis of cytology were managed surgically during the study period. Positive pre-lavage bacterial cultures were found in 14 cases, 13 of which were a result of intestinal leakage. The post-lavage cultures showed fewer isolates in 9 cases and in 1 case became negative. The number of dogs with a decrease in the concentration of bacteria cultured from pre-lavage to post-lavage samples was not statistically significant. There was no significant effect of the change in pre- to post-lavage culture, single versus multiple types of bacteria, selection of an appropriate empiric antimicrobial on survival or the need for subsequent surgery.

  10. Real-time Near-infrared Virtual Intraoperative Surgical Photoacoustic Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-09-01

    We developed a near infrared (NIR) virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy (NIR-VISPAM) system that combines a conventional surgical microscope and an NIR light photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) system. NIR-VISPAM can simultaneously visualize PA B-scan images at a maximum display rate of 45 Hz and display enlarged microscopic images on a surgeon's view plane through the ocular lenses of the surgical microscope as augmented reality. The use of the invisible NIR light eliminated the disturbance to the surgeon's vision caused by the visible PAM excitation laser in a previous report. Further, the maximum permissible laser pulse energy at this wavelength is approximately 5 times more than that at the visible spectral range. The use of a needle-type ultrasound transducer without any water bath for acoustic coupling can enhance convenience in an intraoperative environment. We successfully guided needle and injected carbon particles in biological tissues ex vivo and in melanoma-bearing mice in vivo.

  11. Wide-field optical coherence micro-elastography for intraoperative assessment of human breast cancer margins

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Wijesinghe, Philip; Kirk, Rodney W.; Latham, Bruce; Sampson, David D.; Saunders, Christobel M.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    Incomplete excision of malignant tissue is a major issue in breast-conserving surgery, with typically 20 - 30% of cases requiring a second surgical procedure arising from postoperative detection of an involved margin. We report advances in the development of a new intraoperative tool, optical coherence micro-elastography, for the assessment of tumor margins on the micro-scale. We demonstrate an important step by conducting whole specimen imaging in intraoperative time frames with a wide-field scanning system acquiring mosaicked elastograms with overall dimensions of ~50 × 50 mm, large enough to image an entire face of most lumpectomy specimens. This capability is enabled by a wide-aperture annular actuator with an internal diameter of 65 mm. We demonstrate feasibility by presenting elastograms recorded from freshly excised human breast tissue, including from a mastectomy, lumpectomies and a cavity shaving. PMID:27867721

  12. Retroperitoneoscopic drainage of bilateral psoas abscesses under intraoperative laparoscopic ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Koichi; Takase, Yasukazu; Motoi, Isamu; Mizuno, Hideki; Goshima, Kenichi; Sawaguchi, Takeshi

    2014-05-01

    Despite improved diagnostic modalities for psoas abscesses, the optimum management strategy is not uniform. A 67-year-old man presented with bilateral psoas abscesses secondary to L1-L2 pyogenic discitis. On contrast-enhanced CT, the largest of these abscesses measured 13 × 14 × 33 mm on the right. The patient developed sepsis caused by Klebsiella pneumonia. There were no signs of improvement after 3 weeks of systematic antibiotic administration. We performed surgical drainage of bilateral psoas abscesses by retroperitoneoscopy. Intraoperative laparoscopic ultrasound was useful to determine abscess location in the muscles prior to drainage and confirm no residual abscesses after drainage. The patient was afebrile 3 days later, and his clinical symptoms resolved. Retroperitoneoscopic drainage may represent a feasible minimally invasive therapeutic option for psoas abscess, and intraoperative laparoscopic ultrasound has the potential to increase the safety and efficacy of this surgical procedure.

  13. Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty: intraoperative and postoperative imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Ang, Marcus; Dubis, Adam M; Wilkins, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case report of using the same handheld spectral-domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT) for rapid intraoperative and postoperative imaging in a case of Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). A 67-year-old woman, with Fuchs dystrophy and corneal decompensation, underwent DMEK with intraoperative ASOCT imaging using the handheld Envisu spectral domain ASOCT system (Bioptigen, Inc., Morrisville, NC, USA). We found that this easy-to-use portable system with handheld probe allowed for rapid imaging of the anterior segment during donor manipulation to visualize the orientation of the DMEK donor, as well as to confirm the initial adhesion of the DMEK donor. Moreover, the same system may be used for postoperative monitoring of graft adhesion, corneal thickness, and stromal remodeling in the clinic with very high-definition images.

  14. Three-dimensional Intraoperative Imaging Modalities in Orthopaedic Surgery: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sheeraz; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Baird, Evan

    2014-12-01

    Intraoperative imaging and navigation systems have revolutionized orthopaedic surgery for the spine, joints, and orthopaedic trauma. Imaging modalities such as the isocentric C-arm, O-arm imaging, and intraoperative MRI or navigation systems allow the visualization of surgical instruments and implants relative to a three-dimensional CT image or MRI. Studies show that these technologies lower the rates of implant misplacement and inadequate fracture reduction, thereby improving surgical outcomes and reducing reoperation rates. An additional benefit is reduced radiation exposure compared with that for conventional fluoroscopy. Concerns surrounding adoption of these technologies include cost and increased operating times, but improvements in design and protocol may improve the integration of these imaging modalities into the operating room.

  15. A case of large anterior paraclinoid aneurysm with intraoperative premature rupture.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Shinya; Inaba, Makoto; Kagami, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    We report here troubleshooting of intraoperative premature rupture with large anterior paraclinoid aneurysm, which was successfully clipped. A 61-year-old woman with left nasal hemianopia was referred to our institute. Preoperative three-dimensional computed tomography angiography and a left internal carotid artery angiogram showed a large left anterior clinoid aneurysm adjacent to the anterior clinoid process. Aneurysm was ruptured prematurely and tentative clipping of the dome of the aneurysm was done incidentally to stop bleeding and to reduce the volume of the aneurysm. The anterior clinoid process and superior wall of the orbit were drilled out safely, since the tentative clipping had created sufficient space between the aneurysm and the anterior clinoid process to perform the procedure. The proximal neck was observed and tandem clipping was applied to the aneurysm. Intraoperative and postoperative angiography revealed complete disappearance of the aneurysm.

  16. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period and difficult airway].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is a method of ventilatory assistance aimed at increasing alveolar ventilation, thus achieving, in selected subjects, the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation, with the consequent improvement in survival. There has been a systematic review and study of the technical, clinical experiences, and recommendations concerning the application of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period. The use of prophylactic non-invasive mechanical ventilation before surgery that involves significant alterations in the ventilatory function may decrease the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Its intraoperative use will mainly depend on the type of surgery, type of anaesthetic technique, and the clinical status of the patient. Its use allows greater anaesthetic depth without deterioration of oxygenation and ventilation of patients.

  17. Intraoperative neural monitoring in thyroid surgery: lessons learned from animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Gregory W.; Lu, I-Cheng; Chang, Pi-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ting; Hun, Pao-Chu; Lin, Yi-Chu; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Chiang, Feng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury remains a significant morbidity associated with thyroid and parathyroid surgery. In the past decade, surgeons have increasingly used intraoperative neural monitoring (IONM) as an adjunct technique for localizing and identifying the RLN, detecting RLN injury, and predicting the outcome of vocal cord function. In recent years, many animal studies have investigated common pitfalls and new applications of IONM. For example, the use of IONM technology in animal models has proven valuable in studies of the electrophysiology of RLN injury. The advent of animal studies has substantially improved understanding of IONM technology. Lessons learned from animal studies have immediate clinical applications in establishing reliable strategies for preventing intraoperative RLN injury. This article gives an overview of the research progress on IONM-relevant animal models. PMID:27867861

  18. A case report of intraoperative endoscopic ultrasound during robotic assisted Heller myotomy for severe esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Abdel Khalek, Mohamed; Abbas, Abbas; Joshi, Virendra; Hariri, Nizar; Kandil, Emad

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is the best described primary esophageal motility disorder. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is considered a useful adjunct for grading and establishing the prognosis of these patients. Recent experience using Da Vinci robotic assisted myotomy has demonstrated that this is a safe and effective approach of treatment. The benefit of magnification and three dimensional imaging helps prevent esophageal perforation and identify residual circular muscle fibers. This paper reports the relative efficacy and safety of intraoperative ultrasound during robotic assisted myotomy in a patient with severe achalasia. Intraoperative esophageal endoscopic ultrasound is a safe technique that may improve the success rate of surgery by confirming the adequacy of myotomy, thereby decreasing the likelihood of recurrent symptoms.

  19. Intraoperative β{sup -} detecting probe for radio-guided surgery in tumour resection

    SciTech Connect

    Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Bellini, Fabio; Bocciy, Valerio; Collamatiyz, Francesco; Faccini, Riccardo; Paramattiy, Riccardo; Paterayz, Vincenzo; Pinciy, Davide; Recchiay, Luigi; Sciubbayz, Adalberto; Senzacqua, Martina; Voenay, Cecilia; Morgantiy, Silvio; De Luciax, Erika; Matteixk, Ilaria; Sartizx, Alessio; Russomando, Aandrea; Marafiniy, Michela

    2015-07-01

    The development of the β{sup -} based radio-guided surgery aims to extend the technique to those tumours where surgery is the only possible treatment and the assessment of the resection would most profit from the low background around the lesion, as for brain tumours. Feasibility studies on meningioma and gliomas already estimated the potentiality of this new treatment. To validate the technique, a prototype of the intraoperative probe detecting β{sup -} decays and specific phantoms simulating tumour remnant patterns embedded in healthy tissue have been realized. The response of the probe in this simulated environment is tested with dedicated procedures. This document discusses the innovative aspects of the method, the status of the developed intraoperative β{sup -} detecting probe and the results of the preclinical tests. (authors)

  20. [INVASIVE TECHNIQUES AND INTRAOPERATIVE ECHOGRAPHY IN THE LOCALIZATION OF INSULINOMAS; A CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Martínez, Aura D; Padillo-Cuenca, José C; Calañas Continente, Alfonso; Bahamondes-Opazo, Rodrigo; Muñoz-Jiménez, Concepción; Gálvez Moreno, María A

    2015-07-01

    The insulinoma is the most common pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Surgery is curative in most cases, an appropriate preoperative localization allows a minimal invasive surgical technique for keeping the exo and endocrine function of the pancreas. Some authors suggest the use of invasive localization techniques just in cases with non-identified tumor lesion, others recommend their routinely use. We describe a case with clinical and biochemical diagnosis of insulinoma, conventional image studies revealed a tumor image in the pancreas which corresponded to a lipoma, the intraoperative ultrasound allowed the localization of the real tumor, but body-tail pancreatectomy was performed due to pancreatic necrosis in relation with the duration of the surgery. The systematic use of invasive localization techniques as the intra-arterial calcium stimulation and the pancreatic intraoperative ultrasound would allow a better localization of insulinoma for avoiding complications and associated morbidity.

  1. Intraoperative 16-Channel Electroencephalography and Bilateral Near Infrared Spectroscopy Monitorization in Aortic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Demir, Aslı; Aydınlı, Bahar; Ünal, Ertekin Utku; Bindal, Mustafa; Koçulu, Rabia; Sarıtaş, Ahmet; Karadeniz, Ümit

    2015-08-01

    Transient neurologic dysfunction is common after aortic surgery. Major causes of postoperative complications followed by cardiac surgery are due to hypoperfusion states such as selective cerebral perfusion, embolic debris during cardiopulmonary bypass and ulcerated plaque emboli originated from carotid arteries. Neurologic complications prolong periods of intensive care unit and hospital stay, worsens quality of life and unfortunately they are an important cause of morbidity. Anaesthesia during a carotid and aortic surgery constitutes of providing adequate brain perfusion pressure, attenuating cerebral metabolism by anaesthetic agents and monitoring the cerebral metabolic supply and demand relationship during the intraoperative period. We present a monitoring approach with an intraoperative 16-channel electroencephalography and bilateral near infrared spectroscopy during redo aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva surgery.

  2. Intraoperative 16-Channel Electroencephalography and Bilateral Near Infrared Spectroscopy Monitorization in Aortic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Aslı; Aydınlı, Bahar; Ünal, Ertekin Utku; Bindal, Mustafa; Koçulu, Rabia; Sarıtaş, Ahmet; Karadeniz, Ümit

    2015-01-01

    Transient neurologic dysfunction is common after aortic surgery. Major causes of postoperative complications followed by cardiac surgery are due to hypoperfusion states such as selective cerebral perfusion, embolic debris during cardiopulmonary bypass and ulcerated plaque emboli originated from carotid arteries. Neurologic complications prolong periods of intensive care unit and hospital stay, worsens quality of life and unfortunately they are an important cause of morbidity. Anaesthesia during a carotid and aortic surgery constitutes of providing adequate brain perfusion pressure, attenuating cerebral metabolism by anaesthetic agents and monitoring the cerebral metabolic supply and demand relationship during the intraoperative period. We present a monitoring approach with an intraoperative 16-channel electroencephalography and bilateral near infrared spectroscopy during redo aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva surgery. PMID:27366510

  3. Functional preoperative and intraoperative mapping and monitoring: increasing safety and efficacy in glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Ottenhausen, Malte; Krieg, Sandro M; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Greater extent of resection (EOR) of low-grade gliomas is associated with improved survival. Proximity to eloquent cortical regions often limits resectability and elevates the risk of surgery-related deficits. Therefore, functional localization of eloquent cortex or subcortical fiber tracts can enhance the EOR and functional outcome. Imaging techniques such as functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking, and neurophysiological methods like navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and magnetoencephalography, make it possible to identify eloquent areas prior to resective surgery and to tailor indication and surgical approach but also to assess the surgical risk. Intraoperative monitoring with direct cortical stimulation and subcortical stimulation enables surgeons to preserve essential functional tissue during surgery. Through tailored pre- and intraoperative mapping and monitoring the EOR can be maximized, with reduced rates of surgery-related deficits.

  4. Computed tomography, endoscopic, laparoscopic, and intra-operative sonography for assessing resectability of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, Eliza E; Van Dam, Jacques; Weinstein, Stefanie; Jeffrey, Brooke; Desser, Terry; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2005-08-01

    Pancreas cancer is the fourth leading cancer killer in adults. Cure of pancreas cancer is dependent on the complete surgical removal of localized tumor. A complete surgical resection is dependent on accurate preoperative and intra-operative imaging of tumor and its relationship to vital structures. Imaging of pancreatic tumors preoperatively and intra-operatively is achieved by pancreatic protocol computed tomography (CT), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), laparoscopic ultrasound (LUS), and intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). Multi-detector CT with three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of images is the most useful preoperative modality to assess resectability. It has a sensitivity and specificity of 90 and 99%, respectively. It is not observer dependent. The images predict operative findings. EUS and LUS have sensitivities of 77 and 78%, respectively. They both have a very high specificity. Further, EUS has the ability to biopsy tumor and obtain a definitive tissue diagnosis. IOUS is a very sensitive (93%) method to assess tumor resectability during surgery. It adds little time and no morbidity to the operation. It greatly facilitates the intra-operative decision-making. In reality, each of these methods adds some information to help in determining the extent of tumor and the surgeon's ability to remove it. We rely on pancreatic protocol CT with 3-D reconstruction and either EUS or IOUS depending on the tumor location and operability of the tumor and patient. With these modern imaging modalities, it is now possible to avoid major operations that only determine an inoperable tumor. With proper preoperative selection, surgery is able to remove tumor in the majority of patients.

  5. Intraoperative monitoring by imaging and electrophysiological techniques during giant intracranial aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Durand, A; Penchet, G; Thines, L

    2016-02-01

    Difficulties in giant intracranial aneurysm surgery are the consequence of aneurysmal wall histology and the complex angioarchitecture of the vascular tree. In order to reduce complications and risks of those procedures, various imaging and electrophysiological techniques can be implemented perioperatively. The authors review the principles, goals and main results in this context of micro-Doppler and flowmeter techniques, near-infrared spectroscopy, operative microscope-integrated indocyanine green video-angiography, neuro-endoscopy, selective intraoperative angiography and electrophysiological monitoring.

  6. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid flow assessed using intraoperative MRI during posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Bond, Aaron E; Jane, John A; Liu, Kenneth C; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The authors completed a prospective, institutional review board-approved study using intraoperative MRI (iMRI) in patients undergoing posterior fossa decompression (PFD) for Chiari I malformation. The purpose of the study was to examine the utility of iMRI in determining when an adequate decompression had been performed. METHODS Patients with symptomatic Chiari I malformations with imaging findings of obstruction of the CSF space at the foramen magnum, with or without syringomyelia, were considered candidates for surgery. All patients underwent complete T1, T2, and cine MRI studies in the supine position preoperatively as a baseline. After the patient was placed prone with the neck flexed in position for surgery, iMRI was performed. The patient then underwent a bone decompression of the foramen magnum and arch of C-1, and the MRI was repeated. If obstruction was still present, then in a stepwise fashion the patient underwent dural splitting, duraplasty, and coagulation of the tonsils, with an iMRI study performed after each step guiding the decision to proceed further. RESULTS Eighteen patients underwent PFD for Chiari I malformations between November 2011 and February 2013; 15 prone preincision iMRIs were performed. Fourteen of these patients (93%) demonstrated significant improvement of CSF flow through the foramen magnum dorsal to the tonsils with positioning only. This improvement was so notable that changes in CSF flow as a result of the bone decompression were difficult to discern. CONCLUSIONS The authors observed significant CSF flow changes when simply positioning the patient for surgery. These results put into question intraoperative flow assessments that suggest adequate decompression by PFD, whether by iMRI or intraoperative ultrasound. The use of intraoperative imaging during PFD for Chiari I malformation, whether by ultrasound or iMRI, is limited by CSF flow dynamics across the foramen magnum that change significantly when the patient is

  7. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., <1/5th of a typical diagnostic head CT). CBCT images are available ~15 seconds after scan completion (~1 min acquisition) and reviewed at bedside using custom 3D visualization software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  8. Anesthetic Complication during Maxillofacial Trauma Surgery: A Case Report of Intraoperative Tension Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Al Shetawi, Al Haitham; Golden, Leonard; Turner, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Tension pneumothorax is a life-threatening emergency that requires a high index of suspension and immediate intervention to prevent circulatory collapse and death. Only five cases of pneumothorax were described in the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery literature. All cases were postoperative complications associated with orthognathic surgery. We report a case of intraoperative tension pneumothorax during a routine facial trauma surgery requiring emergency chest decompression. The possible causes, classification, and reported cases will be presented.

  9. Complications and Cost Analysis of Intraoperative Arterial Complications in Head and Neck Free Flap Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catherine S; Chu, Michael W; Nelson, Jonas A; Basta, Marten; Gerety, Patrick; Kanchwala, Suhail K; Wu, Liza C

    2017-02-25

    Background Microvascular anastomotic patency is fundamental to head and neck free flap reconstructive success. The aims of this study were to identify factors associated with intraoperative arterial anastomotic issues and analyze the impact on subsequent complications and cost in head and neck reconstruction. Methods A retrospective review was performed on all head and neck free flap reconstructions from 2005 to 2013. Patients with intraoperative, arterial anastomotic difficulties were compared with patients without. Postoperative outcomes and costs were analyzed to determine factors associated with microvascular arterial complications. A regression analysis was performed to control for confounders. Results Total 438 head and neck free flaps were performed, with 24 (5.5%) having intraoperative arterial complications. Patient groups and flap survival between the two groups were similar. Free flaps with arterial issues had higher rates of unplanned reoperations (p < 0.001), emergent take-backs (p = 0.034), and major surgical (p = 0.002) and respiratory (p = 0.036) complications. The overall cost of reconstruction was nearly double in patients with arterial issues (p = 0.001). Regression analysis revealed that African American race (OR = 5.5, p < 0.009), use of vasopressors (OR = 6.0, p = 0.024), end-to-side venous anastomosis (OR = 4.0, p = 0.009), and use of internal fixation hardware (OR =3.5, p = 0.013) were significantly associated with arterial complications. Conclusion Intraoperative arterial complications may impact complications and overall cost of free flap head and neck reconstruction. Although some factors are nonmodifiable or unavoidable, microsurgeons should nonetheless be aware of the risk association. We recommend optimizing preoperative comorbidities and avoiding use of vasopressors in head and neck free flap cases to the extent possible.

  10. An MRS- and PET-guided biopsy tool for intraoperative neuronavigational systems.

    PubMed

    Grech-Sollars, Matthew; Vaqas, Babar; Thompson, Gerard; Barwick, Tara; Honeyfield, Lesley; O'Neill, Kevin; Waldman, Adam D

    2017-03-17

    OBJECTIVE Glioma heterogeneity and the limitations of conventional structural MRI for identifying aggressive tumor components can limit the reliability of stereotactic biopsy and, hence, tumor characterization, which is a hurdle for developing and selecting effective treatment strategies. In vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS) and PET enable noninvasive imaging of cellular metabolism relevant to proliferation and can detect regions of more highly active tumor. Here, the authors integrated presurgical PET and MRS with intraoperative neuronavigation to guide surgical biopsy and tumor sampling of brain gliomas with the aim of improving intraoperative tumor-tissue characterization and imaging biomarker validation. METHODS A novel intraoperative neuronavigation tool was developed as part of a study that aimed to sample high-choline tumor components identified by multivoxel MRS and (18)F-methylcholine PET-CT. Spatially coregistered PET and MRS data were integrated into structural data sets and loaded onto an intraoperative neuronavigation system. High and low choline uptake/metabolite regions were represented as color-coded hollow spheres for targeted stereotactic biopsy and tumor sampling. RESULTS The neurosurgeons found the 3D spherical targets readily identifiable on the interactive neuronavigation system. In one case, areas of high mitotic activity were identified on the basis of high (18)F-methylcholine uptake and elevated choline ratios found with MRS in an otherwise low-grade tumor, which revealed the possible use of this technique for tumor characterization. CONCLUSIONS These PET and MRI data can be combined and represented usefully for the surgeon in neuronavigation systems. This method enables neurosurgeons to sample tumor regions based on physiological and molecular imaging markers. The technique was applied for characterizing choline metabolism using MRS and (18)F PET; however, this approach provides proof of principle for using different radionuclide tracers and

  11. An MRS- and PET-guided biopsy tool for intraoperative neuronavigational systems.

    PubMed

    Grech-Sollars, Matthew; Vaqas, Babar; Thompson, Gerard; Barwick, Tara; Honeyfield, Lesley; O'Neill, Kevin; Waldman, Adam D

    2016-11-11

    OBJECTIVE Glioma heterogeneity and the limitations of conventional structural MRI for identifying aggressive tumor components can limit the reliability of stereotactic biopsy and, hence, tumor characterization, which is a hurdle for developing and selecting effective treatment strategies. In vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS) and PET enable noninvasive imaging of cellular metabolism relevant to proliferation and can detect regions of more highly active tumor. Here, the authors integrated presurgical PET and MRS with intraoperative neuronavigation to guide surgical biopsy and tumor sampling of brain gliomas with the aim of improving intraoperative tumor-tissue characterization and imaging biomarker validation. METHODS A novel intraoperative neuronavigation tool was developed as part of a study that aimed to sample high-choline tumor components identified by multivoxel MRS and (18)F-methylcholine PET-CT. Spatially coregistered PET and MRS data were integrated into structural data sets and loaded onto an intraoperative neuronavigation system. High and low choline uptake/metabolite regions were represented as color-coded hollow spheres for targeted stereotactic biopsy and tumor sampling. RESULTS The neurosurgeons found the 3D spherical targets readily identifiable on the interactive neuronavigation system. In one case, areas of high mitotic activity were identified on the basis of high (18)F-methylcholine uptake and elevated choline ratios found with MRS in an otherwise low-grade tumor, which revealed the possible use of this technique for tumor characterization. CONCLUSIONS These PET and MRI data can be combined and represented usefully for the surgeon in neuronavigation systems. This method enables neurosurgeons to sample tumor regions based on physiological and molecular imaging markers. The technique was applied for characterizing choline metabolism using MRS and (18)F PET; however, this approach provides proof of principle for using different radionuclide tracers and

  12. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography coregistration for diagnosis and intraoperative localization in recurrent nelson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hintz, Eric B; Tomlin, Jeffery M; Chengazi, Vaseem; Vates, G Edward

    2013-06-01

    Recurrent pituitary disease presents unique challenges, including in some cases difficulty localizing a tumor radiographically. Here, we present the case of a patient with recurrent Nelson syndrome whose radiographic work-up was complicated by a significant parasellar metallic artifact. Positron emission tomography ultimately localized the lesion, and coregistration with computed tomography allowed for accurate intraoperative navigation. Additionally, we review a range of imaging techniques available in the evaluation of pituitary disease.

  13. Intraoperative Optical Biopsy During Robotic-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Using Confocal Endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Kathleen E.; Bui, Daniel; Liu, Jen-Jane; Rouse, Robert V.; Harris, Theodore; Leppert, John T.; Liao, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intraoperative optical biopsy technologies may aid identification of important anatomic landmarks and improve surgical outcomes of robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP).We sought to evaluate the feasibility of confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) during RARP. Materials and Methods Twenty-one patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer scheduled for RARP were recruited. After intravenous administration of fluorescein, 15 patients underwent in vivo intraoperative CLE of prostatic and periprostatic structures using either a 2.6-mm or 0.85-mm imaging probe. Standard robotic instruments were used to grasp and maneuver the CLE probes for image acquisition. CLE imaging was performed ex vivo on fresh prostate specimens from 20 patients. Confocal video sequences acquired in vivo and ex vivo were reviewed and analyzed, with additional image processing using a mosaicing algorithm. Processed confocal images were compared with standard hematoxylin and eosin analysis of imaged regions. Results CLE was successfully integrated with robotic surgery, including co-registration of confocal video sequences with white light and probe handling with standard robotic instrumentation. Intraoperative CLE imaging of the neurovascular bundle prior to and following nerve-sparing dissection revealed characteristic features including dynamic vascular flow and intact axon fibers. Ex vivo confocal imaging of the prostatic parenchyma demonstrated the normal prostatic glands, stroma, and prostate carcinoma. Conclusions We report the initial feasibility of optical biopsy of prostatic and periprostatic tissue during RARP. Image guidance and tissue interrogation using CLE offers a new intraoperative imaging method that has the potential to improve the functional and oncologic outcomes of prostate cancer surgery. PMID:26626214

  14. Registration-free laparoscope augmentation for intra-operative liver resection planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Marco; Mussack, Thomas; Heining, Sandro M.; Navab, Nassir

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of liver tumor indications were treated by minimally invasive laparoscopic resection. Besides the restricted view, a major issue in laparoscopic liver resection is the enhanced visualization of (hidden) vessels, which supply the tumorous liver segment and thus need to be divided prior to the resection. To navigate the surgeon to these vessels, pre-operative abdominal imaging data can hardly be used due to intraoperative organ deformations mainly caused by appliance of carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum and respiratory motion. While regular respiratory motion can be gated and synchronized intra-operatively, motion caused by pneumoperitoneum is individual for every patient and difficult to estimate. Therefore, we propose to use an optically tracked mobile C-arm providing cone-beam CT imaging capability intraoperatively. The C-arm is able to visualize soft tissue by means of its new flat panel detector and is calibrated offline to relate its current position and orientation to the coordinate system of a reconstructed volume. Also the laparoscope is optically tracked and calibrated offline, so both laparoscope and C-arm are registered in the same tracking coordinate system. Intra-operatively, after patient positioning, port placement, and carbon dioxide insufflation, the liver vessels are contrasted and scanned during patient exhalation. Immediately, a three-dimensional volume is reconstructed. Without any further need for patient registration, the volume can be directly augmented on the live laparoscope video, visualizing the contrasted vessels. This augmentation provides the surgeon with advanced visual aid for the localization of veins, arteries, and bile ducts to be divided or sealed.

  15. Intraoperative bradycardia and postoperative hyperkalemia in patients undergoing endoscopic third ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Anandh, B; Madhusudan Reddy, K R; Mohanty, A; Umamaheswara Rao, G S; Chandramouli, B A

    2002-09-01

    During our initial experience with endoscopic third ventriculostomies, we observed intraoperative bradycardia and postoperative hyperkalemia. The present study was carried out to verify the consistency of these initial observations. Intraoperative heart rate (HR) changes and postoperative serum K + changes were studied prospectively in 20 patients of endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Another 6 patients who underwent endoscopic procedures other than ventriculostomy acted as controls. The anaesthetic technique and intraoperative and postoperative fluid regimen were similar in all patients. Serum K + concentrations were measured intraoperatively and once a day for the next 5 days. The third ventriculostomy group exhibited a significant slowing of the heart rate during the fenestration of the floor of the third ventricle (112 +/- 26 to 101 +/- 28 bpm, p < 0.001) and also at the time of the reversal of the neuromuscular block at the end of surgery (104 +/- 29 to 96 +/- 33 bpm, p < 0.01). The control group did not exhibit similar changes in the heart rate. The postoperative increase in serum K + values in the ventriculostomy group (0.82 +/- 0.55 mmol/L) was higher than that in the control group (0.10 +/- 0.44 mmol/L) (p < 0.01). Endoscopic third ventriculostomy is associated with a significant bradycardia at the time of fenestration and at the time of reversal of the neuromuscular block. The procedure is also associated with a postoperative increase in serum K + values. We propose a mechanism involving distortion of the posterior hypothalamus, which accounts for the bradycardia and postoperative hyperkalemia.

  16. Accuracy of pedicle screw placement using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Korres, Demetrios S; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos; Sakas, Damianos E; Pneumaticos, Spiros

    2009-01-01

    Fifty consecutive patients with posterior thoracolumbar spine fusion were included in a prospective study to determine the accuracy of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) for safe pedicle screw placement using postoperative computed tomography (CT). The patients were allocated into two equal groups. Pedicle screw placement was evaluated intraoperatively by using the image intensifier. In group A, the integrity of the pedicle wall was evaluated intraoperatively with monopolar stimulation of each screw head with a hand-held single-tip stimulator; the compound muscle action potentials were recorded. A constant current threshold of 7 mA was considered indicative of pedicle breach; < 7 mA was considered as direct contact with neural elements, and > 7mA was considered normal. In group B, pedicle screw placement was performed without IONM. Overall, 306 pedicle screws were inserted in both groups. Postoperatively, all patients underwent CT scans of the spine to evaluate pedicle screw placement. Intraoperatively, five screws in respective group A patients had to be repositioned after IONM (threshold of < 7 mA); in these patients, postoperative CT scans showed proper screw placement. Postoperative CT scans showed eight misdirected screws; two screws (1.26%) in group A patients and six screws (4%) in group B patients. Two screws were misdirected through the medial pedicle wall and six screws were misdirected through the lateral pedicle wall. Both medially misdirected screws were observed in group B patients (1.35%); these patients developed neurologic symptoms postoperatively and underwent revision surgery, with redirection of the misdirected screws and subsequent resolution of the neurologic symptoms. Two of the six laterally misdirected screws were observed in group A patients (1.26%); the remaining four laterally misdirected screws were observed in group B patients (2.7%). None of these patients had neurologic sequelae; no revision surgery was required. The

  17. Use of Intraoperative Temporary Invasive Distraction to Reduce a Chronic Talar Neck Fracture-Dislocation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    medial approaches with a medial malleolar osteotomy . The talus was approximately 60° externally rotated in the mortise with the talar head pointing... TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of intraoperative temporary invasive distraction to reduce a chronic talar neck...if needed (this pin was not available in the external fixator set used in this procedure ). The construct was then assembled using four 4.0-mm

  18. Intraoperative Device Closure of Atrial Septal Defects with Minimal Transthoracic Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Peng; Sun, Yong; Yang, Qian; Qiu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Atrial septal defect is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Open-heart repair via midline sternotomy or right thoracotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass has been considered the standard treatment for the closure of atrial septal defects, but transcatheter closure with the Amplatzer septal occluder has recently become a viable option. We have adopted a 3rd alternative: intraoperative device closure with minimal transthoracic invasion. From May 2007 through June 2011, 250 patients with secundum atrial septal defect underwent cardiac surgery at our institution. Open-heart repair with cardiopulmonary bypass was performed in 72 patients, and intraoperative device closure was performed in 178 patients. This minimally invasive approach, which required a full evaluation of the atrial septal defect by transthoracic echocardiography, was performed by deploying the device through the delivery sheath to occ