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Sample records for intravascular ultrasound ivus

  1. Multi-Frequency Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Yu, Mingyue; Chen, Zeyu; Fei, Chunlong; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is frequently associated with the sudden rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque within the coronary artery. Several unique physiological features, including a thin fibrous cap accompanied by a necrotic lipid core, are the targeted indicators for identifying the vulnerable plaques. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), a catheter-based imaging technology, has been routinely performed in clinics for more than 20 years to describe the morphology of the coronary artery and guide percutaneous coronary interventions. However, conventional IVUS cannot facilitate the risk assessment of ACS because of its intrinsic limitations, such as insufficient resolution. Renovation of the IVUS technology is essentially needed to overcome the limitations and enhance the coronary artery characterization. In this paper, a multi-frequency intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging system was developed by incorporating a higher frequency IVUS transducer (80 to 150 MHz) with the conventional IVUS (30–50 MHz) system. The newly developed system maintains the advantage of deeply penetrating imaging with the conventional IVUS, while offering an improved higher resolution image with IVUS at a higher frequency. The prototyped multi-frequency catheter has a clinically compatible size of 0.95 mm and a favorable capability of automated image co-registration. In vitro human coronary artery imaging has demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of the multi-frequency IVUS imaging system to deliver a more comprehensive visualization of the coronary artery. This ultrasonic-only intravascular imaging technique, based on a moderate refinement of the conventional IVUS system, is not only cost-effective from the perspective of manufacturing and clinical practice, but also holds the promise of future translation into clinical benefits. PMID:25585394

  2. Real-time simulator for intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkai, Ciamak; Becherer, Nico; Hesser, Jürgen; Männer, Reinhard

    2007-03-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) plays a significant role in diagnostics of atherosclerotic diseases. Simulation of imaging techniques promises a better understanding of the physical background and segmentation strategies. Most simulation approaches describe ultrasonic backscattering using wave-equation based simplifications. More complicated real-time simulation techniques are not available so far. In this paper, we present an empirical model derived from wave-equations given by the Rayleigh integration method. According to boundary conditions and weak scatterers, a hybrid approach including the Beer-Lambert law to model attenuation is introduced. Scatterers are described by a 4D vessel-system model based on elastic tubes. Sophisticated discretization and numerical simplifications in addition to a highly optimized implementation of the model yields a real-time and realistic IVUS simulation with 20 frames/s on a 3.2 GHz Pentium 4 PC.

  3. A state-of-the-art review on segmentation algorithms in intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images.

    PubMed

    Katouzian, Amin; Angelini, Elsa D; Carlier, Stéphane G; Suri, Jasjit S; Navab, Nassir; Laine, Andrew F

    2012-09-01

    Over the past two decades, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) image segmentation has remained a challenge for researchers while the use of this imaging modality is rapidly growing in catheterization procedures and in research studies. IVUS provides cross-sectional grayscale images of the arterial wall and the extent of atherosclerotic plaques with high spatial resolution in real time. In this paper, we review recently developed image processing methods for the detection of media-adventitia and luminal borders in IVUS images acquired with different transducers operating at frequencies ranging from 20 to 45 MHz. We discuss methodological challenges, lack of diversity in reported datasets, and weaknesses of quantification metrics that make IVUS segmentation still an open problem despite all efforts. In conclusion, we call for a common reference database, validation metrics, and ground-truth definition with which new and existing algorithms could be benchmarked.

  4. Micromachined PIN-PMN-PT crystal composite transducer for high-frequency intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Ma, Teng; Tian, Jian; Han, Pengdi; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we report the use of micromachined PbIn1/2Nb1/2O3-PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3-PbTiO 3 (PIN-PMNPT) single crystal 1-3 composite material for intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging application. The effective electromechanical coupling coefficient kt(eff) of the composite was measured to be 0.75 to 0.78. Acoustic impedance was estimated to be 20 MRayl. Based on the composite, needle-type and flexible-type IVUS transducers were fabricated. The composite transducer achieved an 86% bandwidth at the center frequency of 41 MHz, which resulted in a 43 μm axial resolution. Ex vivo IVUS imaging was conducted to demonstrate the improvement of axial resolution. The composite transducer was capable of identifying the three layers of a cadaver coronary artery specimen with high resolution. The PIN-PMN-PT-based composite has superior piezoelectric properties comparable to PMN-PT-based composite and its thermal stability is higher than PMN-PT. PIN-PMN-PT crystal can be an alternative approach for fabricating high-frequency composite, instead of using PMN-PT.

  5. Micromachined PIN-PMN-PT Crystal Composite Transducer for High-Frequency Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Ma, Teng; Tian, Jian; Han, Pengdi; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the use of micromachined PbIn1/2Nb1/2O3–PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3–PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) single crystal 1–3 composite material for intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging application. The effective electromechanical coupling coefficient kt(eff) of the composite was measured to be 0.75 to 0.78. Acoustic impedance was estimated to be 20 MRayl. Based on the composite, needle-type and flexible-type IVUS transducers were fabricated. The composite transducer achieved an 86% bandwidth at the center frequency of 41 MHz, which resulted in a 43 μm axial resolution. Ex vivo IVUS imaging was conducted to demonstrate the improvement of axial resolution. The composite transducer was capable of identifying the three layers of a cadaver coronary artery specimen with high resolution. The PIN-PMN-PT-based composite has superior piezoelectric properties comparable to PMN-PT-based composite and its thermal stability is higher than PMN-PT. PIN-PMN-PT crystal can be an alternative approach for fabricating high-frequency composite, instead of using PMN-PT. PMID:24960706

  6. Validating a bimodal intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) catheter for atherosclerotic plaque detection in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Abran, Maxime; Stähli, Barbara E.; Merlet, Nolwenn; Mihalache-Avram, Teodora; Mecteau, Mélanie; Rhéaume, Eric; Busseuil, David; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is characterized by atherosclerotic plaque formation. Despite impressive advances in intravascular imaging modalities, in vivo molecular plaque characterization remains challenging, and different multimodality imaging systems have been proposed. We validated an engineered bimodal intravascular ultrasound imaging (IVUS) / near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging catheter in vivo using a balloon injury atherosclerosis rabbit model. Rabbit aortas and right iliac arteries were scanned in vivo after indocyanine green (ICG) injection, and compared to corresponding ex vivo fluorescence and white light images. Areas of ICG accumulation were colocalized with macroscopic atherosclerotic plaque formation. In vivo imaging was performed with the bimodal catheter integrating ICG-induced fluorescence signals into cross-sectional IVUS imaging. In vivo ICG accumulation corresponded to ex vivo fluorescence signal intensity and IVUS identified plaques. PMID:26504648

  7. Impact of gender and age on in vivo virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound imaging plaque characterization (from the global Virtual Histology Intravascular Ultrasound [VH-IVUS] registry).

    PubMed

    Qian, Jie; Maehara, Akiko; Mintz, Gary S; Margolis, M Pauliina; Lerman, Amir; Rogers, Jason; Banai, Shuel; Kazziha, Samer; Castellanos, Celia; Dani, Lokesh; Fahy, Martin; Stone, Gregg W; Leon, Martin B

    2009-05-01

    Virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) analyses were performed in the first 990 patients enrolled in the 3,000+ patient global VH-IVUS Registry to assess the impact of gender and age on in vivo VH-IVUS plaque characterization. The 990 patients were divided into 3 age group terciles (<58, 58 to 68, and >68 years) and again divided according to gender. In conclusion, (1) both women and men had an increase in plaque with increasing age; (2) at any age, men had more plaque than women; (3) percentages of dense calcium and necrotic core increased with increasing patient age in both men and women; and (4) gender differences were lowest in the oldest tercile (>68 years).

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of integrated intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography (IVUS-OCT) system for coronary plaque characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Correa, Adrian; Minami, Hataka; Jing, Joseph; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav M.; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT), two commonly used intracoronary imaging modalities, play important roles in plaque evaluation. The combined use of IVUS (to visualize the entire plaque volume) and OCT (to quantify the thickness of the plaque cap, if any) is hypothesized to increase plaque diagnostic accuracy. Our group has developed a fully-integrated dual-modality IVUS-OCT imaging system and 3.6F catheter for simultaneous IVUS-OCT imaging with a high resolution and deep penetration depth. However, the diagnostic accuracy of an integrated IVUS-OCT system has not been investigated. In this study, we imaged 175 coronary artery sites (241 regions of interest) from 20 cadavers using our previous reported integrated IVUS-OCT system. IVUS-OCT images were read by two skilled interventional cardiologists. Each region of interest was classified as either calcification, lipid pool or fibrosis. Comparing the diagnosis by cardiologists using IVUSOCT images with the diagnosis by the pathologist, we calculated the sensitivity and specificity for characterization of calcification, lipid pool or fibrosis with this integrated system. In vitro imaging of cadaver coronary specimens demonstrated the complementary nature of these two modalities for plaques classification. A higher accuracy was shown than using a single modality alone.

  9. Evaluating the intensity of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) in intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging: Preliminary in vitro results.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cho-Chiang; Lai, Ting-Yu; Huang, Chih-Chung

    2016-08-01

    The ability to measure the elastic properties of plaques and vessels is significant in clinical diagnosis, particularly for detecting a vulnerable plaque. A novel concept of combining intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has recently been proposed. This method has potential in elastography for distinguishing between the stiffness of plaques and arterial vessel walls. However, the intensity of the acoustic radiation force requires calibration as a standard for the further development of an ARFI-IVUS imaging device that could be used in clinical applications. In this study, a dual-frequency transducer with 11MHz and 48MHz was used to measure the association between the biological tissue displacement and the applied acoustic radiation force. The output intensity of the acoustic radiation force generated by the pushing element ranged from 1.8 to 57.9mW/cm(2), as measured using a calibrated hydrophone. The results reveal that all of the acoustic intensities produced by the transducer in the experiments were within the limits specified by FDA regulations and could still displace the biological tissues. Furthermore, blood clots with different hematocrits, which have elastic properties similar to the lipid pool of plaques, with stiffness ranging from 0.5 to 1.9kPa could be displaced from 1 to 4μm, whereas the porcine arteries with stiffness ranging from 120 to 291kPa were displaced from 0.4 to 1.3μm when an acoustic intensity of 57.9mW/cm(2) was used. The in vitro ARFI images of the artery with a blood clot and artificial arteriosclerosis showed a clear distinction of the stiffness distributions of the vessel wall. All the results reveal that ARFI-IVUS imaging has the potential to distinguish the elastic properties of plaques and vessels. Moreover, the acoustic intensity used in ARFI imaging has been experimentally quantified. Although the size of this two-element transducer is unsuitable for IVUS imaging, the

  10. Intravascular ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, A F; de Korte, C L; Céspedes, E I

    1998-10-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound Blastography. The response of a tissue to mechanical excitation is a function of its mechanical properties. Excitation can be dynamic or quasistatic in nature. The response (e.g. displacement, velocity, compression) can be measured via ultrasound. This is the main principle underlying ultrasound elasticity imaging, sonoelasticity imaging, or ultrasound elastography. It is of great interest to know the local hardness of vessel wall and plaques. Intravascular elastography yields information unavailable or inconclusive if obtained from IVUS alone and thus contributes to more correct diagnosis. Potentially it can be used for therapy guidance. During the last decade several working groups used elastography in intravascular applications with varying success. In this paper we discuss the various approaches by different working groups. Focus will be on the approach of the Rotterdam group. Using a 30 MHz IVUS catheter, RF data are acquired from vessels in vitro at different intraluminal pressures. Local tissue displacement estimation by cross-correlation is followed by computation of the local strain. The resulting image supplies local information on the elastic properties of the vessel and plaque with high spatial resolution. Feasibility and usefulness are shown by means of phantom measurements. Furthermore, initial in vitro results of femoral arteries and correlation with histology are discussed. Phantom data show that the elastograms reveal information not presented by the echogram. In vitro artery data prove that in principle elastography is capable of identifying plaque composition where echography fails.

  11. Heterogeneous Intravascular Ultrasound Findings of Stent Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Morofuji, Toru; Inaba, Shinji; Aisu, Hiroe; Takahashi, Kayo; Saito, Makoto; Higashi, Haruhiko; Yoshii, Toyofumi; Sumimoto, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The underlying mechanisms of stent thrombosis are not completely understood. Methods We experienced 12 definite stent thrombosis cases (1 early, 1 late, and 10 very late) at our hospital from July 2011 to April 2016 and evaluated the possible causes of stent thrombosis by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Results Five different potential morphological causes of stent thrombosis (neoatherosclerosis, stent malapposition, stent fracture, edge dissection, and stent underexpansion) were detected by IVUS in 10 cases (83.3%); in 1 of the remaining 2 cases, the discontinuation of antithrombotic drugs resulted in early stent thrombosis without abnormal IVUS findings. Of the 12 stent thrombosis cases, 4 occurred at a bare-metal stent (average time from stent implantation, 106 months); in all 12, significant neointimal hyperplasia was observed on IVUS, and 2 had plaque ruptures at an in-stent or proximal reference. Malapposed stent struts were observed in three very-late stent thromboses, and all of these underwent sirolimus-eluting stent implantation. Stent thrombosis due to mechanical (stent fracture) or procedure-related complications (edge dissection and stent underexpansion) was observed in three cases. Conclusion In patients with stent thrombosis, heterogeneous findings were observed in IVUS. This IVUS case series illustrates the possible mechanisms of stent thrombosis. PMID:28154268

  12. Ability of combined Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-Intravascular Ultrasound (NIRS-IVUS) imaging to detect lipid core plaques and estimate cap thickness in human autopsy coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grainger, S. J.; Su, J. L.; Greiner, C. A.; Saybolt, M. D.; Wilensky, R. L.; Raichlen, J. S.; Madden, S. P.; Muller, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to determine plaque cap thickness during catheterization is thought to be of clinical importance for plaque vulnerability assessment. While methods to compositionally assess cap integrity are in development, a method utilizing currently available tools to measure cap thickness is highly desirable. NIRS-IVUS is a commercially available dual imaging method in current clinical use that may provide cap thickness information to the skilled reader; however, this is as yet unproven. Ten autopsy hearts (n=15 arterial segments) were scanned with the multimodality NIRS-IVUS catheter (TVC Imaging System, Infraredx, Inc.) to identify lipid core plaques (LCPs). Skilled readers made predictions of cap thickness over regions of chemogram LCP, using NIRS-IVUS. Artery segments were perfusion fixed and cut into 2 mm serial blocks. Thin sections stained with Movat's pentachrome were analyzed for cap thickness at LCP regions. Block level predictions were compared to histology, as classified by a blinded pathologist. Within 15 arterial segments, 117 chemogram blocks were found by NIRS to contain LCP. Utilizing NIRSIVUS, chemogram blocks were divided into 4 categories: thin capped fibroatheromas (TCFA), thick capped fibroatheromas (ThCFA), pathological intimal thickening (PIT)/lipid pool (no defined cap), and calcified/unable to determine cap thickness. Sensitivities/specificities for thin cap fibroatheromas, thick cap fibroatheromas, and PIT/lipid pools were 0.54/0.99, 0.68/0.88, and 0.80/0.97, respectively. The overall accuracy rate was 70.1% (including 22 blocks unable to predict, p = 0.075). In the absence of calcium, NIRS-IVUS imaging provided predictions of cap thickness over LCP with moderate accuracy. The ability of this multimodality imaging method to identify vulnerable coronary plaques requires further assessment in both larger autopsy studies, and clinical studies in patients undergoing NIRS-IVUS imaging.

  13. Intravascular ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaye, D.M.; White, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    This book will give vascular surgeons, cardiologists, radiologists, and technologists a complete working knowledge of intravascular ultrasound imaging and the crucial role of this new technology in endovascular diagnosis and therapy. The book reviews the essential principles of vascular pathology and ultrasound imaging and then provides state-of-the-art information on intraluminal ultrasound imaging devices and techniques, including practical guidelines for using catheters, optimizing image quality, and avoiding artifacts. Image interpretation and computerized image reconstruction are also discussed in detail. The first section explains the diagnostic, therapeutic, and experimental applications of intravascular ultrasound, particularly as a adjunct to angioplasty and other current interventional procedures.

  14. Development of catheters for combined intravascular ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Wang, Bo; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2009-02-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis is a complex disease accompanied by the development of plaques in the arterial wall. Since the vulnerability of the plaques depends on their composition, the appropriate treatment of the arteriosclerosis requires a reliable characterization of the plaques' geometry and content. The intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging is capable of providing structural details of the plaques as well as some functional information. In turn, more functional information about the same plaques can be obtained from intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) images since the optical properties of the plaque's components differ from that of their environment. The combined IVUS/IVPA imaging is capable of simultaneously detecting and differentiating the plaques, thus determining their vulnerability. The potential of combined IVUS/IVPA imaging has already been demonstrated in phantoms and ex-vivo experiments. However, for in-vivo or clinical imaging, an integrated IVUS/IVPA catheter is required. In this paper, we introduce two prototypes of integrated IVUS/IVPA catheters for in-vivo imaging based on a commercially available single-element IVUS imaging catheter. The light delivery systems are developed using multimode optical fibers with custom-designed distal tips. Both prototypes were tested and compared using an arterial mimicking phantom. The advantages and limitations of both designs are discussed. Overall, the results of our studies suggest that both designs of integrated IVUS/IVPA catheter have a potential for in-vivo IVPA/IVUS imaging of atherosclerotic plaques.

  15. Design, construction, and validation of a multimodal intravascular diagnostic catheter combining IVUS and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy detection channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph; Marcu, Laura

    2011-03-01

    We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter that enables bi-modal interrogation of arterial pathologies based on fast-frame time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). The catheter is based on a parallel design that allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In current configuration, the two channels consist of a) a standard 8 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (15 MHz) and b) a side-viewing UV-grade silica/silica fiber optic (400 μm core). The catheter is terminated by a small (0.82 mm internal diameter) polyimide tube to keep the fiber stable within the sheath. To clear the field of view from blood, a saline solution can be flushed in a sheath channel, concentric with the fiber optic, through the tube and in a radial opening aligned with the fiber's optical beam. The flushing function was optimized with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model pursued in a parallel study. The ability of the catheter to operate in intraluminal setting in blood flow, the effect of probe-to-tissue distance on optical signal and ability to generate co-registered TRFS and IVUS data were demonstrated in blood vessel phantoms. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the described catheter for parallel interrogation of vessel walls based on TRFS and IVUS and to generate robust TRFS data. These results facilitate further development of a bi-modal TRFS-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques.

  16. Recanalized chronic coronary thrombus: unraveling a hazy coronary lesion by intravascular ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chotai, Shayna; Khokhar, Azhar A.; Kelly, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Hazy lesions in coronary angiography can often be a puzzle for the interventional cardiologist. Recanalized chronic coronary thrombus, although rare, is one of the potential diagnoses. Intracoronary imaging with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are tools that can guide to the correct diagnosis. We present the images of a case where IVUS was used to unravel such a lesion. PMID:27054109

  17. Development of a Mechanical Scanning-type Intravascular Ultrasound System Using a Miniature Ultrasound Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Masayuki; Xie, Shangping; Tagawa, Norio; Moriya, Tadashi; Furukawa, Yuji

    2007-07-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) plays an important role for the detection of arteriosclerosis, which causes the ischemic heart disease. In mechanical scanning-type IVUS, it is necessary to rotate a transducer or a reflecting mirror. A method that involves rotating the transducer using a torque wire causes image distortion (NURD: non uniform rotation distortion). For a method that involves placing an electromagnetic motor on the tip of an IVUS probe is difficult to miniaturize the probe. Our objectives are to miniaturize the probe (1 mm in diameter, 5 mm in length) and to remove NURD. Therefore, we conducted a study to assess the feasibility of attaining these objectives by constructing a prototype IVUS system, in which an ultrasound motor using a stator in the form of a helical coil (abbreviated as CS-USM: coiled stator-ultrasonic motor) is incorporated, and to clarify problems that need to be solved in constructing the probe.

  18. Fast treatment planning with IVUS imaging in intravascular brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novario, Raffaele; Bianchi, Carla; Lorusso, Rita; Sampietro, Chiara; Tanzi, Fabio; Conte, Leopoldo; Vescovi, Mario; Caccia, Massimo; Alemi, Mario; Cappellini, Chiara

    2004-05-01

    The planned target volume in intracoronary brachytherapy is the vessel wall. The success of the treatment is based on the need of delivering doses possibly not lower than 8 and not higher than 30 Gy. An automatic procedure in order to acquire intravascular ultrasound images of the whole volume to be irradiated is pointed out; a motor driven pullback device, with velocity of the catheter of 0.5 and 1 mm/s allows to acquire the entire target volume of the vessel with a number of slices normally ranging from 400 to 1600. A semiautomatic segmentation and classification of the different structures in each slice of the vessel is proposed. The segmentation and the classification of the structures allows the calculation of their volume; this is very useful in particular for plaque volume assessment in the follow-up of the patients. A 3D analyser tool was developed in order to visualize the walls and the lumen of the vessel. The knowledge, for each axial slice, of the position of the source (in the centre of the catheter) and the position of the target (vessel walls) allows the calculation of a set of source-target distances. Given a time of irradiation, and a type of source a dose volume histogram (DVH) describing the distribution of the doses in the whole target can be obtained. The whole procedure takes few minutes and then is compatible with a safe treatment of the patient, giving an important indication about the quality of the radiation treatment selected.

  19. Comparison of Angiography and Intravascular Ultrasound Before and After Balloon Angioplasty of the Femoropopliteal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Lankeren, Winnifred van; Gussenhoven, Elma J.; Pieterman, Herman; Sambeek, Marc R.H.M. van; Lugt, Aad van der

    1998-09-15

    Purpose: To compare angiographic and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) data before and after balloon angioplasty (PTA) of the femoropopliteal artery. Methods: Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed on corresponding angiographic and IVUS levels obtained from 135 patients. Results: IVUS detected more lesions, calcified lesions, and vascular damage than angiography. Sensitivity of angiography was good for the presence of a lesion (84%), moderate for eccentric lesions (53%) and for vascular damage (52%), and poor for calcified lesions (30%). The increase in angiographic diameter stenosis was associated with a decrease in lumen area and increase in percentage area stenosis on IVUS. Conclusions: Angiography is less sensitive than IVUS for detecting lesion eccentricity, calcified lesions, and vascular damage. Presence of a lesion and amount of plaque were underestimated angiographically. Only before PTA was good agreement found between angiographic diameter stenosis and lumen size on IVUS.

  20. Design, construction, and validation of a rotary multifunctional intravascular diagnostic catheter combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter for bimodal interrogation of arterial pathologies. This is based on a point-spectroscopy scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy technique enabling reconstruction of fluorescence lifetime images (FLIm) and providing information on arterial intima composition and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) providing information on arterial wall morphology. The catheter design allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In the current configuration, the two channels consist of (a) a standard 3 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (40 MHz) and (b) a side-viewing fiber optic (400 μm core). Experiments conducted in tissue phantoms showed the ability of the catheter to operate in an intraluminal setting and to generate coregistered FLIm and IVUS in one pull-back scan. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the catheter for simultaneous bimodal interrogation of arterial lumen and for generation of robust fluorescence lifetime data under IVUS guidance. These results facilitate further development of a FLIm-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques. PMID:23224011

  1. Design, construction, and validation of a rotary multifunctional intravascular diagnostic catheter combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph; Marcu, Laura

    2012-10-01

    We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter for bimodal interrogation of arterial pathologies. This is based on a point-spectroscopy scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy technique enabling reconstruction of fluorescence lifetime images (FLIm) and providing information on arterial intima composition and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) providing information on arterial wall morphology. The catheter design allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In the current configuration, the two channels consist of (a) a standard 3 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (40 MHz) and (b) a side-viewing fiber optic (400 μm core). Experiments conducted in tissue phantoms showed the ability of the catheter to operate in an intraluminal setting and to generate coregistered FLIm and IVUS in one pull-back scan. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the catheter for simultaneous bimodal interrogation of arterial lumen and for generation of robust fluorescence lifetime data under IVUS guidance. These results facilitate further development of a FLIm-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques.

  2. Design, construction, and validation of a rotary multifunctional intravascular diagnostic catheter combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego R; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph; Marcu, Laura

    2012-10-01

    We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter for bimodal interrogation of arterial pathologies. This is based on a point-spectroscopy scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy technique enabling reconstruction of fluorescence lifetime images (FLIm) and providing information on arterial intima composition and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) providing information on arterial wall morphology. The catheter design allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In the current configuration, the two channels consist of (a) a standard 3 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (40 MHz) and (b) a side-viewing fiber optic (400 μm core). Experiments conducted in tissue phantoms showed the ability of the catheter to operate in an intraluminal setting and to generate coregistered FLIm and IVUS in one pull-back scan. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the catheter for simultaneous bimodal interrogation of arterial lumen and for generation of robust fluorescence lifetime data under IVUS guidance. These results facilitate further development of a FLIm-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques.

  3. A physics-based intravascular ultrasound image reconstruction method for lumen segmentation.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal-Ruiz, Gerardo; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2016-08-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) refers to the medical imaging technique consisting of a miniaturized ultrasound transducer located at the tip of a catheter that can be introduced in the blood vessels providing high-resolution, cross-sectional images of their interior. Current methods for the generation of an IVUS image reconstruction from radio frequency (RF) data do not account for the physics involved in the interaction between the IVUS ultrasound signal and the tissues of the vessel. In this paper, we present a novel method to generate an IVUS image reconstruction based on the use of a scattering model that considers the tissues of the vessel as a distribution of three-dimensional point scatterers. We evaluated the impact of employing the proposed IVUS image reconstruction method in the segmentation of the lumen/wall interface on 40MHz IVUS data using an existing automatic lumen segmentation method. We compared the results with those obtained using the B-mode reconstruction on 600 randomly selected frames from twelve pullback sequences acquired from rabbit aortas and different arteries of swine. Our results indicate the feasibility of employing the proposed IVUS image reconstruction for the segmentation of the lumen.

  4. The potential value of intravascular ultrasound imaging in diagnosis of aortic intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Schiele, Francois; Meneveau, Nicolas; Seronde, Marie-France; Legalery, Pierre; Bonneville, Jean-Francois; Chocron, Sidney; Bassand, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential value of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging in the diagnosis of aortic intramural hematoma (AIH). Methods From September 2002 to May 2005, a consecutive series of 15 patients with suspected aortic dissection (AD) underwent both IVUS imaging and spiral computed tomography (CT). Six patients diagnosed as acute type B AIH by CT or IVUS composed the present study group. Results The study group consisted of five males and one female with mean age of 66 years old. All of them had chest or back pain. In one patient, CT omitted a localized AIH and an associated penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU), which were detected by IVUS. In another patient, CT mistaken a partly thrombosed false lumen as an AIH, whereas IVUS detected a subtle intimal tear and slow moving blood in the false lumen. In the four rest patients, both CT and IVUS made the diagnosis of AIH, however, IVUS detected three PAUs in three of them, only one of them was also detected by CT, and two of them escaped initial CT and were confirmed by follow up CT or magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions IVUS imaging is a safe examination and has high accuracy in the diagnosis of AIH, particularly for diagnosing localized AIH, distinguishing AIH with thrombosed classic AD and detecting accompanied small PAUs. PMID:22783309

  5. Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging system for intravascular diagnostics with ultrasound guidance: in vivo validation in swine arteries.

    PubMed

    Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong M; Yankelevich, Diego R; Liu, Jing; Ferrier, William T; Southard, Jeffrey; Marcu, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetime technique has demonstrated potential for analysis of atherosclerotic lesions and for complementing existing intravascular imaging modalities such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in identifying lesions at high risk of rupture. This study presents a multimodal catheter system integrating a 40 MHz commercial IVUS and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) using fast helical motion scanning (400 rpm, 0.75 mm/s), able to acquire in vivo in pulsatile blood flow the autofluorescence emission of arterial vessels with high precision (5.08 ± 0.26 ns mean average lifetime over 13 scans). Co-registered FLIm and IVUS data allowed 3D visualization of both biochemical and morphological vessel properties. Current study supports the development of clinically compatible intravascular diagnostic system integrating FLIm and demonstrates, to our knowledge, the first in vivo intravascular application of a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique.

  6. Intravascular Ultrasound and Histology in In Vitro Assessment of Iliac Artery Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lankeren, Winnifred van; Gussenhoven, Elma J.; Qureshi, Akeel; Lugt, Aad van der

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was used to assess in vitro the morphologic and quantitative effects of balloon angioplasty (PTA) of the iliac artery. Methods: Forty human iliac arteries ({>=} 30% area stenosis) were studied with IVUS in vitro before and after PTA and the findings were validated with histology. Results: The sensitivity of IVUS for dissection was 74% and for media rupture 59%. The incidence of vascular damage was higher when the whole segment was analyzed rather than the target site alone. Dissections occurred at the thinnest region of the plaque, unrelated to plaque calcification. Following PTA, quantitative changes at the target site were greater compared with the overall data derived from all cross-sections. The increase in lumen area was caused solely by an increase in vessel area. Conclusions: IVUS is sensitive in detecting dissections, which occurred irrespective of calcification at the thinnest region of the plaque. The increase in lumen area after PTA was caused by stretching of the vessel.

  7. Functional assessment of coronary artery disease by intravascular ultrasound and computational fluid dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Sebastián; Xie, Xinzhou; Peinado-Peinado, Rafael; Sánchez-Recalde, Angel; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Galeote-Garcia, Guillermo; Moreno, Raúl

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials have shown that functional assessment of coronary stenosis by fractional flow reserve (FFR) improves clinical outcomes. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) complements conventional angiography, and is a powerful tool to assess atherosclerotic plaques and to guide percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation represents a novel method for the functional assessment of coronary flow. A CFD simulation can be calculated from the data normally acquired by IVUS images. A case of coronary heart disease studied with FFR and IVUS, before and after PCI, is presented. A three-dimensional model was constructed based on IVUS images, to which CFD was applied. A discussion of the literature concerning the clinical utility of CFD simulation is provided.

  8. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging and Intravascular Ultrasound: Co-Registration Study Using Ex Vivo Human Coronaries

    PubMed Central

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Qi, Jinyi

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has demonstrated potential for robust assessment of atherosclerotic plaques biochemical composition and for complementing conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which provides information on plaque morphology. The success of such a bi-modal imaging modality depends on accurate segmentation of the IVUS images and proper angular registration between these two modalities. This paper reports a novel IVUS segmentation methodology addressing this issue. The image preprocessing consisted of denoising, using the Wiener filter, followed by image smoothing, implemented through the application of the alternating sequential filter on the edge separability metric images. Extraction of the lumen/intima and media/adventitia boundaries was achieved by tracing the gray-scale peaks over the A-lines of the IVUS preprocessed images. Cubic spline interpolation, in both cross-sectional and longitudinal directions, ensured boundary smoothness and continuity. The detection of the guide-wire artifact in both modalities is used for angular registration. Intraluminal studies were conducted in 13 ex vivo segments of human coronaries. The IVUS segmentation accuracy was assessed against independent manual tracings, providing 91.82% sensitivity and 97.55% specificity. The proposed methodology makes the bi-modal FLIM and IVUS approach feasible for comprehensive intravascular diagnosis by providing co-registered biochemical and morphological information of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:25163056

  9. Integrated IVUS-OCT Imaging for Atherosclerotic Plaque Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Li, Jiawen; Jing, Joe; Ma, Teng; Liang, Shanshan; Zhang, Jun; Mohar, Dilbahar; Raney, Aidan; Mahon, Sari; Brenner, Matthew; Patel, Pranav; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    For the diagnosis of atherosclerosis, biomedical imaging techniques such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have been developed. The combined use of IVUS and OCT is hypothesized to remarkably increase diagnostic accuracy of vulnerable plaques. We have developed an integrated IVUS-OCT imaging apparatus, which includes the integrated catheter, motor drive unit, and imaging system. The dual-function imaging catheter has the same diameter of current clinical standard. The imaging system is capable for simultaneous IVUS and OCT imaging in real time. Ex vivo and in vivo experiments on rabbits with atherosclerosis were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of the integrated intravascular imaging modality. PMID:24771992

  10. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence catheter with ultrasound guidance and blood attenuation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Adam J.; Hossack, John A.

    2013-05-01

    Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging offers a new approach for characterizing atherosclerotic plaque, but random catheter positioning within the vessel lumen results in variable light attenuation and can yield inaccurate measurements. We hypothesized that NIRF measurements could be corrected for variable light attenuation through blood by tracking the location of the NIRF catheter with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). In this study, a combined NIRF-IVUS catheter was designed to acquire coregistered NIRF and IVUS data, an automated image processing algorithm was developed to measure catheter-to-vessel wall distances, and depth-dependent attenuation of the fluorescent signal was corrected by an analytical light propagation model. Performance of the catheter sensing distance correction method was evaluated in coronary artery phantoms and ex vivo arteries. The correction method produced NIRF estimates of fluorophore concentrations, in coronary artery phantoms, with an average root mean square error of 17.5%. In addition, the correction method resulted in a statistically significant improvement in correlation between spatially resolved NIRF measurements and known fluorophore spatial distributions in ex vivo arteries (from r=0.24 to 0.69, p<0.01, n=6). This work demonstrates that catheter-to-vessel wall distances, measured from IVUS images, can be employed to compensate for inaccuracies caused by variable intravascular NIRF sensing distances.

  11. A novel dual-frequency imaging method for intravascular ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Chen, Yan; Wong, Chi-Man; Liu, Baoqiang; Dai, Jiyan; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which is able to delineate internal structures of vessel wall with fine spatial resolution, has greatly enriched the knowledge of coronary atherosclerosis. A novel dual-frequency imaging method is proposed in this paper for intravascular imaging applications. A probe combined two ultrasonic transducer elements with different center frequencies (36 MHz and 78 MHz) is designed and fabricated with PMN-PT single crystal material. It has the ability to balance both imaging depth and resolution, which are important imaging parameters for clinical test. A dual-channel imaging platform is also proposed for real-time imaging, and this platform has been proven to support programmable processing algorithms, flexible imaging control, and raw RF data acquisition for IVUS applications. Testing results show that the -6 dB axial and lateral imaging resolutions of low-frequency ultrasound are 78 and 132 μm, respectively. In terms of high-frequency ultrasound, axial and lateral resolutions are determined to be as high as 34 and 106 μm. In vitro intravascular imaging on healthy swine aorta is conducted to demonstrate the performance of the dual-frequency imaging method for IVUS applications.

  12. Three-dimensional segmentation of luminal and adventitial borders in serial intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shekhar, R.; Cothren, R. M.; Vince, D. G.; Chandra, S.; Thomas, J. D.; Cornhill, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides exact anatomy of arteries, allowing accurate quantitative analysis. Automated segmentation of IVUS images is a prerequisite for routine quantitative analyses. We present a new three-dimensional (3D) segmentation technique, called active surface segmentation, which detects luminal and adventitial borders in IVUS pullback examinations of coronary arteries. The technique was validated against expert tracings by computing correlation coefficients (range 0.83-0.97) and William's index values (range 0.37-0.66). The technique was statistically accurate, robust to image artifacts, and capable of segmenting a large number of images rapidly. Active surface segmentation enabled geometrically accurate 3D reconstruction and visualization of coronary arteries and volumetric measurements.

  13. Accurate visualization and quantification of coronary vasculature by 3D/4D fusion from biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Andreas; Mitchell, Steven C.; Olszewski, Mark E.; Long, Ryan M.; Sonka, Milan

    2001-01-01

    In the rapidly evolving field of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for tissue characterization and visualization, the assessment of vessel morphology still lacks a geometrically correct 3D reconstruction. The IVUS frames are usually stacked up to form a straight vessel, neglecting curvature and the axial twisting of the catheter during the pullback. This paper presents a comprehensive system for geometrically correct reconstruction of IVUS images by fusion with biplane angiography, thus combining the advantages of both modalities. Vessel cross-section and tissue characteristics are obtained form IVUS, while the 3D locations are derived by geometrical reconstruction from the angiographic projections. ECG-based timing ensures a proper match of the image data with the respective heart phase. The fusion is performed for each heart phase individually, thus yielding the 4-D data as a set of 3-D reconstructions.

  14. In vitro atherosclerotic plaque and calcium quantitation by intravascular ultrasound and electron-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gutfinger, D E; Leung, C Y; Hiro, T; Maheswaran, B; Nakamura, S; Detrano, R; Kang, X; Tang, W; Tobis, J M

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the accuracy of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) in quantitating human atherosclerotic plaque and calcium. In experiment 1, 12 human atherosclerotic arterial segments were obtained at autopsy and imaged by using IVUS and EBCT. The plaque from each arterial segment was dissected and a volume measurement of the dissected plaque was obtained by water displacement. The plaque from each arterial segment was ashed at 700 degrees F, and the weight of the remaining ashes was used as an estimate of the calcium mass. In experiment II, 11 calcified arterial segments were obtained at autopsy and imaged by using IVUS at one site along the artery. A corresponding histologic cross section stained with Masson's trichrome was prepared. In experiment I, the mean plaque volume measured by water displacement was 165.3 +/- 118.4 microliters. The mean plaque volume calculated by IVUS was 166.1 +/- 114.4 microliters and correlated closely with that by water displacement (r = 0.98, p < 0.0001). The mean calcium mass measured by ashing was 19.4 +/- 15.8 mg. The mean calculated calcium mass by EBCT was 19.9 mg and correlated closely with that by ashing (r=0.98, p<0.001). The mean calculated calcium volume by IVUS was 18.6 +/- 11.2 microliters and correlated linearly with the calcium mass by ashing (r = 0.87, p < 0.0003). In experiment II, the mean cross-sectional area of the calcified matrix was 1.71 +/- 0.66 mm2 by histologic examination compared with 1.44 +/- 0.66 mm2 by IVUS. There was a good correlation between the calcified cross-sectional area by histologic examination and IVUS (r = 0.76, p < 0.007); however, IVUS may underestimate the amount of calcium present depending on the intralesional calcium morphologic characteristics. In conclusion, IVUS accurately quantitates atherosclerotic plaque volume as well as the cross-sectional area and volume of intralesional calcium, especially if the

  15. Utility of intravascular ultrasound in intracranial and extracranial neurointerventions: experience at University at Buffalo Neurosurgery-Millard Fillmore Gates Circle Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kan, Peter; Mokin, Maxim; Abla, Adib A; Eller, Jorge L; Dumont, Travis M; Levy, Elad I; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2012-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) generates high-resolution cross-sectional images and sagittal reconstructions of the vessel wall and lumen. As a result, this imaging modality can provide accurate measurements of the degree of vessel stenosis, allow the detection of intraluminal thrombus, and analyze the plaque composition. The IVUS modality is widely used in interventional cardiology, and its use in neurointerventions has gradually increased. With case examples, the authors illustrate the utility of IVUS as an adjunct to conventional angiography for a wide range of intracranial and extracranial neurointerventions.

  16. In vivo volumetric analysis of coronary stent using optical coherence tomography with a novel balloon occlusion-flushing catheter: a comparison with intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Yoshiaki; Hoshino, Kozo; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; McGregor, Jennifer; Hajjar, Roger J; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Hayase, Motoya

    2005-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is limited as an intravascular imaging tool because of interference with blood. This study tested a new balloon occlusion-flushing catheter for OCT scanning of stented coronary arteries and compared stent measurements between OCT and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Motorized pullback with OCT and IVUS was examined in coronary stents deployed in swine. Quantitative measurements were obtained and compared between both groups. In addition, stent strut thickness was compared among OCT, IVUS and actual measurement. The occlusion catheter successfully provided motorized pullback OCT images in the stented coronary arteries without any complications. There were no differences in calculated lumen volume. However, stent volumes were significantly smaller with OCT than with IVUS (p < 0.05). OCT significantly underestimated the stent strut thickness compared with the actual measurement. Although OCT underestimates the stent strut thickness, motorized pullback OCT imaging with the occlusion catheter can provide appropriate in-stent images in the porcine coronary arteries.

  17. Comparison of intravascular optical frequency domain imaging versus intravascular ultrasound during balloon pulmonary angioplasty in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Shuji; Okazaki, Toru; Hara, Hisao; Hiroi, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study are (1) to evaluate the safety and feasibility of using optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) during balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA) procedures, (2) to assess the correlations between the vessel area (VA) and luminal area (LA) obtained by OFDI and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), and (3) to compare inter‐ and intra‐observer variability among measurements taken from OFDI and IVUS images. Background The BPA in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is an evolving procedure. Methods Twenty‐three consecutive attempts of pair of OFDI and IVUS during BPA were evaluated. All complications that occurred during‐BPA and up to 48 hr post‐BPA were recorded. Using side branches as landmarks, 48 pairs of regions were chosen to compare measurements of VA and LA. Results OFDI images can be obtained without any procedurally related complications. Although the VA and LA measurements obtained by OFDI were smaller than those obtained by IVUS, high correlations were found (VA: r = 0.78, P < 0.0001 and LA: r = 0.75, P < 0.0001). Less inter‐ and intra‐observer variability was found when using measurements taken from OFDI versus IVUS images. Conclusions OFDI during BPA was safe and feasible. The reproducibility of OFDI imaging was excellent and offered a favorable addition to the BPA procedures. © 2016 The Authors Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991798

  18. (100)-Textured KNN-based thick film with enhanced piezoelectric property for intravascular ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Benpeng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Teng; Yang, Xiaofei; Li, Yongxiang; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Using tape-casting technology, 35 μm free-standing (100)-textured Li doped KNN (KNLN) thick film was prepared by employing NaNbO3 (NN) as template. It exhibited similar piezoelectric behavior to lead containing materials: a longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d33) of ∼150 pm/V and an electromechanical coupling coefficient (kt) of 0.44. Based on this thick film, a 52 MHz side-looking miniature transducer with a bandwidth of 61.5% at −6 dB was built for Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging. In comparison with 40 MHz PMN-PT single crystal transducer, the rabbit aorta image had better resolution and higher noise-to-signal ratio, indicating that lead-free (100)-textured KNLN thick film may be suitable for IVUS (>50 MHz) imaging. PMID:25991874

  19. (100)-Textured KNN-based thick film with enhanced piezoelectric property for intravascular ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Benpeng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Teng; Yang, Xiaofei; Li, Yongxiang; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-04-01

    Using tape-casting technology, 35 μm free-standing (100)-textured Li doped KNN (KNLN) thick film was prepared by employing NaNbO3 (NN) as template. It exhibited similar piezoelectric behavior to lead containing materials: a longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d33) of ˜150 pm/V and an electromechanical coupling coefficient (kt) of 0.44. Based on this thick film, a 52 MHz side-looking miniature transducer with a bandwidth of 61.5% at -6 dB was built for Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging. In comparison with 40 MHz PMN-PT single crystal transducer, the rabbit aorta image had better resolution and higher noise-to-signal ratio, indicating that lead-free (100)-textured KNLN thick film may be suitable for IVUS (>50 MHz) imaging.

  20. Advances in a fully integrated intravascular OCT-ultrasound system for cardiovascular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Joe; Li, Jiawen; Li, Xiang; Yin, Jiechen; Zhang, Jun; Hoang, Khiet; Patel, Pranav; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-01-01

    Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) are two popular techniques for the detection and determination of atherosclerosis. IVUS allows visualization of plaques while also providing a large penetration depth to determine plaque volume. Intracoronary OCT provides the ability to capture microscopic features associated with high risk plaque. Traditionally to utilize the benefits of both modalities, separate probes and systems had to be used one at a time to image a vessel. We present work required to create a combined OCT IVUS system capable of simultaneous imaging to detect atherosclerotic plaques. A novel integrated probe of size 0.69 mm OD featuring sequential placement of components was created to acquire co-registered images within small coronary vessels. By utilizing commercial graphics processing units (GPUs) real time visualization of acquired data is possible up to a maximum 48 frames per second per channel. In vitro studies on human coronary artery samples as well as in vivo studies in rabbits and pigs show various plaque buildups in both OCT and IVUS images which match histology results, demonstrating the capabilities of the system.

  1. The Imaging Modulography Technique Revisited for High-Definition Intravascular Ultrasound: Theoretical Framework.

    PubMed

    Tacheau, Antoine; Le Floc'h, Simon; Finet, Gérard; Doyley, Marvin M; Pettigrew, Roderic I; Cloutier, Guy; Ohayon, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical characterization of atherosclerotic lesions remains an essential step for the detection of vulnerable plaques (VPs). Recently, an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) elasticity reconstruction method (iMOD) has been tested in vivo by our group. The major limitation of iMOD is the need to estimate the strain field in the entire VP despite attenuated depth penetration signals when using high-definition (HD) IVUS systems. Therefore, an extended iMOD approach (E-iMOD) was designed and applied to coronary lesions of patients imaged in vivo with IVUS. The E-iMOD method (i) quantified necrotic core areas with a mean absolute relative error of 3.5 ± 3.5% and (ii) identified Young's moduli of the necrotic cores and fibrous regions with mean values of 5.7 ± 0.8 kPa and 794.5 ± 22.0 kPa instead of 5 kPa and 800 kPa, respectively. This study demonstrates the potential of the improved HD-IVUS modulography technique E-iMOD to characterize coronary VPs.

  2. Analysis of Cardiovascular Tissue Components for the Diagnosis of Coronary Vulnerable Plaque from Intravascular Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yoo Na; Kim, Ga Young; Shin, Eun Seok

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize cardiovascular tissue components and analyze the different tissue properties for predicting coronary vulnerable plaque from intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. For this purpose, sequential IVUS image frames were obtained from human coronary arteries using 20 MHz catheters. The plaque regions between the intima and media-adventitial borders were manually segmented in all IVUS images. Tissue components of the plaque regions were classified into having fibrous tissue (FT), fibrofatty tissue (FFT), necrotic core (NC), or dense calcium (DC). The media area and lumen diameter were also estimated simultaneously. In addition, the external elastic membrane (EEM) was computed to predict the vulnerable plaque after the tissue characterization. The reliability of manual segmentation was validated in terms of inter- and intraobserver agreements. The quantitative results found that the FT and the media as well as the NC would be good indicators for predicting vulnerable plaques in IVUS images. In addition, the lumen was not suitable for early diagnosis of vulnerable plaque because of the low significance compared to the other vessel parameters. To predict vulnerable plaque rupture, future study should have additional experiments using various tissue components, such as the EEM, FT, NC, and media.

  3. Chirp-Coded Ultraharmonic Imaging with a Modified Clinical Intravascular Ultrasound System.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Huntzicker, Steven; Awuor, Ivy; Doyley, Marvin M

    2016-11-01

    Imaging plaque microvasculature with contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) could help clinicians evaluate atherosclerosis and guide therapeutic interventions. In this study, we evaluated the performance of chirp-coded ultraharmonic imaging using a modified IVUS system (iLab™, Boston Scientific/Scimed) equipped with clinically available peripheral and coronary imaging catheters. Flow phantoms perfused with a phospholipid-encapsulated contrast agent were visualized using ultraharmonic imaging at 12 MHz and 30 MHz transmit frequencies. Flow channels with diameters as small as 0.8 mm and 0.5 mm were visualized using the peripheral and coronary imaging catheters. Radio-frequency signals were acquired at standard IVUS rotation speed, which resulted in a frame rate of 30 frames/s. Contrast-to-tissue ratios up to 17.9 ± 1.11 dB and 10.7 ± 2.85 dB were attained by chirp-coded ultraharmonic imaging at 12 MHz and 30 MHz transmit frequencies, respectively. These results demonstrate the feasibility of performing ultraharmonic imaging at standard frame rates with clinically available IVUS catheters using chirp-coded excitation.

  4. Introducing nuclei scatterer patterns into histology based intravascular ultrasound simulation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Silvan; Karamalis, Athanasios; Sheet, Debdoot; Drecoll, Enken; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Navab, Nassir; Noël, Peter B.; Katouzian, Amin

    2013-03-01

    Medical ultrasonic grayscale images are formed from acoustic waves following their interactions with distributed scatterers within tissues media. For accurate simulation of acoustic wave propagation, a reliable model describing unknown parameters associated with tissues scatterers such as distribution, size and acoustic properties is essential. In this work, we introduce a novel approach defining ultrasonic scatterers by incorporating a distribution of cellular nuclei patterns in biological tissues to simulate ultrasonic response of atherosclerotic tissues in intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). For this reason, a virtual phantom is generated through manual labeling of different tissue types (fibrotic, lipidic and calcified) on histology sections. Acoustic properties of each tissue type are defined by assuming that the ultrasound signal is primarily backscattered by the nuclei of the organic cells within the intima and media of the vessel wall. This resulting virtual phantom is subsequently used to simulate ultrasonic wave propagation through the tissue medium computed using finite difference estimation. Subsequently B-mode images for a specific histological section are processed from the simulated radiofrequency (RF) data and compared with the original IVUS of the same tissue section. Real IVUS RF signals for these histological sections were obtained using a single-element mechanically rotating 40MHz transducer. Evaluation is performed by trained reviewers subjectively assessing both simulated and real B-mode IVUS images. Our simulation platform provides a high image quality with a very promising correlation to the original IVUS images. This will facilitate to better understand progression of such a chronic disease from micro-level and its integration into cardiovascular disease-specific models.

  5. X-IVUS: integrated x-ray and IVUS system for the Cathlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Leung, Barbara; Eck, Kai; Bredno, Joerg; Aach, Til

    2005-04-01

    Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty is currently the preferred method for coronary artery disease treatment. Angiograms depict residual lumen, but lack information about plaque characteristics and exact geometry. During instrument positioning, intracoronary characterization at the current instrument location is desirable. By pulling back an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probe through a stenosis, cross-sections of the artery are acquired. These images can provide the desired characterization if they are properly registered to diagnostic angiograms or interventional fluoroscopies. The method we propose acquires fluoroscopy frames at the beginning, end, and optionally during a constant speed pullback. The IVUS probe is localized and registered to previously acquired angiograms using a compensation algorithm for heartbeat and respiration. Then, for each heart phase, the pullback path is interpolated and the corresponding IVUS frames are positioned. During the intervention the instrument is localized and registered onto the pullback path. Thus, each IVUS frame can be registered with a position on an angiogram or to an instrument location and during subsequent steps of the intervention the appropriate IVUS frames can be displayed as if an IVUS probe were present at the instrument position. The method was tested using a phantom featuring respiratory and contraction movement and an automatic pullback with constant speed. The IVUS acquisition was replaced by fibre optics and the phantom was imaged in angiographic and fluoroscopic modes. The study showed that for the phantom case it is indeed possible to register the IVUS cross-section to the interventional instrument positions to an accuracy of less than 2mm.

  6. Mapping Intravascular Ultrasound Controversies in Interventional Cardiology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, David; Adams, Samantha; Maresca, Bruno; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound is a catheter-based imaging modality that was developed to investigate the condition of coronary arteries and assess the vulnerability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques in particular. Since its introduction in the clinic 20 years ago, use of intravascular ultrasound innovation has been relatively limited. Intravascular ultrasound remains a niche technology; its clinical practice did not vastly expand, except in Japan, where intravascular ultrasound is an appraised tool for guiding percutaneous coronary interventions. In this qualitative research study, we follow scholarship on the sociology of innovation in exploring both the current adoption practices and perspectives on the future of intravascular ultrasound. We conducted a survey of biomedical experts with experience in the technology, the practice, and the commercialization of intravascular ultrasound. The collected information enabled us to map intravascular ultrasound controversies as well as to outline the dynamics of the international network of experts that generates intravascular ultrasound innovations and uses intravascular ultrasound technologies. While the technology is praised for its capacity to measure coronary atherosclerotic plaque morphology and is steadily used in clinical research, the lack of demonstrated benefits of intravascular ultrasound guided coronary interventions emerges as the strongest factor that prevents its expansion. Furthermore, most of the controversies identified were external to intravascular ultrasound technology itself, meaning that decision making at the industrial, financial and regulatory levels are likely to determine the future of intravascular ultrasound. In light of opinions from the responding experts', a wider adoption of intravascular ultrasound as a stand-alone imaging modality seems rather uncertain, but the appeal for this technology may be renewed by improving image quality and through combination with complementary imaging

  7. Back-to-back optical coherence tomography-ultrasound probe for co-registered three-dimensional intravascular imaging with real-time display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Ma, Teng; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Patel, Pranav M.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a novel integrated optical coherence tomography (OCT)-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probe, with a 1.5 mm-long rigid-part and 0.9 mm outer diameter, for real-time intracoronary imaging of atherosclerotic plaques and guiding interventional procedures. By placing the OCT ball lens and IVUS 45MHz single element transducer back-to-back at the same axial position, this probe can provide automatically co-registered, co-axial OCT-IVUS imaging. To demonstrate its capability, 3D OCT-IVUS imaging of a pig's coronary artery in real-time displayed in polar coordinates, as well as images of two major types of advanced plaques in human cadaver coronary segments, was obtained using this probe and our upgraded system. Histology validation is also presented.

  8. All-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Noimark, Sacha; Mosse, Charles A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-02-01

    High frequency ultrasound probes such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters can be invaluable for guiding minimally invasive medical procedures in cardiology such as coronary stent placement and ablation. With current-generation ultrasound probes, ultrasound is generated and received electrically. The complexities involved with fabricating these electrical probes can result in high costs that limit their clinical applicability. Additionally, it can be challenging to achieve wide transmission bandwidths and adequate wideband reception sensitivity with small piezoelectric elements. Optical methods for transmitting and receiving ultrasound are emerging as alternatives to their electrical counterparts. They offer several distinguishing advantages, including the potential to generate and detect the broadband ultrasound fields (tens of MHz) required for high resolution imaging. In this study, we developed a miniature, side-looking, pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging, with fibre-optic transmission and reception. The axial resolution was better than 70 microns, and the imaging depth in tissue was greater than 1 cm. Ultrasound transmission was performed by photoacoustic excitation of a carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite material; ultrasound reception, with a fibre-optic Fabry-Perot cavity. Ex vivo tissue studies, which included healthy swine tissue and diseased human tissue, demonstrated the strong potential of this technique. To our knowledge, this is the first study to achieve an all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging. The potential for performing all-optical B-mode imaging (2D and 3D) with virtual arrays of transmit/receive elements, and hybrid imaging with pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic sensing are discussed.

  9. Plaque Vulnerability as Assessed by Radiofrequency Intravascular Ultrasound in Patients with Valvular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Senguttuvan, Nagendra Boopathy; Kumar, Sharath; Mishra, Sundeep; Cho, Jun Hwan; Kwon, Jee Eun; Hyeon, Seong Hyeop; Jeong, Yun Sang; Won, Hoyoun; Shin, Seung Yong; Lee, Kwang Je; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Chee Jeong; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac valvular calcification is associated with the overall coronary plaque burden and considered an independent cardiovascular risk and prognostic factor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the presence of valvular calcification and plaque morphology and/or vulnerability. Methods Transthoracic echocardiography was used to assess valvular calcification in 280 patients with coronary artery disease who underwent radiofrequency intravascular ultrasound (Virtual Histology IVUS, VH-IVUS). A propensity score–matched cohort of 192 patients (n = 96 in each group) was analyzed. Thin-capped fibroatheroma (TCFA) was defined as a necrotic core (NC) >10% of the plaque area with a plaque burden >40% and NC in contact with the lumen for ≥3 image slices. A remodeling index (lesion/reference vessel area) >1.05 was considered to be positive. Results Patients were divided into two groups: any calcification in at least one valve (152 patients) vs. no detectable valvular calcification (128 patients). Groups were similar in terms of age, risk factors, clinical diagnosis, and angiographic analysis after propensity score-matched analysis. Gray-scale IVUS analysis showed that the vessel size, plaque burden, minimal lumen area, and remodeling index were similar. By VH-IVUS, % NC and % dense calcium (DC) were greater in patients with valvular calcification (p = 0.024, and p = 0.016, respectively). However, only % DC was higher at the maximal NC site by propensity score-matched analysis (p = 0.029). The frequency of VH-TCFA occurrence was higher depending on the complexity (p = 0.0064) and severity (p = 0.013) of valvular calcification. Conclusions There is a significant relationship between valvular calcifications and VH-IVUS assessment of TCFAs. Valvular calcification indicates a greater atherosclerosis disease complexity (increased calcification of the coronary plaque) and vulnerable coronary plaques (higher incidence of VH-TCFA). PMID

  10. Reliable and Accurate Calcium Volume Measurement in Coronary Artery Using Intravascular Ultrasound Videos.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tadashi; Banchhor, Sumit K; Londhe, Narendra D; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Radeva, Petia; Shukla, Devarshi; Saba, Luca; Balestrieri, Antonella; Nicolaides, Andrew; Shafique, Shoaib; Laird, John R; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative assessment of calcified atherosclerotic volume within the coronary artery wall is vital for cardiac interventional procedures. The goal of this study is to automatically measure the calcium volume, given the borders of coronary vessel wall for all the frames of the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) video. Three soft computing fuzzy classification techniques were adapted namely Fuzzy c-Means (FCM), K-means, and Hidden Markov Random Field (HMRF) for automated segmentation of calcium regions and volume computation. These methods were benchmarked against previously developed threshold-based method. IVUS image data sets (around 30,600 IVUS frames) from 15 patients were collected using 40 MHz IVUS catheter (Atlantis® SR Pro, Boston Scientific®, pullback speed of 0.5 mm/s). Calcium mean volume for FCM, K-means, HMRF and threshold-based method were 37.84 ± 17.38 mm(3), 27.79 ± 10.94 mm(3), 46.44 ± 19.13 mm(3) and 35.92 ± 16.44 mm(3) respectively. Cross-correlation, Jaccard Index and Dice Similarity were highest between FCM and threshold-based method: 0.99, 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.95 + 0.02 respectively. Student's t-test, z-test and Wilcoxon-test are also performed to demonstrate consistency, reliability and accuracy of the results. Given the vessel wall region, the system reliably and automatically measures the calcium volume in IVUS videos. Further, we validated our system against a trained expert using scoring: K-means showed the best performance with an accuracy of 92.80%. Out procedure and protocol is along the line with method previously published clinically.

  11. Dilatation Mechanism of Balloon Angioplasty in Children: Assessment by Angiography and Intravascular Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Ino, Toshihiro; Kishiro, Masahiko; Okubo, Mataichi; Akimoto, Katsumi; Nishimoto, Kei; Yabuta, Keijiro; Kawasaki, Shiori; Hosoda, Yasuyuki

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: Little information is available about the dilatation mechanism in children. This prospective study aimed to (1) evaluate the dilatation mechanism of balloon angioplasty in children with arterial stenosis, and (2) compare the morphological changes seen by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and angiography. Methods: Twenty consecutive patients, who had undergone a total of 23 procedures, were examined before and immediately after balloon angioplasty with a 4.3 Fr, 30 MHz rotational tip IVUS system. The lesions for IVUS study had resulted from coarctation of the aorta in six patients, pulmonary arterial stenosis in five, Blalock-Taussig shunt stenosis in three, subclavian artery stenosis in two, renal artery stenosis in two, coronary artery stenosis in one and ductus arteriosus in one. Results: Four distinctive morphological types were identified: type I with arterial stretching, type IIa with superficial tearing, type IIb with deep intimal-medial tearing, type III with flap formation, and type IV with dissection. The diameter of the narrowest site before and after balloon angioplasty increased significantly from 2.1 {+-} 1.4 mm to 4.6 {+-} 3.4 mm (p < 0.001). Eighteen of the 23 angioplasty procedures (78%) were considered to be successful, with a dilatation ratio of more than 50%. In most patients with successful dilatation, non-stretch mechanisms such as tearing, flap formation, or dissection were found. The positive percent (70%) of non-stretch mechanisms seen by IVUS was significantly higher than the positive findings (39%) by angiography ({chi}{sup 2}= 6.47, p < 0.02). Conclusions: Non-stretch morphology of the arterial wall may be a common mechanism of dilatation after balloon angioplasty in children with arterial stenosis. IVUS is a useful modality for evaluating the effectiveness of balloon angioplasty and the mechanism of dilatation in individual cases.

  12. Angioplasty Guided by Intravascular Ultrasound: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    de Figueiredo, José Albuquerque; Nogueira, Iara Antonia Lustosa; Figueiro, Mabel Fernandes; Buehler, Anna Maria; Berwanger, Otavio

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) use on stenting has shown inconclusive results. Objective Systematic review and meta-analysis of the impact of IVUS on stenting regarding the clinical and angiographic evolution. Methods A search was performed in Medline/Pubmed, CENTRAL, Embase, Lilacs, Scopus and Web of Science databases. It included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated the implantation of stents guided by IVUS, compared with those using angiography alone (ANGIO). The minimum follow-up duration was six months and the following outcomes were assessed: thrombosis, mortality, myocardial infarction, percutaneous and surgical revascularization, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and restenosis. The binary outcomes were presented considering the number of events in each group; the estimates were generated by a random effects model, considering Mantel-Haenszel statistics as weighting agent and magnitude of effect for the relative risk (RR) with its respective 95% confidence interval (95%CI). Higgins I2 test was used to quantify the consistency between the results of each study. Results A total of 2,689 articles were evaluated, including 8 RCTs. There was a 27% reduction in angiographic restenosis (RR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.54-0.97, I2 = 51%) and statistically significant reduction in the rates of percutaneous revascularization and overall (RR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.51 to 1.53, I2 = 61%, RR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.54 to 0.99, I2 = 55%), with no statistical difference in surgical revascularization (RR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.52-1.74, I2 = 0%) in favor of IVUS vs. ANGIO. There were no differences regarding the other outcomes in the comparison between the two strategies. Conclusion Angioplasty with stenting guided by IVUS decreases the rates of restenosis and revascularization, with no impact on MACE, acute myocardial infarction, mortality or thrombosis outcomes. PMID:23821407

  13. An algorithm to correct 2D near-infrared fluorescence signals using 3D intravascular ultrasound architectural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallas, Georgios; Brooks, Dana H.; Rosenthal, Amir; Vinegoni, Claudio; Calfon, Marcella A.; Razansky, R. Nika; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-03-01

    Intravascular Near-Infrared Fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is a promising imaging modality to image vessel biology and high-risk plaques in vivo. We have developed a NIRF fiber optic catheter and have presented the ability to image atherosclerotic plaques in vivo, using appropriate NIR fluorescent probes. Our catheter consists of a 100/140 μm core/clad diameter housed in polyethylene tubing, emitting NIR laser light at a 90 degree angle compared to the fiber's axis. The system utilizes a rotational and a translational motor for true 2D imaging and operates in conjunction with a coaxial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) device. IVUS datasets provide 3D images of the internal structure of arteries and are used in our system for anatomical mapping. Using the IVUS images, we are building an accurate hybrid fluorescence-IVUS data inversion scheme that takes into account photon propagation through the blood filled lumen. This hybrid imaging approach can then correct for the non-linear dependence of light intensity on the distance of the fluorescence region from the fiber tip, leading to quantitative imaging. The experimental and algorithmic developments will be presented and the effectiveness of the algorithm showcased with experimental results in both saline and blood-like preparations. The combined structural and molecular information obtained from these two imaging modalities are positioned to enable the accurate diagnosis of biologically high-risk atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries that are responsible for heart attacks.

  14. Fast retrieval of calcification from sequential intravascular ultrasound gray-scale images.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Sun; Bing-Ru, Liu

    2016-08-12

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-based tissue characterization is invaluable for the computer-aided diagnosis and interventional treatment of cardiac vessel diseases. Although the analysis of raw backscattered signals allows more accurate plaque characterization than gray-scale images, its applications are limited due to its nature of electrocardiogram-gated acquisition. Images acquired by IVUS devices that do not allow the acquisition of raw signals cannot be characterized. To address these limitations, we developed a method for fast frame-by-frame retrieval and location of calcification according to the jump features of radial gray-level variation curves from sequential IVUS gray-scale images. The proposed method consists of three main steps: (1) radial gray-level variation curves are extracted from each filtered polar view, (2) sequential images are preliminarily queried according to the maximal slopes of radial gray-level variation curves, and finally, (3) key frames that include calcification are selected through checking the gray-level features of successive pixel columns in the preliminary results. Experimental results with clinically acquired in vivo data sets indicate key frames that include calcification can be retrieved with the advantages of simplicity, high efficiency, and accuracy. Recognition results correlate well with manual characterization results obtained by experienced physicians and through virtual histology.

  15. Systematic and exclusive use of intravascular ultrasound for endovascular aneurysm repair - the Lausanne experience.

    PubMed

    Marty, Bettina; Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Ruchat, Patrick; Haesler, Eric; von Segesser, Ludwig Karl

    2005-06-01

    Five years of experience with endovascular infrarenal aneurysm repair at our institution is reviewed. Implantation of endoprostheses in 88 patients has been performed by surgeons using exclusively intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and fluoroscopy. IVUS identified the target site of deployment in all cases. In-hospital morbidity was 22% (19/88). Two percent mortality (2/88) and 5% early conversion (4/88) as a consequence of type I endoleaks were noted only in the first 53 patients with early devices (NS). Early endoleaks were present in 36% (32/88) including twenty-two type I, five type II and five type III endoleaks. Proximal endoleaks were associated with early devices (P<0.001), and technical difficulties with deployment. Tube grafts used in the beginning, performed poorly with 54% (7/13) type I endoleaks. Endoleaks diminished to 10% (9/88) by spontaneous closure and secondary endovascular procedures that were necessary in 24% (21/88) and consisted of coil embolization/cuff extension (9), late conversion (6), and limb recanalization or femoral cross-over bypass (6). Endovascular aneurysm repair using IVUS is a valid alternative technique. Improved devices and systematic use of bifurcated endoprostheses for infrarenal aneurysms reduce the occurrence of type I endoleaks.

  16. Fast integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changhoon; Cho, Seunghee; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Sungjo; Park, Hyoeun; Kim, Jinmoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Kang, Yeonsu; Jang, Kiyuk; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    In cardiology, a vulnerable plaque is considered to be a key subject because it is strongly related to atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. Because conventional intravascular imaging devices exhibit several limitations with regard to vulnerable plaque detection, the need for an effective lipid imaging modality has been continuously suggested. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a medical imaging technique with a high level of ultrasound (US) resolution and strong optical contrast. In this study, we successfully developed an integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IV-PAUS) imaging system with a catheter diameter of 1.2 mm for lipid-rich atherosclerosis imaging. An Nd:YAG pulsed laser with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm was utilized. IV-PAUS offers 5-mm depth penetration and axial and lateral PA imaging resolutions of 94 μm and 203 μm, respectively, as determined by imaging a 6-μm carbon fiber. We initially obtained 3-dimensional (3D) co-registered PA/US images of metal stents. Subsequently, we successfully obtained 3D coregistered PA/US ex vivo images using an iliac artery from a rabbit atherosclerosis model. Accordingly, lipid-rich plaques were sufficiently differentiated from normal tissue in the ex vivo experiment. We validated these findings histologically to confirm the lipid content.

  17. Intravascular OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph M.; Adler, Desmond; Xu, Chenyang

    Since the first coronary angioplasty was performed in the late 1970s, imaging has played a central role in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Today more than three million PCI procedures are performed worldwide to expand narrowed arteries and to clear blood clots that can cause debilitating symptoms of myocardial ischemia or fatal heart attacks. Although X-ray angiography is still the workhorse imaging modality in the field of interventional cardiology, intravascular imaging has become an indispensable tool for guiding complex PCI procedures. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are the two most commonly used catheter-based imaging technologies in coronary procedures. Since the first commercial intravascular OCT systems were introduced in Japan and the European Union in 2004 and in the United States in 2009, the application of intravascular OCT has grown rapidly [3, 15, 16].

  18. Radiographic and Intravascular (IVUS) Evaluation of Venous Morphology During CCSVI Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-06

    To Determine the Safety and Validity of Venous Angioplasty and; Valvuloplasty in the Treatment of CCSVI. In Addition, it Will; Allow Researchers to Sub-classify Valve Morphology in Relation; to Treatment Success. This Will be Evidenced by Venous Patency; Forty-eight Hours by Doppler Ultrasound as Well as Clinical; Symptom Improvement.

  19. Invasive evaluation of plaque morphology of symptomatic superficial femoral artery stenoses using combined near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Sibin K; Safian, Robert D; Madder, Ryan D; Hanson, Ivan D; Pica, Mark C; Smith, James L; Goldstein, James A; Abbas, Amr E

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the plaque morphology of severe stenoses in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) employing combined near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound (NIRS-IVUS). Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. Plaque composition of SFA stenoses has been characterized as primarily fibrous or fibrocalcific by non-invasive and autopsy studies. NIRS has been validated to detect lipid-core plaque (LCP) in the coronary circulation. We imaged severe SFA stenoses with NIRS-IVUS prior to revascularization in 31 patients (46 stenoses) with Rutherford claudication ⩾ class 3. Angiographic parameters included lesion location and stenosis severity. IVUS parameters included plaque burden and presence of calcium. NIRS images were analyzed for LCP and maximum lipid-core burden index in a 4-mm length of artery (maxLCBI4mm). By angiography, 38 (82.6%) lesions were calcified and 9 (19.6%) were chronic total occlusions. Baseline stenosis severity and lesion length were 86.0 ± 11.0% and 36.5 ± 46.5 mm, respectively. NIRS-IVUS identified calcium in 45 (97.8%) lesions and LCP in 17 (37.0%) lesions. MaxLCBI4mm was 433 ± 244. All lesions with LCP also contained calcium; there were no non-calcified lesions with LCP. In conclusion, this is the first study of combined NIRS-IVUS in patients with PAD. NIRS-IVUS demonstrates that nearly all patients with symptomatic severe SFA disease have fibrocalcific plaque, and one-third of such lesions contain LCP. These findings contrast with those in patients with acute coronary syndromes, and may have implications regarding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in different vascular beds.

  20. Visualizing the stress distribution within vascular tissues using intravascular ultrasound elastography: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael S; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M

    2015-06-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson's ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson's ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography.

  1. Safety and efficacy of carbon dioxide and intravascular ultrasound-guided stenting for renal artery stenosis in patients with chronic renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Daizo; Fujii, Kenichi; Fukunaga, Masashi; Fukuda, Nobuhisa; Masuyama, Tohru; Ohkubo, Nobukazu; Kato, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the feasibility, safety, and mid-term outcomes of renal artery stenting using carbon dioxide (CO₂) digital subtraction angiography and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for patients with renal insufficiency and significant atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS). Eighteen consecutive patients with chronic renal insufficiency underwent renal artery stenting under the guidance of CO₂ angiography and IVUS without contrast media. Renal function and blood pressure were assessed pre- and postintervention. A total of 27 de novo RAS in 18 patients (15 males; mean age: 72 ± 9 years) with renal insufficiency were treated by renal artery stenting with the combined use of the CO₂ angiography and IVUS without any procedural complications. Although the mean serum creatinine concentration preprocedure and 6 months after treatment did not change (2.7 ± 1.0-2.4 ± 1.1 mg/dL), blood pressure significantly decreased 6 months after stenting (158 ± 10-147 ± 11 mm Hg, P < .01).

  2. Percutaneous transradial coronary Palmaz-Schatz stent implantation, guided by intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; Slagboom, T

    1995-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) allows accurate assessment of stent deployment, its use being confined to the use of 8 French (F) guiding catheters. We evaluated the feasibility of combining transradial artery Palmaz-Schatz stent implantation through 6F guiding catheters with IVUS for assessment of stent diameter after delivery at moderate inflation pressures (10-12 atmospheres [atm]) with compliant balloons and after high pressure dilatations with balloons of intermediate compliance. In 8 consecutive patients, 12 stents were delivered with Scimed Express balloon catheters at 10-12 atm followed by IVUS (EndoSonics CathScanner; Visions FX 3.5F 20 MHz transducer). An ultrasound study was repeated after high pressure dilatations (16-20 atm) with Schneider Magical Speedy balloon catheters. The balloon diameters were derived from manufacturer provided specifications. In all patients the transducer could easily be advanced through the guiding catheters. Reference diameter of the stented segment was 3.7 +/- 0.5 mm (2.7-4.5) and the diameter of Scimed Express balloons during inflation was 4.0 +/- 0.3 mm (3.6-4.7). Stent diameter was 3.0 +/- 0.1 mm (2.8-3.2) (P < 0.001 compared to the reference and the balloon diameter). The diameter of the Schneider Magical Speedy balloons at secondary dilatations with 16 +/- 3 atm (14-20) was 4.1 +/- 0.4 mm (3.3-4.5) (P = 0.50 compared to the initial balloon diameter). Final stent diameter was 3.3 +/- 0.4 mm (2.9-4.1) (P = 0.02 compared to the initial stent diameter). All stents were symmetrically deployed and well apposed. No damage to vessel or stents was detected after passage of the transducer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. CONTRAST-ENHANCED INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND PULSE SEQUENCES FOR BANDWIDTH-LIMITED TRANSDUCERS

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, David; Renaud, Guillaume; van Soest, Gijs; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate two methods for vasa vasorum imaging using contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound, which can be performed using commercial catheters. Plaque neovascularization was recognized as an independent marker of coronary artery plaque vulnerability. IVUS-based methods to image the microvessels available to date require high bandwidth (−6 dB relative frequency bandwidth >70%), which are not routinely available commercially. We explored the potential of ultraharmonic imaging and chirp reversal imaging for vasa vasorum imaging. In vitro recordings were performed on a tissue-mimicking phantom using a commercial ultrasound contrast agent and a transducer with a center frequency of 34 MHz and a −6 dB relative bandwidth of 56%. Acoustic peak pressures <500 kPa were used. A tissue-mimicking phantom with channels down to 200 μm in diameter was successfully imaged by the two contrast detection sequences while the smallest channel stayed invisible in conventional intravascular ultrasound images. Ultraharmonic imaging provided the best contrast agent detection. PMID:23384459

  4. Near-infrared spectroscopy-intravascular ultrasound: scientific basis and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ismail Dogu; Caiazzo, Gianluca; Fabris, Enrico; Serdoz, Roberta; Abou-Sherif, Sara; Madden, Sean; Moreno, Pedro R; Goldstein, James; Di Mario, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Coronary angiography underestimates the magnitude of the atherosclerotic burden and cannot detect the presence of disease in the early phases. Recognition of these inherent limitations of angiography has been an impetus for the development of other coronary imaging techniques. The novel near-infrared spectroscopy-intravascular ultrasound (NIRS-IVUS) catheters can detect and quantify the presence of lipid core in the atherosclerotic plaque and associate it with other features such as lumen size and plaque architecture. Lipid-rich plaques are known to pose a higher risk of distal embolization during interventions and plaque disruption. The aim of this manuscript is the review of the potential clinical and research applications of this technology as highlighted by recent studies.

  5. Intravascular Ultrasound Catheter to Enhance Microbubble-Based Drug Delivery via Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, Joseph P.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Wamhoff, Brian R.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that acoustic radiation force enhances intravascular microbubble adhesion to blood vessels in the presence of flow for molecular-targeted ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. A prototype acoustic radiation force intravascular ultrasound (ARFIVUS) catheter was designed and fabricated to displace a microbubble contrast agent in flow representative of conditions encountered in the human carotid artery. The prototype ARFIVUS transducer was designed to match the resonance frequency of 1.4- to 2.6-μm-diameter microbubbles modeled by an experimentally verified 1-D microbubble acoustic radiation force translation model. The transducer element was an elongated Navy Type I (hard) lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic designed to operate at 3 MHz. Fabricated devices operated with center frequencies of 3.3 and 3.6 MHz with −6-dB fractional bandwidths of 55% and 50%, respectively. Microbubble translation velocities as high as 0.86 m/s were measured using a high-speed streak camera when insonating with the ARFIVUS transducer. Finally, the prototype was used to displace microbubbles in a flow phantom while imaging with a commercial 45-MHz imaging IVUS transducer. A sustained increase of 31 dB in average video intensity was measured following insonation with the ARFIVUS, indicating microbubble accumulation resulting from the application of acoustic radiation force. PMID:23143566

  6. Intravascular Ultrasound and Angiographic Predictors of In-Stent Restenosis of Chronic Total Occlusion Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeehoon; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Seong-Wook; Park, Jin Joo; Yoon, Yeonyee E; Oh, Il-Young; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Suh, Jung-Won; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Choi, Dong-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Despite the benefits of successful percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesions, PCIs of CTO lesions still carry a high rate of adverse events, including in-stent restenosis (ISR). Because previous reports have not specifically investigated the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) predictors of ISR in CTO lesions, we focused on these predictors. We included 126 patients who underwent successful PCIs, using drug-eluting stents, and post-PCI IVUS of CTO lesions. Patient and lesion characteristics were analyzed to elucidate the ISR predictors. In each lesion, an average of 1.7 ± 0.7 (mean length, 46.4 ± 20.3 mm) stents were used. At 9 months follow-up, 14 (11%) patients demonstrated ISR, and 8 (6.3%) underwent target lesion revascularization. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the independent predictors of ISR were the post-PCI minimal luminal diameter (MLD) and the stent expansion ratio (SER; minimal stent cross-sectional area (CSA) over the nominal CSA of the implanted stent), measured using quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and IVUS, respectively. A receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that the best post-PCI MLD and SER cut-off values for predicting ISR were 2.4 mm (area under the curve [AUC], 0.762; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.639-0.885) and 70% (AUC, 0.714; 95% CI, 0.577-0.852), respectively. Lesions with post-PCI MLD and SER values less than these threshold values were at a higher risk of ISR, with an odds ratio of 23.3 (95% CI, 2.74-198.08), compared with lesions having larger MLD and SER values. Thus, the potential predictors of ISR, after PCI of CTO lesions, are the post-PCI MLD and SER values. The ISR rate was highest in lesions with a post-PCI MLD ≤2.4 mm and an SER ≤70%.

  7. Towards a Reduced-Wire Interface for CMUT-Based Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jaemyung; Tekes, Coskun; Degertekin, F Levent; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2016-09-20

    Having intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging capability on guide wires used in cardiovascular interventions may eliminate the need for separate IVUS catheters and expand the use of IVUS in a larger portion of the vasculature. High frequency capacitive micro machined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays should be integrated with interface electronics and placed on the guide wire for this purpose. Besides small size, this system-on-a-chip (SoC) front-end should connect to the back-end imaging system with a minimum number of wires to preserve the critical mechanical properties of the guide wire. We present a 40 MHz CMUT array interface SoC, which will eventually use only two wires for power delivery and transmits image data using a combination of analog-to-time conversion (ATC) and an impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) wireless link. The proof-of-concept prototype ASIC consumes only 52.8 mW and occupies 4.07 [Formula: see text] in a 0.35-[Formula: see text] standard CMOS process. A rectifier and regulator power the rest of the SoC at 3.3 V from a 10 MHz power carrier that is supplied through a 2.4 m micro-coax cable with an overall efficiency of 49.1%. Echo signals from an 8-element CMUT array are amplified by a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) array and down-converted to baseband by quadrature sampling using a 40 MHz clock, derived from the power carrier. The ATC generates pulse-width-modulated (PWM) samples at 2 × 10 MS/s with 6 bit resolution, while the entire system achieved 5.1 ENOB. Preliminary images from the prototype system are presented, and alternative data transmission and possible future directions towards practical implementation are discussed.

  8. A four-criterion selection procedure for atherosclerotic plaque elasticity reconstruction based on in vivo coronary intravascular ultrasound radial strain sequences.

    PubMed

    Le Floc'h, Simon; Cloutier, Guy; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Finet, Gérard; Yazdani, Saami K; Deleaval, Flavien; Rioufol, Gilles; Pettigrew, Roderic I; Ohayon, Jacques

    2012-12-01

    Plaque elasticity (i.e., modulogram) and morphology are good predictors of plaque vulnerability. Recently, our group developed an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) elasticity reconstruction method which was successfully implemented in vitro using vessel phantoms. In vivo IVUS modulography, however, remains a major challenge as the motion of the heart prevents accurate strain field estimation. We therefore designed a technique to extract accurate strain fields and modulograms from recorded IVUS sequences. We identified a set of four criteria based on tissue overlapping, RF-correlation coefficient between two successive frames, performance of the elasticity reconstruction method to recover the measured radial strain, and reproducibility of the computed modulograms over the cardiac cycle. This four-criterion selection procedure (4-CSP) was successfully tested on IVUS sequences obtained in twelve patients referred for a directional coronary atherectomy intervention. This study demonstrates the potential of the IVUS modulography technique based on the proposed 4-CSP to detect vulnerable plaques in vivo.

  9. Side-Branch and Coaxial Intravascular Ultrasound Guided Wire Re-Entry after Failed Retrograde Approach of Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ruey-Hsing; Lai, Chih-Hung; Lu, Tse-Min

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can provide valuable information during the intervention of difficult chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesion. Stumpless CTO lesions with an adjacent side branch are associated with a significantly lower success rate because the proper entry point is not always clearly identified and the guidewires easily slip into the side branch. Herein we presented a case of a stumpless middle left circumflex (LCX) artery CTO lesion with auto-collateral from obtuse marginal branch. Initially, we positioned the IVUS into the side-branch to find the entry point of LCX-CTO lesion. However, the punctured wire went into the false lumen. A retrograde approach was tried but later failed. Therefore, we used IVUS to find the entry point where the true lumen transited to the false lumen, and used a stiff guidewire to puncture the entry point. After we confirmed with IVUS that the whole guidewire was in the true lumen, we deployed 3 drug-eluting stents. The final angiogram showed TIMI 3 flow with preservation of all side branches. The patient was angina-free during the 6-month follow-up. By presenting this case, we have demonstrated the application of both side-branch and coaxial IVUS-guided recanalization technique in the stumpless CTO lesion. PMID:27274179

  10. Three-dimensional imaging in aortic disease by lighthouse transesophageal echocardiography using intravascular ultrasound catheters. Comparison to three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography and three-dimensional intra-aortic ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Buck, T; Görge, G; Hunold, P; Erbel, R

    1998-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and 2D intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging face their greatest limitation in visualizing aortic disease in patients. With the aid of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction, TEE and IVUS can potentially overcome this limitation but still provide only limited spatial appreciation in aortic disease because 3D imaging of the thoracic aorta requires a broader spatial visualization of the mediastinum than provided by both techniques. Moreover, for timely decision making about aortic disease TEE is limited by a large probe, which requires sedation. Therefore, we developed an approach called 3D lighthouse transesophageal echocardiography (LTEE) using a thin intravascular ultrasound catheter, which provides a full circumferential (360 degree) image and requires no sedation. The purpose of this study was to compare the feasibility and accuracy of 3D TEE, 3D IVUS, and 3D LTEE for obtaining spatial visualization of the thoracic aorta to detect aortic diseases in patients. 3D image datasets were obtained for 3D LTEE by a manual pullback of a 3.3 mm thick, 10 MHz intravascular ultrasound catheter positioned in the esophagus; for 3D TEE using a conventional 15 mm thick probe; and for 3D IVUS using a 2.6 mm thick, 20 MHz intravascular ultrasound catheter. In 12 consecutive patients, three with aortic dissection (two with type III, one with type I) and 11 with suspected artherosclerosis, we analyzed and compared spatial visualization of the thoracic aorta, 3D image quality, patient discomfort, and study time. Providing a 3D dataset of 360-degree tomographic images of the mediastinum, 3D LTEE was the only approach that allowed broad spatial visualization of the aortic arch (9 of 12 patients) with the detection of aortic dissection or atherosclerotic plaques. Spatial visualization of the aortic arch by 3D TEE was incomplete because of the relatively narrow 90-degree image sector. However, in other segments 3D image

  11. Virtual angioscopic visualization and analysis of coronary aneurysms using intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayeni, Tina A.; Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2001-05-01

    Kawasaki Disease is an inflammatory illness of young children that can seriously affect the cardiovascular system. The disease may cause coronary artery aneurysms, a thinning and dilation of the arterial wall when the wall is weakened by disease. Such aneurysms significantly increase the risk of rupture of the arterial wall, an event from which few patients survive. Due to the largely asymptotic nature of coronary aneurysms, diagnosis must be timely and accurate in order for treatment to be effective. Currently, aneurysms are detected primarily using X-ray angiography, MRI, and CT images. Increased insight into the disease and its effects on the arterial wall can be gained by multi-dimensional computerized visualization and quantitative analysis of diagnostic images made possible by the techniques of intravascular imaging and virtual endoscopy. Intravascular ultrasound images (IVUS) of a coronary artery exhibiting aneurysms were acquired from a patient with Kawasaki Disease. The disease is characterized by low luminescent in the IVUS images. Image segmentation of the abnormal, prominent anechoic regions branching from the lumen and originating within other layers of the arterial wall was performed and each region defined as a separate object. An object segmentation map was generated and used in perspective rendering of the original image volume set at successive locations along the length of the arterial segment, producing a 'fly-through' of the interior of the artery. The diseased region (aneurysm) of the wall was well defined by the differences in luminal size and by differences in appearance of the arterial wall shape observed during virtual angioscopic fly-throughs. Erosions of the endovascular surface caused pronounced horizontal and vertical ballooning of the lumen. Minute cracks within the unaffected luminal areas revealed possible early development of an aneurysm on the contralateral wall, originating in the medial section of the artery and spreading

  12. Joint learning of ultrasonic backscattering statistical physics and signal confidence primal for characterizing atherosclerotic plaques using intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sheet, Debdoot; Karamalis, Athanasios; Eslami, Abouzar; Noël, Peter; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy; Ray, Ajoy K; Laine, Andrew F; Carlier, Stephane G; Navab, Nassir; Katouzian, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) is a predominant imaging modality in interventional cardiology. It provides real-time cross-sectional images of arteries and assists clinicians to infer about atherosclerotic plaques composition. These plaques are heterogeneous in nature and constitute fibrous tissue, lipid deposits and calcifications. Each of these tissues backscatter ultrasonic pulses and are associated with a characteristic intensity in B-mode IVUS image. However, clinicians are challenged when colocated heterogeneous tissue backscatter mixed signals appearing as non-unique intensity patterns in B-mode IVUS image. Tissue characterization algorithms have been developed to assist clinicians to identify such heterogeneous tissues and assess plaque vulnerability. In this paper, we propose a novel technique coined as Stochastic Driven Histology (SDH) that is able to provide information about co-located heterogeneous tissues. It employs learning of tissue specific ultrasonic backscattering statistical physics and signal confidence primal from labeled data for predicting heterogeneous tissue composition in plaques. We employ a random forest for the purpose of learning such a primal using sparsely labeled and noisy samples. In clinical deployment, the posterior prediction of different lesions constituting the plaque is estimated. Folded cross-validation experiments have been performed with 53 plaques indicating high concurrence with traditional tissue histology. On the wider horizon, this framework enables learning of tissue-energy interaction statistical physics and can be leveraged for promising clinical applications requiring tissue characterization beyond the application demonstrated in this paper.

  13. Intravascular ultrasound for angiographically indeterminant left main coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Parashara, D K; Jacobs, L E; Ledley, G S; Yazdanfar, S; Oline, J; Kotler, M N

    1994-01-01

    The precise diagnosis of the presence of significant left main coronary artery disease has profound prognostic and therapeutic implications. Coronary cineangiography has shown to be imprecise and inaccurate to determine the percent stenosis of the left main coronary artery. We report a case with significant left main coronary artery disease in whom coronary cineangiography was in discordance with the clinical data and intravascular ultrasonography. Based on the intravascular ultrasound findings, the patient underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Therefore, the intravascular ultrasonography may be the procedure of choice for assessing indeterminant left main coronary artery lesions by coronary angiography.

  14. Volumetric imaging using single chip integrated CMUT-on-CMOS IVUS array.

    PubMed

    Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Gurun, Gokce; Satir, Sarp; Xu, Toby; Hochman, Michael; Degertekin, F Levent

    2012-01-01

    An intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheter that can provide forward viewing volumetric ultrasound images would be an invaluable clinical tool for guiding interventions. Single chip integration of front-end electronics with capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is highly desirable to reduce the interconnection complexity and enable miniaturization in IVUS catheters. For this purpose we use the monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS integration where CMUTs are fabricated directly on top of pre-processed CMOS wafers. This minimizes parasitic capacitances associated with connection lines. We have recently implemented a system design including all the required electronics using 0.35-µm CMOS process integrated with a 1.4-mm diameter CMUT array. In this study, we present the experimental volumetric imaging results from an ex-vivo chicken heart phantom. The imaging results demonstrate that the single-chip forward looking IVUS (FL-IVUS) system with monolithically integrated electronics has potential to visualize the front view of coronary arteries.

  15. 12-month intravascular ultrasound observations from BiOSS® first-in-man studies.

    PubMed

    Gil, Robert J; Bil, Jacek; Costa, Ricardo A; Gil, Katarzyna E; Vassiliev, Dobrin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the difference in neointima pattern assessed by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) between two dedicated bifurcation stents, BiOSS® Expert and BiOSS® LIM at 12-month follow-up. This manuscript reports IVUS findings obtained from the analysis of patients enrolled into first-in-man registries initially assessing the BiOSS Expert® (paclitaxel) and BiOSS LIM® (sirolimus) stents. Quantitative angiographic analysis was performed pre, post-stenting, and at follow-up. IVUS examination was performed at 12 months. There were analyzed 34 cases (BiOSS Expert® 11 patients, BiOSS LIM® 23 patients). Procedural characteristics in the two groups were similar, except for rates of main vessel predilatation and FKB/POT, which were higher in BiOSS® LIM group, 54.5 % vs 73.9 % (P < 0.05) and 0 % vs 39.1 % (P < 0.05), respectively. When comparing late lumen loss (LLL) for both stents there were significantly bigger values for main vessel and main branch in the BiOSS® Expert group, but not in side branch. Intravascular ultrasound examination showed that in the BiOSS LIM® group comparing with the BiOSS Expert® group there was lower neointima burden in the whole stent (24.7 ± 7.5 % vs 19.4 ± 8.6 %, P < 0.05) as well as in main vessel (22.8 ± 5.6 % vs 16.9 ± 6.1 %, P < 0.05) and main branch (36.1 ± 6.5 % vs 27.6 ± 8.7 %, P < 0.05), but not at the level of bifurcation (15.1 ± 3.8 % vs 13.6 ± 5.4 %, P = NS). In addition, we found that final kissing balloon/proximal optimization technique (FKB/POT) was associated with significantly smaller value of LLL in main vessel (0.24 ± 0.09 mm vs 0.32 ± 0.14 mm, P < 0.05), which in IVUS analysis resulted in smaller neointima burden in main vessel (13.7 ± 3.9 % vs 18.9 ± 4.45 %, P < 0.05) as well as at the bifurcation site (12.6 ± 4.1 % vs 14.1 ± 2.4 %, P < 0.05). The

  16. Combined frequency domain photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging for intravascular applications

    PubMed Central

    Castelino, Robin F.; Hynes, Michael; Munding, Chelsea E.; Telenkov, Sergey; Foster, F. Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging has the potential to characterize lipid-rich structures based on the optical absorption contrast of tissues. In this study, we explore frequency domain photoacoustics (FDPA) for intravascular applications. The system employed an intensity-modulated continuous wave (CW) laser diode, delivering 1W over an intensity modulated chirp frequency of 4-12MHz. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach on an agar vessel phantom with graphite and lipid targets, imaged using a planar acoustic transducer co-aligned with an optical fibre, allowing for the co-registration of IVUS and FDPA images. A frequency domain correlation method was used for signal processing and image reconstruction. The graphite and lipid targets show an increase in FDPA signal as compared to the background of 21dB and 16dB, respectively. Use of compact CW laser diodes may provide a valuable alternative for the development of photoacoustic intravascular devices instead of pulsed laser systems. PMID:27895986

  17. Renal denervation by intravascular ultrasound: Preliminary in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor; McClain, Steve; Zou, Yong; Smith, David; Warnking, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound denervation has recently become a subject of intense research in connection with the treatment of complex medical conditions including neurological conditions, development of pain management, reproduction of skin sensation, neuropathic pain and spasticity. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of intravascular ultrasound to produce nerve damage in renal sympathetic nerves without significant injury to the renal artery. This technique may potentially be used to treat various medical conditions, such as hypertension. The study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Ultrasound was applied to renal nerves of the swine model for histopathological evaluation. Therapeutic ultrasound energy was delivered circumferentially by an intravascular catheter maneuvered into the renal arteries. Fluoroscopic imaging was conducted pre-and post-ultrasound treatment. Animals were recovered and euthanized up to 30 hours post procedure, followed by necropsy and tissue sample collection. Histopathological examination showed evidence of extensive damage to renal nerves, characterized by nuclear pyknosis, hyalinization of stroma and multifocal hemorrhages, with little or no damage to renal arteries. This study demonstrates the feasibility of intravascular ultrasound as a minimally invasive renal denervation technique. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of this technique and its related clinical significance.

  18. The Role of Intracoronary Plaque Imaging with Intravascular Ultrasound, Optical Coherence Tomography, and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Vu; Grounds, Jill; Pham, Don; Virani, Salim; Hamzeh, Ihab; Qureshi, Athar Mahmood; Lakkis, Nasser; Alam, Mahboob

    2016-09-01

    The development of multiple diagnostic intracoronary imaging modalities has increased our understanding of coronary atherosclerotic disease. These imaging modalities, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), have provided a method to study plaques and introduced the concept of plaque vulnerability. They are being increasingly used for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) optimization and are invaluable tools in research studying the pathophysiology of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), in-stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. IVUS has the ability to visualize the intracoronary lumen and the vessel wall and can be used to detect early atherosclerotic disease even in the setting of positive arterial remodeling. Studies supporting the use of IVUS to optimize stent deployment and apposition have shown a significant reduction in cardiovascular events. OCT provides even higher resolution imaging and near microscopic detail of plaques, restenoses, and thromboses; thus, it can identify the etiology of ACS. Ongoing trials are evaluating the role of OCT in PCI and using OCT to study stent endothelialization and neointimal proliferation. NIRS is a modality capable of localizing and quantifying lipid core burden. It is usually combined with IVUS and is used to characterize plaque composition. The benefits of NIRS in the setting of ACS have been limited to case reports and series. The utilization of all these intracoronary imaging modalities will continue to expand as their indications for clinical use and research grow. Studies to support their use for PCI optimization resulting in improved outcomes with potential to prevent downstream events are ongoing.

  19. a Deformable Template Model with Feature Tracking for Automated Ivus Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, Prakash; Hau Chen, Chi

    2010-02-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) can be used to create a 3D vascular profile of arteries for preventative prediction of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). Segmentation of individual B-scan frames is a crucial step for creating profiles. Manual segmentation is too labor intensive to be of routine use. Automated segmentation algorithms are not yet accurate enough. We present a method of tracking features across frames of ultrasound data to increase automated segmentation accuracy using a deformable template model.

  20. Intravascular Ultrasound and Angiographic Predictors of In-Stent Restenosis of Chronic Total Occlusion Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeehoon; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Seong-Wook; Park, Jin Joo; Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Oh, Il-Young; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Suh, Jung-Won; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Choi, Dong-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Despite the benefits of successful percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesions, PCIs of CTO lesions still carry a high rate of adverse events, including in-stent restenosis (ISR). Because previous reports have not specifically investigated the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) predictors of ISR in CTO lesions, we focused on these predictors. We included 126 patients who underwent successful PCIs, using drug-eluting stents, and post-PCI IVUS of CTO lesions. Patient and lesion characteristics were analyzed to elucidate the ISR predictors. In each lesion, an average of 1.7 ± 0.7 (mean length, 46.4 ± 20.3 mm) stents were used. At 9 months follow-up, 14 (11%) patients demonstrated ISR, and 8 (6.3%) underwent target lesion revascularization. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the independent predictors of ISR were the post-PCI minimal luminal diameter (MLD) and the stent expansion ratio (SER; minimal stent cross-sectional area (CSA) over the nominal CSA of the implanted stent), measured using quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and IVUS, respectively. A receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that the best post-PCI MLD and SER cut-off values for predicting ISR were 2.4 mm (area under the curve [AUC], 0.762; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.639–0.885) and 70% (AUC, 0.714; 95% CI, 0.577–0.852), respectively. Lesions with post-PCI MLD and SER values less than these threshold values were at a higher risk of ISR, with an odds ratio of 23.3 (95% CI, 2.74–198.08), compared with lesions having larger MLD and SER values. Thus, the potential predictors of ISR, after PCI of CTO lesions, are the post-PCI MLD and SER values. The ISR rate was highest in lesions with a post-PCI MLD ≤2.4 mm and an SER ≤70%. PMID:26465755

  1. Analysis of Plaque Composition in Coronary Chronic Total Occlusion Lesion Using Virtual Histology-Intravascular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yo-Han; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Seo, Duck-Jun; Seo, Young-Hoon; Lee, Chung-Seop; Song, In-Geol; Yang, Dong-Ju; Kim, Ki-Hong; Park, Hyun-Woong; Kim, Wan-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Success rates of chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have recently been reported to range from 80% to 90%. A better understanding of the pathologic characteristics of the CTO lesion may helpful to improving CTO PCI success rates. We evaluated the CTO lesion in patients with stable angina (SA) by virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS). Subjects and Methods The study population consisted of 149 consecutive patients with SA underwent VH-IVUS examination. We analyzed demographic and VH-IVUS findings in 22 CTO patients (17 males; mean, 62.3 years old) compared with 127 non-CTO patients (82 males; mean, 61.3 years old). Results A significantly lower ejection fraction (57.6±13.0% vs. 65.4±8.8%, p=0.007) was detected in the CTO group compared with the non-CTO group. Reference vessel lumen area of the proximal and distal segment was significantly less in CTO group than in non-CTO group. The lesion length of the CTO group was significantly longer than those of the non-CTO group (24.4±9.6 mm vs. 17.2±7.4 mm, p<0.001). Total atheroma volume (224±159 mm3 vs. 143±86 mm3, p=0.006) and percent atheroma volume (63.2±9.6% vs. 55.8±8.5%, p=0.011) of the CTO group were also significantly greater than those of non-CTO group. However, the lesion length adjusted plaque composition of the CTO group was not significantly different compared with that of the non-CTO group. Conclusion CTO lesions had a longer lesion length and greater plaque burden than the non-CTO lesion in patients with SA. However, lesion length adjusted plaque composition showed similar between the two groups. These results support that plaque characteristics of CTO lesions are similar to non-CTO lesions in patients with SA. PMID:26798383

  2. Image analysis techniques for automated IVUS contour detection.

    PubMed

    Papadogiorgaki, Maria; Mezaris, Vasileios; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Giannoglou, George D; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis

    2008-09-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) constitutes a valuable technique for the diagnosis of coronary atherosclerosis. The detection of lumen and media-adventitia borders in IVUS images represents a necessary step towards the reliable quantitative assessment of atherosclerosis. In this work, a fully automated technique for the detection of lumen and media-adventitia borders in IVUS images is presented. This comprises two different steps for contour initialization: one for each corresponding contour of interest and a procedure for the refinement of the detected contours. Intensity information, as well as the result of texture analysis, generated by means of a multilevel discrete wavelet frames decomposition, are used in two different techniques for contour initialization. For subsequently producing smooth contours, three techniques based on low-pass filtering and radial basis functions are introduced. The different combinations of the proposed methods are experimentally evaluated in large datasets of IVUS images derived from human coronary arteries. It is demonstrated that our proposed segmentation approaches can quickly and reliably perform automated segmentation of IVUS images.

  3. Intravascular Ultrasound Observation of the Mechanism of No-Reflow Phenomenon in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junxia; Wu, Longmei; Tian, Xinli; Zhang, Jian; Shi, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the mechanism of the no-reflow phenomenon using coronary angiography (CAG) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Methods A total of 120 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who successfully underwent indwelling intracoronary stent placement by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). All patients underwent pre- and post-PCI CAG and pre-IVUS. No-reflow was defined as post-PCI thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) grade 0, 1, or 2 flow in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Normal reflow was defined as TIMI grade 3 flow. The pre-operation reference vascular area, minimal luminal cross-sectional area, plaque cross-sectional area, lesion length, plaque volume and plaque traits were measured by IVUS. Results The no-reflow group was observed in 14 cases (11.6%) and normal blood-flow group in 106 cases (89.4%) based on CAG results. There was no statistically significant difference in the patients’ medical history, reference vascular area (no-flow vs. normal-flow; 15.5 ± 3.2 vs. 16.2 ± 3.3, p> 0.05) and lesion length (21.9 ± 5.1 vs. 19.5 ± 4.8, p> 0.05) between the two groups. No-reflow patients had a longer symptom onset to reperfusion time compared to normal blood-flow group [(6.6 ± 3.1) h vs (4.3 ± 2.7) h; p< 0.05] and higher incidence of TIMI flow grade< 3 (71.4% vs 49.0%, p< 0.05). By IVUS examination, the no-reflow group had a significantly increased coronary plaque area and plaque volume compared to normal blood-flow group [(13.7 ± 3.0) mm2 vs (10.2 ± 2.9) mm2; (285.4 ± 99.8) mm3 vs (189.7 ± 86.4) mm3; p< 0.01]. The presence of IVUS-detected soft plaque (57.1% vs. 24.0%, p< 0.01), eccentric plaque (64.2% vs. 33.7%, p< 0.05), plaque rupture (50.0% vs. 21.2%, p< 0.01), and thrombosis (42.8% vs. 15.3%) were significantly more common in no-reflow group. Conclusion There was no obvious relationship between the coronary risk factors and no-reflow phenomenon. The symptom onset to reperfusion time, TIMI flow grade before

  4. Integrated intravascular optical coherence tomography ultrasound imaging system.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jiechen; Yang, Hao-Chung; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Qifa; Hu, Changhong; Shung, K Kirk; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    We report on a dual-modality optical coherence tomography (OCT) ultrasound (US) system for intravascular imaging. To the best of our knowledge, we have developed the first integrated OCT-US probe that combines OCT optical components with an US transducer. The OCT optical components mainly consist of a single-mode fiber, a gradient index lens for light-beam focusing, and a right-angled prism for reflecting light into biological tissue. A 40-MHz piezoelectric transducer (PZT-5H) side-viewing US transducer was fabricated to obtain the US image. These components were integrated into a single probe, enabling both OCT and US imaging at the same time. In vitro OCT and ultrasound images of a rabbit aorta were obtained using this dual-modality imaging system. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an OCT-US system for intravascular imaging, which is expected to have a prominent impact on early detection and characterization of atherosclerosis.

  5. Integrated intravascular optical coherence tomography ultrasound imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jiechen; Yang, Hao-Chung; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Qifa; Hu, Changhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    We report on a dual-modality optical coherence tomography (OCT) ultrasound (US) system for intravascular imaging. To the best of our knowledge, we have developed the first integrated OCT-US probe that combines OCT optical components with an US transducer. The OCT optical components mainly consist of a single-mode fiber, a gradient index lens for light-beam focusing, and a right-angled prism for reflecting light into biological tissue. A 40-MHz piezoelectric transducer (PZT-5H) side-viewing US transducer was fabricated to obtain the US image. These components were integrated into a single probe, enabling both OCT and US imaging at the same time. In vitro OCT and ultrasound images of a rabbit aorta were obtained using this dual-modality imaging system. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an OCT-US system for intravascular imaging, which is expected to have a prominent impact on early detection and characterization of atherosclerosis. PMID:20210424

  6. An artificial neural network method for lumen and media-adventitia border detection in IVUS.

    PubMed

    Su, Shengran; Hu, Zhenghui; Lin, Qiang; Hau, William Kongto; Gao, Zhifan; Zhang, Heye

    2016-11-17

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has been well recognized as one powerful imaging technique to evaluate the stenosis inside the coronary arteries. The detection of lumen border and media-adventitia (MA) border in IVUS images is the key procedure to determine the plaque burden inside the coronary arteries, but this detection could be burdensome to the doctor because of large volume of the IVUS images. In this paper, we use the artificial neural network (ANN) method as the feature learning algorithm for the detection of the lumen and MA borders in IVUS images. Two types of imaging information including spatial, neighboring features were used as the input data to the ANN method, and then the different vascular layers were distinguished accordingly through two sparse auto-encoders and one softmax classifier. Another ANN was used to optimize the result of the first network. In the end, the active contour model was applied to smooth the lumen and MA borders detected by the ANN method. The performance of our approach was compared with the manual drawing method performed by two IVUS experts on 461 IVUS images from four subjects. Results showed that our approach had a high correlation and good agreement with the manual drawing results. The detection error of the ANN method close to the error between two groups of manual drawing result. All these results indicated that our proposed approach could efficiently and accurately handle the detection of lumen and MA borders in the IVUS images.

  7. Image-based dosimetry of an implanted radioactive stent using intravascular ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Stephen W.

    Angioplasty has become an increasingly popular and effective treatment for heart disease. Unfortunately, restenosis, a cellular and biological reaction to the procedure, has hindered its effectiveness. Two of the most successful methods of inhibiting restenosis are radiation and stents. The combination of these two components, radioactive stents, is not as common as some of the other methods, yet still has potential of slowing restenosis. Investigation into source characteristics and artery wall radiobiology may illuminate some possible solutions to the problems of restenosis. This work has developed a calculational method to look at in-vivo images of implanted stents and determine the dose to the artery walls in order to test different source characteristics. The images are Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) cross-sectional slices of the stent and the artery. From these images, it is possible to determine the implanted stent structure. The pieces of the stent are identified in the images and modeled in a Monte Carlo simulation, using MCNP4c3. The simulation results were combined with the images to give three-dimensional absolute dose contours of the stent. The absolute dose values were verified using radiochromic film and 198Au-plated stents. This work was able to successfully verify the dose results and create a three-dimensional dose map of the implanted stent.

  8. Evaluation of a framework for the co-registration of intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography coronary artery pullbacks.

    PubMed

    Molony, David S; Timmins, Lucas H; Rasoul-Arzrumly, Emad; Samady, Habib; Giddens, Don P

    2016-12-08

    A growing number of studies have used a combination of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the assessment of atherosclerotic plaques. Given their respective strengths these imaging modalities highly complement each other. Correlations of hemodynamics and coronary artery disease (CAD) have been extensively investigated with both modalities separately, though not concurrently due to challenges in image registration. Manual co-registration of these modalities is a time expensive task subject to human error, and the development of an automatic method has not been previously addressed. We developed a framework that uses dynamic time warping for the longitudinal co-registration and dynamic programming for the circumferential co-registration of images and evaluated the methodology in a cohort (n = 12) of patients with moderate CAD. Excellent correlation was seen between the algorithm and two expert readers for longitudinal co-registration (CCC = 0.9964, CCC = 0.9959) and circumferential co-registration (CCC = 0.9688, CCC = 0.9598). The mean error of the circumferential co-registration angle was found to be within 10%. A framework for the co-registration of IVUS and OCT pullbacks has been developed which provides a foundation for comprehensive studies of CAD biomechanics.

  9. Relation between baseline plaque features and subsequent coronary artery remodeling determined by optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zulong; Dong, Nana; Sun, Rong; Liu, Xinxin; Gu, Xia; Sun, Yong; Du, Hongwei; Dai, Jiannan; Liu, Youbin; Hou, Jingbo; Tian, Jinwei; Yu, Bo

    2017-01-17

    Atherosclerosis often leads to myocardial infarction and stroke. We examined the influence of baseline plaque characteristics on subsequent vascular remodeling in response to changes in plaque size. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), we examined 213 plaques from 138 patients with acute coronary syndrome at baseline and repeated IVUS at the 12-month follow-up. The change in external elastic membrane (EEM) area for each 1 mm2 change in plaque area (i.e., the slope of the regression line) was calculated as a measure of vascular remodeling capacity. In plaques with static positive remodeling, the slope was smaller than in plaques without static positive remodeling. In addition, the slope of the regression line for lesions with a large plaque burden was much smaller than that for lesions with a small plaque burden. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that diabetes, calcification and static positive remodeling were inversely and independently associated with the level of change in EEM area/change in plaque area. Lesions with a large plaque burden, calcifications or static positive remodeling had less remodeling capacity, and calcification and static positive remodeling were independent predictors of reduced subsequent remodeling. Therefore, calcifications and static positive remodeling could be used as morphological biomarkers to predict decreased subsequent arterial remodeling.

  10. Diagnostic Performance of Intravascular Ultrasound-Derived Minimal Lumen Area to Predict Functionally Significant Non-Left Main Coronary Artery Disease: a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ho-Cheol; Bae, Jong Seok; Jin, Han-Young; Seo, Jeong-Sook; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Kyeong; Cho, Kyoung-Im; Kim, Bo-Hyun; Park, Yong Hyun; Je, Hyung-Gon; Kim, Dong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention frequently results in unnecessary stenting due to the low positive predictive value of IVUS-derived minimal lumen area (MLA) for identification of functionally significant coronary stenosis. We appraised the diagnostic accuracy of IVUS-derived MLA compared with the fractional flow reserve (FFR) to assess intermediate coronary stenosis. Subjects and Methods We searched MEDLINE and Cochrane databases for studies using IVUS and FFR methods to establish the best MLA cut-off values to predict significant non-left main coronary artery stenosis. Summary estimates were obtained using a random-effects model. Results The 17 studies used in our analysis enrolled 3920 patients with 4267 lesions. The weighted overall mean MLA cut-off value was 2.58 mm2. The pooled MLA sensitivity that predicted functionally significant coronary stenosis was 0.75 (confidence interval [CI]: 0.72 to 0.77) and the specificity was 0.66 (CI: 0.64 to 0.68). The positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 2.33 (CI: 2.06 to 2.63) and LR (-) was 0.33 (CI: 0.26 to 0.42). The pooled diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) was 7.53 (CI: 5.26 to 10.76) and the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve for all the trials was 0.782 with a Q point of 0.720. Meta-regression analysis demonstrated that an FFR cut-off point of 0.75 was associated with a four times higher diagnostic accuracy compared to that of 0.80 (relative DOR: 3.92; 95% CI: 1.25 to 12.34). Conclusion IVUS-derived MLA has limited diagnostic accuracy and needs careful interpretation to correlate with functionally significant non-left main coronary artery stenosis. PMID:27721852

  11. Long-term outcomes of intravascular ultrasound-guided implantation of bare metal stents versus drug-eluting stents in primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yun-Kyeong; Park, Nam-Hee; Choi, Sang-Woong; Sohn, Ji-Hyun; Cho, Hyun-Ok; Park, Hyoung-Seob; Yoon, Hyuck-Jun; Kim, Hyungseop; Nam, Chang-Wook; Kim, Yoon-Nyun; Kim, Kwon-Bae

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims While drug-eluting stents (DESs) have shown favorable outcomes in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) compared to bare metal stents (BMSs), there are concerns about the risk of stent thrombosis (ST) with DESs. Because intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance may help optimize stent placement and improve outcomes in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients, we evaluated the impact of IVUS-guided BMS versus DES implantation on long-term outcomes in primary PCI. Methods In all, 239 STEMI patients received DES (n = 172) or BMS (n = 67) under IVUS guidance in primary PCI. The 3-year incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) including death, myocardial infarction (MI), target vessel revascularization (TVR), and ST was evaluated. Results There was no difference in all cause mortality or MI. However, the incidence of TVR was 23.9% with BMS versus 9.3% with DES (p = 0.005). Thus, the number of MACEs was significantly lower with DES (11.0% vs. 29.9%; p = 0.001). The incidence of definite or probable ST was not different (1.5% vs. 2.3%; p = 1.0). IVUS-guided DES implantation (hazard ratio [HR], 0.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.08 to 0.78; p = 0.017), stent length (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.06; p = 0.046), and multivessel disease (HR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.11 to 8.15; p = 0.030) were independent predictors of MACE. Conclusions In patients treated with primary PCI under IVUS guidance, the use of DES reduced the incidence of 3-year TVR versus BMS. However, all cause mortality and MI were similar between the groups. The incidence of ST was low in both groups. PMID:24574835

  12. Coronary artery calcification is inversely related to body morphology in patients with significant coronary artery disease: a three-dimensional intravascular ultrasound study

    PubMed Central

    Dangas, George D.; Maehara, Akiko; Evrard, Solene M.; Sartori, Samantha; Li, Jennifer R.; Chirumamilla, Amala P.; Nomura-Kitabayashi, Aya; Gukathasan, Nilusha; Hassanin, Ahmed; Baber, Usman; Fahy, Martin; Fuster, Valentin; Mintz, Gary S.; Kovacic, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Emerging data have indicated unexpected complexity in the regulation of vascular and bone calcification. In particular, several recent studies have challenged the concept of a universally positive relationship between body morphology [weight, height, body mass index (BMI), body surface area (BSA)] and the extent of vascular calcification. We sought to clarify these discrepancies and investigated the relationship between index lesion coronary artery calcification (CAC) and body morphology in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using three-dimensional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Methods and results We analysed CAC in patients who underwent PCI with pre-intervention IVUS imaging. The main outcome measure was the calcium index (CalcIndex); a three-dimensional IVUS-derived measure of total calcification per obstructive coronary lesion. A total of 346 patients (65.3 ± 10.6 years; 29.5% females) underwent PCI with IVUS-based CAC assessment. CalcIndex was categorized as zero–low (0–0.1399; n = 152) or intermediate–high (0.1400–1.2541; n = 194). All measures of body morphology were lower in patients with intermediate–high CalcIndex (height, P = 0.024; weight, P = 0.008; BMI, P = 0.064; BSA, P = 0.005). In adjusted multivariable models, weight and BSA were independent inverse predictors of intermediate–high CalcIndex [weight: odds ratio (OR) 0.986, P = 0.017; BSA: OR 0.323, P = 0.012] while CalcIndex also trended towards an inverse association with both height (P = 0.068) and BMI (P = 0.064). These independent inverse associations were consistent across multiple clinical subgroups, including stratification by age, race, gender, diabetes, and renal impairment. Conclusion Using three-dimensional IVUS to assess vascular calcification, these data confirm an independent, inverse relationship between body size and index lesion CAC in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease. PMID:23904334

  13. Delineation of atherosclerotic plaque using subharmonic imaging filtering techniques and a commercial intravascular ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; deMuinck, Ebo D; Doyley, Marvin M; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    The ability to delineate atherosclerotic plaque from the surrounding tissue using custom-developed subharmonic imaging (SHI) digital filtering techniques was investigated in vivo using a commercially available system. Atherosclerosis was induced in the aorta of two Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic rabbits following which injections of an ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, Massachusetts) were administered. Imaging was performed using a Galaxy intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) scanner (Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts) equipped with an Atlantis® SR Pro Imaging Catheter (Boston Scientific). Four preliminary band-pass filters were designed to isolate the subharmonic signal (from surrounding tissue) and applied to the radio-frequency (RF) data. Preliminary filter performances were compared in terms of vessel-tissue contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and visual examination. Based on preliminary results, a subharmonic adaptive filter and a stopband (SB) filter were designed and applied to the RF data. Images were classified as fundamental, SHI, and SB. Four readers performed qualitative analysis of 168 randomly selected images (across all three imaging modes). The images were scored for overall image quality, image noise, plaque visualization, and vessel lumen visualization. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the scores followed by intraclass correlation (ICC) evaluation. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating the CTRs for the vessel-to-plaque and vessel-to-tissue (compared using a paired student's t test). Qualitative analysis showed SHI and SB to have significantly less image noise relative to the fundamental mode (p < 0.001). Fundamental mode scored significantly higher than SHI and SB for the remaining three categories. ICC showed mixed results among reader evaluation for delineation of plaque. However, quantitatively, SHI produced the best vessel-plaque CTR.

  14. Computerized methodology for micro-CT and histological data inflation using an IVUS based translation map.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Lambros S; Rigas, George A; Sakellarios, Antonis I; Exarchos, Themis P; Siogkas, Panagiotis K; Naka, Katerina K; Panetta, Daniele; Pelosi, Gualtiero; Vozzi, Federico; Michalis, Lampros K; Parodi, Oberdan; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2015-10-01

    A framework for the inflation of micro-CT and histology data using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images, is presented. The proposed methodology consists of three steps. In the first step the micro-CT/histological images are manually co-registered with IVUS by experts using fiducial points as landmarks. In the second step the lumen of both the micro-CT/histological images and IVUS images are automatically segmented. Finally, in the third step the micro-CT/histological images are inflated by applying a transformation method on each image. The transformation method is based on the IVUS and micro-CT/histological contour difference. In order to validate the proposed image inflation methodology, plaque areas in the inflated micro-CT and histological images are compared with the ones in the IVUS images. The proposed methodology for inflating micro-CT/histological images increases the sensitivity of plaque area matching between the inflated and the IVUS images (7% and 22% in histological and micro-CT images, respectively).

  15. Effects of sitagliptin on coronary atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes-A serial integrated backscatter-intravascular ultrasound study

    PubMed Central

    Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Kazuki; Koyama, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Kunishima, Tomoyuki; Hikita, Hiroyuki; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Miyazawa, Akiyoshi; Michishita, Ichiro; Investigators, for the TRUST

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic effects in an animal model. However, the clinical usefulness of DPP-4 inhibitors, particularly its effects on coronary atherosclerosis, has not been evaluated thus far. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the effects of sitagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, on coronary atherosclerosis using integrated backscatter (IB)-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with type 2 diabetes. This trial was a prospective, open-labeled, randomized, multicenter study. Twenty-eight patients with type 2 diabetes who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomly assigned to either the sitagliptin group (group S) or the control group (group C). Non-PCI lesions were evaluated using IB-IVUS at the time of PCI and at the 48-week follow-up. The primary endpoint was the percentage change in plaque volume measured using grayscale IVUS, and the secondary endpoint was changes in plaque composition evaluated using IB-IVUS. Grayscale IVUS analysis demonstrated that plaque volume tended to decrease in both groups (group S: -1.7±8.5%; group C: -3.2±12.2%), but a between-group difference was not observed. A decrease in the lipid plaque volume (group S: from 200.1±116.2 to 179.8±121.0 mm3, P = 0.02; group C: from 298.3±363.0 to 256.6±386.1 mm3, P = 0.1) and an increase in the calcified plaque volume (group S: from 2.1±0.9 to 3.2±1.8 mm3, P = 0.06; group C: from 2.3±1.7 to 4.8±3.5 mm3, P = 0.04) was observed on IB-IVUS analysis. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses showed that the percentage change in serum non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level was an independent and significant predictor of a reduction in lipid plaque volume (β = 0.445, P = 0.04). In conclusions, sitagliptin did not significantly reduce coronary plaque volume in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, a decrease in the lipid plaque volume was observed in the sitagliptin

  16. Dual-element needle transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Williams, Jay A.; Yoon, Changhan; Kang, Bong Jin; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor; Shung, K. Kirk; Kim, Hyung Ham

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A dual-element needle transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging has been developed. A low-frequency element and a high-frequency element were integrated into one device to obtain images which conveyed both low- and high-frequency information from a single scan. The low-frequency element with a center frequency of 48 MHz was fabricated from the single crystal form of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate solid solution with two matching layers (MLs) and the high frequency element with a center frequency of 152 MHz was fabricated from lithium niobate with one ML. The measured axial and lateral resolutions were 27 and 122  μm, respectively, for the low-frequency element, and 14 and 40  μm, respectively, for the high-frequency element. The performance of the dual-element needle transducer was validated by imaging a tissue-mimicking phantom with lesion-mimicking area, and ex vivo rabbit aortas in water and rabbit whole blood. The results suggest that a low-frequency element effectively provides depth resolved images of the whole vessel and its adjacent tissue, and a high-frequency element visualizes detailed structure near the surface of the lumen wall in the presence of blood within the lumen. The advantages of a dual-element approach for intravascular imaging are also discussed. PMID:26158118

  17. Choosing the optimal mother wavelet for decomposition of radio-frequency intravascular ultrasound data for characterization of atherosclerotic plaque lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedekar, Devyani; Nair, Anuja; Vince, D. Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Aim: The objective of this work is to determine the optimal basis function to perform wavelet analysis for tissue characterization of radio frequency intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) backscattered data. This is the most important step in wavelet analysis as it ensures accurate decomposition of the original signal into the various frequency bands. The criterion to choose the mother wavelet that is best suited to the data depends on the intended application. Wavelet families possessing properties like orthogonality, regularity, stability and admissibility have previously been shown to have application in tissue characterization. Algorithm: Depending on the usable data bandwidth known from previous studies we decomposed data using a 4-level decomposition scheme. We then calculated Shannon"s entropy for every level and employed "minimum Shannon entropy criterion" to determine the best mother wavelet for signal decomposition. According to this criterion, accurate decomposition is indicated when the total entropy of the daughter (decomposed) levels is lower than the entropy of the parent level. Analysis and Results: We acquired 40 MHz IVUS data ex-vivo from 10 left anterior descending (LAD) coronary arteries. Data was acquired such that each frame comprised of 256 scanlines. Next, we randomly selected 3 scanlines for each LAD and applied the above-mentioned Shannon entropy criterion for these 30 scanlines. We analyzed 23 mother wavelets from different families. Daubechies 3rd order wavelet accurately decomposes 29/30 scanlines at all levels. Daubechies 6th order wavelet appears optimal for 21/30 scanlines. Future direction: To obtain more precise signal decomposition, the optimal mother wavelet should be selected at every decomposition level. The best mother wavelet is indicated by the lowest Shannon entropy for that particular level.

  18. An automated method for lumen and media-adventitia border detection in a sequence of IVUS frames.

    PubMed

    Plissiti, Marina E; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Michalis, Lampros K; Bozios, George E

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method for the automated detection of lumen and media-adventitia border in sequential intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) frames. The method is based on the use of deformable models. The energy function is appropriately modified and minimized using a Hopfield neural network. Proper modifications in the definition of the bias of the neurons have been introduced to incorporate image characteristics. A simulated annealing scheme is included to ensure convergence at a global minimum. The method overcomes distortions in the expected image pattern, due to the presence of calcium, employing a specialized structure of the neural network and boundary correction schemas which are based on a priori knowledge about the vessel geometry. The proposed method is evaluated using sequences of IVUS frames from 18 arterial segments, some of them indicating calcified regions. The obtained results demonstrate that our method is statistically accurate, reproducible, and capable to identify the regions of interest in sequences of IVUS frames.

  19. Does intravascular ultrasound provide clinical benefits for percutaneous coronary intervention with bare-metal stent implantation? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) is still controversial despite several previously published meta-analyses. A meta-analysis to evaluate the controversial role of IVUS-guided PCI with bare-metal stenting was performed and a previous published meta-analysis was re-evaluated in order to clarify the discrepancy between results of these studies. Methods A systematic review was performed by an electronic search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Knowledge databases and by a manual search of reference lists for randomized controlled trials published until April 2011, with clinical outcomes and, at least, six months of clinical follow-up. A meta-analysis based on the intention to treat was performed with the selected studies. Results Five studies and 1,754 patients were included. There were no differences in death (OR = 1.86; 95% CI = 0.88-3.95; p = 0.10), non-fatal myocardial infarction (OR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.27-1.58; p = 0.35) and major adverse cardiac events (OR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.49-1.13; p = 0.16). An analysis of the previous published meta-analysis strongly suggested the presence of publication bias. Conclusions There is no evidence to recommend routine IVUS-guided PCI with bare-metal stent implantation. This may be explained by the paucity and heterogeneity of the studies published so far. PMID:22999055

  20. Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging of Peripheral Arteries as an Adjunct to Balloon Angioplasty and Atherectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Korogi, Yukunori; Hirai, Toshinori; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1996-11-15

    This article reviews many of the applications of intravascular ultrasound (US) imaging for peripheral arterial diseases. In vitro studies demonstrate an excellent correlation between ultrasound measurements of lumen and plaque crossectional area compared with histologic sections. In vivo clinical studies reveal the enhanced diagnostic capabilities of this technology compared with angiography. Intravascular US imaging can provide valuable information on the degree, eccentricity, and histologic type of stenosis before intervention, and on the morphological changes in the arterial wall and the extent of excision after intervention. Intravascular US may also serve as a superior index for gauging the diameter of balloon, stent, laser probe, and/or atherectomy catheter appropriate for a proposed intervention. Significant new insights into the mechanisms of balloon angioplasty and atherectomy have been established by intravascular US findings. Intravascular US imaging has been shown to be a more accurate method than angiography for determining the cross-sectional area of the arterial lumen, and for assessing severity of stenosis. Quantitative assessment of the luminal cross-sectional area after the balloon dilatation should be more accurate than angiography as intimal tears or dissections produced by the dilatation may not be accurately evaluated with angiography. At the present time, intravascular US is still a controversial imaging technique. Outcome studies are currently being organized to assess the clinical value and cost effectiveness of intravascular ultrasound in the context of these interventional procedures.

  1. The Effect of Statin Therapy on Coronary Plaque Composition Using Virtual Histology Intravascular Ultrasound: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guian; Li, Yuxin; Huang, Huishan; Wang, Jinghan; Hirayama, Atsushi; Lin, Jinxiu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have indicated that statin therapy may promote plaque regression. However, the impact of statin therapy on plaque composition has not been clearly elucidated. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effect of statin therapy on coronary plaque composition as assessed by virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS). Methods Online databases were searched from inception to March 1, 2015. Studies providing VH-IVUS volumetric analyses of coronary plaque composition at baseline and follow-up in patients receiving statin therapy were included. Weighted mean difference (WMD) using a random-effects model was used. Results Ten studies involving 682 patients were included. There was a substantial reduction in fibrous volume between baseline and follow-up (WMD: -2.37 mm3, 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.01 to -0.74 mm3, P=0.004), and a significant increase in dense calcium (DC) volume (WMD: 0.89 mm3, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.08 mm3, P<0.00001). No significant change was seen in fibro-fatty and necrotic core (NC) volumes. In stratified analyses, the fibrous volume was decreased significantly (WMD: -3.39 mm3, 95% CI -6.56 to -0.21 mm3, P=0.04) and the absolute DC volume (WMD: 0.99 mm3, 95% CI 0.23 to 1.76 mm3, P=0.01) was increased in the subgroup with ≥12 months follow-up, whereas no significant change was observed in the subgroup with < 12 months follow-up. Similarly, a substantial decrease in fibrous volume (WMD: -2.01 mm3, 95% CI -3.05 to -0.96 mm3, P< 0.0002) and an increase in DC volume (WMD: 0.90 mm3, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.10 mm3, P< 0.00001) were observed in the subgroup with high-intensive statin therapy, while the change in fibrous and DC volumes approached statistical significance (P=0.05 and P=0.05, respectively) in the subgroup with low-intensive statin therapy. Conclusions Statin treatment, particularly of high-intensity and long-term duration, induced a marked modification in coronary plaque composition including a decrease in

  2. Image Processing in Intravascular OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao; Wilson, David L.; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in the world. Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is rapidly becoming a promising imaging modality for characterization of atherosclerotic plaques and evaluation of coronary stenting. OCT has several unique advantages over alternative technologies, such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), due to its better resolution and contrast. For example, OCT is currently the only imaging modality that can measure the thickness of the fibrous cap of an atherosclerotic plaque in vivo. OCT also has the ability to accurately assess the coverage of individual stent struts by neointimal tissue over time. However, it is extremely time-consuming to analyze IVOCT images manually to derive quantitative diagnostic metrics. In this chapter, we introduce some computer-aided methods to automate the common IVOCT image analysis tasks.

  3. Intraluminal fluorescence spectroscopy catheter with ultrasound guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Park, Jesung; Sun, Yang; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Marcu, Laura

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) technique for intraluminal investigation of arterial vessel composition under intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance. A prototype 1.8-mm (5.4 Fr) catheter combining a side-viewing optical fiber (SVOF) and an IVUS catheter was constructed and tested with in vitro vessel phantoms. The prototype catheter can locate a fluorophore in the phantom vessel wall, steer the SVOF in place, perform blood flushing under flow conditions, and acquire high-quality TRFS data using 337-nm wavelength excitation. The catheter steering capability used for the coregistration of the IVUS image plane and the SVOF beam produce a guiding precision to an arterial phantom wall site location of 0.53+/-0.16 mm. This new intravascular multimodal catheter enables the potential for in vivo arterial plaque composition identification using TRFS.

  4. A Review of Intravascular Ultrasound–Based Multimodal Intravascular Imaging: The Synergistic Approach to Characterizing Vulnerable Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Zhou, Bill; Hsiai, Tzung K.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-based intravascular imaging modalities are being developed to visualize pathologies in coronary arteries, such as high-risk vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques known as thin-cap fibroatheroma, to guide therapeutic strategy at preventing heart attacks. Mounting evidences have shown three distinctive histopathological features—the presence of a thin fibrous cap, a lipid-rich necrotic core, and numerous infiltrating macrophages—are key markers of increased vulnerability in atherosclerotic plaques. To visualize these changes, the majority of catheter-based imaging modalities used intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as the technical foundation and integrated emerging intravascular imaging techniques to enhance the characterization of vulnerable plaques. However, no current imaging technology is the unequivocal “gold standard” for the diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. Each intravascular imaging technology possesses its own unique features that yield valuable information although encumbered by inherent limitations not seen in other modalities. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss current scientific innovations, technical challenges, and prospective strategies in the development of IVUS-based multi-modality intravascular imaging systems aimed at assessing atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. PMID:26400676

  5. Usual Dose of Simvastatin Does Not Inhibit Plaque Progression and Lumen Loss at the Peri-Stent Reference Segments after Bare-Metal Stent Implantation: A Serial Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Joon; Choi, Yun Ha; Ma, Eun Hye; Ko, Jum Suk; Lee, Min Goo; Park, Keun Ho; Sim, Doo Sun; Yoon, Nam Sik; Youn, Hyun Ju; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun; Kang, Jung Chaee

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a usual dose of simvastatin (20 mg/day) on plaque regression and vascular remodeling at the peri-stent reference segments after bare-metal stent implantation. Methods We retrospectively investigated serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) findings in 380 peri-stent reference segments (184 proximal and 196 distal to the stent) in 196 patients (simvastatin group, n = 132 vs. non-statin group, n = 64). Quantitative volumetric IVUS analysis was performed in 5-mm vessel segments proximal and distal to the stent. Results IVUS follow-up was performed at a mean of 9.4 months after stenting (range, 5 to 19 months). No significant differences were observed in the changes in mean plaque plus media (P&M) area, mean lumen area, and mean external elastic membrane (EEM) area from post-stenting to follow-up at both proximal and distal edges between the simvastatin and non-statin group. Although lumen loss within the first 3 mm from each stent edge was primarily due to an increase in P&M area rather than a change in EEM area, and lumen loss beyond 3 mm from each stent edge was due to a combination of increased P&M area and decreased EEM area, no significant differences in changes were observed in P&M, EEM, and lumen area at every 1-mm subsegment between the simvastatin and non-statin group. Conclusions A usual dose of simvastatin does not inhibit plaque progression and lumen loss and does not affect vascular remodeling in peri-stent reference segments in patients undergoing bare-metal stent implantation. PMID:21179272

  6. 80-MHz intravascular ultrasound transducer using PMN-PT free-standing film.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wu, Wei; Chung, Youngsoo; Shih, Wan Y; Shih, Wei-Heng; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2011-11-01

    [Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)](0.63)[PbTiO(3)](0.37) (PMN-PT) free-standing film of comparable piezoelectric properties to bulk material with thickness of 30 μm has been fabricated using a modified precursor coating approach. At 1 kHz, the dielectric permittivity and loss were 4364 and 0.033, respectively. The remnant polarization and coercive field were 28 μC/cm(2) and 18.43 kV/cm. The electromechanical coupling coefficient k(t) was measured to be 0.55, which was close to that of bulk PMN-PT single-crystal material. Based on this film, high-frequency (82 MHz) miniature ultrasonic transducers were fabricated with 65% bandwidth and 23 dB insertion loss. Axial and lateral resolutions were determined to be as high as 35 and 176 μm. In vitro intravascular imaging on healthy rabbit aorta was performed using the thin film transducers. In comparison with a 35-MHz IVUS transducer, the 80-MHz transducer showed superior resolution and contrast with satisfactory penetration depth. The imaging results suggest that PMN-PT free-standing thin film technology is a feasible and efficient way to fabricate very-high-frequency ultrasonic transducers.

  7. Monolithic CMUT on CMOS Integration for Intravascular Ultrasound Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zahorian, Jaime; Hochman, Michael; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Gurun, Gokce; Karaman, Mustafa; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important promises of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology is integration with electronics. This approach is required to minimize the parasitic capacitances in the receive mode, especially in catheter based volumetric imaging arrays where the elements need to be small. Furthermore, optimization of the available silicon area and minimized number of connections occurs when the CMUTs are fabricated directly above the associated electronics. Here, we describe successful fabrication and performance evaluation of CMUT arrays for intravascular imaging on custom designed CMOS receiver electronics from a commercial IC foundry. The CMUT on CMOS process starts with surface isolation and mechanical planarization of the CMOS electronics to reduce topography. The rest of the CMUT fabrication is achieved by modifying a low temperature micromachining process through the addition of a single mask and developing a dry etching step to produce sloped sidewalls for simple and reliable CMUT to CMOS interconnection. This CMUT to CMOS interconnect method reduced the parasitic capacitance by a factor of 200 when compared with a standard wire bonding method. Characterization experiments indicate that the CMUT on CMOS elements are uniform in frequency response and are similar to CMUTs simultaneously fabricated on standard silicon wafers without electronics integration. Experiments on a 1.6 mm diameter dual-ring CMUT array with a 15 MHz center frequency show that both the CMUTs and the integrated CMOS electronics are fully functional. The SNR measurements indicate that the performance is adequate for imaging CTOs located 1 cm away from the CMUT array. PMID:23443701

  8. Application of Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Intravascular Ultrasound and the Coronary Calcium Score to Predict Adverse Coronary Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    planned. 15. SUBJECT TERMS coronary artery disease , near infrared spectroscopy, calcium scoring, intravascular ultrasound 16. SECURIY CLASSIFICATION OF...findings and intracoronary ultrasound in predicting those outcomes in #2. 6 Body Revision and review of the original protocol was followed by

  9. Fully automatic contour detection in intravascular ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusseau, Elisabeth F.; de Korte, Chris L.; Mastik, Fritz; Schaar, Johannes; van der Steen, Anton F.

    2004-04-01

    Segmentation of deformable structures remains a challenging task in ultrasound imaging especially in low signal-to-noise ratio applications. In this paper a fully automatic method, dedicated to the luminal contour segmentation in intracoronary ultrasound imaging is introduced. The method is based on an active contour with a priori properties that evolves according to the statistics of the ultrasound texture brightness, determined as being mainly Rayleigh distributed. However, contrary to classical snake-based algorithms, the presented technique neither requires from the user the pre-selection of a region of interest tight around the boundary, nor parameter tuning. This fully automatic character is achieved by an initial contour that is not set, but estimated and thus adapted to each image. Its estimation combines two statistical criteria extracted from the a posteriori probability, function of the contour position. These criteria are the location of the function maximum (or maximum a posteriori estimator) and the first zero-crossing of the function derivative. Then starting form the initial contour, a region of interest is automatically selected and the process iterated until the contour evolution can be ignored. In vivo coronary images from 15 patients, acquired with a 20 MHz central frequency Jomed Invision ultrasound scanner were segmented with the developed method. Automatic contours were compared to those manually drawn by two physician in terms of mean absolute difference. Results demonstrate that the error between automatic contours and the average of manual ones (0.099+/-0.032mm) and the inter-expert error (0.097+/-0.027mm) are similar and of small amplitude.

  10. Monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS integration for intravascular ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Zahorian, Jaime; Hochman, Michael; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Gurun, Gokce; Karaman, Mustafa; Degertekin, F Levent

    2011-12-01

    One of the most important promises of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology is integration with electronics. This approach is required to minimize the parasitic capacitances in the receive mode, especially in catheter-based volumetric imaging arrays, for which the elements must be small. Furthermore, optimization of the available silicon area and minimized number of connections occurs when the CMUTs are fabricated directly above the associated electronics. Here, we describe successful fabrication and performance evaluation of CMUT arrays for intravascular imaging on custom-designed CMOS receiver electronics from a commercial IC foundry. The CMUT-on-CMOS process starts with surface isolation and mechanical planarization of the CMOS electronics to reduce topography. The rest of the CMUT fabrication is achieved by modifying a low-temperature micromachining process through the addition of a single mask and developing a dry etching step to produce sloped sidewalls for simple and reliable CMUT-to-CMOS interconnection. This CMUT-to-CMOS interconnect method reduced the parasitic capacitance by a factor of 200 when compared with a standard wire-bonding method. Characterization experiments indicate that the CMUT-on-CMOS elements are uniform in frequency response and are similar to CMUTs simultaneously fabricated on standard silicon wafers without electronics integration. Ex- periments on a 1.6-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array with a center frequency of 15 MHz show that both the CMUTs and the integrated CMOS electronics are fully functional. The SNR measurements indicate that the performance is adequate for imaging chronic total occlusions located 1 cm from the CMUT array.

  11. Knuckle technique guided by intravascular ultrasound for in-stent restenosis occlusion treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tasic, Mladen; Jagic, Nikola; Miloradovic, Vladimir; Nikolic, Dusan

    2015-01-01

    One of the rarest lesions is in-stent restenosis chronic total occlusion (CTO). Limited data suggest that the treatment success rate is dependent on the possibility to cross into the lumen of an occluded stent, and the decision about what technique to use varies by operator preference. The knuckle technique is used to create a deliberate dissection plane in various CTO techniques. A guide wire is pushed until a complex loop is formed and advanced through the lesion. In this report we present a case where a knuckle wire guided by intravascular ultrasound control is used to penetrate the distal cap in an in-stent restenosis CTO lesion. PMID:25848374

  12. Evaluation of combined near-IR spectroscopic (NIRS)-IVUS imaging as a means to detect lipid-rich plaque burden in human coronary autopsy specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jimmy L.; Grainger, Stephanie J.; Greiner, Cherry A.; Hendricks, Michael J.; Goode, Meghan M.; Saybolt, Matthew D.; Wilensky, Robert L.; Madden, Sean P.; Muller, James E.

    2016-02-01

    Intracoronary near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can identify lipid in the coronary arteries, but lacks depth resolution. A novel catheter is currently in clinical use that combines NIRS with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which provides depth-resolved structural information via the IVUS modality. A measure designated as lipid-rich plaque burden (LRPB) has been proposed as a means to interpret the combined acoustic and optical information of NIRS-IVUS. LRPB is defined as the area created by the intersection of the NIRS lipid-rich arc with the corresponding IVUS-measured plaque burden. We determined the correlation in human coronary autopsy specimens between LRPB, a measure of lipid presence and extent available via intravascular imaging in patients, and the area of lipid-rich plaque as determined by the gold-standard of histology. Fifteen artery segments from 8 human autopsy hearts were imaged with the NIRS-IVUS system (TVC Imaging System, Infraredx Inc., Burlington, MA). Arteries were imaged in a specialty fixture that assured accurate co-registration between imaging and histology. The arteries were then fixed and divided into 2 mm blocks for histological staining. Pathological contouring of lipid-rich areas was performed on the stained thin sections for 54 lipid-rich blocks. Computation of LRPB was performed on transverse NIRS-IVUS frames corresponding to the histologic sections. The quantified LRPB was frequently higher than the lipid-rich plaque area determined by histology, because the region denoted by the EEL and lumen within the NIRS lipid-rich arc is not entirely comprised of lipid. Overall, a moderate to strong correlation (R = 0.73) was found between LRPB determined by NIRS-IVUS imaging and the lipid-rich plaque area determined by histology. LRPB, which can be measured in patients with NIRS-IVUS imaging, corresponds to the amount of lipid-rich plaque in a coronary artery. LRPB should be evaluated in prospective clinical trials for its ability to

  13. Intraarterial Ultrasound in Pancreatic Cancer: Feasibility Study and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Timm, Stephan; Kickuth, Ralph; Kenn, Werner; Steger, Ulrich; Jurowich, Christian; Germer, Christoph-Thomas

    2010-08-15

    Despite technological advances in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, the involvement of the celiac or mesenteric artery in pancreatic cancer remains uncertain in many cases. Infiltration of these vessels is important in making decisions about therapy choices but often can only be definitively determined through laparotomy. Local (intraarterial) ultrasound may increase diagnostic accuracy. Using the Volcano intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) system, we applied a transfemoral method to scan the celiac and mesenteric arteries directly intraarterial. This technique was used in five patients with suspected pancreatic cancer. Technical success was achieved in all cases. In one case, a short dissection of the mesenteric artery occurred but could be managed interventionally. In tumors that did not contact with the vessels, IVUS was unable to display the tissue pathology. Our main interest was the infiltration of the arteries. In one case, infiltration was certain in the CT scan but uncertain in two patients. In the latter two cases, IVUS correctly predicted infiltration in one and freedom from tumor in the other case. In our preliminary study, IVUS correctly predicted arterial infiltration in all cases. IVUS did not provide new information when the tumor was far away from the vessel. Compared with IVUS in the portal vein, the information about the artery is more detailed, and the vessel approach is easier. These results encouraged us to design a prospective study to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of this method.

  14. Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance with an Intracardiac Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchetta, Mario Rigatelli, Gianluca; Pedon, Luigi; Zennaro, Marco; Ronsivalle, Salvatore; Maiolino, Pietro

    2003-09-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficacy of intravascular ultrasound guidance obtained by an intracardiac ultrasound probe during complex aortic endografting. Between November 1999 and July 2002, 19 patients (5 female, 14 male; mean age 73.5 {+-} 2.1 years) underwent endovascular repair of thoracic (n = 10), complex abdominal (n = 6) and concomitant thoraco-abdominal (n = 3) aortic aneurysm. The most suitable size and configuration of the stent-graft were chosen on the basis of preoperative computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Intraoperative intravascular ultrasound imaging was obtained using a 9 Fr, 9 MHz intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) probe, 110 cm in length, inserted through a 10 Fr precurved long sheath. The endografts were deployed as planned by CTA or MRA. Before stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to view the posterior aortic arch and descending thoraco-abdominal aorta without position-related artifacts, and to identify both sites of stent-graft positioning. After stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to detect the need for additional modular components to internally reline the aorta in 11 patients, and to discover 2 incomplete graft expansions subsequently treated with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. In 1 patient, the ICE probe supported the decision that the patient was ineligible for the endovascular exclusion procedure. The ICE probe provides accurate information on the anatomy of the posterior aortic arch and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and a rapid identification of attachment sites and stent-graft pathology, allowing refinement and improvement of the endovascular strategy.

  15. Intravascular ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... which blood vessel is involved in aortic dissection Risks There is a slight risk of complications with ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  16. Intravascular Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... your heart. The pictures come from inside the heart rather than through the chest wall. The sound waves are sent with a device ... is threaded through an artery and into your heart. The sound waves bounce off of the walls of the artery and return to the transducer ...

  17. Long-Term Histopathologic and IVUS Evaluations of a Novel Coiled Sheet Stent in Porcine Carotid Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneda, Hideaki; Ikeno, Fumiaki Lyons, Jennifer; Rezaee, Mehrdad; Yeung, Alan C.; Fitzgerald, Peter J.

    2006-06-15

    Carotid angioplasty with stent placement has been proposed as an alternative method for revascularization of carotid artery stenosis. A novel stent with a laser-cut, rolled sheet of Nitinol (EndoTex Interventional Systems, Inc., Cupertino, CA) has been developed to customize treatment of stenotic lesions in carotid arteries utilizing a single stent, designed to adapt to multiple diameters and to tapered or nontapered configurations. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the conformability and vascular response to a novel stent in a chronic porcine carotid model using serial three-dimensional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analysis as well as histological examination. Ten Yucatan pigs underwent stent implantation in both normal carotid arteries with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. Three-dimensional IVUS analysis was performed before stent implantation, after adjunctive balloon angioplasty, and at follow-up [1 month (n = 6), 3 months (n = 6), or 6 months (n = 8)]. Histological examination (injury score, percent plaque obstruction, and qualitative analysis) was also performed. All stents were successfully deployed and well apposed in different sized vessels (lumen area range: 19-30 mm{sup 2}). Volumetric IVUS analysis showed no significant difference between the lumen areas before stent implantation and after adjunctive balloon angioplasty and no stent area change at each follow-up point compared to immediately postprocedure. Histological examination revealed minimal injury and neointimal hyperplasia at each follow-up point. In the chronic porcine carotid model, the novel stent system demonstrated good conformability, resulting in minimal vessel injury and neointimal formation.

  18. Contour detection of atherosclerotic plaques in IVUS images using ellipse template matching and particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ma, Jianying; Shi, Jun

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable for diagnosis of atherosclerosis to detect lumen and media-adventitia contours in intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images of atherosclerotic plaques. In this paper, a method for contour detection of plaques is proposed utilizing the prior knowledge of elliptic geometry of plaques. Contours are initialized as ellipses by using ellipse template matching, where a matching function is maximized by particle swarm optimization. Then the contours are refined by boundary vector field snakes. The method was evaluated via 88 in vivo images from 21 patients. It outperformed a state-of-the-art method by 3.8 pixels and 4.8% in terms of the mean distance error and relative mean distance error, respectively.

  19. Intravascular Photoacoustics for Image-Guidance and Temperature Monitoring During Plasmonic Photothermal Therapy of Atherosclerotic Plaques: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Doug; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Litovsky, Silvio; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Recently, combined intravascular ultrasound and photoacoustic (IVUS/IVPA) imaging has been demonstrated as a novel imaging modality capable of visualizing both morphology (via IVUS) and cellular/molecular composition (via IVPA) of atherosclerotic plaques, using both endogenous tissue absorbers and exogenous contrast agents. Plasmonic gold nanoparticles were previously utilized as IVPA contrast agents which co-localize with atherosclerotic plaques, particularly phagocytically active macrophages. The present work demonstrates the use of IVUS/IVPA imaging as a tool for localized temperature monitoring during laser heating. The temperature dependent change in IVPA signal intensity of silica-coated gold nanorod contrast agents absorbing within the near-infrared optical wavelength range is evaluated and shown to have a linear relationship, with a slope greater than that of endogenous tissue. A continuous wave laser was subsequently incorporated into the IVUS/IVPA integrated catheter and utilized to selectively heat the nanoparticles with simultaneous IVPA temperature monitoring. IVUS/IVPA, therefore, provides a platform for detection and temperature monitoring of atherosclerotic plaques through the selective heating of plasmonic gold nanoparticle contrast agents. PMID:24396514

  20. IVUS-Guided Implantation of Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds for Very Late Paclitaxel Stent Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhe-Zhong; Chang, Wei-Ting; Chiang, Chun-Yen; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Ku, Po-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) implantation has been shown to be safe in patients with stable coronary disease, and effective against the thrombotic lesion and the in-stent restenosis (ISR) of the drug-eluting stent (DES). BVSs have the advantages of a snow racket concept, positive vessel remodeling, and better conformability compared with DES in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We report on a young patient with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who presented to our emergency department arising from very late stent thrombosis (VLST) of a 2.5 × 28 mm paclitaxel-eluting stent (Coroflex® Please) three years after its implantation. After the patient was treated with balloon dilation, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) revealed a short segment of a guide wire outside the DES mesh. Two BVSs were implanted to prevent a DES recoil. Post-scaffold-implantation IVUS showed adequately expanded strut of BVSs. Six months later, optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed that some segments of the scaffold had been absorbed and that there was no in-scaffold restenosis. The patient had not complained about angina during the out-patient clinic follow-up. This is the first report of successful BVS implantation for a STEMI patient attributable to DES VLST. PMID:28115812

  1. Quantify patient-specific coronary material property and its impact on stress/strain calculations using in vivo IVUS data and 3D FSI models: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoya; Zhu, Jian; Maehara, Akiko; Monoly, David; Samady, Habib; Wang, Liang; Billiar, Kristen L; Zheng, Jie; Yang, Chun; Mintz, Gary S; Giddens, Don P; Tang, Dalin

    2017-02-01

    Computational models have been used to calculate plaque stress and strain for plaque progression and rupture investigations. An intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-based modeling approach is proposed to quantify in vivo vessel material properties for more accurate stress/strain calculations. In vivo Cine IVUS and VH-IVUS coronary plaque data were acquired from one patient with informed consent obtained. Cine IVUS data and 3D thin-slice models with axial stretch were used to determine patient-specific vessel material properties. Twenty full 3D fluid-structure interaction models with ex vivo and in vivo material properties and various axial and circumferential shrink combinations were constructed to investigate the material stiffness impact on stress/strain calculations. The approximate circumferential Young's modulus over stretch ratio interval [1.0, 1.1] for an ex vivo human plaque sample and two slices (S6 and S18) from our IVUS data were 1631, 641, and 346 kPa, respectively. Average lumen stress/strain values from models using ex vivo, S6 and S18 materials with 5 % axial shrink and proper circumferential shrink were 72.76, 81.37, 101.84 kPa and 0.0668, 0.1046, and 0.1489, respectively. The average cap strain values from S18 material models were 150-180 % higher than those from the ex vivo material models. The corresponding percentages for the average cap stress values were 50-75 %. Dropping axial and circumferential shrink consideration led to stress and strain over-estimations. In vivo vessel material properties may be considerably softer than those from ex vivo data. Material stiffness variations may cause 50-75 % stress and 150-180 % strain variations.

  2. A Preliminary Engineering Design of Intravascular Dual-Frequency Transducers for Contrast-Enhanced Acoustic Angiography and Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probes are not optimized for contrast detection because of their design for high-frequency fundamental-mode imaging. However, data from transcutaneous contrast imaging suggests the possibility of utilizing contrast ultrasound for molecular imaging or vasa vasorum assessment to further elucidate atherosclerotic plaque deposition. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a small-aperture (0.6 × 3 mm) IVUS probe optimized for high-frequency contrast imaging. The design utilizes a dual-frequency (6.5 MHz/30 MHz) transducer arrangement for exciting microbubbles at low frequencies (near their resonance) and detecting their broadband harmonics at high frequencies, minimizing detected tissue backscatter. The prototype probe is able to generate nonlinear microbubble response with more than 1.2 MPa of rarefractional pressure (mechanical index: 0.48) at 6.5 MHz, and is also able to detect microbubble response with a broadband receiving element (center frequency: 30 MHz, −6-dB fractional bandwidth: 58.6%). Nonlinear super-harmonics from microbubbles flowing through a 200-μm-diameter micro-tube were clearly detected with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 12 dB. Preliminary phantom imaging at the fundamental frequency (30 MHz) and dual-frequency super-harmonic imaging results suggest the promise of small aperture, dual-frequency IVUS transducers for contrast-enhanced IVUS imaging. PMID:24801226

  3. Radial Modulation Contrast Imaging Using a 20-MHz Single-Element Intravascular Ultrasound Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Francois T. H.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.; Chen, Xucai

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound imaging is a promising tool for the characterization of coronary vasa vasorum proliferation, which has been identified as a marker of, and possible etiologic factor in, the development of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Resonance-based nonlinear detection methods have required the development of prototype catheters which are not commercially available, thus limiting clinical translation. In this study, we investigated the performances of a radial modulation imaging approach (25/3 MHz combination) using simulations, implemented it on a clinical 20-MHz rotating catheter, and tested it in a wall-less tissue-mimicking flow phantom perfused with lipid-encapsulated microbubbles (MBs). The effects of the phase lag, low-frequency pressure, and MB concentration on the envelope subtracted radial modulation signals were investigated as a function of depth. Our dual-pulse dual-frequency approach produced contrast-specific images with contrast-to-tissue improvements over B-mode of 15.1 ± 2.1 dB at 2 mm and 6.8 ± 0.1 dB at 4 mm depths. Using this imaging strategy, 200-μm-diameter cellulose tubing perfused with MBs could be resolved while surrounding tissue scattering was suppressed. These results raise promise for the detection of coronary vasa vasorum and may ultimately facilitate the detection of plaque at risk for rupture. PMID:24803134

  4. Angled-focused 45 MHz PMN-PT single element transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Williams, Jay; Kang, Bong Jin; Yoon, Changhan; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor; Jeong, Jong Seob; Lee, Sang Goo; Shung, K Kirk; Kim, Hyung Ham

    2015-06-01

    A transducer with an angled and focused aperture for intravascular ultrasound imaging has been developed. The acoustic stack for the angled-focused transducer was made of PMN-PT single crystal with one matching layer, one protective coating layer, and a highly damped backing layer. It was then press-focused to a desired focal length and inserted into a thin needle housing with an angled tip. A transducer with an angled and unfocused aperture was also made, following the same fabrication procedure, to compare the performance of the two transducers. The focused and unfocused transducers were tested to measure their center frequencies, bandwidths, and spatial resolutions. Lateral resolution of the angled-focused transducer (AFT) improved more than two times compared to that of the angled-unfocused transducer (AUT). A tissue-mimicking phantom in water and a rabbit aorta tissue sample in rabbit blood were scanned using AFT and AUT. Imaging with AFT offered improved contrast, over imaging with AUT, of the tissue-mimicking phantom and the rabbit aorta tissue sample by 23 dB and 8 dB, respectively. The results show that AFT has strong potential to provide morphological and pathological information of coronary arteries with high resolution and high contrast.

  5. Angled-focused 45 MHz PMN-PT single element transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sangpil; Williams, Jay; Kang, Bong Jin; Yoon, Changhan; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor; Jeong, Jong Seob; Lee, Sang Goo; Shung, K. Kirk; Kim, Hyung Ham

    2015-01-01

    A transducer with an angled and focused aperture for intravascular ultrasound imaging has been developed. The acoustic stack for the angled-focused transducer was made of PMN-PT single crystal with one matching layer, one protective coating layer, and a highly damped backing layer. It was then press-focused to a desired focal length and inserted into a thin needle housing with an angled tip. A transducer with an angled and unfocused aperture was also made, following the same fabrication procedure, to compare the performance of the two transducers. The focused and unfocused transducers were tested to measure their center frequencies, bandwidths, and spatial resolutions. Lateral resolution of the angled-focused transducer (AFT) improved more than two times compared to that of the angled-unfocused transducer (AUT). A tissue-mimicking phantom in water and a rabbit aorta tissue sample in rabbit blood were scanned using AFT and AUT. Imaging with AFT offered improved contrast, over imaging with AUT, of the tissue-mimicking phantom and the rabbit aorta tissue sample by 23 dB and 8 dB, respectively. The results show that AFT has strong potential to provide morphological and pathological information of coronary arteries with high resolution and high contrast. PMID:25914443

  6. Reconstruction of Intima and Adventitia Models into a State Undeformed by a Catheter by Using CT, IVUS, and Biplane X-Ray Angiogram Images

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jinwon

    2017-01-01

    The number of studies on blood flow analysis using fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis is increasing. Though a 3D blood vessel model that includes intima and adventitia is required for FSI analysis, there are difficulties in generating it using only one type of medical imaging. In this paper, we propose a 3D modeling method for accurate FSI analysis. An intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) image is used with biplane X-ray angiogram images to calculate the position and orientation of the blood vessel. However, these images show that the blood vessel is deformed by the catheter inserted into the blood vessel for IVUS imaging. To eliminate such deformation, a CT image was added and the two models were registered. First, a 3D model of the undeformed intima was generated using a CT image. In the second stage, a model of intima and adventitia deformed by the catheter was generated by combining the IVUS image and the X-ray angiogram images. A 3D model of intima and adventitia with the deformation caused by insertion of the catheter eliminated was generated by matching these 3D blood vessel models in different states. In addition, a 3D blood vessel model including bifurcation was generated using the proposed method. PMID:28154609

  7. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging with fast optical parametric oscillator laser at 1.7 μm.

    PubMed

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Li, Jiawen; Wiedmann, Maximilian T; Huang, Shenghai; Yu, Mingyue; Kirk Shung, K; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-08-24

    Intravascular photoacoustic imaging at 1.7 μm spectral band has shown promising capabilities for lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque detection. In this work, we report a high speed catheter-based integrated intravascular photoacoustic/intravascular ultrasound (IVPA/IVUS) imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A lipid-mimicking phantom and atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta were imaged at 1 frame per second, which is two orders of magnitude faster than previously reported in IVPA imaging with the same wavelength. Clear photoacoustic signals by the absorption of lipid rich deposition demonstrated the ability of the system for high speed vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques detection.

  8. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging with fast optical parametric oscillator laser at 1.7 μm

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Li, Jiawen; Wiedmann, Maximilian T.; Huang, Shenghai; Yu, Mingyue; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic imaging at 1.7 μm spectral band has shown promising capabilities for lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque detection. In this work, we report a high speed catheter-based integrated intravascular photoacoustic/intravascular ultrasound (IVPA/IVUS) imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A lipid-mimicking phantom and atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta were imaged at 1 frame per second, which is two orders of magnitude faster than previously reported in IVPA imaging with the same wavelength. Clear photoacoustic signals by the absorption of lipid rich deposition demonstrated the ability of the system for high speed vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques detection. PMID:26339072

  9. A Case of Acute Myocardial Infarction due to Left Main Trunk Occlusion Complicated With Aortic Dissection as Diagnosed by Intravascular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Masashi; Amano, Tomonori; Matsuoka, Shunzo; Hirai, Hideki; Masuda, Kazunori; Nakajima, Kanta; Sueyoshi, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    A 52-year-old man was transferred to our hospital with a sudden onset of severe chest pains. His electrocardiogram revealed ST-segment elevation suggestive of acute myocardial infarction. Emergency coronary angiography showed subtotal occlusion of left main trunk (LMT) with delayed coronary flow. Because intravascular ultrasound revealed a large intimal flap, we diagnosed aortic dissection involving the LMT. After stenting of the LMT, the patient underwent surgical repair of the aortic dissection. Although it is difficult to obtain a correct diagnosis of aortic dissection complicated with myocardial ischemia, we succeeded in diagnosing this rare condition by use of a intravascular ultrasound.

  10. Iatrogenic subtle acute aortic dissection during coronary angioplasty for in-stent restenosis. Value of intravascular ultrasound for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Alvarez, Lucia; Almeria, Carlos

    2004-09-01

    A patient with a subtle, iatrogenic, type A aortic dissection following a coronary angioplasty is described. Intravascular ultrasound was useful to confirm the diagnosis of the confined aortic dissection and also to guide adequate stent coverage of its coronary entry door. Both transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging failed to detect any significant aortic wall abnormality.

  11. Early Effects of Intensive Lipid-Lowering Treatment on Plaque Characteristics Assessed by Virtual Histology Intravascular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hee; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The effects of short-term intensive lipid-lowering treatment on coronary plaque composition have not yet been sufficiently evaluated. We investigated the influence of short-term intensive lipid-lowering treatment on quantitative and qualitative changes in plaque components of non-culprit lesions in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Materials and Methods This was a prospective, randomized, open-label, single-center trial. Seventy patients who underwent both baseline and three-month follow-up virtual histology intravascular ultrasound were randomly assigned to either an intensive lipid-lowering treatment group (ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/40 mg, n=34) or a control statin treatment group (pravastatin 20 mg, n=36). Using virtual histology intravascular ultrasound, plaque was characterized as fibrous, fibro-fatty, dense calcium, or necrotic core. Changes in plaque components during the three-month lipid-lowering treatment were compared between the two groups. Results Compared with the control statin treatment group, there was a significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the intensive lipid-lowering treatment group (-20.4±17.1 mg/dL vs. -36.8±17.4 mg/dL, respectively; p<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in baseline, three-month follow-up, or serial changes of gray-scale intravascular ultrasound parameters between the two groups. The absolute volume of fibro-fatty plaque was significantly reduced in the intensive lipid-lowering treatment group compared with the control group (-1.5±3.4 mm3 vs. 0.8±4.7 mm3, respectively; p=0.024). A linear correlation was found between changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and changes in the absolute volumes of fibro-fatty plaque (p<0.001, R2=0.209). Conclusion Modification of coronary plaque may be attainable after only three months of intensive lipid-lowering treatment. PMID:27401638

  12. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds for LMCA with double vessel disease under IVUS guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kasturi, Sridhar; Vilvanathan, Vinoth Kumar

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old male patient, presented with chest pain. ECG showed ST elevation in leads V2 to V4 and T wave inversion in leads V2-V6. Check angiogram revealed ostial LMCA 70% lesion & mid-LAD 90% lesion and LCX proximal 80% lesion. Predilatation of LMCA lesion was done with 2.0 × 12 mm NC Trek balloon and the LAD lesion with 2.0 × 12 mm and 2.5 × 08 mm (NC Trek balloons). Prestenting IVUS (Intravascular ultrasound) was done with Atlantis SR pro 40 MHz 3.6Fr catheter. IVUS showed the LAD to have a minimal lumen area of 2.6 sq mm with 90% fibrotic plaque and a vessel size of 2.5 mm and the LMCA to have a minimal lumen area of 8.8 sq mm with 70% fibrotic plaque and vessel size of 3.8 mm. Mid-LAD stenting was done with 2.5 × 28 mm Absorb Stent (BVS). Predilatation of LCX lesion was done with 2.5 × 08 mm NC Trek balloon. Then stenting was performed with 3.0 × 28 mm Absorb Stent (BVS). Check angiogram showed edge dissection proximal to the BVS Stent which was covered with 3.0 × 12 mm Xience Xpedtion Stent (DES). Then LMCA Stenting was done with 3.5 × 12 mm Absorb Stent. Post dilatation was done with 4.0 × 08 mm NC Trek balloon. Post Stenting LMCA - LAD IVUS was done. LMCA and LAD Stents were well opposed without any dissection or residual stenosis. TIMI III Flow was achieved in the final results. PMID:26995415

  13. Validating Intravascular Imaging with Serial Optical Coherence Tomography and Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Pier-Luc; Bertrand, Marie-Jeanne; Abran, Maxime; Castonguay, Alexandre; Lefebvre, Joël; Stähli, Barbara E.; Merlet, Nolwenn; Mihalache-Avram, Teodora; Geoffroy, Pascale; Mecteau, Mélanie; Busseuil, David; Ni, Feng; Abulrob, Abedelnasser; Rhéaume, Éric; L’Allier, Philippe; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are characterized by the formation of a plaque in the arterial wall. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides high-resolution images allowing delineation of atherosclerotic plaques. When combined with near infrared fluorescence (NIRF), the plaque can also be studied at a molecular level with a large variety of biomarkers. In this work, we present a system enabling automated volumetric histology imaging of excised aortas that can spatially correlate results with combined IVUS/NIRF imaging of lipid-rich atheroma in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Pullbacks in the rabbit aortas were performed with a dual modality IVUS/NIRF catheter developed by our group. Ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) histology was performed combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy, providing high-resolution anatomical and molecular information, respectively, to validate in vivo findings. The microscope was combined with a serial slicer allowing for the imaging of the whole vessel automatically. Colocalization of in vivo and ex vivo results is demonstrated. Slices can then be recovered to be tested in conventional histology. PMID:27983695

  14. 3-D ultrasound imaging using a forward-looking CMUT ring array for intravascular/intracardiac applications.

    PubMed

    Yeh, David T; Oralkan, Omer; Wygant, Ira O; O'Donnell, Matthew; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2006-06-01

    Forward-viewing ring arrays can enable new applications in intravascular and intracardiac ultrasound. This work presents compelling, full-synthetic, phased-array volumetric images from a forward-viewing capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) ring array wire bonded to a custom integrated circuit front end. The CMUT ring array has a diameter of 2 mm and 64 elements each 100 microm x 100 microm in size. In conventional mode, echo signals received from a plane reflector at 5 mm had 70% fractional bandwidth around a center frequency of 8.3 MHz. In collapse mode, 69% fractional bandwidth is measured around 19 MHz. Measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the echo averaged 16 times was 29 dB for conventional operation and 35 dB for collapse mode. B-scans were generated of a target consisting of steel wires 0.3 mm in diameter to determine resolution performance. The 6 dB axial and lateral resolutions for the B-scan of the wire target are 189 microm and 0.112 radians for 8 MHz, and 78 microm and 0.051 radians for 19 MHz. A reduced firing set suitable for real-time, intravascular applications was generated and shown to produce acceptable images. Rendered three-dimensional (3-D) images of a Palmaz-Schatz stent also are shown, demonstrating that the imaging quality is sufficient for practical applications.

  15. Fully integrated optical coherence tomography, ultrasound, and indocyanine green-based fluorescence tri-modality system for intravascular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Jing, Joseph; Qu, Yueqiao; Miao, Yusi; Zhang, Buyun; Ma, Teng; Yu, Mingyue; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2017-01-01

    We present a tri-modality imaging system and fully integrated tri-modality probe for intravascular imaging. The tri-modality imaging system is able to simultaneously acquire optical coherence tomography (OCT), ultrasound (US), and fluorescence imaging. Moreover, for fluorescence imaging, we used the FDA-approved indocyanine green (ICG) dye as the contrast agent to target lipid-loaded macrophages. We conducted imaging from a male New Zealand white rabbit to evaluate the performance of the tri-modality system. In addition, tri-modality images of rabbit aortas were correlated with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histology to check the measurement accuracy. The fully integrated miniature tri-modality probe, together with the use of ICG dye suggest that the system is of great potential for providing a more accurate assessment of vulnerable plaques in clinical applications. PMID:28271001

  16. Mode of deployment of coronary Palmaz-Schatz stents after implantation with the stent delivery system: an intravascular ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G; Slagboom, T

    1995-04-01

    The stent delivery system (SDS) is a sheath-covered Palmaz-Schatz stent mounted on a 3.0, 3.5, or 4.0 mm compliant polyethylene balloon catheter; the balloon resists maximal inflation pressures of 5.7, 6.2, or 6.0 atm, respectively. It is postulated that these pressures are too low to obtain optimal stent deployment. Because optimal stent deployment is a prerequisite for optimal short- and long-term outcome, we performed an intravascular ultrasound study to the mode of stent deployment after delivery with the SDS and after high-pressure dilatations with low-compliant, oversized balloon catheters. In 23 patients an intravascular ultrasound study (30 MHz, 4.3F transducer) was performed to the geometry of 29 stents immediately after delivery with the SDS and after successive high-pressure inflations with low-compliant balloons. After delivery with the SDS (3.3 +/- 0.4 mm), stent diameter was 3.0 +/- 0.4 mm. After high-pressure dilatations (12.4 +/- 1.4 atm) with low-compliant balloons (3.9 +/- 0.5 mm), stent diameter increased to 3.4 +/- 0.4 mm (p < 0.001). Only 8 (28%) stents were completely and symmetrically expanded to the corresponding reference diameter with good apposition after delivery with the SDS. Diameter of incomplete deployed stents (n = 16) was 2.8 +/- 0.3 mm. After high-pressure dilatations with low-compliant balloons (3.9 +/- 0.5 mm), diameter increased to 3.4 +/- 0.4 mm (p < 0.001). Now 20 (69%) stents (p = 0.004) became completely and symmetrically expanded to a diameter corresponding to the reference diameter. In conclusion, most stents are suboptimally deployed after delivery with the stent delivery system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Lipid detection by intravascular photoacoustic imaging with flexible catheter at 20 fps (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Min; Daeichin, Verya; Springeling, Geert; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van Soest, Gijs

    2016-02-01

    Intravascular Photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging is a promising new technology to assess lipid content of coronary atherosclerotic plaque, an important determinant of the risk associated with the plaque triggering a heart attack. Clinical translation of IVPA imaging requires real-time image acquisition, which has been a technological challenge. In this work, we demonstrate a high-speed, dual-wavelength IVPA imaging system at 1.7 µm wavelength, operating with a flexible catheter of 1.2 mm outer diameter (including outer sheath). The catheter was custom designed and fabricated, and used a 40 MHz transducer for intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and IVPA imaging. The optical excitation is provided by a dual OPO system, pumped by CW diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers, with a repetition rate of 5 kHz. Each OPO can be tuned to a custom wavelength between 1690 and 1750 nm; two wavelengths only are needed to discriminate between plaque lipids and adipose tissue. The pulse energy is about 80 µJ. We tested the imaging performance of the presented system in a polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA) vessel mimicking phantom and human coronary arteries ex vivo. IVPA identified lipid deposits inside atherosclerotic plaque, while IVUS showed tissue structure. We demonstrated IVPA imaging at a speed of 20 frames per second, with 250 A-scans per frame. This is significantly faster than previous IVPA imaging systems, and will enable the translation of IVPA imaging into clinical practice.

  18. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-07

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for the design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers.

  19. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for the design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers.

  20. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with the low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers. PMID:25856384

  1. Anatomical and Physiological Changes after Paclitaxel-Coated Balloon for Atherosclerotic De Novo Coronary Lesions: Serial IVUS-VH and FFR Study

    PubMed Central

    Ann, Soe Hee; Balbir Singh, Gillian; Lim, Kyung Hun; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Shin, Eun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess the serial changes of de novo coronary lesions treated with paclitaxel-coated balloon (PCB) using intravascular ultrasound virtual histology (IVUS-VH) and fractional flow reserve (FFR). Method and Results This prospective observational study enrolled 27 patients with coronary artery disease treated with PCB who underwent coronary angiography, IVUS-VH and FFR before, immediately after intervention and at 9 months. 28 de novo lesions were successfully treated with PCB. Angiographic late luminal loss was 0.02 ± 0.27mm. Mean vessel and lumen areas showed increase at 9 months (12.0 ± 3.5mm2 to 13.2 ± 3.9mm2, p <0.001; and 5.4 ± 1.2mm2 to 6.5 ± 1.8mm2, p <0.001, respectively). Although mean plaque area was unchanged (6.6 ± 2.6mm2 to 6.6 ± 2.4mm2, p = 0.269), percent atheroma volume decreased significantly (53.4 ± 7.9% to 49.5 ± 6.4%, p = 0.002). The proportion of plaque compositions including fibrous, fibrofatty, dense calcium and necrotic core by IVUS-VH was unchanged at 9 months. The FFR of the treated lesion was 0.71 ± 0.13 pre-procedure, 0.87 ± 0.06 post-procedure and 0.84 ± 0.06 at follow-up. Conclusions De novo coronary lesions treated with PCB showed persistent anatomical and physiological patency with plaque redistribution and vessel remodeling without chronic elastic recoil or plaque compositional change during follow-up. PMID:26824602

  2. On the potential of a new IVUS elasticity modulus imaging approach for detecting vulnerable atherosclerotic coronary plaques: In vitro vessel phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Le Floc’h, Simon; Cloutier, Guy; Finet, Gérard; Tracqui, Philippe; Pettigrew, Roderic I.; Ohayon, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Peak cap stress amplitude is recognized as a good indicator of vulnerable plaque (VP) rupture. However, such stress evaluation strongly relies on a precise, but still lacking, knowledge of the mechanical properties exhibited by the plaque components. As a first response to this limitation, our group recently developed, in a previous theoretical study, an original approach, called iMOD, which reconstructs elasticity maps (or modulograms) of atheroma plaques from the estimation of strain fields. In the present in vitro experimental study, conducted on PVA-C arterial phantoms, we investigate the benefit of coupling the iMOD procedure with the acquisition of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measurements for detection of VP. Our results show that the combined iMOD-IVUS strategy : 1) successfully detected and quantified soft inclusion contours with high positive predictive values and sensitivities of 89.7 ± 3.9% and 81.5 ± 8.8 %, respectively, 2) estimated reasonably cap thicknesses larger than ~300 µm, but underestimated thinner caps, and 3) quantified satisfactorily Young's modulus of hard medium (mean value of 109.7 ± 23.7 kPa instead of 145.4 ± 31.8 kPa), but overestimated the stiffness of soft inclusions (mean Young`s moduli of 31.4 ± 9.7 kPa instead of 17.6 ± 3.4 kPa). All together, these results demonstrate a promising benefit of the new iMOD-IVUS clinical imaging method for in vivo VP detection. PMID:20826899

  3. Multimodality Intravascular Imaging Assessment of Plaque Erosion versus Plaque Rupture in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jee Eun; Mintz, Gary S.; Hong, Young Joon; Lee, Sung Yun; Kim, Ki Seok; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Kumar, Kaup Sharath; Won, Hoyoun; Hyeon, Seong Hyeop; Shin, Seung Yong; Lee, Kwang Je; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Chee Jeong; Kim, Sang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We assessed plaque erosion of culprit lesions in patients with acute coronary syndrome in real world practice. Subjects and Methods Culprit lesion plaque rupture or plaque erosion was diagnosed with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was used to determine arterial remodeling. Positive remodeling was defined as a remodeling index (lesion/reference EEM [external elastic membrane area) >1.05. Results A total of 90 patients who had plaque rupture showing fibrous-cap discontinuity and ruptured cavity were enrolled. 36 patients showed definite OCT-plaque erosion, while 7 patients had probable OCT-plaque erosion. Overall, 26% (11/43) of definite/probable plaque erosion had non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) while 35% (15/43) had ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Conversely, 14.5% (13/90) of plaque rupture had NSTEMI while 71% (64/90) had STEMI (p<0.0001). Among plaque erosion, white thrombus was seen in 55.8% (24/43) of patients and red thrombus in 27.9% (12/43) of patients. Compared to plaque erosion, plaque rupture more often showed positive remodeling (p=0.003) with a larger necrotic core area examined by virtual histology (VH)-IVUS, while negative remodeling was prominent in plaque erosion. Overall, 65% 28/43 of plaque erosions were located in the proximal 30 mm of a culprit vessel-similar to plaque ruptures (72%, 65/90, p=0.29). Conclusion Although most of plaque erosions show nearly normal coronary angiogram, modest plaque burden with negative remodeling and an uncommon fibroatheroma might be the nature of plaque erosion. Multimodality intravascular imaging with OCT and VH-IVUS showed fundamentally different pathoanatomic substrates underlying plaque rupture and erosion. PMID:27482258

  4. Endovascular Surgery for Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Contrast Allergy—Usefulness of Carbon Dioxide Angiography and Intravascular Ultrasound: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Morito, Haruna; Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Hosaka, Akihiro; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Miyata,, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    We report a patient with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair, despite his having an allergy to iodinated contrast medium and anatomy unsuitable for the procedure. Intravascular ultrasound-guided and CO2-assisted aortic stent graft placement was performed, and the procedures resulted in the successful exclusion of the aneurysm with regression of the mantle sign and resolution of hydronephrosis. PMID:23555498

  5. Comparison of diagnostic and therapeutic value of transesophageal echocardiography, intravascular ultrasonic imaging, and intraluminal phased-array imaging in aortic dissection with tear in the descending thoracic aorta (type B).

    PubMed

    Bartel, Thomas; Eggebrecht, Holger; Müller, Silvana; Gutersohn, Achim; Bonatti, Johannes; Pachinger, Otmar; Erbel, Raimund

    2007-01-15

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) have limited capabilities in type B aortic dissection. To evaluate its diagnostic value, intraluminal phased-array imaging (IPAI) was compared with IVUS and TEE. In 23 patients with type B aortic dissection, IPAI was tested with respect to its ability to depict true lumen (TL) and false lumen (FL), to localize which abdominal arteries originate from the TL and FL, and to identify all entries and reentries. After the completion of TEE, 2 additional examiners performed angiography and positioned an AcuNav catheter inside the TL. An IVUS catheter was then introduced into the TL by a fourth examiner. All examiners were blinded to one another. Four additional patients with type B aortic dissection developed peripheral malperfusion due to TL collapse. Transvenous IPAI was used to guide emergency fenestration of the intimal flap. TL and FL could be equally well identified by all diagnostic methods. IPAI detected more entries than IVUS (3.0 +/- 1.2 vs 0.8 +/- 0.5, p <0.001), and thoracic IPAI depicted more entries than TEE (1.8 +/- 1.0 vs 1.2 +/- 0.5, p <0.001). IPAI and IVUS showed >90% of the abdominal side branches. In all patients with peripheral malperfusion, successful emergency intimal flap fenestration was safely guided by IPAI. In conclusion, in the detailed diagnostic evaluation of type B aortic dissection, IPAI is superior to IVUS and TEE in detecting communications between the TL and FL. IPAI is also highly useful as a guiding tool for emergency intimal flap fenestration.

  6. Combined chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental ultrasound imaging for intravascular ultrasound: 20–60 MHz phantom and ex vivo results

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhyoung; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2013-01-01

    The application of chirp coded excitation to pulse inversion tissue harmonic imaging can increase signal to noise ratio. On the other hand, the elevation of range side lobe level, caused by leakages of the fundamental signal, has been problematic in mechanical scanners which are still the most prevalent in high frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. Fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging can achieve range side lobe levels lower than –60 dB with Hanning window, but it yields higher side lobes level than pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic imaging (PI-CTHI). Therefore, in this paper a combined pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental imaging mode (CPI-CTHI) is proposed to retain the advantages of both chirp coded harmonic and fundamental imaging modes by demonstrating 20–60 MHz phantom and ex vivo results. A simulation study shows that the range side lobe level of CPI-CTHI is 16 dB lower than PI-CTHI, assuming that the transducer translates incident positions by 50 μm when two beamlines of pulse inversion pair are acquired. CPI-CTHI is implemented for a proto-typed intravascular ultrasound scanner capable of combined data acquisition in real-time. A wire phantom study shows that CPI-CTHI has a 12 dB lower range side lobe level and a 7 dB higher echo signal to noise ratio than PI-CTHI, while the lateral resolution and side lobe level are 50 μm finer and –3 dB less than fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging respectively. Ex vivo scanning of a rabbit trachea demonstrates that CPI-CTHI is capable of visualizing blood vessels as small as 200 μm in diameter with 6 dB better tissue contrast than either PI-CTHI or fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging. These results clearly indicate that CPI-CTHI may enhance tissue contrast with less range side lobe level than PI-CTHI. PMID:22871273

  7. Combined chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental ultrasound imaging for intravascular ultrasound: 20-60 MHz phantom and ex vivo results.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyoung; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-02-01

    The application of chirp coded excitation to pulse inversion tissue harmonic imaging can increase signal to noise ratio. On the other hand, the elevation of range side lobe level, caused by leakages of the fundamental signal, has been problematic in mechanical scanners which are still the most prevalent in high frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. Fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging can achieve range side lobe levels lower than -60dB with Hanning window, but it yields higher side lobes level than pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic imaging (PI-CTHI). Therefore, in this paper a combined pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental imaging mode (CPI-CTHI) is proposed to retain the advantages of both chirp coded harmonic and fundamental imaging modes by demonstrating 20-60MHz phantom and ex vivo results. A simulation study shows that the range side lobe level of CPI-CTHI is 16dB lower than PI-CTHI, assuming that the transducer translates incident positions by 50μm when two beamlines of pulse inversion pair are acquired. CPI-CTHI is implemented for a proto-typed intravascular ultrasound scanner capable of combined data acquisition in real-time. A wire phantom study shows that CPI-CTHI has a 12dB lower range side lobe level and a 7dB higher echo signal to noise ratio than PI-CTHI, while the lateral resolution and side lobe level are 50μm finer and -3dB less than fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging respectively. Ex vivo scanning of a rabbit trachea demonstrates that CPI-CTHI is capable of visualizing blood vessels as small as 200μm in diameter with 6dB better tissue contrast than either PI-CTHI or fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging. These results clearly indicate that CPI-CTHI may enhance tissue contrast with less range side lobe level than PI-CTHI.

  8. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) on an IVUS Circular Array

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vivek; Dahl, Jeremy; Bradway, David; Doherty, Joshua; Lee, Seung Yun; Smith, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Our long-term goal is the detection and characterization of vulnerable plaque in the coronary arteries of the heart using IVUS catheters. Vulnerable plaque, characterized by a thin fibrous cap and a soft, lipid-rich, necrotic core is a pre-cursor to heart attack and stroke. Early detection of such plaques may potentially alter the course of treatment of the patient in order to prevent ischemic events. We have previously described the characterization of carotid plaques using external linear arrays operating at 9 MHz. In addition, we previously modified circular array IVUS catheters by short-circuiting several neighboring elements to produce fixed beam-widths for intra-vascular hyperthermia applications. In this paper we modified Volcano Visions 8.2 French, 9 MHz catheters and Volcano Platinum 3.5 French, 20 MHz catheters by short circuiting portions of the array for ARFI applications. The catheters had an effective transmit aperture size of 2 mm and 1.5 mm respectively. The catheters were connected to a Verasonics scanner and driven with pushing pulses of 180 V p-p to acquire ARFI data from a soft gel phantom with a Young’s modulus of 2.9 kPa. The dynamic response of the tissue-mimicking material demonstrates a typical ARFI motion of 1–2 microns as the gel phantom displaces away and recovers back to its normal position. The hardware modifications applied to our IVUS catheters mimic potential beamforming modifications that could be implemented on IVUS scanners. Our results demonstrate that the generation of radiation force from IVUS catheters and the development of intra-vascular ARFI may be feasible. PMID:24554291

  9. Intravascular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Nico; Bom, Nicolaas; Schaar, Johannes; Goertz, David; Frijlink, Martijn; Steen, Anton Fw Van Der

    IVUS is used for diagnostics, therapy guidance and scientific purposes. It is the only clinical available technique that can assess plaque burden and free lumen diameter at high accuracy. Contrast angiography, which was the golden standard before IVUS, can only give a shadow projection of the lumen. Especially with the advent of 3D IVUS using pull backs it became an important tool for monitoring treatment and follow up of interventions like balloon angioplasty and placing of stents (wire prostheses that are used to prevent the arterial wall from recoiling). 3D IVUS in combination with biplane angiography allows assessment of true 3D reconstructions of arteries, pre and post treatment. Using computational fluid dynamics the velocity profile and thus the shear stress at the vascular wall can be calculated. This can be related to biological markers, which gives insight in formation of atherosclerosis, restenosis and remodelling.

  10. The salvage of graft occlusion in a maintenace hemodialysis patient with tuberous sclerosis by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty using intravascular ultrasound: case report.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Terumi; Abe, Masanori; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiko; Ohnishi, Yoshihiko; Hagi, Chihiro; Fukuda, Noboru; Kuno, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Susumu; Saito, Satoshi; Nagura, Yuji; Matsumoto, Koichi

    2004-04-01

    End-stage renal failure due to tuberous sclerosis is rare and there is no previous report of a patient with tuberous sclerosis undergoing long-term hemodialysis for over 18 years. The patency rate for a dialysis prosthetic graft is low, however, our patient's graft survived over 16 years. For thrombotic occlusion of a graft, we performed percutaneous thrombectomy and balloon angioplasty and salvaged graft occlusion. Moreover, this case is the first report in which the interventional procedure (mechanical thrombectomy and balloon angioplasty) could be observed by intravascular ultrasound in addition to angiography.

  11. Intravascular ultrasound-guided percutaneous coronary intervention in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient with cocaine-associated acute myocardial infarction: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Carolin; Stempfle, Hans-Ulrich; Klauss, Volker; Schiele, Thomas M

    2005-09-01

    Cocaine use is a major problem worldwide and there are numerous reports about cocaine-associated myocardial infarction. Nevertheless minimal data are available from randomised clinical trials to suggest evidence-based approaches to the management of cocaine-associated myocardial ischemia. Moreover, most reports have been limited to conservative management of cocaine-associated myocardial infarction. We report a case of a young male cocaine user with acute myocardial infarction, undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound revealing severe atherosclerosis, followed by successful stent implantation.

  12. Intravascular ultrasound guidance of percutaneous coronary intervention in ostial chronic total occlusions: a description of the technique and procedural results.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicola; Gonzalo, Nieves; Dingli, Philip; Cruz, Oscar Vedia; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan; Trigo, María Del; Salinas, Pablo; Macaya, Carlos; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Escaned, Javier

    2017-02-14

    Inability to cross the lesion with a guidewire is the most common reason for failure in percutaneous revascularization (PCI) of chronic total occlusions (CTOs). An ostial or stumpless CTO is an acknowledged challenge for CTO recanalization due to difficulty in successful wiring. IVUS imaging provides the opportunity to visualize the occluded vessel and to aid guidewire advancement. We review the value of this technique in a single-centre experience of CTO PCI. This series involves 22 patients who underwent CTO-PCI using IVUS guidance for stumpless CTO wiring at our institution. CTO operators with extensive IVUS experience in non-CTO cases carried out all procedures. Procedural and outcome data was prospectively entered into the institutional database and a retrospective analysis of clinical, angiographic and technical data performed. 17 (77%) of the 22 procedures were successful. The mean age was 59.8 ± 11.5 years, and 90.9% were male. The most commonly attempted lesions were located in the left anterior descending 36.4% (Soon et al. in J Intervent Cardiol 20(5):359-366, 2007) and Circumflex artery (LCx) 31.8% (Mollet et al. in Am J Cardiol 95(2):240-243, 2005). Mean JCTO score was 3.09 ± 0.75 (3.06 ± 0.68, 3.17 ± 0.98 in the successful and failed groups respectively p = 0.35). The mean contrast volume was 378.7 ml ± 114.7 (389.9 ml ± 130.5, 349.2 ml ± 52.2 p = 0.3 in the successful and failed groups respectively). There was no death, coronary artery bypass grafting or myocardial infarction requiring intervention in this series. When the success rates were analyzed taking into account the date of adoption of this technique, the learning curve had no significant impact on CTO-PCI success. This series describes a good success rate in IVUS guided stumpless wiring of CTOs in consecutive patients with this complex anatomical scenario.

  13. Neointimal hyperplasia in a thin-strut cobalt-chromium stent: insights from detailed 3-D intravascular ultrasound analysis.

    PubMed

    Otake, Hiromasa; Ako, Junya; Waseda, Katsuhisa; Sakurai, Ryota; Hirohata, Atsushi; Kaneda, Hideaki; Hasegawa, Takao; Honda, Yasuhiro; Fitzgerald, Peter J

    2010-11-05

    The effect of current generation cobalt-chromium stents on neointimal proliferation has not been fully elucidated. IVUS images of 137 patients treated with a single thin-strut cobalt-chromium stent (Driver: DRI, n=74) or stainless steel stent (Multilink plus: ML, n=63) were selected. Although % neointima volume (neointimal volume divided by stent volume) were comparable, DRI showed significantly smaller maximum %cross-sectional narrowing (%CSN: neointimal area divided by stent area) (P=0.006) with significantly less %CSN>60 (percent stent length with %CSN>60%) than ML (P=0.04). In conclusion, the amount of neointimal hyperplasia after DRI implantation was comparable to that after ML. However, current generation cobalt-chromium DRI may show less and shorter severe narrowing than the stainless steel ML.

  14. Long-term safety and feasibility of three-vessel multimodality intravascular imaging in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: the IBIS-4 (integrated biomarker and imaging study) substudy.

    PubMed

    Taniwaki, Masanori; Radu, Maria D; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Heg, Dik; Kelbæk, Henning; Holmvang, Lene; Moschovitis, Aris; Noble, Stephane; Pedrazzini, Giovanni; Saunamäki, Kari; Dijkstra, Jouke; Landmesser, Ulf; Wenaweser, Peter; Meier, Bernhard; Stefanini, Giulio G; Roffi, Marco; Lüscher, Thomas F; Windecker, Stephan; Räber, Lorenz

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the feasibility and the procedural and long-term safety of intracoronary (i.c) imaging for documentary purposes with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary PCI in the setting of IBIS-4 study. IBIS4 (NCT00962416) is a prospective cohort study conducted at five European centers including 103 STEMI patients who underwent serial three-vessel coronary imaging during primary PCI and at 13 months. The feasibility parameter was successful imaging, defined as the number of pullbacks suitable for analysis. Safety parameters included the frequency of peri-procedural complications, and major adverse cardiac events (MACE), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI) and any clinically-indicated revascularization at 2 years. Clinical outcomes were compared with the results from a cohort of 485 STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI without additional imaging. Imaging of the infarct-related artery at baseline (and follow-up) was successful in 92.2% (96.6%) of patients using OCT and in 93.2% (95.5%) using IVUS. Imaging of the non-infarct-related vessels was successful in 88.7% (95.6%) using OCT and in 90.5% (93.3%) using IVUS. Periprocedural complications occurred <2.0% of OCT and none during IVUS. There were no differences throughout 2 years between the imaging and control group in terms of MACE (16.7 vs. 13.3%, adjusted HR1.40, 95% CI 0.77-2.52, p = 0.27). Multi-modality three-vessel i.c. imaging in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI is consistent a high degree of success and can be performed safely without impact on cardiovascular events at long-term follow-up.

  15. Single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS front-end system for real-time volumetric IVUS and ICE imaging.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F Levent

    2014-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) catheters with real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging capability can provide unique benefits to many interventional procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary and structural heart diseases. Integration of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays with front-end electronics in single-chip configuration allows for implementation of such catheter probes with reduced interconnect complexity, miniaturization, and high mechanical flexibility. We implemented a single-chip forward-looking (FL) ultrasound imaging system by fabricating a 1.4-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array using CMUT-on-CMOS technology on a front-end IC implemented in 0.35-μm CMOS process. The dual-ring array has 56 transmit elements and 48 receive elements on two separate concentric annular rings. The IC incorporates a 25-V pulser for each transmitter and a low-noise capacitive transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for each receiver, along with digital control and smart power management. The final shape of the silicon chip is a 1.5-mm-diameter donut with a 430-μm center hole for a guide wire. The overall front-end system requires only 13 external connections and provides 4 parallel RF outputs while consuming an average power of 20 mW. We measured RF A-scans from the integrated single- chip array which show full functionality at 20.1 MHz with 43% fractional bandwidth. We also tested and demonstrated the image quality of the system on a wire phantom and an ex vivo chicken heart sample. The measured axial and lateral point resolutions are 92 μm and 251 μm, respectively. We successfully acquired volumetric imaging data from the ex vivo chicken heart at 60 frames per second without any signal averaging. These demonstrative results indicate that single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS systems have the potential to produce realtime volumetric images with image quality and speed suitable for catheter-based clinical applications.

  16. Single-Chip CMUT-on-CMOS Front-End System for Real-Time Volumetric IVUS and ICE Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gurun, Gokce; Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) catheters with real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging capability can provide unique benefits to many interventional procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary and structural heart diseases. Integration of CMUT arrays with front-end electronics in single-chip configuration allows for implementation of such catheter probes with reduced interconnect complexity, miniaturization, and high mechanical flexibility. We implemented a single-chip forward-looking (FL) ultrasound imaging system by fabricating a 1.4-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array using CMUT-on-CMOS technology on a front-end IC implemented in 0.35-µm CMOS process. The dual-ring array has 56 transmit elements and 48 receive elements on two separate concentric annular rings. The IC incorporates a 25-V pulser for each transmitter and a low-noise capacitive transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for each receiver, along with digital control and smart power management. The final shape of the silicon chip is a 1.5-mm-diameter donut with a 430-µm center hole for a guide wire. The overall front-end system requires only 13 external connections and provides 4 parallel RF outputs while consuming an average power of 20 mW. We measured RF A-scans from the integrated single-chip array which show full functionality at 20.1 MHz with 43% fractional bandwidth. We also tested and demonstrated the image quality of the system on a wire phantom and an ex-vivo chicken heart sample. The measured axial and lateral point resolutions are 92 µm and 251 µm, respectively. We successfully acquired volumetric imaging data from the ex-vivo chicken heart with 60 frames per second without any signal averaging. These demonstrative results indicate that single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS systems have the potential to produce real-time volumetric images with image quality and speed suitable for catheter based clinical applications. PMID:24474131

  17. Dual-Mode IVUS Catheter for Intracranial Image-Guided Hyperthermia: Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Herickhoff, Carl D.; Grant, Gerald A.; Britz, Gavin W.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of modifying 3-Fr IVUS catheters in several designs to potentially achieve minimally-invasive, endovascular access for image-guided ultrasound hyperthermia treatment of tumors in the brain. Using a plane wave approximation, target frequencies of 8.7 and 3.5 MHz were considered optimal for heating at depths (tumor sizes) of 1 and 2.5 cm, respectively. First, a 3.5-Fr IVUS catheter with a 0.7-mm diameter transducer (30 MHz nominal frequency) was driven at 8.6 MHz. Second, for a low-frequency design, a 220-μm-thick, 0.35 × 0.35-mm PZT-4 transducer—driven at width-mode resonance of 3.85 MHz—replaced a 40-MHz element in a 3.5-Fr coronary imaging catheter. Third, a 5 × 0.5-mm PZT-4 transducer was evaluated as the largest aperture geometry possible for a flexible 3-Fr IVUS catheter. Beam plots and on-axis heating profiles were simulated for each aperture, and test transducers were fabricated. The electrical impedance, impulse response, frequency response, maximum intensity, and mechanical index were measured to assess performance. For the 5 × 0.5-mm transducer, this testing also included mechanically scanning and reconstructing an image of a 2.5-cm-diameter cyst phantom as a preliminary measure of imaging potential. PMID:21041144

  18. Catheter ultrasound for cross-sectional imaging and drug delivery to vessel wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossack, John A.

    2015-05-01

    Current methods for delivery of an anti-restenosis drug to an arterial vessel wall post-percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement are limited in terms of drug choice, dosing level, and ability to assure drug coverage between the struts of a drug eluting stent. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides real-time, radiation-free, imaging and assessment of atherosclerotic disease in terms of anatomical, functional and molecular information. In this presentation, the design of a dual imaging / therapy IVUS catheter is described and results documenting gene and drug delivery reported. Microbubbles and drug / gene (shell associated or co-injected) are dispensed from the catheter tip. Using this approach, it becomes possible to address the need for complete vessel wall coverage and achieve delivery in regions poorly addressed using conventional stent-based approaches. A range of in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo results are presented. Our most recent results involve a demonstration in a pig model of coronary balloon angioplasty that produced a 33% reduction in neointima formation versus a drug plus microbubble, but no ultrasound, control.

  19. Demonstration of second-harmonic IVUS feasibility with focused broadband miniature transducers.

    PubMed

    Chandrana, Chaitanya; Kharin, Nikolay; Vince, Geoffrey; Roy, Shuvo; Fleischman, Aaron

    2010-05-01

    Focused broadband miniature polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene (PVDF TrFE) ultrasonic transducers were investigated for intravascular (IVUS) second-harmonic imaging. Modeling and experimental studies demonstrated that focused transducers, unlike conventional flat transducers, build up second harmonic peak pressures faster and stronger, leading to an increased SNR of second harmonic content within the coronary geometry. Experimental results demonstrated that focused second harmonic pressures could be controlled to occur at specific depths by controlling the f-number of the transducer. The experimental results were in good agreement with the modeled results. Experiments were conducted using three imaging modalities: fundamental 20 MHz (F20), second harmonic 40 MHz (H40), and fundamental 40 MHz (F40). The lateral resolutions for a 1-mm transducer (f-number 3.2) at F20, F40, and H40 were experimentally measured to be 162, 123, and 124 microm, respectively, which agreed well with the theoretical calculations with <8% error. Lateral resolution was further characterized in the three modes, using a micromachined phantom consisting of fixed bars and spaces with widths ranging from 20 to 160 microm. H40 exhibited better lateral resolution, clearly displaying 40- and 60-microm bars with about 4 dB and 7 dB greater signal strength compared with F20. Ex vivo human aorta images were obtained in the second-harmonic imaging mode to show the feasibility of high resolution second-harmonic IVUS using focused transducers.

  20. Interstudy reproducibility of the second generation, Fourier domain optical coherence tomography in patients with coronary artery disease and comparison with intravascular ultrasound: a study applying automated contour detection.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Z; Tearney, G; Bruining, N; Sihan, K; van Soest, G; Ligthart, J; van Domburg, R; Bouma, B; Regar, E

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Fourier domain OCT (FD-OCT) has been introduced for clinical use. This approach allows in vivo, high resolution (15 micron) imaging with very fast data acquisition, however, it requires brief flushing of the lumen during imaging. The reproducibility of such fast data acquisition under intracoronary flush application is poorly understood. To assess the inter-study variability of FD-OCT and to compare lumen morphometry to the established invasive imaging method, IVUS. 18 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease scheduled for PCI were included. In each target vessel a FD-OCT pullback (MGH system, light source 1,310 nm, 105 fps, pullback speed 20 mm/s) was acquired during brief (3 s) injection of X-ray contrast (flow 3 ml/s) through the guiding catheter. A second pullback was repeated under the same conditions after re-introduction of the FD OCT catheter into the coronary artery. IVUS and OCT imaging was performed in random order. FD-OCT and IVUS pullback data were analyzed using a recently developed software employing semi automated lumen contour and stent strut detection algorithms. Corresponding ROI were matched based on anatomical landmarks such as side branches and/or stent edges. Inter-study variability is presented as the absolute difference between the two pullbacks. FD-OCT showed remarkably good reproducibility. Inter-study variability in native vessels (cohort A) was very low for mean and minimal luminal area (0.10 ± 0.38, 0.19 ± 0.57 mm(2), respectively). Likewise inter-study variability was very low in stented coronary segments (cohort B) for mean lumen, mean stent, minimal luminal and minimal stent area (0.06 ± 0.08, 0.07 ± 0.10, 0.04 ± 0.09, 0.04 ± 0.10 mm(2), respectively). Comparison to IVUS morphometry revealed no significant differences. The differences between both imaging methods, OCT and IVUS, were very low for mean lumen, mean stent, minimal luminal and minimal stent area (0.10 ± 0.45, 0.10 ± 0

  1. An integrated semicompliant balloon ultrasound catheter for quantitative feedback and image guidance during stent deployment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Charles D; Savage, James; Stephens, Douglas N; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2005-09-01

    An integrated balloon ultrasound catheter prototype was designed to image from inside the balloon for real-time guidance during stent deployment. It was fabricated using a semicompliant balloon material (polyethylene) and a 20 MHz, 64-element circumferential ultrasound array. A commercial stent, nominally 4.4 mm in diameter and 12 mm in length, was used for a phantom study and placed along the length of the integrated balloon ultrasound catheter. A rubber phantom was created with an elastic modulus of 175 kPa with a 4.36 mm diameter lumen. Real-time balloon pressure measurements were recorded using a digital pressure sensor, and real-time radio-frequency (RF) data were captured as the balloon was inflated. The slope of the area-pressure ratio (APR) was compared to a reference measure of the balloon and stent expanded in water to determine a measure for optimal stent deployment. The results clearly indicate stent deployment at 11.1 atm using this metric. The APR slope could serve as quantitative feedback parameter for guiding stent deployment to reduce arterial injury and subsequent restenosis. After the stent deployment experiment, RF data were captured as the balloon catheter was moved along the length of the stent in pullback mode to confirm successful stent deployment. Ultimately, an integrated balloon ultrasound catheter could serve as a single catheter intervention device by providing real-time intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging and quantitative feedback during stent deployment.

  2. Optical Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (OMUT)-- A New Approach for High Frequency Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadayon, Mohammad Amin

    Piezoelectric technology is the backbone of most medical ultrasound imaging arrays, however, in scaling the technology to sizes required for high frequency operation (> 20 MHz), it encounters substantial difficulties in fabrication and signal transduction efficiency. These limitations particularly affect the design of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging probes whose operating frequency can approach 60 MHz. Optical technology has been proposed and investigated for several decades as an alternative approach for high frequency ultrasound transducers. However, to apply this promising technology in guiding clinical operations such as in interventional cardiology, brain surgery, and laparoscopic surgery further raise in the sensitivity is required. Here, in order to achieve the required sensitivity for an intravascular ultrasound imaging probe, we introduce design changes making use of alternative receiver mechanisms. First, we present an air cavity detector that makes use of a polymer membrane for increased mechanical deflection. We have also significantly raised the thin film detector sensitivity by improving its optical characteristics. This can be achieved by inducing a refractive index feature inside the Fabry-Perot resonator that simply creates a waveguide between the two mirrors. This approach eliminates the loss in energy due to diffraction in the cavity, and therefore the Q-factor is only limited by mirror loss and absorption. To demonstrate this optical improvements, a waveguide Fabry-Perot resonator has been fabricated consisting of two dielectric Bragg reflectors with a layer of photosensitive polymer between them. The measured finesse of the fabricated resonator was 692, and the Q-factor was 55000. The fabrication process of this device has been modified to fabricate an ultrasonically testable waveguide Fabry-Perot resonator. By applying this method, we have achieved a noise equivalent pressure of 178 Pa over a bandwidth of 28 MHz or 0.03 Pa/Hz1/2 which

  3. Systematic study of the effects of lowering low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol on regression of coronary atherosclerotic plaques using intravascular ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Conflicting results currently exist on the effects of LDL-C levels and statins therapy on coronary atherosclerotic plaque, and the target level of LDL-C resulting in the regression of the coronary atherosclerotic plaques has not been settled. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched from Jan. 2000 to Jan. 2014 for randomized controlled or blinded end-points trials assessing the effects of LDL-C lowering therapy on regression of coronary atherosclerotic plaque (CAP) in patients with coronary heart disease by intravascular ultrasound. Data concerning the study design, patient characteristics, and outcomes were extracted. The significance of plaques regression was assessed by computing standardized mean difference (SMD) of the volume of CAP between the baseline and follow-up. SMD were calculated using fixed or random effects models. Results Twenty trials including 5910 patients with coronary heart disease were identified. Mean lowering LDL-C by 45.4% and to level 66.8 mg/dL in the group of patients with baseline mean LDL-C 123.7 mg/dL, mean lowering LDL-C by 48.8% and to level 60.6 mg/dL in the group of patients with baseline mean LDL-C 120 mg/dL, and mean lowering LDL-C by 40.4% and to level 77.8 mg/dL in the group of patients with baseline mean LDL-C 132.4 mg/dL could significantly reduce the volume of CAP at follow up (SMD −0.108 mm3, 95% CI −0.176 ~ −0.040, p = 0.002; SMD −0.156 mm3, 95% CI −0.235 ~ −0.078, p = 0.000; SMD −0.123 mm3, 95% CI −0.199 ~ −0.048, p = 0.001; respectively). LDL-C lowering by rosuvastatin (mean 33 mg daily) and atorvastatin (mean 60 mg daily) could significantly decrease the volumes of CAP at follow up (SMD −0.162 mm3, 95% CI: −0.234 ~ −0.081, p = 0.000; SMD −0.101, 95% CI: −0.184 ~ −0.019, p = 0.016; respectively). The mean duration of follow up was from 17 ~ 21 months. Conclusions Intensive lowering LDL-C (rosuvastatin

  4. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... your test will be done. Alternative Names Sonogram Images Abdominal ultrasound Ultrasound in pregnancy 17 week ultrasound ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  5. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  6. Intravascular ultrasound evaluation of optimal drug-eluting stent expansion after poststent balloon dilation using a noncompliant balloon versus a semicompliant balloon (from the Poststent Optimal Stent Expansion Trial [POET]).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Sun; Moon, Jae-Youn; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Kang, Woong Chol; Ahn, Taehoon; Kim, Byoung-Keuk; Oh, Seong Jin; Jeon, Dong Woon; Yang, Joo-Young

    2008-08-01

    The impact of type of balloon such as noncompliant (NC; Quantum) or semicompliant (SC; Maverick(2)) used after stent dilation on optimal stent expansion (OSE) has not been established for drug-eluting stents (DESs). We conducted a prospective multicenter, randomized study to compare NC with SC balloons after stent balloon dilatation. A total of 301 patients (127 men, 83 women, 62 +/- 9 years of age) treated with a DES (sirolimus-eluting stent [SES], n = 152; paclitaxel-eluting stent, n = 149) were included. OSE followed the definition of the Multicenter Ultrasound Stenting in Coronaries (MUSIC) study. The primary end point was the incidence of OSE using intravascular ultrasound according to type of balloon. Baseline characteristics of each group showed no significant differences. OSE in the SC balloon group was achieved at higher rates than the NC balloon group (53 +/- 35%, vs 73 +/- 48%, p = 0.022 in all stents; 25 +/- 33%, vs 36, 48%, p = 0.051 in SESs). However, any differences in the achievement of OSE between the NC and SC balloon groups were not present in paclitaxel-eluting stents. In conclusion, despite postadjuvant balloon inflations with high pressures, underexpansion of the DES was seen commonly. Between the 2 types of balloon for adjuvant dilation after DES implantation, same-size SC balloons could be more useful for obtaining OSE than NC balloons, especially in SESs.

  7. Comparison of acute and long-term results and underlying mechanisms from sirolimus-eluting stent implantation for the treatment of in-stent restenosis and recurrent in-stent restenosis in patients in whom intracoronary radiation failed as assessed by intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Thomas M; Rieber, Johannes; König, Andreas; Leibig, Marcus; Erhard, Isabelle; Theisen, Karl; Siebert, Uwe; Klauss, Volker

    2004-10-01

    In-stent restenosis (ISR), especially after vascular brachytherapy, is a therapeutic challenge. Sirolimus-eluting stent implantation is a promising new option for the treatment of patients with ISR. The efficacy of sirolimus-eluting stent implantation for the treatment of patients with their first episodes of ISR and with recurrent ISR due to the failure of vascular brachytherapy was compared using intravascular ultrasound imaging.

  8. Imminent Cardiac Risk Assessment via Optical Intravascular Biochemical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.; Wetzel, L; Wetzel, M; Lodder, R

    2009-01-01

    still the first line of defense. However, with the fidelity of 64-slice CT imaging, this technique has recently become an option when the patient presents with symptoms of reduced arterial flow. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) treadmill exercise testing is a standard non-invasive test for decreased perfusion of heart muscle, but is time consuming and not suited for emergent evaluation. Once the invasive clinical option of catherization is chosen, this provides the opportunity for intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging. As the probe is pulled through the artery, the diameter at different parts is measurable, and monochrome contrast in the constricted area reveals the presence of tissue with a different ultrasonic response. Also, via an optical catheter with a fiber-optic conductor, the possibly of spectroscopic analysis of arterial walls is now a reality. In this case, the optical transducer is coupled to a near-infrared spectrometer. Revealing the arterial chemical health means that plaque vulnerability and imminent risk could be assessed by the physician. The classical emergency use of catherization involves a contrast agent and dynamic X-ray imaging to locate the constriction, determine its severity, and possibly perform angioplasty, and stent placement.

  9. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... called multiples) To screen for birth defects, like spina bifida or heart defects . Screening means seeing if your ... example, if the ultrasound shows your baby has spina bifida, she may be treated in the womb before ...

  10. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's uterus. The sound waves bounce off solid structures in the body ...

  11. An analog integrated circuit beamformer for high-frequency medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Zahorian, Jaime S; Sisman, Alper; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Paul E; Degertekin, F Levent

    2012-10-01

    We designed and fabricated a dynamic receive beamformer integrated circuit (IC) in 0.35-μm CMOS technology. This beamformer IC is suitable for integration with an annular array transducer for high-frequency (30-50 MHz) intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging. The beamformer IC consists of receive preamplifiers, an analog dynamic delay-and-sum beamformer, and buffers for 8 receive channels. To form an analog dynamic delay line we designed an analog delay cell based on the current-mode first-order all-pass filter topology, as the basic building block. To increase the bandwidth of the delay cell, we explored an enhancement technique on the current mirrors. This technique improved the overall bandwidth of the delay line by a factor of 6. Each delay cell consumes 2.1-mW of power and is capable of generating a tunable time delay between 1.75 ns to 2.5 ns. We successfully integrated the fabricated beamformer IC with an 8-element annular array. Experimental test results demonstrated the desired buffering, preamplification and delaying capabilities of the beamformer.

  12. Theory and operation of 2-D array piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Dausch, David E; Castellucci, John B; Chou, Derrick R; von Ramm, Olaf T

    2008-11-01

    Piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducers (pMUTs) are a new approach for the construction of 2-D arrays for forward-looking 3-D intravascular (IVUS) and intracardiac (ICE) imaging. Two-dimensional pMUT test arrays containing 25 elements (5 x 5 arrays) were bulk micromachined in silicon substrates. The devices consisted of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film membranes formed by deep reactive ion etching of the silicon substrate. Element widths ranged from 50 to 200 microm with pitch from 100 to 300 mum. Acoustic transmit properties were measured in de-ionized water with a calibrated hydrophone placed at a range of 20 mm. Measured transmit frequencies for the pMUT elements ranged from 4 to 13 MHz, and mode of vibration differed for the various element sizes. Element capacitance varied from 30 to over 400 pF depending on element size and PZT thickness. Smaller element sizes generally produced higher acoustic transmit output as well as higher frequency than larger elements. Thicker PZT layers also produced higher transmit output per unit electric field applied. Due to flexure mode operation above the PZT coercive voltage, transmit output increased nonlinearly with increased drive voltage. The pMUT arrays were attached directly to the Duke University T5 Phased Array Scanner to produce real-time pulse-echo B-mode images with the 2-D pMUT arrays.

  13. An intravascular protein osmometer.

    PubMed

    Henson, J W; Brace, R A

    1983-05-01

    Our purpose was to develop an intravascular osmometer for measuring the colloid (i.e., protein) osmotic pressure (COP) of circulating blood. A semipermeable hollow fiber from a Cordis Dow artificial kidney (C-DAK 4000) was attached to polyethylene tubing on one end, filled with saline, and sealed at the other end. This was small enough to be inserted into the vasculature of research animals. Protein osmotic pressure plus hydrostatic pressure was measured by a Statham pressure transducer attached to the hollow fiber. Simultaneously, a second catheter and transducer was used to measure hydrostatic pressure, which was subtracted from the pressure measured from the fiber with an on-line computer. The system was documented by a variety of tests. The colloid osmotic pressure vs. albumin concentration curve determined with the fiber is identical to the curve determined by standard membrane osmometry. The time constant for 2- and 8-cm fibers was 2.6 +/- 0.6 and 1.5 +/- 0.5 (+/- SD) min, respectively. The reflection coefficient (+/- SD) of the fiber for NaCl is 0.042 +/- 0.019 (n = 38); COP measured at varying temperatures (absolute scale) changed linearly as expected from COP = nCRT (i.e., van't Hoff's law). Finally, hollow-fiber osmometers were inserted into femoral veins of dogs and sheep, and blood COP was continuously recorded during osmotic manipulations. In conclusion, we attempted to develop and document a simple method for continuous measurement of intravascular colloid osmotic pressure.

  14. Positron autoradiography for intravascular imaging: feasibility evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L; Easwaramoorthy, Balasubramaniam; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-02-21

    Approximately 70% of acute coronary artery disease is caused by unstable (vulnerable) plaques with an inflammation of the overlying cap and high lipid content. A rupturing of the inflamed cap of the plaque results in propagation of the thrombus into the lumen, blockage of the artery and acute ischaemic syndrome or sudden death. Morphological imaging such as angiography or intravascular ultrasound cannot determine inflammation status of the plaque. A radiotracer such as 18F-FDG is accumulated in vulnerable plaques due to higher metabolic activity of the inflamed cap and could be used to detect a vulnerable plaque. However, positron emission tomography (PET) cannot detect the FDG-labelled plaques because of respiratory and heart motions, small size and low activity of the plaques. Plaques can be detected using a miniature particle (positron) detector inserted into the artery. In this work, a new detector concept is investigated for intravascular imaging of the plaques. The detector consists of a storage phosphor tip bound to the end of an intravascular catheter. It can be inserted into an artery, absorb the 18F-FDG positrons from the plaques, withdrawn from the artery and read out. Length and diameter of the storage phosphor tip can be matched to the length and the diameter of the artery. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental evaluations of coronary plaque imaging with the proposed detector were performed. It was shown that the sensitivity of the storage phosphor detector to the positrons of 18F-FDG is sufficient to detect coronary plaques with 1 mm and 2 mm sizes and 590 Bq and 1180 Bq activities in the arteries with 2 mm and 3 mm diameters, respectively. An experimental study was performed using plastic tubes with 2 mm diameter filled with an FDG solution, which simulates blood. FDG spots simulating plaques were placed over the surface of the tube. A phosphor tip was inserted into the tube and imaged the plaques. Exposure time was 1 min in all simulations and

  15. Positron autoradiography for intravascular imaging: feasibility evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L.; Easwaramoorthy, Balasubramaniam; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-02-01

    Approximately 70% of acute coronary artery disease is caused by unstable (vulnerable) plaques with an inflammation of the overlying cap and high lipid content. A rupturing of the inflamed cap of the plaque results in propagation of the thrombus into the lumen, blockage of the artery and acute ischaemic syndrome or sudden death. Morphological imaging such as angiography or intravascular ultrasound cannot determine inflammation status of the plaque. A radiotracer such as 18F-FDG is accumulated in vulnerable plaques due to higher metabolic activity of the inflamed cap and could be used to detect a vulnerable plaque. However, positron emission tomography (PET) cannot detect the FDG-labelled plaques because of respiratory and heart motions, small size and low activity of the plaques. Plaques can be detected using a miniature particle (positron) detector inserted into the artery. In this work, a new detector concept is investigated for intravascular imaging of the plaques. The detector consists of a storage phosphor tip bound to the end of an intravascular catheter. It can be inserted into an artery, absorb the 18F-FDG positrons from the plaques, withdrawn from the artery and read out. Length and diameter of the storage phosphor tip can be matched to the length and the diameter of the artery. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental evaluations of coronary plaque imaging with the proposed detector were performed. It was shown that the sensitivity of the storage phosphor detector to the positrons of 18F-FDG is sufficient to detect coronary plaques with 1 mm and 2 mm sizes and 590 Bq and 1180 Bq activities in the arteries with 2 mm and 3 mm diameters, respectively. An experimental study was performed using plastic tubes with 2 mm diameter filled with an FDG solution, which simulates blood. FDG spots simulating plaques were placed over the surface of the tube. A phosphor tip was inserted into the tube and imaged the plaques. Exposure time was 1 min in all simulations and

  16. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  17. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uterine bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Menstrual bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Infertility - transvaginal ultrasound; Ovarian - transvaginal ultrasound; Abscess - transvaginal ultrasound

  18. Intravascular photoacoustic tomography for characterization of atherosclerotic lipid and inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Qin, Huan; Shi, Yujiao; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a fast growing imaging technology depending on its high optical resolution of optics while taking the advantage of the high penetration depth of ultrasound. In this paper, we demonstrate the new progress in the photoacoustic imaging. Atherosclerosis is characterized by a progressive build-up of lipid in the arterial wall, which is known as plaque. Histological studies demonstrate that the primary cause of acute cardiovascular events is the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Lipid and inflammation within the plaque are related to influence the propensity of plaques to disrupt. Photoacoustic intravascular tomography (IVPAT) holds a great advantage in providing comprehensive morphological and functional information of plaques. Lipid relative concentration maps of atherosclerotic aorta were obtained and compared with histology. Furthermore, by selectively targeting the intravascular inflammatory cytokines, IVPAT is also capable of mapping the inflamed area and determining the degree of inflammation.

  19. Central Venous Catheter Intravascular Malpositioning: Causes, Prevention, Diagnosis, and Correction.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Carlos J; Paniagua, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Despite the level of skill of the operator and the use of ultrasound guidance, central venous catheter (CVC) placement can result in CVC malpositioning, an unintended placement of the catheter tip in an inadequate vessel. CVC malpositioning is not a complication of central line insertion; however, undiagnosed CVC malpositioning can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this review were to describe factors associated with intravascular malpositioning of CVCs inserted via the neck and chest and to offer ways of preventing, identifying, and correcting such malpositioning. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and MD Consult was performed in June 2014. By searching for "Central line malposition" and then for "Central venous catheters intravascular malposition," we found 178 articles written in English. Of those, we found that 39 were relevant to our objectives and included them in our review. According to those articles, intravascular CVC malpositioning is associated with the presence of congenital and acquired anatomical variants, catheter insertion in left thoracic venous system, inappropriate bevel orientation upon needle insertion, and patient's body habitus variants. Although plain chest radiography is the standard imaging modality for confirming catheter tip location, signs and symptoms of CVC malpositioning even in presence of normal or inconclusive conventional radiography findings should prompt the use of additional diagnostic methods to confirm or rule out CVC malpositioning. With very few exceptions, the recommendation in cases of intravascular CVC malpositioning is to remove and relocate the catheter. Knowing the mechanisms of CVC malpositioning and how to prevent, identify, and correct CVC malpositioning could decrease harm to patients with this condition.

  20. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines: Traditional ultrasound: This uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound: This ...

  1. Improved dosimetry techniques for intravascular brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Varun

    using Monte Carlo-based radiation transport code MCNP and tabulated for a range of different coronary geometries and different radionuclides. A new technique using imaging techniques such as intravascular ultrasound and angiography to assess dosimetry for realistic coronary arteries is also introduced. The results indicate the need for accurate assessment of post-intervention clinical measurements such as minimal lumen diameter and residual plaque burden and incorporating them into dose calculations.

  2. [Intravascular lymphoma causing acute abdomen].

    PubMed

    Kröber, S M

    2007-02-01

    A 65-year old man presented with acute abdominal pain and fever. The initial diagnosis was small bowel gangrene. Pathology revealed small to large abdominal vessels obliterated by cells of intravascular B-cell-lymphoma (IVL). Visceral IVL involvement is common at autopsy but rarely reported in patients with acute abdomen. The subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy, which in typical cases is characterized by cephalic or cutaneous manifestation. Few cases showed involvement of large vessels which in combination to fibrin thrombi may lead to infarction of the organ involved. Thus IVL should be considered in cases of ischemic diseases with fever of unknown origin.

  3. Bioresorbable vascular scaffold restenosis: intravascular imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Enrico; Kilic, Ismail Dogu; Caiazzo, Gianluca; Serdoz, Roberta; Foin, Nicolas; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Di Mario, Carlo

    2015-11-21

    The mechanism of restenosis in bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) may be different from that of metallic stents and it is still poorly investigated. Intravascular imaging techniques are useful tools for corroborating or excluding possible mechanisms of intra-scaffold restenosis. In these novel devices intravascular imaging should be systematically used for a better comprehension of the in-scaffold restenosis mechanism.

  4. Ultrasound in trauma.

    PubMed

    Rippey, James C R; Royse, Alistair G

    2009-09-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound is well suited for use in the emergency setting for assessment of the trauma patient. Currently, portable ultrasound machines with high-resolution imaging capability allow trauma patients to be imaged in the pre-hospital setting, emergency departments and operating theatres. In major trauma, ultrasound is used to diagnose life-threatening conditions and to prioritise and guide appropriate interventions. Assessment of the basic haemodynamic state is a very important part of ultrasound use in trauma, but is discussed in more detail elsewhere. Focussed assessment with sonography for Trauma (FAST) rapidly assesses for haemoperitoneum and haemopericardium, and the Extended FAST examination (EFAST) explores for haemothorax, pneumothorax and intravascular filling status. In regional trauma, ultrasound can be used to detect fractures, many vascular injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, testicular injuries and can assess foetal viability in pregnant trauma patients. Ultrasound can also be used at the bedside to guide procedures in trauma, including nerve blocks and vascular access. Importantly, these examinations are being performed by the treating physician in real time, allowing for immediate changes to management of the patient. Controversy remains in determining the best training to ensure competence in this user-dependent imaging modality.

  5. Focused intravascular ultrasonic probe using dimpled transducer elements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Qiu, W B; Lam, K H; Liu, B Q; Jiang, X P; Zheng, H R; Luo, H S; Chan, H L W; Dai, J Y

    2015-02-01

    High-frequency focused intravascular ultrasonic probes were fabricated in this study using dimple technique based on PMN-PT single crystal and lead-free KNN-KBT-Mn ceramic. The center frequency, bandwidth, and insertion loss of the PMN-PT transducer were 34 MHz, 75%, and 22.9 dB, respectively. For the lead-free probe, the center frequency, bandwidth, and insertion loss were found to be 40 MHz, 72%, and 28.8 dB, respectively. The ultrasonic images of wire phantom and vessels with good resolution were obtained to evaluate the transducer performance. The -6 dB axial and lateral resolutions of the PMN-PT probe were determined to be 58 μm and 131 μm, respectively. For the lead-free probe, the axial and lateral resolutions were found to be 44 μm and 125 μm, respectively. These results suggest that the mechanical dimpling technique has good potential in preparing focused transducers for intravascular ultrasound applications.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Intravascular brachytherapy of the coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, R. A.

    2002-02-01

    This is a review of the relatively recently developed field of intravascular brachytherapy of coronary arteries. It presents a brief overview of the discipline of coronary angioplasty describing the problem of restenosis and discusses the potential for ionizing radiation to overcome this problem. It examines the various methods that have been used to irradiate the coronary arteries comparing their advantages and disadvantages. Special consideration is given to seeds and wires in the artery, radioactive liquids in the angioplasty balloon and radioactive stents. Passing reference is made to a number of other methods that have also been proposed, but which are not commonly used to irradiate the coronary arteries at present. The dosimetry of each of the major techniques is discussed and the data from different laboratories compared. Specific consideration is given to the need for centring of the radioactive source and the factors affecting the selection of a dose prescription. A brief review of recent clinical trials is followed by an examination of possible future directions in this field including the use of intravascular ultrasound to improve dosimetry, the use of gas-filled balloons to enhance the penetration of beta-emitting sources and the use of gamma-emitting stents to overcome the problems associated with edge restenosis.

  7. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic arteries (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Qu, Yueqiao; Li, Jiawen; Yu, Mingyue; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the industrialized nations. Accurate quantification of both the morphology and composition of lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque are essential for early detection and optimal treatment in clinics. In previous works, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging for detection of lipid-rich plaque within coronary artery walls has been demonstrated in ex vivo, but the imaging speed is still limited. In order to increase the imaging speed, a high repetition rate laser is needed. In this work, we present a high speed integrated IVPA/US imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A miniature catheter with 1.0 mm outer diameter was designed with a 200 μm multimode fiber and an ultrasound transducer with 45 MHz center frequency. The fiber was polished at 38 degree and enclosed in a glass capillary for total internal reflection. An optical/electrical rotary junction and pull-back mechanism was applied for rotating and linearly scanning the catheter to obtain three-dimensional imaging. Atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta was imaged as two frame/second at 1725 nm. Furthermore, by wide tuning range of the laser wavelength from 1680 nm to 1770 nm, spectroscopic photoacoustic analysis of lipid-mimicking phantom and an human atherosclerotic artery was performed ex vivo. The results demonstrated that the developed IVPA/US imaging system is capable for high speed intravascular imaging for plaque detection.

  8. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  9. Intravascular lymphoma and thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Katalinić, Darko; Valković, Toni; Lucin, Ksenija; Rudez, Josip

    2006-03-01

    Intravascular lymphoma (IVL) is a rare disease characterized by the proliferation of neoplastic cells in the small blood vessels that frequently goes undiagnosed until the time of autopsy. The neoplastic cells are usually of B-cell origin. The clinical course was examined to determine factors that would facilitate antemortem diagnosis. IVL is observed with clinical, histopathological and immunohystochemical methods. This is a unique case because the thyroid gland is a rare place for IVL. Accent is given on immunohystochemical methods and tissue biopsy in the differential diagnosis of IVL when nervous system and thyroid gland dysfunction occur This report indicates that micro-ecosystem of multinodular goitrous might influence the expression of chemokines and/or adhesion moleculs on endothelial and lymphoma cells, leading to heavy infiltration of thyroid gland. Concurrently, that may guide the physician to tissue biopsy facilitating antemortem diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy.

  10. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Ultrasound imaging of the abdomen uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures within ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  11. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Hip Ultrasound Hip ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of muscles, tendons, ligaments, ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  12. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of a baby (embryo ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  13. Assessment of coronary vasomotion by intracoronary ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupouy, Patrick J.; Dubois-Rande, Jean Luc; Pelle, Gabriel; Gallot, Dominique; Geschwind, Herbert J.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, new intravascular ultrasound devices for intracoronary use became available. The aim of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of intravascular ultrasound for the assessment of coronary artery vasomotion and endothelial function in patients with atherosclerosis. Twenty patients with luminal irregularities on coronary angiogram and a high cholesterol level (287 +/- 19 mg/dl) (group 1) and 6 patients with angiographically smooth arteries and a minimally elevated cholesterol level (197 +/- 12 mg/dl) (group 2) were studied. A mechanical intravascular ultrasound probe (4.3 French, 30 MHz, Cardiovascular Imaging Systems) was placed into the proximal segment of the coronary artery. Off-line measurements of the lumen area and calculation of mean intimal thickness indice was performed using digitized ultrasound images. Endothelial function was studied during a sympathetic stimulation by a cold pressor test and after intracoronary administration of papaverine and linsidomine. Mean intimal thickness was higher in group 1 than in group 2 (1.52 +/- 0.64 mm vs. 0.18 +/- 0.08 mm, p < 0.001). Linsidomine infusion induced a significant vasodilating effect in both groups (p < 0.001).

  14. Microbubbles and ultrasound: a bird's eye view.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sanjiv

    2004-01-01

    Gas-filled microbubbles were initially used as ultrasound contrast agent because of their intravascular rheology, which is similar to that of red blood cells. Their transit through tissue can thus be quantified with ultrasound. More recently, these bubbles have been successfully used for molecular imaging by incorporating ligands on their surfaces that will adhere to cellular and other components within the microvasculature and can be detected by ultrasound. These bubbles have also been used for delivery of genes and drugs which can be released locally by disruption of the bubbles with high-energy ultrasound. Finally, bioeffects produced by localized ultrasound disruption of microbubbles have been shown to induce angiogenesis. This brief review will provide a bird's eye view of these applications.

  15. Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia of the foot.

    PubMed

    Cisco, R W; McCormac, R M

    1994-01-01

    Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia is a rare benign reactive lesion usually found in thrombosed subcutaneous blood vessels. The lesion resembles malignant angiosarcoma clinically and histopathologically, and must be diagnosed correctly to avoid inappropriate treatment. The following is a case presentation involving the foot.

  16. Molecular imaging with targeted contrast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Mark; Allroggen, Achim; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound uses targeted microbubbles that are retained in diseased tissue. The resonant properties of these microbubbles produce acoustic signals in an ultrasound field. The microbubbles are targeted to diseased tissue by using certain chemical constituents in the microbubble shell or by attaching disease-specific ligands such as antibodies to the microbubble. In this review, we discuss the applications of this technique to pathological states in the cerebrovascular system including atherosclerosis, tumor angiogenesis, ischemia, intravascular thrombus, and inflammation.

  17. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  18. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  1. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  2. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  3. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  4. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  5. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  6. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... the examination. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a console ... ultrasound that require biopsy are not cancers. Many facilities do not offer ultrasound screening, and the procedure ...

  7. Techniques for Intravascular Foreign Body Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhouse, Joe B.; Uberoi, Raman

    2013-08-01

    As endovascular therapies increase in frequency, the incidence of lost or embolized foreign bodies is increasing. The presence of an intravascular foreign body (IFB) is well recognized to have the potential to cause serious complications. IFB can embolize and impact critical sites such as the heart, with subsequent significant morbidity or mortality. Intravascular foreign bodies most commonly result from embolized central line fragments, but they can originate from many sources, both iatrogenic and noniatrogenic. The percutaneous approach in removing an IFB is widely perceived as the best way to retrieve endovascular foreign bodies. This minimally invasive approach has a high success rate with a low associated morbidity, and it avoids the complications related to open surgical approaches. We examined the characteristics, causes, and incidence of endovascular embolizations and reviewed the various described techniques that have been used to facilitate subsequent explantation of such materials.

  8. Relief of vasospasm by intravascular ultraviolet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Kanji; Morimoto, Yuji; Ito, Hirotaka; Kominami, Kimito; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1998-05-01

    We investigated the photovasorelaxation with intravascular transluminal irradiation using in vivo model. A 2.5 Fr. catheter was inserted in the femoral artery of a rabbit under anesthesia. A 400 micrometers diameter quartz fiber was inserted through the catheter. The catheter was withdrawn from the distal end to the proximal end of the exposed femoral artery without laser irradiation in order to observe the mechanical dilation by the procedure. The femoral artery lumen was irradiated by a Helium-Cadmium(He-Cd) laser (wavelength; 325 nm) with 8 mW through the fiber during 30 s. We carried out that the laser irradiation produced vasorelaxation (185% on the average) compared with mechanical vasodilation (150% on the average) with angiography. The results suggest that intravascular transluminal irradiation with low-power UV laser might be applicable to the relief of acute arterial vasospasm.

  9. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  10. [IVUS-controlled aorto-ostial directional coronary atherectomy in higher grade stenosis of the central anastomosis of a sequential triple venous bypass].

    PubMed

    Schiele, T M; Beauport, J; Niehues, R; Jacksch, R

    1998-12-01

    Following coronary artery bypass grafting repeat ischemia mandatory for reintervention occurs in 2 to 30% of cases, depending mainly on graft age. Selection of a suitable strategy for revascularisation--transcatheter angioplasty or reoperation--depends on various parameters including coronary morphology, left ventricular performance, comorbidity and availability of graft material. Catheter-based interventions on saphenous vein bypass grafts are feasible, but lower primary success rates and a higher incidence of restenosis--compared with native coronary arteries--have to be expected. Repeat coronary artery bypass graft operations are associated with a significantly higher perioperative morbidity and mortality, patency rates are lower and late clinical outcome is worse than in primary surgery. We report on a patient who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting 4 years ago revealing a high grade ostial stenosis in a jump-graft supplying RCA, LAD and Cx sequentially, making reintervention necessary. As a prerequisite serial balloon angioplasty of two native vessels was performed prior to ostial intervention. Intravascular-ultrasound guided directional coronary atherectomy was performed with good primary and long-term result. Our case demonstrates that, if all relevant clinical parameters and different therapeutic options are taken into account, complex transcatheter angioplasty procedures are feasible and associated with a reasonable amount of risk, thus avoiding repeat coronary artery bypass graft operations.

  11. Hypothesis: Disseminated Intravascular Inflammation as the Inflammatory Counterpart to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Brian S.; Bull, Maureen H.

    1994-08-01

    We have identified a leukocyte activation syndrome that is occasionally associated with the transfusion of intraoperatively recovered erythrocytes. This syndrome appears to result from intravascular damage caused by leukocytes activated during the erythrocyte salvage process. We hypothesize that this syndrome is part of a larger disease grouping: disseminated intravascular inflammation (DII). DII is the analog of the coagulation disorder disseminated intravascular coagulation. In disseminated intravascular coagulation, the organ damage results from uncontrolled activation of the clotting pathway; in DII the damage is caused by leukocytes that have become activated by direct contact with bacteria or in rare instances-such as erythrocyte salvage-in the absence of bacteria and bacterial products. Recent studies of the hazards associated with intraoperative blood salvage indicate that activation of leukocytes can be achieved by exposure to activated platelets alone. If such activated leukocytes are reinfused along with the washed erythrocytes, widespread organ damage may result. The lung is the organ most severely affected by activated leukocytes. Adult respiratory distress syndrome is one outcome. It is likely that DII is a presently unrecognized pathophysiological process that complicates a variety of primary disease states and increases their lethality.

  12. Use of an Intravascular Fluorescent Continuous Glucose Sensor in ICU Patients

    PubMed Central

    Strasma, Paul J.; Finfer, Simon; Flower, Oliver; Hipszer, Brian; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Macken, Lewis; Sechterberger, Marjolein; van der Voort, Peter H. J.; DeVries, J. Hans; Joseph, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are associated with adverse clinical outcomes in intensive care patients. In product development studies at 4 ICUs, the safety and performance of an intravascular continuous glucose monitoring (IV-CGM) system was evaluated in 70 postsurgical patients. Methods: The GluCath System (GluMetrics, Inc) used a quenched chemical fluorescence mechanism to optically measure blood glucose when deployed via a radial artery catheter or directly into a peripheral vein. Periodic ultrasound assessed blood flow and thrombus formation. Patient glucose levels were managed according to the standard of care and existing protocols at each site. Reference blood samples were acquired hourly and compared against prospectively calibrated sensor results. Results: In all, 63 arterial sensors and 9 venous sensors were deployed in 70 patients. Arterial sensors did not interfere with invasive blood pressure monitoring, sampling or other aspects of patient care. A majority of venous sensors (66%) exhibited thrombus on ultrasound. In all, 89.4% (1383/1547) of arterial and 72.2% (182/252) of venous measurements met ISO15197:2003 criteria (within 20%), and 72.7% (1124/1547) of arterial and 56.3% (142/252) of venous measurements met CLSI POCT 12-A3 criteria (within 12.5%). The aggregate mean absolute relative difference (MARD) between the sensors and the reference was 9.6% for arterial and 14.2% for venous sensors. Conclusions: The GluCath System exhibited acceptable accuracy when deployed in a radial artery for up to 48 hours in ICU patients after elective cardiac surgery. Accuracy of venous deployment was substantially lower with significant rates of intravascular thrombus observed using ultrasound. PMID:25972280

  13. Intravascular haemolysis in the recreational runner.

    PubMed Central

    Deitrick, R W

    1991-01-01

    Intravascular haemolysis has been found to result from prolonged endurance competition, rigorous military training and participation in impact sports. Haematological research involving the recreational runner is sparse. Recreational runners frequently vary their training to avoid monotony and improve endurance capacity. This study investigated the haematological effects of a typical day of increased distance training in 15 male recreational runners (62.4(3.1) ml kg-1 min-1 treadmill VO2max; 44.6(8.4) km per week training (means(s.d.)). Venous blood samples were collected before, immediately after, 1 day, 4 days, and 10 days after a 13-km training run (about twice the subjects' typical running distance) and analysed for changes in bilirubin, serum potassium, haematocrit, haemoglobin, red blood cell count, haptoglobin, poikilocytosis and reticulocytosis. Urine samples were collected at the same times as the blood samples and analysed for urobilinogen. Significant (P less than 0.05) 1-day and 4-day decreases in mean haemoglobin, red blood cell count, and haptoglobin values, compared to before training venous blood values and significant (P less than 0.05) post-training increases in bilirubin, serum potassium, urobilinogen and poikilocytosis provided evidence for increased intravascular haemolysis. After 10 days the values for haematocrit, bilirubin, serum potassium, red blood cell count, urobilinogen and poikilocytosis were not significantly (P less than 0.05) different from pre-training values while haemoglobin remained significantly (P less than 0.05) lower, exhibiting a constant but not significant increase over the period from 1 to 10 days. The results indicate that mild intravascular 'footstrike' haemolysis can occur in the recreational runner when typical training distance is increased. This condition appears to be transient and benign. PMID:1810610

  14. Disseminated intravascular coagulation and acute myocardial necrosis caused by lightning.

    PubMed

    Ekoé, J M; Cunningham, M; Jaques, O; Balague, F; Baumann, R P; Humair, L; de Torrenté, A

    1985-01-01

    A 24-year-old woman was struck by lightning and suffered 20% second degree burns. She was admitted after cardiac and respiratory arrest. Despite intensive supportive care she died 24 h later of cardiogenic shock complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation. At autopsy there was myocardial necrosis. Disseminated intravascular coagulation and myocardial necrosis are only rarely described as complications of lightning.

  15. CMUT-based Volumetric Ultrasonic Imaging Array Design for Forward Looking ICE and IVUS Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Rashid, Muhammad W.; Satir, Sarp; Gurun, Gokce; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Designing a mechanically flexible catheter based volumetric ultrasonic imaging device for intravascular and intracardiac imaging is challenging due to small transducer area and limited number of cables. With a few parallel channels, synthetic phased array processing is necessary to acquire data from a large number of transducer elements. This increases the data collection time and hence reduces frame rate and causes artifacts due to tissue-transducer motion. Some of these drawbacks can be resolved by different array designs offered by CMUT-on-CMOS approach. We recently implemented a 2.1-mm diameter single chip 10 MHz dual ring CMUT-on-CMOS array for forward looking ICE with 64-transmit and 56-receive elements along with associated electronics. These volumetric arrays have the small element size required by high operating frequencies and achieve sub mm resolution, but the system would be susceptible to motion artifacts. To enable real time imaging with high SNR, we designed novel arrays consisting of multiple defocused annular rings for transmit aperture and a single ring receive array. The annular transmit rings are utilized to act as a high power element by focusing to a virtual ring shaped line behind the aperture. In this case, image reconstruction is performed by only receive beamforming, reducing total required firing steps from 896 to 14 with a trade-off in image resolution. The SNR of system is improved more than 5 dB for the same frequency and frame rate as compared to the dual ring array, which can be utilized to achieve the same resolution by increasing the operating frequency. PMID:23366605

  16. CMUT-based volumetric ultrasonic imaging array design for forward looking ICE and IVUS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Rashid, Muhammad W.; Satir, Sarp; Gurun, Gokce; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F. L.

    2013-03-01

    Designing a mechanically flexible catheter based volumetric ultrasonic imaging device for intravascular and intracardiac imaging is challenging due to small transducer area and limited number of cables. With a few parallel channels, synthetic phased array processing is necessary to acquire data from a large number of transducer elements. This increases the data collection time and hence reduces frame rate and causes artifacts due to tissue-transducer motion. Some of these drawbacks can be resolved by different array designs offered by CMUT-on-CMOS approach. We recently implemented a 2.1-mm diameter single chip 10 MHz dual ring CMUT-on-CMOS array for forward looking ICE with 64-transmit and 56-receive elements along with associated electronics. These volumetric arrays have the small element size required by high operating frequencies and achieve sub mm resolution, but the system would be susceptible to motion artifacts. To enable real time imaging with high SNR, we designed novel arrays consisting of multiple defocused annular rings for transmit aperture and a single ring receive array. The annular transmit rings are utilized to act as a high power element by focusing to a virtual ring shaped line behind the aperture. In this case, image reconstruction is performed by only receive beamforming, reducing total required firing steps from 896 to 14 with a trade-off in image resolution. The SNR of system is improved more than 5 dB for the same frequency and frame rate as compared to the dual ring array, which can be utilized to achieve the same resolution by increasing the operating frequency.

  17. Pulsed liquid microjet for intravascular injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel V.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Miller, Jason; Huie, Philip; Marmor, Michael; Blumenkranz, Mark S.

    2002-06-01

    Occlusions of the retinal veins and arteries are associated with common diseases such as hypertension and arteriosclerosis and usually cause severe and irreversible loss of vision. Treatments for these vascular diseases have been unsatisfactory to date in part because of the difficulty of delivering thrombolytic drugs locally within the eye. In this article we describe a pulsed liquid microjet for minimally invasive intra-vascular drug delivery. The microjet is driven by a vapor bubble following an explosive evaporation of saline, produced by a microsecond-long electric discharge in front of the 25 micrometers electrode inside the micronozzle. Expansion of the transient vapor bubble produces a water jet with a diameter equal to the diameter of the nozzle, and with a velocity and duration that are controlled by the pulse energy. We found that fluid could be injected through the wall of a 60-micrometers -diameter artery in choriallantoic membrane using a 15-micrometers diameter liquid jet traveling at more than 60 m/s. Histological analysis of these arteries showed that the width of the perforation is limited to the diameter of the micronozzle, and the penetration depth of the jet is controlled by the discharge energy. The pulsed liquid microjet offers a promising technique for precise and needle-free intravascular delivery of thrombolytic drugs for localized treatment of retinal vascular occlusions.

  18. Display Considerations For Intravascular Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessert, James M.; Krinke, Charlie; Mallery, John A.; Zalesky, Paul J.

    1989-08-01

    A display has been developed for intravascular ultrasonic imaging. Design of this display has a primary goal of providing guidance information for therapeutic interventions such as balloons, lasers, and atherectomy devices. Design considerations include catheter configuration, anatomy, acoustic properties of normal and diseased tissue, catheterization laboratory and operating room environment, acoustic and electrical safety, acoustic data sampling issues, and logistical support such as image measurement, storage and retrieval. Intravascular imaging is in an early stage of development so design flexibility and expandability are very important. The display which has been developed is capable of acquisition and display of grey scale images at rates varying from static B-scans to 30 frames per second. It stores images in a 640 X 480 X 8 bit format and is capable of black and white as well as color display in multiplevideo formats. The design is based on the industry standard PC-AT architecture and consists of two AT style circuit cards, one for high speed sampling and the other for scan conversion, graphics and video generation.

  19. Protection against high intravascular pressure in giraffe legs.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin K; Hørlyck, Arne; Ostergaard, Kristine H; Andresen, Joergen; Broegger, Torbjoern; Skovgaard, Nini; Telinius, Niklas; Laher, Ismael; Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Smerup, Morten; Secher, Niels H; Brøndum, Emil; Hasenkam, John M; Wang, Tobias; Baandrup, Ulrik; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2013-11-01

    The high blood pressure in giraffe leg arteries renders giraffes vulnerable to edema. We investigated in 11 giraffes whether large and small arteries in the legs and the tight fascia protect leg capillaries. Ultrasound imaging of foreleg arteries in anesthetized giraffes and ex vivo examination revealed abrupt thickening of the arterial wall and a reduction of its internal diameter just below the elbow. At and distal to this narrowing, the artery constricted spontaneously and in response to norepinephrine and intravascular pressure recordings revealed a dynamic, viscous pressure drop along the artery. Histology of the isolated median artery confirmed dense sympathetic innervation at the narrowing. Structure and contractility of small arteries from muscular beds in the leg and neck were compared. The arteries from the legs demonstrated an increased media thickness-to-lumen diameter ratio, increased media volume, and increased numbers of smooth muscle cells per segment length and furthermore, they contracted more strongly than arteries from the neck (500 ± 49 vs. 318 ± 43 mmHg; n = 6 legs and neck, respectively). Finally, the transient increase in interstitial fluid pressure following injection of saline was 5.5 ± 1.7 times larger (n = 8) in the leg than in the neck. We conclude that 1) tissue compliance in the legs is low; 2) large arteries of the legs function as resistance arteries; and 3) structural adaptation of small muscle arteries allows them to develop an extraordinary tension. All three findings can contribute to protection of the capillaries in giraffe legs from a high arterial pressure.

  20. Advances in Molecular Imaging with Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan; Dayton, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has long demonstrated utility in the study and measurement of anatomic features and noninvasive observation of blood flow. Within the last decade, advances in molecular biology and contrast agents have allowed researchers to use ultrasound to detect changes in the expression of molecular markers on the vascular endothelium and other intravascular targets. This new technology, referred to as ultrasonic molecular imaging, is still in its infancy. However, in preclinical studies, ultrasonic molecular imaging has shown promise in assessing angiogenesis, inflammation, and thrombus. In this review, we discuss recent advances in microbubble-type contrast agent development, ultrasound technology, and signal processing strategies that have the potential to substantially improve the capabilities and utility of ultrasonic molecular imaging. PMID:20487678

  1. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007646.htm Endoscopic ultrasound To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is ...

  3. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  4. Carotid Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Carotid Ultrasound Also known as carotid duplex. Carotid ultrasound is a painless imaging test that uses high- ... of your carotid arteries. This test uses an ultrasound machine, which includes a computer, a screen, and ...

  5. A Broadband Polyvinylidene Difluoride-Based Hydrophone with Integrated Readout Circuit for Intravascular Photoacoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Daeichin, Verya; Chen, Chao; Ding, Qing; Wu, Min; Beurskens, Robert; Springeling, Geert; Noothout, Emile; Verweij, Martin D; van Dongen, Koen W A; Bosch, Johan G; van der Steen, Antonius F W; de Jong, Nico; Pertijs, Michiel; van Soest, Gijs

    2016-05-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging can visualize the coronary atherosclerotic plaque composition on the basis of the optical absorption contrast. Most of the photoacoustic (PA) energy of human coronary plaque lipids was found to lie in the frequency band between 2 and 15 MHz requiring a very broadband transducer, especially if a combination with intravascular ultrasound is desired. We have developed a broadband polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) transducer (0.6 × 0.6 mm, 52 μm thick) with integrated electronics to match the low capacitance of such a small polyvinylidene difluoride element (<5 pF/mm(2)) with the high capacitive load of the long cable (∼100 pF/m). The new readout circuit provides an output voltage with a sensitivity of about 3.8 μV/Pa at 2.25 MHz. Its response is flat within 10 dB in the range 2 to 15 MHz. The root mean square (rms) output noise level is 259 μV over the entire bandwidth (1-20 MHz), resulting in a minimum detectable pressure of 30 Pa at 2.25 MHz.

  6. Quinine-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Every drug comes with some side effect. It is the benefit/risk ratio that determines the medical use of the drug. Quinine, a known antimalarial drug, has been used for nocturnal leg cramps since the 1930s; it is associated with severe life-threatening hematological and cardiovascular side effects. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), albeit rare, is a known coagulopathy associated with Quinine. It is imperative to inquire about the Quinine intake in medication history in patients with coagulopathy, as most patients still consider it a harmless home remedy for nocturnal leg cramps. In this report, we present a case of coagulopathy in a middle-aged woman, who gave a history of taking Quinine for nocturnal leg cramps, as her home remedy. Early identification of the offending agent led to the diagnosis, prompt discontinuation of the medication, and complete recovery and prevented the future possibility of recurrence. PMID:27293443

  7. Prostate cancer: beware of disseminated intravascular coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mihir; John, Babbin; Evans, Gillian; Eddy, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a pathological systemic condition resulting from aberrant activation of the coagulation system. It is characterised by the release and activation of procoagulants into the blood, with an associated consumption coagulopathy. Its association with solid and haematological malignancies is well described in literature. This case describes an elderly man, known to have prostate cancer, who following transurethral resection of the prostate developed DIC with haematuria, spontaneous ecchymoses and mucosal bleeding. Subsequent investigations revealed a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >1000 µg/L, and staging CT showed multiple sclerotic metastatic lesions affecting the thoracic and lumbar vertebra, as well as infiltration into his left femur. Coagulation normalised with blood products and vitamin K within 1 week, and the patient responded to antiandrogen therapy with a reduction in pain and PSA on discharge. PMID:25819815

  8. Real-time volumetric lipid imaging in vivo by intravascular photoacoustics at 20 frames per second

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Springeling, Geert; Lovrak, Matija; Mastik, Frits; Iskander-Rizk, Sophinese; Wang, Tianshi; van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; Van Soest, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    Lipid deposition can be assessed with combined intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IVPA/US) imaging. To date, the clinical translation of IVPA/US imaging has been stalled by a low imaging speed and catheter complexity. In this paper, we demonstrate imaging of lipid targets in swine coronary arteries in vivo, at a clinically useful frame rate of 20 s−1. We confirmed image contrast for atherosclerotic plaque in human samples ex vivo. The system is on a mobile platform and provides real-time data visualization during acquisition. We achieved an IVPA signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. These data show that clinical translation of IVPA is possible in principle. PMID:28270995

  9. Mechanical effects of muscle contraction increase intravascular ATP draining quiescent and active skeletal muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Richards, Jennifer C; Dinenno, Frank A

    2013-04-01

    Intravascular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) evokes vasodilation and is implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise. Mechanical stresses to erythrocytes and endothelial cells stimulate ATP release in vitro. How mechanical effects of muscle contractions contribute to increased plasma ATP during exercise is largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that simulated mechanical effects of muscle contractions increase [ATP](venous) and ATP effluent in vivo, independent of changes in tissue metabolic demand, and further increase plasma ATP when superimposed with mild-intensity exercise. In young healthy adults, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) (Doppler ultrasound) and plasma [ATP](v) (luciferin-luciferase assay), then calculated forearm ATP effluent (FBF×[ATP](v)) during rhythmic forearm compressions (RFC) via a blood pressure cuff at three graded pressures (50, 100, and 200 mmHg; Protocol 1; n = 10) and during RFC at 100 mmHg, 5% maximal voluntary contraction rhythmic handgrip exercise (RHG), and combined RFC + RHG (Protocol 2; n = 10). [ATP](v) increased from rest with each cuff pressure (range 144-161 vs. 64 ± 13 nmol/l), and ATP effluent was graded with pressure. In Protocol 2, [ATP](v) increased in each condition compared with rest (RFC: 123 ± 33; RHG: 51 ± 9; RFC + RHG: 96 ± 23 vs. Mean Rest: 42 ± 4 nmol/l; P < 0.05), and ATP effluent was greatest with RFC + RHG (RFC: 5.3 ± 1.4; RHG: 5.3 ± 1.1; RFC + RHG: 11.6 ± 2.7 vs. Mean Rest: 1.2 ± 0.1 nmol/min; P < 0.05). We conclude that the mechanical effects of muscle contraction can 1) independently elevate intravascular ATP draining quiescent skeletal muscle without changes in local metabolism and 2) further augment intravascular ATP during mild exercise associated with increases in metabolism and local deoxygenation; therefore, it is likely one stimulus for increasing intravascular ATP during exercise in humans.

  10. AUGMENTATION OF LIMB PERFUSION AND REVERSAL OF TISSUE ISCHEMIA PRODUCED BY ULTRASOUND-MEDIATED MICROBUBBLE CAVITATION

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Mott, Brian H.; Xie, Aris; Zhao, Yan; Kim, Sajeevani; Lindner, Nathan J.; Ammi, Azzdine; Linden, Joel M.; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasound can increase tissue blood flow in part through the intravascular shear produced by oscillatory pressure fluctuations. We hypothesized that ultrasound-mediated increases in perfusion can be augmented by microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation, and sought to characterize the biologic mediators. Methods and Results Contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging of hindlimb skeletal muscle and femoral artery diameter measurement were performed in non-ischemic mice after unilateral 10 min exposure to intermittent ultrasound alone (mechanical index [MI] 0.6 or 1.3) or ultrasound with lipid microbubbles (2×108 I.V.). Studies were also performed after inhibiting shear- or pressure-dependent vasodilator pathways, and in mice with hindlimb ischemia. Ultrasound alone produced a 2-fold increase (p<0.05) in muscle perfusion regardless of ultrasound power. Ultrasound-mediated augmentation in flow was greater with microbubbles (3-fold and 10-fold higher than control for MI 0.6 and 1.3, respectively; p<0.05), as was femoral artery dilation. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) attenuated flow augmentation produced by ultrasound and microbubbles by 70% (p<0.01), whereas inhibition of adenosine-A2a receptors and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids had minimal effect. Limb nitric oxide (NO) production and muscle phospho-eNOS increased in a stepwise fashion by ultrasound and ultrasound with microbubbles. In mice with unilateral hindlimb ischemia (40–50% reduction in flow), ultrasound (MI 1.3) with microbubbles increased perfusion by 2-fold to a degree that was greater than the control non-ischemic limb. Conclusions Increases in muscle blood flow during high-power ultrasound are markedly amplified by the intravascular presence of microbubbles and can reverse tissue ischemia. These effects are most likely mediated by cavitation-related increases in shear and activation of eNOS. PMID:25834183

  11. Ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound has become an important modality for obtaining critical information in the acute care of patients. It is important to understand the physics of ultrasound in order to perform and interpret images at the bedside. The physics of both continuous wave and pulsed wave sound underlies diagnostic ultrasound. The instrumentation, including transducers and image processing, is important in the acquisition of appropriate sonographic images. Understanding how these concepts interplay with each other enables practitioners to obtain the best possible images.

  12. Intravascular probe for detection of vulnerable plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Tull, Carolyn R.; Janecek, Martin; Hoffman, Edward J.; Strauss, H. William; Tsugita, Ross; Ghazarossian, Vartan

    2001-12-01

    Coronary angiography is unable to define the status of the atheroma, and only measures the luminal dimensions of the blood vessel, without providing information about plaque content. Up to 70% of heart attacks are caused by minimally obstructive vulnerable plaques, which are too small to be detected adequately by angiography. We have developed an intravascular imaging detector to identify vulnerable coronary artery plaques. The detector works by sensing beta or conversion electron radiotracer emissions from plaque-binding radiotracers. The device overcomes the technical constraints of size, sensitivity and conformance to the intravascular environment. The detector at the distal end of the catheter uses six 7mm long by 0.5mm diameter scintillation fibers coupled to 1.5m long plastic fibers. The fibers are offset from each other longitudinally by 6mm and arranged spirally around a guide wire in the catheter. At the proximal end of the catheter the optical fibers are coupled to an interface box with a snap on connector. The interface box contains a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) to decode the individual fibers. The whole detector assembly fits into an 8-French (2.7 mm in diameter) catheter. The PSPMT image is further decoded with software to give a linear image, the total instantaneous count rate and an audio output whose tone corresponds to the count rate. The device was tested with F-18 and Tl-204 sources. Spectrometric response, spatial resolution, sensitivity and beta to background ratio were measured. System resolution is 6 mm and the sensitivity is >500 cps / micrometers Ci when the source is 1 mm from the detector. The beta to background ratio was 11.2 for F-18 measured on a single fiber. The current device will lead to a system allowing imaging of labeled vulnerable plaque in coronary arteries. This type of signature is expected to enable targeted and cost effective therapies to prevent acute coronary artery diseases such as: unstable angina

  13. Microbubbles in Ultrasound-Triggered Drug and Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hernot, Sophie; Klibanov, Alexander L.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents, in the form of gas-filled microbubbles, are becoming popular in perfusion monitoring; they are employed as molecular imaging agents. Microbubbles are manufactured from biocompatible materials, they can be injected intravenously, and some are approved for clinical use. Microbubbles can be destroyed by ultrasound irradiation. This destruction phenomenon can be applied to targeted drug delivery and enhancement of drug action. The ultrasonic field can be focused at the target tissues and organs; thus, selectivity of the treatment can be improved, reducing undesirable side effects. Microbubbles enhance ultrasound energy deposition in the tissues and serve as cavitation nuclei, increasing intracellular drug delivery. DNA delivery and successful tissue transfection is observed in the areas of the body where ultrasound is applied after intravascular administration of microbubbles and plasmid DNA. Accelerated blood clot dissolution in the areas of insonation by cooperative action of thrombolytic agents and microbubbles is demonstrated in several clinical trials. PMID:18486268

  14. Toward a Continuous Intravascular Glucose Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Brooke; Musick, Katherine; Matsumoto, Akira; Panitch, Alyssa; Nauman, Eric; Irazoqui, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Proof-of-concept studies that display the potential of using a glucose-sensitive hydrogel as a continuous glucose sensor are presented. The swelling ratio, porosity, and diffusivity of the hydrogel increased with glucose concentration. In glucose solutions of 50, 100, 200, and 300 mg/dL, the hydrogel swelling ratios were 4.9, 12.3, 15.9, and 21.7, respectively, and the swelling was reversible. The impedance across the hydrogel depended solely on the thickness and had an average increase of 47 Ω/mm. The hydrogels exposed to a hyperglycemic solution were more porous than the hydrogels exposed to a normal glycemic solution. The diffusivity of 390 Da MW fluorescein isothiocyanate in hydrogels exposed to normal and hyperglycemic solutions was examined using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and was found to be 9.3 × 10−14 and 41.4 × 10−14 m2/s, respectively, compared to 6.2 × 10−10 m2/s in glucose solution. There was no significant difference between the permeability of hydrogels in normal and hyperglycemic glucose solutions with averages being 5.26 × 10−17 m2 and 5.80 × 10−17 m2, respectively, which resembles 2–4% agarose gels. A prototype design is presented for continuous intravascular glucose monitoring by attaching a glucose sensor to an FDA-approved stent. PMID:22344366

  15. Immunological characterization of pulmonary intravascular macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitko-McKown, C. G.; Reddy, D. N.; Chapes, S. K.; McKown, R. D.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) are lung macrophages found apposed to the endothelium of pulmonary capillaries. In many species, they are responsible for the clearance of blood-borne particulates and pathogens; however, little else is known about their roles as immunologic effector cells. We compared PIMs with pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) to determine the relative immunological activities of these two cell populations. Our results suggested that both populations possess similar phagocytic and bactericidal activities. In assays measuring cytotoxicity, PIMs were more cytotoxic than PAMs against virally infected target cells; however, differences between these macrophage populations were not as marked when noninfected targets were used. LPS-stimulated PIMs produced more T-cell proliferative cytokines than PAMs, and both populations of nonstimulated macrophages produced similar amounts of the cytokines. In contrast, PAMs produced more TNF alpha and NO2- than PIMs when both populations were stimulated with LPS; however, nonstimulated PAMs and PIMs produced similar amounts of TNF alpha and NO2. These data suggest that bovine PIMs are immunologically active. Differences between the degrees of activity of PIMs and PAMs indicate that these macrophage populations may have different roles in lung surveillance.

  16. High-intensity focused ultrasound sonothrombolysis: the use of perfluorocarbon droplets to achieve clot lysis at reduced acoustic power.

    PubMed

    Pajek, Daniel; Burgess, Alison; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate use of intravascular perfluorocarbon droplets to reduce the sonication power required to achieve clot lysis with high-intensity focused ultrasound. High-intensity focused ultrasound with droplets was initially applied to blood clots in an in vitro flow apparatus, and inertial cavitation thresholds were determined. An embolic model for ischemic stroke was used to illustrate the feasibility of this technique in vivo. Recanalization with intravascular droplets was achieved in vivo at 24 ± 5% of the sonication power without droplets. Recanalization occurred in 71% of rabbits that received 1-ms pulsed sonications during continuous intravascular droplet infusion (p = 0.041 vs controls). Preliminary experiments indicated that damage was confined to the ultrasonic focus, suggesting that tolerable treatments would be possible with a more tightly focused hemispheric array that allows the whole focus to be placed inside of the main arteries in the human brain.

  17. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease. It is also used to measure conditions affecting blood flow to and within the brain, such as: Stenosis : ... saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures ... represent the flow of blood through the blood vessels. top of ...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  19. 21 CFR 880.5970 - Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular... and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5970 Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter. (a) Identification. A percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter is a device...

  20. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  1. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  2. Incidental Intravascular Lipoleiomyomatosis in A Hysterectomy Specimen: How To Manage?

    PubMed Central

    Aslanova, Rakhshanda; Can, Nuray; Okten, Sabri Berkem; Aslan, Mehmet Musa

    2015-01-01

    Leiomyomas are common benign tumors in female gynaecologic surgery. They are originated from smooth muscle cells of the uterus and/or sometimes of the uterine vessels. Intravascular lipoleiomyomatosis is a very rare form of leiomyomas which grow within veins and can extend up to vena cava inferior and right heart chamber with cardiac symptoms and is diagnosed by cardiovascular surgeons. We report a case of incidental intravascular lipoleiomyomatosis which was confined to the uterus being diagnosed after a total abdominal hysterectomy by pathology and its management strategy. PMID:25738043

  3. Extremely refractory Kawasaki disease with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Kwon; Lee, Jae Hee; Park, Yeong Bong

    2017-03-07

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a rare complication of Kawasaki disease and appears in <0.1% of Kawasaki disease patients. We report a case of refractory Kawasaki disease complicated with disseminated intravascular coagulation and giant coronary aneurysm. A 5-month-old boy presented with Kawasaki disease with coagulopathy. Although the coagulopathy improved after fresh-frozen plasma and antithrombin-III administration, the fever persisted despite two rounds of intravenous immunoglobulin, along with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy and infliximab administration. Despite all efforts to treatment, the patient had giant coronary aneurysms and died suddenly.

  4. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... plan for their effective treatment. detect blood clots (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the major veins of ... What are the limitations of Vascular Ultrasound? Vessels deep in the body are harder to see than ...

  5. Assessment of Inter-Expert Variability and of an Automated Segmentation Method of 40 and 60 MHz IVUS Images of Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Destrempes, François; Roy Cardinal, Marie-Hélène; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Finet, Gérard; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were to compare the performance of a segmentation algorithm, based on the minimization of an uncertainty function, to delineate contours of external elastic membrane and lumen of human coronary arteries imaged with 40 and 60 MHz IVUS, and to use values of this function to delineate portions of contours with highest uncertainty. For 8 patients, 40 and 60 MHz IVUS coronary data acquired pre- and post-interventions were used, for a total of 68,516 images. Manual segmentations of contours (on 2312 images) performed by experts at three core laboratories were the gold-standards. Inter-expert variability was highest on contour points with largest values of the uncertainty function (p < 0.001). Inter-expert variability was lower at 60 than 40 MHz for external elastic membrane (p = 0.013) and lumen (p = 0.024). Average differences in plaque (and atheroma) burden between algorithmic contours and experts’ contours were within inter-expert variability (p < 0.001). PMID:28107355

  6. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  7. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Carotid Carotid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the carotid arteries ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375 Section 870.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices §...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375 Section 870.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices §...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intravascular occluding catheter. 882.5150 Section 882.5150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5150...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intravascular occluding catheter. 882.5150 Section 882.5150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5150...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intravascular occluding catheter. 882.5150 Section 882.5150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5150...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intravascular occluding catheter. 882.5150 Section 882.5150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5150...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intravascular occluding catheter. 882.5150 Section 882.5150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5150...

  15. 21 CFR 880.5210 - Intravascular catheter securement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intravascular catheter securement device. 880.5210 Section 880.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal...

  16. 21 CFR 880.5210 - Intravascular catheter securement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intravascular catheter securement device. 880.5210 Section 880.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375 Section 870.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... side of the heart and the pulmonary circulation. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375 Section 870.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... side of the heart and the pulmonary circulation. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375 Section 870.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... side of the heart and the pulmonary circulation. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls...

  20. A Prognostic Dilemma of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Intravascular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Niumsawatt, Vachara; Castley, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy; however, it very rarely metastasizes. Despite the low mortality caused by this cancer, once it spreads, it has dim prognosis. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma with rare intravascular invasion and review the literature for risk factors and management of metastasis. PMID:27757356

  1. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially when the mass is solid). Blood flow images of the testicles are not always reliable in determining the presence or absence of blood supply to a testicle that has twisted. When searching for an absent testicle, ultrasound may not be ...

  2. Ex vivo detection of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques using intravascular ultrasonic-photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang Bui, Nhat; Hlaing, Kyu Kyu; Lee, Yong Wook; Kang, Hyun Wook; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are excellent imaging targets for detecting atherosclerotic plaques as they are involved in all the developmental stages of atherosclerosis. However, no imaging technique is currently capable of visualizing macrophages inside blood vessel walls. The current study develops an intravascular ultrasonic-photoacoustic (IVUP) imaging system combined with indocyanine green (ICG) as a contrast agent to provide morphological and compositional information about the targeted samples. Both tissue-mimicking vessel phantoms and atherosclerotic plaque-mimicking porcine arterial tissues are used to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping macrophages labeled with ICG by endoscopically applying the proposed hybrid technique. A delay pulse triggering technique is able to sequentially acquire photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) signals from a single scan without using any external devices. The acquired PA and US signals are used to reconstruct 2D cross-sectional and 3D volumetric images of the entire tissue with the ICG-loaded macrophages injected. Due to high imaging contrast and sensitivity, the IVUP imaging vividly reveals structural information and detects the spatial distribution of the ICG-labeled macrophages inside the samples. ICG-assisted IVUP imaging can be a feasible imaging modality for the endoscopic detection of atherosclerotic plaques.

  3. Wideband optical detector of ultrasound for medical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Amir; Kellnberger, Stephan; Omar, Murad; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-05-11

    Optical sensors of ultrasound are a promising alternative to piezoelectric techniques, as has been recently demonstrated in the field of optoacoustic imaging. In medical applications, one of the major limitations of optical sensing technology is its susceptibility to environmental conditions, e.g. changes in pressure and temperature, which may saturate the detection. Additionally, the clinical environment often imposes stringent limits on the size and robustness of the sensor. In this work, the combination of pulse interferometry and fiber-based optical sensing is demonstrated for ultrasound detection. Pulse interferometry enables robust performance of the readout system in the presence of rapid variations in the environmental conditions, whereas the use of all-fiber technology leads to a mechanically flexible sensing element compatible with highly demanding medical applications such as intravascular imaging. In order to achieve a short sensor length, a pi-phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating is used, which acts as a resonator trapping light over an effective length of 350 µm. To enable high bandwidth, the sensor is used for sideway detection of ultrasound, which is highly beneficial in circumferential imaging geometries such as intravascular imaging. An optoacoustic imaging setup is used to determine the response of the sensor for acoustic point sources at different positions.

  4. The ASTEROID trial: coronary plaque regression with high-dose statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Chhatriwalla, Adnan K; Nicholls, Stephen J; Nissen, Steven E

    2006-11-01

    A Study To Evaluate the effect of Rosuvastatin On Intravascular ultrasound-Derived coronary atheroma burden (ASTEROID) investigated the impact of high-dose rosuvastatin therapy on the rate of atheroma progression in patients with coronary artery disease. Serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed in 349 patients at baseline and following 24 months of therapy with rosuvastatin 40 mg/day. Rosuvastatin therapy lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to 60.8 mg/dl and raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 14.7%. This was associated with a significant reduction in all IVUS measures of atheroma burden. These results suggest that intensive modification of lipid levels with high-dose statin therapy can promote atheroma regression. Further studies will be required to determine whether this benefit is associated with a reduction in clinical events.

  5. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Thukkani, Arun K; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Novel imaging modalities are required to better identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques before their dire consequences of myocardial infarction, sudden death, and stroke. Moving beyond traditional diagnostic methods, the field of molecular imaging offers an innovative approach to report upon critical in vivo biological features of high-risk plaques. Molecular imaging employs engineered, targeted imaging agents in conjunction with sophisticated, high-resolution detection systems. While various modalities have been investigated for this purpose, intravascular near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRF) strategies are uniquely poised to provide high-resolution readouts of human coronary artery plaques. To date, preclinical animal studies have demonstrated feasibility of both standalone NIRF intravascular imaging as well as dual-modality approaches detecting inflammation and fibrin deposition in coronary-sized arteries. This translatable catheter-based approach is positioned to advance the identification of biologically vulnerable coronary plaques and coronary stents at risk of thrombosis. PMID:23638334

  6. Characterization of coronary atherosclerosis by intravascular imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Satoshi; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Noguchi, Teruo; Ogawa, Hisao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is highly prevalent in Western countries and is associated with morbidity, mortality, and a significant economic burden. Despite the development of anti-atherosclerotic medical therapies, many patients still continue to suffer from coronary events. This residual risk indicates the need for better risk stratification and additional therapies to achieve more reductions in cardiovascular risk. Recent advances in imaging modalities have contributed to visualizing atherosclerotic plaques and defining lesion characteristics in vivo. This innovation has been applied to refining revascularization procedure, assessment of anti-atherosclerotic drug efficacy and the detection of high-risk plaques. As such, intravascular imaging plays an important role in further improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CAD. The current article reviews available intravascular imaging modalities with regard to its method, advantage and disadvantage. PMID:27500094

  7. Intravascular magnetic resonance imaging using a loopless catheter antenna.

    PubMed

    Ocali, O; Atalar, E

    1997-01-01

    Recently, intravascular catheter probes have been developed to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for MR imaging of blood vessels. Miniaturization of these catheter probes without degrading their performances is very critical in imaging small vessels such as coronary arteries. Catheter coils have a loop incorporated in their structure and have limitations in physical dimensions and electromagnetic properties. The use of a loopless intravascular catheter antenna is proposed to overcome these problems. The catheter antenna is essentially a dipole, which makes a very thin diameter possible, and its electronic circuitry can be placed outside the blood vessels without performance degradation. The theoretical foundation for the design and operation of the catheter antenna is presented. Several catheter antennae, as small as 1.5 French, were constructed and tested on phantoms and rabbits with great success. The catheter antenna has a simple structure and is easy to design, implement, and operate.

  8. Look away: arterial and venous intravascular embolisation following shotgun injury.

    PubMed

    Vedelago, John; Dick, Elizabeth; Thomas, Robert; Jones, Brynmor; Kirmi, Olga; Becker, Jennifer; Alavi, Afshin; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cases of intravascular embolization of shotgun pellets found distant to the entry site of penetrating firearm injury. The cases demonstrate antegrade embolization of a shotgun pellet from neck to right middle cerebral artery, and antegrade followed by retrograde venous embolization through the left lower limb to pelvis. Radiologists and Trauma Physicians should be aware that post shotgun injury, the likelihood of an embolised shot pellet is increased compared to other types of firearm missile injury, and should therefore search away from the site of injury to find such missiles. Shotgun pellets may travel in an antegrade or a retrograde intravascular direction - both were seen in these cases - and may not be clinically obvious. This underscores the importance of a meticuluous search through all images, including CT scout images, for evidence of their presence.

  9. Treatment of Vertebro-Basilar Dissecting Aneurysms Using Intravascular Stents

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Kawano, Y.; Yoshimura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Hara, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Endovascular surgery is an established primary therapeutic modality for dissecting aneurysms at vertebro-basilar arteries. Intravascular stents can be used to treat the dissecting aneurysms for which simple obliteration procedures cannot be used. In such cases, stent implantation alone or a combination of stents and coils need to be selected properly by taking into consideration the site and shape of dissections. In this report, three patterns of stent application are described and their method of selection is discussed. PMID:20569619

  10. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  11. Vascular wall stress during intravascular optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Yang, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Biomechanical properties of arterial wall is crucial for understanding the changes in the cardiovascular system. Catheters are used during intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) imaging. The presence of a catheter alters the flow field, pressure distribution and frictional resistance to flow in an artery. In this paper, we first study the transmural stress distribution of the catheterized vessel. COMSOL (COMSOL 4.4) was used to simulate the blood flow induced deformation in a catheterized vessel. Blood is modeled as an incompressible Newtonian fluid. Stress distribution from an three-layer vascular model with an eccentric catheter are simulated, which provides a general idea about the distribution of the displacement and the stress. Optical coherence elastography techniques were then applied to porcine carotid artery samples to look at the deformation status of the vascular wall during saline or water injection. Preliminary simulation results show nonuniform stress distribution in the circumferential direction of the eccentrically catheterized vascular model. Three strain rate methods were tested for intravascular OCE application. The tissue Doppler method has the potential to be further developed to image the vascular wall biomechnical properties in vivo. Although results in this study are not validated quantitatively, the experiments and methods may be valuable for intravascular OCE studies, which may provide important information for cardiovascular disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Intravascular foreign bodies: danger of unretrieved fragmented medical devices.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Minori; Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2009-01-01

    A warning on the danger of unretrieved device fragments and recommendations to mitigate the danger were issued by the Food and Drug Administration in January 2008. The causes of intravascular foreign bodies are classified into three main categories: improper manipulation and usage, device defects, and others, such as patient and anatomical factors. Device failure after long-term use is rarely predicted at the time of approval, since device abnormality is rarely experienced in animal studies and clinical trials conducted during development of the device. Stent fracture due to metal fatigue is one example. Complex complications could occur from simultaneous use of two or more devices with diverse characteristics. The success rate of percutaneous retrieval of intravascular foreign bodies has improved with the advances in commercially available devices. However, the procedure is not always successful and sometimes surgical removal becomes necessary. Appropriate device selection and acquisition of experience in using the device are important. When an intravascular foreign body cannot be retrieved, the risk of complication could be high. Magnetic resonance imaging examination sometimes causes adverse events, including burns due to the heat generated by metal movement. Such information should be correctly recorded. Furthermore, it is necessary to provide patients with adequate information about the characteristics of implanted devices and unretrieved fragments. We reviewed the literature on unretrieved medical device fragments and include articles that describe the Japanese experience.

  13. Intravascular Talcosis due to Intravenous Drug Use Is an Underrecognized Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Christopher C.; Raval, Jay S.; Nichols, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous injection of illegal drugs or medications meant for oral administration can cause granulomatous disease of the lung. This intravascular talcosis results in pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Nine cases of histologically confirmed intravascular talcosis were reviewed with specific attention given to the clinical histories in these patients. Five autopsy cases were included in this series with detailed investigation in the anatomic features associated with intravascular talcosis and pulmonary hypertension. All nine patients showed perivascular and/or intravascular deposition of polarizable foreign material in their lungs. Intravascular talcosis as a result of previous intravenous drug use was not clinically suspected in any patient despite clinically diagnosed pulmonary hypertension in five. All patients showed dilatation of the right and left heart, but none had dilatation of the aortic valve. Congestive heart failure with hepatosplenomegaly was also common. We conclude that intravascular talcosis is an underdiagnosed cause of pulmonary hypertension in patients with known history of intravenous drug use. PMID:22645680

  14. Intravascular Talcosis due to Intravenous Drug Use Is an Underrecognized Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Christopher C; Raval, Jay S; Nichols, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous injection of illegal drugs or medications meant for oral administration can cause granulomatous disease of the lung. This intravascular talcosis results in pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Nine cases of histologically confirmed intravascular talcosis were reviewed with specific attention given to the clinical histories in these patients. Five autopsy cases were included in this series with detailed investigation in the anatomic features associated with intravascular talcosis and pulmonary hypertension. All nine patients showed perivascular and/or intravascular deposition of polarizable foreign material in their lungs. Intravascular talcosis as a result of previous intravenous drug use was not clinically suspected in any patient despite clinically diagnosed pulmonary hypertension in five. All patients showed dilatation of the right and left heart, but none had dilatation of the aortic valve. Congestive heart failure with hepatosplenomegaly was also common. We conclude that intravascular talcosis is an underdiagnosed cause of pulmonary hypertension in patients with known history of intravenous drug use.

  15. Ultrasound-guided tunneled lower extremity peripherally inserted central catheter placement in infants.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Subramanian; Moe, David C; Vo, Jack N

    2013-12-01

    Tunneled lower extremity peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are placed in infants under combined ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance in the interventional radiology suite. In infants requiring a bedside procedure, image guidance is limited, often using portable radiographs during the procedure. This report demonstrates feasibility of placing tunneled lower extremity PICCs using ultrasound as the sole imaging modality for vascular access, intravascular length measurement, and final confirmation of catheter tip position in a case series of 15 critically ill infants. The technique negates the need for added imaging confirmation methods that use ionizing radiation and can be performed at the bedside.

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  17. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  18. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  19. Breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ueno, E

    1996-03-01

    In ultrasound, ultrasonic images are formed by means of echoes among tissues with different acoustic impedance. Acoustic impedance is the product of sound speed and bulk modulus. The bulk modulus expresses the elasticity of an object, and in the human body, the value is increased by conditions such as fibrosis and calcification. The sound speed is usually high in elastic tissues and low in water. In the body, it is lowest in the fatty tissue. Ultrasound echoes are strong on the surface of bones which are hard and have a high sound speed. In organs filled with air such as the lungs, the bulk modulus is low and the sound speed is extremely low at 340 m/s, which produce strong echoes (the sound speed in solid tissues is 1,530 m/s). Human tissue is constructed of units smaller than the ultrasonic beam, and it is necessary to understand back-scattering in order to understand the ultrasonic images of these tissues. When ultrasound passes through tissue, it is absorbed as thermal energy and attenuated. Fiber is a tissue with a high absorption and attenuation rate. When the rate increases, the posterior echoes are attenuated. However, in masses with a high water content such as cysts, the posterior echoes are accentuated. This phenomenon is an important, basic finding for determining the properties of tumors. Breast cancer can be classified into two types: stellate carcinoma and circumscribed carcinoma. Since stellate carcinoma is rich in fiber, the posterior echoes are attenuated or lacking. However, circumscribed carcinoma has a high cellularity and the posterior echoes are accentuated. The same tendency is also seen in benign tumors. In immature fibroadenomas, posterior echoes are accentuated, while in fibroadenomas with hyalinosis, the posterior echoes are attenuated. Therefore, if the fundamentals of this tissue characterization and the histological features are understood, reading of ultrasound becomes easy. Color Doppler has also been developed and has contributed

  20. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  1. Impact of combined lipid lowering and blood pressure control on coronary plaque: myocardial ischemia treated by percutaneous coronary intervention and plaque regression by lipid lowering and blood pressure controlling assessed by intravascular ultrasonography (MILLION) study.

    PubMed

    Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Sakata, Kenji; Hayashi, Kenshi; Gamou, Tadatsugu; Kanaya, Honin; Miwa, Kenji; Ueda, Kosei; Higashikata, Toshinori; Mizuno, Sumio; Michishita, Ichiro; Namura, Masanobu; Nitta, Yutaka; Katsuda, Shoji; Okeie, Kazuyasu; Hirase, Hiroaki; Tada, Hayato; Uchiyama, Katsuharu; Konno, Tetsuo; Ino, Hidekazu; Nagase, Keisuke; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2016-10-31

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the aggressive reduction of both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and blood pressure (BP) reduced coronary atherosclerotic plaque volume compared with a standard treatment of LDL-C and BP in Japanese patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This study is a prospective, randomized, and open-labelled with a blind-endpoint evaluation study. A total of 97 patients (81 men, mean age 62.0 ± 9.6) with CAD undergoing intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomized, and 68 patients had IVUS examinations at baseline and at 18-24 months follow-up. Patients were randomly assigned to standard or aggressive strategies targeting LDL-C and a BP of 100 mg/dL and 140/90 mmHg vs. 70 mg/dL and 120/70 mmHg, respectively. The primary endpoint was the percent change in coronary plaque volume. Both standard and aggressive strategies succeeded to achieve target levels of LDL-C and BP; 74.9 ± 14.7 vs. 63.7 ± 11.9 mg/dL (NS) and 124.1 ± 9.4/75.8 ± 7.7 vs. 113.6 ± 9.6/65.8 ± 9.4 mmHg (systolic BP; NS, diastolic BP; p < 0.05), respectively. Both groups showed a significant reduction in the coronary plaque volume of -9.4 ± 10.7% and -8.7 ± 8.6% (NS) in standard and aggressive therapies, respectively. Both standard and aggressive intervention significantly regressed coronary plaque volume by the same degree, suggesting the importance of simultaneous reductions of LDL-C and BP for prevention of CAD.

  2. Contrast Enhanced Superharmonic Imaging for Acoustic Angiography Using Reduced Form-Factor Lateral Mode Transmitters for Intravascular and Intracavity Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuochen; Heath Martin, K; Huang, Wenbin; Dayton, Paul A; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2017-02-01

    Techniques to image the microvasculature may play an important role in imaging tumor-related angiogenesis and vasa vasorum associated with vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. However, the microvasculature associated with these pathologies is difficult to detect using traditional B-mode ultrasound or even harmonic imaging due to small vessel size and poor differentiation from surrounding tissue. Acoustic angiography, a microvascular imaging technique that utilizes superharmonic imaging (detection of higher order harmonics of microbubble response), can yield a much higher contrast-to-tissue ratio than second harmonic imaging methods. In this paper, two dual-frequency transducers using lateral mode transmitters were developed for superharmonic detection and acoustic angiography imaging in intracavity applications. A single element dual-frequency intravascular ultrasound transducer was developed for concept validation, which achieved larger signal amplitude, better contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and pulselength compared to the previous work. A dual-frequency [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]-x[PbTiO3] array transducer was then developed for superharmonic imaging with dynamic focusing. The axial and lateral sizes of the microbubbles in a 200- [Formula: see text] tube were measured to be 269 and [Formula: see text], respectively. The maximum CNR was calculated to be 22 dB. These results show that superharmonic imaging with a low frequency lateral mode transmitter is a feasible alternative to thickness mode transmitters when the final transducer size requirements dictate design choices.

  3. A primary intravascular synovial sarcoma causing deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a 20-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, M.; Sanad, W.; Pfitzner, B.M.; Baumann, G.; Knebel, F.

    2015-01-01

    Primary intravascular synovial sarcoma is a rare malignancy with only a few cases documented in the literature. On presentation, this tumour usually resembles a deep venous thrombosis (dvt) or pulmonary embolism (pe). Here, we report the case of a 20-year-old woman complaining of shortness of breath who had a history of dvt 6 weeks before presentation at our institution. Vascular ultrasound detected a suspicious mass in the right groin, which was identified as a monophasic synovial sarcoma by surgical biopsy. The tumour extended from the right superficial femoral vein into the common iliac vein, profound femoral vein, and great saphenous vein. It caused pe with near-total occlusion of the right pulmonary artery. After initial treatment on the cardiac intensive care unit, the patient was referred to the oncology department for neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy with doxorubicin–ifosfamide according to the Interdisziplinäre Arbeitsgemeinschaft Weichteilsarkome [Interdisciplinary AG Sarcomas] protocol and surgical resection of the tumour. No signs of tumour recurrence were found during the subsequent course of the disease, but the patient died from treatment complications approximately 15 months after initial presentation. This case underlines the importance of screening for malignancies even in young patients presenting with dvt or pe. We also recommend whole-leg compression ultrasonography in patients with suspected dvt or pe (as opposed to venography or simple four-point ultrasound examination in the groin and popliteal fossa) to detect possible underlying causes for thrombosis. PMID:26628882

  4. Fiber-Laser-Based Ultrasound Sensor for Photoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yizhi; Jin, Long; Wang, Lidai; Bai, Xue; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, especially for intravascular and endoscopic applications, requires ultrasound probes with miniature size and high sensitivity. In this paper, we present a new photoacoustic sensor based on a small-sized fiber laser. Incident ultrasound waves exert pressures on the optical fiber laser and induce harmonic vibrations of the fiber, which is detected by the frequency shift of the beating signal between the two orthogonal polarization modes in the fiber laser. This ultrasound sensor presents a noise-equivalent pressure of 40 Pa over a 50-MHz bandwidth. We demonstrate this new ultrasound sensor on an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope. The axial and lateral resolutions are 48 μm and 3.3 μm. The field of view is up to 1.57 mm2. The sensor exhibits strong resistance to environmental perturbations, such as temperature changes, due to common-mode cancellation between the two orthogonal modes. The present fiber laser ultrasound sensor offers a new tool for all-optical photoacoustic imaging.

  5. Fiber-Laser-Based Ultrasound Sensor for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yizhi; Jin, Long; Wang, Lidai; Bai, Xue; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, especially for intravascular and endoscopic applications, requires ultrasound probes with miniature size and high sensitivity. In this paper, we present a new photoacoustic sensor based on a small-sized fiber laser. Incident ultrasound waves exert pressures on the optical fiber laser and induce harmonic vibrations of the fiber, which is detected by the frequency shift of the beating signal between the two orthogonal polarization modes in the fiber laser. This ultrasound sensor presents a noise-equivalent pressure of 40 Pa over a 50-MHz bandwidth. We demonstrate this new ultrasound sensor on an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope. The axial and lateral resolutions are 48 μm and 3.3 μm. The field of view is up to 1.57 mm2. The sensor exhibits strong resistance to environmental perturbations, such as temperature changes, due to common-mode cancellation between the two orthogonal modes. The present fiber laser ultrasound sensor offers a new tool for all-optical photoacoustic imaging. PMID:28098201

  6. Six-month IVUS and two-year clinical outcomes in the EVOLVE FHU trial: a randomised evaluation of a novel bioabsorbable polymer-coated, everolimus-eluting stent.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Ian T; Verheye, Stefan; Weissman, Neil J; Barragan, Paul; Scott, Douglas; Chávarri, Mariano Valdés; West, Nick E J; Kelbæk, Henning; Whitbourn, Robert; Walters, Darren L; Kubica, Jacek; Thuesen, Leif; Masotti, Monica; Banning, Adrian; Sjögren, Iwar; Stables, Rod H; Allocco, Dominic J; Dawkins, Keith D

    2013-05-22

    Aims: The EVOLVE FHU trial demonstrated non-inferiority of six-month late loss with two dose formulations of SYNERGY, a novel bioabsorbable polymer everolimus-eluting stent (EES) compared with the durable polymer PROMUS Element (PE) EES. The current analysis describes the six-month IVUS and clinical results through two years from the EVOLVE FHU trial. Methods and results: EVOLVE recruited 291 patients from 29 centres. At six months, IVUS-assessed in-stent net volume obstruction was 3.40±5.06% for PROMUS Element (PE) vs. 2.68±4.60% for SYNERGY (p=0.34) and 3.09±4.29% for SYNERGY ½ dose (p=0.68 vs. PE). There were no significant differences between groups for any other measured IVUS parameter including resolved, persistent, and late-acquired incomplete stent apposition (ISA). At two years, target lesion failure (TLF) was 6.1% for PE vs. 5.5% for SYNERGY (p=0.87) and 5.2% for SYNERGY ½ dose (p=0.81). There were no significant differences between groups for cardiac death, repeat revascularisation, MI or stent thrombosis through two years. Conclusions: At six months, everolimus delivered from an ultrathin bioabsorbable abluminal polymer resulted in equivalent net volume obstruction and ISA compared with a permanent polymer EES. There were no significant differences between PE and either SYNERGY stent for any major cardiac endpoint through two years. Clinical trials number: NCT01135225.

  7. Bothrops jararaca envenomation: Pathogenesis of hemostatic disturbances and intravascular hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Senise, Luana V; Yamashita, Karine M

    2015-01-01

    To attain fully functional biological activity, vitamin-K dependent coagulation factors (VKDCF) are γ-carboxylated prior to secretion from liver. Warfarin impairs the γ-carboxylation, and consequently their physiological function. Bothrops jararaca snake venom (BjV) contains several activators of blood coagulation, especially procoagulant enzymes (prothrombin and factor X activators) and thrombin-like enzymes. In order to clarify the relative contribution of prothrombin and factor X activators to the hemostatic disturbances occurring during experimental B. jararaca envenomation, warfarin was used to deplete VKDCF, prior to BjV administration. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with saline (Sal) or warfarin (War) and inoculated subsequently with BjV or saline, thus forming four groups: Sal + Sal (negative control), Sal + BjV (positive control), War + Sal (warfarinization control), and War + BjV. Three hours after inoculation, prothrombin and factor X levels fell 40% and 50%, respectively; levels of both factors decreased more than 97% in the War + Sal and War + BjV groups. Platelet counts dropped 93% and 76% in Sal + BjV and War + BjV, respectively, and plasma fibrinogen levels decreased 86% exclusively in Sal + BjV. After 6 and 24 h, platelet counts and fibrinogen levels increased progressively. A dramatic augmentation in plasma hemoglobin levels and the presence of schizocytes and microcytes in the Sal + BjV group indicated the development of intravascular hemolysis, which was prevented by warfarin pretreatment. Our findings show that intravascular thrombin generation has the foremost role in the pathogenesis of coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, but not in the development of thrombocytopenia, in B. jararaca envenomation in rats; in addition, fibrinogenases (metalloproteinases) may contribute to coagulopathy more than thrombin-like enzymes. PMID:26080462

  8. Ultrasound for drug and gene delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, Kullervo

    2008-06-30

    Noninvasive, transient, and local image-guided blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) has been demonstrated with focused ultrasound exposure in animal models. Most studies have combined low pressure amplitude and low time average acoustic power burst sonications with intravascular injection of pre-formed micro-bubbles to produce BBBD without damage to the neurons. The BBB has been shown to be healed within a few hours after the exposure. The combination of focused ultrasound beams with MR image guidance allows precise anatomical targeting as demonstrated by the delivery of several marker molecules in different animal models. This method may in the future have a significant impact on the diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Most notably, the delivery of the chemotherapy agents (liposomal Doxorubicin and Herceptin) has been shown in a rat model.

  9. Why Have So Many Intravascular Glucose Monitoring Devices Failed?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, John L.; Rice, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary to the inherent limitations of both point-of-care and central laboratory glucose technologies, continuous glucose measurement has recently enjoyed a high level of investment. Because of the perceived advantages by some of measuring in the intravascular space compared to the subcutaneous tissue, a number of technologies have been developed. In this review, we evaluate nine systems that have shown promise, although only one of these has been cleared for sale in the United States. The detection methodology, regulatory status, technical issues, and company circumstance surrounding each technology are examined. PMID:26129733

  10. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation after Surgery for Facial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Hirohiko; Ishikawa, Shigeo; Yusa, Kazuyuki; Kitabatake, Kenichirou; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A case of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) presenting after surgery for facial trauma associated with multiple facial bone fractures is described. With regard to the oral and maxillofacial region, DIC has been described in the literature following head trauma, infection, and metastatic disease. Until now, only 5 reports have described DIC after surgery for facial injury. DIC secondary to facial injury is thus rare. The patient in this case was young and had no medical history. Preoperative hemorrhage or postoperative septicemia may thus induce DIC. PMID:27313913

  11. Implantable ventricular assist device exchange with focused intravascular deairing techniques.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y Joseph; Acker, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    As ventricular assist devices are increasingly adopted and widely implemented as a highly effective therapy for end-stage heart disease, extended utilization periods for destination therapy or bridge-to-transplantation have created the possibility of device failure, infection, or thrombosis, requiring challenging implant exchanges. A major problem in these operations is the risk of air embolization, particularly in a nonsternotomy approach that precludes access to the outflow aortic graft and to the ascending aorta. We report a minimally invasive, nonsternotomy HeartMate II implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD) exchange, using peripheral cardiopulmonary support and a novel approach to continuous intravascular ascending aortic air removal.

  12. Adhesive Tape and Intravascular-Catheter-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Livesley, Nigel J

    1999-01-01

    Adhesive tape is placed in close contact with intravascular catheters for extended periods and could theoretically contribute to local infections. We found that 74% of specimens of tape collected in one hospital were colonized by pathogenic bacteria. However, only 5% of specimens had significant growth from an inner layer obtained by discarding the outside layer from each roll. We suggest that adhesive tape is a potential source of pathogenic bacteria and that discarding the outer layer from a partially used roll might be a simple method for reducing the risk of infection to patients. PMID:10354258

  13. Laser-activated shape memory polymer intravascular thrombectomy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Ward, IV; Wilson, Thomas S.; Benett, William J.; Loge, Jeffrey M.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2005-10-01

    A blood clot (thrombus) that becomes lodged in the arterial network supplying the brain can cause an ischemic stroke, depriving the brain of oxygen and often resulting in permanent disability. As an alternative to conventional clot-dissolving drug treatment, we are developing an intravascular laser-activated therapeutic device using shape memory polymer (SMP) to mechanically retrieve the thrombus and restore blood flow to the brain. Thermal imaging and computer simulation were used to characterize the optical and photothermal behavior of the SMP microactuator. Deployment of the SMP device in an in vitro thrombotic vascular occlusion model demonstrated the clinical treatment concept.

  14. Removal of Chronic Intravascular Blood Clots using Liquid Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Chul; Choi, Myeong; Koo, Il; Yu, Zengqi; Collins, George

    2011-10-01

    An electrical embolectomy device for removing chronic intravascular blood clots using liquid plasma under saline environment was demonstrated. We employed a proxy experimental blood clot model of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and actual equine blood clot. Thermal damage to contiguous tissue and the collagen denaturing via the plasma irradiation were investigated by histological analysis using birefringence of the tissue and verified by FT-IR spectroscopic study, respectively, which showed the high removal rate up to 2 mm per minute at room temperature and small thermal damage less than 200 μm.

  15. [Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma with massive pulmonary lesions].

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Asumi; Hashino, Satoshi; Onozawa, Masahiro; Takahata, Mutsumi; Okada, Kohei; Kahata, Kaoru; Taniguchi, Natsuko; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Kanako; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Nishimura, Masahiro; Asaka, Masahiro

    2010-05-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea on effort. Neither computed tomography scan nor chest X-ray film detected any specific findings that could explain hypoxemia. Since (67)Ga scintigraphy showed abnormal uptake in the bilateral lungs, transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) was performed. The TBLB specimen was diagnosed as intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). There was no involvement of any other organ considered typical of IVLBCL. In cases showing clinical findings such as hypoxia despite mild pulmonary radiographic changes, a definitive diagnosis should be made using methods such as TBLB with consideration given to the possibility of IVLBCL.

  16. Ultrasound and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril

    This paper begins with an overview and a description of the interactions between ultrasound and biological tissues encountered during treatment protocols. In a second part of this seminar, two clinical applications of therapeutic ultrasound will be described in details: -Kidney stone destruction by ultrasound (lithotripsy) and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for treating prostate cancer (HIFU).

  17. [Ultrasound in emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Lapostolle, F; Deltour, S; Petrovic, T

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound has revolutionized the practice of emergency medicine, particularly in prehospital setting. About a patient with dyspnea, we present the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and emergency treatment. Echocardiography, but also hemodynamic ultrasound (vena cava) and lung exam are valuable tools. Achieving lung ultrasound and diagnostic value of B lines B are detailed.

  18. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  19. Low-Power 2-MHz Pulsed-Wave Transcranial Ultrasound Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Barlinn, Kristian; Strong, Roger; Alexandrov, Anne W; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2011-09-01

    It is largely unknown whether prolonged insonation with ultrasound impacts the ischemic brain tissue by itself. Our goal was to evaluate safety and the effect of high-frequency ultrasound on infarct volume in rats. Thirty-two Long-Evans rats with permanent middle cerebral and carotid artery occlusions received either 2-MHz ultrasound at two levels of insonation power (128 or 10 mW) or no ultrasound (controls). We measured cerebral hemorrhage, indirect and direct infarct volume as well as edema volume at 24 h. No cerebral hemorrhages were detected in all animals. Exposure to low-power (10 mW) ultrasound resulted in a significantly decreased indirect infarct volume (p = 0.0039), direct infarct volume (p = 0.0031), and brain edema volume (p = 0.01) compared with controls. High-power (128 mW) ultrasound had no significant effects. An additional experiment with India ink showed a greater intravascular penetration of dye into ischemic tissues exposed to low-power ultrasound. Insonation with high-frequency, low-power ultrasound reduces ischemic brain damage in rat. Its effect on edema reduction and possible promotion of microcirculation could be used to facilitate drug and nutrient delivery to ischemic areas.

  20. Intravascular eosinophilic deposits-when common knowledge is insufficient to render a diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Kenneth S

    2009-05-01

    In the course of daily sign-out, the diagnoses within a histopathologist's armamentarium are limited by the scope of the histopathologist's knowledge, that is, one cannot diagnose what one does not know. The subject of homogeneous intravascular eosinophilic deposits is used to illustrate this point. A histopathologist unaware that a tick bite reaction can induce intravascular eosinophilic deposits may misdiagnose the specimen as representing a manifestation of cryoglobulinemia. Furthermore, conventional teaching imparts that monoclonal cryoglobulinemia shows intravascular eosinophilic deposits (cryoprecipitates) histopathologically, whereas mixed cryoglobulinemia is histopathologically manifested as leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Although it is not well known, this is not always the case because mixed cryoglobulinemia may histopathologically present itself as intravascular eosinophilic deposits without leukocytoclastic vasculitis. In addition, it is not common knowledge that intravascular cryoprecipitates, when present, may be associated with an increased number of blood vessels. Examples of these phenomena are presented in conjunction with a discussion of relevant issues/lessons learned from such cases.

  1. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  2. The syndrome of pneumococcemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation and asplenia.

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, M E; MacKenzie, C R

    1979-01-01

    A 58-year-old man who survived an episode of fulminant pneumococcal septicemia with disseminated intravascular coagulation had undergone splenectomy 23 years previously. In the literature there are 25 reported cases of fulminant septicemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with asplenia in adults (excluding cases in which corticosteroid or immunosuppressive therapy was given). The pneumococcus was responsible for all of these cases as well. The mortality in this series was more than 90%, and death occurred within 24 hours of presentation at hospital in almost 70% of the fatal cases and was associated with high-density bacteremia and adrenal hemorrhage. Gram-staining of the buffy coat of the peripheral blood or the exudate from purpuric skin lesions was carried out in only 6 of the 26 cases but yielded positive results in all but 1. It is concluded that a diagnosis of septicemia in asplenic adults can be established within a short time of presentation on the basis of statistical probability and the results of Gram-staining of the peripheral blood and exudate from the skin lesions. Prevention appears to be the cornerstone of management because of the variable interval from splenectomy to the onset of the syndrome and the high mortality. Images FIG. 1 PMID:38002

  3. A short contemporary history of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome characterized by systemic intravascular activation of coagulation, leading to a widespread deposition of fibrin in the circulation. There is ample experimental and pathological evidence that the fibrin deposition contributes to multiple organ failure. The massive and ongoing activation of coagulation may result in depletion of platelets and coagulation factors, which may cause bleeding (consumption coagulopathy). The syndrome of DIC is well known in the medical literature for centuries, although a more precise description of the underlying mechanisms had to await the 20th century. Initial ideas on a role of the contact activation system as the primary trigger for the systemic activation of coagulation as well as a presumed hyperfibrinolytic response in DIC have been found to be misconceptions. Experimental and clinical evidence now indicate that the initiation of coagulation in DIC is caused by tissue factor expression, which in combination with downregulated physiological anticoagulant pathways and impaired fibrinolysis leads to widespread fibrin deposition. In addition, an extensive bidirectional interaction between coagulation and inflammation may further contribute to the pathogenesis of DIC.

  4. [Disseminated intravascular coagulation. Case series and literature review].

    PubMed

    Del Carpio-Orantes, Luis; García-Ortiz, Jorge José

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: la coagulación intravascular diseminada es una entidad caracteriza por activación de la cascada de la coagulación y fibrinólisis endógena, que puede provocar la muerte. Nuestros objetivos fueron identificar la incidencia de coagulación intravascular diseminada, sus agentes etiológicos y la correlación entre la puntuación de la escala Apache II y la propuesta por la Sociedad Internacional de Trombosis y Hemostasia para el diagnóstico de esta entidad. MÉTODOS: estudio retrospectivo, observacional y descriptivo de pacientes atendidos en una unidad de cuidados intensivos en un periodo de 17 meses. Se analizó etiología, edad, sexo, conteo de plaquetas, coagulograma, niveles de fibrinógeno sérico y cuantificación del dímero D. Se calculó la puntuación de la escala propuesta por la Sociedad Internacional de Trombosis y Hemostasia y de la escala APACHE II.

  5. Adapting the Lagrangian speckle model estimator for endovascular elastography: Theory and validation with simulated radio-frequency data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, Roch L.; Ohayon, Jacques; Finet, Gérard; Cloutier, Guy

    2004-08-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is known to be the reference tool for preoperative vessel lesion assessments and for endovascular therapy planning. Nevertheless, IVUS echograms only provide subjective information about vessel wall lesions. Since changes in the vascular tissue stiffness are characteristic of vessel pathologies, catheter-based endovascular ultrasound elastography (EVE) has been proposed in the literature as a method for outlining the elastic properties of vessel walls. In this paper, the Lagrangian Speckle Model Estimator (LSME) is formulated for investigations in EVE, i.e., using a polar coordinate system. The method was implemented through an adapted version of the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm, using the optical flow equations to compute the Jacobbian matrix. The theoretical framework was validated with simulated ultrasound rf data of mechanically complex vessel wall pathologies. The results, corroborated with Ansys finite element software, demonstrated the potential of EVE to provide useful information about the heterogeneous nature of atherosclerotic plaques.

  6. Adapting the Lagrangian speckle model estimator for endovascular elastography: theory and validation with simulated radio-frequency data.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Roch L; Ohayon, Jacques; Finet, Gérard; Cloutier, Guy

    2004-08-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is known to be the reference tool for preoperative vessel lesion assessments and for endovascular therapy planning. Nevertheless, IVUS echograms only provide subjective information about vessel wall lesions. Since changes in the vascular tissue stiffness are characteristic of vessel pathologies, catheter-based endovascular ultrasound elastography (EVE) has been proposed in the literature as a method for outlining the elastic properties of vessel walls. In this paper, the Lagrangian Speckle Model Estimator (LSME) is formulated for investigations in EVE, i.e., using a polar coordinate system. The method was implemented through an adapted version of the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm, using the optical flow equations to compute the Jacobbian matrix. The theoretical framework was validated with simulated ultrasound rf data of mechanically complex vessel wall pathologies. The results, corroborated with Ansys finite element software, demonstrated the potential of EVE to provide useful information about the heterogeneous nature of atherosclerotic plaques.

  7. Cardiac arrhythmias produced by ultrasound and contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Claudio

    effects on the murine heart were also discovered. In the presence of microbubbles, ultrasound could produce morphological changes in the ECG and vascular damage in the myocardium. Taken together, these results indicate that ultrasound-induced arrhythmias were produced by intravascular microbubble activity. The findings of this thesis provide a greater understanding of acoustic cavitation in vivo, useful for the advancement of ultrasound contrast agents in imaging and therapy.

  8. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Thyroid Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the thyroid gland ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  9. Ultrasound Annual, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 edition of Ultrasound Annual features a state-of-the-art assessment of real-time ultrasound technology and a look at improvements in real-time equipment. Chapters discuss important new obstetric applications of ultrasound in measuring fetal umbilical vein blood flow and monitoring ovarian follicular development in vivo and in vitro fertilization. Other topics covered include transrectal prostate ultrasound using a linear array system; ultrasound of the common bile duct; ultrasound in tropical diseases; prenatal diagnosis of craniospinal anomalies; scrotal ultrasonography; opthalmic ultrasonography; and sonography of the upper abdominal venous system.

  10. [Freshly frozen preserved plasma for the treatment of intravascular coagulation in polytraumatized patients].

    PubMed

    Hehne, H J; Nyman, D; Burri, H; Wolff, G

    1976-05-15

    Coagulation disorders in hemorrhagic shock need not represent an isolated intravascular coagulation. They may also occur as a complex of local disseminated intravascular consumption, extravascular consumption, dilution, and reduced synthesis of coagulation factors. In the severely bleeding patient with hemorrhagic diathesis heparin is contraindicated because it does not normalize coagulability. Therefore, it fails to stop hemorrhage and shock remains untreatable. Fresh frozen plasma, however, has proved to be suitable as simultaneous substitution therapy of coagulopathy and of hypovolemic shock. 11 patients suffering from traumatic-hemorrhagic shock associated with intravascular coagulation and hemorrhagic diathesis were successfully treated with fresh frozen plasma, after conventional shock therapy had failed over a period of hours.

  11. [Management of intravascular catheters for prevention of perioperative cross infections].

    PubMed

    Okubo, Takashi; Ohara, Eiko; Nakamura, Akishige; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Manabe, Tadao

    2004-11-01

    Bloodstream infection derived from an intravascular catheter occupies an important position among the various types of nosocomial infection. It is therefore necessary to establish a system for preventing catheter infection not only as measures for each separate infection, but also for the entire hospital. Catheter infections are mainly caused by contamination of the connecting part of a transfusion line during the infusion of drug solution as well as by contamination of the part of the catheter inserted. Consequently, the greatest possible care should be taken in the preparation of aseptic transfusion and the prevention of contamination when connecting a transfusion line. In particular, there are problems with three-way stopcocks, management of hubs, frequency of transfusion line exchange, fat emulsion injection method, and blood preparation. It is most important to consider effective nutritional management methods that do not require the insertion of a central venous catheter.

  12. [Kidney donor with severe disseminated intravascular coagulation: transplantation however successful].

    PubMed

    Keeris, Lodewijk M; Bergmans, Dennis C J J; van der Sande, Frank M; Wind, Tineke J; van Suylen, Robert Jan; van Mook, Walther N K A

    2009-01-01

    A 41-year-old male, with no previous medical history, was admitted to our intensive care unit with severe isolated neurotrauma and a Glasgow Coma Scale of E1-M1-V1, mid-dilated unreactive pupils and severe abnormalities on the brain CT-scan. A severe syndrome of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and non-oliguric renal insufficiency developed. Following clinical and neurophysiological examination the patient was declared brain-dead, and the family gave permission for organ donation. The left kidney was transplanted and functioned well immediately. However, in view of the DIC and renal function disorders the right kidney was not considered usable for transplantation elsewhere. Pathological examination revealed many fibrin thrombi in the glomerular capillaries and acute tubular necrosis. This case supports the view that thrombotic microangiopathy in kidneys of patients with DIS, even with renal function impairment, is not an a priori reason for excluding donation.

  13. Adaptive Estimation of Intravascular Shear Rate Based on Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Takeda, Naoto

    2008-05-01

    The relationships between the intravascular wall shear stress, controlled by flow dynamics, and the progress of arteriosclerosis plaque have been clarified by various studies. Since the shear stress is determined by the viscosity coefficient and shear rate, both factors must be estimated accurately. In this paper, an adaptive method for improving the accuracy of quantitative shear rate estimation was investigated. First, the parameter dependence of the estimated shear rate was investigated in terms of the differential window width and the number of averaged velocity profiles based on simulation and experimental data, and then the shear rate calculation was optimized. The optimized result revealed that the proposed adaptive method of shear rate estimation was effective for improving the accuracy of shear rate calculation.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  15. Automatic classification of atherosclerotic plaques imaged with intravascular OCT

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Jimenez, Jose J.; Campos-Delgado, Daniel U.; Villiger, Martin; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Bouma, Brett E.; Jo, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT) allows evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques; however, plaque characterization is performed by visual assessment and requires a trained expert for interpretation of the large data sets. Here, we present a novel computational method for automated IV-OCT plaque characterization. This method is based on the modeling of each A-line of an IV-OCT data set as a linear combination of a number of depth profiles. After estimating these depth profiles by means of an alternating least square optimization strategy, they are automatically classified to predefined tissue types based on their morphological characteristics. The performance of our proposed method was evaluated with IV-OCT scans of cadaveric human coronary arteries and corresponding tissue histopathology. Our results suggest that this methodology allows automated identification of fibrotic and lipid-containing plaques. Moreover, this novel computational method has the potential to enable high throughput atherosclerotic plaque characterization. PMID:27867716

  16. Intravascular Optical Imaging Technology for Investigating the Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Melissa J.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.; Weisz, Giora; Tanaka, Atsushi; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing demand for new imaging methods that can provide additional information about the coronary wall to better characterize and stratify high-risk plaques, and to guide interventional and pharmacologic management of patients with coronary artery disease. While there are a number of imaging modalities that facilitate the assessment of coronary artery pathology, this review paper focuses on intravascular optical imaging modalities that provide information on the microstructural, compositional, biochemical, biomechanical, and molecular features of coronary lesions and stents. The optical imaging modalities discussed include angioscopy, optical coherence tomography, polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, near-infrared spectroscopy, time-resolved laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging. Given the wealth of information that these techniques can provide, optical imaging modalities are poised to play an increasingly significant role in the evaluation of the coronary artery in the future. PMID:21920342

  17. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: a syndrome of intravascular platelet consumption.

    PubMed Central

    Neame, P. B.; Hirsh, J.; Browman, G.; Denburg, J.; D'Souza, T. J.; Gallus, A.; Brain, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    In four of five patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) in whom serial tests of hemostatic function were performed, severe thrombocytopenia, normal plasma fibrinogen concentrations and mildly increased concentrations of fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products were observed. Widespread platelet thrombi were found in arterioles and capillaries. Fibrin could be seen around some of the platelet clumps and was the main component in a small number of the thrombi in two patients. The observations show that TTP is a disorder in which intravascular platelet consumption results in disseminated platelet thrombosis. The coagulation system is apparently activated secondarily to platelet aggregation and variable quantities of fibrin are incorporated into the thrombi. Clinical improvement resulted from combined therapy with corticosteroids, heparin and drugs that suppress platelet function. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1084215

  18. Basic studies on intravascular low-intensity laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Duan, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Jin, Hua; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Intravascular low intensity laser therapy (ILILT) was originally put forward in USA in 1982, but popularized in Russia in 1980s and in China in 1990s, respectively. A randomized placebo-controlled study has shown ILILT clinical efficacy in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. As Chinese therapeutic applications of ILILT were the most widely in the world, its basic research, such as intracellular signal transduction research, blood research in vitro, animal blood research in vivo, human blood research in vivo and traditional Chinese medicine research, was also very progressive in China. Its basic studies will be reviewed in terms of the biological information model of photobiomodulation in this paper. ILILT might work in view of its basic studies, but the further randomized placebo-controlled trial and the further safety research should be done.

  19. Asian-variant intravascular large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pasch, Whitney; Costales, Cristina; Siddiqi, Imran; Mohrbacher, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare and deadly malignancy involving the growth of lymphoma cells within vessel lumina of all organ types. IVLBCL is further divided into the hemophagocytic Asian variant and a classical Western variant. Both variants are difficult to diagnose by imaging, and although diagnostic criteria have been developed to guide workup, histopathological examination remains imperative. Treatment of IVLBCL remains difficult given the high mortality of the disease, but rituximab has emerged as a promising therapeutic option when combined with various cytotoxic regimens. The two main variants of IVLBCL generally manifest in their respective Asian or Western populations, and crossover between ethnicities is rare. We present the second described case of Asian-variant IVLBCL in an African American individual.

  20. Advanced Congestive Heart Failure Associated With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Sarcon, Annahita; Liu, Xiaoli; Ton, David; Haywood, James; Hitchcock, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is a complication of an underlying disease and not a primary illness. It is most commonly associated with sepsis, trauma, obstetrical complications, and malignancies. There are very few cases in the literature illustrating the association between DIC and congestive heart failure. Findings. In this report, we present a case of severe congestive heart failure, leading to biventricular thrombi and subsequently DIC. Conclusion. We suggest that the association between congestive heart failure and DIC is an underrecognized one. Congestive heart failure continues to remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite advances in medical therapies. Thus far, the precise role of coagulation factors in congestive heart failure is unknown. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and coagulation factors.

  1. The Development of a Continuous Intravascular Glucose Monitoring Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Barry C.; Barwell, Nicholas P.; Gopal, Palepu; Gopichand, Mannam; Higgs, Timothy; James, Tony D.; Jones, Christopher M.; Mackenzie, Alasdair; Mulavisala, Krishna Prasad; Paterson, William

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glycemic control in hospital intensive care units (ICU) has been the subject of numerous research publications and debate over the past 2 decades. There have been multiple studies showing the benefit of ICU glucose control in reducing both morbidity and mortality. GlySure Ltd has developed a glucose monitor based on a diboronic acid receptor that can continuously measure plasma glucose concentrations directly in a patient’s vascular system. The goal of this study was to validate the performance of the GlySure CIGM system in different patient populations. Methods: The GlySure Continuous Intravascular Glucose Monitoring (CIGM) System was evaluated in both the Cardiac ICU (33 patients) and MICU setting (14 patients). The sensor was placed through a custom CVC and measured the patients’ blood glucose concentration every 15 seconds. Comparison blood samples were taken at 2 hourly then 4 hourly intervals and measured on a YSI 2300 STAT Plus or an i-STAT. Results: Consensus error grid analysis of the data shows that the majority of the data (88.2% Cardiac, and 95.0% MICU) fell within zone A, which is considered to be clinically accurate and all data points fell within zones A and B. The MARD of the Cardiac trial was 9.90% and the MICU trial had a MARD of 7.95%. Data analysis showed no significant differences between data generated from Cardiac and MICU patients or by time or glucose concentration. Conclusions: The GlySure CIGM System has met the design challenges of measuring intravascular glucose concentrations in critically ill patients with acceptable safety and performance criteria and without disrupting current clinical practice. The accuracy of the data is not affected by the patients’ condition. PMID:26033921

  2. Robust intravascular optical coherence elastography driven by acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, Gijs; Bouchard, Richard R.; Mastik, Frits; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Anton F. W.

    2007-07-01

    High strain spots in the vessel wall indicate the presence of vulnerable plaques. The majority of acute cardiovascular events are preceded by rupture of such a plaque in a coronary artery. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be extended, in principle, to an elastography technique, mapping the strain in the vascular wall. However, the susceptibility of OCT to frame-to-frame decorrelation, caused by tissue and catheter motion, inhibits reliable tissue displacement tracking and has to date obstructed the development of OCT-based intravascular elastography. We introduce a new technique for intravascular optical coherence elastography, which is robust against motion artifacts. Using acoustic radiation force, we apply a pressure to deform the tissue synchronously with the line scan rate of the OCT instrument. Radial tissue displacement can be tracked based on the correlation between adjacent lines, instead of subsequent frames in conventional elastography. The viability of the method is demonstrated with a simulation study. The root mean square (rms) error of the displacement estimate is 0.55 μm, and the rms error of the strain is 0.6%. It is shown that high-strain spots in the vessel wall, such as observed at the sites of vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions, can be detected with the technique. Experiments to realize this new elastographic method are presented. Simultaneous optical and ultrasonic pulse-echo tracking demonstrate that the material can be put in a high-frequency oscillatory motion with an amplitude of several micrometers, more than sufficient for accurate tracking with OCT. The resulting data are used to optimize the acoustic pushing sequence and geometry.

  3. Clinical ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Hefny, Ashraf F; Corr, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the basic physics of ultrasound is essential for acute care physicians. Medical ultrasound machines generate and receive ultrasound waves. Brightness mode (B mode) is the basic mode that is usually used. Ultrasound waves are emitted from piezoelectric crystals of the ultrasound transducer. Depending on the acoustic impedance of different materials, which depends on their density, different grades of white and black images are produced. There are different methods that can control the quality of ultrasound waves including timing of ultrasound wave emission, frequency of waves, and size and curvature of the surface of the transducer. The received ultrasound signal can be amplified by increasing the gain. The operator should know sonographic artifacts which may distort the studied structures or even show unreal ones. The most common artifacts include shadow and enhancement artifacts, edge artifact, mirror artifact and reverberation artifact.

  4. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  5. Transvaginal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

  6. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  7. Prenatal ultrasound - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100197.htm Prenatal ultrasound - series—Procedure, part 1 To use the sharing ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Prenatal Testing Ultrasound A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  8. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  9. Endobronchial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Franco; Fois, Flavio; Grosso, Daniele

    2003-01-01

    Complex technical problems interfered with the application of thoracic ultrasound (US) for studies and clinical research. Moreover, in contrast to radiologists, cardiologists, gastroenterologists, internists, obstetricians, gynecologists and others, pulmonologists were not trained in the basics of US images. However, endoscopic US methods were developed in the last 20 years and these methods also provided important results for pulmonologists. As soon as the technical problems interfering with US application in air-containing spaces were solved, endobronchial US (EBUS) became a valuable technique as well. With EBUS, the delicate multilayer structure of the tracheobronchial wall can be analyzed. This knowledge became decisive for the management of early cancer in the central airways. These lesions can undergo local treatment instead of surgical intervention if the bronchial cartilage is intact and if the adjacent lymph nodes are not involved. EBUS proved valuable as well for the staging of more advanced lung cancer, especially with regard to endoluminal, intramural and extraluminal tumor spread. Endobronchial endosonographers are able to diagnose mediastinal lymph nodes similar to the experience of gastrointestinal endosonographers. EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) improved the results of N-staging of lung cancer, especially in difficult lymph node levels without any clear endoscopic landmarks. The possibility of identifying N2 and N3 stages by means of a nonsurgical procedure can modify the management of lung cancer and decrease the number of unnecessary surgical interventions. EBUS can reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as thoracoscopy or mediastinoscopy. It is also useful for biopsying peripheral lesions or solitary pulmonary nodules instead of fluoroscopic guidance and also plays an important role in the strategy of interventional endoscopy.

  10. Massive intravascular hemolysis with mechanical rheolytic thrombectomy of a hemodialysis arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Louis A; Reddy, Rachita; Pamoukian, Vicken N; Michelis, Michael F; DeVita, Maria V; Rosenstock, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with chronic kidney disease stage 5 presented for ambulatory evaluation of his arteriovenous fistula. He underwent rheolytic thrombectomy with tissue plasminogen activator infusion, angioplasty, and brachial artery stenting under local sedation. His immediate postoperative course was complicated by hypotension, cardiac dysrhythmias and hyperkalemia requiring emergent hemodialysis, due to severe intravascular hemolysis. This case illustrates that mechanical thrombectomy can cause clinically significant intravascular hemolysis, thus careful postoperative monitoring is recommended.

  11. IVUSAngio tool: a publicly available software for fast and accurate 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Doulaverakis, Charalampos; Tsampoulatidis, Ioannis; Antoniadis, Antonios P; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis; Giannoglou, George D

    2013-11-01

    There is an ongoing research and clinical interest in the development of reliable and easily accessible software for the 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries. In this work, we present the architecture and validation of IVUSAngio Tool, an application which performs fast and accurate 3D reconstruction of the coronary arteries by using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and biplane angiography data. The 3D reconstruction is based on the fusion of the detected arterial boundaries in IVUS images with the 3D IVUS catheter path derived from the biplane angiography. The IVUSAngio Tool suite integrates all the intermediate processing and computational steps and provides a user-friendly interface. It also offers additional functionality, such as automatic selection of the end-diastolic IVUS images, semi-automatic and automatic IVUS segmentation, vascular morphometric measurements, graphical visualization of the 3D model and export in a format compatible with other computer-aided design applications. Our software was applied and validated in 31 human coronary arteries yielding quite promising results. Collectively, the use of IVUSAngio Tool significantly reduces the total processing time for 3D coronary reconstruction. IVUSAngio Tool is distributed as free software, publicly available to download and use.

  12. Bubbles Quantified In vivo by Ultrasound Relates to Amount of Gas Detected Post-mortem in Rabbits Decompressed from High Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Møllerløkken, Andreas; Havnes, Marianne B.; Brubakk, Alf O.; González-Díaz, Oscar; Fernández, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism of decompression sickness is not fully understood but there is evidence that it can be caused by intravascular and autochthonous bubbles. Doppler ultrasound at a given circulatory location is used to detect and quantify the presence of intravascular gas bubbles as an indicator of decompression stress. In this manuscript we studied the relationship between presence and quantity of gas bubbles by echosonography of the pulmonary artery of anesthetized, air-breathing New Zealand White rabbits that were compressed and decompressed. Mortality rate, presence, quantity, and distribution of gas bubbles elsewhere in the body was examined postmortem. We found a strong positive relationship between high ultrasound bubble grades in the pulmonary artery, sudden death, and high amount of intra and extra vascular gas bubbles widespread throughout the entire organism. In contrast, animals with lower bubble grades survived for 1 h after decompression until sacrificed, and showed no gas bubbles during dissection. PMID:27493634

  13. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Difficult Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maria S; McCubbin, Mark; Nand, Sucha

    2014-01-01

    Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Hispanic male, with a past history of diabetes and coronary disease, was admitted for fever, diarrhea, and confusion of 4 weeks duration. Physical examination showed a disoriented patient with multiple ecchymoses, possible ascites, and bilateral scrotal swelling. Hemoglobin was 6.7, prothrombin time (PT) 21.4 seconds with international normalized ratio 2.1, partial thromboplastin time (PTT) 55.6 seconds, fibrin split 10 µg/L, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) 1231 IU/L. Except for a positive DNA test for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, extensive diagnostic workup for infections, malignancy, or a neurological cause was negative. Mixing studies revealed a nonspecific inhibitor of PT and PTT but Factor VIII levels were normal. The patient was empirically treated with antibiotics but developed hypotension and died on day 27 of admission. At autopsy, patient was found to have intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving skin, testes, lung, and muscles. The malignant cells were positive for CD20, CD791, Mum-1, and Pax-5 and negative for CD3, CD5, CD10, CD30, and Bcl-6. The malignant cells were 100% positive for Ki-67. Discussion. Intravascular large cell B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is rare form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules. The cause of its affinity for vascular bed remains unknown. In many reports, IVLBCL was associated with HIV, HHV8, and EBV infections. The fact that our case showed evidence of EBV infection lends support to the association of this diagnosis to viral illness. The available literature on this subject is scant, and in many cases, the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The typical presentation of this disorder is with B symptoms, progressive neurologic deficits, and skin findings. Bone marrow, spleen, and liver are involved in a minority of patients. Nearly all patients have elevated LDH, and about 65% are

  14. Acoustic determination of early stages of intravascular blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Uzlova, Svetlana G; Guria, Konstantin G; Guria, Georgy Th

    2008-10-13

    The blood coagulation system (BCS) is a complex biological system playing a principal role in the maintenance of haemostasis. Insufficient activity of the BCS may lead to bleeding and blood loss (e.g. in the case of haemophilia). On the other hand, excessive activity may cause intravascular blood coagulation, thromboses and embolization. Most of the methods currently used for BCS monitoring suffer from the major disadvantage of being invasive. The purpose of the present work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrasonic methods for non-invasive registration of the early stages of blood coagulation processes in intensive flows. With this purpose, a special experimental set-up was designed, facilitating the simultaneous detection of optical and acoustic signals during the clotting process. It was shown that (i) as microemboli appear in the flow during the early stage of blood coagulation, the intensity of the Doppler signal increases twofold, and (ii) microemboli formation in the early stages of blood clotting always reveals itself through an acoustic contrast. Both of these effects are well defined, so we hope that they may be used for non-invasive BCS monitoring in clinical practice.

  15. Heartbeat OCT: in vivo intravascular megahertz-optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianshi; Pfeiffer, Tom; Regar, Evelyn; Wieser, Wolfgang; van Beusekom, Heleen; Lancee, Charles T; Springeling, Geert; Krabbendam, Ilona; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Huber, Robert; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac motion artifacts, non-uniform rotational distortion and undersampling affect the image quality and the diagnostic impact of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). In this study we demonstrate how these limitations of IV-OCT can be addressed by using an imaging system that we called "Heartbeat OCT", combining a fast Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser, fast pullback, and a micromotor actuated catheter, designed to examine a coronary vessel in less than one cardiac cycle. We acquired in vivo data sets of two coronary arteries in a porcine heart with both Heartbeat OCT, working at 2.88 MHz A-line rate, 4000 frames/s and 100 mm/s pullback speed, and with a commercial system. The in vivo results show that Heartbeat OCT provides faithfully rendered, motion-artifact free, fully sampled vessel wall architecture, unlike the conventional IV-OCT data. We present the Heartbeat OCT system in full technical detail and discuss the steps needed for clinical translation of the technology.

  16. Heartbeat OCT: in vivo intravascular megahertz-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianshi; Pfeiffer, Tom; Regar, Evelyn; Wieser, Wolfgang; van Beusekom, Heleen; Lancee, Charles T.; Springeling, Geert; Krabbendam, Ilona; van der Steen, Antonius F.W.; Huber, Robert; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac motion artifacts, non-uniform rotational distortion and undersampling affect the image quality and the diagnostic impact of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). In this study we demonstrate how these limitations of IV-OCT can be addressed by using an imaging system that we called “Heartbeat OCT”, combining a fast Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser, fast pullback, and a micromotor actuated catheter, designed to examine a coronary vessel in less than one cardiac cycle. We acquired in vivo data sets of two coronary arteries in a porcine heart with both Heartbeat OCT, working at 2.88 MHz A-line rate, 4000 frames/s and 100 mm/s pullback speed, and with a commercial system. The in vivo results show that Heartbeat OCT provides faithfully rendered, motion-artifact free, fully sampled vessel wall architecture, unlike the conventional IV-OCT data. We present the Heartbeat OCT system in full technical detail and discuss the steps needed for clinical translation of the technology. PMID:26713214

  17. Intra-Vascular Neural Interface with Nano-Wire Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirobumi; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakao, Masayuki; Walton, Kerry; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    A less-invasive recording technique capable of simultaneously monitoring the activity of significant number (103 ∼ 104) of neurons is a vital step in developing an effective brain-machine interface. Although there are many excellent techniques for recording activities of a single neuron or a group of neurons, there is no methodology for accessing large number of cells in a behaving experimental animal or human individual. Brain vascular parenchyma offers the promising candidate to solve this problem. We have proposed the use of myriad of nano-wire-electrodes that are introduced into the Central Nervous System through the vascular system to address any brain area. In this study we design a microcatheter for ex vivo experiments. Using a Wollaston platinum wire we design a submicron-scale electrode, and develop the fabrication method. We then evaluate the mechanical property of the electrode to flow into the intricacies of the capillary bed in ex vivo Xenopus laevis. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of intravascular recording in the spinal cord of Xenopus laevis.

  18. Light intensity matching between different intravascular optical coherence tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengnan; Eggermont, Jeroen; Nakatani, Shimpei; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2016-02-01

    Currently two commercial intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) systems are available: Illumien Optis from St. Jude Medical (SJM) and Lunawave from Terumo. Both systems store the light intensity data in a raw vendor specific polar format. However, whereas SJM uses 16-bits per pixel Terumo uses 8-bits meaning the intensity values are in different ranges. This complicates quantitative light intensity based analysis when comparing results based on data from both systems. Therefore, this work aims to find an intensity transformation function from Terumo's 8-bit OFDI data to SJM's 16-bit range. The data consists of 8 pullbacks, 4 acquired with each system in the same arteries of 2 different patents pre- and post-stenting implantation. A total of 133 matching sections without stent struts from the two sets of pullbacks were identified based on landmarks such as side-branches and calcified regions. Since the main region of interest in the image is the tissue region only the pixels within 2mm behind the lumen border are used. In order to match the SJM data range, the Terumo data was rescaled and cumulative distribution functions (CDF) were calculated based on the histogram distributions. Comparing these CDFs, the transformation function can be determined. Application of this transformation function not only improves the visual similarity of matching slices it can also be used for further quantitative analysis.

  19. Cerebral Blood Volume MRI with Intravascular Superparamagentic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Harel, Noam; Jin, Tao; Kim, Tae; Lee, Phil; Zhao, Fuqiang

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is a crucial physiological indicator of tissue viability and vascular reactivity. Thus, non-invasive CBV mapping has been of great interest. For this, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO) including monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MION) can be used as long half-life, intravascular susceptibility agents of CBV MRI measurements. Also, CBV-weighted fMRI with USPIO provides enhanced sensitivity, reduced large vessel contribution, and improved spatial specificity compared to conventional blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) fMRI, and measures a single physiological parameter that is easily interpretable. We review physiochemical and magnetic properties as well as pharmacokinetics of USPIO in brief. We then extensively discuss quantifications of baseline CBV, vessel size index, and functional CBV change. We also provide reviews of dose-dependent sensitivity, vascular filter function, specificity, characteristics, and impulse response function of CBV fMRI. Examples of CBV fMRI specificity at the laminar and columnar resolution are provided. Finally, we briefly review application of CBV measurements to functional and pharmacological studies in animals. Overall, the use of USPIO can determine baseline CBV and its changes induced by functional activity and pharmacological interventions. PMID:23208650

  20. Trombocytopenia: one of the markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Hugo

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a complication of a variety of severe underlying diseases and a contributing factor in multi-organ failure and death. DIC is diagnosed on the basis of clinical findings (organ failure, bleeding) and laboratory abnormalities. The laboratory data include (repeated) measurements of platelet count and global clotting tests, to which more specific and sensitive tests for activated coagulation are added. The focus of this paper is on thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 103/microl) as a marker in DIC. First, in patients with suspected DIC it is imperative to consider alternative causes of thrombocytopenia,such as related to heparin use (heparin induced thrombocytopenia II) or thrombocytopenic purpura. Second, the observation of thrombocytopenia in relation to DIC should be interpreted as a marker of advanced or overt DIC and not as an early indicator. According to recommended guidelines measurements of platelet counts should always be coupled to a panel of coagulation markers and not be used as single marker of DIC (or other syndromes). In general, thrombocytopenia should not trigger platelet transfusions except in patients with severe bleeding complications.

  1. Biochemistry and pathophysiology of intravascular and intracellular lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Stephen G.; Zechner, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    All organisms use fatty acids (FAs) for energy substrates and as precursors for membrane and signaling lipids. The most efficient way to transport and store FAs is in the form of triglycerides (TGs); however, TGs are not capable of traversing biological membranes and therefore need to be cleaved by TG hydrolases (“lipases”) before moving in or out of cells. This biochemical process is generally called “lipolysis.” Intravascular lipolysis degrades lipoprotein-associated TGs to FAs for their subsequent uptake by parenchymal cells, whereas intracellular lipolysis generates FAs and glycerol for their release (in the case of white adipose tissue) or use by cells (in the case of other tissues). Although the importance of lipolysis has been recognized for decades, many of the key proteins involved in lipolysis have been uncovered only recently. Important new developments include the discovery of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1), the molecule that moves lipoprotein lipase from the interstitial spaces to the capillary lumen, and the discovery of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) as crucial molecules in the hydrolysis of TGs within cells. This review summarizes current views of lipolysis and highlights the relevance of this process to human disease. PMID:23475957

  2. [Ultrasound in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, F J; Muñoz-Garza, F Z; Hernández-Martín, A

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound is particularly useful in pediatric dermatology to diagnose numerous diseases without the need to use invasive tests. The present articles reviews some frequent dermatological entities in children whose study can be simplified through cutaneous ultrasound. This article also provides practical recommendations reported in the literature that may facilitate ultrasound examination, with special mention of benign tumoural disease, both congenital and acquired, and vascular anomalies.

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  4. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  5. Calculation of intravascular signal in dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI using adaptive complex independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Chopra, Rajiv; Martel, Anne L

    2013-04-01

    Assessing tumor response to therapy is a crucial step in personalized treatments. Pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling provides quantitative information about tumor perfusion and vascular permeability that are associated with prognostic factors. A fundamental step in most PK analyses is calculating the signal that is generated in the tumor vasculature. This signal is usually inseparable from the extravascular extracellular signal. It was shown previously using in vivo and phantom experiments that independent component analysis (ICA) is capable of calculating the intravascular time-intensity curve in dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI. A novel adaptive complex independent component analysis (AC-ICA) technique is developed in this study to calculate the intravascular time-intensity curve and separate this signal from the DCE-MR images of tumors. The use of the complex-valued DCE-MRI images rather than the commonly used magnitude images satisfied the fundamental assumption of ICA, i.e., linear mixing of the sources. Using an adaptive cost function in ICA through estimating the probability distribution of the tumor vasculature at each iteration resulted in a more robust and accurate separation algorithm. The AC-ICA algorithm provided a better estimate for the intravascular time-intensity curve than the previous ICA-based method. A simulation study was also developed in this study to realistically simulate DCE-MRI data of a leaky tissue mimicking phantom. The passage of the MR contrast agent through the leaky phantom was modeled with finite element analysis using a diffusion model. Once the distribution of the contrast agent in the imaging field of view was calculated, DCE-MRI data was generated by solving the Bloch equation for each voxel at each time point. The intravascular time-intensity curve calculation results were compared to the previously proposed ICA-based intravascular time-intensity curve calculation method that applied ICA to the magnitude of the DCE-MRI data

  6. HHV-8 and EBV-positive intravascular lymphoma: an unusual presentation of extracavitary primary effusion lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Shirley, Courtney M.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Kasamon, Yvette L.; Taube, Janis M.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular lymphomas are rare and aggressive hematolymphoid tumors. Here we describe a human herpesvirus type-8/Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8/KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive intravascular lymphoma. The patient was a 59 year-old HIV-positive man who presented with diarrhea, abdominal pain, fevers, night sweats, and weight loss. Radiographic studies of the abdomen and pelvis revealed numerous subcentimeter nodules within the subcutaneous fat that lacked connection to the skin. An excisional biopsy demonstrated large atypical cells within vessels in the deep subcutaneous fat, and many of the vessels contained extensive organizing thrombi. The atypical cells lacked strong expression of most B-cell markers but were positive for MUM-1 and showed partial expression of several T-cell markers. An immunohistochemical stain for HHV-8 and an in situ hybridization for EBV were both positive in the neoplastic cells. The disease had a rapidly progressive and fatal course. This lymphoma appears to represent an entirely intravascular form of primary effusion lymphoma, and highlights the propensity for HHV-8 and EBV-positive lymphoid neoplasms to show aberrant expression of T-cell markers, illustrates the utility of skin biopsies for the diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma, and suggests that biopsies to evaluate for intravascular lymphoma should be relatively deep and include subcutaneous fat. PMID:24525514

  7. Platelets and neutrophil extracellular traps collaborate to promote intravascular coagulation during sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Braedon; Davis, Rachelle P; Kim, Seok-Joo; Tse, Mandy; Esmon, Charles T; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Jenne, Craig N

    2017-03-09

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs; webs of DNA coated in antimicrobial proteins) are released into the vasculature during sepsis where they contribute to host defense, but also cause tissue damage and organ dysfunction. Various components of NETs have also been implicated as activators of coagulation. Using multicolor confocal intravital microscopy in mouse models of sepsis, we observed profound platelet aggregation, thrombin activation, and fibrin clot formation within (and downstream of) NETs in vivo. NETs were critical for the development of sepsis-induced intravascular coagulation regardless of the inciting bacterial stimulus (gram-negative, gram-positive, or bacterial products). Removal of NETs via DNase infusion, or in peptidylarginine deiminase-4-deficient mice (which have impaired NET production), resulted in significantly lower quantities of intravascular thrombin activity, reduced platelet aggregation, and improved microvascular perfusion. NET-induced intravascular coagulation was dependent on a collaborative interaction between histone H4 in NETs, platelets, and the release of inorganic polyphosphate. Real-time perfusion imaging revealed markedly improved microvascular perfusion in response to the blockade of NET-induced coagulation, which correlated with reduced markers of systemic intravascular coagulation and end-organ damage in septic mice. Together, these data demonstrate, for the first time in an in vivo model of infection, a dynamic NET-platelet-thrombin axis that promotes intravascular coagulation and microvascular dysfunction in sepsis.

  8. Percutaneous Retrieval of Misplaced Intravascular Foreign Objects with the Dormia Basket: An Effective Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, Rahul Someshwar, Vimal; Warawdekar, Gireesh

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. We report our experience of the retrieval of intravascular foreign body objects by the percutaneous use of the Gemini Dormia basket. Methods. Over a period of 2 years we attempted the percutaneous removal of intravascular foreign bodies in 26 patients. Twenty-six foreign bodies were removed: 8 intravascular stents, 4 embolization coils, 9 guidewires, 1 pacemaker lead, and 4 catheter fragments. The percutaneous retrieval was achieved with a combination of guide catheters and the Gemini Dormia basket. Results. Percutaneous retrieval was successful in 25 of 26 patients (96.2%). It was possible to remove all the intravascular foreign bodies with a combination of guide catheters and the Dormia basket. No complication occurred during the procedure, and no long-term complications were registered during the follow-up period, which ranged from 6 months to 32 months (mean 22.4 months overall). Conclusion. Percutaneous retrieval is an effective and safe technique that should be the first choice for removal of an intravascular foreign body.

  9. Extraforaminal needle tip position reduces risk of intravascular injection in CT-fluoroscopic lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Robinson K.; Ghodadra, Anish; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injection is a common and effective tool for managing lumbar radicular pain, although accidental intravascular injection can rarely result in paralysis. The purpose of this study is to determine the safest needle tip position for computed tomography (CT)-guided lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections as determined by incidence of intravascular injection. Methods Three radiologists, in consensus, reviewed procedural imaging for consecutive CT-fluoroscopic lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections performed during a 16-month period. Intravascular injections were identified and categorized by needle tip position, vessel type injected, intravascular injection volume and procedural phase containing the intravascular injection. Pearson chi-square and logistic regression testing were used to assess differences between groups, as appropriate. Results Intravascular injections occurred in 9% (52/606) of injections. The intravascular injection rate was significantly lower (P<0.001) for extraforaminal needle position (0%, 0/109) compared to junctional (8%, 27/319) and foraminal (14%, 25/178) needle tip positions. Of the intravascular injections, 4% (2/52) were likely arterial, 35% (18/52) were likely venous, and 62% (32/52) were indeterminate for vessel type injected. 46% (24/52) of intravascular injections were large volume, 33% (17/52) were small volume, and 21% (11/52) were trace volume. 56% (29/52) of intravascular injections occurred with the contrast trial dose, 29% (15/52) with the steroid/analgesic cocktail, and 15% (8/52) with both. Conclusions An extraforaminal needle position for CT-fluoroscopic lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections decreases the risk of intravascular injection and therefore may be safer than other needle tip positions. PMID:28097241

  10. Mechanotransductional Basis of Endothelial Cell Response to Intravascular Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Alexandra L.; Pichette, Benjamin; Sobolewski, Peter; Eckmann, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular air embolism resulting from too rapid decompression is a well-known risk in deep-sea diving, aviation and space travel. It is also a common complication during surgery or other medical procedures when air or other endogenously administered gas is entrained in the circulation. Preventive and post-event treatment options are extremely limited for this dangerous condition, and none of them address the poorly understood pathophysiology of endothelial response to intravascular bubble presence. Using a novel apparatus allowing precise manipulation of microbubbles in real time fluorescence microscopy studies, we directly measure human umbilical vein endothelial cell responses to bubble contact. Strong intracellular calcium transients requiring extracellular calcium are observed upon cell-bubble interaction. The transient is eliminated both by the presence of the stretch activated channel inhibitor, gadolinium, and the transient receptor potential vanilliod family inhibitor, ruthenium red. No bubble induced calcium upsurge occurs if the cells are pretreated with an inhibitor of actin polymerization, cytochalasin-D. This study explores the biomechanical mechanisms at play in bubble interfacial interactions with endothelial surface layer (ESL) macromolecules, reassessing cell response after selective digestion of glycocalyx glycosoaminoglycans, hyaluran (HA) and heparin sulfate (HS). HA digestion causes reduction of cell-bubble adherence and a more rapid induction of calcium influx after contact. HS depletion significantly decreases calcium transient amplitudes, as does pharmacologically induced sydencan ectodomain shedding. The surfactant perfluorocarbon oxycyte abolishes any bubble induced calcium transient, presumably through direct competition with ESL macromolecules for interfacial occupancy, thus attenuating the interactions that trigger potentially deleterious biochemical pathways. PMID:21931900

  11. Central respiratory and circulatory depression caused by intravascular saxitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Borison, H.L.; Culp, W.J.; Gonsalves, S.F.; McCarthy, L.E.

    1980-01-01

    1 In cats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone and vagotomized, observations were made on the phrenic nerve action potential and the diaphragm electromyogram (EMG) at constant end-tidal Pco2. Arterial blood pressure was stabilized by intravenous infusions of noradrenaline. 2 Intravenous administration of saxitoxin (STX) initially abolished respiratory activity in the EMG and caused a slowing of oscillation in the central phrenic neurogram. Additional STX produced apneustic phrenic discharges followed by a progressive loss of nerve action potentials. 3 The inspiratory centre in the medulla oblongata was stimulated electrically to evoke a sustained phrenic nerve discharge. STX, given intravenously, resulted in the elimination of spontaneous nerve activity without interfering with the evoked response. 4 The cephalic intravascular infusion of STX into a carotid or vertebral artery depressed spontaneous respiratory activity while sparing EMG activity evoked by electrical stimulation of the intact phrenic nerve. 5 Spontaneous respiratory discharge in the phrenic nerve was eliminated by smaller doses of STX administered intra-arterially than were required intravenously. In addition, onset of and recovery from neural silence occurred faster following intra-arterial injection of STX. 6 Depressant effects on arterial blood pressure coincided with those on respiration when STX was given intra-arterially. 7 An electrophysiological assay on frog sartorius muscle was used to measure STX in the cerebrospinal fluid. Levels of STX detected were proportional to amounts of the toxin infused intra-arterially. 8 It is concluded that STX exchanges rapidly between blood and brain to bring about central depression and this adds to its peripheral paralytic actions. PMID:7357210

  12. Hepatic abscess-associated Clostridial bacteraemia presenting with intravascular haemolysis and severe hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Andrew George; Rudd, Kristina Elizabeth; Halliday, Melissa; Hess, John Rider

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clostridium perfringens bacteraemia is a potentially fatal condition, and its early identification is paramount to maximise chances of survival. Prompt recognition of intravascular haemolysis, a known complication of C. perfringens bacteraemia, can help guide clinical decision-making before microbiology data becomes available. We present a novel finding of severe hypertension in a fatal case of Clostridial bacteraemia with massive haemolysis. A 58-year-old man with no known medical history presented to the emergency department with malaise, fever and hypertension. He developed abdominal pain and a hepatic abscess was identified on CT imaging. Within 4 h of presentation, he developed massive intravascular haemolysis, extreme hypertension, pulmonary oedema and respiratory failure. He died less than 8 h after presentation. His blood cultures subsequently grew C. perfringens. This case underscores the importance of early recognition of intravascular haemolysis complicating C. perfringens bacteraemia, and discusses the rare complication of hypertensive emergency in this setting. PMID:26823354

  13. Nonlinear dynamic characteristics of SMA intravascular stent under radial stochastic loads.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwen; Zhang, Qingxin; Xu, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamic characteristics of shape memory alloy (SMA) intravascular stent under radial stochastic loads were studied in this paper. Von de Pol item was improved to interpret the hysteretic phenomena of SMA, and the nonlinear dynamic model of SMA intravascular stent under radial stochastic loads was developed. The conditions of stochastic stability of the system were obtained in singular boundary theory. The steady-state probability density function of the dynamic response of the system was given, and the stochastic Hopf bifurcation characteristics of the system were analyzed. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that the stability of the trivial solution varies with bifurcation parameters, and stochastic Hopf bifurcation appears in the process, which can cause stent fracture or loss. The results of this paper are helpful to application of SMA intravascular stent in biomedical engineering fields.

  14. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography: Clinical and research applications and intravascular imaging software overview.

    PubMed

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Albuquerque, Felipe N; Sotomi, Yohei; Zeng, Yaping; Suwannasom, Pannipa; Tateishi, Hiroki; Cavalcante, Rafael; Ishibashi, Yuki; Nakatani, Shimpei; Abdelghani, Mohammad; Dijkstra, Jouke; Bourantas, Christos; Collet, Carlos; Karanasos, Antonios; Radu, Maria; Wang, Ancong; Muramatsu, Takashi; Landmesser, Ulf; Okamura, Takayuki; Regar, Evelyn; Räber, Lorenz; Guagliumi, Giulio; Pyo, Robert T; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W

    2017-01-21

    By providing valuable information about the coronary artery wall and lumen, intravascular imaging may aid in optimizing interventional procedure results and thereby could improve clinical outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a light-based technology with a tissue penetration of approximately 1 to 3 mm and provides near histological resolution. It has emerged as a technological breakthrough in intravascular imaging with multiple clinical and research applications. OCT provides detailed visualization of the vessel following PCI and provides accurate assessment of post-procedural stent performance including detection of edge dissection, stent struts apposition, tissue prolapse, and healing parameters. Additionally, it can provide accurate characterization of plaque morphology and provides key information to optimize post-procedural outcomes. This manuscript aims to review the current clinical and research applications of intracoronary OCT and summarize the analytic OCT imaging software packages currently available. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. High-sensitivity intravascular photoacoustic imaging of lipid–laden plaque with a collinear catheter design

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yingchun; Hui, Jie; Kole, Ayeeshik; Wang, Pu; Yu, Qianhuan; Chen, Weibiao; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive catheter probe is critical to catheter-based intravascular photoacoustic imaging. Here, we present a photoacoustic catheter probe design on the basis of collinear alignment of the incident optical wave and the photoacoustically generated sound wave within a miniature catheter housing for the first time. Such collinear catheter design with an outer diameter of 1.6 mm provided highly efficient overlap between optical and acoustic waves over an imaging depth of >6 mm in D2O medium. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of lipid-laden atherosclerotic plaque and perivascular fat was demonstrated, where a lab-built 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator outputting nanosecond optical pulses at a wavelength of 1.7 μm was used for overtone excitation of C-H bonds. In addition to intravascular imaging, the presented catheter design will benefit other photoacoustic applications such as needle-based intramuscular imaging. PMID:27121894

  16. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology.

  17. Pelvic ultrasound - abdominal

    MedlinePlus

    ... pelvic ultrasound. In: Lumb P, Karakitsos D, eds. Critical Care Ultrasound. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 43. Review Date 3/4/2016 Updated by: Irina Burd, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, ...

  18. Development and evaluation of a novel VEGFR2-targeted nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Houqiang; Li, Chunfang; He, Xiaoling; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Recent literatures have reported that the targeted nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents are becoming more and more important in medical application, like ultrasound imaging, detection of perfusion, drug delivery and molecular imaging and so on. In this study, we fabricated an uniform nanoscale bubbles (257 nm with the polydispersity index of 0.458) by incorporation of antibody targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) into the nanobubbles membrane by using avidin-biotin interaction. Some fundamental characterizations such as nanobubble suspension, surface morphology, particle size distribution and zeta potential were investigated. The concentration and time-intensity curves (TICs) were obtained with a self-made ultrasound experimental setup in vitro evaluation. In addition, in order to evaluate the contrast enhancement ability and the potential tumor-targeted ability in vivo, normal Wistar rats and nude female BALB/c mice were intravascular administration of the nanobubbles via tail vein injection, respectively. Significant contrast enhancement of ultrasound imaging within liver and tumor were visualized. These experiments demonstrated that the targeted nanobubbles is efficient in ultrasound molecular imaging by enhancement of the contrast effect and have potential capacity for targeted tumor diagnosis and therapy in the future.

  19. In Vivo Assessment of Pulmonary Arterial Wall Fibrosis by Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A New Prognostic Marker of Adverse Clinical Follow-Up§

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Enric; Grignola, Juan C; Aguilar, Rio; Montero, María Angeles; Arredondo, Christian; Vázquez, Manuel; López-Messeguer, Manuel; Bravo, Carlos; Bouteldja, Nadia; Hidalgo, Cristina; Roman, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim is to correlate pulmonary arterial (PA) remodeling estimated by PA fibrosis in PA hypertension (PAH) with clinical follow-up. Histology of PA specimens is also performed. Methods: 19 patients, aged 54±16 (4 men), functional class II-III were studied with right heart catheterization, PA Intravascular Ultrasound and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in inferior lobe segment. PA wall fibrosis was obtained by OCT ( area of fibrosis/PA cross sectional area × 100). Patients follow-up was blind to OCT. Events were defined as mortality, lung transplantation, need of intravenous prostaglandins or onset of right ventricular failure. Results: OCT measurements showed high intra- and interobserver agreement. There was a good correlation between OCT and histology in PA fibrosis from explanted lungs. Area of fibrosis was 1.4±0.8 mm2, % fibrosis was 22.3±8. Follow-up was 3.5 years (2.5-4.5). OCT %Fib was significantly correlated with PA capacitance (r=-0.536) and with pulmonary vascular rsistance (r=0.55). Patients were divided according to the median value of PA fibrosis. There were 10 patients with a high (≥ 22%) and 9 with a low fibrosis (<22%). Events occurred in 6 (1 death, 1 lung transplantation, 2 intravenous prostaglandins, 2 right heart failure) out of 10 patients with high and in 0 out of 9 patients with low fibrosis (p<0.01). Conclusions: In PAH, the severity of PA remodeling assessed by OCT wall fibrosis was significantly predictive of severely unfavorable clinical outcome. In vivo assessment of pulmonary arterial wall fibrosis by intravascular OCT in PAH is a promising new prognostic marker of adverse clinical outcome. PMID:23730366

  20. A case of intravascular lymphoma complicated with Fournier's syndrome due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Fournier's syndrome is the fulminant necrotizing fasciitis of the external genitalia. The occurrence of Fournier's syndrome in patients with hematologic malignancies has been reported. Here we report a case of an intravascular lymphoma complicated with Fournier's syndrome due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP). A 71-year-old Japanese man received intensive chemotherapy for recurring intravascular lymphoma. Blood culture revealed MDRP, and physical examination led to the diagnosis of Fournier's syndrome. Aggressive treatment that comprised granulocyte transfusion, granulocyte stimulating factor, endotoxin filtration, appropriate antibiotic coverage, and aggressive surgical therapy was administered, and this lead to the successful recovery from sepsis and Fournier's syndrome.

  1. Leiomyosarcoma of the Uterus with Intravascular Tumor Extension and Pulmonary Tumor Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Douglas K.; Kalva, Sanjeeva P. Fan, C.-M.; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2007-02-15

    We report the case of a 48-year-old woman presenting with recurrent uterine leiomyosarcoma (LMS) associated with right iliac vein and inferior vena cava (IVC) invasion and left lower lobe pulmonary tumor embolus. Because the prognosis and treatment differ from that of thrombotic pulmonary emboli, the differentiating imaging characteristics of intravascular tumor embolism are reviewed. To our knowledge, only two other cases of intravenous uterine leiomyosarcomatosis have been described in the existing literature, and this is the first reported case of the entity with associated intravascular tumor embolism.

  2. Engineering considerations for integrating laser angioplasty with ultrasound diagnostics in a single device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passafaro, James D.; Zalesky, Paul J.

    1990-07-01

    The application of direct laser energy for the ablation of atherosclerotic plaque has been investigated extensively. It has been recognized that the need for an onboard guidance capability which can direct the laser energy is essential for controlled plaque removal. Intravascular ultrasound represents one approach for identifying diseased tissue and directing laser therapy. The design of a catheter with combined laser and ultrasound capabilities is discussed. The design considers the optical and acoustical requirements. In addition, vascular anatomical constraints and their impact on the mechanical aspects of the device configuration are considered. The optical considerations dictate safe and predictable high energy laser transmission. The acoustic requirements consider material properties and ultrasonic beam resolution. The vascular anatomy imposes constraints on maximum catheter size and it requires a means for conventional delivery of the device to the targeted lesion.

  3. Rifampicin-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation in pulmonary tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo; He, Jian-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) induced by daily rifampicin therapy is rare, especially the patient is absent of malignancy, severe infection, and prior exposure to rifampicin. Patient concerns: We report a case of DIC induced by daily rifampicin treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis. A 22-year-old, previously healthy man received an anti-tuberculosis therapy consisting of isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide on the daily dose recommended by the World Health Organization tuberculosis guidelines after a diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. Two weeks later, he was transferred to the West China Hospital with nasal hemorrhage for 1 week, hematochezia, hematuria, and petechiae for 5 days. Diagnoses: Laboratory data and symptoms on admission indicated DIC. Interventions: The anti-tuberculosis drugs were discontinued after admission and he was initiated with targeted treatment for DIC, omeprazole and polyene hosphatidylcholine infusion, as well as nutrition supportive treatment. Five days after admission, ethambutol, moxifloxacin, and amikacin were added to the patient without further active hemorrhage. Eight days after admission, the platelet count had risen gradually. Isoniazid was administered on 24 days after admission, while his liver function tests and platelet counts returned to normal. No recurrence of DIC occurred. The diagnosis of rifampicin-induced DIC was confirmed. Outcomes: The patient recovered and left hospital with isoniazid, ethambutol, levofloxacin, and streptomycin after 4 weeks of hospitalization. There was no recurrence of DIC or hemorrhage during the 8 months of follow-up. The literature review revealed that there were 10 other cases of rifampicin-induced DIC. Only 4 cases received rifampicin on a daily basis for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment and the others were on intermittent dosing schedule for pulmonary tuberculosis or leprosy treatment. Lessons: As a rare adverse effect, DIC induced by

  4. Meta-analysis on intravascular low energy laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Dong; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Wang, Yan-Fang; Liu, Song-Hao

    2008-12-01

    Intravascular low energy laser therapy (ILELT) was put forward for cardiocirculatory diseases in USA in 1982, was popular in Russia in 1980s, and then in China in 1990s. The therapeutic effects of ILELT and drugs in comparison with drugs only on Chinese patients and their blood parameters were analyzed with meta-analyses and reported as (OR, 95%CI) for patient improvement and (WMD, 95% CI) for blood parameter improvement, where 95%CI, OR and WMD denoted 95% confidence intervals, odds ratio and weighted mean difference, respectively. It was found that the patients of cerebral infarction (2.39, 2.09~2.74) and cerebrovascular diseases (2.97, 1.69~2.53) were cured, respectively, (P < 0.01), and the symptom improvement of patients of cerebral infarction, cerebrovascular diseases and diabetes were significant (3.13, 2.79~3.51), (4.92, 3.39~7.14) , and (3.80, 2.79~5.18), and mild (3.66, 3.15~4.24), (4.95, 2.77~8.84), and (7.11, 4.54~11.13), respectively, (P < 0.01). It was also found that the blood parameters such as cholesterol (-0.78, -1.32~-0.24), total cholesterol (-1.08, -1.80~-0.36), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (-0.6, -1.01~-0.19), triacylglycerol (0.63, -0.83~-0.42), high density lipoprotein (0.34, 0.10~0.59), erythrocyte aggregation index (-0.24, -0.27~-0.21), erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (-4.57, -7.26~-1.89), fibrinogen (-0.76, -1.31~-0.21), whole blood contrast viscosity (-0.40, -0.69~-0.12), low cut blood viscosity (-1.2, -1.93~-0.48), high cut blood viscosity (-0.62, -0.92~-0.32), whole blood viscosity(-1.2, -1.85~-0.54) and plasma blood contrast viscosity(-0.07, -0.12~-0.03) were found improved (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the patients of cerebral infarction, cerebrovascular diseases and diabetes might be improved with ILELT, which might be mediated by blood parameter improvement.

  5. Catheter-related infections: diagnosis and intravascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Burillo, A; Muñoz, P

    2001-11-01

    catheter infections, diagnosed without catheter withdrawal, can be handled nowadays with the so-called "antibiotic lock-in technique", which consists in locking the infected catheter lumen with a solution containing antibiotics. A high proportion of infected catheters, mainly those with coagulase-negative staphylococci, can be maintained in place and sterilized with this technique, including catheters in patients with therapeutic failure after receiving conventional intravenous antibiotic therapy. New diagnostic and therapeutic techniques may avoid the unnecessary withdrawal of thousands of efficient, difficult to replace and expensive intravascular lines.

  6. Ultrasound in regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J; Nicholls, B

    2010-04-01

    Ultrasound guidance is rapidly becoming the gold standard for regional anaesthesia. There is an ever growing weight of evidence, matched with improving technology, to show that the use of ultrasound has significant benefits over conventional techniques, such as nerve stimulation and loss of resistance. The improved safety and efficacy that ultrasound brings to regional anaesthesia will help promote its use and realise the benefits that regional anaesthesia has over general anaesthesia, such as decreased morbidity and mortality, superior postoperative analgesia, cost-effectiveness, decreased postoperative complications and an improved postoperative course. In this review we consider the evidence behind the improved safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia, before discussing its use in pain medicine, paediatrics and in the facilitation of neuraxial blockade. The Achilles' heel of ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia is that anaesthetists are far more familiar with providing general anaesthesia, which in most cases requires skills that are achieved faster and more reliably. To this ends we go on to provide practical advice on ultrasound-guided techniques and the introduction of ultrasound into a department.

  7. [Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy in a dog with Angiostrongylus vasorum infection].

    PubMed

    Kruse, B D; Hartmann, K; Groth, A; Schulz, B; Wehner, A

    2013-01-01

    A 2-year-old female spayed Epagneul-Breton dog was presented with ecchymoses, but an undisturbed general condition. Clinical examination additionally revealed petechia and a haematoma. Travel history included Italy and Denmark. Laboratory abnormalities were moderate thrombocytopenia, prolonged PT, aPTT and TT, and elevated d-dimers. Initial therapy consisted of plasma transfusions, fluids, doxycycline and famotidine administration. Babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, leishmaniosis, dirofilariosis or anaplasmosis could not be confirmed. Abdominal ultrasound was unremarkable, while thoracic radiographs showed a bronchointerstitial pattern. Faecal samples collected over 3 days were positive for Angiostrongylus vasorum after examination using the Baermann lungworm test. The A. vasorum infection was successfully treated with fenbendazole, whereupon thrombocytopenia and prolonged coagulation times were resolved. In regions of low prevalence, an infection with A. vasorum should also be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs with coagulation abnormalities. Respiratory signs can be absent with this disease. The patient may have acquired the infection abroad or in Germany.

  8. A polyimide-etalon thin film structure for all-optical high-frequency ultrasound transduction.

    PubMed

    Sheaff, Clay; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we have designed, fabricated, and tested an all-optical ultrasound transducer by integrating a photoabsorptive polyimide thin film into a Fabry-Pérot (etalon) high-frequency receiver. A 5-ns UV pulse was used for thermoelastic ultrasound generation in the polyimide film, and the transmission had a maximum amplitude of 4.3 MPa centered at 27 MHz with a fractional bandwidth of 107%. The device attained a noise-equivalent pressure of 1.3 Pa/√Hz in receive-only mode. When used in pulse-echo mode, the -6-dB upper cutoff frequency of the transmit/receive response reached 47 MHz. Basic imaging capabilities were also investigated by scanning the near-infrared probe beam across the device to create a 2 × 2 mm synthetic aperture. The imaging of targets placed at depths of 1.8 and 5.2 mm yielded estimates of 71 and 145 μm, respectively, for the lateral resolution and 35 and 38 μm, respectively, for the axial resolution. Finally, a design concept for a forward-viewing intravascular imager is presented that entails the coupling of light to a rotating, linear array of optical fibers on top of which are deposited polyimide-etalon transducers. Such a design would allow for a flexible and compact high-resolution imager well-suited for intravascular applications, such as guidance of treatment in the case of chronic total occlusion.

  9. Low-level He-Ne laser in intravascular irradiation treatment of schizophrenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Xue; Fu, Zheng-Hua

    1998-11-01

    Intravascular low level He-Ne laser irradiation is a new therapy developed in recent years. In our hospital it was applied in the treatment and observation of 220 cases of schizophrenia, among which certain effect was achieved and about which the detail was collated and elaborated.

  10. Disseminated intravascular coagulation due to IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bleakly, N Teresa; Fontaine, Magali J; Pate, Lisa L; Sutherland, Scott M; Jeng, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) due to red cell hemolysis has been previously attributed to transfusion-related hemolytic reactions, but not to autoimmune hemolytic anemia. We report a case of DIC in a child with complement-fixing IgM-mediated cold-agglutinin autoimmune hemolysis, which resulted in arterial thrombosis and gangrene of the upper and lower extremities.

  11. Research of epidermal cellular vegetal cycle of intravascular low level laser irradiation in treatment of psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Bao, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Mei-Jue

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To research epidermal cellular vegetal cycle and the difference of DNA content between pre and post Intravascular Low Level Laser Irradiation treatment of psoriasis. Method: 15 patients suffered from psoriasis were treated by intravascular low level laser irradiation (output power: 4-5mw, 1 hour per day, a course of treatment is 10 days). We checked the different DNA content of epidermal cell between pre and post treatment of psoriasis and 8 natural human. Then the percentage of each phase among the whole cellular cycle was calculated and the statistical analysis was made. Results: The mean value of G1/S phase is obviously down while G2+M phase increased obviously. T test P<0.05.The related statistical analysis showed significant difference between pre and post treatments. Conclusions: The Intravascular Low Level Laser Irradiation (ILLLI) in treatment of psoriasis is effective according to the research of epidermal cellular vegetal cycle and the difference DNA content of Intravascular Low Level Laser Irradiation between pre and post treatment of psoriasis

  12. Microfluidics in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Device Fabrication and an Experiment to Mimic Intravascular Gas Embolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jablonski, Erin L.; Vogel, Brandon M.; Cavanagh, Daniel P.; Beers, Kathryn L.

    2010-01-01

    A method to fabricate microfluidic devices and an experimental protocol to model intravascular gas embolism for undergraduate laboratories are presented. The fabrication process details how to produce masters on glass slides; these masters serve as molds to pattern channels in an elastomeric polymer that can be adhered to a substrate, resulting in…

  13. Multi-mode Intravascular RF Coil for MRI-guided Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Kurpad, Krishna N.; Unal, Orhan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using a single intravascular RF probe connected to the external MRI system via a single coaxial cable to perform active tip tracking and catheter visualization, and high SNR intravascular imaging. Materials and Methods A multi-mode intravascular RF coil was constructed on a 6F balloon catheter and interfaced to a 1.5T MRI scanner via a decoupling circuit. Bench measurements of coil impedances were followed by imaging experiments in saline and phantoms. Results The multi-mode coil behaves as an inductively-coupled transmit coil. Forward looking capability of 6mm is measured. Greater than 3-fold increase in SNR compared to conventional imaging using optimized external coil is demonstrated. Simultaneous active tip tracking and catheter visualization is demonstrated. Conclusions It is feasible to perform 1) active tip tracking, 2) catheter visualization, and 3) high SNR imaging using a single multi-mode intravascular RF coil that is connected to the external system via a single coaxial cable. PMID:21448969

  14. Asian variant of intravascular large B cell lymphoma causes patients to frequently develop the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Chie; Ikejiri, Fumiyoshi; Kawakami, Koshi; Miyake, Takaaki; Kumanomido, Satoshi; Inoue, Masaya; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Junko; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Suzumiya, Junji

    2011-11-01

    The Asian variant of intravascular large B cell lymphoma is a special type of intravascular lymphoma with hemophagocytic syndrome and hypercytokinemia including interleukin-6, which stimulates antidiuretic hormone synthesis in the hypothalamus. We present here that the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion frequently occurs in patients with the Asian variant of intravascular large B cell lymphoma. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion was found in eight of 118 (6.8%) lymphoma patients at the first diagnosis. Although there were six (5.1%) among 118 lymphoma patients with the Asian variant of intravascular large B cell lymphoma, four of the six patients (66.7%) developed the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. In four patients with the Asian variant of intravascular large B cell lymphoma with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, elevated serum interleukin-6 and low sodium levels were almost normalized after chemotherapy. The Asian variant of intravascular large B cell lymphoma patients frequently develop the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, and interleukin-6 might play a role in the occurrence of this disease. We should pay attention to hyponatremia caused by the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion in patients with the Asian variant of intravascular large B cell lymphoma.

  15. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... A radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray and ultrasound images) will ...

  16. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... radiologist (a doctor who is specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray and ultrasound images) will ...

  17. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... A radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray and ultrasound images) will ...

  18. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... A radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray, ultrasound, and other imaging ...

  19. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg – a condition often referred to as deep vein thrombosis. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation ... leg. This condition is often referred to as deep vein thrombosis or DVT. These clots may break ...

  20. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pelvic area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  1. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  2. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  3. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  4. Ultrasound in pregnancy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ultrasound has become a standard procedure used during pregnancy. It can demonstrate fetal growth and can detect increasing ... abnormalities, hydrocephalus, anencephaly, club feet, and other ... does not produce ionizing radiation and is considered ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  6. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  7. Thyroid and parathyroid ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ghervan, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Thyroid ultrasound is easy to perform due to the superficial location of the thyroid gland, but appropriate equipment is mandatory with a linear high frequency transducer (7.5 - 12) MHz. Some pathological aspects of the thyroid gland are easily diagnosed by ultrasound, like the enlargement of the thyroid volume (goiter) or the presence of nodules and cysts; while other aspects are more difficult and need more experience (diffuse changes in the structure, echogenicity and vascularization of the parenchyma, differential diagnosis of malignant nodules). Ultrasound has become the diagnostic procedure of choice in guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules; most structural abnormalities of the thyroid need evaluation and monitoring but not intervention. A good knowledge of the normal appearance of the thyroid gland is compulsory for an accurate ultrasound diagnosis.

  8. Guidelines for the management of intravascular catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Mermel, L A; Farr, B M; Sherertz, R J; Raad, I I; O'Grady, N; Harris, J S; Craven, D E

    2001-01-01

    These guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American College of Critical Care Medicine (for the Society of Critical Care Medicine), and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America contain recommendations for the management of adults and children with, and diagnosis of infections related to, peripheral and nontunneled central venous catheters (CVCs), pulmonary artery catheters, tunneled central catheters, and implantable devices. The guidelines, written for clinicians, contain IDSA evidence-based recommendations for assessment of the quality and strength of the data. Recommendations are presented according to the type of catheter, the infecting organism, and the associated complications. Intravascular catheter-related infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, aerobic gram-negative bacilli, and Candida albicans most commonly cause catheter-related bloodstream infection. Management of catheter-related infection varies according to the type of catheter involved. After appropriate cultures of blood and catheter samples are done, empirical i.v. antimicrobial therapy should be initiated on the basis of clinical clues, the severity of the patient's acute illness, underlying disease, and the potential pathogen(s) involved. In most cases of nontunneled CVC-related bacteremia and fungemia, the CVC should be removed. For management of bacteremia and fungemia from a tunneled catheter or implantable device, such as a port, the decision to remove the catheter or device should be based on the severity of the patient's illness, documentation that the vascular-access device is infected, assessment of the specific pathogen involved, and presence of complications, such as endocarditis, septic thrombosis, tunnel infection, or metastatic seeding. When a catheter-related infection is documented and a specific pathogen is identified, systemic antimicrobial

  9. Evaluation of Intravascular Hemolysis With Erythrocyte Creatine in Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tetsuro; Okumiya, Toshika; Kubo, Toru; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Yoshihisa

    2016-07-27

    Chronic intravascular hemolysis has been identified in patients with cardiac valve prostheses, but only a few case reports have evaluated intravascular hemolysis in patients with native valvular heart disease. To detect intravascular hemolysis in patients with aortic stenosis, erythrocyte creatine was evaluated with hemodynamic indices obtained by echocardiography.Erythrocyte creatine, a marker of erythrocyte age, was assayed in 30 patients with aortic stenosis and 10 aged matched healthy volunteers. Peak flow velocity of the aortic valve was determined by continuous-wave Doppler echocardiography. Twenty of 30 patients with aortic stenosis had high erythrocyte creatine levels (> 1.8 µmol/g Hb) and erythrocyte creatine was significantly higher as compared with control subjects (1.98 ± 0.49 versus 1.52 ± 0.19 µmol/g Hb, P = 0.007). Peak transvalvular pressure gradient ranged from 46 to 142 mmHg and peak flow velocity ranged from 3.40 to 5.95 m/second. Patients with aortic stenosis had a significantly lower erythrocyte count (387 ± 40 versus 436 ± 42 × 10(4) µL, P = 0.002) and hemoglobin (119 ± 11 versus 135 ± 11 g/L, P < 0.001) as compared with control subjects. Erythrocyte creatine had a fair correlation with peak flow velocity (r = 0.55, P = 0.002).In conclusion, intravascular hemolysis due to destruction of erythrocytes was detected in patients with moderate to severe aortic stenosis and the severity of intravascular hemolysis was related to valvular flow velocity of the aortic valve.

  10. Recent developments of imaging modalities of carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Tomoyuki; Pacchioni, Andrea; Nikas, Dimitrios; Reimers, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    Compared with conventional angiogram-guided procedure, intravascular imaging modalities give us a lot of useful information to make the procedure better. Intravascular imaging modalities give us the information about lesion characters, reference vessel diameter and the interaction between the stent strut and the plaque such as stent strut malapposition or plaque prolapse in real time during the procedure. We can change our strategy according to this information. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is a most common intravascular imaging modality during carotid artery stenting (CAS) in these days. Its advantage is easy to use compared with optical coherence tomograpy (OCT) which has been reported recently in some case reports or case series. However, due to its high resolution, OCT provides more detailed information especially about plaque prolapse and strut malapposition. IVUS and OCT have a potential to improve acute result and reduce the procedural complication by providing the data of lesion character, reference vessel diameter and the interaction of stent strut and vessel wall. Interventionalists who perform CAS procedure should acquire proficiency in imaging modalities during CAS procedure.

  11. Evolution of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Paefgen, Vera; Doleschel, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most frequently used diagnostic methods. It is a non-invasive, comparably inexpensive imaging method with a broad spectrum of applications, which can be increased even more by using bubbles as contrast agents (CAs). There are various different types of bubbles: filled with different gases, composed of soft- or hard-shell materials, and ranging in size from nano- to micrometers. These intravascular CAs enable functional analyses, e.g., to acquire organ perfusion in real-time. Molecular analyses are achieved by coupling specific ligands to the bubbles' shell, which bind to marker molecules in the area of interest. Bubbles can also be loaded with or attached to drugs, peptides or genes and can be destroyed by US pulses to locally release the entrapped agent. Recent studies show that US CAs are also valuable tools in hyperthermia-induced ablation therapy of tumors, or can increase cellular uptake of locally released drugs by enhancing membrane permeability. This review summarizes important steps in the development of US CAs and introduces the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced US. Additionally, an overview of the recent developments in US probe design for functional and molecular diagnosis as well as for drug delivery is given.

  12. Evolution of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Paefgen, Vera; Doleschel, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most frequently used diagnostic methods. It is a non-invasive, comparably inexpensive imaging method with a broad spectrum of applications, which can be increased even more by using bubbles as contrast agents (CAs). There are various different types of bubbles: filled with different gases, composed of soft- or hard-shell materials, and ranging in size from nano- to micrometers. These intravascular CAs enable functional analyses, e.g., to acquire organ perfusion in real-time. Molecular analyses are achieved by coupling specific ligands to the bubbles’ shell, which bind to marker molecules in the area of interest. Bubbles can also be loaded with or attached to drugs, peptides or genes and can be destroyed by US pulses to locally release the entrapped agent. Recent studies show that US CAs are also valuable tools in hyperthermia-induced ablation therapy of tumors, or can increase cellular uptake of locally released drugs by enhancing membrane permeability. This review summarizes important steps in the development of US CAs and introduces the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced US. Additionally, an overview of the recent developments in US probe design for functional and molecular diagnosis as well as for drug delivery is given. PMID:26441654

  13. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Ronald H

    2016-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via ciliodestruction), tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. PMID:27757007

  14. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Ronald H

    2016-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via ciliodestruction), tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities.

  15. Application of Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Intravascular Ultrasound and the Coronary Calcium Score to Predict Adverse Coronary Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    small&vessels&and&severe&disease James&Watts& 8/6/14 Smith Karey& Franklin 8/6/14 Smith Clint&Musick 8/6/14 Smith German&Conde 8/1/14 Smith Spanish...stent(MD(said(no(disease(on(visual(in(other(vessels 20 Nathaniel( Benjamin 10/17/14 Gangadharan mycardial(bridging(no(disease(to(image 21 Michael(Worm

  16. Application of Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Intravascular Ultrasound and the Coronary Calcium Score to Predict Adverse Coronary Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    lipid or significant atherosclerosis is identified. 8 A second run-in patient is illustrated below. The horizontal scan display in this...circumferential large lipid deposit which is visualized easily. This is associated with a significant degree of atherosclerosis demonstrated on

  17. Application of Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Intravascular Ultrasound and the Coronary Calcium Score to Predict Adverse Coronary Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other...included changes in investigational design , period of the study, data collection and analysis. In June of 2012, the revised protocol (attached) was...review for human protections was requested. Implementation of the study will commence following that approval. The design of the study includes a

  18. [Invasive diagnostic imaging of coronary atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Gamou, Tadatsugu; Kawashiri, Masaaki; Tada, Hayato; Hayashi, Kenshi; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    Invasive diagnostic imaging technique of coronary atherosclerosis has rapidly developed. For example, intravascular ultrasound(IVUS) is recognized as an essential device for percutaneous coronary intervention to evaluate the vessel wall, vascular lumen and coronary plaque morphologies because of its accuracy for quantitative analysis capability. Recently new imaging modalities such as radio-frequency signal analysis, elastography and contrast harmonic echography have been developed for the evaluation of histological characteristics. Also, optical coherence tomography(OCT), which provides approximately ten-times higher-resolutional cross-section images of the coronary arterial wall in comparison with IVUS, became available in clinical setting. In this article, we review the latest progress of the invasive diagnostic imaging of coronary atherosclerosis.

  19. Broadband optical ultrasound sensor with a unique open-cavity structure.

    PubMed

    Chow, Colin M; Zhou, Yun; Guo, Yunbo; Norris, Theodore B; Wang, Xueding; Deng, Cheri X; Ye, Jing Yong

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasound imaging requires quality sensors with wide bandwidth and high sensitivity, as shown in a wide range of applications, including intravascular imaging of cardiovascular diseases. However, piezoelectric technology, the current dominant approach for hydrophone fabrication, has encountered many technical limitations in the high-frequency range. Using optical techniques for the detection of high-frequency ultrasound signals has attracted much recent attention. One of the most studied approaches is based on a Fabry-Pérot interferometer, consisting of an optical cavity sandwiched between two mirrors. This technique offers promising sensitivity and bandwidth, and a potential alternative to piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hydrophones. We propose an innovative optical ultrasound sensor using only a single mirror in a total-internal-reflection configuration. Besides retaining the advantages of Fabry-Pérot interferometer-based ultrasound sensors, this unique design provides a bandwidth of at least 160 MHz, a potential decrease in fabrication cost, and an increase in signal fidelity.

  20. Imaging of coronary atherosclerosis in various susceptible groups

    PubMed Central

    Nerlekar, Nitesh; Wong, Dennis T. L.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Atherosclerosis, which is the primary pathophysiologic mechanism for the development of plaque leading to CAD, is a multifactorial process resulting from a complex interplay between genetic susceptibility and various risk factors such as hypertension (HT), dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus (DM) and smoking. In addition, influences from other disease states such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), obesity and the metabolic syndrome as well as gender and ethnic diversity also contribute to the disease process. Insights from pathological observations and advances in cellular and molecular biology have helped us understand the process of plaque formation, progression and rupture leading to events. Several intravascular imaging techniques such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), Virtual histology IVUS (VH-IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) allow in vivo assessment of plaque burden, plaque morphology and response to therapy. In addition, non invasive assessment using coronary artery calcium (CAC) score allows risk stratification and plaque burden assessment whilst computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) allows evaluation of luminal stenosis, plaque characterisation and quantification. This review aims to summarise the results of invasive and non-invasive imaging studies of coronary atherosclerosis seen in various high-risk populations including DM, metabolic syndrome, obesity, CKD and, gender differences and ethnicity. Understanding the phenotype of plaques in various susceptible groups may allow potential development of personalised therapies. PMID:27500095

  1. Optoacoustic endoscopy in curved scanning mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hailong; Buehler, Andreas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-01

    Optoacoustic technique has been shown to resolve anatomical, functional and molecular features at depths that go beyond the reach of epi-illumination optical microscopy offering new opportunities for endoscopic imaging. Herein, we interrogate the merits of optoacoustic endoscopy implemented by translating a sound detector in linear or curved geometries. The linear and curved detection geometries are achieved by employing an intravascular ultrasound transducer (IVUS) within a plastic guide shaped to a line or a curve. This concept could be used together with optical endoscopes to yield hybrid optical and optoacoustic imaging.

  2. Ultrasound physics in a nutshell.

    PubMed

    Coltrera, Marc D

    2010-12-01

    This content presents to the neophyte ultrasonographer the essential nutshell of information needed to properly interpret ultrasound images. Basic concepts of physics related to ultrasound are supported with formulas and related to clinical use.

  3. Quo vadis medical ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Lewin, Peter A

    2004-04-01

    The last three decades of development in diagnostic ultrasound imaging and technology are briefly reviewed and the impact of the crucial link between the two apparently independent research efforts, which eventually facilitated implementation of harmonic imaging modality is explored. These two efforts included the experiments with piezoelectric PVDF polymer material and studies of the interaction between ultrasound energy and biological tissue. Harmonic imaging and its subsequent improvements revolutionized the diagnostic power of clinical ultrasound and brought along images of unparalleled resolution, close to that of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality. The nonlinear propagation effects and their implications for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ultrasound are also briefly addressed. In diagnostic applications, the impact of these effects on image resolution and tissue characterization is reviewed; in therapeutic applications, the influence of nonlinear propagation effects on highly localized tissue ablation and cauterization is examined. Next, the most likely developments and future trends in clinical ultrasound technology, including 3D and 4D imaging, distant palpation, image enhancement using contrast agents, monitoring, and merger of diagnostic and therapeutic applications by e.g. introducing ultrasonically controlled targeted drug delivery are reviewed. Finally, a possible competition from other imaging modalities is discussed.

  4. Medical ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

    2011-08-06

    Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue.

  5. All-Optical Ultrasound Transducers for High Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheaff, Clay Smith

    High frequency ultrasound (HFUS) has increasingly been used within the past few decades to provide high resolution (< 200 mum) imaging in medical applications such as endoluminal imaging, intravascular imaging, ophthalmology, and dermatology. The optical detection and generation of HFUS using thin films offers numerous advantages over traditional piezoelectric technology. Circumvention of an electronic interface with the device head is one of the most significant given the RF noise, crosstalk, and reduced capacitance that encumbers small-scale electronic transducers. Thin film Fabry-Perot interferometers - also known as etalons - are well suited for HFUS receivers on account of their high sensitivity, wide bandwidth, and ease of fabrication. In addition, thin films can be used to generate HFUS when irradiated with optical pulses - a method referred to as Thermoelastic Ultrasound Generation (TUG). By integrating a polyimide (PI) film for TUG into an etalon receiver, we have created for the first time an all-optical ultrasound transducer that is both thermally stable and capable of forming fully sampled 2-D imaging arrays of arbitrary configuration. Here we report (1) the design and fabrication of PI-etalon transducers; (2) an evaluation of their optical and acoustic performance parameters; (3) the ability to conduct high-resolution imaging with synthetic 2-D arrays of PI-etalon elements; and (4) work towards a fiber optic PI-etalon for in vivo use. Successful development of a fiber optic imager would provide a unique field-of-view thereby exposing an abundance of prospects for minimally-invasive analysis, diagnosis, and treatment of disease.

  6. In Vivo Evaluation of the Potential of High-Frequency Ultrasound for Arthroscopic Examination of the Shoulder Joint

    PubMed Central

    Puhakka, Jani; Afara, Isaac O.; Paatela, Teemu; Sormaala, Markus J.; Timonen, Matti A.; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    Objective Accurate arthroscopic evaluation of cartilage lesions could significantly improve the outcome of repair surgery. In this study, we investigated for the first time the potential of intra-articular ultrasound as an arthroscopic tool for grading cartilage defects in the human shoulder joint in vivo and compared the outcome to results from arthroscopic evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Design A total of 26 sites from 9 patients undergoing routine shoulder arthroscopy were quantitatively evaluated with a clinical intravascular (40MHz) ultrasound imaging system, using the regular arthroscopy portals. Reflection coefficient (R), integrated reflection coefficient (IRC), apparent integrated backscattering (AIB), and ultrasound roughness index (URI) were calculated, and high-resolution ultrasound images were obtained per site. Each site was visually graded according to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) system. “Ultrasound scores” corresponding to the ICRS system were determined from the ultrasound images. Magnetic resonance imaging was conducted and cartilage integrity at each site was classified into 5 grades (0 = normal, 4 = severely abnormal) by a radiologist. Results R and IRC were lower at sites with damaged cartilage surface (P = 0.033 and P = 0.043, respectively) and correlated with arthroscopic ICRS grades (rs = −0.444, P = 0.023 and rs = −0.426, P = 0.03, respectively). Arthroscopic ICRS grades and ultrasound scores were significantly correlated (rs = 0.472, P = 0.015), but no significant correlation was found between magnetic resonance imaging data and other parameters. Conclusion The results suggest that ultrasound arthroscopy could facilitate quantitative clinical appraisal of articular cartilage integrity in the shoulder joint and provide information on cartilage lesion depth and severity for quantitative diagnostics in surgery. PMID:27375840

  7. Ultrasound in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, David S.; South, Donna A.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Arbeille, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Physiology of the human body in space has been a major concern for space-faring nations since the beginning of the space era. Ultrasound (US) is one of the most cost effective and versatile forms of medical imaging. As such, its use in characterizing microgravity-induced changes in physiology is being realized. In addition to the use of US in related ground-based studies, equipment has also been modified to fly in space. This involves alteration to handle the stresses of launch and different power and cooling requirements. Study protocols also have been altered to accommodate the microgravity environment. Ultrasound studies to date have shown a pattern of adaptation to microgravity that includes changes in cardiac chamber sizes and vertebral spacing. Ultrasound has been and will continue to be an important component in the investigation of physiological and, possibly, pathologic changes occurring in space or as a result of spaceflight.

  8. Ultrasound in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Priego Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasound is a type of energy which can help analytical chemists in almost all their laboratory tasks, from cleaning to detection. A generic view of the different steps which can be assisted by ultrasound is given here. These steps include preliminary operations usually not considered in most analytical methods (e.g. cleaning, degassing, and atomization), sample preparation being the main area of application. In sample preparation ultrasound is used to assist solid-sample treatment (e.g. digestion, leaching, slurry formation) and liquid-sample preparation (e.g. liquid-liquid extraction, emulsification, homogenization) or to promote heterogeneous sample treatment (e.g. filtration, aggregation, dissolution of solids, crystallization, precipitation, defoaming, degassing). Detection techniques based on use of ultrasonic radiation, the principles on which they are based, responses, and the quantities measured are also discussed.

  9. An intravascular immune response to Borrelia burgdorferi involves Kupffer cells and iNKT cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo-Yong; Moriarty, Tara J; Wong, Connie H Y; Zhou, Hong; Strieter, Robert M; van Rooijen, Nico; Chaconas, George; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigate the dynamics of the hepatic intravascular immune response to a pathogen relevant to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). Immobilized Kupffer cells with highly ramified extended processes into multiple sinusoids could effectively capture blood-borne, disseminating Borrelia burgdorferi, creating a highly efficient surveillance and filtering system. After ingesting B. burgdorferi, Kupffer cells induced chemokine receptor CXCR3–dependent clustering of iNKT cells. Kupffer cells and iNKT cells formed stable contacts via the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d, which led to iNKT cell activation. An absence of iNKT cells caused B. burgdorferi to leave the blood and enter the joints more effectively. B. burgdorferi that escaped Kupffer cells entered the liver parenchyma and survived despite Ito cell responses. Kupffer cell–iNKT cell interactions induced a key intravascular immune response that diminished the dissemination of B. burgdorferi. PMID:20228796

  10. Distal polyneuropathy after canine heartworm disease therapy complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Dillon, A R; Braund, K G

    1982-08-01

    A 3-year-old male Setter-type dog had a progressive distal sensorimotor polyneuropathy characterized by weakness, bilateral atrophy of distal appendicular musculature, and reduced response to tactile stimuli. The diagnosis of a distal axonopathy was supported by electromyographic findings of fibrillation potentials, positive sharp waves in distal limb muscles, and absence of evoked action potentials, myopathic changes of atrophic angular fibers, and myelinated nerve fiber depletion in distal parts of peripheral nerves. The neuropathy appeared 5 weeks after 38 days of heparin therapy for disseminated intravascular coagulation. The disseminated intravascular coagulation, a complication of thiacetarsamide therapy for heartworm disease, had resolved 40 days after the end of heparin therapy. The cause of the neuropathy was not determined.

  11. A Whitacre-type spinal needle does not prevent intravascular injection during cervical nerve root injections.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kenneth D; Ghaly, Ramsis F; Mackerley, Sara; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2010-07-01

    We present a case of intravascular injection in a 41-year-old female during cervical selective nerve root injection using a 22-gauge 3.5-inch Whitacre-type pencil-point subarachnoid needle with a curve placed at the distal tip positioned using continual live fluoroscopic guidance. After negative aspiration for blood and cerebrospinal fluid and no elicited paresthesias during the procedure, 1 mL of contrast was injected. Initial imaging at C6 captured the outline of the nerve root along with a significant amount of transient vascular runoff. This case report demonstrates that Whitacre-type spinal needles do not prevent vascular injection, and that aspiration of the needle is not a reliable sign of intravascular injection.

  12. [Decision-making while implantation of biodegradable vascular scaffolds ABSORB based on methods of intravascular visualization].

    PubMed

    Buzaev, I V; Plechev, V V; Nikolaeva, I E; Zagitov, I G; Oleĭnik, B A

    A series of studies demonstrated comparability of the incidence rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in the middle-term postoperative period following implantation of last-generation drug-coated stents and biodegradable intravascular scaffolds. It was noted observed that these complications may be associated with malposition and inadequate inappropriate preparation of the lesion. We carried out a total of 16 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with implantation of absorbable vascular scaffolds (Absorb, Abbott Vascular) under the guidance of optical coherent tomography. Besides, a further 16 PCIs were performed without intravascular visualization (control group). As experience was gathered, the algorithm of carrying out optical coherent tomography was subjected to changes, resulting in proposal of an optimal algorithm for choice of intraoperative policy based on the findings obtained in optical coherent tomography.

  13. Enhanced glucose tolerance by intravascularly administered piceatannol in freely moving healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Oritani, Yukihiro; Okitsu, Teru; Nishimura, Eisaku; Sai, Masahiko; Ito, Tatsuhiko; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-02-12

    Piceatannol is a phytochemical in the seeds of passion fruit that has a hypoglycemic effect when orally administered. To elucidate the contribution of intact and metabolites of piceatannol after gastro-intestinal absorption to hypoglycemic effect, we examined the influence of piceatannol and isorhapontigenin on blood glucose concentrations during fasting and glucose tolerance tests by administering them intravascularly to freely moving healthy rats. We found that intravascularly administered piceatannol reduced the blood glucose concentrations during both fasting and glucose tolerance tests, but isorhapontigenin did not during either of them. Furthermore, we found that piceatannol increased the insulinogenic index during glucose tolerance tests and that piceatannol had no influence on insulin sensitivity by performing hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamping tests. These results suggest that piceatannol orally intaken may enhance glucose tolerance by the effect of intact piceatannol through enhanced early-phase secretion of insulin. Therefore, oral intake of piceatannol might contribute to proper control of postprandial glycemic excursions in healthy subjects.

  14. [Ultrasound and regional anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Delaunay, L; Plantet, F; Jochum, D

    2009-02-01

    The use of ultrasound is the latest major evolution in regional anaesthesia. Review of available literature shows significant changes in clinical practice. Ultrasound guidance allows the visualization of anatomical variations or unsuspected intraneural injections, reduces the volume of local anaesthetic injections and confirms correct local anaesthetic distribution or catheter placement. No study has found a statistical difference in success rates and safety because all studies were underpowered. However, the ability to visualize an invasive procedure that has been performed blindly in the past is an undeniable progress in terms of safety. The necessity to be familiar with the machine and the learning curve can be repulsive. The aim of this article is to demystify ultrasound guidance by explaining the fundamentals of the clinical use of ultrasound. With the help of different chapters, the authors explain the different adjustments and possible artefacts and give easy solutions for the use of bedside ultrasound. Training is essential and can be performed on manikins or training phantom. For each region the main anatomical landmarks are explained. One must be familiar with several imaging techniques: short axis (transverse) or long axis (longitudinal) nerve imaging, in-plane or out-of-plane imaging and hydrolocalization. Viewing the needle's tip position during its progression remains the main safety endpoint. Therefore, electrical nerve stimulation and ultrasound guidance should be combined, especially for beginners, to confirm proximity to neural structures and to help in case of difficulty. Optimizing safety and clinical results must remain a key priority in regional anaesthesia. Finally, specific regulations concerning the transducers are described. Paediatric specificities are also mentioned.

  15. Automatic lumen contour detection in intravascular OCT images using Otsu binarization and intensity curve.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Chungkeun; Ha, Jong-Won; Yoon, Young-Ro

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an automatic method for the detection of lumen contours in intravascular OCT images with guide wire shadow artifacts. This algorithm is divided into five main procedures: pre-processing, an Otsu binarization approach, an intensity curve approach, a lumen contour position correction, and image reconstruction and contour extraction. The 30 IVOCT images from six anonymous patients were used to verify this method and we obtained 99.2% sensitivity and 99.7% specificity with this algorithm.

  16. Evaluation of intravascular microdialysis for continuous blood glucose monitoring in hypoglycemia: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Schierenbeck, Fanny; Wallin, Mats; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Liska, Jan

    2014-07-01

    We have previously shown that intravascular microdialysis in a central vein is an accurate method for continuous glucose monitoring in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, no hypoglycemia occurred in our earlier studies, prompting further evaluation of the accuracy of intravascular microdialysis in the hypoglycemic range. Thus, this animal study was performed. A porcine model was developed; hypoglycemia was induced using insulin injections. The pigs were monitored with intravascular microdialysis integrated in a triple-lumen central venous catheter. As reference, venous blood gas samples were taken every 5 minutes and analyzed in a blood gas analyzer. Ethical permission for the animal experiments was obtained from the Stockholm Regional Ethical Committee, reference no N397/09. A total of 213 paired samples were obtained for analysis, and 126 (59.2%) of these were in the hypoglycemic range (<74 mg/dl). Using Clarke error grid analysis, 100% of the paired samples were in region AB and 99% in region A. The ISO standard (ISO15197) was met. Bland-Altman analysis showed bias (mean difference) ± limits of agreement was -0.18 ± 16.2 mg/dl. No influence from glucose infusions was seen. The microdialysis monitoring system was found to be very responsive in rapid changes in blood glucose concentration. This study shows that intravascular microdialysis in a central vein is an accurate method for continuous glucose monitoring in hypoglycemia in a porcine experimental model. Furthermore, the system was not influenced by glucose administration and was found to be responsive in rapid blood glucose fluctuations.

  17. Effect of intravascular irradiation of He-Ne laser on cerebral infarction: Hemorrheology and apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Liang, Min-yi; Cao, Hao-cai; Li, Xiao-Yuan; Li, Shao-ming; Li, Shun-hao; Li, Wen-qi; Zhang, Jin-hong; Liu, Lei; Lai, Jian-hong

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To explore the efficacy of He-Ne laser intravascular irradiation on infarction and hemorrheology. To observe the effects of intravascular low level He-Ne laser irradiation (ILLLI) of blood on cell proliferation, apoptosis and chromosome in lymphocyte from cerebral infarction Methods: Seventy cases with cerebral infarction were randomly divided into groups control group (35 cases) treated only with common drugs and therapeutic group (35 cases) treated besides common drugs also by He-Ne laser intravascular irradiation. Their hemorrheology index and treatment results were observed and compared. The blood lymphocytes of cerebral infarction were cultured before and after treatment. After that, the mitosis index (MI), cell kinetics index (CKI), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE) frequencies and apoptosis were determined. Results The therapeutic group was better than the control one. The effective rate in the therapeutic group was 88.6%, in the control one was 65.7%. The viscosity and fibrinogen, etc were better than that in the control group with significant difference (P<0.01). The lymphocyte proliferation index was significantly two increased than the control one (P>0.05) in cerebral infarction patients after treatment; The CKI of lymphocytes had no obvious difference among groups (P>0.05) SCE frequencies of lymphocytes had no statistic significance between control group and ILLLI on (P>0.05). It showed the apoptosis rate of lymphocytes in cerebral infarction patients after ILLLI treatment increased significantly compared with the control group, (P<0.001). There was a significant difference of apoptosis rate of lymphocytes in cerebral infarction patients than the control (P<0.001). Conclusions: During the He-Ne laser intravascular irradiation of the cerebral infarction, the low level He-Ne by ILLLI can increase the proliferation of lymphocytes, and can induce lymphocytes to apoptosis, but has no mutagenicity of cells.

  18. Laparoscopic manipulation of a probe-based confocal laser endomicroscope using a steerable intravascular catheter.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Crispin; Desjardins, Adrien E; Gurusamy, Kurinchi; Hawkes, David J; Davidson, Brian R

    2015-04-01

    Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy is an emerging imaging modality that enables visualization of histologic details during endoscopy and surgery. A method of guiding the probe with millimeter accuracy is required to enable imaging in all regions of the abdomen accessed during laparoscopy. On the basis of a porcine model of laparoscopic liver resection, we report our experience of using a steerable intravascular catheter to guide a probe-based confocal laser endomicroscope.

  19. Laparoscopic Manipulation of a Probe-based Confocal Laser Endomicroscope Using a Steerable Intravascular Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Adrien E.; Gurusamy, Kurinchi; Hawkes, David J.; Davidson, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy is an emerging imaging modality that enables visualization of histologic details during endoscopy and surgery. A method of guiding the probe with millimeter accuracy is required to enable imaging in all regions of the abdomen accessed during laparoscopy. On the basis of a porcine model of laparoscopic liver resection, we report our experience of using a steerable intravascular catheter to guide a probe-based confocal laser endomicroscope. PMID:25807277

  20. Surgical management of Wilms tumor with intravascular extension: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Aspiazu, Diego; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Cabello, Rosa; Ramirez, Gema; Alvarez-Madrid, Antonio; De Agustin, Juan Carlos

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the clinical presentation, treatment, and outcomes of children with Wilms tumor (WT) and intravascular extension who were treated at a single institution. A retrospective review was conducted of medical records of all children with Wilms tumor and intravascular extension treated at Virgen del Rocio Children's Hospital between 1992 and 2010. Seven patients (median age 3.4 years, range 2-8.1 years) were identified. At diagnosis, 6 of the 7 patients (85.7%) presented with tumor thrombus that reached the right atrium (RA) and 1 patient with infrahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombus. All patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (SIOP 2001 protocol) with vincristine, doxorubicin, and actinomycin D. Regression of the intravascular extension of the tumor was documented in all patients. Postchemotherapy level of extension was suprahepatic IVC in 1 patient, infrahepatic IVC in 2 patients, renal vein (RV) in 1 patient, and RA in 3 patients. Nephrectomy and thrombectomy were performed in all cases, requiring cardiopulmonary bypass for the 4 patients who presented with suprahepatic IVC and RA thrombus. The other 3 patients with infrahepatic IVC and RV involvement underwent cavotomy and thrombus extraction. Computed tomography, ultrasonography, and echocardiography were used for diagnosis and follow-up. All patients remain disease-free with a median follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 2-19 years). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for WT with intravascular extension may facilitate the resection by decreasing the extent of the tumor thrombus. Cardiopulmonary bypass is indicated for suprahepatic IVC and RA involvement. Accurate diagnostic imaging is necessary.

  1. [Interest of an intensive chemotherapy for intravascular large B cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Baldolli, Aurélie; Chuffart, Marie; Geffray, Loik; Verneuil, Laurence; Reman, Oumédaly

    2013-04-01

    We describe three cases of intravascular lymphoma B with different clinical presentation: one case of a cutaneous variant and two cases with surrenal and cutaneous localisation. All patients are in complete remission after chemotherapy alone or after chemotherapy and autologous stem cells transplantation. The review of the literature as well as our cases specify the interest of an aggressive chemotherapy with autologous of peripheral stem cells if it was possible.

  2. Thromboelastographic profile for a dog with hypocoagulable and hyperfibrinolytic phase of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Saavedra, P; Hosoya, K

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study is to report the use of thromboelastography as a diagnostic tool for the hyperfibrinolytic phase of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy in a dog with metastatic haemangiosarcoma. We established a cytological (i.e. fine needle aspirate) and histopathological (i.e. excisional surgical biopsy) diagnosis of haemangiosarcoma in a 10-year-old male castrated Bichon Frise with multiple dark purple dermoepidermal nodules on the ventral abdomen and medial stifle areas, multiple small pulmonary nodules and a solitary liver mass. The dog was treated with chemotherapy (AC protocol). Forty-nine days after completion of four treatment cycles, the dog was presented for recheck. Complete blood count revealed anaemia and mild thrombocytopenia. Chemistry profile showed no significant abnormalities. Analysis of haemostasis consisted of prolonged clotting times (prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time), mild hypofibrinogenaemia and increased D-dimers. A presumptive diagnosis of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy was made. A re-calcified thromboelastography was simultaneously done to confirm the coagulopathy. Thromboelastographic tracings correlated with the plasma-based test results showing hypocoagulability (prolonged clotting times and prolonged thromboelastography clot kinetics; weaker clot with decreased fibrinogen levels, platelet count and lower thromboelastography tracing amplitude) and hyperfibrinolysis (increased D-dimers and increased D-dimers and increased thromboelastography lysis parameters). Based on these results, the dog was considered to be in the hyperfibrinolytic phase of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Results of the conventional haemostasis tests supported those obtained on thromboelastography. Humane euthanasia was performed because of poor prognosis and progressive disease, making further follow-up unavailable. As demonstrated in this case report, thromboelastography was found to be a helpful

  3. Xampling in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Noam; Eldar, Yonina C.; Feuer, Arie; Danin, Gilad; Friedman, Zvi

    2011-03-01

    Recent developments of new medical treatment techniques put challenging demands on ultrasound imaging systems in terms of both image quality and raw data size. Traditional sampling methods result in very large amounts of data, thus, increasing demands on processing hardware and limiting the flexibility in the postprocessing stages. In this paper, we apply Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques to analog ultrasound signals, following the recently developed Xampling framework. The result is a system with significantly reduced sampling rates which, in turn, means significantly reduced data size while maintaining the quality of the resulting images.

  4. Intravascular haemolysis during prolonged running on asphalt and natural grass in long and middle distance runners.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, Kamal; Shenoy, Shweta; Sandhu, Jaspal Singh

    2011-09-01

    Surface features such as uneven playing surfaces, low impact absorption capacity and inappropriate friction/traction characteristics are connected with injury prevalence whereas force impact during foot strike has been suggested to be an important mechanism of intravascular haemolysis during running. We aimed to evaluate intravascular haemolysis during running and compare the effect of running on two different types of surfaces on haemolysis. We selected two surfaces (asphalt and grass) on which these athletes usually run. Participants were randomly assigned to group A (asphalt) or group B (grass) with 10 athletes in each group. Each athlete completed one hour of running at the calculated target heart rate (60-70%). Venous blood samples were collected before and immediately after running. We measured unconjugated bilirubin (UBR) (mg · dl(-1)), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (μ · ml(-1)), haemoglobin (g · l(-1)) and serum ferritin (ng · ml(-1)) as indicators of haemolysis. Athletes who ran on grass demonstrated an increase in the haematological parameters (UBR: P < 0.01, LDH: P < 0.05) when compared to athletes who ran on asphalt (UBR: P < 0.05, LDH: P = 0.241). Our findings indicate that intravascular haemolysis occurs significantly after prolonged running. Furthermore, we conclude that uneven grass surface results in greater haemolysis compared to asphalt road.

  5. The lateral neostriatum is necessary for compensatory ingestive behaviour after intravascular dehydration in female rats.

    PubMed

    Lelos, M J; Harrison, D J; Rosser, A E; Dunnett, S B

    2013-12-01

    Aberrant striatal function results in an array of physiological symptoms, including impaired consummatory and regulatory behaviours, which can lead to weight loss and dehydration. It was hypothesised, therefore, that cell loss in the neostriatum may contribute to altered fluid intake by regulating physiological signals related to dehydration status. To test this theory, rats with lesions of the lateral neostriatum and sham controls underwent a series of physiological challenges, including the experimental induction of intracellular and intravascular dehydration. No baseline differences in prandial or non-prandial drinking were observed, nor were differences in locomotor activity evident between groups. Furthermore, intracellular dehydration increased water intake in lesion rats in a manner comparable to sham rats. Interestingly, a specific impairment was evident in lesion rats after subcutaneous injection of poly-ethylene glycol was used to induce intravascular dehydration, such that lesion rats failed to adapt their water intake to this physiological change. The results suggest that the striatal lesions resulted in regulatory dysfunction by impairing motivational control over compensatory ingestive behaviour after intravascular hydration, while the physiological signals related to dehydration remain intact. Loss of these cells in neurodegenerative disorders, such Huntington's disease, may contribute to regulatory changes evident in the course of the disease.

  6. High frame-rate intravascular optical frequency-domain imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han Saem; Jang, Sun-Joo; Kim, Kyunghun; Dan-Chin-Yu, Alexey V.; Shishkov, Milen; Bouma, Brett E.; Oh, Wang-Yuhl

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular optical frequency-domain imaging (OFDI), a second-generation optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology, enables imaging of the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the vessel wall following a short and nonocclusive clear liquid flush. Although 3D vascular visualization provides a greater appreciation of the vessel wall and intraluminal structures, a longitudinal imaging pitch that is several times bigger than the optical imaging resolution of the system has limited true high-resolution 3D imaging, mainly due to the slow scanning speed of previous imaging catheters. Here, we demonstrate high frame-rate intravascular OFDI in vivo, acquiring images at a rate of 350 frames per second. A custom-built, high-speed, and high-precision fiber-optic rotary junction provided uniform and high-speed beam scanning through a custom-made imaging catheter with an outer diameter of 0.87 mm. A 47-mm-long rabbit aorta was imaged in 3.7 seconds after a short contrast agent flush. The longitudinal imaging pitch was 34 μm, comparable to the transverse imaging resolution of the system. Three-dimensional volume-rendering showed greatly enhanced visualization of tissue microstructure and stent struts relative to what is provided by conventional intravascular imaging speeds. PMID:24466489

  7. Use of an oxygen-carrying blood substitute to improve intravascular optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Khiet C.; Edris, Ahmad; Su, Jianping; Mukai, David S.; Mahon, Sari; Petrov, Artiom D.; Kern, Morton; Ashan, Chowdhury; Chen, Zhongping; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Narula, Jagat; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a catheter-based imaging technology with powerful resolution capable of identifying vulnerable plaques and guiding coronary intervention. However, a significant limitation of intravascular OCT imaging is its attenuation by blood. We propose that the use of an oxygen-carrying blood substitute could potentially optimize OCT image quality. Surgical isolation of the descending thoracic aorta of six rabbits is performed, followed by intravascular OCT imaging of the abdominal aorta. Perfluorodecalin (PFD) is oxygenated using a bubble-through technique with 100% oxygen. OCT imaging is performed and compared using three different flushing modalities: PFD; saline; and blood. OCT imaging of the rabbit abdominal aorta is successful in all of the subjects. In each of the six studied subjects, flushing with PFD consistently provides dramatically better imaging of the vessel wall tissue structures. OCT image quality is highly dependent on the ability of the flushing modality to remove blood from the imaging field. From this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that endovascular flushing with an oxygen-carrying blood substitute (PFD) is optically superior to saline flushing for intravascular imaging.

  8. The intravascular low level laser irradiation (ILLLI) in treatment of psoriasis clinically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Nie, Fan; Shi, Hong-Min

    2005-07-01

    Objective: The title is research curative effect of intravascular low level laser irradiation (ILLLI) in treatment of psoriasis. Method: 478 patients with psoriasis from five groups to observe their efficacy. Group1 were treated by He-Ne laser combined with drug. Group 2 were treated by semi-conductor laser combined with drug. Group 3 were treated only by He-He laser. Group 4 were treated by semi-conductor laser. Group 5 were treated only by drug. The Ridit statistical analysis was applied to all of these data. The treatment of intravascular low level laser irradiation is as follow: laser power:4-5mw, 1 hour per day and 10 days as a period combined with vit C 2.0 g iv and inhalation of O2. Results: The clinical results: the near efficient rate was 100%, in group1-4, if combined with drugs it would be better. Ridit statistical analysis showed no significant difference between group1-4, p>0.05. The efficient rate 72.97% in group5.There were showed very significant difference with group1-4, p<0.01. 2.There were no significant differences between He-Ne laser (632.8nm) and semiconductor laser(650nm); 3.The efficacy of ILLLI in psoriasis was positive correlation to the ILLLI times. Conclusions: It can improve curative effect of intravascular low levellaser irradiation (ILLLI) in treatment of psoriasis.

  9. Stochastic bifurcation characteristics of SMA intravascular stent subjected to radial and axial excitations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwen; Zhang, Wendi; Xu, Jia

    2014-01-01

    A kind of shape memory alloy (SMA) hysteretic nonlinear model is developed, and the stochastic bifurcation characteristics of SMA intravascular stents subjected to radial and axial excitations are studied in this paper. A new nonlinear differential item is introduced to interpret the hysteretic phenomena of SMA strain-stress curves, and the dynamic model of SMA intravascular stent subjected to radial and axial stochastic excitations is established. The conditions of the system's stochastic stability are determined, and the probability density function of the system response is obtained. Finally, the stochastic Hopf bifurcation characteristics of the system are analyzed. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that the system stability varies with bifurcation parameters, and stochastic Hopf bifurcation occurs in the process; there are two limit cycles in the stationary probability density of the system response in some cases, which means that there are two vibration amplitudes whose probability are both very high; jumping phenomena between the two vibration amplitudes appears with the change of conditions, which may cause stent fracture or loss. The results of this paper are helpful for application of SMA intravascular stent in biomedical engineering fields.

  10. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  11. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tyler; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Lu, Huihong; Mathewson, Kory; Walsh, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J

    2009-11-23

    We report on the development of an imaging system capable of combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging based on a fast-scanning single-element 25-MHz ultrasound transducer and a unique light-delivery system. The system is capable of 20 ultrasound frames per second and slower photoacoustic frame rates limited by laser pulse-repetition rates. Laser and ultrasound pulses are interlaced for co-registration of photoacoustic and ultrasound images. In vivo imaging of a human finger permits ultrasonic visualization of vessel structures and speckle changes indicative of blood flow, while overlaid photoacoustic images highlight some small vessels that are not clear from the ultrasound scan. Photoacoustic images provide optical absorption contrast co-registered in the structural and blood-flow context of ultrasound with high-spatial resolution and may prove important for clinical diagnostics and basic science of the microvasculature.

  12. Recent advances in medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound has become one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medicine; yet, before ultrasound-imaging systems became available, high intensity ultrasound was used as early as the 1950s to ablate regions in the brains of human patients. Recently, a variety of novel applications of ultrasound have been developed that include site-specific and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, histotripsy, tissue regeneration, and bloodless surgery, among many others. This lecture will review several new applications of therapeutic ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors.

  13. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff.

  14. Doppler ultrasound monitoring technology.

    PubMed

    Docker, M F

    1993-03-01

    Developments in the signal processing of Doppler ultrasound used for the detection of fetal heart rate (FHR) have improved the operation of cardiotocographs. These developments are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the various Doppler and signal processing methods are compared.

  15. Pleural ultrasound for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M

    2016-11-01

    Pleural ultrasonography is useful for identifying and characterising pleural effusions, solid pleural lesions (nodules, masses, swellings) and pneumothorax. Pleural ultrasonography is also considered the standard care for guiding interventionist procedures on the pleura at the patient's bedside (thoracentesis, drainage tubes, pleural biopsies and pleuroscopy). Hospitals should promote the acquisition of portable ultrasound equipment to increase the patient's safety.

  16. Ultrasound and the IRB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist researchers in writing their research protocols and subject consent forms so that both the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and subjects are assured of the minimal risk associated with diagnostic B-scan ultrasound as it is used in speech research. There have been numerous epidemiological studies on fetal…

  17. History of intraoperative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Makuuchi, M; Torzilli, G; Machi, J

    1998-11-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) using A-mode or non-real-time B-mode imaging started in the 1960s; however, it was not widely accepted mainly because of difficulty in image interpretation. In the late 1970s, IOUS became one of the topics in the surgical communities upon the introduction of high-frequency real-time B-mode ultrasound. Special probes for operative use were developed. In the 1980s, all over the world the use of IOUS spread to a variety of surgical fields, such as hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery, neurosurgery, and cardiovascular surgery. IOUS changed hepatic surgery dramatically because IOUS was the only modality that was capable of delineating and examining the interior of the liver during surgery. After 1990, color Doppler imaging and laparoscopic ultrasound were incorporated into IOUS. Currently, IOUS is considered an indispensable operative procedure for intraoperative decision-making and guidance of surgical procedures. For better surgical practice, education of surgeons in the use of ultrasound is the most important issue.

  18. Drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier using focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Alison; Hynynen, Kullervo H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a significant impediment to the delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain for treatment of brain diseases. Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been developed as a non-invasive method for transiently increasing the permeability of the BBB to promote drug delivery to targeted regions of the brain. Areas Covered The present review briefly compares the methods used to promote drug delivery to the brain and describes the benefits and limitations of FUS technology. We summarize the experimental data which shows that FUS, combined with intravascular microbubbles, increases therapeutic agent delivery into the brain leading to significant reductions in pathology in preclinical models of disease. The potential for translation of this technology to the clinic is also discussed. Expert Opinion The introduction of MRI guidance and intravascular administration of microbubbles to FUS treatments permits the consistent, transient, and targeted opening of the BBB. The development of feedback systems and real-time monitoring techniques improve the safety of BBB opening. Successful clinical translation of FUS has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of brain disease resulting in effective, less-invasive treatments without the need for expensive drug development. PMID:24650132

  19. Ultrasound-Assisted Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. E.; Sun, Da-Wen

    Freezing is a well-known preservation method widely used in the food industry. The advantages of freezing are to a certain degree counterbalanced by the risk of damage caused by the formation and size of ice crystals. Over recent years new approaches have been developed to improve and control the crystallization process, and among these approaches sonocrystallization has proved to be very useful, since it can enhance both the nucleation rate and the crystal growth rate. Although ultrasound has been successfully used for many years in the evaluation of various aspects of foods and in medical applications, the use of power ultrasound to directly improve processes and products is less popular in food manufacturing. Foodstuffs are very complex materials, and research is needed in order to define the specific sound parameters that aid the freezing process and that can later be used for the scale-up and production of commercial frozen food products.

  20. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique.

  1. Sparsity driven ultrasound imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.; C¸etin, Müjdat; Karl, W. Clem

    2012-01-01

    An image formation framework for ultrasound imaging from synthetic transducer arrays based on sparsity-driven regularization functionals using single-frequency Fourier domain data is proposed. The framework involves the use of a physics-based forward model of the ultrasound observation process, the formulation of image formation as the solution of an associated optimization problem, and the solution of that problem through efficient numerical algorithms. The sparsity-driven, model-based approach estimates a complex-valued reflectivity field and preserves physical features in the scene while suppressing spurious artifacts. It also provides robust reconstructions in the case of sparse and reduced observation apertures. The effectiveness of the proposed imaging strategy is demonstrated using experimental data. PMID:22352501

  2. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated.

  3. Clinical ophthalmic ultrasound improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, J. B.; Piro, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of digital synthetic aperture techniques to obtain high resolution ultrasound images of eye and orbit was proposed. The parameters of the switched array configuration to reduce data collection time to a few milliseconds to avoid eye motion problems in the eye itself were established. An assessment of the effects of eye motion on the performance of the system was obtained. The principles of synthetic techniques are discussed. Likely applications are considered.

  4. Tissue identification by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.; Gammell, P. M.; Wilson, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic properties of animal and human soft tissue were measured over the frequency range of 1.5 to 10.0 MHz. The method employed a swept-frequency, coherent technique known as time delay spectrometry. Measurements of attenuation versus frequency on liver, backfat, kidney, pancreas, spleen, breast, and other tissue were made. Considerable attention was paid to tissue handling and in determining the effects of fixing on the attenuation of ultrasound in the tissue.

  5. Ultrasound Imaging Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    texture mapping hardware," IEEE Tranactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, Submitted. [14] C.R. Castro Pareja , J.M. Jagadeesh and R. Shekhar...modulation in real-time three-dimensional sparse synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging systems "* Carlos R. Castro Pareja , Masters of Science, The Ohio...C.R. Castro Pareja , "An architecture for real-time image registration," M.S. Thesis, The Ohio State University, March 2002. 14. C.R. Castro Pareja , R

  6. Physics and instrumentation of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, John P

    2007-08-01

    A thorough understanding of the physics of ultrasound waves and the instrumentation will provide the user with a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of ultrasound equipment. The ultrasound machine combines two technologies: image production (M-mode and 2-dimensional imaging) with Doppler assessment (continuous and pulse wave as well as color-flow mapping). These distinct technologies have been combined to provide the examiner with the ability to make accurate and comprehensive diagnoses and guide therapeutic intervention.

  7. Doppler Ultrasound: What Is It Used for?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your neck (carotid artery stenosis) A Doppler ultrasound can estimate how fast blood flows by measuring the rate of change in its pitch (frequency). During a Doppler ultrasound, a technician trained in ultrasound imaging (sonographer) presses ...

  8. Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Uterine Fibroids

    MedlinePlus

    Focused ultrasound surgery for uterine fibroids Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a noninvasive treatment option for ... whether you're a good candidate for focused ultrasound surgery, your doctor may perform a pelvic magnetic ...

  9. Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Caraway, Nancy P; Salina, Davide; Deavers, Michael T; Morice, Rodolfo; Landon, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare intraluminal malignant neoplasm that has an aggressive biological behavior, and early diagnosis may improve patient outcome. We describe a case of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed on cytologic material obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsy with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE). The aspirate showed loosely cohesive clusters of pleomorphic malignant spindled and epithelioid cells. An immunostain panel did not demonstrate any definitive mesenchymal or epithelial differentiation. The tumor's intraluminal origin was supported by radiographic imaging studies. Subsequently, the patient received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent tumor resection with reconstruction. This report describes the cytomorphologic features of this rare intravascular tumor and demonstrates how EBUS-TBNA with ROSE was instrumental in obtaining optimal cytologic sampling for ancillary studies, thus expediting the management.

  10. Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Caraway, Nancy P.; Salina, Davide; Deavers, Michael T.; Morice, Rodolfo; Landon, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare intraluminal malignant neoplasm that has an aggressive biological behavior, and early diagnosis may improve patient outcome. We describe a case of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed on cytologic material obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsy with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE). The aspirate showed loosely cohesive clusters of pleomorphic malignant spindled and epithelioid cells. An immunostain panel did not demonstrate any definitive mesenchymal or epithelial differentiation. The tumor's intraluminal origin was supported by radiographic imaging studies. Subsequently, the patient received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent tumor resection with reconstruction. This report describes the cytomorphologic features of this rare intravascular tumor and demonstrates how EBUS-TBNA with ROSE was instrumental in obtaining optimal cytologic sampling for ancillary studies, thus expediting the management. PMID:25745502

  11. Anatomic Variation of Subclavian Artery Visualized on Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Arunima; Banerjee, Sumantra Sarathi

    2014-01-01

    Use of ultrasonography for performance of nerve and plexus blocks has made the process simpler and safer. However, at times, variant anatomy of the visualized structures can lead to failure of blocks or complications such as intravascular injections. This is especially true in case of novice operators. We report a case of a variant branch of subclavian artery, possibly the dorsal scapular artery passing through the brachial plexus nerve bundles in the supraclavicular area. Since this variation in anatomy was visualized in the scout scan prior to the performance of the block, it was possible to avoid any accidental puncture. Hence, a thorough knowledge of the ultrasound anatomy is important in order to identify various aberrations and variations. It is also prudent to perform a preliminary scan, prior to performance of the block to localize the target area and avoid any inadvertent complications. PMID:25143765

  12. Microparticle production, neutrophil activation, and intravascular bubbles following open-water SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bogush, Marina; Bhopale, Veena M; Yang, Ming; Bushmann, Kim; Pollock, Neal W; Ljubkovic, Marko; Denoble, Petar; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate annexin V-positive microparticles (MPs) and neutrophil activation in humans following decompression from open-water SCUBA diving with the hypothesis that changes are related to intravascular bubble formation. Sixteen male volunteer divers followed a uniform profile of four daily SCUBA dives to 18 m of sea water for 47 min. Blood was obtained prior to and at 80 min following the first and fourth dives to evaluate the impact of repetitive diving, and intravascular bubbles were quantified by trans-thoracic echocardiography carried out at 20-min intervals for 2 h after each dive. MPs increased by 3.4-fold after each dive, neutrophil activation occurred as assessed by surface expression of myeloperoxidase and the CD18 component of β(2)-integrins, and there was an increased presence of the platelet-derived CD41 protein on the neutrophil surface indicating interactions with platelet membranes. Intravascular bubbles were detected in all divers. Surprisingly, significant inverse correlations were found among postdiving bubble scores and MPs, most consistently at 80 min or more after the dive on the fourth day. There were significant positive correlations between MPs and platelet-neutrophil interactions after the first dive and between platelet-neutrophil interactions and neutrophil activation documented as an elevation in β(2)-integrin expression after the fourth dive. We conclude that MPs- and neutrophil-related events in humans are consistent with findings in an animal decompression model. Whether there are causal relationships among bubbles, MPs, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and neutrophil activation remains obscure and requires additional study.

  13. In vivo intravascular electric impedance spectroscopy using a new catheter with integrated microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Süselbeck, Tim; Thielecke, Hagen; Weinschenk, Ines; Reininger-Mack, Alexandra; Stieglitz, Thomas; Metz, Jürgen; Borggrefe, Martin; Robitzki, Andrea; Haase, Karl K

    2005-01-01

    Interventional techniques are necessary, which allow the characterization of intravascular pathological processes. Electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS) can provide cellular information of biological tissue. We tested the feasibility of intravascular EIS by using a new impedance catheter system with integrated microelectrodes in an experimental animal model. Eighteen stents were implanted into the iliac arteries of female New Zealand White rabbits (n = 11) to induce intimal proliferation. After 14, 28 and 56 days the electric impedance was measured inside and outside of the stented arterial segments by using a balloon catheter with four integrated microelectrodes. The impedance was recorded at a frequency ranging from 1 Hz to 1 MHz. After the measurements, the stents were explanted and histomorphometry was performed. The impedance inside and outside the stent was analysed and compared with the histomorphometric data. Fourteen (n = 6), 28 (n = 5) and 56 (n = 6) days after stent implantation the difference of the electrical impedance between the native and the stented iliac artery segment increased from -924 +/- 715 Ohm to 3689 +/- 1385 Ohm (14 days vs. 28 days; p < 0.05) and 8637 +/- 2881 Ohm (14 days vs. 56 days; p < 0.05), respectively. The increase of the electrical impedance corresponded to an increased neointimal proliferation in the stented arterial segment of 3.6% +/-0.7% after 14 days, 8.4% +/- 4.8% after 28 days (14 days vs. 28 days; p < 0.05) and 10.0% +/- 4.1% after 56 days (14 days vs. 56 days; p < 0.01). Intravascular EIS can be performed by a balloon catheter with integrated microelectrodes and allows the detection of neointimal proliferation after stent implantation.

  14. Frequency-Domain Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography of the Femoropopliteal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Karnabatidis, Dimitris Katsanos, Konstantinos; Paraskevopoulos, Ioannis; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Siablis, Dimitris

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a catheter-based imaging method that employs near-infrared light to produce high-resolution intravascular images. The authors report the safety and feasibility and illustrate common imaging findings of frequency-domain OCT (FD-OCT) imaging of the femoropopliteal artery in a series of 20 patients who underwent infrainguinal angioplasty. Methods: After crossing the lesion of interest, OCT was performed with a dextrose saline flush technique with simultaneous obstructive manual groin compression. An automatic pullback FD-OCT device was employed (each scan acquiring 54 mm of vessel lumen in 271 consecutive frames). OCT images were acquired before and after balloon dilatation and following provisional stenting if necessary and were evaluated for baseline characteristics of plaque or in-stent restenosis (ISR), vessel wall trauma after angioplasty, presence of thrombus, stent apposition, and tissue prolapse. Imaging follow-up was not included in this study's protocol. Results: Twenty-seven obstructive lesions (18 cases of de novo atherosclerosis and 9 of ISR) of the femoropopliteal artery were imaged and 148 acquisitions were analyzed in total. High-resolution intravascular OCT imaging with effective blood clearance was achieved in 93.9%. Failure was mainly attributed to preocclusive proximal lesions and/or collateral flow. Mixed features of lipid pool areas, calcium deposits, necrotic core, and fibrosis were identified in all of the imaged atherosclerotic lesions, whereas ISR was purely fibrotic. After balloon angioplasty, OCT identified extensive intimal tears in all cases and one case of severe dissection that biplane subtraction angiography failed to identify. Conclusions: Infrainguinal frequency-domain optical coherence tomography is safe and feasible and may provide intravascular high-resolution imaging of the femoropopliteal artery during infrainguinal angioplasty procedures.

  15. Clinician-performed thyroid ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Coltrera, Marc D

    2014-08-01

    This article is intended to demystify the process for those with a potential interest in acquiring ultrasound skills. It is not intended to be a comprehensive review of head and neck ultrasound but, rather, is focused on the bare minimum requirements and considerations involved in clinician-performed ultrasound. The article covers the initial diagnosis and the unparalleled usefulness of ultrasound for surgical planning just before incision. Further readings are listed at the end of the article to direct the reader to some excellent texts to help build confidence and experience.

  16. Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy for Thrombocytopenia after Surgery for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Daichi; Okada, Hiroshi; Date, Kazuma; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is known to be rarely accompanied by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We report a case of AAA with DIC. An 81-year-old man with abdominal pain referred to our hospital. Computed tomography demonstrated an AAA (maximum diameter: 90 mm). The patient underwent a laparotomy, and an abdominal aorta replacement was performed. At the 3-month follow-up, the patient underwent Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment for 1 week. After treatment, the platelet count dramatically increased. The mechanism by which H. pylori eradication therapy improves hematological parameters has not been elucidated; however, this noninvasive treatment effectively resolved DIC associated with AAA. PMID:28018509

  17. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm followed by disseminated intravascular coagulation and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Machida, Hisanori; Kobayashi, Makoto; Taguchi, Hirokuni

    2002-11-01

    A 71-year-old man was diagnosed as having an abdominal aortic aneurysm when he was treated for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP). Three years later, he developed severe thrombocytopenia and had disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) that was associated with the inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA). The coagulation abnormalities were corrected by low-molecular weight heparin, however the platelet count remained low. Bone marrow showed normocellularity with an increase of immature and mature forms of megakaryocytes. Platelet-associated IgG level was high. These findings suggested that the patient had severe thrombocytopenia caused by unusual complications of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and IAAA-associated DIC.

  18. Specific imaging of atherosclerotic plaque lipids with two-wavelength intravascular photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    The lipid content in plaques is an important marker for identifying atherosclerotic lesions and disease states. Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging can be used to visualize lipids in the artery. In this study, we further investigated lipid detection in the 1.7-µm spectral range. By exploiting the relative difference between the IVPA signal strengths at 1718 and 1734 nm, we could successfully detect and differentiate between the plaque lipids and peri-adventitial fat in human coronary arteries ex vivo. Our study demonstrates that IVPA imaging can positively identify atherosclerotic plaques using only two wavelengths, which could enable rapid data acquisition in vivo. PMID:26417500

  19. Delivery of Adeno-Associated Virus Gene Therapy by Intravascular Limb Infusion Methods.

    PubMed

    Gruntman, Alisha M; Flotte, Terence R

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) can be delivered to the skeletal muscle of the limb (pelvic or thoracic) by means of regional intravascular delivery. This review summarizes the evolution of this technique to deliver rAAV either via the arterial blood supply or via the peripheral venous circulation. The focus of this review is on applications in large animal models, including preclinical studies. Based on this overview of past research, we aim to inform the design of preclinical and clinical studies.

  20. Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapriya, J.; Gopalakrishnan, N.; Arun, V.; Dineshkumar, T.; Sakthirajan, R.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Haris, M.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI) and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months. PMID:27194836

  1. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation and Excessive Fibrinolysis (DIC XFL) Syndrome in Prostate Cancer: A Rare Complicated Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hamzah, Azhar Bin Amir; Choo, Yew Maw; Saleem, Fahad; Verma, Ashutosh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) develops in patient with prostate cancer, which is manifested by systemic, intracranial, intracavitary or intracutaneous bleeding indicating uncompensated or excessive fibrinolysis (XFL). This case report is a description of a 61-year-old male with metastatic prostate cancer that progressed to manifest DIC. The condition is rare in clinical practice, and even rarer when is coupled with XFL. Treatment was mainly replenishing coagulation factors, platelets and controlling the disease progression with aggressive hormonal therapy. The patient progressed to coagulopathy further with fibrinolysis, hence leading to mortality. This case study discusses the pathophysiology of this complication and various methods to monitor the disease progression are discussed. PMID:28274032

  2. A Case of Hypereosinophilic Syndrome Presenting With Multiorgan Infarctions Associated With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-Mi; Park, Ji-Won; Kim, Sung-Min; Koo, Eun-Hee; Lee, Jin-Young; Lee, Chul-Su; Choi, Dong-Chull

    2012-01-01

    Thromboembolism is one of the most critical complications of hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). We report here a case of multi-organ infarctions related to HES. A 23-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with hemoptysis. Not only pulmonary, but also renal and splenic infarctions were detected on computed tomography images. Blood tests showed profound peripheral eosinophilia. She was diagnosed with HES with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We initiated infusion of corticosteroids, which effectively suppressed peripheral eosinophilia. However, consumptive coagulopathy did not improve and intracerebral hemorrhage related to thrombosis then developed. Addition of interferon-alpha resulted in the correction of the DIC associated with HES. PMID:22548210

  3. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma presenting pulmonary arterial hypertension as an initial manifestation.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Takeshi; Kosugi, Satoru; Takimoto, Takayuki; Nakata, Soichi; Shiga, Junko; Nagate, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Take, Hironori; Katagiri, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    We report a 39-year-old man with intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) who had been treated as a case with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) for one year. After he became worse, diffuse pulmonary (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) suggested the existence of IVLBCL in the lung showing normal CT images. The diagnosis was confirmed with random transbronchial lung biopsy, and he was then successfully treated. Since IVLBCL presenting PAH has been rare and is difficult to diagnose, early application of FDG-PET may provide early recognition of the disorder, leading to a better outcome.

  4. Rash, disseminated intravascular coagulation and legionella: Episode 10 and a rewind into the past

    PubMed Central

    Thalanayar, Prashanth M.; Holguin, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the most common cause of legionellosis and is one of the organisms causing atypical pneumonia. We report the presentation of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and skin rash in a single case of severe Legionella pneumonia. The unique clinical presentation of a diffuse rash diagnosed as purpura fulminans and the unpredictable variations encountered during the diagnostic work-up of the case make this write-up crucial. This article synthesizes all reported cases of L. pneumonia associated with cutaneous manifestations as well as cases presenting with DIC. Furthermore, this manuscript illustrates the correlation between cutaneous and coagulopathic manifestations, and morbidity and mortality from L. pneumonia. PMID:26236615

  5. Intravascular low-level laser irradiation in the treatment of psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Shi, Hong-Min; Zhang, Hui-Guo; Zhang, Mei-Jue; Xu, Jian; Zhou, Min; Hu, Guo-Qiang

    1998-11-01

    Liu TCY et al have put forward the biological information model on low intensity laser irradiation (BIML): low intensity laser irradiation couples with intracellular messenger through the chromophore absorption in the cell membrane: hot-color laser irradiation activates cAMP phosphodiestererase through Gi protein, or activates phosphoinositide phospholipase C through G protein, or activates one of receptor-associated kinases: cAMP; cold- color laser irradiation activates adenylate cyclase through Gs protein: cAMP$ARUP. In this paper, under the guidance of BIML, we applied the intravascular low intensity He-He laser irradiation on blood to a patient of idiopathic edema, and succeeded.

  6. Blue or red: which intravascular laser light has more effects in diabetic patients?

    PubMed

    KazemiKhoo, N; Ansari, F

    2015-01-01

    The effects of intravascular laser irradiation of blood (ILIB), with 405 and 632.8 nm on serum blood sugar (BS) level, were comparatively studied. Twenty-four diabetic type 2 patients received 14 sessions of ILIB with blue and red lights. BS was measured before and after therapy. Serum BS decreased highly significant after ILIB with both red and blue lights (p < 0.0001), but we did not find significant difference between red and blue lights. The ILIB effect would be of benefit in the clinical treatment of diabetic type 2 patients, irrespective of lasers (blue or red lights) that are used.

  7. Intravascular Papillary Endothelial Hyperplasia (Masson’s Tumor): Diagnosis the Plastic Surgeon Should Be Aware of

    PubMed Central

    Boukovalas, Stefanos; Dillard, Rachel; Qiu, Suimin

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH) or Masson’s tumor is a rare benign entity commonly found on the head, neck, and upper extremities. It usually arises within a blood vessel but is considered to be a nonneoplastic reactive process often associated with vascular injury. Typically, IPEHs cause no symptoms and present as slowly growing soft-tissue masses. Given their prevalent location and indolent clinical presentation, the plastic surgeon should be familiar with this rare entity. We are presenting a case of IPEH of the forehead with unusual clinical and pathologic characteristics. Differential diagnosis, special considerations regarding preoperative work-up, and treatment options are discussed. PMID:28203491

  8. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer: Fatal outcome following strontium-89 therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, C.; McKenzie, R.; Coupland, D.B.

    1994-10-01

    A patient with metastatic prostate cancer was found to have low-grade disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). He had significant bone pain despite external-beam radiotherapy and was given {sup 89}Sr with subsequent thrombocytopenia and epistaxis. The patient died from generalized hemorrhage 36 days postinjection. Although it is not possible to establish a causal relationship between {sup 89}Sr and DIC, practitioners should be alert to complications associated with the primary disorder which might occur at a time to raise concern about the intervention. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Nephrotic syndrome resulting in thromboembolic disease and disseminated intravascular coagulation in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ritt, M G; Rogers, K S; Thomas, J S

    1997-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease and progression to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) are potential life-threatening complications for dogs with nephrotic syndrome. Platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), plasma concentration of fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs), antithrombin III (ATIII), protein C, and plasminogen were used to identify hemostatic abnormalities in a dog with nephrotic syndrome. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease was diagnosed by thoracic radiography, arterial blood gas analysis, and pulmonary scintigraphy. Prompt recognition and treatment of hemostatic complications is necessary in dogs with nephrotic syndrome.

  10. Eptifibatide-induced thrombocytopenia: with thrombosis and disseminated intravascular coagulation immediately after left main coronary artery percutaneous coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Tempelhof, Michael W; Benzuly, Keith H; Fintel, Dan; Krichavsky, Marc Z

    2012-01-01

    Early clinical trials of eptifibatide did not show a significant association between eptifibatide and the development of thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, or disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, more recent literature has suggested a significant association between eptifibatide and the development of thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. Although the true incidence and the pathophysiology of these associations are unknown, the development of these events can be life-threatening. Herein, we describe the case of a patient who experienced acute onset of profound thrombocytopenia, developing thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. This paper adds to the few previous reports of cases that suggested an association between thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, and the administration of eptifibatide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the medical literature that associates the new onset of thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation with the administration of eptifibatide. We also provide a subject review.

  11. Ultrasonic Transducer-Guided Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy to Assess Lipid-Laden Plaques.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianguo; Luo, Yuan; Sevag Packard, René R; Ma, Teng; Ding, Yichen; Abiri, Parinaz; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, Kirk K; Li, Rongsong; Hsiai, Tzung

    2016-11-01

    Plaque rupture causes acute coronary syndromes and stroke. Intraplaque oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is metabolically unstable and prone to induce rupture. We designed an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) sensor to enhance the detection reproducibility of oxLDL-laden plaques. The flexible 2-point micro-electrode array for EIS was affixed to an inflatable balloon anchored onto a co-axial double layer catheter (outer diameter = 2 mm). The mechanically scanning-driven IVUS transducer (45 MHz) was deployed through the inner catheter (diameter = 1.3 mm) to the acoustic impedance matched-imaging window. Water filled the inner catheter to match acoustic impedance and air was pumped between the inner and outer catheters to inflate the balloon. The integrated EIS and IVUS sensor was deployed into the ex vivo aortas dissected from the fat-fed New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits (n=3 for fat-fed, n= 5 normal diet). IVUS imaging was able to guide the 2-point electrode to align with the plaque for EIS measurement upon balloon inflation. IVUS-guided EIS signal demonstrated reduced variability and increased reproducibility (p < 0.0001 for magnitude, p < 0.05 for phase at < 15 kHz) as compared to EIS sensor alone (p < 0.07 for impedance, p < 0.4 for phase at < 15 kHz). Thus, we enhanced topographic and EIS detection of oxLDL-laden plaques via a catheter-based integrated sensor design to enhance clinical assessment for unstable plaque.

  12. Optical coherence tomography and highly sensitivity troponin T for evaluating cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Iris P; García-Lara, Juan; Pinar, Eduardo; Pastor-Pérez, Francisco; Sánchez-Mas, Jesus; Valdés-Chavarri, Mariano; Pascual-Figal, Domingo A

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major impediment to long-term graft survival after heart transplantation. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is more sensitive than coronary angiography for diagnosis, but the identification of specific plaque components or plaque composition is limited. In addition, there is an evident need for other noninvasive tools for diagnosing CAV. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of 2 new techniques for evaluating CAV: optical coherence tomography (OCT), and new high-sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) assays. In 21 heart transplantation patients, coronary arteriography with IVUS and OCT were performed. Maximal intimal thickness (MIT) and luminal area at the most severe site were measured using the 2 techniques. Immediately before cardiac catheterization, blood samples were obtained and hsTnT levels measured. The evaluation of CAV by OCT showed a good correlation with IVUS measurements, with a mean difference in MIT of 0.0033 (95% confidence interval -0.049 to 0.043), taking advantage of lower interobserver variability (r = 0.94 for OCT vs r = 0.78 for IVUS) and better plaque characterization. When independent predictors of MIT were assessed in a multiple linear regression model, time after transplantation (β = 0.488, p = 0.004) and hsTnT (β = 0.392, p = 0.011) were the only independent predictors of MIT (R(2) = 0.591). In conclusion, this study is the first to evaluate 2 new techniques, OCT and hsTnT, in the challenging setting of CAV. The findings suggest that OCT provides lower interobserver variability and better plaque characterization than IVUS. Also, hsTnT could become a useful tool for ruling out CAV.

  13. A perspective on high-frequency ultrasound for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Aristizába, Orlando; Silverman, Ronald H.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >15 MHz) is a rapidly developing field. HFU is currently used and investigated for ophthalmologic, dermatologic, intravascular, and small-animal imaging. HFU offers a non-invasive means to investigate tissue at the microscopic level with resolutions often better than 100 μm. However, fine resolution is only obtained over the limited depth-of-field (˜1 mm) of single-element spherically-focused transducers typically used for HFU applications. Another limitation is penetration depth because most biological tissues have large attenuation at high frequencies. In this study, two 5-element annular arrays with center frequencies of 17 and 34 MHz were fabricated and methods were developed to obtain images with increased penetration depth and depth-of-field. These methods were used in ophthalmologic and small-animal imaging studies. Improved blood sensitivity was obtained when a phantom mimicking a vitreous hemorrhage was imaged. Central-nervous systems of 12.5-day-old mouse embryos were imaged in utero and in three dimensions for the first time.

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided interventions in special situations

    PubMed Central

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was introduced in 1982 and has since become a popular advanced procedure for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. Initially, EUS was most commonly used for the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary diseases and tissue acquisition. EUS was first used for guided cholangiography in 1996, followed by EUS-guided biliary drainage in 2001. Advancements in equipment and endoscopic accessories have led to an expansion of EUS-guided procedures, which now include EUS-guided drainage of intra-abdominal abscesses or collections, intra-vascular treatment of refractory variceal and nonvariceal bleeding, transmural pancreatic drainage, common bile duct stone clearance, enteral feeding tube placement and entero-enteric anastomosis. Patients with surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomies have greatly benefited from EUS also. This systematic review describes and discusses EUS procedures performed in uncommon diseases and conditions, as well as applications on more vulnerable patients such as young children and pregnant women. In these cases, routine approaches do not always apply, and thus may require the use of innovative and unconventional techniques. Increased knowledge of such special applications will help increase the success rates of these procedures and provide a foundation for additional advances and utilizations of the technique. PMID:26839650

  15. Thromboemboli, acute right heart failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation after intraoperative application of a topical hemostatic matrix.

    PubMed

    Ferschl, Marla B; Rollins, Mark D

    2009-02-01

    Topical hemostatic agents are frequently used in spine surgeries to control or reduce bleeding. Although there are a number of commercially available products, at our institution, an absorbable gelatin powder (Surgifoam) is mixed with bovine thrombin and used for this purpose. We report the case of a patient undergoing a posterior spinal fusion for scoliosis who developed acute right heart failure, cardiac arrest, and disseminated intravascular coagulation after probable intravascular hemostatic agent-induced emboli. Clinicians need to be aware of this potentially deadly complication associated with topical hemostatic agents.

  16. Influence of distance and incident angle on light intensities in intravascular optical coherence tomography pullback runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengnan; Eggermont, Jeroen; Wolterbeek, Ron; Lelieveldy, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2016-02-01

    Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is an intravascular imaging modality which enables the visualization arterial structures at the micro-structural level. The interpretations of these structures is mainly on the basis of relative image intensities. However, even for homogeneous tissue light intensities can differ. In this study the incident light intensity is modeled to be related to the catheter position. Two factors, the distance between catheter and inner lumen wall as well as the incident angle of the light upon the lumen wall, are considered. A three-level hierarchical model is constructed to statistically validate this model to include the potential effect of different pullbacks and/or frame numbers. The model is solved using 169 images out of 9 pull-backs recorded with a St.Jude Medical IVOCT system. F-tests results indicate that both the distance and the incident angle contribute to the model statistically significantly with p < 0.001. Based on the results from the statistical analysis, a potential compensation method is introduced to normalize the IVOCT intensities for the catheter position effects and small shadows.

  17. NIR fluorescence lifetime sensing through a multimode fiber for intravascular molecular probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelberts, H.; Hernot, S.; Debie, P.; Lahoutte, T.; Kuijk, M.

    2016-04-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) contributes to millions of deaths each year. The identification of vulnerable plaques is essential to the diagnosis of CAD but is challenging. Molecular probes can improve the detection of these plaques using intravascular imaging methods. Fluorescence lifetime sensing is a safe and robust method to image these molecular probes. We present two variations of an optical system for intravascular near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence lifetime sensing through a multimode fiber. Both systems are built around a recently developed fast and efficient CMOS detector, the current-assisted photonic sampler (CAPS) that is optimized for sub-nanosecond NIR fluorescence lifetime sensing. One system mimics the optical setup of an epifluorescence microscope while the other uses a practical fiber optic coupler to separate fluorescence excitation and emission. We test both systems by measuring the lifetime of several NIR dyes in DMSO solutions and we show that these systems are capable of detecting lifetimes of solutions with concentrations down to 370 nM and this with short acquisition times. These results are compared with time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurements for reference.

  18. Induction of microparticle- and cell-associated intravascular tissue factor in human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Aras, Omer; Shet, Arun; Bach, Ronald R; Hysjulien, Jessica L; Slungaard, Arne; Hebbel, Robert P; Escolar, Gines; Jilma, Bernd; Key, Nigel S

    2004-06-15

    The precise role of intravascular tissue factor (TF) remains poorly defined, due to the limited availability of assays capable of measuring circulating TF procoagulant activity (PCA). As a model of inflammation-associated intravascular thrombin generation, we studied 18 volunteers receiving an infusion of endotoxin. A novel assay that measures microparticle (MP)-associated TF PCA from a number of cellular sources (but not platelets) demonstrated an 8-fold increase in activity at 3 to 4 hours after endotoxin administration (P <.001), with a return to baseline by 8 hours. TF antigen-positive MPs isolated from plasma were visualized by electron microscopy. Interindividual MP-associated TF response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was highly variable. In contrast, a previously described assay that measures total (cell and MP-borne) whole-blood TF PCA demonstrated a more modest increase, with a peak in activity (1.3-fold over baseline; P <.000 01) at 3 to 4 hours, and persistence for more than 24 hours. This surprisingly modest increase in whole-blood TF activity is likely explained by a profound although transient LPS-induced monocytopenia. MP-associated TF PCA was highly correlated with whole-blood TF PCA and total number of circulating MPs, and whole-blood TF PCA was highly correlated with TF mRNA levels.

  19. Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia: report of 4 cases with immunohistochemical findings.

    PubMed

    Campos, Marcia-Sampaio; Garcia-Rejas, Roberto-A; Pinto, Décio-Santos; de Sousa, Suzana-C O M; Nunes, Fabio-Daumas

    2009-10-01

    Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH) is a benign endothelial proliferation, usually intravascular, that may mimic angiosarcoma. In this report, four new cases of IPEH involving the oral region are described. The affected sites were the lower lip, labial comissure and the submandibular region. After clinical evaluation, the complete removal of the lesions showed a circumscribed and soft mass. Histologically, the major feature was a reactive proliferation of endothelial cells composed of small papillary structures with hypocellular and hyalinized cores arising in an organized thrombus. Immunohistochemical staining for CD34 was strongly positive in endothelial cells. Vimentin and laminin immunolabelling were also consistent with a vascular origin. In order to verify the proliferative potential of the lesions, the Ki-67 antibody was used, revealing low percentage of labeled cells (<20%). No immunoreactivity for GLUT-1 was observed. Since the complete removal is curative, no additional treatment was necessary, and no signs of recurrence had been observed until now. Due to the particular features of IPEH, it is important for pathologists and clinicians to become familiar with this lesion. Additionally, the specific histological arrangement, including the absence of cellular pleomorphism, mitotic activity and necrosis, represents a guide to help in the differential diagnosis. Moreover, the vascular origin and the proliferative index should be assessed by immunohistochemistry in order to provide an accurate diagnosis.

  20. Automatic classification of atherosclerotic plaques imaged with intravascular OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico-Jimenez, Jose D.; Campos-Delgado, Daniel U.; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett; Jo, Javier A.

    2016-03-01

    A novel computational method for plaque tissue characterization based on Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography (IV-OCT) is presented. IV-OCT is becoming a powerful tool for the clinical evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques; however, it requires a trained expert for visual assessment and interpretation of the imaged plaques. Moreover, due to the inherit effect of speckle and the scattering attenuation of the optical scheme the direct interpretation of OCT images is limited. To overcome these difficulties, we propose to automatically identify the A-line profiles of the most significant plaque types (normal, fibrotic, or lipid-rich) and their respective abundance by using a probabilistic framework and blind alternated least squares to achieve the optimal decomposition. In this context, we present preliminary results of this novel probabilistic classification tool for intravascular OCT that relies on two steps. First, the B-scan is pre-processed to remove catheter artifacts, segment the lumen, select the region of interest (ROI), flatten the tissue surface, and reduce the speckle effect by a spatial entropy filter. Next, the resulting image is decomposed and its A-lines are classified by an automated strategy based on alternating-least-squares optimization. Our early results are encouraging and suggest that the proposed methodology can identify normal tissue, fibrotic and lipid-rich plaques from IV-OCT images.

  1. The role of medical management for acute intravascular hemolysis in patients supported on axial flow LVAD.

    PubMed

    Hasin, Tal; Deo, Salil; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Topilsky, Yan; Edwards, Brooks S; Pereira, Naveen L; Stulak, John M; Joyce, Lyle; Daly, Richard; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Park, Soon J

    2014-01-01

    Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are used with good outcome. However, acute intravascular hemolysis due to thrombus in the pump remains a clinical challenge. We screened for LVAD-related intravascular hemolysis among 115 consecutive patients surviving HeartMateII implantation and investigated the role of medical therapy in resolving the hemolysis. Hemolytic events were identified in 7% of patients, 2-26 months after implant, manifested by peak lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels >6 times normal. With the institution of heparin and enhanced antiplatelet therapy, LDH levels receded rapidly reaching a stable trough level near baseline within 2 weeks with the resolution of clinical symptoms except in one patient who required additional therapy with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Complications included transient renal failure, one splenic infarct, and a cerebrovascular attack after tPA. The acute event of hemolysis resolved with medical therapy, and all were successfully discharged. However, recurrent hemolysis was common (6/8 patients over the next 1-7 months). At the end of follow-up, three patients were transplanted, one patient died refusing LVAD exchange for recurrent hemolysis, and 4 remained alive on LVAD support. Medical treatment with intensification of anticoagulation can be effective in resolving the acute hemolytic event. However, a definitive long-term strategy should be planned because the recurrence rate is high.

  2. Atomic layer deposition enhanced grafting of phosphorylcholine on stainless steel for intravascular stents.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qi; Yan, Jin; Qian, Xu; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Aidong

    2014-09-01

    In-stent restenosis (ISR) and re-endothelialization delay are two major issues of intravascular stent in terms of clinical safety and effects. Construction of mimetic cell membrane surface on stents using phosphorylcholine have been regarded as one of the most powerful strategies to resolve these two issues and improve the performance of stents. In this study, atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology, which is widely used in semiconductor industry, was utilized to fabricate ultra-thin layer (10nm) of alumina (Al2O3) on 316L stainless steel (SS), then the alumina covered surface was modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) sequentially in order to produce phosphorylcholine mimetic cell membrane surface. The pristine and modified surfaces were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscope and water contact angle measurement. Furthermore, the abilities of protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and cell proliferation on the surfaces were investigated. It was found that alumina layer can significantly enhance the surface grafting of APS and MPC on SS; and in turn efficiently inhibit protein adsorption and platelet adhesion, and promote the attachment and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on the surfaces. In association with the fact that the deposition of alumina layer is also beneficial to the improvement of adhesion and integrity of drug-carrying polymer coating on drug eluting stents, we expect that ALD technology can largely assist in the modifications on inert metallic surfaces and benefit implantable medical devices, especially intravascular stents.

  3. Computational analysis of the effectiveness of blood flushing with saline injection from an intravascular diagnostic catheter.

    PubMed

    Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph C; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura

    2014-11-01

    Optical techniques including fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy have demonstrated potential as a tool for study and diagnosis of arterial vessel pathologies. However, their application in the intravascular diagnostic procedures has been hampered by the presence of blood hemoglobin that affects the light delivery to and the collection from the vessel wall. We report a computational fluid dynamics model that allows for the optimization of blood flushing parameters in a manner that minimizes the amount of saline needed to clear the optical field of view and reduces any adverse effects caused by the external saline jet. A 3D turbulence (k - ω) model was employed for Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow to simulate the flow inside and around a side-viewing fiber-optic catheter. Current analysis demonstrates the effects of various parameters including infusion and blood flow rates, vessel diameters, and pulsatile nature of blood flow on the flow structure around the catheter tip. The results from this study can be utilized in determining the optimal flushing rate for given vessel diameter, blood flow rate, and maximum wall shear stress that the vessel wall can sustain and subsequently in optimizing the design parameters of optical-based intravascular catheters.

  4. Pulmonary intravascular lymphoma detected by FDG PET-CT: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kohan, A A; Paganini, L; Biedak, P; Arma, J I; Dalurzo, M C L; Garcia-Monaco, R D

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular lymphoma is a rare subtype of extranodal Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Its prognosis is poor in a high percentage of cases due to its insidious appearance and low clinical suspicion. Its diagnosis is usually only reached after an autopsy. It may affect different organs as a whole or only one organ. It is extremely rare that the lung is the only damaged organ. Its diagnosis depends of the clinician's suspicion and proper evaluation with imaging studies as well as correct selection of the organ to be biopsied. When detected on time, the treatment of choice is a combination of a series of chemotherapy associated to a monoclonal antibody (anti-CD20). We present the case of a male patient who underwent a positron emission tomography-computed tomography with 2-[F-18]-fluoro-2 deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) due to symptoms suggestive of a lymphoproliferative disease with no clear structural abnormalities. The images led to a diagnosis of pulmonary intravascular large B cell lymphoma.

  5. Thumb ultrasound: Technique and pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jatinder P; Kumar, Shwetam; Kathiria, Atman V; Harjai, Rachit; Jawed, Akram; Gupta, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited for the assessment of complex anatomy and pathologies of the thumb. Focused and dynamic thumb ultrasound can provide a rapid real-time diagnosis and can be used for guided treatment in certain clinical situations. We present a simplified approach to scanning technique for thumb-related pathologies and illustrate a spectrum of common and uncommon pathologies encountered. PMID:27857468

  6. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  7. Addressing Phonological Questions with Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound can be used to address unresolved questions in phonological theory. To date, some studies have shown that results from ultrasound imaging can shed light on how differences in phonological elements are implemented. Phenomena that have been investigated include transitional schwa, vowel coalescence, and transparent vowels. A study of…

  8. Evaluation of osteoporosis using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Joaquim M.; Costa, Eduardo T.; Nantes Button, Vera L. d. S.; Dantas, Ricardo G.

    2000-04-01

    We have developed an equipment using ultrasound transducers to help in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The equipment consists of an X-Y axes displacement system controlled by a microcomputer and uses two ultrasound transducers in opposite sides to inspect the calcaneus region of the patient. We have used two pairs of transducers with 500 kHz and 1 MHz central frequencies. Each pair of transducers was fixed in the X-Y displacement system submerged in a small water tank with a support for the foot of the patient. The transmitter was excited with pulses of 400 - 600 kHz or 800 - 1200 kHz and the ultrasound waves propagating through the bone in the calcaneus region are received by the opposite transducer, amplified and acquired in a digital oscilloscope. The data are transferred to the microcomputer and the ultrasound attenuation and the ultrasound transmission velocity are determined. The system was tested in patients, selected from a group that had already been diagnosed using a DEXA equipment. The results showed that there is a decrease in the ultrasound transmission velocity and the ultrasound attenuation in osteoporotic patients when compared to healthy patients of the same sex and age group. The conclusion is that ultrasound attenuation and the transmission velocity in the calcaneus region may be used as parameters in the evaluation of osteoporosis using our new system.

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  10. What's new in urologic ultrasound?

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Anupam; Naranje, Priyanka; Pavunesan, Santhosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an imaging technology that has evolved swiftly and has come a long way since its beginnings. It is a commonly used initial diagnostic imaging modality as it is rapid, effective, portable, relatively inexpensive, and causes no harm to human health. In the last few decades, there have been significant technological improvements in the equipment as well as the development of contrast agents that allowed ultrasound to be even more widely adopted for urologic imaging. Ultrasound is an excellent guidance tool for an array of urologic interventional procedures and also has therapeutic application in the form of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for tumor ablation. This article focuses on the recent advances in ultrasound technology and its emerging clinical applications in urology. PMID:26166960

  11. Invasive Human Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Feasibility During Revascularization in a Combined XMR Suite

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Alexander J.; Raman, Venkatesh K.; Raval, Amish N.; Guttman, Michael A.; Thompson, Richard B.; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Peters, Dana C.; Stine, Annette M.; Wright, Victor J.; Schenke, William H.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    We tested the feasibility and safety of invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during peripheral angioplasty. Real-time MRI can image soft tissue and may potentially guide therapeutic procedures without ionizing radiation or nephrotoxic contrast. MRI-guided diagnostic catheterization has been described recently, but safe and conspicuous catheter devices are not widely available. An active guidewire, which serves as an MRI receiver antenna, might be useful to guide catheterization or even to image atheroma. We describe a combined interventional suite offering both X-ray fluoroscopy and real-time MRI. We used a 0.030″ active guidewire receiver coil for invasive MRI after X-ray lesion traversal in patients undergoing percutaneous iliofemoral artery revascularization. Intra-vascular MRI was compared with noninvasive MRI, X-ray angiography, and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Seven eligible patients consented to participate, but three were excluded because of lengthy revascularization procedures. Four remaining patients safely underwent combined X-ray fluoroscopy and real-time magnetic resonance imaging (XMR) transport, continuous monitoring, and all imaging modalities. There was no device dislodgment, contamination or evidence of heating. The intravascular MRI coil was well visualized except at the tip, but did not provide superior mural imaging compared with IVUS. Therefore, because an adequate safety and workflow experience was obtained, enrollment was terminated after only four subjects. Invasive MRI is feasible and apparently safe during peripheral angioplasty. Patients can safely be transported and monitored in an XMR interventional suite. An active quarter-wavelength guidewire coil does not provide superior imaging compared with IVUS, but provides satisfactory guide-wire visualization. These tools may prove useful for advanced therapeutic procedures in the future. PMID:15736247

  12. SU-E-P-10: Imaging in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab - Technologies and Clinical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is often aided by a multitude of imaging technologies. The purpose of this work is to highlight the contributions to patient care offered by the various imaging systems used during cardiovascular interventional procedures. Methods: Imaging technologies used in the cardiac catheterization lab were characterized by their fundamental technology and by the clinical applications for which they are used. Whether the modality is external to the patient, intravascular, or intracavity was specified. Specific clinical procedures for which multiple modalities are routinely used will be highlighted. Results: X-ray imaging modalities include fluoroscopy/angiography and angiography CT. Ultrasound imaging is performed with external, trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), and intravascular (IVUS) transducers. Intravascular infrared optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is used to assess vessel endothelium. Relatively large (>0.5 mm) anatomical structures are imaged with x-ray and ultrasound. IVUS and IVOCT provide high resolution images of vessel walls. Cardiac CT and MRI images are used to plan complex cardiovascular interventions. Advanced applications are used to spatially and temporally merge images from different technologies. Diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease frequently utilizes angiography and intra-vascular imaging, and treatment of complex structural heart conditions routinely includes use of multiple imaging modalities. Conclusion: There are several imaging modalities which are routinely used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory to diagnose and treat both coronary artery and structural heart disease. Multiple modalities are frequently used to enhance the quality and safety of procedures. The cardiac catheterization laboratory includes many opportunities for medical physicists to contribute substantially toward advancing patient care.

  13. Ultra-high Speed Optical Imaging of Ultrasound-activated Microbubbles in Mesenteric Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong

    Ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles have gained widespread applications in diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. Animal studies of bioeffects induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles have demonstrated that microbubbles can cause microvessel damage. Much scientific attention has been attracted to such microvascular bioeffects, not only because of the related safety concerns, but also because of the potential useful applications of microbubbles in the intravascular delivery of drugs and genetic materials into target tissues. A significant challenge in using microbubbles in medical ultrasound is the lack of knowledge about how the microbubbles behave in blood vessels when exposed to ultrasound and how their interactions with ultrasound cause vascular damage. Although extensive studies were performed in the past to study the dynamics of microbubbles, most of those studies were performed in vitro and did not directly address the clinical environment in which microbubbles are injected into blood vessels. In this thesis work, a synchronized optical-acoustic system was set up for ultrahigh speed imaging of insonated microbubbles in microvessels. The recorded images revealed the formation of microjets penetrating the microbubbles, as well as vessel distention (motion outward against the surrounding tissue) and vessel invagination (motion inward toward the lumen) caused by the expansion and collapse of the microbubbles, respectively. Contrary to current paradigms which propose that microbubbles damage vessels either by distending them or by forming liquid jets impinging on them, microbubbles translation and jetting were in the direction away from the nearest vessel wall; furthermore, invagination typically exceeded distention in arterioles and venules. Vessel invagination was found to be associated with vascular damage. These studies suggest that vessel invagination may be a newly discovered potential mechanism for vascular damage by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

  14. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  15. Accelerated Focused Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    White, P. Jason; Thomenius, Kai; Clement, Gregory T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most, basic trade-offs in ultrasound imaging involves frame rate, depth, and number of lines. Achieving good spatial resolution and coverage requires a large number of lines, leading to decreases in frame rate. An even more serious imaging challenge occurs with imaging modes involving spatial compounding and 3-D/4-D imaging, which are severely limited by the slow speed of sound in tissue. The present work can overcome these traditional limitations, making ultrasound imaging many-fold faster. By emitting several beams at once, and by separating the resulting overlapped signals through spatial and temporal processing, spatial resolution and/or coverage can be increased by many-fold while leaving frame rates unaffected. The proposed approach can also be extended to imaging strategies that do not involve transmit beamforming, such as synthetic aperture imaging. Simulated and experimental results are presented where imaging speed is improved by up to 32-fold, with little impact on image quality. Object complexity has little impact on the method’s performance, and data from biological systems can readily be handled. The present work may open the door to novel multiplexed and/or multidimensional protocols considered impractical today. PMID:20040398

  16. Ultrasound in cardiac trauma.

    PubMed

    Saranteas, Theodosios; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Mandila, Christina; Poularas, John; Panou, Fotios

    2017-04-01

    In the perioperative period, the emergency department or the intensive care unit accurate assessment of variable chest pain requires meticulous knowledge, diagnostic skills, and suitable usage of various diagnostic modalities. In addition, in polytrauma patients, cardiac injury including aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, and pericardial effusion should be immediately revealed and treated. In these patients, arrhythmias, mainly tachycardia, cardiac murmurs, or hypotension must alert physicians to suspect cardiovascular trauma, which would potentially be life threatening. Ultrasound of the heart using transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography are valuable diagnostic tools that can be used interchangeably in conjunction with other modalities such as the electrocardiogram and computed tomography for the diagnosis of cardiovascular abnormalities in trauma patients. Although ultrasound of the heart is often underused in the setting of trauma, it does have the advantages of being easily accessible, noninvasive, and rapid bedside assessment tool. This review article aims to analyze the potential cardiac injuries in trauma patients, and to provide an elaborate description of the role of echocardiography for their accurate diagnosis.

  17. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure.

  18. Aesthetic ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthe, Peter G.; Slayton, Michael H.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound provides key benefits in aesthetic surgery compared to laser and RF based energy sources. We present results of research, development, pre-clinical and clinical studies, regulatory clearance and commercialization of a revolutionary non-invasive aesthetic ultrasound imaging and therapy system. Clinical applications for this platform include non-invasive face-lifts, brow-lifts, and neck-lifts achieved through fractionated treatment of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and subcutaneous tissue. Treatment consists of placing a grid of micro-coagulative lesions on the order of 1 mm3 at depths in skin of 1 to 6 mm, source energy levels of 0.1 to 3 J, and spacing on the order of 1.5 mm, from 4 to 10 MHz dual-mode image/treat transducers. System details are described, as well as a regulatory pathway consisting of acoustic and bioheat simulations, source characterization (hydrophone, radiation force, and Schlieren), pre-clinical studies (porcine skin ex vivo, in vivo, and human cadaver), human safety studies (treat and resect) and efficacy trials which culminated in FDA clearance (2009) under a new device classification and world-wide usage. Clinical before and after photographs are presented which validate the clinical approach.

  19. Determining Directions of Ultrasound in Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.; Roth, Don J.

    1987-01-01

    Ultrasound shadows cast by grooves. Improved method for determining direction of ultrasound in materials is shadow method using Scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM). Direction of ultrasound calculated from dimensions of groove and portion of surface groove shields from ultrasound. Method has variety of applications in nontraditional quality-control applications.

  20. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical linear array ultrasound probe for guiding nerve blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J.; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate identification of tissue structures such as nerves and blood vessels is critically important for interventional procedures such as nerve blocks. Ultrasound imaging is widely used as a guidance modality to visualize anatomical structures in real-time. However, identification of nerves and small blood vessels can be very challenging, and accidental intra-neural or intra-vascular injections can result in significant complications. Multi-spectral photoacoustic imaging can provide high sensitivity and specificity for discriminating hemoglobin- and lipid-rich tissues. However, conventional surface-illumination-based photoacoustic systems suffer from limited sensitivity at large depths. In this study, for the first time, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging (IMPA) system was used to image nerves in a swine model in vivo. Pulsed excitation light with wavelengths in the ranges of 750 - 900 nm and 1150 - 1300 nm was delivered inside the body through an optical fiber positioned within the cannula of an injection needle. Ultrasound waves were received at the tissue surface using a clinical linear array imaging probe. Co-registered B-mode ultrasound images were acquired using the same imaging probe. Nerve identification was performed using a combination of B-mode ultrasound imaging and electrical stimulation. Using a linear model, spectral-unmixing of the photoacoustic data was performed to provide image contrast for oxygenated and de-oxygenated hemoglobin, water and lipids. Good correspondence between a known nerve location and a lipid-rich region in the photoacoustic images was observed. The results indicate that IMPA is a promising modality for guiding nerve blocks and other interventional procedures. Challenges involved with clinical translation are discussed.