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Sample records for intrinsic antibiotic resistance

  1. Intrinsic antibiotic resistance: mechanisms, origins, challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Wright, Gerard D

    2013-08-01

    The intrinsic antibiotic resistome is a naturally occurring phenomenon that predates antibiotic chemotherapy and is present in all bacterial species. In addition to the intrinsic resistance mediated by the bacterial outer membrane and active efflux, studies have shown that a surprising number of additional genes and genetic loci also contribute to this phenotype. Antibiotic resistance is rife in both the clinic and the environment; novel therapeutic strategies need to be developed in order to prevent a major global clinical threat. The possibility of inhibiting elements comprising the intrinsic resistome in bacterial pathogens offers the promise for repurposing existing antibiotics against intrinsically resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Antibiotic Capture by Bacterial Lipocalins Uncovers an Extracellular Mechanism of Intrinsic Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    El-Halfawy, Omar M.; Klett, Javier; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Loutet, Slade A.; Murphy, Michael E. P.; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The potential for microbes to overcome antibiotics of different classes before they reach bacterial cells is largely unexplored. Here we show that a soluble bacterial lipocalin produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia upon exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations increases resistance to diverse antibiotics in vitro and in vivo. These phenotypes were recapitulated by heterologous expression in B. cenocepacia of lipocalin genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Purified lipocalin bound different classes of bactericidal antibiotics and contributed to bacterial survival in vivo. Experimental and X-ray crystal structure-guided computational studies revealed that lipocalins counteract antibiotic action by capturing antibiotics in the extracellular space. We also demonstrated that fat-soluble vitamins prevent antibiotic capture by binding bacterial lipocalin with higher affinity than antibiotics. Therefore, bacterial lipocalins contribute to antimicrobial resistance by capturing diverse antibiotics in the extracellular space at the site of infection, which can be counteracted by known vitamins. PMID:28292982

  3. Antibiotic Capture by Bacterial Lipocalins Uncovers an Extracellular Mechanism of Intrinsic Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Klett, Javier; Ingram, Rebecca J; Loutet, Slade A; Murphy, Michael E P; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Valvano, Miguel A

    2017-03-14

    The potential for microbes to overcome antibiotics of different classes before they reach bacterial cells is largely unexplored. Here we show that a soluble bacterial lipocalin produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia upon exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations increases resistance to diverse antibiotics in vitro and in vivo These phenotypes were recapitulated by heterologous expression in B. cenocepacia of lipocalin genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Purified lipocalin bound different classes of bactericidal antibiotics and contributed to bacterial survival in vivo Experimental and X-ray crystal structure-guided computational studies revealed that lipocalins counteract antibiotic action by capturing antibiotics in the extracellular space. We also demonstrated that fat-soluble vitamins prevent antibiotic capture by binding bacterial lipocalin with higher affinity than antibiotics. Therefore, bacterial lipocalins contribute to antimicrobial resistance by capturing diverse antibiotics in the extracellular space at the site of infection, which can be counteracted by known vitamins.IMPORTANCE Current research on antibiotic action and resistance focuses on targeting essential functions within bacterial cells. We discovered a previously unrecognized mode of general bacterial antibiotic resistance operating in the extracellular space, which depends on bacterial protein molecules called lipocalins. These molecules are highly conserved in most bacteria and have the ability to capture different classes of antibiotics outside bacterial cells. We also discovered that liposoluble vitamins, such as vitamin E, overcome in vitro and in vivo antibiotic resistance mediated by bacterial lipocalins, providing an unexpected new alternative to combat resistance by using this vitamin or its derivatives as antibiotic adjuvants.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals High Intrinsic Resistance to Penem Antibiotics: Penem Resistance Mechanisms and Their Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Kiyomi; Gotoh, Naomasa; Nishino, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics such as faropenem, ritipenem, AMA3176, sulopenem, Sch29482, and Sch34343. To investigate the mechanisms contributing to penem resistance, we used the laboratory strain PAO1 to construct a series of isogenic mutants with an impaired multidrug efflux system MexAB-OprM and/or impaired chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase. The outer membrane barrier of PAO1 was partially eliminated by inducing the expression of the plasmid-encoded Escherichia coli major porin OmpF. Susceptibility tests using the mutants and the OmpF expression plasmid showed that MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier, but not AmpC β-lactamase, are the main mechanisms involved in the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1. However, reducing the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1 to the same level as that of penem-susceptible gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli required the loss of either both MexAB-OprM and AmpC β-lactamase or both MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier. Competition experiments for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) revealed that the affinity of PBP 1b and PBP 2 for faropenem were about 1.8- and 1.5-fold lower, than the respective affinity for imipenem. Loss of the outer membrane barrier, MexAB, and AmpC β-lactamase increased the susceptibility of PAO1 to almost all penems tested compared to the susceptibility of the AmpC-deficient PAO1 mutants to imipenem. Thus, it is suggested that the high intrinsic penem resistance of P. aeruginosa is generated from the interplay among the outer membrane barrier, the active efflux system, and AmpC β-lactamase but not from the lower affinity of PBPs for penems. PMID:11408209

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics: penem resistance mechanisms and their interplay.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Gotoh, N; Nishino, T

    2001-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics such as faropenem, ritipenem, AMA3176, sulopenem, Sch29482, and Sch34343. To investigate the mechanisms contributing to penem resistance, we used the laboratory strain PAO1 to construct a series of isogenic mutants with an impaired multidrug efflux system MexAB-OprM and/or impaired chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase. The outer membrane barrier of PAO1 was partially eliminated by inducing the expression of the plasmid-encoded Escherichia coli major porin OmpF. Susceptibility tests using the mutants and the OmpF expression plasmid showed that MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier, but not AmpC beta-lactamase, are the main mechanisms involved in the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1. However, reducing the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1 to the same level as that of penem-susceptible gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli required the loss of either both MexAB-OprM and AmpC beta-lactamase or both MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier. Competition experiments for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) revealed that the affinity of PBP 1b and PBP 2 for faropenem were about 1.8- and 1.5-fold lower, than the respective affinity for imipenem. Loss of the outer membrane barrier, MexAB, and AmpC beta-lactamase increased the susceptibility of PAO1 to almost all penems tested compared to the susceptibility of the AmpC-deficient PAO1 mutants to imipenem. Thus, it is suggested that the high intrinsic penem resistance of P. aeruginosa is generated from the interplay among the outer membrane barrier, the active efflux system, and AmpC beta-lactamase but not from the lower affinity of PBPs for penems.

  6. The Mycobacterial Transcriptional Regulator whiB7 Gene Links Redox Homeostasis and Intrinsic Antibiotic Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Burian, Ján; Ramón-García, Santiago; Sweet, Gaye; Gómez-Velasco, Anaximandro; Av-Gay, Yossef; Thompson, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis limits therapeutic options for treating tuberculosis. The mycobacterial transcriptional regulator whiB7 contributes to intrinsic resistance by activating its own expression and many drug resistance genes in response to antibiotics. To investigate whiB7 activation, we constructed a GFP reporter to monitor its expression, and we used it to investigate the whiB7 promoter and to screen our custom library of almost 600 bioactive compounds, including the majority of clinical antibiotics. Results showed whiB7 was transcribed from a promoter that was conserved across mycobacteria and other actinomycetes, including an AT-rich sequence that was likely targeted by WhiB7. Expression was induced by compounds having diverse structures and targets, independent of the ability of whiB7 to mediate resistance, and was dependent on media composition. Pretreatment with whiB7 activators resulted in clinically relevant increases in intrinsic drug resistance. Antibiotic-induced transcription was synergistically increased by the reductant dithiothreitol, an effect mirrored by a whiB7-dependent shift to a highly reduced cytoplasm reflected by the ratio of reduced/oxidized mycothiol. These data provided evidence that intrinsic resistance resulting from whiB7 activation is linked to fundamental changes in cell metabolism. PMID:22069311

  7. Chemical genomic interaction profiling reveals determinants of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weizhen; DeJesus, Michael A; Rücker, Nadine; Engelhart, Curtis A; Wright, Meredith G; Healy, Claire; Lin, Kan; Wang, Ruojun; Park, Sae Woong; Ioerger, Thomas R; Schnappinger, Dirk; Ehrt, Sabine

    2017-09-11

    Chemotherapy for tuberculosis (TB) is lengthy and could benefit from synergistic adjuvant therapeutics that enhance current and novel drug regimens. To identify genetic determinants of intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) we applied a chemical genetic interaction (CGI) profiling approach. We screened a saturated transposon mutant library and identified mutants that exhibit altered fitness in the presence of partially-inhibitory concentrations of rifampicin, ethambutol, isoniazid, vancomycin and meropenem, antibiotics of diverse mechanisms-of-action. This screen identified Mtb's cell envelope as a major determinant of antibiotic susceptibility but did not yield mutants whose increase in susceptibility was due to transposon insertions in genes encoding efflux pumps. Intrinsic antibiotic resistance determinants affecting multiple antibiotics included the peptidoglycan-arabinogalactan ligase Lcp1, the mycolic acid synthase MmaA4, the protein translocase SecA2, the mannosyltransferase PimE, the cell envelope-associated protease CaeA/Hip1, and FecB, a putative iron-dicitrate-binding protein. Characterization of a deletion mutant confirmed FecB to be involved in the intrinsic resistance to every antibiotic analyzed. In contrast to its predicted function, FecB was dispensable for growth in low iron medium, and instead functioned as a critical mediator of envelope integrity. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND) efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putative TetR regulator. The B. cenocepacia rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated increased sensitivity to inhibitory compounds, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in drug resistance. Moreover, the rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated reduced accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactones in the growth medium. In contrast, deletion of the rnd-1 operon had no detectable phenotypes under the conditions assayed. Conclusion Two of the three inactivated RND efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia J2315 contribute to the high level of intrinsic resistance of this strain to some antibiotics and other inhibitory compounds. Furthermore, these efflux systems also mediate accumulation in the growth medium of quorum sensing molecules that have been shown to contribute to infection. A systematic study of RND efflux systems in B. cenocepacia is required to provide a full picture of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in this opportunistic bacterium. PMID:19761586

  9. The intrinsic resistance of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gang, Zhang; Jie, Feng

    2016-10-20

    Antibiotic resistance is often considered to be a trait acquired by previously susceptible bacteria, on the basis of which can be attributed to the horizontal acquisition of new genes or the occurrence of spontaneous mutation. In addition to acquired resistance, bacteria have a trait of intrinsic resistance to different classes of antibiotics. An intrinsic resistance gene is involved in intrinsic resistance, and its presence in bacterial strains is independent of previous antibiotic exposure and is not caused by horizontal gene transfer. Recently, interest in intrinsic resistance genes has increased, because these gene products not only may provide attractive therapeutic targets for development of novel drugs that rejuvenate the activity of existing antibiotics, and but also might predict future emergence of resistant pathogens if they become mobilized. In the present review, we summarize the conventional examples of intrinsic resistance, including the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or lack of drug targets. We also demonstrate that transferases and enzymes involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes confer intrinsic resistance in Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. We present as well information on the cryptic intrinsic resistance genes that do not confer resistance to their native hosts but are capable of conferring resistance when their expression levels are increased and the activation of the cryptic genes. Finally, we discuss that intrinsic genes could be the origin of acquired resistance, especially in the genus Acinetobacter.

  10. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... are even stronger. Bacteria and Viruses Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Bacteria and Viruses Bacteria and viruses are the two ... even help us to digest food. But other bacteria cause bad diseases like TB and lyme disease. Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Does this affect me? If you have a ...

  11. An unusual class of anthracyclines potentiate Gram-positive antibiotics in intrinsically resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard D

    2014-07-01

    An orthogonal approach taken towards novel antibacterial drug discovery involves the identification of small molecules that potentiate or enhance the activity of existing antibacterial agents. This study aimed to identify natural-product rifampicin adjuvants in the intrinsically resistant organism Escherichia coli. E. coli BW25113 was screened against 1120 actinomycete fermentation extracts in the presence of subinhibitory (2 mg/L) concentrations of rifampicin. The active molecule exhibiting the greatest rifampicin potentiation was isolated using activity-guided methods and identified using mass and NMR spectroscopy. Susceptibility testing and biochemical assays were used to determine the mechanism of antibiotic potentiation. The anthracycline Antibiotic 301A(1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of a strain of Streptomyces (WAC450); the molecule was shown to be highly synergistic with rifampicin (fractional inhibitory concentration index = 0.156) and moderately synergistic with linezolid (FIC index = 0.25) in both E. coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. Activity was associated with inhibition of efflux and the synergistic phenotype was lost when tested against E. coli harbouring mutations within the rpoB gene. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that other anthracyclines do not synergize with rifampicin and removal of the sugar moiety of Antibiotic 301A(1) abolishes activity. Screening only a subsection of our natural product library identified a small-molecule antibiotic adjuvant capable of sensitizing Gram-negative bacteria to antibiotics to which they are ordinarily intrinsically resistant. This result demonstrates the great potential of this approach in expanding antibiotic effectiveness in the face of the growing challenge of resistance in Gram-negatives. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. An unusual class of anthracyclines potentiate Gram-positive antibiotics in intrinsically resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Georgina; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives An orthogonal approach taken towards novel antibacterial drug discovery involves the identification of small molecules that potentiate or enhance the activity of existing antibacterial agents. This study aimed to identify natural-product rifampicin adjuvants in the intrinsically resistant organism Escherichia coli. Methods E. coli BW25113 was screened against 1120 actinomycete fermentation extracts in the presence of subinhibitory (2 mg/L) concentrations of rifampicin. The active molecule exhibiting the greatest rifampicin potentiation was isolated using activity-guided methods and identified using mass and NMR spectroscopy. Susceptibility testing and biochemical assays were used to determine the mechanism of antibiotic potentiation. Results The anthracycline Antibiotic 301A1 was isolated from the fermentation broth of a strain of Streptomyces (WAC450); the molecule was shown to be highly synergistic with rifampicin (fractional inhibitory concentration index = 0.156) and moderately synergistic with linezolid (FIC index = 0.25) in both E. coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. Activity was associated with inhibition of efflux and the synergistic phenotype was lost when tested against E. coli harbouring mutations within the rpoB gene. Structure–activity relationship studies revealed that other anthracyclines do not synergize with rifampicin and removal of the sugar moiety of Antibiotic 301A1 abolishes activity. Conclusions Screening only a subsection of our natural product library identified a small-molecule antibiotic adjuvant capable of sensitizing Gram-negative bacteria to antibiotics to which they are ordinarily intrinsically resistant. This result demonstrates the great potential of this approach in expanding antibiotic effectiveness in the face of the growing challenge of resistance in Gram-negatives. PMID:24627312

  13. The role of outer membrane in Serratia marcescens intrinsic resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L; Ruiz, N; Leranoz, S; Viñas, M; Puig, M

    1997-09-01

    Three different porins from Serratia marcescens were described. They were named Omp1, Omp2 and Omp3 and their molecular weights were 42, 40 and 39 kDa respectively. Omp2 and Omp3 showed osmoregulation and thermoregulation in a similar way to OmpC and OmpF of Escherichia coli. Permeability coefficients of the outer membrane of this species were calculated following the Zimmermann and Rosselet method. P values were similar to those obtained in Escherichia coli, which suggests that the chromosomal beta-lactamase would play a major role in the resistance of Serratia marcescens to beta-lactam antibiotics. Both MIC values and permeabilities were modified by salycilates and acetylsalycilate. Synergism between the outer membrane and the beta-lactamase was also evaluated. When bacteria grew in the presence of a beta-lactam in the medium, the beta-lactamase accounted for most of the resistance.

  14. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus.

    PubMed

    Hollenbeck, Brian L; Rice, Louis B

    2012-08-15

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options.

  15. Proteasome Accessory Factor C (pafC) Is a novel gene Involved in Mycobacterium Intrinsic Resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics--Fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiming; Xie, Longxiang; Long, Quanxin; Mao, Jinxiao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Mingliang; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-03

    Antibiotics resistance poses catastrophic threat to global public health. Novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of action will inspire better measures to control drug resistance. Fluoroquinolones are potent and widely prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics. Bacterial protein degradation pathways represent novel druggable target for the development of new classes of antibiotics. Mycobacteria proteasome accessory factor C (pafC), a component of bacterial proteasome, is involved in fluoroquinolones resistance. PafC deletion mutants are hypersensitive to fluoroquinolones, including moxifloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, but not to other antibiotics such as isoniazid, rifampicin, spectinomycin, chloramphenicol, capreomycin. This phenotype can be restored by complementation. The pafC mutant is hypersensitive to H2O2 exposure. The iron chelator (bipyridyl) and a hydroxyl radical scavenger (thiourea) can abolish the difference. The finding that pafC is a novel intrinsic selective resistance gene provided new evidence for the bacterial protein degradation pathway as druggable target for the development of new class of antibiotics.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Webber, Mark A; Baylay, Alison J; Ogbolu, David O; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria that are difficult or impossible to treat are becoming increasingly common and are causing a global health crisis. Antibiotic resistance is encoded by several genes, many of which can transfer between bacteria. New resistance mechanisms are constantly being described, and new genes and vectors of transmission are identified on a regular basis. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which bacteria are either intrinsically resistant or acquire resistance to antibiotics, including the prevention of access to drug targets, changes in the structure and protection of antibiotic targets and the direct modification or inactivation of antibiotics.

  17. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  18. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  19. Mechanisms of intrinsic resistance and acquired susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients to temocillin, a revived antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Chalhoub, Hussein; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Braun, Yvonne; Tunney, Michael M.; Elborn, J. Stuart; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; Plésiat, Patrick; Kahl, Barbara C.; Denis, Olivier; Winterhalter, Mathias; Tulkens, Paul M.; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    The β-lactam antibiotic temocillin (6-α-methoxy-ticarcillin) shows stability to most extended spectrum β-lactamases, but is considered inactive against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Mutations in the MexAB-OprM efflux system, naturally occurring in cystic fibrosis (CF) isolates, have been previously shown to reverse this intrinsic resistance. In the present study, we measured temocillin activity in a large collection (n = 333) of P. aeruginosa CF isolates. 29% of the isolates had MICs ≤ 16 mg/L (proposed clinical breakpoint for temocillin). Mutations were observed in mexA or mexB in isolates for which temocillin MIC was ≤512 mg/L (nucleotide insertions or deletions, premature termination, tandem repeat, nonstop, and missense mutations). A correlation was observed between temocillin MICs and efflux rate of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (MexAB-OprM fluorescent substrate) and extracellular exopolysaccharide abundance (contributing to a mucoid phenotype). OpdK or OpdF anion-specific porins expression decreased temocillin MIC by ~1 two-fold dilution only. Contrarily to the common assumption that temocillin is inactive on P. aeruginosa, we show here clinically-exploitable MICs on a non-negligible proportion of CF isolates, explained by a wide diversity of mutations in mexA and/or mexB. In a broader context, this work contributes to increase our understanding of MexAB-OprM functionality and help delineating how antibiotics interact with MexA and MexB. PMID:28091521

  20. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  1. Proteasome Accessory Factor C (pafC) Is a novel gene Involved in Mycobacterium Intrinsic Resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics - Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiming; Xie, Longxiang; Long, Quanxin; Mao, Jinxiao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Mingliang; Xie, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics resistance poses catastrophic threat to global public health. Novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of action will inspire better measures to control drug resistance. Fluoroquinolones are potent and widely prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics. Bacterial protein degradation pathways represent novel druggable target for the development of new classes of antibiotics. Mycobacteria proteasome accessory factor C (pafC), a component of bacterial proteasome, is involved in fluoroquinolones resistance. PafC deletion mutants are hypersensitive to fluoroquinolones, including moxifloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, but not to other antibiotics such as isoniazid, rifampicin, spectinomycin, chloramphenicol, capreomycin. This phenotype can be restored by complementation. The pafC mutant is hypersensitive to H2O2 exposure. The iron chelator (bipyridyl) and a hydroxyl radical scavenger (thiourea) can abolish the difference. The finding that pafC is a novel intrinsic selective resistance gene provided new evidence for the bacterial protein degradation pathway as druggable target for the development of new class of antibiotics. PMID:26139381

  2. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Combating Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... however, have contributed to a phenomenon known as antibiotic resistance. This resistance develops when potentially harmful bacteria change ...

  3. A diverse intrinsic antibiotic resistome from a cave bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, Andrew C.; Wang, Wenliang; Koteva, Kalinka; Barton, Hazel A.; McArthur, Andrew G.; Wright, Gerard D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is ancient and widespread in environmental bacteria. These are therefore reservoirs of resistance elements and reflective of the natural history of antibiotics and resistance. In a previous study, we discovered that multi-drug resistance is common in bacteria isolated from Lechuguilla Cave, an underground ecosystem that has been isolated from the surface for over 4 Myr. Here we use whole-genome sequencing, functional genomics and biochemical assays to reveal the intrinsic resistome of Paenibacillus sp. LC231, a cave bacterial isolate that is resistant to most clinically used antibiotics. We systematically link resistance phenotype to genotype and in doing so, identify 18 chromosomal resistance elements, including five determinants without characterized homologues and three mechanisms not previously shown to be involved in antibiotic resistance. A resistome comparison across related surface Paenibacillus affirms the conservation of resistance over millions of years and establishes the longevity of these genes in this genus. PMID:27929110

  4. Antibiotic resistance in Chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Rockey, Daniel D

    2010-09-01

    There are few documented reports of antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia and no examples of natural and stable antibiotic resistance in strains collected from humans. While there are several reports of clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to antibiotics, these strains either lost their resistance phenotype in vitro, or lost viability altogether. Differences in procedures for chlamydial culture in the laboratory, low recovery rates of clinical isolates and the unknown significance of heterotypic resistance observed in culture may interfere with the recognition and interpretation of antibiotic resistance. Although antibiotic resistance has not emerged in chlamydiae pathogenic to humans, several lines of evidence suggest they are capable of expressing significant resistant phenotypes. The adept ability of chlamydiae to evolve to antibiotic resistance in vitro is demonstrated by contemporary examples of mutagenesis, recombination and genetic transformation. The isolation of tetracycline-resistant Chlamydia suis strains from pigs also emphasizes their adaptive ability to acquire antibiotic resistance genes when exposed to significant selective pressure.

  5. Contribution of the Rv2333c efflux pump (the Stp protein) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis to intrinsic antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Ramón-García, Santiago; Martín, Carlos; De Rossi, Edda; Aínsa, José A

    2007-03-01

    To characterize the efflux pump encoded by the gene Rv2333c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and assess its contribution to intrinsic antibiotic resistance using Mycobacterium bovis BCG as a model organism. Firstly, the Rv2333c gene was expressed from a multicopy plasmid in M. bovis BCG. Secondly, the gene was inactivated in the chromosome of M. bovis BCG. Antibiotic susceptibility tests and tetracycline uptake/efflux experiments were carried out with the strains mentioned above. When the Rv2333c gene was inactivated in the M. bovis BCG chromosome, there was a decrease in the MIC values of spectinomycin and tetracycline, and an increase in [3H]tetracycline accumulation. When the Rv2333c gene was cloned into a multicopy plasmid, there was an increase in the MIC values of spectinomycin and tetracycline, and a decrease in [3H]tetracycline accumulation. These results indicate that both antibiotics are substrates of the Rv2333c efflux pump, which has been named Stp, for Spectinomycin Tetracycline efflux Pump. The Rv2333c efflux pump (Stp protein) of M. tuberculosis contributes to intrinsic spectinomycin and tetracycline resistance.

  6. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Sánchez, Borja; G. de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara; Margolles, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue. PMID:23882264

  7. [Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Mühlemann, K

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotics interfere with structural and regulatory elements of bacterial cells leading to growth arrest or cell death. Bacteria have evolved a variety of strategies to overcome the effects of antibiotics. Examples are enzymatic destruction, alteration of the target, efflux and permeability changes. Resistance towards the same substance can be mediated by several mechanisms. Efflux pumps can probably act as mediators of higher resistance development. Alteration of common targets can lead to cross-resistance against several classes of antibiotics. Genetic events, such as point mutations, transfer of plasmids and gen regulation, can mediate a rapid emergence of resistance. Therefore, substances like rifampicin should be only used in combination with other drugs. Accumulation of resistance genes under common regulatory control in integrons induces co-resistance against substances of different specificity. Detailed knowledge of resistance mechanisms, their evolution and dynamics is important for a rational use of antibiotics and other strategies against antibiotic resistance.

  8. Diversity within Serogroups of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viceae in the Palouse Region of Eastern Washington as Indicated by Plasmid Profiles, Intrinsic Antibiotic Resistance, and Topography

    PubMed Central

    Brockman, F. J.; Bezdicek, D. F.

    1989-01-01

    Serology, plasmid profiles, and intrinsic antibiotic resistance (IAR) were determined for 192 isolates of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viceae from nodules of peas (Pisum sativum L.) grown on the south slope and bottomland topographic positions in eastern Washington State. A total of 3 serogroups and 18 plasmid profile groups were identified. Nearly all isolates within each plasmid profile group were specific for one of the three serogroups. Cluster analysis of IAR data showed that individual clusters were dominated by one serogroup and by one or two plasmid profile groups. Plasmid profile analysis and IAR analysis grouped 72% of the isolates similarly. Most plasmid profile groups and several IAR clusters favored either the south slope or the bottomland topographic position. These findings show that certain intraserogroup strains possess a greater competitiveness for nodulation and/or possess a greater ability to survive in adjacent soil environments. Images PMID:16347814

  9. Evolution of antibiotic resistance without antibiotic exposure.

    PubMed

    Knöppel, Anna; Näsvall, Joakim; Andersson, Dan I

    2017-09-11

    Antibiotic use is the main driver in the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Another unexplored possibility is that resistance evolves coincidentally in response to other selective pressures. We show that selection in the absence of antibiotics can co-select for decreased susceptibility to several antibiotics. Thus, genetic adaptation of bacteria to natural environments may drive resistance evolution by generating a pool of resistance mutations that selection could act on to enrich resistant mutants when antibiotic exposure occurs. Copyright © 2017 Knöppel et al.

  10. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chellat, Mathieu F.; Raguž, Luka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human‐pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last‐resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled “Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow” triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  11. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  12. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  13. Antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Katherine A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2016-09-01

    The genus Burkholderia comprises metabolically diverse and adaptable Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in often adversarial environments. A few members of the genus are prominent opportunistic pathogens. These include Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei of the B. pseudomallei complex, which cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia multivorans, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis belong to the Burkholderia cepacia complex and affect mostly cystic fibrosis patients. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. The first line of defense against antimicrobials in Burkholderia species is the outer membrane penetration barrier. Most Burkholderia contain a modified lipopolysaccharide that causes intrinsic polymyxin resistance. Contributing to reduced drug penetration are restrictive porin proteins. Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division family are major players in Burkholderia multidrug resistance. Third and fourth generation β-lactam antibiotics are seminal for treatment of Burkholderia infections, but therapeutic efficacy is compromised by expression of several β-lactamases and ceftazidime target mutations. Altered DNA gyrase and dihydrofolate reductase targets cause fluoroquinolone and trimethoprim resistance, respectively. Although antibiotic resistance hampers therapy of Burkholderia infections, the characterization of resistance mechanisms lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens, especially ESKAPE bacteria such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  14. Antibiotic Resistance in Burkholderia Species

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Katherine A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia comprises metabolically diverse and adaptable Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in often adversarial environments. A few members of the genus are prominent opportunistic pathogens. These include B. mallei and B. pseudomallei of the B. pseudomallei complex, which cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, and B. vietnamiensis belong to the B. cepacia complex and affect mostly cystic fibrosis patients. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. The first line of defense against antimicrobials in Burkholderia species is the outer membrane penetration barrier. Most Burkholderia contain a modified lipopolysaccharide that causes intrinsic polymyxin resistance. Contributing to reduced drug penetration are restrictive porin proteins. Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division family are major players in Burkholderia multidrug resistance. Third and fourth generation β-lactam antibiotics are seminal for treatment of Burkholderia infections, but therapeutic efficacy is compromised by expression of several β-lactamases and ceftazidime target mutations. Altered DNA gyrase and dihydrofolate reductase targets cause fluoroquinolone and trimethoprim resistance, respectively. Although antibiotic resistance hampers therapy of Burkholderia infections, the characterization of resistance mechanisms lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens, especially ESKAPE bacteria such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:27620956

  15. Antibiotic Resistance in Acne Treatment.

    PubMed

    Adler, Brandon L; Kornmehl, Heather; Armstrong, April W

    2017-08-01

    What is the evidence for antibiotic resistance in acne, and how does resistance affect treatment? Use of topical and systemic antibiotics for acne is associated with formation of resistance in Propionibacterium acnes and other bacteria, with clinical consequences. Guidelines recommend resistance reduction strategies including avoidance of antibiotic monotherapy, combination treatment with topical modalities, and limiting the duration of oral antibiotic use.

  16. Pneumococcal resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Klugman, K P

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of pneumococci resistant to one or more of the antibiotics penicillin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline appears to be expanding, and there exist foci of resistance to chloramphenicol and rifampin. Multiply resistant pneumococci are being encountered more commonly and are more often community acquired. Factors associated with infection caused by resistant pneumococci include young age, duration of hospitalization, infection with a pneumococcus of serogroup 6, 19, or 23 or serotype 14, and exposure to antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. At present, the most useful drugs for the management of resistant pneumococcal infections are cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, and rifampin. If the strains are susceptible, chloramphenicol may be useful as an alternative, less expensive agent. Appropriate interventions for the control of resistant pneumococcal outbreaks include investigation of the prevalence of resistant strains, isolation of patients, possible treatment of carriers, and reduction of usage of antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. The molecular mechanisms of penicillin resistance are related to the structure and function of penicillin-binding proteins, and the mechanisms of resistance to other agents involved in multiple resistance are being elucidated. Recognition is increasing of the standard screening procedure for penicillin resistance, using a 1-microgram oxacillin disk. PMID:2187594

  17. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have emerged not only in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic “attack” is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. “Survival of the fittest” is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  18. Predicting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Baquero, Fernando; Andersson, Dan I

    2007-12-01

    The treatment of bacterial infections is increasingly complicated because microorganisms can develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. This article discusses the information that is required to predict when antibiotic resistance is likely to emerge in a bacterial population. Indeed, the development of the conceptual and methodological tools required for this type of prediction represents an important goal for microbiological research. To this end, we propose the establishment of methodological guidelines that will allow researchers to predict the emergence of resistance to a new antibiotic before its clinical introduction.

  19. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gonorrhea Antibiotic Resistance Basic Information Laboratory Information Resources & References Combating the ... Page Surveillance Trends and Treatment Challenges Laboratory Issues Antibiotic resistance (AR) is the ability of bacteria to resist ...

  20. Antibiotic resistance among autochthonous aquatic environmental bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Christiane; Kistemann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are widely used in both human and veterinary medicine and antibiotic-resistant bacteria cause problems in antibiotic therapy. The current study was conducted in the catchment area of the river Swist (Germany) and focuses on the resistance of environmental Rhodospirillaceae to antibiotics used in human medicine. The samples collected reflect different levels of human impact on the environment. In total, 614 isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility. About half of these isolates were susceptible to all substances tested. Oxacillin resistance was observed most frequently (41%). Resistant Rhodospirillaceae were detected in wastewater effluent from a municipal sewage treatment plant, as well as in non-polluted upper reaches. The highest multi-resistance level was detected in small tributaries and it surprisingly decreased with an increasing influence of municipal wastewater. It could be shown that the detected resistances were acquired rather than intrinsic. Besides natural occurrence of multi-resistance among non-sulphur purple bacteria, horizontal gene transfer and acquired cross-resistance against veterinary antibiotics are assumed to be important factors. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study investigating the potential of Rhodospirillaceae as a reservoir for resistance to antibiotics used in human medicine. The consequence for resistance prevalence in human pathogens and for their antibiotic therapy needs evaluation.

  1. Tackling antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Karen; Courvalin, Patrice; Dantas, Gautam; Davies, Julian; Eisenstein, Barry; Huovinen, Pentti; Jacoby, George A.; Kishony, Roy; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Kutter, Elizabeth; Lerner, Stephen A.; Levy, Stuart; Lewis, Kim; Lomovskaya, Olga; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Piddock, Laura J. V.; Projan, Steven; Thomas, Christopher M.; Tomasz, Alexander; Tulkens, Paul M.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Watson, James D.; Witkowski, Jan; Witte, Wolfgang; Wright, Gerry; Yeh, Pamela; Zgurskaya, Helen I.

    2014-01-01

    The development and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a universal threat to both humans and animals that is generally not preventable, but can nevertheless be controlled and must be tackled in the most effective ways possible. To explore how the problem of antibiotic resistance might best be addressed, a group of thirty scientists from academia and industry gathered at the Banbury Conference Centre in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, May 16-18, 2011. From these discussions emerged a priority list of steps that need to be taken to resolve this global crisis. PMID:22048738

  2. [Resistance to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús Silva

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major public health problem around the world causing high rates of morbi-mortality and economic problems in hospital settings. Major bacterial causing nosocomial infections are: extended-spectrum beta-lactameses (ESBL) producing enterobacteria, methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, metallo fl-lactamases (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus spp, Acinetobacter baumani. This last bacteria is not very often isolated in hospital settings yet, but it is multi-resistance pathogen causing high mortality. Helicobacter pylori, which is not a nosocomial pathogen but is associated to gastric diseases (from gastritis to gastric cancer). Infections prevention, to obtain an accuracy diagnostic and effective treatment, use antibiotic wisely and pathogen dissemination prevention (hand washing), are important steps to control the bacterial resistance.

  3. Investigating the Antibiotic Resistance Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael; Lawson, Amy L.

    1998-01-01

    Seeks to give teachers useful information on the extent of the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics, the causes of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms, and practices that can prevent or reverse this trend. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  4. Investigating the Antibiotic Resistance Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael; Lawson, Amy L.

    1998-01-01

    Seeks to give teachers useful information on the extent of the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics, the causes of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms, and practices that can prevent or reverse this trend. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  5. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics. PMID:24036486

  6. Strategies to minimize antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-09-12

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  7. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance involves the collection and analysis of data for the detection and monitoring of threats to public health. Surveillance should also inform as to the epidemiology of the threat and its burden in the population. A further key component of surveillance is the timely feedback of data to stakeholders with a view to generating action aimed at reducing or preventing the public health threat being monitored. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance involves the collection of antibiotic susceptibility test results undertaken by microbiology laboratories on bacteria isolated from clinical samples sent for investigation. Correlation of these data with demographic and clinical data for the patient populations from whom the pathogens were isolated gives insight into the underlying epidemiology and facilitates the formulation of rational interventions aimed at reducing the burden of resistance. This article describes a range of surveillance activities that have been undertaken in the UK over a number of years, together with current interventions being implemented. These activities are not only of national importance but form part of the international response to the global threat posed by antibiotic resistance. PMID:25918439

  8. Endless Resistance. Endless Antibiotics?

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2016-01-01

    The practice of medicine was profoundly transformed by the introduction of the antibiotics (compounds isolated from Nature) and the antibacterials (compounds prepared by synthesis) for the control of bacterial infection. As a result of the extraordinary success of these compounds over decades of time, a timeless biological activity for these compounds has been presumed. This presumption is no longer. The inexorable acquisition of resistance mechanisms by bacteria is retransforming medical practice. Credible answers to this dilemma are far better recognized than they are being implemented. In this perspective we examine (and in key respects, reiterate) the chemical and biological strategies being used to address the challenge of bacterial resistance. PMID:27746889

  9. Addressing antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kalpana

    2002-07-08

    Management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) has traditionally been based on 2 important principles: the spectrum of organisms causing acute UTI is highly predictable (Escherichia coli accounts for 75% to 90% and Staphylococcus saprophyticus accounts for 5% to 15% of isolates), and the susceptibility patterns of these organisms have also been relatively predictable. As a result, empiric therapy with short-course trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been a standard management approach for uncomplicated cystitis.However, antibiotic resistance is now becoming a major factor not only in nosocomial complicated UTIs, but also in uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs. Resistance to TMP-SMX now approaches 18% to 22% in some regions of the United States, and nearly 1 in 3 bacterial strains causing cystitis or pyelonephritis demonstrate resistance to amoxicillin. Fortunately, resistance to other agents, such as nitrofurantoin and the fluoroquinolones, has remained low, at approximately 2%. Preliminary data suggest that the increase in TMP-SMX resistance is associated with poorer bacteriologic and clinical outcomes when TMP-SMX is used for therapy. As a result, these trends have necessitated a change in the management approach to community-acquired UTI. The use of TMP-SMX as a first-line agent for empiric therapy of uncomplicated cystitis is only appropriate in areas where TMP-SMX resistance prevalence is <10% to 20%. In areas where resistance to TMP-SMX exceeds this rate, alternative agents need to be considered.

  10. Addressing antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kalpana

    2003-02-01

    Management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) has traditionally been based on 2 important principles: the spectrum of organisms causing acute UTI is highly predictable (Escherichia coli accounts for 75% to 90% and Staphylococcus saprophyticus accounts for 5% to 15% of isolates), and the susceptibility patterns of these organisms have also been relatively predictable. As a result, empiric therapy with short-course trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been a standard management approach for uncomplicated cystitis.However, antibiotic resistance is now becoming a major factor not only in nosocomial complicated UTIs, but also in uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs. Resistance to TMP-SMX now approaches 18% to 22% in some regions of the United States, and nearly 1 in 3 bacterial strains causing cystitis or pyelonephritis demonstrate resistance to amoxicillin. Fortunately, resistance to other agents, such as nitrofurantoin and the fluoroquinolones, has remained low, at approximately 2%. Preliminary data suggest that the increase in TMP-SMX resistance is associated with poorer bacteriologic and clinical outcomes when TMP-SMX is used for therapy. As a result, these trends have necessitated a change in the management approach to community-acquired UTI. The use of TMP-SMX as a first-line agent for empiric therapy of uncomplicated cystitis is only appropriate in areas where TMP-SMX resistance prevalence is <10% to 20%. In areas where resistance to TMP-SMX exceeds this rate, alternative agents need to be considered.

  11. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  12. [Antibiotic therapy: impact and resistance].

    PubMed

    Weiler, S; Corti, N

    2014-04-01

    Many achievements in modern medicine, such as in transplantation medicine, cancer therapy, surgery, and intensive care medicine would have been impossible without effective treatment of bacterial infections. Antibiotic resistance is on the rise; the reasons for this are complex and vary greatly. Knowledge about the impact of antibiotics and mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, which are the cornerstones of calculated and targeted antibiotic therapy, is imperative. This review describes the pharmacodynamics of relevant antibiotics in emergency and intensive care medicine. Commonly resistant bacteria with clinical relevance and the respective mechanisms of resistance are highlighted. Furthermore, the use of antiinfectives for reserve treatment of severe infections is discussed. Understanding the mechanisms of resistance and effects of antibiotics are fundamental for efficient and successful treatment of bacterial infections and for the reduction of resistant species.

  13. Mechanisms of polymyxin resistance: acquired and intrinsic resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Olaitan, Abiola O.; Morand, Serge; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Polymyxins are polycationic antimicrobial peptides that are currently the last-resort antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant, Gram-negative bacterial infections. The reintroduction of polymyxins for antimicrobial therapy has been followed by an increase in reports of resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. Some bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, develop resistance to polymyxins in a process referred to as acquired resistance, whereas other bacteria, such as Proteus spp., Serratia spp., and Burkholderia spp., are naturally resistant to these drugs. Reports of polymyxin resistance in clinical isolates have recently increased, including acquired and intrinsically resistant pathogens. This increase is considered a serious issue, prompting concern due to the low number of currently available effective antibiotics. This review summarizes current knowledge concerning the different strategies bacteria employ to resist the activities of polymyxins. Gram-negative bacteria employ several strategies to protect themselves from polymyxin antibiotics (polymyxin B and colistin), including a variety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modifications, such as modifications of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine and 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose, in addition to the use of efflux pumps, the formation of capsules and overexpression of the outer membrane protein OprH, which are all effectively regulated at the molecular level. The increased understanding of these mechanisms is extremely vital and timely to facilitate studies of antimicrobial peptides and find new potential drugs targeting clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25505462

  14. Antibiotic and Antimicrobial Resistance: Threat Report 2013

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria [page 18] Assessment of Domestic Antibiotic-Resistant Threats [page 20] Running Out of ... Preventing the Spread of Resistance [page 32] CDC's Work to Prevent Infections and Antibiotic Resistance in Healthcare ...

  15. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  16. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  17. Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2011-04-14

    Over the past decade, resistance to antibiotics has emerged as a crisis of global proportion. Microbes resistant to many and even all clinically approved antibiotics are increasingly common and easily spread across continents. At the same time there are fewer new antibiotic drugs coming to market. We are reaching a point where we are no longer able to confidently treat a growing number of bacterial infections. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance provide the essential knowledge on new drug development and clinical use. These mechanisms include enzyme catalyzed antibiotic modifications, bypass of antibiotic targets and active efflux of drugs from the cell. Understanding the chemical rationale and underpinnings of resistance is an essential component of our response to this clinical challenge.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Tests Susceptibility Testing (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Prevention and Risk Factors Antibiotic Resistance (Food and Drug Administration) Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the ...

  19. Evolutionary Trajectories to Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Diarmaid; Andersson, Dan I

    2017-09-08

    The ability to predict the evolutionary trajectories of antibiotic resistance would be of great value in tailoring dosing regimens of antibiotics so as to maximize the duration of their usefulness. Useful prediction of resistance evolution requires information about (a) the mutation supply rate, (b) the level of resistance conferred by the resistance mechanism, (c) the fitness of the antibiotic-resistant mutant bacteria as a function of drug concentration, and (d) the strength of selective pressures. In addition, processes including epistatic interactions and compensatory evolution, coselection of drug resistances, and population bottlenecks and clonal interference can strongly influence resistance evolution and thereby complicate attempts at prediction. Currently, the very limited quantitative data on most of these parameters severely limit attempts to accurately predict trajectories of resistance evolution.

  20. The role of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature.

    PubMed

    Aminov, Rustam I

    2009-12-01

    Investigations of antibiotic resistance from an environmental prospective shed new light on a problem that was traditionally confined to a subset of clinically relevant antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. It is clear that the environmental microbiota, even in apparently antibiotic-free environments, possess an enormous number and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes, some of which are very similar to the genes circulating in pathogenic microbiota. It is difficult to explain the role of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in natural environments from an anthropocentric point of view, which is focused on clinical aspects such as the efficiency of antibiotics in clearing infections and pathogens that are resistant to antibiotic treatment. A broader overview of the role of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature from the evolutionary and ecological prospective suggests that antibiotics have evolved as another way of intra- and inter-domain communication in various ecosystems. This signalling by non-clinical concentrations of antibiotics in the environment results in adaptive phenotypic and genotypic responses of microbiota and other members of the community. Understanding the complex picture of evolution and ecology of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance may help to understand the processes leading to the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance and also help to control it, at least in relation to the newer antibiotics now entering clinical practice.

  1. Antibiotic resistance: An ethical challenge.

    PubMed

    Littmann, Jasper; Buyx, Alena; Cars, Otto

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we argue that antibiotic resistance (ABR) raises a number of ethical problems that have not yet been sufficiently addressed. We outline four areas in which ethical issues that arise in relation to ABR are particularly pressing. First, the emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant infections exacerbates traditional ethical challenges of infectious disease control, such as the restriction of individual liberty for the protection of the public's health. Second, ABR raises issues of global distributive justice, both with regard to the overuse and lack of access to antibiotics. Third, the use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine raises serious concerns for animal welfare and sustainable farming practices. Finally, the diminishing effectiveness of antibiotics leads to questions about intergenerational justice and our responsibility for the wellbeing of future generations. We suggest that current policy discussions should take ethical conflicts into account and engage openly with the challenges that we outline in this paper.

  2. Two Small RNAs Conserved in Enterobacteriaceae Provide Intrinsic Resistance to Antibiotics Targeting the Cell Wall Biosynthesis Enzyme Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muna A.; Göpel, Yvonne; Milewski, Slawomir; Görke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Formation of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) by enzyme GlcN6P synthase (GlmS) represents the first step in bacterial cell envelope synthesis. In Escherichia coli, expression of glmS is controlled by small RNAs (sRNAs) GlmY and GlmZ. GlmZ activates the glmS mRNA by base-pairing. When not required, GlmZ is bound by adapter protein RapZ and recruited to cleavage by RNase E inactivating the sRNA. The homologous sRNA GlmY activates glmS indirectly. When present at high levels, GlmY sequesters RapZ by an RNA mimicry mechanism suppressing cleavage of GlmZ. The interplay of both sRNAs is believed to adjust GlmS synthesis to the needs of the cell, i.e., to achieve GlcN6P homeostasis. Bacilysin (tetaine) and Nva-FMDP are dipeptide antibiotics that impair cell envelope synthesis by inhibition of enzyme GlmS through covalent modification. However, although taken up efficiently, these antibiotics are less active against E. coli for reasons unknown so far. Here we show that the GlmY/GlmZ circuit provides resistance. Inhibition of GlmS causes GlcN6P deprivation leading to activation of GlmY and GlmZ, which in turn trigger glmS overexpression in a dosage-dependent manner. Mutation of glmY or glmZ disables this response and renders the bacteria highly susceptible to GlmS inhibitors. Thus, E. coli compensates inhibition of GlmS by increasing its synthesis through the GlmY/GlmZ pathway. This mechanism is also operative in Salmonella indicating that it is conserved in Enterobacteriaceae possessing these sRNAs. As GlmY apparently responds to GlcN6P, co-application of a non-metabolizable GlcN6P analog may prevent activation of the sRNAs and thereby increase the bactericidal activity of GlmS inhibitors against wild-type bacteria. Initial experiments using glucosamine-6-sulfate support this possibility. Thus, GlcN6P analogs might be considered for co-application with GlmS inhibitors in combined therapy to treat infections caused by pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27379045

  3. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteria are stained dark purple. Cell walls of gram-negative bacteria are more permeable - they do not retain much of the dye, and so their cell walls do not show much stain. Growth promoters A class of substances, usually antibiotics, ...

  4. Antibiotic resistance: A current epilogue.

    PubMed

    Dodds, David R

    2017-06-15

    The history of the first commercial antibiotics is briefly reviewed, together with data from the US and WHO, showing the decrease in death due to infectious diseases over the 20th century, from just under half of all deaths, to less than 10%. The second half of the 20th century saw the new use of antibiotics as growth promoters for food animals in the human diet, and the end of the 20th century and beginning of the 21st saw the beginning and rapid rise of advanced microbial resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saswati; Chattopadhyay, Madhab K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in sub-inhibitory concentrations acting as signaling molecules supporting the process of quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host–parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell, and so on). The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behavior of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and the genes that confer resistance to antibiotics

  6. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals. PMID:21694883

  7. Advances in pneumococcal antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hoon

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance and serotypes in Streptococcus pneumoniae have been evolving with the widespread use of antibiotics and the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). Particularly, among various types of antimicrobial resistance, macrolide resistance has most remarkably increased in many parts of the world, which has been reported to be >70% among clinical isolates from Asian countries. Penicillin resistance has dramatically decreased among nonmeningeal isolates due to the changes in resistance breakpoints, although resistance to other β-lactams such as cefuroxime has increased. Multidrug resistance became a serious concern in the treatment of invasive pneumococcal diseases, especially in Asian countries. After PCV7 vaccination, serotype 19A has emerged as an important cause of invasive pneumococcal diseases which was also associated with increasing prevalence of multidrug resistance in pneumococci. Widespread use of PCV13, which covers additional serotypes 3, 6A and 19A, may contribute to reduce the clonal spread of drug-resistant 19A pneumococci.

  8. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed. PMID:24694026

  9. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  10. Suppression of antibiotic resistance acquisition by combined use of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shingo; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the effect of combinatorial use of antibiotics with a trade-off relationship of resistance, i.e., resistance acquisition to one drug causes susceptibility to the other drug, and vice versa, on the evolution of antibiotic resistance. We demonstrated that this combinatorial use of antibiotics significantly suppressed the acquisition of resistance. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Antibiotic resistance: A global crisis].

    PubMed

    Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of antibiotics into clinical practice represented one of the most important interventions for the control of infectious diseases. Antibiotics have saved millions of lives and have also brought a revolution in medicine. However, an increasing threat has deteriorated the effectiveness of these drugs, that of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, which is defined here as the ability of bacteria to survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit/kill others of the same species. In this review some recent and important examples of resistance in pathogens of concern for mankind are mentioned. It is explained, according to present knowledge, the process that led to the current situation in a short time, evolutionarily speaking. It begins with the resistance genes, continues with clones and genetic elements involved in the maintenance and dissemination, and ends with other factors that contribute to its spread. Possible responses to the problem are also reviewed, with special reference to the development of new antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We propose a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal link is briefly su...

  13. Spatial mapping of antibiotic resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A serious concern for modern animal production is the fear that feed antimicrobials, such as monensin, increase the potential for high levels of antibiotic resistant (AR) gene prevalence in the manure, which may subsequently be shared with soil communities and eventually be taken up by human pathoge...

  14. Antibiotic resistance: a geopolitical issue.

    PubMed

    Carlet, J; Pulcini, C; Piddock, L J V

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), associated with a lack of new antibiotics, is a major threat. Some countries have been able to contain resistance, but in most countries the numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria continue to increase, along with antibiotic consumption by humans and animals. AMR is a global issue, and concerns all decision-makers worldwide. Some initiatives have been undertaken in the last 15 years, in particular by the WHO, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, and the CDC, but those initiatives were partial and poorly implemented, without coordination. Very recently, some important initiatives have been implemented by the WHO. Since 2009, a US and European joint task force, the Trans-Atlantic Task Force on Antibiotic Resistance, has been working on common recommendations. At a national level, some important initiatives have been implemented, in particular in European countries and in the USA. The Chennai declaration, in India, is also a good example of a multidisciplinary and national initiative that was highly political. Finally, several non-governmental non-profit organizations are also very active, and have helped to raise awareness about the problem of AMR. In the future, this global issue will need political involvement and strong cooperation between countries and between international agencies.

  15. Persistence and resistance as complementary bacterial adaptations to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vogwill, T; Comfort, A C; Furió, V; MacLean, R C

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial persistence represents a simple of phenotypic heterogeneity, whereby a proportion of cells in an isogenic bacterial population can survive exposure to lethal stresses such as antibiotics. In contrast, genetically based antibiotic resistance allows for continued growth in the presence of antibiotics. It is unclear, however, whether resistance and persistence are complementary or alternative evolutionary adaptations to antibiotics. Here, we investigate the co-evolution of resistance and persistence across the genus Pseudomonas using comparative methods that correct for phylogenetic nonindependence. We find that strains of Pseudomonas vary extensively in both their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and rifampicin) and persistence following exposure to these antibiotics. Crucially, we find that persistence correlates positively to antibiotic resistance across strains. However, we find that different genes control resistance and persistence implying that they are independent traits. Specifically, we find that the number of type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) in the genome of a strain is correlated to persistence, but not resistance. Our study shows that persistence and antibiotic resistance are complementary, but independent, evolutionary adaptations to stress and it highlights the key role played by TAs in the evolution of persistence.

  16. Antibiotic resistance in the opportunistic pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, María B

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an environmental bacterium found in the soil, associated with plants and animals, and in aquatic environments. It is also an opportunistic pathogen now causing an increasing number of nosocomial infections. The treatment of S. maltophilia is quite difficult given its intrinsic resistance to a number of antibiotics, and because it is able to acquire new resistances via horizontal gene transfer and mutations. Certainly, strains resistant to quinolones, cotrimoxale and/or cephalosporins-antibiotics commonly used to treat S. maltophilia infections-have emerged. The increasing number of available S. maltophilia genomes has allowed the identification and annotation of a large number of antimicrobial resistance genes. Most encode inactivating enzymes and efflux pumps, but information on their role in intrinsic and acquired resistance is limited. Non-typical antibiotic resistance mechanisms that also form part of the intrinsic resistome have been identified via mutant library screening. These include non-typical antibiotic resistance genes, such as bacterial metabolism genes, and non-inheritable resistant phenotypes, such as biofilm formation and persistence. Their relationships with resistance are complex and require further study.

  17. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    useful in the care of patients with combat-related wound infections. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Antibiotic resistance, plasmid, biofilm, coevolution , bacteria...Antibiotic!resistance,!plasmid,!biofilm,! coevolution ,!bacteria,!wound!infections! ! ! ! 3! 3. OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY: The! successful! persistence

  18. Intrinsic novobiocin resistance in Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Anna A; Chopra, Ian; O'Neill, Alex J

    2007-12-01

    Intrinsic novobiocin resistance in Staphylococcus saprophyticus was associated with expression of a novobiocin-resistant form of the drug target protein (GyrB). Site-directed mutagenesis established that resistance depends upon the presence of two specific amino acid residues in GyrB: a glycine at position 85 and a lysine at position 140.

  19. Mathematical analysis of multi-antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-09-15

    Multi-antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections is a growing threat to public health. Some experiments were carried out to study the multi-antibiotic resistance. The changes of the multi-antibiotic resistance with time were achieved by numerical simulations and the mathematical models, with the calculated temperature field, velocity field, and the antibiotic concentration field. The computed results and experimental results are compared. Both numerical simulations and the analytic models suggest that minor low concentrations of antibiotics could induce antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intrinsic Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants in the Superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justine L; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Whiteley, Marvin

    2015-10-27

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria pose a serious threat in the clinic. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens that possess high intrinsic resistance. Though many studies have focused on understanding the acquisition of bacterial resistance upon exposure to antimicrobials, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are not well understood. In this study, we subjected the model opportunistic superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa to 14 antimicrobials under highly controlled conditions and assessed its response using expression- and fitness-based genomic approaches. Our results reveal that gene expression changes and mutant fitness in response to sub-MIC antimicrobials do not correlate on a genomewide scale, indicating that gene expression is not a good predictor of fitness determinants. In general, fewer fitness determinants were identified for antiseptics and disinfectants than for antibiotics. Analysis of gene expression and fitness data together allowed the prediction of antagonistic interactions between antimicrobials and insight into the molecular mechanisms controlling these interactions. Infections involving multidrug-resistant pathogens are difficult to treat because the therapeutic options are limited. These infections impose a significant financial burden on infected patients and on health care systems. Despite years of antimicrobial resistance research, we lack a comprehensive understanding of the intrinsic mechanisms controlling antimicrobial resistance. This work uses two fine-scale genomic approaches to identify genetic loci important for antimicrobial resistance of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results reveal that antibiotics have more resistance determinants than antiseptics/disinfectants and that gene expression upon exposure to antimicrobials is not a good predictor of these resistance determinants. In addition, we show that when used together, genomewide gene expression and fitness profiling can provide

  1. Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Alba, Claudio; Blanco, Ana; Alarcón, Teresa

    2017-10-01

    Treatment of Helicobacter pylori is difficult nowadays because of its high resistance. The prevalence and mechanism of resistance, the different methods to detect it and the clinical implication of resistance were addressed in several research papers last year. Clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori has been recognized by the WHO as 'high priority', for which new antibiotics are needed. Moreover, the Maastricht consensus recommended, in areas with high resistance, that susceptibility tests should be performed, at least after a treatment failure. Metronidazole and clarithromycin resistance rates are alarming although they vary among populations. Tetracycline and amoxicillin-resistance are very low in most countries. H. pylori resistance can be detected by phenotypic or by molecular methods. Different break points may be used when performing an antimicrobial susceptibility test, so comparing resistance among different populations is challenging. Genomic techniques open new possibilities in the diagnosis of H. pylori, and the detection of H. pylori and its antimicrobial resistance in faeces is an interesting approach. Eradication rates are dependent on the susceptibility of the strain to metronidazole and clarithromycin, being lower in patients infected with a resistant strain.

  2. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water. PMID:27029309

  3. Antibiotic resistance in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Carlota; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection is one of the most frequent complications in cancer patients and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. In recent years, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a significant problem worldwide, and cancer patients are among those affected. Treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria represents a clinical challenge, especially in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, since the therapeutic options are often very limited. As the antibiotics active against MDR bacteria present several disadvantages (limited clinical experience, higher incidence of adverse effects, and less knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug), a thorough acquaintance with the main characteristics of these drugs is mandatory in order to provide safe treatment to cancer patients with MDR bacterial infections. Nevertheless, the implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs and infection control measures is the cornerstone for controlling the development and spread of these MDR pathogens.

  4. Resistance to Antibiotics Mediated by Target Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Brian G.

    1994-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics by reductions in the affinities of their enzymatic targets occurs most rapidly for antibiotics that inactivate a single target and that are not analogs of substrate. In these cases of resistance (for example, resistance to rifampicin), numerous single amino acid substitutions may provide large decreases in the affinity of the target for the antibiotic, leading to clinically significant levels of resistance. Resistance due to target alterations should occur much more slowly for those antibiotics (penicillin, for example) that inactivate multiple targets irreversibly by acting as close analogs of substrate. Resistance to penicillin because of target changes has emerged, by unexpected mechanisms, only in a limited number of species. However, inactivating enzymes commonly provide resistance to antibiotics that, like penicillin, are derived from natural products, although such enzymes have not been found for synthetic antibiotics. Thus, the ideal antibiotic would be produced by rational design, rather than by the modification of a natural product.

  5. Origins and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julian; Davies, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and every means of horizontal gene transmission to develop multiple mechanisms of resistance for each and every antibiotic introduced into practice clinically, agriculturally, or otherwise. This review presents the salient aspects of antibiotic resistance development over the past half-century, with the oft-restated conclusion that it is time to act. To achieve complete restitution of therapeutic applications of antibiotics, there is a need for more information on the role of environmental microbiomes in the rise of antibiotic resistance. In particular, creative approaches to the discovery of novel antibiotics and their expedited and controlled introduction to therapy are obligatory. PMID:20805405

  6. Origins and evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Davies, Julian; Davies, Dorothy

    2010-09-01

    Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and every means of horizontal gene transmission to develop multiple mechanisms of resistance for each and every antibiotic introduced into practice clinically, agriculturally, or otherwise. This review presents the salient aspects of antibiotic resistance development over the past half-century, with the oft-restated conclusion that it is time to act. To achieve complete restitution of therapeutic applications of antibiotics, there is a need for more information on the role of environmental microbiomes in the rise of antibiotic resistance. In particular, creative approaches to the discovery of novel antibiotics and their expedited and controlled introduction to therapy are obligatory.

  7. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it.

  8. Rationalizing antibiotic use to limit antibiotic resistance in India.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Nirmal K; Arora, N K; Chandy, Sujith J; Fairoze, Mohamed Nadeem; Gill, J P S; Gupta, Usha; Hossain, Shah; Joglekar, Sadhna; Joshi, P C; Kakkar, Manish; Kotwani, Anita; Rattan, Ashok; Sudarshan, H; Thomas, Kurien; Wattal, Chand; Easton, Alice; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2011-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance, a global concern, is particularly pressing in developing nations, including India, where the burden of infectious disease is high and healthcare spending is low. The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership (GARP) was established to develop actionable policy recommendations specifically relevant to low- and middle-income countries where suboptimal access to antibiotics - not a major concern in high-income countries - is possibly as severe a problem as is the spread of resistant organisms. This report summarizes the situation as it is known regarding antibiotic use and growing resistance in India and recommends short and long term actions. Recommendations aim at (i) reducing the need for antibiotics; (ii) lowering resistance-enhancing drug pressure through improved antibiotic targeting, and (iii) eliminating antibiotic use for growth promotion in agriculture. The highest priority needs to be given to (i) national surveillance of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic use - better information to underpin decisions on standard treatment guidelines, education and other actions, as well as to monitor changes over time; (ii) increasing the use of diagnostic tests, which necessitates behavioural changes and improvements in microbiology laboratory capacity; (iii) setting up and/or strengthening infection control committees in hospitals; and (iv) restricting the use of antibiotics for non-therapeutic uses in agriculture. These interventions should help to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance, improve public health directly, benefit the populace and reduce pressure on the healthcare system. Finally, increasing the types and coverage of childhood vaccines offered by the government would reduce the disease burden enormously and spare antibiotics.

  9. Rationalizing antibiotic use to limit antibiotic resistance in India+

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, a global concern, is particularly pressing in developing nations, including India, where the burden of infectious disease is high and healthcare spending is low. The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership (GARP) was established to develop actionable policy recommendations specifically relevant to low- and middle-income countries where suboptimal access to antibiotics - not a major concern in high-income countries - is possibly as severe a problem as is the spread of resistant organisms. This report summarizes the situation as it is known regarding antibiotic use and growing resistance in India and recommends short and long term actions. Recommendations aim at (i) reducing the need for antibiotics; (ii) lowering resistance-enhancing drug pressure through improved antibiotic targeting, and (iii) eliminating antibiotic use for growth promotion in agriculture. The highest priority needs to be given to (i) national surveillance of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic use - better information to underpin decisions on standard treatment guidelines, education and other actions, as well as to monitor changes over time; (ii) increasing the use of diagnostic tests, which necessitates behavioural changes and improvements in microbiology laboratory capacity; (iii) setting up and/or strengthening infection control committees in hospitals; and (iv) restricting the use of antibiotics for non-therapeutic uses in agriculture. These interventions should help to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance, improve public health directly, benefit the populace and reduce pressure on the healthcare system. Finally, increasing the types and coverage of childhood vaccines offered by the government would reduce the disease burden enormously and spare antibiotics. PMID:21985810

  10. Development of botanicals to combat antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja D; Birdi, Tannaz J

    2017-08-30

    The discovery of antibiotics in the previous century lead to reduction in mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases but their inappropriate and irrational use has resulted in emergence of resistant microbial populations. Alteration of target sites, active efflux of drugs and enzymatic degradations are the strategies employed by the pathogenic bacteria to develop intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. This has led to an increased interest in medicinal plants since 25-50% of current pharmaceuticals are plant derived. Crude extracts of medicinal plants could serve as an alternate source of resistance modifying agents owing to the wide variety of secondary metabolites. These metabolites (alkaloids, tannins, polyphenols etc.) could act as potentials for antimicrobials and resistance modifiers. Plant extracts have the ability to bind to protein domains leading to modification or inhibition protein-protein interactions. This enables the herbals to also present themselves as effective modulators of host related cellular processes viz immune response, mitosis, apoptosis and signal transduction. Thus they may exert their activity not only by killing the microorganism but by affecting key events in the pathogenic process, thereby, the bacteria, fungi and viruses may have a reduced ability to develop resistance to botanicals. The article is meant to stimulate research wherein the cidal activity of the extract is not the only parameter considered but other mechanism of action by which plants can combat drug resistant microbes are investigated. The present article emphasizes on mechanisms involved in countering multi drug resistance. Copyright © 2017 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibiotic use and resistance in animals: Belgian initiatives.

    PubMed

    Daeseleire, Els; De Graef, Evelyne; Rasschaert, Geertrui; De Mulder, Thijs; Van den Meersche, Tina; Van Coillie, Els; Dewulf, Jeroen; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics in animals is causing concerns about the growing risk for development and the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Antibiotic consumption is higher in animals than in humans as reported in a joint publication of EFSA (European Food Safety Agency), ECDC (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control), and EMA (European Medicines Agency) using data from 2011 and 2012. Both in humans and animals, positive associations between the consumption of antibiotics and resistant bacteria are observed. Responsible use of antibiotics in humans and animals should therefore be promoted. In this paper some general aspects of antibiotic resistance such as microbiological versus clinical resistance, intrinsic versus acquired resistance, resistance mechanisms, and transfer of resistance are briefly introduced. In 2012, the Belgian Center of Expertise on Antimicrobial Consumption and Resistance in Animals (AMCRA) was founded. Its mission is to collect and analyze all data related to antibiotic use and resistance in animals in Belgium and to communicate these findings in a neutral and objective manner. One of AMCRA's 10 objectives is a 50% reduction in antibiotic consumption in veterinary medicine in Belgium by 2020. The aim of this paper is to report on the achievements of this national project. The Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research (ILVO, Merelbeke-Melle), in collaboration with Ghent University, is currently working on three nationally funded projects on antibiotic resistance in animal husbandry. In the first project, an in vitro model is used to study the influence of low antibiotic concentrations due to carry-over after production and usage of medicated feed on the development of resistance in the pig gut. Part of that project is to develop a quantitative risk assessment model. A second project focuses on tracking excreted antibiotics used in pig rearing and their influence on the development of antibiotic resistance in pig

  12. Insights into antibiotic resistance through metagenomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Robert; Edwards, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of bacterial infections have been curtailed by the introduction of a wide range of antibiotics. However, infections continue to be a leading cause of mortality, in part due to the evolution and acquisition of antibiotic-resistance genes. Antibiotic misuse and overprescription have created a driving force influencing the selection of resistance. Despite the problem of antibiotic resistance in infectious bacteria, little is known about the diversity, distribution and origins of resistance genes, especially for the unculturable majority of environmental bacteria. Functional and sequence-based metagenomics have been used for the discovery of novel resistance determinants and the improved understanding of antibiotic-resistance mechanisms in clinical and natural environments. This review discusses recent findings and future challenges in the study of antibiotic resistance through metagenomic approaches.

  13. Adjuvant strategies for potentiation of antibiotics to overcome antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Pieren, Michel; Tigges, Marcel

    2012-10-01

    Alarming facts about the occurrence and spreading of multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria have caught the attention of global surveillance authorities and public media. The demand for novel effective antimicrobial drugs is high and on the rise while, at the same time, the supply of fresh 'magic bullets' is drying up. This review summarizes examples of recent strategies for development of adjunctive antibiotic therapies that overcome microbial resistance and thus rejuvenate the existing arsenal of drugs. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of compounds that inhibit the action of the repressor protein implicated in ethionamide resistance, thus stimulating activation of the drug and thereby restoring the activity of the antibiotic for treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Such specific interference with regulators or signal transduction mechanisms involved in antibiotic resistance or virulence provides a new toolbox for novel combinations of antimicrobial drugs with adjuvant molecules lacking intrinsic antibiotic activity. In addition to the development of new antibiotics and vaccination initiatives this strategy of restoring or potentiating the activity of existing antibiotics may help to postpone the day when antibiotics are no longer generally efficacious.

  14. Resistance diagnosis and the changing epidemiology of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    McAdams, David

    2017-01-01

    Widespread adoption of point-of-care resistance diagnostics (POCRD) reduces ineffective antibiotic use but could increase overall antibiotic use. Indeed, in the context of a standard susceptible-infected epidemiological model with a single antibiotic, POCRD accelerates the rise of resistance in the disease-causing bacterial population. When multiple antibiotics are available, however, POCRD may slow the rise of resistance even as more patients receive antibiotic treatment, belying the conventional wisdom that antibiotics are "exhaustible resources" whose increased use necessarily promotes the rise of resistance. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Mechanisms of Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics are used to treat many Gram-negative and some Gram-positive infections and, importantly, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Among various bacterial species, resistance to AGs arises through a variety of intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. The bacterial cell wall serves as a natural barrier for small molecules such as AGs and may be further fortified via acquired mutations. Efflux pumps work to expel AGs from bacterial cells, and modifications here too may cause further resistance to AGs. Mutations in the ribosomal target of AGs, while rare, also contribute to resistance. Of growing clinical prominence is resistance caused by ribosome methyltransferases. By far the most widespread mechanism of resistance to AGs is the inactivation of these antibiotics by AG-modifying enzymes. We provide here an overview of these mechanisms by which bacteria become resistant to AGs and discuss their prevalence and potential for clinical relevance. PMID:26877861

  16. Tackling antibiotic resistance: the environmental framework.

    PubMed

    Berendonk, Thomas U; Manaia, Célia M; Merlin, Christophe; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo; Cytryn, Eddie; Walsh, Fiona; Bürgmann, Helmut; Sørum, Henning; Norström, Madelaine; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Kreuzinger, Norbert; Huovinen, Pentti; Stefani, Stefania; Schwartz, Thomas; Kisand, Veljo; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a threat to human and animal health worldwide, and key measures are required to reduce the risks posed by antibiotic resistance genes that occur in the environment. These measures include the identification of critical points of control, the development of reliable surveillance and risk assessment procedures, and the implementation of technological solutions that can prevent environmental contamination with antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes. In this Opinion article, we discuss the main knowledge gaps, the future research needs and the policy and management options that should be prioritized to tackle antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  17. Antibiotics and Bacterial Resistance in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Richard J; Tor, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Dangerous, antibiotic resistant bacteria have been observed with increasing frequency over the past several decades. In this review the factors that have been linked to this phenomenon are addressed. Profiles of bacterial species that are deemed to be particularly concerning at the present time are illustrated. Factors including economic impact, intrinsic and acquired drug resistance, morbidity and mortality rates, and means of infection are taken into account. Synchronously with the waxing of bacterial resistance there has been waning antibiotic development. The approaches that scientists are employing in the pursuit of new antibacterial agents are briefly described. The standings of established antibiotic classes as well as potentially emerging classes are assessed with an emphasis on molecules that have been clinically approved or are in advanced stages of development. Historical perspectives, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum of activity, and preeminent members of each class are discussed. PMID:25232278

  18. General principles of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jose L

    2014-03-01

    Given the impact of antibiotic resistance on human health, its study is of great interest from a clinical view- point. In addition, antibiotic resistance is one of the few examples of evolution that can be studied in real time. Knowing the general principles involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance is therefore of interest to clinicians, evolutionary biologists and ecologists. The origin of antibiotic resistance genes now possessed by human pathogens can be traced back to environmental microorganisms. Consequently, a full understanding of the evolution of antibiotic resistance requires the study of natural environments as well as clinical ecosystems. Updated information on the evolutionary mechanisms behind resistance, indicates that ecological connectivity, founder effect and fitness costs are important bottle- necks that modulate the transfer of resistance from environmental microorganisms to pathogens.

  19. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions.

    PubMed

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Antibiotic adjuvants - A strategy to unlock bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    González-Bello, Concepción

    2017-09-15

    Resistance to available antibiotics in pathogenic bacteria is currently a global challenge since the number of strains that are resistant to multiple types of antibiotics has increased dramatically each year and has spread worldwide. To unlock this problem, the use of an 'antibiotic adjuvant' in combination with an antibiotic is now being exploited. This approach enables us to prolong the lifespan of these life-saving drugs. This digests review provides an overview of the main types of antibiotic adjuvants, the basis of their operation and the remaining issues to be tackled in this field. Particular emphasis is placed on those compounds that are already in clinical development, namely β-lactamase inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Update on the antibiotic resistance crisis.

    PubMed

    Rossolini, Gian Maria; Arena, Fabio; Pecile, Patrizia; Pollini, Simona

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotics tend to lose their efficacy over time due to the emergence and dissemination of resistance among bacterial pathogens. Strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes have emerged among major Gram-positive and Gram-negative species including Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. Enterobacteriaceae, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. With some Gram-negatives, resistance may involve most or even all the available antimicrobial options, resulting in extremely drug-resistant or totally drug-resistant phenotypes. This so-called 'antibiotic resistance crisis' has been compounded by the lagging in antibiotic discovery and development programs occurred in recent years, and is jeopardizing the essential role played by antibiotics in current medical practices.

  2. [Antibiotic resistance and siderophore production in enterococci].

    PubMed

    Lisiecki, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci belong to the normal bacterial flora of the gastrointensinal tract of humans. Enterococci are regarded as harmless commensal, and are even believed to have probiotic characteristics. However, they can cause variety of infections, including endocarditis, bloodstream infections and urinary tract infections. During the past several decades, enterococci, and particularly Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium, have been identified as an important cause of nosocomial infections. Enterococci are intrinsically resistant to a broad range of antimicrobials. Infection caused by resistant strains are difficult to treat. Iron is an essential element for bacteria, but is not easily available in host organisms. Enterococci are iron dependent bacteria. Competition for iron between the host and bacteria is an important factor determining the course of bacterial infections. A common strategy among bacteria living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. The aim of the presented study was to evaluate the correlation between antibiotic resistance and siderophore production of bacteria of the genus Enterococcus. The study included 55 bacterial strains from genus Enterococcus belonging to two species--Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were carried out using disc diffusion methods with guidelines of European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Total siderophore activity in the culture supernatants was measured using chrome azurol S. Hydroxamate siderophores were assayed using a chemical-specific assay. Antibacterial susceptibility pattern reveals that E. faecium is more resistant than E. faecalis. A significant correlation was found between resistance to fluoroquinolnes and siderophores production. Ciprofloxacin- and norfloxacin-resistant enterococal strains produced siderophores in large

  3. Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Internationally Across Borders.

    PubMed

    Barlam, Tamar F; Gupta, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant (ABR) bacteria develop when bacteria are exposed to antibiotics either during treatments in humans or animals or through environmental sources contaminated with antibiotic residues. Resistant bacteria selected by medical, agricultural, and industrial use spread globally through international travel, the export of animals and retail products, and the environment. It is essential that nations work together to identify how to reduce emergence and amplification of resistant bacteria through sensible antibiotic treatment guidelines and restrictions, concerted efforts for surveillance, and infection control. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  4. Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance in Agroecosystems: State of the Science.

    PubMed

    Williams-Nguyen, Jessica; Sallach, J Brett; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon; Boxall, Alistair B; Durso, Lisa M; McLain, Jean E; Singer, Randall S; Snow, Daniel D; Zilles, Julie L

    2016-03-01

    We propose a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal link is briefly summarized, and key knowledge gaps are highlighted. A lack of quantitative estimates of human exposure to environmental bacteria, in general, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria, specifically, is a significant data gap hindering the assessment of effects on human health. The contribution of horizontal gene transfer to resistance in the environment and conditions that might foster the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes into human pathogens also need further research. Existing research has focused heavily on human health effects, with relatively little known about the effects of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance on natural and agricultural ecosystems. The proposed causal model is used to elucidate gaps in knowledge that must be addressed by the research community and may provide a useful starting point for the design and analysis of future research efforts. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Antibiotic resistance: a physicist’s view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Rosalind; Waclaw, Bartłomiej

    2016-08-01

    The problem of antibiotic resistance poses challenges across many disciplines. One such challenge is to understand the fundamental science of how antibiotics work, and how resistance to them can emerge. This is an area where physicists can make important contributions. Here, we highlight cases where this is already happening, and suggest directions for further physics involvement in antimicrobial research.

  6. Antibiotic resistance: a physicist’s view

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Rosalind; Waclaw, Bartłomiej

    2016-01-01

    The problem of antibiotic resistance poses challenges across many disciplines. One such challenge is to understand the fundamental science of how antibiotics work, and how resistance to them can emerge. This is an area where physicists can make important contributions. Here, we highlight cases where this is already happening, and suggest directions for further physics involvement in antimicrobial research. PMID:27510596

  7. A review of the influence of treatment strategies on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; Johnson, Natalie; Cizmas, Leslie; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in the aquatic environment have become an emerging contaminant issue, which has implications for human and ecological health. This review begins with an introduction to the occurrence of ARB and ARG in different environmental systems such as natural environments and drinking water resources. For example, ARG or ARB with resistance to ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, quinolone, vancomycin, or tetracycline (e.g., tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(G), tet(O), tet(M), tet(W), sul I, and sul II) have been detected in the environment. The development of resistance may be intrinsic, may be acquired through spontaneous mutations (de novo), or may occur due to horizontal gene transfer from donor bacteria, phages, or free DNA to recipient bacteria. An overview is also provided of the current knowledge regarding inactivation of ARB and ARG, and the mechanism of the effects of different disinfection processes in water and wastewater (chlorination, UV irradiation, Fenton reaction, ozonation, and photocatalytic oxidation). The effects of constructed wetlands and nanotechnology on ARB and ARG are also summarized.

  8. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  9. Counteracting selection for antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yosef, Ido; Manor, Miriam; Qimron, Udi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens is on the rise because antibiotics exert selection pressure that kills only the antibiotic-sensitive pathogens. Sanitation and cleansing of hospital surfaces and the skin of medical personnel do not counteract this selective pressure, but rather indiscriminately reduce total pathogens on treated surfaces. Here, we discuss two recently introduced genetic strategies, based on temperate bacteriophages as DNA-delivery vehicles, that aim to sensitize bacteria to antibiotics and selectively kill the antibiotic-resistant ones. Outlooks for rendering one such approach more efficient and applicable are proposed. We believe that using an end product designed according to the provided principles on hospital surfaces and in hand-sanitizers will facilitate substitution of antibiotic-resistant pathogens with sensitive ones. PMID:27144084

  10. Counteracting selection for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Ido; Manor, Miriam; Qimron, Udi

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens is on the rise because antibiotics exert selection pressure that kills only the antibiotic-sensitive pathogens. Sanitation and cleansing of hospital surfaces and the skin of medical personnel do not counteract this selective pressure, but rather indiscriminately reduce total pathogens on treated surfaces. Here, we discuss two recently introduced genetic strategies, based on temperate bacteriophages as DNA-delivery vehicles, that aim to sensitize bacteria to antibiotics and selectively kill the antibiotic-resistant ones. Outlooks for rendering one such approach more efficient and applicable are proposed. We believe that using an end product designed according to the provided principles on hospital surfaces and in hand-sanitizers will facilitate substitution of antibiotic-resistant pathogens with sensitive ones.

  11. Intrinsic radiation resistance in human chondrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Mollano, Anthony; Martin, James A.; Ayoob, Andrew; Domann, Frederick E.; Gitelis, Steven; Buckwalter, Joseph A. . E-mail: joseph-buckwalter@uiowa.edu

    2006-07-28

    Human chondrosarcomas rarely respond to radiation treatment, limiting the options for eradication of these tumors. The basis of radiation resistance in chondrosarcomas remains obscure. In normal cells radiation induces DNA damage that leads to growth arrest or death. However, cells that lack cell cycle control mechanisms needed for these responses show intrinsic radiation resistance. In previous work, we identified immortalized human chondrosarcoma cell lines that lacked p16{sup ink4a}, one of the major tumor suppressor proteins that regulate the cell cycle. We hypothesized that the absence of p16{sup ink4a} contributes to the intrinsic radiation resistance of chondrosarcomas and that restoring p16{sup ink4a} expression would increase their radiation sensitivity. To test this we determined the effects of ectopic p16{sup ink4a} expression on chondrosarcoma cell resistance to low-dose {gamma}-irradiation (1-5 Gy). p16{sup ink4a} expression significantly increased radiation sensitivity in clonogenic assays. Apoptosis did not increase significantly with radiation and was unaffected by p16{sup ink4a} transduction of chondrosarcoma cells, indicating that mitotic catastrophe, rather than programmed cell death, was the predominant radiation effect. These results support the hypothesis that p16{sup ink4a} plays a role in the radiation resistance of chondrosarcoma cell lines and suggests that restoring p16 expression will improve the radiation sensitivity of human chondrosarcomas.

  12. Antibiotic resistance in ocular bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the eye are common and ophthalmologists are spoilt for choice with a variety of antibiotics available in the market. Antibiotics can be administered in the eye by a number of routes; topical, subconjunctival, subtenon and intraocular. Apart from a gamut of eye drops available, ophthalmologists also have the option of preparing fortified eye drops from parenteral formulations, thereby, achieving high concentrations; often much above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of antibiotics in ocular tissues during therapy. Antibiotic resistance among ocular pathogens is increasing in parallel with the increase seen over the years in bacteria associated with systemic infections. Although it is believed that the rise in resistant ocular bacterial isolates is linked to the rise in resistant systemic pathogens, recent evidence has correlated the emergence of resistant bacteria in the eye to prior topical antibiotic therapy. One would like to believe that either of these contributes to the emergence of resistance to antibiotics among ocular pathogens. Until recently, ocular pathogens resistant to fluoroquinolones have been minimal but the pattern is currently alarming. The new 8-fluoroquinolone on the scene-besifloxacin, is developed exclusively for ophthalmic use and it is hoped that it will escape the selective pressure for resistance because of lack of systemic use. In addition to development of new antibacterial agents, the strategies to halt or control further development of resistant ocular pathogens should always include judicious use of antibiotics in the treatment of human, animal or plant diseases.

  13. Selective decontamination and antibiotic resistance in ICUs.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-06-24

    Selective digestive decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) have been associated with reduced mortality and lower ICU-acquired bacteremia and ventilator-associated pneumonia rates in areas with low levels of antibiotic resistance. However, the effect of selective decontamination (SDD/SOD) in areas where multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are endemic is less clear. It will be important to determine whether SDD/SOD improves patient outcome in such settings and how these measures affect the epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Here we review the current evidence on the effects of SDD/SOD on antibiotic resistance development in individual ICU patients as well as the effect on ICU ecology, the latter including both ICU-level antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance development during long-term use of SDD/SOD.

  14. Influence of population density on antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, N; Hutchinson, J M; van den Bogaard, A E; Giamarellou, H; Degener, J; Stobberingh, E E

    2003-02-01

    Antibiotic consumption and population density as a measure of crowding in the community were related to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance of three cities in three different countries: St Johns in Newfoundland (Canada), Athens in Greece and Groningen in The Netherlands. Antibiotic consumption was expressed in DDD (defined daily dose), as DID (DDD/1000 inhabitants/day) and as DSD (DDD/km(2)). The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli and enterococci was determined in faecal samples of healthy volunteers. In both Newfoundland (28 DID) and Greece (29 DID) the overall consumption of antibiotics was more than three times higher compared with that of The Netherlands (9 DID). The lowest prevalence of resistant E. coli against the majority of antibiotics tested was found for the samples from Newfoundland and was significant (P < 0.05) for cefazolin, oxytetracycline and trimethoprim. A poor correlation between the number of DID and the prevalence of resistance was observed [the Pearson correlation coefficient (Pcc) ranged between -0.93 and 0.87]. However, when population density was taken into consideration and antibiotic consumption was expressed in DSD, a strong correlation was observed (and Pcc ranged between 0.86 and 1.00). This study suggests that population density is an important factor in the development of antibiotic resistance and warrants special attention as a factor in resistance epidemiology.

  15. Antibiotic Resistance in Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Doern, Christopher D; Godbout, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in pediatric patients. Resistance to common antibiotic agents appears to be increasing over time, although resistance rates may vary based on geographic region or country. Prior antibiotic exposure is a pertinent risk factor for acquiring resistant organisms during a first UTI and recurrent UTI. Judicious prescribing of antibiotics for common pediatric conditions is needed to prevent additional resistance from occurring. Complex pediatric patients with histories of hospitalizations, prior antibiotic exposure, and recurrent UTIs are also at high risk for acquiring UTIs due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms. Data regarding the impact of in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing interpretation on UTI treatment outcomes is lacking.

  16. Antibiotic combinations for controlling colistin-resistant Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thais Bergamin; Silva, Osmar Nascimento; de Almeida, Keyla Caroline; Ribeiro, Suzana Meira; Motta, Dielle de Oliveira; Maria-Neto, Simone; Lara, Michelle Brizolla; Filho, Carlos Roberto Souza; Ombredane, Alicia Simalie; de Faria Junior, Celio; Parachin, Nadia Skorupa; Magalhães, Beatriz Simas; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2017-02-01

    Enterobacter cloacae is a Gram-negative bacterium associated with high morbidity and mortality in intensive care patients due to its resistance to multiple antibiotics. Currently, therapy against multi-resistant bacteria consists of using colistin, in spite of its toxic effects at higher concentrations. In this context, colistin-resistant E. cloacae strains were challenged with lower levels of colistin combined with other antibiotics to reduce colistin-associated side effects. Colistin-resistant E. cloacae (ATCC 49141) strains were generated by serial propagation in subinhibitory colistin concentrations. After this, three colistin-resistant and three nonresistant replicates were isolated. The identity of all the strains was confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS, VITEK 2 and MicroScan analysis. Furthermore, cross-resistance to other antibiotics was checked by disk diffusion and automated systems. The synergistic effects of the combined use of colistin and chloramphenicol were observed via the broth microdilution checkerboard method. First, data here reported showed that all strains presented intrinsic resistance to penicillin, cephalosporin (except fourth generation), monobactam, and some associations of penicillin and β-lactamase inhibitors. Moreover, a chloramphenicol and colistin combination was capable of inhibiting the induced colistin-resistant strains as well as two colistin-resistant clinical strains. Furthermore, no cytotoxic effect was observed by using such concentrations. In summary, the data reported here showed for the first time the possible therapeutic use of colistin-chloramphenicol for infections caused by colistin-resistant E. cloacae.

  17. Persistence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Dan I; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2011-09-01

    Unfortunately for mankind, it is very likely that the antibiotic resistance problem we have generated during the last 60 years due to the extensive use and misuse of antibiotics is here to stay for the foreseeable future. This view is based on theoretical arguments, mathematical modeling, experiments and clinical interventions, suggesting that even if we could reduce antibiotic use, resistant clones would remain persistent and only slowly (if at all) be outcompeted by their susceptible relatives. In this review, we discuss the multitude of mechanisms and processes that are involved in causing the persistence of chromosomal and plasmid-borne resistance determinants and how we might use them to our advantage to increase the likelihood of reversing the problem. Of particular interest is the recent demonstration that a very low antibiotic concentration can be enriching for resistant bacteria and the implication that antibiotic release into the environment could contribute to the selection for resistance. Several mechanisms are contributing to the stability of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations and even if antibiotic use is reduced it is likely that most resistance mechanisms will persist for considerable times.

  18. Antibiotic resistance: are we all doomed?

    PubMed

    Collignon, P

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing and worrying problem associated with increased deaths and suffering for people. Overall, there are only two factors that drive antimicrobial resistance, and both can be controlled. These factors are the volumes of antimicrobials used and the spread of resistant micro-organisms and/or the genes encoding for resistance. The One Health concept is important if we want to understand better and control antimicrobial resistance. There are many things we can do to better control antimicrobial resistance. We need to prevent infections. We need to have better surveillance with good data on usage patterns and resistance patterns available across all sectors, both human and agriculture, locally and internationally. We need to act on these results when we see either inappropriate usage or resistance levels rising in bacteria that are of concern for people. We need to ensure that food and water sources do not spread multi-resistant micro-organisms or resistance genes. We need better approaches to restrict successfully what and how antibiotics are used in people. We need to restrict the use of 'critically important' antibiotics in food animals and the entry of these drugs into the environment. We need to ensure that 'One Health' concept is not just a buzz word but implemented. We need to look at all sectors and control not only antibiotic use but also the spread and development of antibiotic resistant bacteria - both locally and internationally. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  19. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William R; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) enterococci are important nosocomial pathogens and a growing clinical challenge. These organisms have developed resistance to virtually all antimicrobials currently used in clinical practice using a diverse number of genetic strategies. Due to this ability to recruit antibiotic resistance determinants, MDR enterococci display a wide repertoire of antibiotic resistance mechanisms including modification of drug targets, inactivation of therapeutic agents, overexpression of efflux pumps and a sophisticated cell envelope adaptive response that promotes survival in the human host and the nosocomial environment. MDR enterococci are well adapted to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and can become the dominant flora under antibiotic pressure, predisposing the severely ill and immunocompromised patient to invasive infections. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci is the first step for devising strategies to control the spread of these organisms and potentially establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25199988

  20. Antibiotic Resistance Related to Biofilm Formation in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Vuotto, Claudia; Longo, Francesca; Balice, Maria Pia; Donelli, Gianfranco; Varaldo, Pietro E.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae, is responsible for causing a spectrum of community-acquired and nosocomial infections and typically infects patients with indwelling medical devices, especially urinary catheters, on which this microorganism is able to grow as a biofilm. The increasingly frequent acquisition of antibiotic resistance by K. pneumoniae strains has given rise to a global spread of this multidrug-resistant pathogen, mostly at the hospital level. This scenario is exacerbated when it is noted that intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial agents dramatically increases when K. pneumoniae strains grow as a biofilm. This review will summarize the findings about the antibiotic resistance related to biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae. PMID:25438022

  1. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Pantosti, Annalisa; Sanchini, Andrea; Monaco, Monica

    2007-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can exemplify better than any other human pathogen the adaptive evolution of bacteria in the antibiotic era, as it has demonstrated a unique ability to quickly respond to each new antibiotic with the development of a resistance mechanism, starting with penicillin and methicillin, until the most recent, linezolid and daptomycin. Resistance mechanisms include enzymatic inactivation of the antibiotic (penicillinase and aminoglycoside-modification enzymes), alteration of the target with decreased affinity for the antibiotic (notable examples being penicillin-binding protein 2a of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and D-Ala-D-Lac of peptidoglycan precursors of vancomycin-resistant strains), trapping of the antibiotic (for vancomycin and possibly daptomycin) and efflux pumps (fluoroquinolones and tetracycline). Complex genetic arrays (staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec elements or the vanA operon) have been acquired by S. aureus through horizontal gene transfer, while resistance to other antibiotics, including some of the most recent ones (e.g., fluoroquinolones, linezolid and daptomycin) have developed through spontaneous mutations and positive selection. Detection of the resistance mechanisms and their genetic basis is an important support to antibiotic susceptibility surveillance in S. aureus.

  2. Antibiotic tolerance facilitates the evolution of resistance.

    PubMed

    Levin-Reisman, Irit; Ronin, Irine; Gefen, Orit; Braniss, Ilan; Shoresh, Noam; Balaban, Nathalie Q

    2017-02-24

    Controlled experimental evolution during antibiotic treatment can help to explain the processes leading to antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Recently, intermittent antibiotic exposures have been shown to lead rapidly to the evolution of tolerance-that is, the ability to survive under treatment without developing resistance. However, whether tolerance delays or promotes the eventual emergence of resistance is unclear. Here we used in vitro evolution experiments to explore this question. We found that in all cases, tolerance preceded resistance. A mathematical population-genetics model showed how tolerance boosts the chances for resistance mutations to spread in the population. Thus, tolerance mutations pave the way for the rapid subsequent evolution of resistance. Preventing the evolution of tolerance may offer a new strategy for delaying the emergence of resistance.

  3. Overview: Global and Local Impact of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Richard R; Bonomo, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    The rapid and ongoing spread of antibiotic resistance poses a serious threat to global public health. The indiscriminant use of antibiotics in agriculture and human medicine along with increasingly connected societies has fueled the distribution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. These factors together have led to rising numbers of infections caused by multidrug-resistant and pan-resistant bacteria, with increases in morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the trends in antibiotic resistance, discusses the impact of antibiotic resistance on society, and reviews the use of antibiotics in agriculture. Feasible ways to tackle antibiotic resistance to avert a post-antibiotic era are suggested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lytic phages obscure the cost of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Hall, Alex R

    2015-03-17

    The long-term persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria depends on their fitness relative to other genotypes in the absence of drugs. Outside the laboratory, viruses that parasitize bacteria (phages) are ubiquitous, but costs of antibiotic resistance are typically studied in phage-free experimental conditions. We used a mathematical model and experiments with Escherichia coli to show that lytic phages strongly affect the incidence of antibiotic resistance in drug-free conditions. Under phage parasitism, the likelihood that antibiotic-resistant genetic backgrounds spread depends on their initial frequency, mutation rate and intrinsic growth rate relative to drug-susceptible genotypes, because these parameters determine relative rates of phage-resistance evolution on different genetic backgrounds. Moreover, the average cost of antibiotic resistance in terms of intrinsic growth in the antibiotic-free experimental environment was small relative to the benefits of an increased mutation rate in the presence of phages. This is consistent with our theoretical work indicating that, under phage selection, typical costs of antibiotic resistance can be outweighed by realistic increases in mutability if drug resistance and hypermutability are genetically linked, as is frequently observed in clinical isolates. This suggests the long-term distribution of antibiotic resistance depends on the relative rates at which different lineages adapt to other types of selection, which in the case of phage parasitism is probably extremely common, as well as costs of resistance inferred by classical in vitro methods.

  5. Lytic phages obscure the cost of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Hall, Alex R

    2015-01-01

    The long-term persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria depends on their fitness relative to other genotypes in the absence of drugs. Outside the laboratory, viruses that parasitize bacteria (phages) are ubiquitous, but costs of antibiotic resistance are typically studied in phage-free experimental conditions. We used a mathematical model and experiments with Escherichia coli to show that lytic phages strongly affect the incidence of antibiotic resistance in drug-free conditions. Under phage parasitism, the likelihood that antibiotic-resistant genetic backgrounds spread depends on their initial frequency, mutation rate and intrinsic growth rate relative to drug-susceptible genotypes, because these parameters determine relative rates of phage-resistance evolution on different genetic backgrounds. Moreover, the average cost of antibiotic resistance in terms of intrinsic growth in the antibiotic-free experimental environment was small relative to the benefits of an increased mutation rate in the presence of phages. This is consistent with our theoretical work indicating that, under phage selection, typical costs of antibiotic resistance can be outweighed by realistic increases in mutability if drug resistance and hypermutability are genetically linked, as is frequently observed in clinical isolates. This suggests the long-term distribution of antibiotic resistance depends on the relative rates at which different lineages adapt to other types of selection, which in the case of phage parasitism is probably extremely common, as well as costs of resistance inferred by classical in vitro methods. PMID:25268496

  6. Boosting bacterial metabolism to combat antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Prerna; Collins, James J

    2015-02-03

    The metabolic state of a bacterial cell influences its susceptibility to antibiotics. In this issue, Peng et al. (2015) show that resistant bacteria can be sensitized to antibiotic treatment through the addition of exogenous metabolites that stimulate central metabolic pathways and increase drug uptake.

  7. Mining metagenomic datasets for antibiotic resistance genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotics are medicines that are used to kill, slow down, or prevent the growth of susceptible bacteria. They became widely used in the mid 20th century for controlling disease in humans, animals, and plants, and for a variety of industrial purposes. Antibiotic resistance is a broad term. There ...

  8. Management Options For Reducing The Release Of Antibiotics And Antibiotic Resistance Genes To The Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water - 77 environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. 78 Objective: To identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and 79 antibiotic resist...

  9. Management Options For Reducing The Release Of Antibiotics And Antibiotic Resistance Genes To The Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water - 77 environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. 78 Objective: To identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and 79 antibiotic resist...

  10. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  11. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  12. Therapeutic strategies to combat antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Benjamin D; Brooks, Amanda E

    2014-11-30

    With multidrug resistant bacteria on the rise, new antibiotic approaches are required. Although a number of new small molecule antibiotics are currently in the development pipeline with many more in preclinical development, the clinical options and practices for infection control must be expanded. Biologics and non-antibiotic adjuvants offer this opportunity for expansion. Nevertheless, to avoid known mechanisms of resistance, intelligent combination approaches for multiple simultaneous and complimentary therapies must be designed. Combination approaches should extend beyond biologically active molecules to include smart controlled delivery strategies. Infection control must integrate antimicrobial stewardship, new antibiotic molecules, biologics, and delivery strategies into effective combination therapies designed to 1) fight the infection, 2) avoid resistance, and 3) protect the natural microbiome. This review explores these developing strategies in the context of circumventing current mechanisms of resistance.

  13. WAAR (World Alliance against Antibiotic Resistance): Safeguarding antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Resistance to antibiotics has increased recently to a dramatic extend, and the pipeline of new antibiotics is almost dry for the five next years. Failures happen already for trivial community acquired infections, like pyelonephritis, or peritonitis, and this is likely to increase. Difficult surgical procedures, transplants, and other immunosuppressive therapies will become far more risky. Resistance is mainly due to an excessive usage of antibiotics, in all sectors, including the animal one. Action is urgently needed. Therefore, an alliance against MDRO has been recently created, which includes health care professionals, consumers, health managers, and politicians. The document highlights the different proposed measures, and represents a strong consensus between the different professionals, including general practicionners, and veterinarians. PMID:22958542

  14. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  15. Assessing Antibiotic Resistance of Staphyloccocus: Students Use Their Own Microbial Flora To Explore Antibiotic Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omoto, Charlotte K.; Malm, Kirstin

    2003-01-01

    Describes a microbiology laboratory experiment in which students test their own microbial flora of Staphylococcus for antibiotic resistance. Provides directions on how to conduct the experiment. (YDS)

  16. Assessing Antibiotic Resistance of Staphyloccocus: Students Use Their Own Microbial Flora To Explore Antibiotic Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omoto, Charlotte K.; Malm, Kirstin

    2003-01-01

    Describes a microbiology laboratory experiment in which students test their own microbial flora of Staphylococcus for antibiotic resistance. Provides directions on how to conduct the experiment. (YDS)

  17. Transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes via phage-related mobile elements.

    PubMed

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Calero-Cáceres, William; Muniesa, Maite

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major concern for society because it threatens the effective prevention of infectious diseases. While some bacterial strains display intrinsic resistance, others achieve antibiotic resistance by mutation, by the recombination of foreign DNA into the chromosome or by horizontal gene acquisition. In many cases, these three mechanisms operate together. Several mobile genetic elements (MGEs) have been reported to mobilize different types of resistance genes and despite sharing common features, they are often considered and studied separately. Bacteriophages and phage-related particles have recently been highlighted as MGEs that transfer antibiotic resistance. This review focuses on phages, phage-related elements and on composite MGEs (phages-MGEs) involved in antibiotic resistance mobility. We review common features of these elements, rather than differences, and provide a broad overview of the antibiotic resistance transfer mechanisms observed in nature, which is a necessary first step to controlling them.

  18. Curing bacteria of antibiotic resistance: reverse antibiotics, a novel class of antibiotics in nature.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Morimoto, Yuh; Baba, Tadashi; Umekita, Maya; Akamatsu, Yuzuru

    2012-06-01

    By screening cultures of soil bacteria, we re-discovered an old antibiotic (nybomycin) as an antibiotic with a novel feature. Nybomycin is active against quinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with mutated gyrA genes but not against those with intact gyrA genes against which quinolone antibiotics are effective. Nybomycin-resistant mutant strains were generated from a quinolone-resistant, nybomycin-susceptible, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain Mu 50. The mutants, occurring at an extremely low rate (<1 × 10(-11)/generation), were found to have their gyrA genes back-mutated and to have lost quinolone resistance. Here we describe nybomycin as the first member of a novel class of antibiotics designated 'reverse antibiotics'.

  19. Antibiotic resistance: Italian awareness survey 2016.

    PubMed

    Prigitano, Anna; Romanò, Luisa; Auxilia, Francesco; Castaldi, Silvana; Tortorano, Anna M

    2017-03-09

    Antimicrobial resistance has become a public health priority worldwide. The WHO conducted a survey concerning the personal use of antibiotics, knowledge of appropriate use and awareness of the issue of resistance. A similar survey was conducted in Italy involving 666 young university students and 131 seniors attending courses of the University of the third age. Antibiotics seem to be taken with moderate frequency and appropriately: 30% of respondents took them in the past six months and 94% took these drugs only prescribed by a doctor, in the correct dose and for the proper duration. Notable confusion concerning the conditions treatable with antibiotics was detected (only 30% indicated gonorrhea, and 30-40% believed that antibiotics should be employed for fever, cold, and flu), while 94% of participants seemed aware of the problem of antibiotic resistance. Most of the respondents identified the behaviors that can reduce the phenomenon of resistance (regular handwashing and use of antibiotics only when prescribed and needed). The results of our survey, that involved people of high level of instruction and living in urban areas of northern regions, cannot be extended to all the Italian population. However, they provide valid elements to promote initiatives aimed to a more aware use of antibiotics.

  20. The genomic enzymology of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Morar, Mariya; Wright, Gerard D

    2010-01-01

    The need for new antibiotic therapies is acute and growing in large part because of the emergence of drug-resistant pathogens. A vast number of resistance determinants are, however, found in nonpathogenic micro-organisms. The resistance totality in the global microbiota is the antibiotic resistome and includes not only established resistance genes but also genes that have the potential to evolve into resistance elements. We term these proto-resistance genes and hypothesize that they share common ancestry with other functional units known as housekeeping genes. Genomic enzymology is the study of protein structure-function in light of genetic context and evolution of protein superfamilies. This concept is highly applicable to study of antibiotic resistance evolution from proto-resistance elements. In this review, we summarize some of the genomic enzymology evidence for resistance enzymes pointing to common ancestry with genes of other metabolic functions. Genomic enzymology plays a key role in understanding the origins of antibiotic resistance and aids in designing strategies for diagnosis and prevention thereof.

  1. The fitness costs of antibiotic resistance mutations

    PubMed Central

    Melnyk, Anita H; Wong, Alex; Kassen, Rees

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is increasing in pathogenic microbial populations and is thus a major threat to public health. The fate of a resistance mutation in pathogen populations is determined in part by its fitness. Mutations that suffer little or no fitness cost are more likely to persist in the absence of antibiotic treatment. In this review, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the fitness costs associated with single mutational events that confer resistance. Generally, these mutations were costly, although several drug classes and species of bacteria on average did not show a cost. Further investigations into the rate and fitness values of compensatory mutations that alleviate the costs of resistance will help us to better understand both the emergence and management of antibiotic resistance in clinical settings. PMID:25861385

  2. Antibiotic Cycling and Antibiotic Mixing: Which One Best Mitigates Antibiotic Resistance?

    PubMed

    Beardmore, Robert Eric; Peña-Miller, Rafael; Gori, Fabio; Iredell, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Can we exploit our burgeoning understanding of molecular evolution to slow the progress of drug resistance? One role of an infection clinician is exactly that: to foresee trajectories to resistance during antibiotic treatment and to hinder that evolutionary course. But can this be done at a hospital-wide scale? Clinicians and theoreticians tried to when they proposed two conflicting behavioral strategies that are expected to curb resistance evolution in the clinic, these are known as "antibiotic cycling" and "antibiotic mixing." However, the accumulated data from clinical trials, now approaching 4 million patient days of treatment, is too variable for cycling or mixing to be deemed successful. The former implements the restriction and prioritization of different antibiotics at different times in hospitals in a manner said to "cycle" between them. In antibiotic mixing, appropriate antibiotics are allocated to patients but randomly. Mixing results in no correlation, in time or across patients, in the drugs used for treatment which is why theorists saw this as an optimal behavioral strategy. So while cycling and mixing were proposed as ways of controlling evolution, we show there is good reason why clinical datasets cannot choose between them: by re-examining the theoretical literature we show prior support for the theoretical optimality of mixing was misplaced. Our analysis is consistent with a pattern emerging in data: neither cycling or mixing is a priori better than the other at mitigating selection for antibiotic resistance in the clinic. : antibiotic cycling, antibiotic mixing, optimal control, stochastic models.

  3. Antibiotic control of antibiotic resistance in hospitals: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Haber, Michael; Levin, Bruce R; Kramarz, Piotr

    2010-08-25

    Using mathematical deterministic models of the epidemiology of hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic resistance, it has been shown that the rates of hospital-acquired bacterial infection and frequency of antibiotic infections can be reduced by (i) restricting the admission of patients colonized with resistant bacteria, (ii) increasing the rate of turnover of patients, (iii) reducing transmission by infection control measures, and (iv) the use of second-line drugs for which there is no resistance. In an effort to explore the generality and robustness of the predictions of these deterministic models to the real world of hospitals, where there is variation in all of the factors contributing to the incidence of infection, we developed and used a stochastic model of the epidemiology of hospital-acquired infections and resistance. In our analysis of the properties of this model we give particular consideration different regimes of using second-line drugs in this process. We developed a simple model that describes the transmission of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant bacteria in a small hospital. Colonized patients may be treated with a standard drug, for which there is some resistance, and with a second-line drug, for which there is no resistance. We then ran deterministic and stochastic simulation programs, based on this model, to predict the effectiveness of various treatment strategies. The results of the analysis using our stochastic model support the predictions of the deterministic models; not only will the implementation of any of the above listed measures substantially reduce the incidences of hospital-acquired infections and the frequency of resistance, the effects of their implementation should be seen in months rather than the years or decades anticipated to control resistance in open communities. How effectively and how rapidly the application of second-line drugs will contribute to the decline in the frequency of resistance to the first-line drugs

  4. Interplay between intrinsic and acquired resistance to quinolones in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    García-León, Guillermo; Salgado, Fabiola; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Sánchez, María Blanca; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    To analyse whether the mutation-driven resistance-acquisition potential of a given bacterium might be a function of its intrinsic resistome, quinolones were used as selective agents and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was chosen as a bacterial model. S. maltophilia has two elements - SmQnr and SmeDEF - that are important in intrinsic resistance to quinolones. Using a battery of mutants in which either or both of these elements had been removed, the apparent mutation frequency for quinolone resistance and the phenotype of the selected mutants were found to be related to the intrinsic resistome and also depended on the concentration of the selector. Most mutants had phenotypes compatible with the overexpression of multidrug efflux pump(s); SmeDEF overexpression was the most common cause of quinolone resistance. Whole genome sequencing showed that mutations of the SmeRv regulator, which result in the overexpression of the efflux pump SmeVWX, are the cause of quinolone resistance in mutants not overexpressing SmeDEF. These results indicate that the development of mutation-driven antibiotic resistance is highly dependent on the intrinsic resistome, which, at least for synthetic antibiotics such as quinolones, did not develop as a response to the presence of antibiotics in the natural ecosystems in which S. maltophilia evolved.

  5. Collateral sensitivity of antibiotic-resistant microbes.

    PubMed

    Pál, Csaba; Papp, Balázs; Lázár, Viktória

    2015-07-01

    Understanding how evolution of microbial resistance towards a given antibiotic influences susceptibility to other drugs is a challenge of profound importance. By combining laboratory evolution, genome sequencing, and functional analyses, recent works have charted the map of evolutionary trade-offs between antibiotics and have explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. Strikingly, mutations that caused multidrug resistance in bacteria simultaneously enhanced sensitivity to many other unrelated drugs (collateral sensitivity). Here, we explore how this emerging research sheds new light on resistance mechanisms and the way it could be exploited for the development of alternative antimicrobial strategies.

  6. Antibiotic-Resistant Vibrios in Farmed Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque Costa, Renata; Araújo, Rayza Lima; Souza, Oscarina Viana; Vieira, Regine Helena Silva dos Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was determined in 100 strains of Vibrio isolated from the Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp and identified phenotypically. A high antibiotic-resistance index (75%) was observed, with the following phenotypic profiles: monoresistance (n = 42), cross-resistance to β-lactams (n = 20) and multiple resistance (n = 13). Plasmid resistance was characterized for penicillin (n = 11), penicillin + ampicillin (n = 1), penicillin + aztreonam (n = 1), and ampicillin (n = 1). Resistance to antimicrobial drugs by the other strains (n = 86) was possibly mediated by chromosomal genes. The findings of this study support the conclusion that the cultured shrimps can be vehicles of vibrios resistant to β-lactam and tetracycline. PMID:25918714

  7. Antibiotic Resistance and the Biology of History.

    PubMed

    Landecker, Hannah

    2016-12-01

    Beginning in the 1940s, mass production of antibiotics involved the industrial-scale growth of microorganisms to harvest their metabolic products. Unfortunately, the use of antibiotics selects for resistance at answering scale. The turn to the study of antibiotic resistance in microbiology and medicine is examined, focusing on the realization that individual therapies targeted at single pathogens in individual bodies are environmental events affecting bacterial evolution far beyond bodies. In turning to biological manifestations of antibiotic use, sciences fathom material outcomes of their own previous concepts. Archival work with stored soil and clinical samples produces a record described here as 'the biology of history': the physical registration of human history in bacterial life. This account thus foregrounds the importance of understanding both the materiality of history and the historicity of matter in theories and concepts of life today.

  8. Antibiotic Resistance and the Biology of History

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Beginning in the 1940s, mass production of antibiotics involved the industrial-scale growth of microorganisms to harvest their metabolic products. Unfortunately, the use of antibiotics selects for resistance at answering scale. The turn to the study of antibiotic resistance in microbiology and medicine is examined, focusing on the realization that individual therapies targeted at single pathogens in individual bodies are environmental events affecting bacterial evolution far beyond bodies. In turning to biological manifestations of antibiotic use, sciences fathom material outcomes of their own previous concepts. Archival work with stored soil and clinical samples produces a record described here as ‘the biology of history’: the physical registration of human history in bacterial life. This account thus foregrounds the importance of understanding both the materiality of history and the historicity of matter in theories and concepts of life today. PMID:28458609

  9. Genomic and metagenomic diversity of antibiotic resistance in dairy animals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic resistance in food animals has received increased scrutiny in recent years due to the increased prevalence of antibiotic resistant infections in the human clinical setting. The extent to which antibiotic usage in food animals is responsible for the burden of antibiotic resistance in human...

  10. Emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance: a global problem.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, R; Panda, S; Singh, D V

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major problem in clinical health settings. Interestingly the origin of many of antibiotic resistance mechanisms can be traced back to non-pathogenic environmental organisms. Important factors leading to the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance include absence of regulation in the use of antibiotics, improper waste disposal and associated transmission of antibiotic resistance genes in the community through commensals. In this review, we discussed the impact of globalisation on the transmission of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria through immigration and export/import of foodstuff. The significance of surveillance to define appropriate use of antibiotics in the clinic has been included as an important preventive measure.

  11. Antibiotic resistance genes & susceptibility patterns in staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Duran, Nizami; Ozer, Burcin; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Onlen, Yusuf; Demir, Cemil

    2012-03-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the association between the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and the antibiotic resistance genes in staphylococcal isolates obtained from various clinical samples of patients attending a teaching hospital in Hatay, Turkey. A total of 298 staphylococci clinical isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The genes implicated in resistance to oxacillin (mecA), gentamicin (aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, ant(4')-Ia), erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA), tetracyclin (tetK, tetM), and penicillin (blaZ) were amplified using multiplex PCR method. Methicillin resistance rate among 139 Staphlococcus aureus isolates was 16.5 and 25.9 per cent of S. aureus carried mecA gene. Of the 159 CoNS isolates, methicillin resistance rate was 18.9 and 29.6 per cent carried mecA gene. Ninety four isolates identified as gentamicin resistant phenotypically, contained at least one of the gentamicin resistance genes [aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, ant(4')-Ia], 17 gentamicin-susceptible isolates were found as positive in terms of one or more resistance genes [aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, ant(4')-Ia] by multiplex PCR. A total of 165 isolates were resistant to erythromycin, and contained at least one of the erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Phenotypically, 106 staphylococcal isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 121 isolates carried either tetK or tetM or both resistance genes. The majority of staphylococci tested possessed the blaZ gene (89.9%). The present results showed that the phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility patterns were not similar to those obtained by genotyping done by multiplex PCR. Rapid and reliable methods for antibiotic susceptibility are important to determine the appropriate therapy decisions. Multiplex PCR can be used for confirmation of the results obtained by conventional phenotypic methods, when needed.

  12. Antibiotic resistance in human chronic periodontitis microbiota.

    PubMed

    Rams, Thomas E; Degener, John E; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) may yield multiple species of putative periodontal bacterial pathogens that vary in their antibiotic drug susceptibility. This study determines the occurrence of in vitro antibiotic resistance among selected subgingival periodontal pathogens in patients with CP. Subgingival biofilm specimens from inflamed deep periodontal pockets were removed before treatment from 400 adults with CP in the United States. The samples were cultured, and selected periodontal pathogens were tested in vitro for susceptibility to amoxicillin at 8 mg/L, clindamycin at 4 mg/L, doxycycline at 4 mg/L, and metronidazole at 16 mg/L, with a post hoc combination of data for amoxicillin and metronidazole. Gram-negative enteric rods/pseudomonads were subjected to ciprofloxacin disk-diffusion testing. Overall, 74.2% of the patients with CP revealed subgingival periodontal pathogens resistant to at least one of the test antibiotics. One or more test species, most often Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens, Streptococcus constellatus, or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, were resistant in vitro to doxycycline, amoxicillin, metronidazole, or clindamycin, in 55%, 43.3%, 30.3%, and 26.5% of the patients with CP, respectively. Fifteen percent of patients harbored subgingival periodontal pathogens resistant to both amoxicillin and metronidazole, which were mostly either S. constellatus (45 individuals) or ciprofloxacin-susceptible strains of Gram-negative enteric rods/pseudomonads (nine individuals). Patients with CP in the United States frequently yielded subgingival periodontal pathogens resistant in vitro to therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics commonly used in clinical periodontal practice. The wide variability found in periodontal pathogen antibiotic-resistance patterns should concern clinicians empirically selecting antibiotic treatment regimens for patients with CP.

  13. Multidrug evolutionary strategies to reverse antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Baym, Michael; Stone, Laura K; Kishony, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic treatment has two conflicting effects: the desired, immediate effect of inhibiting bacterial growth and the undesired, long-term effect of promoting the evolution of resistance. Although these contrasting outcomes seem inextricably linked, recent work has revealed several ways by which antibiotics can be combined to inhibit bacterial growth while, counterintuitively, selecting against resistant mutants. Decoupling treatment efficacy from the risk of resistance can be achieved by exploiting specific interactions between drugs, and the ways in which resistance mutations to a given drug can modulate these interactions or increase the sensitivity of the bacteria to other compounds. Although their practical application requires much further development and validation, and relies on advances in genomic diagnostics, these discoveries suggest novel paradigms that may restrict or even reverse the evolution of resistance. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Multidrug evolutionary strategies to reverse antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Baym, Michael; Stone, Laura K.; Kishony, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic treatment has two conflicting effects: the desired, immediate effect of inhibiting bacterial growth and the undesired, long-term effect of promoting the evolution of resistance. Although these contrasting outcomes seem inextricably linked, recent work has revealed several ways by which antibiotics can be combined to inhibit bacterial growth while, counterintuitively, selecting against resistant mutants. Decoupling treatment efficacy from the risk of resistance can be achieved by exploiting specific interactions between drugs, and the ways in which resistance mutations to a given drug can modulate these interactions or increase the sensitivity of the bacteria to other compounds. Although their practical application requires much further development and validation, and relies on advances in genomic diagnostics, these discoveries suggest novel paradigms that may restrict or even reverse the evolution of resistance. PMID:26722002

  15. Does antifouling paint select for antibiotic resistance?

    PubMed

    Flach, Carl-Fredrik; Pal, Chandan; Svensson, Carl Johan; Kristiansson, Erik; Östman, Marcus; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Tysklind, Mats; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2017-07-15

    There is concern that heavy metals and biocides contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance via co-selection. Most antifouling paints contain high amounts of such substances, which risks turning painted ship hulls into highly mobile refuges and breeding grounds for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The objectives of this study were to start investigate if heavy-metal based antifouling paints can pose a risk for co-selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and, if so, identify the underlying genetic basis. Plastic panels with one side painted with copper and zinc-containing antifouling paint were submerged in a Swedish marina and biofilms from both sides of the panels were harvested after 2.5-4weeks. DNA was isolated from the biofilms and subjected to metagenomic sequencing. Biofilm bacteria were cultured on marine agar supplemented with tetracycline, gentamicin, copper sulfate or zinc sulfate. Biofilm communities from painted surfaces displayed lower taxonomic diversity and enrichment of Gammaproteobacteria. Bacteria from these communities showed increased resistance to both heavy metals and tetracycline but not to gentamicin. Significantly higher abundance of metal and biocide resistance genes was observed, whereas mobile antibiotic resistance genes were not enriched in these communities. In contrast, we found an enrichment of chromosomal RND efflux system genes, including such with documented ability to confer decreased susceptibility to both antibiotics and biocides/heavy metals. This was paralleled by increased abundances of integron-associated integrase and ISCR transposase genes. The results show that the heavy metal-based antifouling paint exerts a strong selection pressure on marine bacterial communities and can co-select for certain antibiotic-resistant bacteria, likely by favoring species and strains carrying genes that provide cross-resistance. Although this does not indicate an immediate risk for promotion of mobile antibiotic resistance, the

  16. Proteome studies of bacterial antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vranakis, Iosif; Goniotakis, Ioannis; Psaroulaki, Anna; Sandalakis, Vassilios; Tselentis, Yannis; Gevaert, Kris; Tsiotis, Georgios

    2014-01-31

    Ever since antibiotics were used to help humanity battle infectious diseases, microorganisms straight away fought back. Antibiotic resistance mechanisms indeed provide microbes with possibilities to by-pass and survive the action of antibiotic drugs. Several methods have been employed to identify these microbial resistance mechanisms in an ongoing effort to reduce the steadily increasing number of treatment failures due to multi-drug-resistant microbes. Proteomics has evolved to an important tool for this area of research. Following rapid advances in whole genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have been widely used to investigate microbial gene expression. This review highlights the contribution of proteomics in identifying microbial drug resistance mechanisms. It summarizes different proteomic studies on bacteria resistant to different antibiotic drugs. The review further includes an overview of the methodologies used, as well as lists key proteins identified, thus providing the reader not only a summary of research already done, but also directions for future research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Trends in Microbial Proteomics.

  17. Antibiotic policies and control of resistance.

    PubMed

    Gould, Ian M

    2002-08-01

    The current worldwide pandemic of antibiotic resistance shows no signs of abating. It is clear that it is driven mainly by heavy and often inappropriate antibiotic use. Although control measures are widely practised, it is important that we assess their efficacy critically in order to concentrate expensive control efforts where they will be most effective. The past year has seen much activity in this area, with evidence-based assessments of the literature according to strict guidelines, as well as progress in basic science studies of mechanisms of resistance, and their causes and relations to pathogenicity and adaptability. The present review summarizes current developments in the causes of antibiotic resistance, the classification of antibiotic stewardship and control measures, the evidence base for their efficacy, current problems in hospital practice, the adaptability of bacteria, the content of antibiotic policies and anticipated activities. The conclusions from the published literature are that much of it that pertains to changing prescribing practices does not stand up to modern evidence-based analysis concepts. Nevertheless, we can learn from experience in changing other areas of medical practice. We must be pragmatic and must not expect to change the world, but rather take it step by step, recognizing barriers and measuring outcomes and quality indicators. Studies into the molecular basis of resistance confirm the superb genetic adaptability of micro-organisms. They will always be several steps ahead of us. Nevertheless, we are learning how to modify our prescribing habits to minimize resistance, not only by using antibiotics less frequently but also by altering dosing schedules in various ways.

  18. Assessing the Risk of Probiotic Dietary Supplements in the Context of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Zhang, Ruijia; Tian, Xuechen; Zhou, Xuan; Pan, Xutong; Wong, Aloysius

    2017-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria are known to harbor intrinsic and mobile genetic elements that confer resistance to a wide variety of antibiotics. Their high amounts in dietary supplements can establish a reservoir of antibiotic resistant genes in the human gut. These resistant genes can be transferred to pathogens that share the same intestinal habitat thus resulting in serious clinical ramifications. While antibiotic resistance of probiotic bacteria from food, human and animal sources have been well-documented, the resistant profiles of probiotics from dietary supplements have only been recently studied. These products are consumed with increasing regularity due to their health claims that include the improvement of intestinal health and immune response as well as prevention of acute and antibiotic-associated diarrhea and cancer; but, a comprehensive risk assessment on the spread of resistant genes to human health is lacking. Here, we highlight recent reports of antibiotic resistance of probiotic bacteria isolated from dietary supplements, and propose complementary strategies that can shed light on the risks of consuming such products in the context of a global widespread of antibiotic resistance. In concomitant with a broader screening of antibiotic resistance in probiotic supplements is the use of computational simulations, live imaging and functional genomics to harvest knowledge on the evolutionary behavior, adaptations and dynamics of probiotics studied in conditions that best represent the human gut including in the presence of antibiotics. The underlying goal is to enable the health benefits of probiotics to be exploited in a responsible manner and with minimal risk to human health.

  19. Priorities for antibiotic resistance surveillance in Europe.

    PubMed

    Fluit, A C; van der Bruggen, J T; Aarestrup, F M; Verhoef, J; Jansen, W T M

    2006-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem. Surveillance studies are needed to monitor resistance development, to guide local empirical therapy, and to implement timely and adequate countermeasures. To achieve this, surveillance studies must have standardised methodologies, be longitudinal, and cover a sufficiently large and representative population. However, many fall short of these requirements that define good surveillance studies. Moreover, current efforts are dispersed among many, mostly small, initiatives with different objectives. These studies must be tailored to the various reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as hospitalised patients, nursing homes, the community, animals and food. Two studies that could serve as examples of tailored programmes are the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS), which collects resistance data during the diagnosis of hospitalised patients, and the DANMAP programme, which collects data in the veterinary sector. As already noted by the WHO, genetic studies that include both the typing of isolates and the characterisation of resistance determinants are necessary to understand fully the spread and development of antibiotic resistance.

  20. Collective Antibiotic Resistance: Mechanisms and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Nicole M.; Gore, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    In collective resistance, microbial communities are able to survive antibiotic exposures that would be lethal to individual cells. In this review, we explore recent advances in understanding collective resistance in bacteria. The population dynamics of “cheating” in a system with cooperative antibiotic inactivation have been described, providing insight into the demographic factors that determine resistance allele frequency in bacteria. Extensive work has elucidated mechanisms underlying collective resistance in biofilms and addressed questions about the role of cooperation in these structures. Additionally, recent investigations of “bet-hedging” strategies in bacteria have explored the contributions of stochasticity and regulation to bacterial phenotypic heterogeneity and examined the effects of these strategies on community survival. PMID:25271119

  1. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-02-16

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics.

  2. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics. PMID:27681908

  3. NOTE: Dielectrophoretic assay of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, Juliana; Hübner, Yvonne; Hull, Judith C.; Dale, Jeremy W.; Hughes, Michael P.

    2003-07-01

    The dielectrophoretic collection spectra of antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis have been determined. These indicate that in the absence of antibiotic treatment there is a strong similarity between the dielectric properties of sensitive and resistant strains, and that there is a significant difference between the sensitive strains before and after treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin after 24 h exposure. This method offers possibilities for the assessment of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

  4. Antibiotic resistance in nosocomial respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Denys, Gerald A; Relich, Ryan F

    2014-06-01

    Nosocomial respiratory infections are the most common acquired infections in patients with severe underlying conditions and are responsible for high morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens are associated with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This article describes the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of HAP and VAP associated with antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The negative impact of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Friedman, N D; Temkin, E; Carmeli, Y

    2016-05-01

    Antibacterial therapy is one of the most important medical developments of the twentieth century; however, the spread of resistance in healthcare settings and in the community threatens the enormous gains made by the availability of antibiotic therapy. Infections caused by resistant bacteria lead to up to two-fold higher rates of adverse outcomes compared with similar infections caused by susceptible strains. These adverse outcomes may be clinical or economic and reflect primarily the failure or delay of antibiotic treatment. The magnitude of these adverse outcomes will be more pronounced as disease severity, strain virulence, or host vulnerability increases. The negative impacts of antibacterial resistance can be measured at the patient level by increased morbidity and mortality, at the healthcare level by increased resource utilization, higher costs and reduced hospital activity and at the society level by antibiotic treatment guidelines favouring increasingly broad-spectrum empiric therapy. In this review we will discuss the negative impact of antibiotic resistance on patients, the healthcare system and society. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mass spectrometry methods for predicting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2016-10-01

    Developing elaborate techniques for clinical applications can be a complicated process. Whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS revolutionized reliable microorganism identification in clinical microbiology laboratories and is now replacing phenotypic microbial identification. This technique is a generic, accurate, rapid, and cost-effective growth-based method. Antibiotic resistance keeps emerging in environmental and clinical microorganisms, leading to clinical therapeutic challenges, especially for Gram-negative bacteria. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is used to reliably predict antimicrobial success in treating infection, but it is inherently limited by the need to isolate and grow cultures, delaying the application of appropriate therapies. Antibiotic resistance prediction by growth-independent methods is expected to reduce the turnaround time. Recently, the potential of next-generation sequencing and microarrays in predicting microbial resistance has been demonstrated, and this review evaluates the potential of MS in this field. First, technological advances are described, and the possibility of predicting antibiotic resistance by MS is then illustrated for three prototypical human pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Clearly, MS methods can identify antimicrobial resistance mediated by horizontal gene transfers or by mutations that affect the quantity of a gene product, whereas antimicrobial resistance mediated by target mutations remains difficult to detect.

  7. Antibiotic bacterial resistance in ambulatory patients.

    PubMed

    Yawn, B P; Wollan, P; Cockerill, F; Lydick, E

    2000-10-01

    This study evaluates trends in antibiotic resistance in patients who were treated in an ambulatory setting. The authors compiled the data from all lower respiratory track(sputum) cultures collected from ambulatory patients who visited the Olmsted Medical Center and Mayo Clinic between 1985 and 1998. Cultured organisms were identified, and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values were presented and categorized as susceptible, intermediate, or resistant based on the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines for MIC and antibiotic susceptibility. 4,297 potentially pathogenic organisms were obtained from sputum cultures for 1,921 patients. The most discernible changes in antibiotic resistance appeared to be in cultures positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A trend toward increasing resistance of isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae to beta-lactam drugs was observed in a portion of the population. An emerging intermediate susceptibility among isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudoumonas species was noted. Trends in antimicrobial resistance of respiratory pathogens from ambulatory patients are less clear than those from hospitalized patients, but must be monitored because of the high percentage of ambulatory patients who receive empirical therapies. Trends in intermediate susceptibility patterns may help reveal emerging antimicrobial resistance.

  8. [Selection and spreading of antibiotic resistance in bacteria].

    PubMed

    Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2011-11-07

    Use of an antibiotic may not only select for resistance against the agent itself, but may at the same time co-select for resistance against other antibiotics if resistance genes are linked on e.g. a plasmid. Resistance plasmids may also carry genes mediating resistance against metals and disinfectants. Therefore, abundant use of metals, e.g. copper and zinc for growth promotion in animals used for food, may also co-select for antibiotic resistance. The same applies to disinfectants, e.g. silver and chlorhexidine. Prudent use of antibiotics and these other agents is essential to control antibiotic resistance.

  9. Effects of temperature and antibiotics on persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in poultry litter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of low, residual concentrations of antibiotics in manure and other environmental matrices is not well understood. It has been hypothesized that antibiotic concentrations below clinical MIC (minimal inhibitory concentrations) are still capable of selecting for resistance. The objective of ...

  10. Friend Turned Foe: Evolution of Enterococcal Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Van Tyne, Daria; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The enterococci are an ancient genus that evolved along with the tree of life. These intrinsically rugged bacteria are highly adapted members of the intestinal consortia of a range of hosts that spans the animal kingdom. Enterococci are also leading opportunistic hospital pathogens, causing infections that are often resistant to treatment with most antibiotics. Despite the importance of enterococci as hospital pathogens, the vast majority live outside of humans, and nearly all of their evolutionary history took place before the appearance of modern humans. Because hospital infections represent evolutionary end points, traits that exacerbate human infection are unlikely to have evolved for that purpose. However, clusters of traits have converged in specific lineages that are well adapted to colonize the antibiotic-perturbed gastrointestinal tracts of patients and that thrive in the hospital environment. Here we discuss these traits in an evolutionary context, as well as how comparative genomics is providing new insights into the evolution of the enterococci. PMID:25002090

  11. 'Superbug' Resistant to All Antibiotics Killed Nevada Woman

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163038.html 'Superbug' Resistant to All Antibiotics Killed Nevada Woman She died after possibly ... in September from a "superbug" infection that resisted all antibiotics, according to a report released Friday. The ...

  12. Screening and deciphering antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii: a state of the art.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, Rémy A; Nordmann, Patrice; Poirel, Laurent

    2013-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, recognized as a serious threat in healthcare facilities, has the ability to develop resistance to antibiotics quite easily. This resistance is related to either gene acquisition (horizontal gene transfer) or mutations in the genome, leading to gene disruption, over- or down-expression of genes. The clinically relevant antibiotic resistances in A. baumannii include resistance to aminoglycosides, broad-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenems, tigecycline and colistin, which are the last resort antibiotics. The intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii are presented here, with special focus on β-lactam resistance. The most up-to-date techniques for identification, including phenotypical and molecular tests, and screening of those emerging resistance traits are also highlighted. The implementation of early detection and identification of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii is crucial to control their spread.

  13. A regulatory cascade involving AarG, a putative sensor kinase, controls the expression of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase and an intrinsic multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) response in Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Rather, P N; Paradise, M R; Parojcic, M M; Patel, S

    1998-06-01

    A recessive mutation, aarG1, has been identified that resulted in an 18-fold increase in the expression of beta-galactosidase from an aac(2')-lacZ fusion. Transcriptional fusions and Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the aarG1 allele also resulted in a large increase in the expression of aarP, a gene encoding a transcriptional activator of aac(2')-Ia. The effects of aarG1 on aac(2')-Ia expression were mediated by aarP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The aarG1 allele also resulted in a multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype, which included increased chloramphenicol, tetracycline and fluoroquinolone resistance. This Mar phenotype also resulted from aarP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Sequence analysis of the aarG locus revealed the presence of two open reading frames, designated aarR and aarG, organized in tandem. The putative AarR protein displayed 75% amino acid identity to the response regulator PhoP, and the AarG protein displayed 57% amino acid identity to the sensor kinase PhoQ. The aarG1 mutation, a C to T substitution, resulted in a threonine to isoleucine substitution at position 279 (T279I) in the putative sensor kinase. The AarG product was functionally similar to PhoQ, as it was able to restore wild-type levels of maganin resistance to a Salmonella typhimurium phoQ mutant. However, expression of the aarP and aac(2')-Ia genes was not significantly affected by the levels of Mg2+ or Ca2+, suggesting that aarG senses a signal other than divalent cations.

  14. Indole-Induced Reversion of Intrinsic Multiantibiotic Resistance in Lysobacter enzymogenes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Wang, Yan; Yu, Yameng; Chen, Haotong; Shen, Yuemao; Du, Liangcheng

    2017-09-01

    Lysobacter species are a group of environmental bacteria that are emerging as a new source of antibiotics. One characteristic of Lysobacter is intrinsic resistance to multiple antibiotics, which had not been studied. To understand the resistance mechanism, we tested the effect of blocking two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) on the antibiotic resistance of Lysobacter enzymogenes, a prolific producer of antibiotics. Upon treatment with LED209, an inhibitor of the widespread TCS QseC/QseB, L. enzymogenes produced a large amount of an unknown metabolite that was barely detectable in the untreated culture. Subsequent structural elucidation by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) unexpectedly revealed that the metabolite was indole. Indole production was also markedly induced by adrenaline, a known modulator of QseC/QseB. Next, we identified two TCS genes, L. enzymogenesqseC (Le-qseC) and Le-qseB, in L. enzymogenes and found that mutations of Le-qseC and Le-qseB also led to a dramatic increase in indole production. We then chemically synthesized a fluorescent indole probe that could label the cells. While the Le-qseB (cytoplasmic response regulator) mutant was clearly labeled by the probe, the Le-qseC (membrane sensor) mutant was not labeled. It was reported previously that indole can enhance antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Therefore, we tested if the dramatic increase in the level of indole production in L. enzymogenes upon blocking of Le-qseC and Le-qseB would lead to enhanced antibiotic resistance. Surprisingly, we found that indole caused the intrinsically multiantibiotic-resistant bacterium L. enzymogenes to become susceptible. Point mutations at conserved amino acids in Le-QseC also led to antibiotic susceptibility. Because indole is known as an interspecies signal, these findings may have implications.IMPORTANCE The environmental bacterium Lysobacter is a new source of antibiotic compounds and exhibits intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Here, we found that the

  15. Ecology and evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Baquero, F; Alvarez-Ortega, C; Martinez, J L

    2009-12-01

    The evolution of bacterial pathogens towards antibiotic resistance is not just a relevant problem for human health, but a fascinating example of evolution that can be studied in real time as well. Although most antibiotics are natural compounds produced by environmental microbiota, exposure of bacterial populations to high concentrations of these compounds as the consequence of their introduction for human therapy (and later on for farming) a few decades ago is a very recent situation in evolutionary terms. Resistance genes are originated in environmental bacteria, where they have evolved for millions of years to play different functions that include detoxification, signal trafficking or metabolic functions among others. However, as the consequence of the strong selective pressure exerted by antimicrobials at clinical settings, farms and antibiotic-contaminated natural ecosystems, the selective forces driving the evolution of these potential resistance determinants have changed in the last few decades. Natural ecosystems contain a large number of potential resistance genes; nevertheless, just a few of them are currently present in gene-transfer units and disseminated among pathogens. Along the review, the processes implied in this situation and the consequences for the future evolution of resistance and the environmental microbiota are discussed.

  16. Antibiotic resistance breakers: can repurposed drugs fill the antibiotic discovery void?

    PubMed

    Brown, David

    2015-12-01

    Concern over antibiotic resistance is growing, and new classes of antibiotics, particularly against Gram-negative bacteria, are needed. However, even if the scientific hurdles can be overcome, it could take decades for sufficient numbers of such antibiotics to become available. As an interim solution, antibiotic resistance could be 'broken' by co-administering appropriate non-antibiotic drugs with failing antibiotics. Several marketed drugs that do not currently have antibacterial indications can either directly kill bacteria, reduce the antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration when used in combination with existing antibiotics and/or modulate host defence through effects on host innate immunity, in particular by altering inflammation and autophagy. This article discusses how such 'antibiotic resistance breakers' could contribute to reducing the antibiotic resistance problem, and analyses a priority list of candidates for further investigation.

  17. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    TERMS Antibiotic resistance, plasmid, biofilm, coevolution , bacteria, wound infections. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...suitable  candidate   for  plasmid  persistence  tests  in  biofilms  and  for   coevolution  experiments.   Plasmid   pB10...under   antibiotic  selection.   Coevolution  experiment:  methods   Prior  to  commencing  the  evolution  experiments,  we

  18. Chemical Countermeasures for Antibiotic Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    focusing on Pseudomonas aeruginosa , methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and MDR Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB); 2) re-sensitize MDR...sensitive S. aureus, A. baumannii and Escherichia coli, and discovered that this class of small molecules was microbicidal primarily against Gram...GRC New Antibacterial Discover and Development, Lucca Italy, April 15-20, 2012. Abstracts: ICAAC, San Francisco, Sep 9-12, 2012, submitted 15

  19. [The international surveillance of antibiotics resistance].

    PubMed

    Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2011-11-07

    The growth promoter story in the 1990 s increased the focus on antibiotic misuse and related resistance. A Danish EU conference, The Microbial Threat, in 1998 resulted in The Copenhagen Recommendations, on the basic principles for a policy to contain resistance, which was transformed into EU recommendations in 2001. Following this a range of programs on monitoring of resistance and consumption, research, national campaigns etc. has been accomplished. The US, Canada and Australia have also upgraded their efforts in this area, while the WHO lacks resources to approach the countries in the rest of the world, in which these problems are the worst.

  20. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoshinori

    1999-06-01

    Macrolides have been used in the treatment of infectious diseases since the late 1950s. Since that time, a finding of antagonistic action between erythromycin and spiramycin in clinical isolates1 led to evidence of the biochemical mechanism and to the current understanding of inducible or constitutive resistance to macrolides mediated by erm genes containing, respectively, the functional regulation mechanism or constitutively mutated regulatory region. These resistant mechanisms to macrolides are recognized in clinically isolated bacteria. (1) A methylase encoded by the erm gene can transform an adenine residue at 2058 (Escherichia coli equivalent) position of 23S rRNA into an 6N, 6N-dimethyladenine. Position 2058 is known to reside either in peptidyltransferase or in the vicinity of the enzyme region of domain V. Dimethylation renders the ribosome resistant to macrolides (MLS). Moreover, another finding adduced as evidence is that a mutation in the domain plays an important role in MLS resistance: one of several mutations (transition and transversion) such as A2058G, A2058C or U, and A2059G, is usually associated with MLS resistance in a few genera of bacteria. (2) M (macrolide antibiotics)- and MS (macrolide and streptogramin type B antibiotics)- or PMS (partial macrolide and streptogramin type B antibiotics)-phenotype resistant bacteria cause decreased accumulation of macrolides, occasionally including streptogramin type B antibiotics. The decreased accumulation, probably via enhanced efflux, is usually inferred from two findings: (i) the extent of the accumulated drug in a resistant cell increases as much as that in a susceptible cell in the presence of an uncoupling agent such as carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), and arsenate; (ii) transporter proteins, in M-type resistants, have mutual similarity to the 12-transmembrane domain present in efflux protein driven by proton-motive force, and in MS- or PMS-type resistants

  1. Fate of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Genes during Wastewater Chlorination: Implication for Antibiotic Resistance Control

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination. PMID:25738838

  2. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  3. Antibiotic resistance: from Darwin to Lederberg to Keynes.

    PubMed

    Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F

    2013-04-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria reflects both, a gradual, completely Darwinian evolution, which mostly yields slight decreases in antibiotic susceptibility, along with phenotypes that are not precisely characterized as "resistance"; and sudden changes, from full susceptibility to full resistance, which are driven by a vast array of horizontal gene transfer mechanisms. Antibiotics select for more than just antibiotic resistance (i.e., increased virulence and enhanced gene exchange abilities); and many non-antibiotic agents or conditions select for or maintain antibiotic resistance traits as a result of a complex network of underlying and often overlapping mechanisms. Thus, the development of new antibiotics and thoughtful, integrated anti-infective strategies is needed to address the immediate and long-term threat of antibiotic resistance. Since the biology of resistance is complex, these new drugs and strategies will not come from free-market forces, or from "incentives" for pharmaceutical companies.

  4. Antibiotic resistance genes & susceptibility patterns in staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Nizami; Ozer, Burcin; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Onlen, Yusuf; Demir, Cemil

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: This study was carried out to evaluate the association between the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and the antibiotic resistance genes in staphylococcal isolates obtained from various clinical samples of patients attending a teaching hospital in Hatay, Turkey. Methods: A total of 298 staphylococci clinical isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The genes implicated in resistance to oxacillin (mecA), gentamicin (aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia), erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA), tetracyclin (tetK, tetM), and penicillin (blaZ) were amplified using multiplex PCR method. Results: Methicillin resistance rate among 139 Staphlococcus aureus isolates was 16.5 and 25.9 per cent of S. aureus carried mecA gene. Of the 159 CoNS isolates, methicillin resistance rate was 18.9 and 29.6 per cent carried mecA gene. Ninety four isolates identified as gentamicin resistant phenotypically, contained at least one of the gentamicin resistance genes [aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia], 17 gentamicin-susceptible isolates were found as positive in terms of one or more resistance genes [aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia] by multiplex PCR. A total of 165 isolates were resistant to erythromycin, and contained at least one of the erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Phenotypically, 106 staphylococcal isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 121 isolates carried either tetK or tetM or both resistance genes. The majority of staphylococci tested possessed the blaZ gene (89.9%). Interpretation & conclusions: The present results showed that the phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility patterns were not similar to those obtained by genotyping done by multiplex PCR. Rapid and reliable methods for antibiotic susceptibility are important to determine the appropriate therapy decisions. Multiplex PCR can be used for confirmation of the results obtained by conventional

  5. [Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Recent results and trends in development of antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Klare, I; Witte, W; Wendt, C; Werner, G

    2012-11-01

    Enterococci (mainly E. faecalis, E. faecium) are important nosocomial pathogens predominantly affecting older and/or immunocompromised patients. The bacteria possess a broad spectrum of intrinsic and acquired antibiotic resistance properties. Among these, the transferrable glycopeptide resistance of the vanA and vanB genotypes in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE; reservoir: E. faecium) as well as resistance to last resort antibiotics (e.g. linezolid and tigecycline) are of special concern. Enterococci (including VRE) are easily transferred in hospitals; however, colonizations are far more frequent than infections. Resistance frequencies for vancomycin in clinical E. faecium isolates have remained at a relatively constant level of 8-15% (but with local or regional variations) in recent years whereas frequencies for teicoplanin resistance have shown a slight decrease. Glycopeptide resistance trends correlate with a spread of hospital-associated E. faecium strains carrying the vanA and, with rising frequency in recent years, the vanB gene cluster, the latter being associated with teicoplanin susceptibility. This increased occurrence of vanB-positive E. faecium strains may be caused by an increased use of antibiotics selecting enterococci and VRE as well as due to methodological reasons (e.g. reduced EUCAST MIC-breakpoints for glycopeptides; increased use and sensitive performance of chromogenic VRE agars, increased use of molecular diagnostic assays).

  6. Antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter: emergence, transmission and persistence

    PubMed Central

    Luangtongkum, Taradon; Jeon, Byeonghwa; Han, Jing; Plummer, Paul; Logue, Catherine M; Zhang, Qijing

    2009-01-01

    Campylobacter is a leading foodborne bacterial pathogen, which causes gastroenteritis in humans. This pathogenic organism is increasingly resistant to antibiotics, especially fluoroquinolones and macrolides, which are the most frequently used antimicrobials for the treatment of campylobacteriosis when clinical therapy is warranted. As a zoonotic pathogen, Campylobacter has a broad animal reservoir and infects humans via contaminated food, water or milk. Antibiotic usage in both animal agriculture and human medicine, can influence the development of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter. This review will describe the trend in fluoroquinolone and macrolide resistance in Campylobacter, summarize the mechanisms underlying the resistance to various antibiotics and discuss the unique features associated with the emergence, transmission and persistence of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter. Special attention will be given to recent findings and emphasis will be placed on Campylobacter resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides. A future perspective on antibiotic resistance and potential approaches for the control of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, will also be discussed. PMID:19257846

  7. Genomics and the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Gillings, Michael R; Paulsen, Ian T; Tetu, Sasha G

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance arises as a consequence of complex interactions among genes, mobile elements, and their bacterial hosts, coupled with the intense selection pressures imposed by humans in an attempt to control bacterial growth. Understanding the evolution of resistance requires an understanding of interacting cellular and genetic components. Here, we review how DNA analysis has helped reconstruct the origins of the mosaic, multiresistant mobile elements that have spread through pathogens in the last 60 years. This history helps inform the future, such that resistance might be better managed. Whole-genome sequencing has great potential for epidemiological tracking and for understanding the development of resistance via experimental evolution. DNA analysis also offers the opportunity for constructing databases that record genes of interest, the mobile elements that move these genes, and the cells or species that acquire such genes. Linking these DNA elements to their human and animal hosts and to the environments where they occur should help us establish a more robust ecological and evolutionary framework for controlling and managing resistance. Such efforts need to be well coordinated because, like many other issues that face humanity, antibiotic resistance is a global problem that requires global solutions. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Assessment of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Transfer in the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Schjørring, Susanne; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed horizontal gene transfer between bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. During the last decades, the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains and treatment failures of bacterial infections have increased the public awareness of antibiotic usage. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics creates a selective pressure on the bacterial flora, thus increasing the emergence of multiresistant bacteria, which results in a vicious circle of treatments and emergence of new antibiotic resistant bacteria. The human gastrointestinal tract is a massive reservoir of bacteria with a potential for both receiving and transferring antibiotic resistance genes. The increased use of fermented food products and probiotics, as food supplements and health promoting products containing massive amounts of bacteria acting as either donors and/or recipients of antibiotic resistance genes in the human GI tract, also contributes to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains. This paper deals with the assessment of antibiotic resistance gene transfer occurring in the gut. PMID:21318188

  9. The global problem of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Gootz, Thomas D

    2010-01-01

    Amid the recent attention justly focused on the potential problem of microbial sources for weapons of bioterrorism, it is also apparent that human pathogens frequently isolated from infections in patients from community and hospital sources have been growing more resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Much of the growth of multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens can be contributed to the overuse of broad-spectrum antimicrobial products. However, an equally troubling and often overlooked component of the problem involves the elegant ways in which pathogenic bacteria continually evolve complex genetic systems for acquiring and regulating an endless array of antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Efforts to develop new antimicrobials have over the past two decades been woefully behind the rapid evolution of resistance genes developing among both gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens. Several new agents that are best suited for use in the hospital environment have been developed to combat staphylococci resistant to beta-lactam antimicrobials following acquisition of the mecA gene. However, the dramatic spread in the US of the now common community strain of Staphylococcus aureus USA300 has shifted the therapeutic need for new antibiotics useful against MRSA to the community. As the pharmaceutical industry focused on discovering new agents for use against MRSA, hospitals in many parts of the world have seen the emergence of gram-negative pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae that are clinically resistant to almost all available antimicrobials. Such MDR isolates usually contain multiple-resistance determinants, including loss of outer membrane porins via gene inactivation by chromosomally encoded insertion sequences, up-regulation of inate efflux pumps, as well as acquisition of drug-inactivating enzymes whose genes are encoded on self-transmissible plasmids, integrons, and complex transposable elements

  10. Antibiotic resistance among Ureaplasma spp. isolates: cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Beeton, M L; Spiller, O B

    2017-02-01

    There is growing global concern regarding the rise of antibiotic-resistant organisms. Many of these reports have focused on various Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, with little attention to the genus Ureaplasma. Ureaplasma spp. are associated with numerous infectious diseases affecting pregnant women, neonates and the immunocompromised. Treatment options are extremely limited due to high levels of intrinsic resistance resulting from the unique physiology of these organisms and further restricted in cases of the developing fetus or neonate, often limiting therapeutic options to predominantly macrolides or rarely fluoroquinolones. The increasing presence of macrolide- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains among neonatal infections may result in pan-drug resistance and potentially untreatable conditions. Here, we review the requirements for accurate measurement of antimicrobial susceptibility, provide a comprehensive review of the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) for Ureaplasma species in the literature and contextualize these results relative to some investigators' reliance on commercial kits that are not CLSI compliant when determining AMR. The dramatic variation in the resistance patterns and impact of high levels of AMR amongst neonatal populations suggests the need for continued surveillance. Commercial kits represent an excellent tool for initial antibiotic susceptibility determination and screening. However, AMR reporting must utilize internationally standardized methods, as high-titre samples, or Mycoplasma hominis-contaminated samples routinely give false AMR results. Furthermore, there is a requirement for future reports to determine the underlying AMR mechanisms and determine whether expanding AMR is due to spontaneous mutation, transmission of resistance genes on mobile elements or selection and expansion of resistant clones. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

  11. Bacteriophage biosensors for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sorokulova, Irina; Olsen, Eric; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2014-03-01

    An increasing number of disease-causing bacteria are resistant to one or more anti-bacterial drugs utilized for therapy. Early and speedy detection of these pathogens is therefore very important. Traditional pathogen detection techniques, that include microbiological and biochemical assays are long and labor-intensive, while antibody or DNA-based methods require substantial sample preparation and purification. Biosensors based on bacteriophages have demonstrated remarkable potential to surmount these restrictions and to offer rapid, efficient and sensitive detection technique for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  12. Biofilm-specific antibiotic tolerance and resistance.

    PubMed

    Olsen, I

    2015-05-01

    Biofilms are heterogeneous structures composed of bacterial cells surrounded by a matrix and attached to solid surfaces. The bacteria here are 100 to 1,000 times more tolerant to antimicrobials than corresponding planktonic cells. Biofilms can be difficult to eradicate when they cause biofilm-related diseases, e.g., implant infections, cystic fibrosis, urinary tract infections, and periodontal diseases. A number of phenotypic features of the biofilm can be involved in biofilm-specific tolerance and resistance. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. The current review deals with both phenotypic and molecular mechanisms of biofilm-specific antibiotic tolerance and resistance.

  13. Low Prevalence of Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteria in River Water: Resistance Is Mostly Related to Intrinsic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tacão, Marta; Correia, António; Henriques, Isabel S

    2015-10-01

    Carbapenems are last-resort antibiotics to handle serious infections caused by multiresistant bacteria. The incidence of resistance to these antibiotics has been increasing and new resistance mechanisms have emerged. The dissemination of carbapenem resistance in the environment has been overlooked. The main goal of this research was to assess the prevalence and diversity of carbapenem-resistant bacteria in riverine ecosystems. The presence of frequently reported carbapenemase-encoding genes was inspected. The proportion of imipenem-resistant bacteria was on average 2.24 CFU/ml. Imipenem-resistant strains (n=110) were identified as Pseudomonas spp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aeromonas spp., Chromobacterium haemolyticum, Shewanella xiamenensis, and members of Enterobacteriaceae. Carbapenem-resistant bacteria were highly resistant to other beta-lactams such as quinolones, aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, tetracyclines, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Carbapenem resistance was mostly associated with intrinsically resistant bacteria. As intrinsic resistance mechanisms, we have identified the blaCphA gene in 77.3% of Aeromonas spp., blaL1 in all S. maltophilia, and blaOXA-48-like in all S. xiamenensis. As acquired resistance mechanisms, we have detected the blaVIM-2 gene in six Pseudomonas spp. (5.45%). Integrons with gene cassettes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides (aacA and aacC genes), trimethoprim (dfrB1b), and carbapenems (blaVIM-2) were found in Pseudomonas spp. Results suggest that carbapenem resistance dissemination in riverine ecosystems is still at an early stage. Nevertheless, monitoring these aquatic compartments for the presence of resistance genes and its host organisms is essential to outline strategies to minimize resistance dissemination.

  14. Intrinsic Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants in the Superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Justine L.; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria pose a serious threat in the clinic. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens that possess high intrinsic resistance. Though many studies have focused on understanding the acquisition of bacterial resistance upon exposure to antimicrobials, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are not well understood. In this study, we subjected the model opportunistic superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa to 14 antimicrobials under highly controlled conditions and assessed its response using expression- and fitness-based genomic approaches. Our results reveal that gene expression changes and mutant fitness in response to sub-MIC antimicrobials do not correlate on a genomewide scale, indicating that gene expression is not a good predictor of fitness determinants. In general, fewer fitness determinants were identified for antiseptics and disinfectants than for antibiotics. Analysis of gene expression and fitness data together allowed the prediction of antagonistic interactions between antimicrobials and insight into the molecular mechanisms controlling these interactions. PMID:26507235

  15. Origin and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance: The Common Mechanisms of Emergence and Spread in Water Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Agnese; Coyne, Sébastien; Berendonk, Thomas Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The environment, and especially freshwater, constitutes a reactor where the evolution and the rise of new resistances occur. In water bodies such as waste water effluents, lakes, and rivers or streams, bacteria from different sources, e.g., urban, industrial, and agricultural waste, probably selected by intensive antibiotic usage, are collected and mixed with environmental species. This may cause two effects on the development of antibiotic resistances: first, the contamination of water by antibiotics or other pollutants lead to the rise of resistances due to selection processes, for instance, of strains over-expressing broad range defensive mechanisms, such as efflux pumps. Second, since environmental species are provided with intrinsic antibiotic resistance mechanisms, the mixture with allochthonous species is likely to cause genetic exchange. In this context, the role of phages and integrons for the spread of resistance mechanisms appears significant. Allochthonous species could acquire new resistances from environmental donors and introduce the newly acquired resistance mechanisms into the clinics. This is illustrated by clinically relevant resistance mechanisms, such as the fluoroquinolones resistance genes qnr. Freshwater appears to play an important role in the emergence and in the spread of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the necessity for strategies of water quality improvement. We assume that further knowledge is needed to better understand the role of the environment as reservoir of antibiotic resistances and to elucidate the link between environmental pollution by anthropogenic pressures and emergence of antibiotic resistances. Only an integrated vision of these two aspects can provide elements to assess the risk of spread of antibiotic resistances via water bodies and suggest, in this context, solutions for this urgent health issue. PMID:22303296

  16. Fate and transport of veterinary antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance gene from fields receiving poultry manure during storm events

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antimicrobials are used in production agriculture to treat disease and promote animal growth, but the presence of antibiotics in the environment raises concern about widespread antibiotic resistance. This study documents the occurrence and transport of tylosin, tetracycline, enterococci resistant to...

  17. Cooperative Antibiotic Resistance in a Multi-Drug Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Dai, Lei; Gore, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. A frequent mechanism of antibiotic resistance involves the production of an enzyme which inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can ``share'' their resistance with other cells in the bacterial population, suggesting that it may be possible to observe cooperation between strains that inactivate different antibiotics. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics. We find that together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either of the strains individually. We observe that even when there is stable coexistence between the two strains, the population size of each strain can undergo large oscillations. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  18. Addressing the Natural Antibiotic Resistome in Studies of Soil Resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The environment is recognized as a source and a reservoir of antibiotic resistance (AR). Many antibiotic compounds are derived from bacteria and fungi that are naturally present in the environment. These microbes carry genes encoding resistance to the antibiotic that they produce and their resistanc...

  19. Antibiotrophs: The complexity of antibiotic-subsisting and antibiotic-resistant microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Woappi, Yvon; Gabani, Prashant; Singh, Arya; Singh, Om V

    2016-01-01

    Widespread overuse of antibiotics has led to the emergence of numerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria; among these are antibiotic-subsisting strains capable of surviving in environments with antibiotics as the sole carbon source. This unparalleled expansion of antibiotic resistance reveals the potent and diversified resistance abilities of certain bacterial strains. Moreover, these strains often possess hypermutator phenotypes and virulence transmissibility competent for genomic and proteomic propagation and pathogenicity. Pragmatic and prospicient approaches will be necessary to develop efficient therapeutic methods against such bacteria and to understand the extent of their genomic adaptability. This review aims to reveal the niches of these antibiotic-catabolizing microbes and assesses the underlying factors linking natural microbial antibiotic production, multidrug resistance, and antibiotic-subsistence.

  20. Environmental dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and correlation to anthropogenic contamination with antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem which threatens modern healthcare globally. Resistance has traditionally been viewed as a clinical problem, but recently non-clinical environments have been highlighted as an important factor in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events are likely to be common in aquatic environments; integrons in particular are well suited for mediating environmental dissemination of ARGs. A growing body of evidence suggests that ARGs are ubiquitous in natural environments. Particularly, elevated levels of ARGs and integrons in aquatic environments are correlated to proximity to anthropogenic activities. The source of this increase is likely to be routine discharge of antibiotics and resistance genes, for example, via wastewater or run-off from livestock facilities and agriculture. While very high levels of antibiotic contamination are likely to select for resistant bacteria directly, the role of sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics in environmental antibiotic resistance dissemination remains unclear. In vitro studies have shown that low levels of antibiotics can select for resistant mutants and also facilitate HGT, indicating the need for caution. Overall, it is becoming increasingly clear that the environment plays an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance; further studies are needed to elucidate key aspects of this process. Importantly, the levels of environmental antibiotic contamination at which resistant bacteria are selected for and HGT is facilitated at should be determined. This would enable better risk analyses and facilitate measures for preventing dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  1. Environmental dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and correlation to anthropogenic contamination with antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem which threatens modern healthcare globally. Resistance has traditionally been viewed as a clinical problem, but recently non-clinical environments have been highlighted as an important factor in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events are likely to be common in aquatic environments; integrons in particular are well suited for mediating environmental dissemination of ARGs. A growing body of evidence suggests that ARGs are ubiquitous in natural environments. Particularly, elevated levels of ARGs and integrons in aquatic environments are correlated to proximity to anthropogenic activities. The source of this increase is likely to be routine discharge of antibiotics and resistance genes, for example, via wastewater or run-off from livestock facilities and agriculture. While very high levels of antibiotic contamination are likely to select for resistant bacteria directly, the role of sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics in environmental antibiotic resistance dissemination remains unclear. In vitro studies have shown that low levels of antibiotics can select for resistant mutants and also facilitate HGT, indicating the need for caution. Overall, it is becoming increasingly clear that the environment plays an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance; further studies are needed to elucidate key aspects of this process. Importantly, the levels of environmental antibiotic contamination at which resistant bacteria are selected for and HGT is facilitated at should be determined. This would enable better risk analyses and facilitate measures for preventing dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance in the environment. PMID:26356096

  2. Bacterial Cheating Limits the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Xiao Chao, Hui; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tatiana; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removal of the antibiotic. The presence of a cooperative mechanism of resistance suggests that a cheater strain - which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic - may be able to take advantage of resistant cells. We find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We use a simple model in conjunction with difference equations to explain the observed population dynamics as a function of cell density and antibiotic concentration. Our experimental difference equations resemble the logistic map, raising the possibility of oscillations or even chaotic dynamics.

  3. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-09-29

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments.

  4. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  5. Diversity and Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Sphingomonadaceae Isolates from Drinking Water▿

    PubMed Central

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Nunes, Olga C.; Manaia, Célia M.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingomonadaceae (n = 86) were isolated from a drinking water treatment plant (n = 6), tap water (n = 55), cup fillers for dental chairs (n = 21), and a water demineralization filter (n = 4). The bacterial isolates were identified based on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, and intraspecies variation was assessed on the basis of atpD gene sequence analysis. The isolates were identified as members of the genera Sphingomonas (n = 27), Sphingobium (n = 28), Novosphingobium (n = 12), Sphingopyxis (n = 7), and Blastomonas (n = 12). The patterns of susceptibility to five classes of antibiotics were analyzed and compared for the different sites of isolation and taxonomic groups. Colistin resistance was observed to be intrinsic (92%). The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence values were observed in members of the genera Sphingomonas and Sphingobium and for beta-lactams, ciprofloxacin, and cotrimoxazole. In tap water and in water from dental chairs, antibiotic resistance was more prevalent than in the other samples, mainly due to the predominance of isolates of the genera Sphingomonas and Sphingobium. These two genera presented distinct patterns of association with antibiotic resistance, suggesting different paths of resistance development. Antibiotic resistance patterns were often related to the species rather than to the site or strain, suggesting the importance of vertical resistance transmission in these bacteria. This is the first study demonstrating that members of the family Sphingomonadaceae are potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance in drinking water. PMID:21705522

  6. Diversity and antibiotic resistance patterns of Sphingomonadaceae isolates from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2011-08-15

    Sphingomonadaceae (n = 86) were isolated from a drinking water treatment plant (n = 6), tap water (n = 55), cup fillers for dental chairs (n = 21), and a water demineralization filter (n = 4). The bacterial isolates were identified based on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, and intraspecies variation was assessed on the basis of atpD gene sequence analysis. The isolates were identified as members of the genera Sphingomonas (n = 27), Sphingobium (n = 28), Novosphingobium (n = 12), Sphingopyxis (n = 7), and Blastomonas (n = 12). The patterns of susceptibility to five classes of antibiotics were analyzed and compared for the different sites of isolation and taxonomic groups. Colistin resistance was observed to be intrinsic (92%). The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence values were observed in members of the genera Sphingomonas and Sphingobium and for beta-lactams, ciprofloxacin, and cotrimoxazole. In tap water and in water from dental chairs, antibiotic resistance was more prevalent than in the other samples, mainly due to the predominance of isolates of the genera Sphingomonas and Sphingobium. These two genera presented distinct patterns of association with antibiotic resistance, suggesting different paths of resistance development. Antibiotic resistance patterns were often related to the species rather than to the site or strain, suggesting the importance of vertical resistance transmission in these bacteria. This is the first study demonstrating that members of the family Sphingomonadaceae are potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance in drinking water.

  7. Emerging antibiotic resistance in bacteria with special reference to India.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, D

    2008-11-01

    The antibiotic era started in the 1940s and changed the profile of infectious diseases and human demography. The burgeoning classes and numbers promised much and elimination of this major cause of human (and animal) morbidity appeared possible. Bacterial antibiotic resistance which was observed soon after antibiotic introduction has been studied extensively. Diverse mechanisms have been demonstrated and the genetic basis elucidated. The resilience of the prokaryote ecosystems to antibiotic stress has been realized. The paper presents these subjects briefly to afford an overview. The epidemiology of antibiotic resistance is dealt with and community practices in different countries are described. The role of high antibiotic usage environments is indicated. The implication of the wide use of antibiotics in animals has been pointed out. Steadily increasing antibiotic resistance and decreasing numbers of newer antibiotics appear to point to a post-antibiotic period during which treatment of infections would become increasingly difficult. This article attempts to review the global antimicrobial resistance scene and juxtaposes it to the Indian experience. The prevalence in India of antibiotic resistance among major groups of pathogens is described. The factors that determine the prevalent high antibiotic resistance rates have been highlighted. The future research activity to ensure continued utility of antibiotics in the control of infections has been indicated.

  8. Development of antibiotics and the future of marine microorganisms to stem the tide of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kasanah, Noer; Hamann, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics remain essential tools in the control of infectious diseases. With the emergence of new diseases, resistant forms of diseases such as tuberculosis and malaria, as well as the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, it has become essential to develop novel antibiotics. Development of the existing antibiotics involved three strategies, including discovery of new target sites, modification of existing antibiotic structures, and the identification of new resources for novel antibiotics. Marine microorganisms have clearly become an essential new resource in the discovery of new antibiotic leads. PMID:15600239

  9. CURRENT ISSUES REGARDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently public concern has increased regarding industrial and environmental substances that may have adverse hormonal effects in human and wildlife populations. This concern has also been expanded to include antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the presence of various antibiotics a...

  10. CURRENT ISSUES REGARDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently public concern has increased regarding industrial and environmental substances that may have adverse hormonal effects in human and wildlife populations. This concern has also been expanded to include antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the presence of various antibiotics a...

  11. Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... and drug-resistant infections can be prevented. How Bacteria Become Resistant When bacteria are exposed to antibiotics, they start learning how to outsmart the drugs. This process occurs in bacteria found in humans, animals, and the environment. Resistant ...

  12. Analysis of Romanian Bacteroides isolates for antibiotic resistance levels and the corresponding antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Székely, Edit; Eitel, Zsuzsa; Molnár, Szabolcs; Szász, Izabella Éva; Bilca, Doina; Sóki, József

    2015-02-01

    As part of an ESCMID Study Group on Anaerobic Infections (ESGAI) project, a study was conducted to measure the antibiotic susceptibilities and corresponding gene contents of 53 Bacteroides fragilis group strains isolated in Romania. The antibiotic resistance data was comparable with the data found for other East-European countries. Here, no resistant isolate was found for imipenem, metronidazole and tigecycline. An increasing role of the cepA, cfxA and cfiA genes was observed in their corresponding antibiotic resistances. Moreover, no isolate was found that harbored the cfiA gene with a possible activating IS element. Clindamycin resistance was low, similarly to that the rate for the ermF gene. However, we did find some isolates with nimB, ermB, msrSA, linA, satG, tetX, tetM and bexA genes. This study was the first to provide antibiotic resistance data for clinical Bacteroides strains from Romania. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Agricultural use of antibiotics and the evolution and transfer of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Khachatourians, G G

    1998-01-01

    Microbial Resistance to antibiotics is on the rise, in part because of inappropriate use of antibiotics in human medicine but also because of practices in the agricultural industry. Intensive animal production involves giving livestock animals large quantities of antibiotics to promote growth and prevent infection. These uses promote the selection of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations. The resistant bacteria from agricultural environments may be transmitted to humans, in whom they cause disease that cannot be treated by conventional antibiotics. The author reviews trends in antibiotic use in animal husbandry and agriculture in general. The development of resistance is described, along with the genetic mechanisms that create resistance and facilitate its spread among bacterial species. Particular aspects of resistance in bacterial species common to both the human population and the agrifood industry are emphasized. Control measures that might reverse the current trends are highlighted. PMID:9835883

  14. Agricultural use of antibiotics and the evolution and transfer of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Khachatourians, G G

    1998-11-03

    Microbial Resistance to antibiotics is on the rise, in part because of inappropriate use of antibiotics in human medicine but also because of practices in the agricultural industry. Intensive animal production involves giving livestock animals large quantities of antibiotics to promote growth and prevent infection. These uses promote the selection of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations. The resistant bacteria from agricultural environments may be transmitted to humans, in whom they cause disease that cannot be treated by conventional antibiotics. The author reviews trends in antibiotic use in animal husbandry and agriculture in general. The development of resistance is described, along with the genetic mechanisms that create resistance and facilitate its spread among bacterial species. Particular aspects of resistance in bacterial species common to both the human population and the agrifood industry are emphasized. Control measures that might reverse the current trends are highlighted.

  15. Fungal treatment for the removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in veterinary hospital wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lucas, D; Badia-Fabregat, M; Vicent, T; Caminal, G; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S; Balcázar, J L; Barceló, D

    2016-06-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance represents one of the most important public health concerns and has been linked to the widespread use of antibiotics in veterinary and human medicine. The overall elimination of antibiotics in conventional wastewater treatment plants is quite low; therefore, residual amounts of these compounds are continuously discharged to receiving surface waters, which may promote the emergence of antibiotic resistance. In this study, the ability of a fungal treatment as an alternative wastewater treatment for the elimination of forty-seven antibiotics belonging to seven different groups (β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, metronidazoles, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim) was evaluated. 77% of antibiotics were removed after the fungal treatment, which is higher than removal obtained in conventional treatment plants. Moreover, the effect of fungal treatment on the removal of some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) was evaluated. The fungal treatment was also efficient in removing ARGs, such as ermB (resistance to macrolides), tetW (resistance to tetracyclines), blaTEM (resistance to β-lactams), sulI (resistance to sulfonamides) and qnrS (reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones). However, it was not possible to establish a clear link between concentrations of antibiotics and corresponding ARGs in wastewater, which leads to the conclusion that there are other factors that should be taken into consideration besides the antibiotic concentrations that reach aquatic ecosystems in order to explain the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of Antibiotic Resistance Genes from Lactobacillus Isolated from Traditional Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiling; Pan, Lin; Li, Lina; Lu, Jie; Kwok, Laiyu; Menghe, Bilige; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2017-03-01

    Lactobacilli are widely used as starter cultures or probiotics in yoghurt, cheese, beer, wine, pickles, preserved food, and silage. They are generally recognized as safe (GRAS). However, recent studies have shown that some lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains carry antibiotic resistance genes and are resistant to antibiotics. Some of them may even transfer their intrinsic antibiotic resistance genes to other LAB or pathogens via horizontal gene transfer, thus threatening human health. A total of 33 Lactobacillus strains was isolated from fermented milk collected from different areas of China. We analyzed (1) their levels of antibiotic resistance using a standardized dilution method, (2) their antibiotic resistance gene profiles by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using gene-specific primers, and (3) the transferability of some of the detected resistance markers by a filter mating assay. All Lactobacillus strains were found to be resistant to vancomycin, but susceptible to gentamicin, linezolid, neomycin, erythromycin, and clindamycin. Their susceptibilities to tetracycline, kanamycin, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, trimethoprim, ampicillin, rifampicin, and chloramphenicol was different. Results from our PCR analysis revealed 19 vancomycin, 10 ciprofloxacin, and 1 tetracycline-resistant bacteria that carried the van(X), van(E), gyr(A), and tet(M) genes, respectively. Finally, no transferal of the monitored antibiotic resistance genes was observed in the filter mating assay. Taken together, our study generated the antibiotic resistance profiles of some milk-originated lactobacilli isolates and preliminarily assessed their risk of transferring antibiotic gene to other bacteria. The study may provide important data concerning the safe use of LAB. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  17. Fate of antibiotic resistant cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songhe; Han, Bing; Gu, Ju; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Ma, Yanyan; Cao, Jiashun; He, Zhenli

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging contaminants of environmental concern. Heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge have an important role in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, the fate of cultivable heterotrophic ARB and ARGs in WWPTs process remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the antibiotic-resistant phenotypes of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria from influent and effluent water of three WWTPs and analysed thirteen ARGs in ARB and in activated sludge from anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic compartments. From each influent or effluent sample of the three plants, 200 isolates were randomly tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics. In these samples, between 5% and 64% isolates showed resistance to >9 antibiotics and the proportion of >9-drug-resistant bacteria was lower in isolates from effluent than from influent. Eighteen genera were identified in 188 isolates from influent (n=94) and effluent (n=94) of one WWTP. Six genera (Aeromonas, Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium, Providencia, and Staphylococcus) were detected in both influent and effluent samples. Gram-negative and -positive isolates dominated in influent and effluent, respectively. The 13 tetracycline-, sulphonamide-, streptomycin- and β-lactam-resistance genes were detected at a higher frequency in ARB from influent than from effluent, except for sulA and CTX-M, while in general, the abundances of ARGs in activated sludge from two of the three plants were higher in aerobic compartments than in anoxic ones, indicating abundant ARGs exit in the excess sledges and/or in uncultivable bacteria. These findings may be useful for elucidating the effect of WWTP on ARB and ARGs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibiotic resistance shaping multi-level population biology of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Fernando; Tedim, Ana P.; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have natural functions, mostly involving cell-to-cell signaling networks. The anthropogenic production of antibiotics, and its release in the microbiosphere results in a disturbance of these networks, antibiotic resistance tending to preserve its integrity. The cost of such adaptation is the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes, and of all genetic and cellular vehicles in which these genes are located. Selection of the combinations of the different evolutionary units (genes, integrons, transposons, plasmids, cells, communities and microbiomes, hosts) is highly asymmetrical. Each unit of selection is a self-interested entity, exploiting the higher hierarchical unit for its own benefit, but in doing so the higher hierarchical unit might acquire critical traits for its spread because of the exploitation of the lower hierarchical unit. This interactive trade-off shapes the population biology of antibiotic resistance, a composed-complex array of the independent “population biologies.” Antibiotics modify the abundance and the interactive field of each of these units. Antibiotics increase the number and evolvability of “clinical” antibiotic resistance genes, but probably also many other genes with different primary functions but with a resistance phenotype present in the environmental resistome. Antibiotics influence the abundance, modularity, and spread of integrons, transposons, and plasmids, mostly acting on structures present before the antibiotic era. Antibiotics enrich particular bacterial lineages and clones and contribute to local clonalization processes. Antibiotics amplify particular genetic exchange communities sharing antibiotic resistance genes and platforms within microbiomes. In particular human or animal hosts, the microbiomic composition might facilitate the interactions between evolutionary units involved in antibiotic resistance. The understanding of antibiotic resistance implies expanding our knowledge on multi

  19. Antibiotic resistance shaping multi-level population biology of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Fernando; Tedim, Ana P; Coque, Teresa M

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have natural functions, mostly involving cell-to-cell signaling networks. The anthropogenic production of antibiotics, and its release in the microbiosphere results in a disturbance of these networks, antibiotic resistance tending to preserve its integrity. The cost of such adaptation is the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes, and of all genetic and cellular vehicles in which these genes are located. Selection of the combinations of the different evolutionary units (genes, integrons, transposons, plasmids, cells, communities and microbiomes, hosts) is highly asymmetrical. Each unit of selection is a self-interested entity, exploiting the higher hierarchical unit for its own benefit, but in doing so the higher hierarchical unit might acquire critical traits for its spread because of the exploitation of the lower hierarchical unit. This interactive trade-off shapes the population biology of antibiotic resistance, a composed-complex array of the independent "population biologies." Antibiotics modify the abundance and the interactive field of each of these units. Antibiotics increase the number and evolvability of "clinical" antibiotic resistance genes, but probably also many other genes with different primary functions but with a resistance phenotype present in the environmental resistome. Antibiotics influence the abundance, modularity, and spread of integrons, transposons, and plasmids, mostly acting on structures present before the antibiotic era. Antibiotics enrich particular bacterial lineages and clones and contribute to local clonalization processes. Antibiotics amplify particular genetic exchange communities sharing antibiotic resistance genes and platforms within microbiomes. In particular human or animal hosts, the microbiomic composition might facilitate the interactions between evolutionary units involved in antibiotic resistance. The understanding of antibiotic resistance implies expanding our knowledge on multi

  20. Genomic and metagenomic analysis of antibiotic resistance in dairy animals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The extent to which carriage of antibiotic resistant bacteria in food animals is responsible for the burden of antibiotic resistance in human infections is currently not well known. Thus, there is a need to further evaluate the genomic diversity of multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria and the microbi...

  1. Emerging trends in antibiotic resistance: Implications for emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Pourmand, Ali; Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Jasani, Gregory; May, Larissa

    2017-08-01

    Many bacteria are demonstrating increasing levels of resistance to commonly used antibiotics. While this has implications for the healthcare system as a whole, many patients infected with these resistant organisms will initially present to the emergency department (ED). The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of current trends in infections caused by the most clinically relevant resistant organisms encountered in emergency medicine. Bacteria were selected based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and PubMed database. The following bacteria were included: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococci, Escherichia coli, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All have shown increasing rates of resistance to one or more of the antibiotics commonly used to treat them. Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance are associated with worse clinical outcomes and greater healthcare costs. Antibiotic resistance is increasing and poses significant a risk to both the patient and public health as a whole. Appropriate choice of initial antibiotic is important in improving clinical outcomes, which is often the role of the ED provider. On a broader level, the ED must also take part in institutional efforts such as Antibiotic Stewardship Programs, which have been shown to decrease costs and rates of infection with resistant organisms. Ultimately, a multifaceted approach will be required to curb the threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Multiple antibiotic resistance of associative microflora during urogenital pathology].

    PubMed

    Akaeva, F S; Omarova, S M; Adieva, A A; Medzhidov, M M

    2008-01-01

    Susceptibility of associative microflora isolated from patients with inflammatory diseases of urogenital tract was investigated. Etiologic structure of the diseases and cross-resistance to antibiotics of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcusaureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from women with endocervicitis and men with urethritiswas assessed. Ciprofloxacin and gentamycin had the highest activity, whereas beta-lactam antibiotics were mildly active. Isolated strainswere resistant to macrolides, penicillines and imipenem. Main types of multidrug resistance to antibiotics were presented in strains circulated in Dagestan.

  3. Multiple antibiotic resistance among gram negative bacteria isolated from poultry.

    PubMed

    Ansari, F A; Khatoon, H

    1994-03-01

    Gram negative bacteria, including species of Salmonella, Escherichia, Pseudomonas and Klebsiella, isolated from poultry, were screened for their resistance to the commonly used antibiotics: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamycin, kanamycin, neomycin, polymyxin B, streptomycin and tetracycline. Of the 500 bacteria screened, 351 were found to be resistant to one or more antibiotics at the level of 50 micrograms/ml. Various patterns of antibiotic resistance observed during these studies have been reported.

  4. The expression of antibiotic resistance genes in antibiotic-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mak, Stefanie; Xu, Ye; Nodwell, Justin R

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotic-producing bacteria encode antibiotic resistance genes that protect them from the biologically active molecules that they produce. The expression of these genes needs to occur in a timely manner: either in advance of or concomitantly with biosynthesis. It appears that there have been at least two general solutions to this problem. In many cases, the expression of resistance genes is tightly linked to that of antibiotic biosynthetic genes. In others, the resistance genes can be induced by their cognate antibiotics or by intermediate molecules from their biosynthetic pathways. The regulatory mechanisms that couple resistance to antibiotic biosynthesis are mechanistically diverse and potentially relevant to the origins of clinical antibiotic resistance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Antibiotic-resistant bacteria and new directions of antimicrobial chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2012-05-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms are becoming more and more serious and are a worldwide problem. Recent trends in new antibiotic-resistant organisms include multiple-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP), MDR-Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-AB) and New Deli metallo beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) -producing bacteria. Antibiotic combination therapy is an option to overcome these MDR organisms. A breakpoint checkerboard plate was created to measure antibiotic combination effects at breakpoint concentrations, making it possible to evaluate the synergy of antibiotic combination within 24 hours. In this article, recent topics regarding antibiotic-resistant organisms are briefly reviewed and the directions of antibiotic chemotherapy against these organisms are discussed.

  6. Antibiotics involved in the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: a nationwide multilevel study suggests differences within antibiotic classes.

    PubMed

    Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Dumartin, Catherine; L'Hériteau, François; Péfau, Muriel; Hocquet, Didier; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Bertrand, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    To identify the antibiotics potentially the most involved in the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from an ecological perspective in French healthcare facilities (HCFs). This study was based on data from the French antimicrobial surveillance network (ATB-RAISIN, 2007-09). Antibiotics were expressed in defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were considered as count data adjusted for patient-days. These were third-generation cephalosporin (3GC)- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli, cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacter cloacae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ceftazidime-, imipenem- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Three-level negative binomial regression models were built to take into account the hierarchical structure of data: level 1, repeated measures each year (count outcome, time, antibiotics); level 2, HCFs (type and size); and level 3, regions (geographical area). A total of 701 HCFs from 20 French regions and up to 1339 HCF-years were analysed. The use of ceftriaxone, but not of cefotaxime, was positively correlated with incidence rates of 3GC- and ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli. In contrast, both 3GCs were positively correlated with the incidence rate of cefotaxime-resistant E. cloacae. Higher levels of use of ciprofloxacin and/or ofloxacin, but not of levofloxacin, were associated with higher incidence rates of 3GC- and ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli, cefotaxime-resistant E. cloacae, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and ceftazidime- and ciprofloxacin-resistant P. aeruginosa. Our study suggests differences within antibiotic classes in promoting antibiotic resistance. We identified ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin as priority targets in public health strategies designed to reduce antibiotic use and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in French HCFs.

  7. Antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Implications for medical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, E. E.; Kellner, J. D.; Arnold, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the definition and prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, its links with antibiotic prescribing, data on antibiotic prescribing and prescribing appropriateness, and evidence-based treatment guidelines for common respiratory tract syndromes. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Primary studies consist of cross-sectional surveys and case-control studies. Treatment guidelines are based on clinical trials, meta-analyses, and cohort studies. Study designs were appropriate for the specific study questions. MAIN FINDINGS: The increasing prevalence of penicillin-resistant S pneumoniae is concurrent with increasing antibiotic prescribing. Individual patients show a twofold to ninefold increase in nasopharyngeal carriage of resistant bacteria or invasion with resistant bacteria (among those who have received antibiotics in the preceding 3 months). Cross-sectional data as well as data from medicaid and drug databases attest to overprescribing of antibiotics for respiratory tract infections. Physician surveys and focus groups blame this on parental pressure for antibiotic prescriptions. However, parents in focus groups and surveys deny they pressure their physicians and indicate their main purpose for office visits is to obtain a diagnosis and to seek reassurance that their children are not seriously ill. Evidence-based guidelines suggest treatment strategies that would reduce antibiotic prescribing. CONCLUSIONS: The few antibiotics that can be used with resistant organisms are expensive and are increasingly being needed. To control the rise of antibiotic resistance, it is important to limit antibiotic overprescribing. PMID:9789668

  8. Comparative Genomics of Environmental and Clinical Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Strains with Different Antibiotic Resistance Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Youenou, Benjamin; Favre-Bonté, Sabine; Bodilis, Josselin; Brothier, Elisabeth; Dubost, Audrey; Muller, Daniel; Nazaret, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a ubiquitous Gram-negative γ-proteobacterium, has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen responsible for nosocomial infections. A major characteristic of clinical isolates is their high intrinsic or acquired antibiotic resistance level. The aim of this study was to decipher the genetic determinism of antibiotic resistance among strains from different origins (i.e., natural environment and clinical origin) showing various antibiotic resistance profiles. To this purpose, we selected three strains isolated from soil collected in France or Burkina Faso that showed contrasting antibiotic resistance profiles. After whole-genome sequencing, the phylogenetic relationships of these 3 strains and 11 strains with available genome sequences were determined. Results showed that a strain’s phylogeny did not match their origin or antibiotic resistance profiles. Numerous antibiotic resistance coding genes and efflux pump operons were revealed by the genome analysis, with 57% of the identified genes not previously described. No major variation in the antibiotic resistance gene content was observed between strains irrespective of their origin and antibiotic resistance profiles. Although environmental strains generally carry as many multidrug resistant (MDR) efflux pumps as clinical strains, the absence of resistance–nodulation–division (RND) pumps (i.e., SmeABC) previously described to be specific to S. maltophilia was revealed in two environmental strains (BurA1 and PierC1). Furthermore the genome analysis of the environmental MDR strain BurA1 showed the absence of SmeABC but the presence of another putative MDR RND efflux pump, named EbyCAB on a genomic island probably acquired through horizontal gene transfer. PMID:26276674

  9. Sequence-Specific Targeting of Bacterial Resistance Genes Increases Antibiotic Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Dilay Hazal; Tamer, Yusuf Talha; Akbar, Mohammed; Bailey, Stacey M; Wong, Michael; Daly, Seth M; Greenberg, David E; Toprak, Erdal

    2016-09-01

    The lack of effective and well-tolerated therapies against antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a global public health problem leading to prolonged treatment and increased mortality. To improve the efficacy of existing antibiotic compounds, we introduce a new method for strategically inducing antibiotic hypersensitivity in pathogenic bacteria. Following the systematic verification that the AcrAB-TolC efflux system is one of the major determinants of the intrinsic antibiotic resistance levels in Escherichia coli, we have developed a short antisense oligomer designed to inhibit the expression of acrA and increase antibiotic susceptibility in E. coli. By employing this strategy, we can inhibit E. coli growth using 2- to 40-fold lower antibiotic doses, depending on the antibiotic compound utilized. The sensitizing effect of the antisense oligomer is highly specific to the targeted gene's sequence, which is conserved in several bacterial genera, and the oligomer does not have any detectable toxicity against human cells. Finally, we demonstrate that antisense oligomers improve the efficacy of antibiotic combinations, allowing the combined use of even antagonistic antibiotic pairs that are typically not favored due to their reduced activities.

  10. Sequence-Specific Targeting of Bacterial Resistance Genes Increases Antibiotic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael; Daly, Seth M.; Greenberg, David E.; Toprak, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    The lack of effective and well-tolerated therapies against antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a global public health problem leading to prolonged treatment and increased mortality. To improve the efficacy of existing antibiotic compounds, we introduce a new method for strategically inducing antibiotic hypersensitivity in pathogenic bacteria. Following the systematic verification that the AcrAB-TolC efflux system is one of the major determinants of the intrinsic antibiotic resistance levels in Escherichia coli, we have developed a short antisense oligomer designed to inhibit the expression of acrA and increase antibiotic susceptibility in E. coli. By employing this strategy, we can inhibit E. coli growth using 2- to 40-fold lower antibiotic doses, depending on the antibiotic compound utilized. The sensitizing effect of the antisense oligomer is highly specific to the targeted gene’s sequence, which is conserved in several bacterial genera, and the oligomer does not have any detectable toxicity against human cells. Finally, we demonstrate that antisense oligomers improve the efficacy of antibiotic combinations, allowing the combined use of even antagonistic antibiotic pairs that are typically not favored due to their reduced activities. PMID:27631336

  11. Antibiotic Resistance Is Prevalent in an Isolated Cave Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Kirandeep; Waglechner, Nicholas; Pawlowski, Andrew; Koteva, Kalinka; Banks, Eric D.; Johnston, Michael D.; Barton, Hazel A.; Wright, Gerard D.

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global challenge that impacts all pharmaceutically used antibiotics. The origin of the genes associated with this resistance is of significant importance to our understanding of the evolution and dissemination of antibiotic resistance in pathogens. A growing body of evidence implicates environmental organisms as reservoirs of these resistance genes; however, the role of anthropogenic use of antibiotics in the emergence of these genes is controversial. We report a screen of a sample of the culturable microbiome of Lechuguilla Cave, New Mexico, in a region of the cave that has been isolated for over 4 million years. We report that, like surface microbes, these bacteria were highly resistant to antibiotics; some strains were resistant to 14 different commercially available antibiotics. Resistance was detected to a wide range of structurally different antibiotics including daptomycin, an antibiotic of last resort in the treatment of drug resistant Gram-positive pathogens. Enzyme-mediated mechanisms of resistance were also discovered for natural and semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotics via glycosylation and through a kinase-mediated phosphorylation mechanism. Sequencing of the genome of one of the resistant bacteria identified a macrolide kinase encoding gene and characterization of its product revealed it to be related to a known family of kinases circulating in modern drug resistant pathogens. The implications of this study are significant to our understanding of the prevalence of resistance, even in microbiomes isolated from human use of antibiotics. This supports a growing understanding that antibiotic resistance is natural, ancient, and hard wired in the microbial pangenome. PMID:22509370

  12. Crystal structure of the carbapenem intrinsic resistance protein CarG.

    PubMed

    Tichy, E M; Luisi, B F; Salmond, G P C

    2014-05-01

    In the Gram-negative enterobacterium Erwinia (Pectobacterium) and Serratia sp. ATCC 39006, intrinsic resistance to the carbapenem antibiotic 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid is mediated by the CarF and CarG proteins, by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report a high-resolution crystal structure for the Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 carbapenem resistance protein CarG. This structure of CarG is the first in the carbapenem intrinsic resistance (CIR) family of resistance proteins from carbapenem-producing bacteria. The crystal structure shows the protein to form a homodimer, in agreement with results from analytical gel filtration. The structure of CarG does not show homology with any known antibiotic resistance proteins nor does it belong to any well-characterised protein structural family. However, it is a close structural homologue of the bacterial inhibitor of invertebrate lysozyme, PliI-Ah, with some interesting structural variations, including the absence of the catalytic site responsible for lysozyme inhibition. Both proteins show a unique β-sandwich fold with short terminal α-helices. The core of the protein is formed by stacked anti-parallel sheets that are individually very similar in the two proteins but differ in their packing interface, causing the splaying of the two sheets in CarG. Furthermore, a conserved cation binding site identified in CarG is absent from the homologue.

  13. Functional metagenomics for the investigation of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to human health and well-being. To effectively combat this problem we need to understand the range of different resistance genes that allow bacteria to resist antibiotics. To do this the whole microbiota needs to be investigated. As most bacteria cannot be cultivated in the laboratory, the reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes in the non-cultivatable majority remains relatively unexplored. Currently the only way to study antibiotic resistance in these organisms is to use metagenomic approaches. Furthermore, the only method that does not require any prior knowledge about the resistance genes is functional metagenomics, which involves expressing genes from metagenomic clones in surrogate hosts. In this review the methods and limitations of functional metagenomics to isolate new antibiotic resistance genes and the mobile genetic elements that mediate their spread are explored.

  14. Functional metagenomics for the investigation of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to human health and well-being. To effectively combat this problem we need to understand the range of different resistance genes that allow bacteria to resist antibiotics. To do this the whole microbiota needs to be investigated. As most bacteria cannot be cultivated in the laboratory, the reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes in the non-cultivatable majority remains relatively unexplored. Currently the only way to study antibiotic resistance in these organisms is to use metagenomic approaches. Furthermore, the only method that does not require any prior knowledge about the resistance genes is functional metagenomics, which involves expressing genes from metagenomic clones in surrogate hosts. In this review the methods and limitations of functional metagenomics to isolate new antibiotic resistance genes and the mobile genetic elements that mediate their spread are explored. PMID:24556726

  15. [Diagnosis and management of antibiotic-resistant bacteria].

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2012-06-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infections acquired in hospitals are of great concern, and have become a serious public issue. Antibiotic-resistant infections can be associated with a variety of bacteria, such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP). Since clinical laboratories are responsible for detecting information regarding antibiotic-resistant bacteria, they are required to perform analysis and dissemination of the information. Currently, rapid methods for detecting antibiotic-resistant bacteria using molecular techniques are being developed in response to the problem of the conventional methods for bacteriological testing, which require a few days to obtain results. This article presents the diagnosis and management of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which comprise a serious health care issue.

  16. Can landscape ecology untangle the complexity of antibiotic resistance?

    PubMed

    Singer, Randall S; Ward, Michael P; Maldonado, George

    2006-12-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics continues to pose a serious threat to human and animal health. Given the considerable spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the distribution of resistance and the factors that affect its evolution, dissemination and persistence, we argue that antibiotic resistance must be viewed as an ecological problem. A fundamental difficulty in assessing the causal relationship between antibiotic use and resistance is the confounding influence of geography: the co-localization of resistant bacterial species with antibiotic use does not necessarily imply causation and could represent the presence of environmental conditions and factors that have independently contributed to the occurrence of resistance. Here, we show how landscape ecology, which links the biotic and abiotic factors of an ecosystem, might help to untangle the complexity of antibiotic resistance and improve the interpretation of ecological studies.

  17. Antibiotic-non-antibiotic combinations for combating extremely drug-resistant Gram-negative 'superbugs'.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Reyes-Ortega, Felisa; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian

    2017-02-28

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance of Gram-negative pathogens has become a worldwide crisis. The status quo for combating resistance is to employ synergistic combinations of antibiotics. Faced with this fast-approaching post-antibiotic era, it is critical that we devise strategies to prolong and maximize the clinical efficacy of existing antibiotics. Unfortunately, reports of extremely drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative pathogens have become more common. Combining antibiotics such as polymyxin B or the broad-spectrum tetracycline and minocycline with various FDA-approved non-antibiotic drugs have emerged as a novel combination strategy against otherwise untreatable XDR pathogens. This review surveys the available literature on the potential benefits of employing antibiotic-non-antibiotic drug combination therapy. The apex of this review highlights the clinical utility of this novel therapeutic strategy for combating infections caused by 'superbugs'.

  18. Empirical Mode Decomposition and k-Nearest Embedding Vectors for Timely Analyses of Antibiotic Resistance Trends

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, Douglas; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a major worldwide public health concern. In clinical settings, timely antibiotic resistance information is key for care providers as it allows appropriate targeted treatment or improved empirical treatment when the specific results of the patient are not yet available. Objective To improve antibiotic resistance trend analysis algorithms by building a novel, fully data-driven forecasting method from the combination of trend extraction and machine learning models for enhanced biosurveillance systems. Methods We investigate a robust model for extraction and forecasting of antibiotic resistance trends using a decade of microbiology data. Our method consists of breaking down the resistance time series into independent oscillatory components via the empirical mode decomposition technique. The resulting waveforms describing intrinsic resistance trends serve as the input for the forecasting algorithm. The algorithm applies the delay coordinate embedding theorem together with the k-nearest neighbor framework to project mappings from past events into the future dimension and estimate the resistance levels. Results The algorithms that decompose the resistance time series and filter out high frequency components showed statistically significant performance improvements in comparison with a benchmark random walk model. We present further qualitative use-cases of antibiotic resistance trend extraction, where empirical mode decomposition was applied to highlight the specificities of the resistance trends. Conclusion The decomposition of the raw signal was found not only to yield valuable insight into the resistance evolution, but also to produce novel models of resistance forecasters with boosted prediction performance, which could be utilized as a complementary method in the analysis of antibiotic resistance trends. PMID:23637796

  19. Empirical mode decomposition and k-nearest embedding vectors for timely analyses of antibiotic resistance trends.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, Douglas; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major worldwide public health concern. In clinical settings, timely antibiotic resistance information is key for care providers as it allows appropriate targeted treatment or improved empirical treatment when the specific results of the patient are not yet available. To improve antibiotic resistance trend analysis algorithms by building a novel, fully data-driven forecasting method from the combination of trend extraction and machine learning models for enhanced biosurveillance systems. We investigate a robust model for extraction and forecasting of antibiotic resistance trends using a decade of microbiology data. Our method consists of breaking down the resistance time series into independent oscillatory components via the empirical mode decomposition technique. The resulting waveforms describing intrinsic resistance trends serve as the input for the forecasting algorithm. The algorithm applies the delay coordinate embedding theorem together with the k-nearest neighbor framework to project mappings from past events into the future dimension and estimate the resistance levels. The algorithms that decompose the resistance time series and filter out high frequency components showed statistically significant performance improvements in comparison with a benchmark random walk model. We present further qualitative use-cases of antibiotic resistance trend extraction, where empirical mode decomposition was applied to highlight the specificities of the resistance trends. The decomposition of the raw signal was found not only to yield valuable insight into the resistance evolution, but also to produce novel models of resistance forecasters with boosted prediction performance, which could be utilized as a complementary method in the analysis of antibiotic resistance trends.

  20. Antibiotics Resistance in Rhizobium: Type, Process, Mechanism and Benefit for Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Naamala, Judith; Jaiswal, Sanjay K; Dakora, Felix D

    2016-06-01

    The use of high-quality rhizobial inoculants on agricultural legumes has contributed substantially to the N economy of farming systems through inputs from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Large populations of symbiotically effective rhizobia should be available in the rhizosphere for symbiotic BNF with host plants. The rhizobial populations should also be able to compete and infect host plants. However, the rhizosphere comprises large populations of different microorganisms. Some of these microorganisms naturally produce antibiotics which are lethal to susceptible rhizobial populations in the soil. Therefore, intrinsic resistance to antibiotics is a desirable trait for the rhizobial population. It increases the rhizobia's chances of growth, multiplication and persistence in the soil. With a large population of rhizobia in the soil, infectivity of host plants and the subsequent BNF efficiency can be guaranteed. This review, therefore, puts together findings by various researchers on antibiotic resistance in bacteria with the main emphasis on rhizobia. It describes the different modes of action of different antibiotics, the types of antibiotic resistance exhibited by rhizobia, the mechanisms of acquisition of antibiotic resistance in rhizobia and the levels of tolerance of different rhizobial species to different antibiotics.

  1. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Lauren

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  2. The relationship between pneumococcal serotypes and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hoon; Dagan, Ron; Klugman, Keith P; Fritzell, Bernard

    2012-04-05

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) causes significant burden of disease, including invasive pneumococcal disease and noninvasive diseases such as pneumonia and acute otitis media. SP has at least 93 different capsular serotypes, with the various serotypes having different propensities for producing disease or developing antibiotic resistance. An increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant SP serotypes has been observed globally. The objective of this paper was to examine the relationship between antibiotic resistance and SP serotypes, with a primary focus on studies published in the past 10 years. Changing trends in antibiotic resistance and serotype distribution during this time, including those before and after the introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), were analyzed. Factors that influence the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant serotypes include antibiotic selection pressure, the use of PCV7, and the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant clones. The emergence of multidrug resistant serotype 19A is of particular concern. Antibiotic-resistant SP is a global problem that must be addressed through multiple strategies, including national vaccination programs, antibiotic control programs, and ongoing surveillance.

  3. The role of healthcare strategies in controlling antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    In an interview in March 2013, the Chief Medical Officer described antibiotic resistance as a 'ticking time bomb' and ranked it along with terrorism on a list of threats to the nation. Her report Infections and the Rise of Antimicrobial Resistance (Department of Health, 2011) highlighted that, while a new infectious disease has been discovered nearly every year over the past three decades, there have been very few new antibiotics developed, leaving our armoury nearly empty. Antibiotic resistance is a universal problem that needs to be tackled by a wide variety of strategies and players. Our approach to tackling resistance to antibiotic agents must therefore also be dynamic. As well as reducing environmental use, we also need to lower antibiotic use in the healthcare setting. Healthcare workers have a huge role to play in combating antibiotic resistance. This article focuses on several issues related to antibiotic resistance, including antibiotic modes of action and the properties that confer resistance on bacteria. It includes information on antibiotic usage and describes current healthcare strategies we can adopt to help reduce the development of resistance.

  4. Antibiotic resistant bacterial profiles of anaerobic swine lagoon effluent.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J P; McLaughlin, M R

    2009-01-01

    Although land application of swine (Sus scrofa) manure lagoon effluent is a common and effective method of disposal, the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal can complicate already understood issues associated with its safe disposal. The aim of this study was to assess antibiotic resistance in swine lagoon bacteria from sow, nursery, and finisher farms in the southeastern United States. Effluents from 37 lagoons were assayed for the presence of Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, Listeria, and Salmonella. Antibiotic resistance profiles were determined by the Kirby-Bauer swab method for 12 antibiotics comprising eight classes. Statistical analyses indicated that farm type influenced the amount and type of resistance, with nurseries and sow farms ranking as most influential, perhaps due to use of more antibiotic treatments. Finisher farms tended to have the least amount of antibiotic class resistance, signaling an overall healthier market pig, and less therapeutic or prophylactic antibiotic use. Many bacterial isolates were resistant to penicillin, cephalosporin, and tetracycline class antibiotics, while nearly all were susceptible to quinolone antibiotics. It appeared that swine farm type had a significant association with the amount of resistance associated with bacterial genera sampled from the lagoons; nurseries contributed the largest amount of bacterial resistance.

  5. Diverse antibiotic resistance genes in dairy cow manure.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Udikovic-Kolic, Nikolina; Andrew, Sheila; Handelsman, Jo

    2014-04-22

    Application of manure from antibiotic-treated animals to crops facilitates the dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants into the environment. However, our knowledge of the identity, diversity, and patterns of distribution of these antibiotic resistance determinants remains limited. We used a new combination of methods to examine the resistome of dairy cow manure, a common soil amendment. Metagenomic libraries constructed with DNA extracted from manure were screened for resistance to beta-lactams, phenicols, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines. Functional screening of fosmid and small-insert libraries identified 80 different antibiotic resistance genes whose deduced protein sequences were on average 50 to 60% identical to sequences deposited in GenBank. The resistance genes were frequently found in clusters and originated from a taxonomically diverse set of species, suggesting that some microorganisms in manure harbor multiple resistance genes. Furthermore, amid the great genetic diversity in manure, we discovered a novel clade of chloramphenicol acetyltransferases. Our study combined functional metagenomics with third-generation PacBio sequencing to significantly extend the roster of functional antibiotic resistance genes found in animal gut bacteria, providing a particularly broad resource for understanding the origins and dispersal of antibiotic resistance genes in agriculture and clinical settings. IMPORTANCE The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance among bacteria is one of the most intractable challenges in 21st-century public health. The origins of resistance are complex, and a better understanding of the impacts of antibiotics used on farms would produce a more robust platform for public policy. Microbiomes of farm animals are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which may affect distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in human pathogens. Previous studies have focused on antibiotic resistance genes in manures of animals subjected

  6. Direction of aminoacylated transfer RNAs into antibiotic synthesis and peptidoglycan-mediated antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2013-09-17

    Prokaryotic aminoacylated-transfer RNAs often need to be efficiently segregated between translation and other cellular biosynthetic pathways. Many clinically relevant bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa direct some aminoacylated-tRNA species into peptidoglycan biosynthesis and/or membrane phospholipid modification. Subsequent indirect peptidoglycan cross-linkage or change in membrane permeability is often a prerequisite for high-level antibiotic resistance. In Streptomycetes, aminoacylated-tRNA species are used for antibiotic synthesis as well as antibiotic resistance. The direction of coding aminoacylated-tRNA molecules away from translation and into antibiotic resistance and synthesis pathways are discussed in this review.

  7. Newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics reserved for resistant infections: Implications for emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Pourmand, Ali; May, Larissa

    2017-01-01

    Millions of patients are evaluated every year in the emergency department (ED) for bacterial infections. Emergency physicians often diagnose and prescribe initial antibiotic therapy for a variety of bacterial infections, ranging from simple urinary tract infections to severe sepsis. In life-threatening infections, inappropriate choice of initial antibiotic has been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. As such, initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy on the part of the emergency physician is critical. Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, drug allergies, and antibiotic shortages further complicates the choice of antibiotics. Patients may have a history of prior resistant infections or culture data indicating that common first-line antibiotics used in the ED may be ineffective. In recent years, there have been several new antibiotic approvals as well as renewed interest in second and third line antibiotics because of the aforementioned concerns. In addition, several newly approved antibiotics have the advantage of being administered once weekly or even as a single infusion, which has the potential to decrease hospitalizations and healthcare costs. This article reviews newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics used to treat resistant infections with a focus on implications for emergency medicine.

  8. Genomic Insights into Intrinsic and Acquired Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Achromobacter xylosoxidans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongfei; Zhu, Yuying; Ma, Yanan; Liu, Fei; Lu, Na; Yang, Xi; Luan, Chunguang; Yi, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an opportunistic pathogen known to be resistant to a wide range of antibiotics; however, the knowledge about the drug resistance mechanisms is limited. We used a high-throughput sequencing approach to sequence the genomes of the A. xylosoxidans type strain ATCC 27061 and a clinical isolate, A. xylosoxidans X02736, and then we used different bioinformatics tools to analyze the drug resistance genes in these bacteria. We obtained the complete genome sequence for A. xylosoxidans ATCC 27061 and the draft sequence for X02736. We predicted a total of 50 drug resistance-associated genes in the type strain, including 5 genes for β-lactamases and 17 genes for efflux pump systems; these genes are also conserved among other A. xylosoxidans genomes. In the clinical isolate, except for the conserved resistance genes, we also identified several acquired resistance genes carried by a new transposon embedded in a novel integrative and conjugative element. Our study provides new insights into the intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in A. xylosoxidans, which will be helpful for better understanding the physiology of A. xylosoxidans and the evolution of antibiotic resistance in this bacterium. PMID:25487802

  9. Genomic insights into intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongfei; Zhu, Yuying; Ma, Yanan; Liu, Fei; Lu, Na; Yang, Xi; Luan, Chunguang; Yi, Yong; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-02-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an opportunistic pathogen known to be resistant to a wide range of antibiotics; however, the knowledge about the drug resistance mechanisms is limited. We used a high-throughput sequencing approach to sequence the genomes of the A. xylosoxidans type strain ATCC 27061 and a clinical isolate, A. xylosoxidans X02736, and then we used different bioinformatics tools to analyze the drug resistance genes in these bacteria. We obtained the complete genome sequence for A. xylosoxidans ATCC 27061 and the draft sequence for X02736. We predicted a total of 50 drug resistance-associated genes in the type strain, including 5 genes for β-lactamases and 17 genes for efflux pump systems; these genes are also conserved among other A. xylosoxidans genomes. In the clinical isolate, except for the conserved resistance genes, we also identified several acquired resistance genes carried by a new transposon embedded in a novel integrative and conjugative element. Our study provides new insights into the intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in A. xylosoxidans, which will be helpful for better understanding the physiology of A. xylosoxidans and the evolution of antibiotic resistance in this bacterium. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Cooperative Bacterial Growth Dynamics Predict the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Hsin-Jung Li, Sophia; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Since the discovery of penicillin, antibiotics have been our primary weapon against bacterial infections. Unfortunately, bacteria can gain resistance to penicillin by acquiring the gene that encodes beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. However, mutations in this gene are necessary to degrade the modern antibiotic cefotaxime. Understanding the conditions that favor the spread of these mutations is a challenge. Here we show that bacterial growth in beta-lactam antibiotics is cooperative and that the nature of this growth determines the conditions in which resistance evolves. Quantitative analysis of the growth dynamics predicts a peak in selection at very low antibiotic concentrations; competition between strains confirms this prediction. We also find significant selection at higher antibiotic concentrations, close to the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the strains. Our results argue that an understanding of the evolutionary forces that lead to antibiotic resistance requires a quantitative understanding of the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

  11. Contribution of resistance-nodulation-cell division efflux systems to antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Chabane, Yassine Nait; Goussard, Sylvie; Snesrud, Erik; Courvalin, Patrice; Dé, Emmanuelle; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2015-03-24

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen of increasing importance due to its multiple resistance to antibiotics and ability to survive in the hospital environment linked to its capacity to form biofilms. To fully characterize the contribution of AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems to acquired and intrinsic resistance, we constructed, from an entirely sequenced susceptible A. baumannii strain, a set of isogenic mutants overexpressing each system following introduction of a point mutation in their cognate regulator or a deletion for the pump by allelic replacement. Pairwise comparison of every derivative with the parental strain indicated that AdeABC and AdeFGH are tightly regulated and contribute to acquisition of antibiotic resistance when overproduced. AdeABC had a broad substrate range, including β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines-tigecycline, macrolides-lincosamides, and chloramphenicol, and conferred clinical resistance to aminoglycosides. Importantly, when combined with enzymatic resistance to carbapenems and aminoglycosides, this pump contributed in a synergistic fashion to the level of resistance of the host. In contrast, AdeIJK was expressed constitutively and was responsible for intrinsic resistance to the same major drug classes as AdeABC as well as antifolates and fusidic acid. Surprisingly, overproduction of AdeABC and AdeIJK altered bacterial membrane composition, resulting in decreased biofilm formation but not motility. Natural transformation and plasmid transfer were diminished in recipients overproducing AdeABC. It thus appears that alteration in the expression of efflux systems leads to multiple changes in the relationship between the host and its environment, in addition to antibiotic resistance. Increased expression of chromosomal genes for RND-type efflux systems plays a major role in bacterial multidrug resistance. Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as an important

  12. Marine bacteria: potential sources for compounds to overcome antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Eom, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Young-Mog; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most problematic Gram-positive bacterium in the context of public health due to its resistance against almost all available antibiotics except vancomycin and teicoplanin. Moreover, glycopeptide-resistant S. aureus have been emerging with the increasing use of glycopeptides. Recently, resistant strains against linezolid and daptomycin, which are alternative drugs to treat MRSA infection, have also been reported. Thus, the development of new drugs or alternative therapies is clearly a matter of urgency. In response to the antibiotic resistance, many researchers have studied for alternative antibiotics and therapies. In this review, anti-MRSA substances isolated from marine bacteria, with their potential antibacterial effect against MRSA as potential anti-MRSA agents, are discussed and several strategies for overcoming the antibiotic resistance are also introduced. Our objective was to highlight marine bacteria that have potential to lead in developing novel antibiotics or clinically useful alternative therapeutic treatments.

  13. Antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater biofilms along a whole river.

    PubMed

    Winkworth, Cynthia L

    2013-06-01

    A key problem challenging public health officials' efforts to stem the spread of antibiotic resistance is the potential increase of resistance in the environment. Yet, despite recent and significant changes to agricultural land in New Zealand, as well as the sector's high antibiotic use, the influence on antibiotic resistance in the environment remained uncharacterised. Spatial and temporal dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater biofilms from NZ's fourth longest river as it transitioned between low and high intensity farming were examined for 1 year. Polymerase chain reaction was employed to gauge the level of resistance present. Biofilms were screened for 10 genes conferring resistance to antibiotics used in humans only and both humans and agricultural animals. Three genes were detected, one which conferred resistance to the important human-only use antibiotic vancomycin. Detected at the two downstream sites only, and those subject to the highest combined land-use stressors, the three genes indicated an elevated presence of antibiotic resistance in relation to surrounding land use; 7.7% versus 2% across the whole river system. The detection of a gene conferring resistance to an important human-only use antibiotic was particularly concerning and highlighted human-based contamination sources along the river, in addition to those of agricultural origin.

  14. Resistance to antibiotics in the normal flora of animals.

    PubMed

    Sørum, H; Sunde, M

    2001-01-01

    The normal bacterial flora contains antibiotic resistance genes to various degrees, even in individuals with no history of exposure to commercially prepared antibiotics. Several factors seem to increase the number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in feces. One important factor is the exposure of the intestinal flora to antibacterial drugs. Antibiotics used as feed additives seem to play an important role in the development of antibiotic resistance in normal flora bacteria. The use of avoparcin as a feed additive has demonstrated that an antibiotic considered "safe" is responsible for increased levels of antibiotic resistance in the normal flora enterococci of animals fed with avoparcin and possibly in humans consuming products from these animals. However, other factors like stress from temperature, crowding, and management also seem to contribute to the occurrence of antibiotic resistance in normal flora bacteria. The normal flora of animals has been studied with respect to the development of antibiotic resistance over four decades, but there are few studies with the intestinal flora as the main focus. The results of earlier studies are valuable when focused against the recent understanding of mobile genetics responsible for bacterial antibiotic resistance. New studies should be undertaken to assess whether the development of antibiotic resistance in the normal flora is directly linked to the dramatic increase in antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens. Bacteria of the normal flora, often disregarded scientifically, should be studied with the intention of using them as active protection against infectious diseases and thereby contributing to the overall reduction of use of antibioties in both animals and humans.

  15. Sensitivity of antibiotic resistant and antibiotic susceptible Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus strains against ozone.

    PubMed

    Heß, Stefanie; Gallert, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Tolerance of antibiotic susceptible and antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus strains from clinical and wastewater samples against ozone was tested to investigate if ozone, a strong oxidant applied for advanced wastewater treatment, will affect the release of antibiotic resistant bacteria into the aquatic environment. For this purpose, the resistance pattern against antibiotics of the mentioned isolates and their survival after exposure to 4 mg/L ozone was determined. Antibiotic resistance (AR) of the isolates was not correlating with higher tolerance against ozone. Except for ampicillin resistant E. coli strains, which showed a trend towards increased resistance, E. coli strains that were also resistant against cotrimoxazol, ciprofloxacin or a combination of the three antibiotics were similarly or less resistant against ozone than antibiotic sensitive strains. Pigment-producing Enterococcus casseliflavus and Staphylococcus aureus seemed to be more resistant against ozone than non-pigmented species of these genera. Furthermore, aggregation or biofilm formation apparently protected bacteria in subsurface layers from inactivation by ozone. The relatively large variance of tolerance against ozone may indicate that resistance to ozone inactivation most probably depends on several factors, where AR, if at all, does not play a major role.

  16. Resistance diagnosis and the changing economics of antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    McAdams, David

    2017-01-01

    Point-of-care diagnostics that can determine an infection's antibiotic sensitivity increase the profitability of new antibiotics that enjoy patent protection, even when such diagnostics reduce the quantity of antibiotics sold. Advances in the science and technology underpinning rapid resistance diagnostics can therefore be expected to spur efforts to discover and develop new antibiotics, especially those with a narrow spectrum of activity that would otherwise fail to find a market. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Counteracting antibiotic resistance: breaking barriers among antibacterial strategies.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M; Cantón, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    To fight against antibiotic resistance, prevention-only is no longer an acceptable strategy. The old concept 'one-infection, one-bug, one-drug', genocentrism in antibiotic discovery, and lack of integration between different antimicrobial strategies have probably contributed to current weaknesses in confronting antibiotic resistance. Resistance should be combatted in all fronts simultaneously, in the patient (complex therapy), the group (where resistance is maintained), and the significant environment (polluted by resistance). This paper is reviewing why specific 'therapeutic' approaches are needed in each of these fronts, using different types of 'drugs' directed to a variety of targets, in the goal of inhibiting antibiotic resistant bacteria. Multi-target integrated combination strategies and therapies should be more extensively evaluated, not only in the infected patient (using novel formats for clinical trials), but as associations of 'therapeutic strategies' in the different compartments where antibiotic resistance emerges and flows (measuring global effects in resistance). Multi-targeted therapeutic approaches require a relaxation of barriers among the various compounds, including systemic and topic antibiotics, antiseptics, biocides, anti-resistant clones vaccination, phages, decontamination products, and in general eco-evo drugs acting on factors influencing ecology and evolution of resistant bacteria. The application of methods of systems biology will facilitate such a multi-lateral attack to antibiotic resistance. Such advances should be paralleled by a simultaneous progress in regulatory sciences and close coordination among all stakeholders.

  18. Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance: setting a parameter space.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José Luis; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens is a relevant problem for human health and one of the few evolution processes amenable to experimental studies. In the present review, we discuss some basic aspects of antibiotic resistance, including mechanisms of resistance, origin of resistance genes, and bottlenecks that modulate the acquisition and spread of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens. In addition, we analyse several parameters that modulate the evolution landscape of antibiotic resistance. Learning why some resistance mechanisms emerge but do not evolve after a first burst, whereas others can spread over the entire world very rapidly, mimicking a chain reaction, is important for predicting the evolution, and relevance for human health, of a given mechanism of resistance. Because of this, we propose that the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance can only be understood in a multi-parameter space. Measuring the effect on antibiotic resistance of parameters such as contact rates, transfer rates, integration rates, replication rates, diversification rates, and selection rates, for different genes and organisms, growing under different conditions in distinct ecosystems, will allow for a better prediction of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of focused interventions.

  19. Antibiotic Resistance of Diverse Bacteria from Aquaculture in Borneo

    PubMed Central

    Kathleen, M. M.; Felecia, C.; Reagan, E. L.; Kasing, A.; Lesley, M.; Toh, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of antimicrobials in aquaculture provides a selective pressure creating a reservoir of multiple resistant bacteria in the cultured fish and shrimps as well as the aquaculture environment. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of antibiotic resistance in aquaculture products and aquaculture's surrounding environment in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Ninety-four identified bacterial isolates constituted of 17 genera were isolated from sediment, water, and cultured organisms (fish and shrimp) in selected aquaculture farms. These isolates were tested for their antibiotic resistance against 22 antibiotics from several groups using the disk diffusion method. The results show that the highest resistance was observed towards streptomycin (85%, n = 20), while the lowest resistance was towards gentamicin (1.1%, n = 90). The multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR) index of the isolates tested ranged between 0 and 0.63. It was suggested that isolates with MAR index > 0.2 were recovered from sources with high risk of antibiotic resistant contamination. This study revealed low level of antibiotic resistance in the aquaculture bacterial isolates except for streptomycin and ampicillin (>50% resistance, n = 94) which have been used in the aquaculture industry for several decades. Antibiotic resistant patterns should be continuously monitored to predict the emergence and widespread of MAR. Effective action is needed to keep the new resistance from further developing and spreading. PMID:27746817

  20. Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance: setting a parameter space

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens is a relevant problem for human health and one of the few evolution processes amenable to experimental studies. In the present review, we discuss some basic aspects of antibiotic resistance, including mechanisms of resistance, origin of resistance genes, and bottlenecks that modulate the acquisition and spread of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens. In addition, we analyse several parameters that modulate the evolution landscape of antibiotic resistance. Learning why some resistance mechanisms emerge but do not evolve after a first burst, whereas others can spread over the entire world very rapidly, mimicking a chain reaction, is important for predicting the evolution, and relevance for human health, of a given mechanism of resistance. Because of this, we propose that the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance can only be understood in a multi-parameter space. Measuring the effect on antibiotic resistance of parameters such as contact rates, transfer rates, integration rates, replication rates, diversification rates, and selection rates, for different genes and organisms, growing under different conditions in distinct ecosystems, will allow for a better prediction of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of focused interventions. PMID:24678768

  1. MurAA Is Required for Intrinsic Cephalosporin Resistance of Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Vesić, Dušanka

    2012-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a low-GC Gram-positive bacterium that is intrinsically resistant to cephalosporins, antibiotics that target cell wall biosynthesis. To probe the mechanistic basis for intrinsic resistance, a library of transposon mutants was screened to identify E. faecalis strains that are highly susceptible to ceftriaxone, revealing a transposon mutant with a disruption in murAA. murAA is predicted to encode a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyl transferase that catalyzes the first committed step in peptidoglycan synthesis: phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent conversion of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-enolpyruvate. In-frame deletion of murAA, but not its homolog in the E. faecalis genome (murAB), led to increased susceptibility of E. faecalis to cephalosporins. Furthermore, expression of murAA enhanced cephalosporin resistance in an E. faecalis mutant lacking IreK (formerly PrkC), a key kinase required for cephalosporin resistance. Further genetic analysis revealed that MurAA catalytic activity is necessary but not sufficient for this role. Collectively, our data indicate that MurAA and MurAB have distinct roles in E. faecalis physiology and suggest that MurAA possesses a unique property or activity that enables it to enhance intrinsic resistance of E. faecalis to cephalosporins. PMID:22290954

  2. Knowledge of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in patients followed by family physicians.

    PubMed

    Robert, A; Nguyen, Y; Bajolet, O; Vuillemin, B; Defoin, B; Vernet-Garnier, V; Drame, M; Bani-Sadr, F

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate factors associated with knowledge of antibiotics and drug resistance. A questionnaire was handed out by 14 family physicians to their patients between December 20, 2014 and April 20, 2015 in Rethel (North-East of France). We conducted a cross-sectional study using a logistical regression model to assess factors associated with antibiotic knowledge. Three criteria were used to assess that knowledge. Overall, 293 questionnaires were analysed; 48% of patients had received antibiotics in the previous 12 months. Only 44% and 26% gave a correct answer for the statements "Antibiotics are effective against bacteria and ineffective against viruses" and "Antibiotic resistance decreases if the antibiotic use decreases", respectively. Characteristics such as female sex, age>30 years, high level of education, high professional categories, and having received antibiotic information by the media were associated with high level of knowledge about antibiotics and/or antibiotic resistance. In contrast, having received antibiotic information from family physicians was not associated with good knowledge. Although media awareness campaigns had an independent impact on a higher public knowledge of antibiotics, the overall public knowledge remains low. It would be necessary to strengthen antibiotic campaigns with clearer information on the relation between the excessive use of antibiotics and the increased risk of antibiotic resistance. Family physicians should be more involved to improve antibiotic knowledge among target groups such as men, young patients, and people from a poor social and cultural background. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Coping with antibiotic resistance: combining nanoparticles with antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kon, Kateryna Volodymyrivna; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Bagirova, Malahat; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2011-11-01

    The worldwide escalation of bacterial resistance to conventional medical antibiotics is a serious concern for modern medicine. High prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria among bacteria-based infections decreases effectiveness of current treatments and causes thousands of deaths. New improvements in present methods and novel strategies are urgently needed to cope with this problem. Owing to their antibacterial activities, metallic nanoparticles represent an effective solution for overcoming bacterial resistance. However, metallic nanoparticles are toxic, which causes restrictions in their use. Recent studies have shown that combining nanoparticles with antibiotics not only reduces the toxicity of both agents towards human cells by decreasing the requirement for high dosages but also enhances their bactericidal properties. Combining antibiotics with nanoparticles also restores their ability to destroy bacteria that have acquired resistance to them. Furthermore, nanoparticles tagged with antibiotics have been shown to increase the concentration of antibiotics at the site of bacterium-antibiotic interaction, and to facilitate binding of antibiotics to bacteria. Likewise, combining nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides and essential oils generates genuine synergy against bacterial resistance. In this article, we aim to summarize recent studies on interactions between nanoparticles and antibiotics, as well as other antibacterial agents to formulate new prospects for future studies. Based on the promising data that demonstrated the synergistic effects of antimicrobial agents with nanoparticles, we believe that this combination is a potential candidate for more research into treatments for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  4. Antibiotic resistance: a primer and call to action.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel A; M'ikanatha, Nkuchia M; Read, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, discoveries of microorganisms as causes of infections and antibiotics as effective therapeutic agents have contributed to significant gains in public health in many parts of the world. Health agencies worldwide are galvanizing attention toward antibiotic resistance, which is a major threat to public health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013; World Health Organization, 2014). Some life scientists believe that we are approaching the post-antibiotic age (Davies & Davies, 2010). The growing threat of antimicrobial resistance is fueled by complex factors with biological, behavioral, and societal aspects. This primer provides an overview of antibiotic resistance and its growing burden on public health, the biological and behavioral mechanisms that increase antibiotic resistance, and examples of where health communication scholars can contribute to efforts to make our current antibiotic drugs last as long as possible. In addition, we identify compelling challenges for current communication theories and practices.

  5. Antibiotic Resistance: A Primer and Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A.; M’ikanatha, Nkuchia M.; Read, Andrew F.

    2014-01-01

    During the past century, discoveries of microorganisms as causes of infections and antibiotics as effective therapeutic agents have contributed to significant gains in public health in many parts of the world. Health agencies worldwide are galvanizing attention toward antibiotic resistance, which is a major threat to public health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2013; World Health Organization [WHO], 2014). Some life scientists believe that we are approaching the post-antibiotic age (Davies & Davies, 2010). The growing threat of antimicrobial resistance is fueled by complex factors with biological, behavioral and societal aspects. This primer provides an overview of antibiotic resistance and its growing burden on public health, the biological and behavioral mechanisms that increase antibiotic resistance, and examples of where health communication scholars can contribute to efforts to make our current antibiotic drugs last as long as possible. In addition, we identify compelling challenges for current communication theories and practices. PMID:25121990

  6. Antibiotic resistance profiles among mesophilic aerobic bacteria in Nigerian chicken litter and associated antibiotic resistance genes1.

    PubMed

    Olonitola, Olayeni Stephen; Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Pruden, Amy

    2015-05-01

    The effect of global antibiotic use practices in livestock on the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens is poorly understood. There is a paucity of data among African nations, which suffer from high rates of antibiotic resistant infections among the human population. Escherichia (29.5%), Staphylococcus (15.8%), and Proteus (15.79%) were the dominant bacterial genera isolated from chicken litter from four different farms in Zaria, Nigeria, all of which contain human pathogenic members. Escherichia isolates were uniformly susceptible to augmentin and cefuroxime, but resistant to sulfamethoxazole (54.5%), ampicillin (22.7%), ciprofloxacin (18.2%), cephalothin (13.6%) and gentamicin (13.6%). Staphylococcus isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and sulfamethoxazole, but resistant to tetracycline (86.7%), erythromycin (80%), clindamycin (60%), and penicillin (33.3%). Many of the isolates (65.4%) were resistant to multiple antibiotics, with a multiple antibiotic resistance index (MARI) ≥ 0.2. sul1, sul2, and vanA were the most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes among the isolates. Chicken litter associated with antibiotic use and farming practices in Nigeria could be a public health concern given that the antibiotic resistant patterns among genera containing pathogens indicate the potential for antibiotic treatment failure. However, the MARI values were generally lower than reported for Escherichia coli from intensive poultry operations in industrial nations. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. The world alliance against antibiotic resistance: consensus for a declaration.

    PubMed

    Carlet, Jean

    2015-06-15

    Antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide and has become a very important threat to public health. The overconsumption of antibiotics is the most important cause of this problem. We created a World Alliance Against Antibiotic Resistance (WAAAR), which now includes 720 people from 55 different countries and is supported by 145 medical societies or various groups. In June 2014, WAAAR launched a declaration against antibiotic resistance. This article describes the process and the content of this declaration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Metagenomics and other Methods for Measuring Antibiotic Resistance in Agroecosystems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: There is broad concern regarding antibiotic resistance on farms and in fields, however there is no standard method for defining or measuring antibiotic resistance in environmental samples. Methods: We used metagenomic, culture-based, and molecular methods to characterize the amount, t...

  9. Antibiotic resistance in the wild: an eco-evolutionary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Virta, Marko

    2017-01-01

    The legacy of the use and misuse of antibiotics in recent decades has left us with a global public health crisis: antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise, making it harder to treat infections. At the same time, evolution of antibiotic resistance is probably the best-documented case of contemporary evolution. To date, research on antibiotic resistance has largely ignored the complexity of interactions that bacteria engage in. However, in natural populations, bacteria interact with other species; for example, competition and grazing are import interactions influencing bacterial population dynamics. Furthermore, antibiotic leakage to natural environments can radically alter bacterial communities. Overall, we argue that eco-evolutionary feedback loops in microbial communities can be modified by residual antibiotics and evolution of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this review is to connect some of the well-established key concepts in evolutionary biology and recent advances in the study of eco-evolutionary dynamics to research on antibiotic resistance. We also identify some key knowledge gaps related to eco-evolutionary dynamics of antibiotic resistance, and review some of the recent technical advantages in molecular microbiology that offer new opportunities for tackling these questions. Finally, we argue that using the full potential of evolutionary theory and active communication across the different fields is needed for solving this global crisis more efficiently. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences'. PMID:27920384

  10. Antibiotic resistance in the wild: an eco-evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, Teppo; Virta, Marko; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2017-01-19

    The legacy of the use and misuse of antibiotics in recent decades has left us with a global public health crisis: antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise, making it harder to treat infections. At the same time, evolution of antibiotic resistance is probably the best-documented case of contemporary evolution. To date, research on antibiotic resistance has largely ignored the complexity of interactions that bacteria engage in. However, in natural populations, bacteria interact with other species; for example, competition and grazing are import interactions influencing bacterial population dynamics. Furthermore, antibiotic leakage to natural environments can radically alter bacterial communities. Overall, we argue that eco-evolutionary feedback loops in microbial communities can be modified by residual antibiotics and evolution of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this review is to connect some of the well-established key concepts in evolutionary biology and recent advances in the study of eco-evolutionary dynamics to research on antibiotic resistance. We also identify some key knowledge gaps related to eco-evolutionary dynamics of antibiotic resistance, and review some of the recent technical advantages in molecular microbiology that offer new opportunities for tackling these questions. Finally, we argue that using the full potential of evolutionary theory and active communication across the different fields is needed for solving this global crisis more efficiently.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences'. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. Combating antibiotic resistance, mitigating future threats and ongoing initiatives.

    PubMed

    Velez, Roseann; Sloand, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    To emphasise the impact of antibiotic resistance as a persistent, global health threat and highlight efforts to improve this complex problem. Political agendas, legislation, development of therapies and educational initiatives are essential to mitigate the increasing rate of antibiotic resistance. Original manuscript. Prescribers, policymakers and researchers are charged with the complex task of mitigating antibiotic resistance in an era when new treatments for bacterial infections are limited. Monitoring, surveillance and incentivising of practice, policy and new treatments provide solutions to antibiotic resistance in both the human and agricultural sectors. This article emphasises the complexity of antibiotic resistance and highlights the need for a multifaceted approach to improve health care outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Antibiotic failure mediated by a resistant subpopulation in Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Band, Victor I; Crispell, Emily K; Napier, Brooke A; Herrera, Carmen M; Tharp, Greg K; Vavikolanu, Kranthi; Pohl, Jan; Read, Timothy D; Bosinger, Steven E; Trent, M Stephen; Burd, Eileen M; Weiss, David S

    2016-05-09

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health threat, further complicated by unexplained treatment failures caused by bacteria that appear antibiotic susceptible. We describe an Enterobacter cloacae isolate harbouring a minor subpopulation that is highly resistant to the last-line antibiotic colistin. This subpopulation was distinct from persisters, became predominant in colistin, returned to baseline after colistin removal and was dependent on the histidine kinase PhoQ. During murine infection, but in the absence of colistin, innate immune defences led to an increased frequency of the resistant subpopulation, leading to inefficacy of subsequent colistin therapy. An isolate with a lower-frequency colistin-resistant subpopulation similarly caused treatment failure but was misclassified as susceptible by current diagnostics once cultured outside the host. These data demonstrate the ability of low-frequency bacterial subpopulations to contribute to clinically relevant antibiotic resistance, elucidating an enigmatic cause of antibiotic treatment failure and highlighting the critical need for more sensitive diagnostics.

  13. Molecular Basis of Intrinsic Macrolide Resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Buriánková, Karolína; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Dorson, Olivier; Gondran, Anne; Ghnassia, Jean-Claude; Weiser, Jaroslav; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    The intrinsic resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) to most antibiotics, including macrolides, is generally attributed to the low permeability of the mycobacterial cell wall. However, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are much more sensitive to macrolides than members of the MTC. A search for macrolide resistance determinants within the genome of M. tuberculosis revealed the presence of a sequence encoding a putative rRNA methyltransferase. The deduced protein is similar to Erm methyltransferases, which confer macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance by methylation of 23S rRNA, and was named ErmMT. The corresponding gene, ermMT (erm37), is present in all members of the MTC but is absent in NTM species. Part of ermMT is deleted in some vaccine strains of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, such as the Pasteur strain, which lack the RD2 region. The Pasteur strain was susceptible to MLS antibiotics, whereas MTC species harboring the RD2 region were resistant to them. The expression of ermMT in the macrolide-sensitive Mycobacterium smegmatis and BCG Pasteur conferred MLS resistance. The resistance patterns and ribosomal affinity for erythromycin of Mycobacterium host strains expressing ermMT, srmA (monomethyltransferase from Streptomyces ambofaciens), and ermE (dimethyltransferase from Saccharopolyspora erythraea) were compared, and the ones conferred by ErmMT were similar to those conferred by SrmA, corresponding to the MLS type I phenotype. These results suggest that ermMT plays a major role in the intrinsic macrolide resistance of members of the MTC and could be the first example of a gene conferring resistance by target modification in mycobacteria. PMID:14693532

  14. Molecular basis of intrinsic macrolide resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Buriánková, Karolína; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Dorson, Olivier; Gondran, Anne; Ghnassia, Jean-Claude; Weiser, Jaroslav; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    The intrinsic resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) to most antibiotics, including macrolides, is generally attributed to the low permeability of the mycobacterial cell wall. However, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are much more sensitive to macrolides than members of the MTC. A search for macrolide resistance determinants within the genome of M. tuberculosis revealed the presence of a sequence encoding a putative rRNA methyltransferase. The deduced protein is similar to Erm methyltransferases, which confer macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance by methylation of 23S rRNA, and was named ErmMT. The corresponding gene, ermMT (erm37), is present in all members of the MTC but is absent in NTM species. Part of ermMT is deleted in some vaccine strains of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, such as the Pasteur strain, which lack the RD2 region. The Pasteur strain was susceptible to MLS antibiotics, whereas MTC species harboring the RD2 region were resistant to them. The expression of ermMT in the macrolide-sensitive Mycobacterium smegmatis and BCG Pasteur conferred MLS resistance. The resistance patterns and ribosomal affinity for erythromycin of Mycobacterium host strains expressing ermMT, srmA (monomethyltransferase from Streptomyces ambofaciens), and ermE (dimethyltransferase from Saccharopolyspora erythraea) were compared, and the ones conferred by ErmMT were similar to those conferred by SrmA, corresponding to the MLS type I phenotype. These results suggest that ermMT plays a major role in the intrinsic macrolide resistance of members of the MTC and could be the first example of a gene conferring resistance by target modification in mycobacteria.

  15. Antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in waters associated with a hospital in Ujjain, India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Concerns have been raised about the public health implications of the presence of antibiotic residues in the aquatic environment and their effect on the development of bacterial resistance. While there is information on antibiotic residue levels in hospital effluent from some other countries, information on antibiotic residue levels in effluent from Indian hospitals is not available. Also, concurrent studies on antibiotic prescription quantity in a hospital and antibiotic residue levels and resistant bacteria in the effluent of the same hospital are few. Therefore, we quantified antibiotic residues in waters associated with a hospital in India and assessed their association, if any, with quantities of antibiotic prescribed in the hospital and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli found in the hospital effluent. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in a teaching hospital outside the city of Ujjain in India. Seven antibiotics - amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, amikacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and levofloxacin - were selected. Prescribed quantities were obtained from hospital records. The samples of the hospital associated water were analysed for the above mentioned antibiotics using well developed and validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry technique after selectively isolating the analytes from the matrix using solid phase extraction. Escherichia coli isolates from these waters were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, by standard Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute breakpoints. Results Ciprofloxacin was the highest prescribed antibiotic in the hospital and its residue levels in the hospital wastewater were also the highest. In samples of the municipal water supply and the groundwater, no antibiotics were detected. There was a positive correlation between the quantity of antibiotics prescribed in the hospital and antibiotic residue levels in the hospital wastewater

  16. Antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in waters associated with a hospital in Ujjain, India.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Vishal; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Khandal, Rakesh K; Sen, Shanta; Aggarwal, Manjeet; Marothi, Yogyata; Iyer, Rama V; Sundblad-Tonderski, Karin; Stålsby-Lundborg, Cecilia

    2010-07-13

    Concerns have been raised about the public health implications of the presence of antibiotic residues in the aquatic environment and their effect on the development of bacterial resistance. While there is information on antibiotic residue levels in hospital effluent from some other countries, information on antibiotic residue levels in effluent from Indian hospitals is not available. Also, concurrent studies on antibiotic prescription quantity in a hospital and antibiotic residue levels and resistant bacteria in the effluent of the same hospital are few. Therefore, we quantified antibiotic residues in waters associated with a hospital in India and assessed their association, if any, with quantities of antibiotic prescribed in the hospital and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli found in the hospital effluent. This cross-sectional study was conducted in a teaching hospital outside the city of Ujjain in India. Seven antibiotics--amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, amikacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and levofloxacin--were selected. Prescribed quantities were obtained from hospital records. The samples of the hospital associated water were analysed for the above mentioned antibiotics using well developed and validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry technique after selectively isolating the analytes from the matrix using solid phase extraction. Escherichia coli isolates from these waters were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, by standard Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute breakpoints. Ciprofloxacin was the highest prescribed antibiotic in the hospital and its residue levels in the hospital wastewater were also the highest. In samples of the municipal water supply and the groundwater, no antibiotics were detected. There was a positive correlation between the quantity of antibiotics prescribed in the hospital and antibiotic residue levels in the hospital wastewater. Wastewater samples collected in

  17. "Practical knowledge" and perceptions of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance among drugsellers in Tanzanian private drugstores.

    PubMed

    Viberg, Nina; Kalala, Willbrord; Mujinja, Phare; Tomson, Göran; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby

    2010-09-16

    Studies indicate that antibiotics are sold against regulation and without prescription in private drugstores in rural Tanzania. The objective of the study was to explore and describe antibiotics sale and dispensing practices and link it to drugseller knowledge and perceptions of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance. Exit customers of private drugstores in eight districts were interviewed about the drugstore encounter and drugs bought. Drugsellers filled in a questionnaire with closed- and open-ended questions about antibiotics and resistance. Data were analyzed using mixed quantitative and qualitative methods. Of 350 interviewed exit customers, 24% had bought antibiotics. Thirty percent had seen a health worker before coming and almost all of these had a prescription. Antibiotics were dispensed mainly for cough, stomachache, genital complaints and diarrhea but not for malaria or headache. Dispensed drugs were assessed as relevant for the symptoms or disease presented in 83% of all cases and 51% for antibiotics specifically. Non-prescribed drugs were assessed as more relevant than the prescribed. The knowledge level of the drugseller was ranked as high or very high by 75% of the respondents. Seventy-five drugsellers from three districts participated. Seventy-nine percent stated that diseases caused by bacteria can be treated with antibiotics but 24% of these also said that antibiotics can be used for treating viral disease. Most (85%) said that STI can be treated with antibiotics while 1% said the same about headache, 4% general weakness and 3% 'all diseases'. Seventy-two percent had heard of antibiotic resistance. When describing what an antibiotic is, the respondents used six different kinds of keywords. Descriptions of what antibiotic resistance is and how it occurs were quite rational from a biomedical point of view with some exceptions. They gave rise to five categories and one theme: Perceiving antibiotic resistance based on practical experience. The

  18. Probing minority population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianxun; Zheng, Yan; Yan, Ya; Yang, Lingling; Yao, Yihui; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wu, Lina; Wang, Xu; Chen, Yuqing; Xing, Jinchun; Yan, Xiaomei

    2016-06-15

    The evolution and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has become a major threat to public health. Advanced tools are urgently needed to quickly diagnose antibiotic-resistant infections to initiate appropriate treatment. Here we report the development of a highly sensitive flow cytometric method to probe minority population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria via single cell detection. Monoclonal antibody against TEM-1 β-lactamase and Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated secondary antibody were used to selectively label resistant bacteria green, and nucleic acid dye SYTO 62 was used to stain all the bacteria red. A laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM) was applied to simultaneously detect the side scatter and dual-color fluorescence signals of single bacteria. By using E. coli JM109/pUC19 and E. coli JM109 as the model systems for antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-susceptible bacteria, respectively, as low as 0.1% of antibiotic-resistant bacteria were accurately quantified. By monitoring the dynamic population change of a bacterial culture with the administration of antibiotics, we confirmed that under the antimicrobial pressure, the original low population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria outcompeted susceptible strains and became the dominant population after 5hours of growth. Detection of antibiotic-resistant infection in clinical urine samples was achieved without cultivation, and the bacterial load of susceptible and resistant strains can be faithfully quantified. Overall, the HSFCM-based quantitative method provides a powerful tool for the fundamental studies of antibiotic resistance and holds the potential to provide rapid and precise guidance in clinical therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Natural Products as Platforms To Overcome Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Sean E; Fletcher, Madison H; Wuest, William M

    2017-09-27

    Natural products have served as powerful therapeutics against pathogenic bacteria since the golden age of antibiotics of the mid-20th century. However, the increasing frequency of antibiotic-resistant infections clearly demonstrates that new antibiotics are critical for modern medicine. Because combinatorial approaches have not yielded effective drugs, we propose that the development of new antibiotics around proven natural scaffolds is the best short-term solution to the rising crisis of antibiotic resistance. We analyze herein synthetic approaches aiming to reengineer natural products into potent antibiotics. Furthermore, we discuss approaches in modulating quorum sensing and biofilm formation as a nonlethal method, as well as narrow-spectrum pathogen-specific antibiotics, which are of interest given new insights into the implications of disrupting the microbiome.

  20. Distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in glacier environments.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Rivera, Andres; Yamada, Akinori; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Barcaza, Gonzalo; Shinbori, Kunio; Motoyama, Hideaki; Kohshima, Shiro; Ushida, Kazunari

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are biologically transmitted from microorganism to microorganism in particular micro-environments where dense microbial communities are often exposed to an intensive use of antibiotics, such as intestinal microflora, and the soil microflora of agricultural fields. However, recent studies have detected antibiotic-resistant bacteria and/or antibiotic resistance genes in the natural environment geographically isolated from such areas. Here we sought to examine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in 54 snow and ice samples collected from the Arctic, Antarctic, Central Asia, North and South America and Africa, to evaluate the level of these genes in environments supposedly not affected by anthropogenic factors. We observed a widespread distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in samples from various glaciers in Central Asia, North and South America, Greenland and Africa. In contrast, Antarctic glaciers were virtually free from these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes, of both clinical (i.e. aac(3), blaIMP) and agricultural (i.e. strA and tetW) origin, were detected. Our results show regional geographical distribution of antibiotic resistance genes, with the most plausible modes of transmission through airborne bacteria and migrating birds.

  1. The role of biofilms as environmental reservoirs of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Balcázar, José L.; Subirats, Jéssica; Borrego, Carles M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a significant and growing threat to public and environmental health. To face this problem both at local and global scales, a better understanding of the sources and mechanisms that contribute to the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance is required. Recent studies demonstrate that aquatic ecosystems are reservoirs of resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes as well as potential conduits for their transmission to human pathogens. Despite the wealth of information about antibiotic pollution and its effect on the aquatic microbial resistome, the contribution of environmental biofilms to the acquisition and spread of antibiotic resistance has not been fully explored in aquatic systems. Biofilms are structured multicellular communities embedded in a self-produced extracellular matrix that acts as a barrier to antibiotic diffusion. High population densities and proximity of cells in biofilms also increases the chances for genetic exchange among bacterial species converting biofilms in hot spots of antibiotic resistance. This review focuses on the potential effect of antibiotic pollution on biofilm microbial communities, with special emphasis on ecological and evolutionary processes underlying acquired resistance to these compounds. PMID:26583011

  2. Metagenomic Insights into Transferable Antibiotic Resistance in Oral Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, S; Roberts, A P; Martin, F E; Adler, C J

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is considered one of the greatest threats to global public health. Resistance is often conferred by the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), which are readily found in the oral microbiome. In-depth genetic analyses of the oral microbiome through metagenomic techniques reveal a broad distribution of ARGs (including novel ARGs) in individuals not recently exposed to antibiotics, including humans in isolated indigenous populations. This has resulted in a paradigm shift from focusing on the carriage of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria to a broader concept of an oral resistome, which includes all resistance genes in the microbiome. Metagenomics is beginning to demonstrate the role of the oral resistome and horizontal gene transfer within and between commensals in the absence of selective pressure, such as an antibiotic. At the chairside, metagenomic data reinforce our need to adhere to current antibiotic guidelines to minimize the spread of resistance, as such data reveal the extent of ARGs without exposure to antimicrobials and the ecologic changes created in the oral microbiome by even a single dose of antibiotics. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of metagenomics in the investigation of the oral resistome, including the transmission of antibiotic resistance in the oral microbiome. Future perspectives, including clinical implications of the findings from metagenomic investigations of oral ARGs, are also considered. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  3. RecA Inhibitors Potentiate Antibiotic Activity and Block Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Kausar; Alhhazmi, Areej; DeCoteau, John F; Luo, Yu; Geyer, C Ronald

    2016-03-17

    Antibiotic resistance arises from the maintenance of resistance mutations or genes acquired from the acquisition of adaptive de novo mutations or the transfer of resistance genes. Antibiotic resistance is acquired in response to antibiotic therapy by activating SOS-mediated DNA repair and mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer pathways. Initiation of the SOS pathway promotes activation of RecA, inactivation of LexA repressor, and induction of SOS genes. Here, we have identified and characterized phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid RecA inhibitors that block antibiotic-induced activation of the SOS response. These inhibitors potentiate the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, including members of the quinolone, β-lactam, and aminoglycoside families in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They reduce the ability of bacteria to acquire antibiotic resistance mutations and to transfer mobile genetic elements conferring resistance. This study highlights the advantage of including RecA inhibitors in bactericidal antibiotic therapies and provides a new strategy for prolonging antibiotic shelf life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A review of global initiatives to fight antibiotic resistance and recent antibiotics׳ discovery.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Arpana Sagwal

    2016-11-01

    Data from across the world have shown an overall decline in the antibiotic pipeline and continually rising resistance to all first-line and last-resort antibiotics. The gaps in our knowledge of existing prevalence and mechanisms of antibiotic resistance (ABR) are all too well known. Several decades of antibiotic abuse in humans, animals, and agricultural practices have created health emergency situations and huge socio-economic impact. This paper discusses key findings of the studies conducted by several national and international collaborative organizations on the current state of affairs in ABR. Alongside, a brief overview of the antibacterial agents׳ discovery in recent years approved by the US FDA is discussed.

  5. What Can Be Done about Antibiotic Resistance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... chosen by doctors whenever possible to avoid destroying populations of beneficial bacteria along with the disease-causing bacteria. In addition, non-therapeutic uses of antibiotics in farm animals and agriculture should be eliminated. Can new antibiotics ...

  6. Antibiotics: Pharmacokinetics, toxicity, resistance and multidrug efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Çiğdem; Özcengiz, Gülay

    2017-06-01

    The discovery of penicillin followed by streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalosporins and other natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic antimicrobials completely revolutionized medicine by reducing human morbidity and mortality from most of the common infections. However, shortly after they were introduced to clinical practice, the development of resistance was emerged. The decreasing interest from antibiotic industry in spite of rapid global emergence of antibiotic resistance is a tough dilemma from the pointview of public health. The efficiency of antimicrobial treatment is determined by both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In spite of their selective toxicity, antibiotics still cause severe, life-threatening adverse reactions in host body mostly due to defective drug metabolism or excessive dosing regimen. The present article aims at updating current knowledge on pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics concepts and models, toxicity of antibiotics as well as antibiotic resistance mechanisms, resistome analyses and search for novel antibiotic resistance determinants with special emphasis given to the-state-of-the-art regarding multidrug efflux pumps and their additional physiological functions in stress adaptation and virulence of bacteria. All these issues are highly linked to each other and not only important for most efficient and prolonged use of current antibiotics, but also for discovery and development of new antibiotics and novel inhibitors of antibiotic resistance determinants of pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Isolated cell behavior drives the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Dudley, Carmel; Vega, Nicole M; Gore, Jeff

    2015-07-29

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is typically quantified by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), which is defined as the minimal concentration of antibiotic that inhibits bacterial growth starting from a standard cell density. However, when antibiotic resistance is mediated by degradation, the collective inactivation of antibiotic by the bacterial population can cause the measured MIC to depend strongly on the initial cell density. In cases where this inoculum effect is strong, the relationship between MIC and bacterial fitness in the antibiotic is not well defined. Here, we demonstrate that the resistance of a single, isolated cell-which we call the single-cell MIC (scMIC)-provides a superior metric for quantifying antibiotic resistance. Unlike the MIC, we find that the scMIC predicts the direction of selection and also specifies the antibiotic concentration at which selection begins to favor new mutants. Understanding the cooperative nature of bacterial growth in antibiotics is therefore essential in predicting the evolution of antibiotic resistance. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  8. Isolated cell behavior drives the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Dudley, Carmel; Vega, Nicole M; Gore, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is typically quantified by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), which is defined as the minimal concentration of antibiotic that inhibits bacterial growth starting from a standard cell density. However, when antibiotic resistance is mediated by degradation, the collective inactivation of antibiotic by the bacterial population can cause the measured MIC to depend strongly on the initial cell density. In cases where this inoculum effect is strong, the relationship between MIC and bacterial fitness in the antibiotic is not well defined. Here, we demonstrate that the resistance of a single, isolated cell—which we call the single-cell MIC (scMIC)—provides a superior metric for quantifying antibiotic resistance. Unlike the MIC, we find that the scMIC predicts the direction of selection and also specifies the antibiotic concentration at which selection begins to favor new mutants. Understanding the cooperative nature of bacterial growth in antibiotics is therefore essential in predicting the evolution of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26227664

  9. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria: a challenge for the food industry.

    PubMed

    Capita, Rosa; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were first described in the 1940s, but whereas new antibiotics were being discovered at a steady rate, the consequences of this phenomenon were slow to be appreciated. At present, the paucity of new antimicrobials coming into the market has led to the problem of antibiotic resistance fast escalating into a global health crisis. Although the selective pressure exerted by the use of antibiotics (particularly overuse or misuse) has been deemed the major factor in the emergence of bacterial resistance to these antimicrobials, concerns about the role of the food industry have been growing in recent years and have been raised at both national and international levels. The selective pressure exerted by the use of antibiotics (primary production) and biocides (e.g., disinfectants, food and feed preservatives, or decontaminants) is the main driving force behind the selection and spread of antimicrobial resistance throughout the food chain. Genetically modified (GM) crops with antibiotic resistance marker genes, microorganisms added intentionally to the food chain (probiotic or technological) with potentially transferable antimicrobial resistance genes, and food processing technologies used at sub-lethal doses (e.g., alternative non-thermal treatments) are also issues for concern. This paper presents the main trends in antibiotic resistance and antibiotic development in recent decades, as well as their economic and health consequences, current knowledge concerning the generation, dissemination, and mechanisms of antibacterial resistance, progress to date on the possible routes for emergence of resistance throughout the food chain and the role of foods as a vehicle for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The main approaches to prevention and control of the development, selection, and spread of antibacterial resistance in the food industry are also addressed.

  10. Epigenetic inheritance based evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a topic of major medical importance. Evolution is the result of natural selection acting on variant phenotypes. Both the rigid base sequence of DNA and the more plastic expression patterns of the genes present define phenotype. Results We investigated the evolution of resistant E. coli when exposed to low concentrations of antibiotic. We show that within an isogenic population there are heritable variations in gene expression patterns, providing phenotypic diversity for antibiotic selection to act on. We studied resistance to three different antibiotics, ampicillin, tetracycline and nalidixic acid, which act by inhibiting cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis and DNA synthesis, respectively. In each case survival rates were too high to be accounted for by spontaneous DNA mutation. In addition, resistance levels could be ramped higher by successive exposures to increasing antibiotic concentrations. Furthermore, reversion rates to antibiotic sensitivity were extremely high, generally over 50%, consistent with an epigenetic inheritance mode of resistance. The gene expression patterns of the antibiotic resistant E. coli were characterized with microarrays. Candidate genes, whose altered expression might confer survival, were tested by driving constitutive overexpression and determining antibiotic resistance. Three categories of resistance genes were identified. The endogenous β-lactamase gene represented a cryptic gene, normally inactive, but when by chance expressed capable of providing potent ampicillin resistance. The glutamate decarboxylase gene, in contrast, is normally expressed, but when overexpressed has the incidental capacity to give an increase in ampicillin resistance. And the DAM methylase gene is capable of regulating the expression of other genes, including multidrug efflux pumps. Conclusion In this report we describe the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria mediated by the

  11. Resurrecting the intestinal microbiota to combat antibiotic-resistant pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Pamer, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota, which is composed of diverse populations of commensal bacterial species, provides resistance against colonization and invasion by pathogens. Antibiotic treatment can damage the intestinal microbiota and, paradoxically, increase susceptibility to infections. Reestablishing microbiota-mediated colonization resistance after antibiotic treatment could markedly reduce infections, particularly those caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Ongoing studies are identifying commensal bacterial species that can be developed into next-generation probiotics to reestablish or enhance colonization resistance. These live medicines are at various stages of discovery, testing, and production and are being subjected to existing regulatory gauntlets for eventual introduction into clinical practice. The development of next-generation probiotics to reestablish colonization resistance and eliminate potential pathogens from the gut is warranted and will reduce health care–associated infections caused by highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:27126035

  12. Resurrecting the intestinal microbiota to combat antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pamer, Eric G

    2016-04-29

    The intestinal microbiota, which is composed of diverse populations of commensal bacterial species, provides resistance against colonization and invasion by pathogens. Antibiotic treatment can damage the intestinal microbiota and, paradoxically, increase susceptibility to infections. Reestablishing microbiota-mediated colonization resistance after antibiotic treatment could markedly reduce infections, particularly those caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Ongoing studies are identifying commensal bacterial species that can be developed into next-generation probiotics to reestablish or enhance colonization resistance. These live medicines are at various stages of discovery, testing, and production and are being subjected to existing regulatory gauntlets for eventual introduction into clinical practice. The development of next-generation probiotics to reestablish colonization resistance and eliminate potential pathogens from the gut is warranted and will reduce health care-associated infections caused by highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Eight More Ways To Deal with Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shlaes, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The fight against antibiotic resistance must be strengthened. We propose actions that U.S. government agencies and private sector entities can take to build a more comprehensive effort. These actions can increase the viability of investing in new antibiotics, ensure the quality and stewardship of all antibiotics, and make responses to emerging resistance more informed. Success requires the thoughtful exercise of federal authority and a firm commitment to share data and reward developers for the value generated with new, life-saving antibiotics. PMID:24867992

  14. Eight more ways to deal with antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Metz, Matthew; Shlaes, David M

    2014-08-01

    The fight against antibiotic resistance must be strengthened. We propose actions that U.S. government agencies and private sector entities can take to build a more comprehensive effort. These actions can increase the viability of investing in new antibiotics, ensure the quality and stewardship of all antibiotics, and make responses to emerging resistance more informed. Success requires the thoughtful exercise of federal authority and a firm commitment to share data and reward developers for the value generated with new, life-saving antibiotics. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Indirect resistance to several classes of antibiotics in cocultures with resistant bacteria expressing antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nicoloff, Hervé; Andersson, Dan I

    2016-01-01

    Indirect resistance (IR), the ability of an antibiotic-resistant population of bacteria to protect a susceptible population, has been previously observed for β-lactamase-producing bacteria and associated with antimicrobial treatment failures. Here, we determined whether other resistance determinants could cause IR in the presence of five other classes of antibiotics. A test was designed to detect IR and 14 antibiotic resistance genes were tested in the presence of 13 antibiotics from six classes. A bioassay was used to measure the ability of resistance-causing enzymes to decrease the concentration of active antibiotics in the medium. We confirmed IR in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics (ampicillin and mecillinam) when TEM-1A was expressed. We found that bacteria expressing antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes Ere(A), Tet(X2) or CatA1 caused IR in the presence of macrolides (erythromycin and clarithromycin), tetracyclines (tetracycline and tigecycline) and chloramphenicol, respectively. IR was not observed with resistance determinants that did not modify or destroy antibiotics or with enzymes modifying aminoglycosides or degrading fosfomycin. IR was dependent on the resistance enzymes decreasing the concentration of active antibiotics in the medium, hence allowing nearby susceptible bacteria to resume growth once the antibiotic concentration fell below their MIC. IR was not limited to β-lactamase-producing bacteria, but was also caused by resistant bacteria carrying cytoplasmic antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes that catalyse energy-consuming reactions requiring complex cellular cofactors. Our results suggest that IR is common and further emphasizes that coinfecting agents and the human microflora can have a negative impact during antimicrobial therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Characterization of antibiotic resistance in Listeria spp. isolated from slaughterhouse environments, pork and human infections.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Paixão, Renata; Gobbi, Débora D S; Raimundo, Daniele C; Ferreira, Thais P; Moreno, Andrea M; Hofer, Ernesto; Reis, Cristhiane M F; Matté, Glavur R; Matté, Maria H

    2014-04-15

    Listeria species are susceptible to most antibiotics. However, over the last decade, increasing reports of multidrug-resistant Listeria spp. from various sources have prompted public health concerns. The objective of this study was to characterize the antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria spp. and the genetic mechanisms that confer resistance. Forty-six Listeria spp. isolates were studied, and their minimal inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were determined by microdilution using Sensititre standard susceptibility MIC plates. The isolates were screened for the presence of gyrA, parC, lde, lsa(A), lnu(A), and mprF by PCR, and the amplified genes were sequenced. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin, and carbapenems. Resistance to clindamycin, daptomycin, and oxacillin was found among L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, and all species possessed at least intermediate resistance to fluoroquinolones. GyrA, parC, and mprF were detected in all isolates; however, mutations were found only in gyrA sequences. A high daptomycin MIC, as reported previously, was observed, suggesting an intrinsic resistance of Listeria spp. to daptomycin. These results are consistent with reports of emerging resistance in Listeria spp. and emphasize the need for further genotypic characterization of antibiotic resistance in this genus.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance in Australian cystic fibrosis centres.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel J; Ramsay, Kay A; Yerkovich, Stephanie T; Reid, David W; Wainwright, Claire E; Grimwood, Keith; Bell, Scott C; Kidd, Timothy J

    2016-02-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is associated with increased morbidity, antibiotic treatments and mortality. By linking Australian CF registry data with a national microbiological data set, we examined the association between where treatment was delivered, its intensity and P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Sputa were collected from paediatric and adult CF patients attending 18 Australian CF centres. P. aeruginosa antibiotic susceptibilities determined by local laboratories were correlated with clinical characteristics, treatment intensity and infection with strains commonly shared among Australian CF patients. Between-centre differences in treatment and antibiotic resistance were also compared. Large variations in antibiotic usage, maintenance treatment practices and multi-antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa (MARPA) prevalence exist between Australian CF centres, although the overall proportions of MARPA isolates were similar in paediatric and adult centres (31% vs 35%, P = 0.29). Among paediatric centres, MARPA correlated with intravenous antibiotic usage and the Australian state where treatment was delivered, while azithromycin, reduced lung function and treating state predicted intravenous antibiotic usage. In adult centres, body mass index (BMI) and treating state were associated with MARPA, while intravenous antibiotic use was predicted by gender, BMI, dornase-alpha, azithromycin, lung function and treating state. In adults, P. aeruginosa strains AUST-01 and AUST-02 independently predicted intravenous antibiotic usage. Increased treatment intensity in paediatric centres and the Australian state where treatment was received are both associated with greater risk of MARPA, but not worse clinical outcomes. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. Inactivation of an integrated antibiotic resistance gene in mammalian cells to re-enable antibiotic selection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Peiling; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Haixia; Chen, Lingyi

    2014-01-01

    Removing an antibiotic resistance gene allows the same antibiotic to be re-used in the next round of genetic manipulation. Here we applied the CRISPR/Cas system to disrupt the puromycin resistance gene in an engineered mouse embryonic stem cell line and then re-used puromycin selection in the resulting cells to establish stable reporter cell lines. With the CRISPR/Cas system, pre-engineered sequences, such as loxP or FRT, are not required. Thus, this technique can be used to disrupt antibiotic resistance genes that cannot be removed by the Cre-loxP and Flp-FRT systems.

  19. Antibiotic resistance to Propionobacterium acnes: worldwide scenario, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Gupta, Tanvi; Garg, Vijay K; Ghunawat, Sneha

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance in cutaneous Propionobacterium is a global problem. As a general rule, resistance levels are high to macrolides, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and clindamycin, while tetracyclines and levofloxacin have low resistance potential. Newer preparations like doxycycline MR and doxycycline 20 mg are subantimicrobial and may not lead to resistance. Sampling techniques are crucial to determine resistance. Genomic evaluation using 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing can be useful in diagnosing mutations and mapping phylotypes of Propionobacterium acnes. Resistance may lead to slow response and relapses. Apart from benzoyl peroxide, azelaic acid, topical dapsone, oral zinc and retinoids, novel molecules with little resistance potential include octadecenedioic acid, phytosphingosine, lauric acid, retapamulin, resveratrol, T-3912 and NB-003. The use of oral retinoids and non-antibiotics like zinc can prevent resistance and help reduce the dependence on antibiotics.

  20. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M.; Partridge, Sally R.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing (‘addiction’) systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative ‘interference plasmids’ were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored. PMID:28245276

  1. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M; Partridge, Sally R; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing ('addiction') systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative 'interference plasmids' were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored.

  2. Molecular typing of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, S M; Emele, F E; Nwaokorie, F O; Idika, N; Umeizudike, A K; Emeka-Nwabunnia, I; Hanson, B M; Nair, R; Wardyn, S E; Smith, T C

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA) are a major concern in densely populated urban areas. Initial studies of S. aureus in Nigeria indicated existence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus strains in clinical and community settings. 73 biological samples (40 throat, 23 nasal, 10 wound) were collected from patients and healthcare workers in three populations in Nigeria: Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, and Owerri General Hospital. S. aureus was isolated from 38 of 73 samples (52%). Of the 38 S. aureus samples, 9 (24%) carried the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene (PVL) while 16 (42%) possessed methicillin resistance genes (mecA). Antibiotic susceptibility profiles indicated resistance to several broad-spectrum antibiotics. Antibiotic-resistant S. aureus isolates were recovered from clinical and community settings in Nigeria. Insight about S. aureus in Nigeria may be used to improve antibiotic prescription methods and minimize the spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms in highly populated urban communities similar to Lagos, Nigeria. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of antibiotic resistance in probiotics of dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Wong, Aloysius; Ngu, Davey Yueh Saint; Dan, Lydia Annabel; Ooi, Amanda; Lim, Renee Lay Hong

    2015-09-14

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer nutrition- and health-promoting benefits if consumed in adequate amounts. Concomitant with the demand for natural approaches to maintaining health is an increase in inclusion of probiotics in food and health products. Since probiotic bacteria act as reservoir for antibiotic resistant determinants, the transfer of these genes to pathogens sharing the same intestinal habitat is thus conceivable considering the fact that dietary supplements contain high amounts of often heterogeneous populations of probiotics. Such events can confer pathogens protection against commonly-used drugs. Despite numerous reports of antibiotic resistant probiotics in food and biological sources, the antibiogram of probiotics from dietary supplements remained elusive. Here, we screened five commercially available dietary supplements for resistance towards antibiotics of different classes. Probiotics of all batches of products were resistant towards vancomycin while batch-dependent resistance towards streptomycin, aztreonam, gentamycin and/or ciprofloxacin antibiotics was detected for probiotics of brands Bi and Bn, Bg, and L. Isolates of brand Cn was also resistant towards gentamycin, streptomycin and ciprofloxacin antibiotics. Additionally, we also report a discrepancy between the enumerated viable bacteria amounts and the claims of the manufacturers. This short report has highlighted the present of antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria from dietary supplements and therefore serves as a platform for further screenings and for in-depth characterization of the resistant determinants and the molecular machinery that confers the resistance.

  4. Metabolic constraints on the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Mattia; Enke, Tim; Chubukov, Victor; Ricci, Vito; Piddock, Laura; Sauer, Uwe

    2017-03-06

    Despite our continuous improvement in understanding antibiotic resistance, the interplay between natural selection of resistance mutations and the environment remains unclear. To investigate the role of bacterial metabolism in constraining the evolution of antibiotic resistance, we evolved Escherichia coli growing on glycolytic or gluconeogenic carbon sources to the selective pressure of three different antibiotics. Profiling more than 500 intracellular and extracellular putative metabolites in 190 evolved populations revealed that carbon and energy metabolism strongly constrained the evolutionary trajectories, both in terms of speed and mode of resistance acquisition. To interpret and explore the space of metabolome changes, we developed a novel constraint-based modeling approach using the concept of shadow prices. This analysis, together with genome resequencing of resistant populations, identified condition-dependent compensatory mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, such as the shift from respiratory to fermentative metabolism of glucose upon overexpression of efflux pumps. Moreover, metabolome-based predictions revealed emerging weaknesses in resistant strains, such as the hypersensitivity to fosfomycin of ampicillin-resistant strains. Overall, resolving metabolic adaptation throughout antibiotic-driven evolutionary trajectories opens new perspectives in the fight against emerging antibiotic resistance.

  5. Previous antibiotic exposure and evolution of antibiotic resistance in mechanically ventilated patients with nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chun; Lin, Ming-Chih; Jao, Mei-Shin; Liu, Tu-Chen; Wu, Ren-Guang

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of previous antibiotic exposure and the influence of time interval since exposure on the evolution of antibiotic-resistant infections. We retrospectively analyzed 167 mechanically ventilated patients with nosocomial infections over a 3-year period, with focus on infections in the bloodstream, urinary tract, lower respiratory tract, and surgical sites. Of 167 patients, 62% were confirmed as antibiotic resistant. The most common isolated pathogen was extended-spectrum β-lactamase Enterobacteriaceae (43.9%), followed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (22.8%), and carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (17.5%). Multivariate analysis revealed that the association between resistance and the time interval increased within 10 days (odds ratio [OR], 2.45; P=.133) and peaked at 11 to 20 days (OR, 7.17; P=.012). The data were categorized into 2 groups: when the time interval was more than 20 days, there was a 23.9% reduction in resistance rate compared with when the time interval was 20 days or less (OR, 0.36; P=.002). Although antibiotic exposure increased resistance rate in nosocomial infections, this association decreased as time interval increased. Antibiotic stewardship should consider the significance of time interval while investigating the evolution of subsequent antibiotic-resistant infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibiotics, Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes: Aerial Transport from Cattle Feed Yards via Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    McEachran, Andrew D.; Blackwell, Brett R.; Hanson, J. Delton; Wooten, Kimberly J.; Mayer, Gregory D.; Cox, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance has become a global health threat and is often linked with overuse and misuse of clinical and veterinary chemotherapeutic agents. Modern industrial-scale animal feeding operations rely extensively on veterinary pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, to augment animal growth. Following excretion, antibiotics are transported through the environment via runoff, leaching, and land application of manure; however, airborne transport from feed yards has not been characterized. Objectives: The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), and ruminant-associated microbes are aerially dispersed via particulate matter (PM) derived from large-scale beef cattle feed yards. Methods: PM was collected downwind and upwind of 10 beef cattle feed yards. After extraction from PM, five veterinary antibiotics were quantified via high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, ARG were quantified via targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and microbial community diversity was analyzed via 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing. Results: Airborne PM derived from feed yards facilitated dispersal of several veterinary antibiotics, as well as microbial communities containing ARG. Concentrations of several antibiotics in airborne PM immediately downwind of feed yards ranged from 0.5 to 4.6 μg/g of PM. Microbial communities of PM collected downwind of feed yards were enriched with ruminant-associated taxa and were distinct when compared to upwind PM assemblages. Furthermore, genes encoding resistance to tetracycline antibiotics were significantly more abundant in PM collected downwind of feed yards as compared to upwind. Conclusions: Wind-dispersed PM from feed yards harbors antibiotics, bacteria, and ARGs. Citation: McEachran AD, Blackwell BR, Hanson JD, Wooten KJ, Mayer GD, Cox SB, Smith PN. 2015. Antibiotics, bacteria, and antibiotic

  7. Evolution of antibiotic resistance by human and bacterial niche construction.

    PubMed

    Boni, Maciej F; Feldman, Marcus W

    2005-03-01

    Antibiotic treatment by humans generates strong viability selection for antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. The frequency of host antibiotic use often determines the strength of this selection, and changing patterns of antibiotic use can generate many types of behaviors in the population dynamics of resistant and sensitive bacterial populations. In this paper, we present a simple model of hosts dimorphic for their tendency to use/avoid antibiotics and bacterial pathogens dimorphic in their resistance/sensitivity to antibiotic treatment. When a constant fraction of hosts uses antibiotics, the two bacterial strain populations can coexist unless host use-frequency is above a critical value; this critical value is derived as the ratio of the fitness cost of resistance to the fitness cost of undergoing treatment. When strain frequencies can affect host behavior, the dynamics may be analyzed in the light of niche construction. We consider three models underlying changing host behavior: conformism, the avoidance of long infections, and adherence to the advice of public health officials. In the latter two, we find that the pathogen can have quite a strong effect on host behavior. In particular, if antibiotic use is discouraged when resistance levels are high, we observe a classic niche-construction phenomenon of maintaining strain polymorphism even in parameter regions where it would not be expected.

  8. Fighting antibiotic resistance in Sweden--past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Struwe, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Sweden has been in the favorable situation of having limited antibiotic resistance and low antibiotic consumption. When pneumococci with reduced susceptibility to penicillin and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emerged during the 1990s, professionals and relevant authorities called for extensive action plans to avoid the critical threshold levels of resistance experienced in other countries. The purpose of this paper is to examine Swedish experiences in light of new and future challenges by reviewing Swedish data on antibiotic resistance and antibiotic use, notifications, outbreak control, action plans and scientific papers. The tradition of liberal performance of clinical cultures, together with well functioning diagnostic laboratories, has formed a basis for close collaboration and development of surveillance within quality assurance programs. For more than 20 years the pharmacy monopoly in Sweden has made it possible to collect well defined data on antibiotic sales at the county level with almost 100% coverage. Multisectorial collaboration was set up in regional Strama (Swedish Strategic Programme Against Antibiotic Resistance) groups. Large diagnosis-prescribing surveys have been undertaken, and the concept of basic hygiene precautions was introduced, together with extensive programs for early case finding. However, surveillance has been hampered by inadequate IT systems and some difficulties in collecting relevant data on antibiotic sales at the national level. Also, a decentralized system with 21 counties and regions has resulted in divergence of action plans and rules. The containment of antibiotic resistance thus far may be explained by the early response in human and veterinary medicine and close multisectorial collaboration, supported by the government, before problems got out of hand. Nevertheless, rapidly growing problems with bacteria that produce extended beta-lactamases have recently emerged and antibiotic sales have started to increase

  9. Antibiotic surgical prophylaxis increases nasal carriage of antibiotic-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Claire L; Hardy, Katherine J; Verlander, Neville Q; Hawkey, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococci are a significant cause of hospital-acquired infection. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is an important risk factor for infection in surgical patients and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a major cause of prosthetic joint infections. The impact that antibiotic surgical prophylaxis has on the nasal carriage of staphylococci has not been studied. Daily nasal swabs were taken from 63 patients who received antibiotic surgical prophylaxis and 16 patients who received no antibiotics. Total aerobic bacterial count, S. aureus and CNS were enumerated by culture from nasal swabs. Representative isolates were typed by staphylococcal interspersed repeat units (SIRU) typing and PFGE, and MICs to nine antibiotics were determined. After antibiotic administration, there was a reduction in S. aureus counts (median - 2.3 log(10)c.f.u. ml(- 1)) in 64.0 % of S. aureus carriers, compared with only a 0.89 log(10)c.f.u. ml(- 1) reduction in 75.0 % of S. aureus carriers who did not receive antibiotics. A greater increase in the nasal carriage rate of meticillin-resistant CNS was observed after antibiotic surgical prophylaxis compared with hospitalization alone, with increases of 16.4 and 4.6 %, respectively. Antibiotic-resistant S. epidermidis carriage rate increased by 16.6 % after antibiotic administration compared with 7.5 % with hospitalization alone. Antibiotic surgical prophylaxis impacts the nasal carriage of both S. aureus and CNS.

  10. Impact of antibiotic resistance in gram-negative bacilli on empirical and definitive antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Paterson, David L

    2008-09-15

    Serious infections with gram-negative pathogens continue to be associated with considerable mortality. Increasing antibiotic resistance in organisms such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae is contributing to difficulties with choosing antibiotics to prescribe for these infections. Optimization of therapy against these organisms starts with the initial empirical antibiotic choice. Surveillance data and hospital or unit antibiograms may inform this decision, although individualization of the initial regimen on the basis of prior antibiotic use and prior isolation of resistant pathogens may be more important. Combinations of antibiotics are often required empirically, and "combination antibiograms" may need to be developed for this purpose. Preliminary data suggest that extending the time over which a dose of antipseudomonal beta-lactam antibiotics is infused may improve clinical outcomes; however, this idea remains to be confirmed in randomized trials. The role of direct susceptibility testing in aiding more-rapid initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy is also being studied. When identification and susceptibility testing is complete, the antibiotic regimen for infections due to gram-negative pathogens can be "fine tuned." On some occasions, this fine tuning necessitates the introduction of "salvage" antibiotics, such as colistin or tigecycline; on others, it necessitates de-escalation and early termination of therapy. The lack of new antibiotic options against gram-negative pathogens underscores the need for optimization of current therapies and prevention of the spread of these organisms.

  11. Behavior of antibiotic resistance genes under extremely high-level antibiotic selection pressures in pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinyan; Yan, Zheng; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Weili; Kong, Deyang; Shan, Zhengjun; Wang, Na

    2017-08-26

    Pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plants (PWWTPs), which receive wastewater containing extremely high levels of antibiotics, are regarded as potential hot spots for antibiotic-resistance development in the environment. Six sampling campaigns in six PWWTPs in Southeastern China were carried out to assess the prevalence and fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Different genes were monitored in different PWWTPs (PWWTP A: lincosamides; PWWTP B: aminoglycosides and macrolides; PWWTP C: quinolones; PWWTP D: macrolides and quinolones; PWWTP E: cephalosporins; and PWWTP F: quinolones and macrolides) using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), according to the antibiotic type produced. The levels of typical ARG subtypes in the final effluents ranged from (1.03±0.91)×10(1) to (6.78±0.21)×10(7)copies/mL. The absolute abundance of ARGs in effluents accounted for 0%-577% of influents to the six PWWTPs with a median value of 6%. Most of the ARGs are transported to the dewatered sludge, with concentrations from (1.38±0.21)×10(5) to (6.84±0.43)×10(10)copies/g dry weight (dw). In different treatment units (before/after biological units), a clear trend of proliferation or attenuation was not observed for the ARGs, aside from a strong attenuation in moving bed bio-film reactor (MBBR) in PWWTP C. Through correlation analyses, this study demonstrated that the bacterial abundance and antibiotic concentrations within the PWWTPs influenced the fate of the associated ARGs, and this was possibly related primarily to the intrinsic resistance mechanisms of corresponding ARGs. Macrolide ARGs, which tend to locate in plasmids and transposons, positively correlate weakly with total macrolide antibiotic concentrations but positively correlate strongly with 16S rRNA concentrations. Furthermore, ARG concentrations in the wastewater from fermentation were significantly higher than in the wastewater from chemical synthesis and preparation. This is the first

  12. Integron Involvement in Environmental Spread of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Thibault; Barraud, Olivier; Casellas, Magali; Dagot, Christophe; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2012-01-01

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a growing problem and a public health issue. In recent decades, various genetic mechanisms involved in the spread of resistance genes among bacteria have been identified. Integrons – genetic elements that acquire, exchange, and express genes embedded within gene cassettes (GC) – are one of these mechanisms. Integrons are widely distributed, especially in Gram-negative bacteria; they are carried by mobile genetic elements, plasmids, and transposons, which promote their spread within bacterial communities. Initially studied mainly in the clinical setting for their involvement in antibiotic resistance, their role in the environment is now an increasing focus of attention. The aim of this review is to provide an in-depth analysis of recent studies of antibiotic-resistance integrons in the environment, highlighting their potential involvement in antibiotic-resistance outside the clinical context. We will focus particularly on the impact of human activities (agriculture, industries, wastewater treatment, etc.). PMID:22509175

  13. Essential Oils, A New Horizon in Combating Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Yiap, Beow Chin; Ping, Hu Cai; Lim, Swee Hua Erin

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the battle between humans and the multitudes of infection and disease causing pathogens continues. Emerging at the battlefield as some of the most significant challenges to human health are bacterial resistance and its rapid rise. These have become a major concern in global public health invigorating the need for new antimicrobial compounds. A rational approach to deal with antibiotic resistance problems requires detailed knowledge of the different biological and non-biological factors that affect the rate and extent of resistance development. Combination therapy combining conventional antibiotics and essential oils is currently blooming and represents a potential area for future investigations. This new generation of phytopharmaceuticals may shed light on the development of new pharmacological regimes in combating antibiotic resistance. This review consolidated and described the observed synergistic outcome between essential oils and antibiotics, and highlighted the possibilities of essential oils as the potential resistance modifying agent. PMID:24627729

  14. At the Nexus of Antibiotics and Metals: The Impact of Cu and Zn on Antibiotic Activity and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Poole, Keith

    2017-10-01

    Environmental influences on antibiotic activity and resistance can wreak havoc with in vivo antibiotic efficacy and, ultimately, antimicrobial chemotherapy. In nature, bacteria encounter a variety of metal ions, particularly copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), as contaminants in soil and water, as feed additives in agriculture, as clinically-used antimicrobials, and as components of human antibacterial responses. Importantly, there is a growing body of evidence for Cu/Zn driving antibiotic resistance development in metal-exposed bacteria, owing to metal selection of genetic elements harbouring both metal and antibiotic resistance genes, and metal recruitment of antibiotic resistance mechanisms. Many classes of antibiotics also form complexes with metal cations, including Cu and Zn, and this can hinder (or enhance) antibiotic activity. This review highlights the ways in which Cu/Zn influence antibiotic resistance development and antibiotic activity, and in so doing impact in vivo antibiotic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Economic implications of antibiotic resistance in a global economy.

    PubMed

    Rudholm, Niklas

    2002-11-01

    This paper concerns the economic implications of antibiotic resistance in a global economy. The global economy consists of several countries, where antibiotic consumption creates a stock of bacteria which is resistant to antibiotics. This stock affects the welfare in all countries because of the risk that resistant bacterial strains may be transmitted. The main purpose of the paper is to compare the socially optimal resource allocation with the allocation brought forward by the decentralized market economy. In addition, a dynamic Pigouvian tax designed to implement the globally optimal resource allocation is presented.

  16. Management options for reducing the release of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes to the environment.

    PubMed

    Pruden, Amy; Larsson, D G Joakim; Amézquita, Alejandro; Collignon, Peter; Brandt, Kristian K; Graham, David W; Lazorchak, James M; Suzuki, Satoru; Silley, Peter; Snape, Jason R; Topp, Edward; Zhang, Tong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2013-08-01

    There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Our aim in this study was to identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance determinants via environmental pathways, with the ultimate goal of extending the useful life span of antibiotics. We also examined incentives and disincentives for action. We focused on management options with respect to limiting agricultural sources; treatment of domestic, hospital, and industrial wastewater; and aquaculture. We identified several options, such as nutrient management, runoff control, and infrastructure upgrades. Where appropriate, a cross-section of examples from various regions of the world is provided. The importance of monitoring and validating effectiveness of management strategies is also highlighted. Finally, we describe a case study in Sweden that illustrates the critical role of communication to engage stakeholders and promote action. Environmental releases of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria can in many cases be reduced at little or no cost. Some management options are synergistic with existing policies and goals. The anticipated benefit is an extended useful life span for current and future antibiotics. Although risk reductions are often difficult to quantify, the severity of accelerating worldwide morbidity and mortality rates associated with antibiotic resistance strongly indicate the need for action.

  17. Management Options for Reducing the Release of Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Genes to the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pruden, Amy; Amézquita, Alejandro; Collignon, Peter; Brandt, Kristian K.; Graham, David W.; Lazorchak, James M.; Suzuki, Satoru; Silley, Peter; Snape, Jason R.; Topp, Edward; Zhang, Tong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Objective: Our aim in this study was to identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance determinants via environmental pathways, with the ultimate goal of extending the useful life span of antibiotics. We also examined incentives and disincentives for action. Methods: We focused on management options with respect to limiting agricultural sources; treatment of domestic, hospital, and industrial wastewater; and aquaculture. Discussion: We identified several options, such as nutrient management, runoff control, and infrastructure upgrades. Where appropriate, a cross-section of examples from various regions of the world is provided. The importance of monitoring and validating effectiveness of management strategies is also highlighted. Finally, we describe a case study in Sweden that illustrates the critical role of communication to engage stakeholders and promote action. Conclusions: Environmental releases of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria can in many cases be reduced at little or no cost. Some management options are synergistic with existing policies and goals. The anticipated benefit is an extended useful life span for current and future antibiotics. Although risk reductions are often difficult to quantify, the severity of accelerating worldwide morbidity and mortality rates associated with antibiotic resistance strongly indicate the need for action. PMID:23735422

  18. Fitness costs associated with the acquisition of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Amado, Sara; Sanz-García, Fernando; Blanco, Paula; Martínez, José L

    2017-02-28

    Acquisition of antibiotic resistance is a relevant problem for human health. The selection and spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms not only compromise the treatment of infectious diseases, but also the implementation of different therapeutic procedures as organ transplantation, advanced surgery or chemotherapy, all of which require proficient methods for avoiding infections. It has been generally accepted that the acquisition of antibiotic resistance will produce a general metabolic burden: in the absence of selection, the resistant organisms would be outcompeted by the susceptible ones. If that was always true, discontinuation of antibiotic use would render the disappearance of resistant microorganisms. However, several studies have shown that, once resistance emerges, the recovery of a fully susceptible population even in the absence of antibiotics is not easy. In the present study, we review updated information on the effect of the acquisition of antibiotic resistance in bacterial physiology as well as on the mechanisms that allow the compensation of the fitness costs associated with the acquisition of resistance.

  19. Diverse Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Dairy Cow Manure

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Udikovic-Kolic, Nikolina; Andrew, Sheila; Handelsman, Jo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Application of manure from antibiotic-treated animals to crops facilitates the dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants into the environment. However, our knowledge of the identity, diversity, and patterns of distribution of these antibiotic resistance determinants remains limited. We used a new combination of methods to examine the resistome of dairy cow manure, a common soil amendment. Metagenomic libraries constructed with DNA extracted from manure were screened for resistance to beta-lactams, phenicols, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines. Functional screening of fosmid and small-insert libraries identified 80 different antibiotic resistance genes whose deduced protein sequences were on average 50 to 60% identical to sequences deposited in GenBank. The resistance genes were frequently found in clusters and originated from a taxonomically diverse set of species, suggesting that some microorganisms in manure harbor multiple resistance genes. Furthermore, amid the great genetic diversity in manure, we discovered a novel clade of chloramphenicol acetyltransferases. Our study combined functional metagenomics with third-generation PacBio sequencing to significantly extend the roster of functional antibiotic resistance genes found in animal gut bacteria, providing a particularly broad resource for understanding the origins and dispersal of antibiotic resistance genes in agriculture and clinical settings. PMID:24757214

  20. Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Serotypes from Cochin Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Divya P.; Durairaj, Srinivasan; Abdulla, Mohamed Hatha

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at detecting the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant serotypes of Escherichia coli in Cochin estuary, India. E. coli strains were isolated during the period January 2010–December 2011 from five different stations set at Cochin estuary. Water samples from five different stations in Cochin estuary were collected on a monthly basis for a period of two years. Isolates were serotyped, antibiogram-phenotyped for twelve antimicrobial agents, and genotyped by polymerase chain reaction for uid gene that codes for β-D-glucuronidase. These E. coli strains from Cochin estuary were tested against twelve antibiotics to determine the prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistance among them. The results revealed that more than 53.33% of the isolates were multiple antibiotic resistant. Thirteen isolates showed resistance to sulphonamides and two of them contained the sul 1 gene. Class 1 integrons were detected in two E. coli strains which were resistant to more than seven antibiotics. In the present study, O serotyping, antibiotic sensitivity, and polymerase chain reaction were employed with the purpose of establishing the present distribution of multiple antibiotic-resistant serotypes, associated with E. coli isolated from different parts of Cochin estuary. PMID:23008708

  1. Review article: the global emergence of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Thung, I; Aramin, H; Vavinskaya, V; Gupta, S; Park, J Y; Crowe, S E; Valasek, M A

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most prevalent global pathogens and can lead to gastrointestinal disease including peptic ulcers, gastric marginal zone lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. To review recent trends in H. pylori antibiotic resistance rates, and to discuss diagnostics and treatment paradigms. A PubMed literature search using the following keywords: Helicobacter pylori, antibiotic resistance, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole, prevalence, susceptibility testing. The prevalence of bacterial antibiotic resistance is regionally variable and appears to be markedly increasing with time in many countries. Concordantly, the antimicrobial eradication rate of H. pylori has been declining globally. In particular, clarithromycin resistance has been rapidly increasing in many countries over the past decade, with rates as high as approximately 30% in Japan and Italy, 50% in China and 40% in Turkey; whereas resistance rates are much lower in Sweden and Taiwan, at approximately 15%; there are limited data in the USA. Other antibiotics show similar trends, although less pronounced. Since the choice of empiric therapies should be predicated on accurate information regarding antibiotic resistance rates, there is a critical need for determination of current rates at a local scale, and perhaps in individual patients. Such information would not only guide selection of appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy but also inform the development of better methods to identify H. pylori antibiotic resistance at diagnosis. Patient-specific tailoring of effective antibiotic treatment strategies may lead to reduced treatment failures and less antibiotic resistance. © 2015 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The challenge of efflux-mediated antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Plésiat, Patrick; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps.

  3. The Challenge of Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps. PMID:25788514

  4. Antibiotic consumption and resistance: data from Europe and Germany.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Elisabeth; Gastmeier, Petra; Deja, Maria; Schwab, Frank

    2013-08-01

    The use of antibiotics - including the over- and misuse - in human and veterinary practices selected for resistant pathogens and led to their emergence and dissemination along with the transmission of resistant bacteria. The aim of this article is to prescribe the prerequisites for the surveillance of antibiotic use and bacterial resistance, to explain advantage and disadvantage of surveillance parameters used, to present new data from a surveillance network of intensive care units focusing on antibiotic use and resistance and to discuss the impact of antibiotic use on resistance. The Surveillance System of Antibiotic Use and Bacterial Resistance in Intensive Care Units (SARI) is an on-going project that collects data from its network of intensive care units (ICU) in Germany. Antimicrobial use was expressed as daily defined doses (DDD) and normalized per 1000 patient-days (pd). ICU decided either to provide monthly data on antibiotic and resistant pathogens or they decided to provide only yearly data on antibiotic use without resistance data. 85% of all antibiotics used in Germany are administered in animals; 85% of the antibiotics used in humans are prescribed in the outpatient setting and 85% of the antibiotics used in hospitals are prescribed on non-ICUs wards. The mostly widely used parameter for the surveillance of resistance is the percentage of resistant pathogens which is important to guide empirical therapy but does not measure the burden of resistance which is of interest to the public health perspective. The burden of MRSA did not increase over the last 11 years in ICUs and was 4.2MRSA/1000pd in 2011. The burden of 3rd generation resistant E. coli and K. pneumoniae more than quintupled (up to 2.6 and 1.2 respectively) and was followed by a three times increased use of carbapenems and correlated with quinolone and 3rd generation cephalosporin use. The burden VRE faecium also increased dramatically from 0.1 to 0.8 within 11 years; VRE faecium showed no

  5. Determinants of Intrinsic Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Krahn, Thomas; Gilmour, Christie; Tilak, Justin; Fraud, Sebastien; Kerr, Nicholas; Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung

    2012-01-01

    Screening of a transposon insertion mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for increased susceptibility to paromomycin identified a number of genes whose disruption enhanced susceptibility of this organism to multiple aminoglycosides, including tobramycin, amikacin, and gentamicin. These included genes associated with lipid biosynthesis or metabolism (lptA, faoA), phosphate uptake (pstB), and two-component regulators (amgRS, PA2797-PA2798) and a gene of unknown function (PA0392). Deletion mutants lacking these showed enhanced panaminoglycoside susceptibility that was reversed by the cloned genes, confirming their contribution to intrinsic panaminoglycoside resistance. None of these mutants showed increased aminoglycoside permeation of the cell envelope, indicating that increased susceptibility was not related to enhanced aminoglycoside uptake owing to a reduced envelope barrier function. Several mutants (pstB, faoA, PA0392, amgR) did, however, show increased cytoplasmic membrane depolarization relative to wild type following gentamicin exposure, consistent with the membranes of these mutants being more prone to perturbation, likely by gentamicin-generated mistranslated polypeptides. Mutants lacking any two of these resistance genes in various combinations invariably showed increased aminoglycoside susceptibility relative to single-deletion mutants, confirming their independent contribution to resistance and highlighting the complexity of the intrinsic aminoglycoside resistome in P. aeruginosa. Deletion of these genes also compromised the high-level panaminoglycoside resistance of clinical isolates, emphasizing their important contribution to acquired resistance. PMID:22908149

  6. Assessment of antibiotic resistance in runoff from cattle feedlots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine, especially at sub-therapeutic doses, is an important issue that has captured national attention, and there is considerable concern about the potential to transmit antibiotic resistance from animals to humans via fecal contamination of surface and ground...

  7. Composting swine slurry to reduce indicators and antibiotic resistance genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over the last twenty years there have been considerable increases in the incidence of human infections with bacteria that are resistant to commonly used antibiotics. This has precipitated concerns about the use of antibiotics in livestock production. Composting of swine manure has several advantages...

  8. Evaluating antibiotic resistance genes in soils with applied manures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotics are commonly used in livestock production to promote growth and combat disease. Recent studies have shown the potential for spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) to the environment following application of livestock manures. In this study, concentrations of bacteria with ARG in soi...

  9. Bacterial cheating limits the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Hui Xiao; Datta, Manoshi; Yurtsev, Eugene; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain--which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic--may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we experimentally find that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors found in nature.

  10. Are Sewage Treatment Plants Promoting Antibiotic Resistance?

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction 1.1. How bacteria exhibit resistance 1.1.1. Resistance to -lactams 1.1.2. Resistance to sulphonamides and trimethoprim 1.1.3. Resistance to macrolides 1.1.4. Resistance to fluoroquinolones 1.1.5. Resistance to tetracyclines 1.1.6. Resistance to nitroimidaz...

  11. Are Sewage Treatment Plants Promoting Antibiotic Resistance?

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction 1.1. How bacteria exhibit resistance 1.1.1. Resistance to -lactams 1.1.2. Resistance to sulphonamides and trimethoprim 1.1.3. Resistance to macrolides 1.1.4. Resistance to fluoroquinolones 1.1.5. Resistance to tetracyclines 1.1.6. Resistance to nitroimidaz...

  12. Spatial analysis of antibiotic resistance along metal contaminated streams.

    PubMed

    Tuckfield, R Cary; McArthur, J Vaun

    2008-05-01

    The spatial pattern of antibiotic resistance in culturable sediment bacteria from four freshwater streams was examined. Previous research suggests that the prevalence of antibiotic resistance may increase in populations via indirect or coselection from heavy metal contamination. Sample bacteria from each stream were grown in media containing one of four antibiotics-tetracycline, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, and streptomycin-at concentrations greater than the minimum inhibitory concentration, plus a control. Bacteria showed high susceptibilities to the former two antibiotics. We summarized the latter two more prevalent (aminoglycoside) resistance responses and ten metals concentrations per sediment sample, by Principal Components Analysis. Respectively, 63 and 58% of the variability was explained in the first principal component of each variable set. We used these multivariate summary metrics [i.e., first principal component (PC) scores] as input measures for exploring the spatial correlation between antibiotic resistance and metal concentration for each stream sampled. Results show a significant and negative correlation between metals PC scores versus aminoglycoside resistance scores and suggest that selection for metal tolerance among sediment bacteria may influence selection for antibiotic resistance differently in sediments than in the water column. Our most important finding comes from geostatistical cross-variogram analysis, which shows that increasing metal concentration scores are spatially associated with decreasing aminoglycoside resistance scores--a negative correlation, but holds for contaminated streams only. We suspect our field results are influenced by metal bioavailability in the sediments and by a contaminant promoted interaction or "cocktail effect" from complex combinations of pollution mediated selection agents.

  13. Modes and Modulations of Antibiotic Resistance Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Depardieu, Florence; Podglajen, Isabelle; Leclercq, Roland; Collatz, Ekkehard; Courvalin, Patrice

    2007-01-01

    Since antibiotic resistance usually affords a gain of function, there is an associated biological cost resulting in a loss of fitness of the bacterial host. Considering that antibiotic resistance is most often only transiently advantageous to bacteria, an efficient and elegant way for them to escape the lethal action of drugs is the alteration of resistance gene expression. It appears that expression of bacterial resistance to antibiotics is frequently regulated, which indicates that modulation of gene expression probably reflects a good compromise between energy saving and adjustment to a rapidly evolving environment. Modulation of gene expression can occur at the transcriptional or translational level following mutations or the movement of mobile genetic elements and may involve induction by the antibiotic. In the latter case, the antibiotic can have a triple activity: as an antibacterial agent, as an inducer of resistance to itself, and as an inducer of the dissemination of resistance determinants. We will review certain mechanisms, all reversible, that bacteria have elaborated to achieve antibiotic resistance by the fine-tuning of the expression of genetic information. PMID:17223624

  14. [Effect of Three Typical Disinfection Byproducts on Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance].

    PubMed

    Lü, Lu; Zhang, Meng-lu; Wang, Chun-ming; Lin, Hui-rong; Yu, Xin

    2015-07-01

    The effect of typical disinfection byproducts (DBPs) on bacterial antibiotic resistance was investigated in this study. chlorodibromomethane (CDBM), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and chloral hydrate (CH) were selected, which belong to trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and aldehydes, respectively. After exposure to the selected DBPs, the resistance change of the tested strains to antibiotics was determined. As a result, all of the three DBPs induced Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to gain increased resistance to the five antibiotics tested, and the DBPs ranked as IAA > CH > CDBM according to their enhancement effects. Multidrug resistance could also be enhanced by treatment with IAA. The same result was observed in Escherichia coli K12, suggesting that the effect of DBPs on antibiotic resistance was a common phenomenon. The mechanism was probably that DBPs stimulated oxidative stress, which induced mutagenesis. And the antibiotic resistance mutation frequency could be increased along with mutagenesis. This study revealed that the acquisition of bacterial antibiotic resistance might be related to DBPs in drinking water systems. Besides the genotoxicological risks, the epidemiological risks of DBPs should not be overlooked.

  15. Multidrug Intrinsic Resistance Factors in Staphylococcus aureus Identified by Profiling Fitness within High-Diversity Transposon Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Mithila; Martin, Melissa J.; Santiago, Marina; Lee, Wonsik; Kos, Veronica N.; Meredith, Tim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of life-threatening infections worldwide. The MIC of an antibiotic against S. aureus, as well as other microbes, is determined by the affinity of the antibiotic for its target in addition to a complex interplay of many other cellular factors. Identifying nontarget factors impacting resistance to multiple antibiotics could inform the design of new compounds and lead to more-effective antimicrobial strategies. We examined large collections of transposon insertion mutants in S. aureus using transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq) to detect transposon mutants with reduced fitness in the presence of six clinically important antibiotics—ciprofloxacin, daptomycin, gentamicin, linezolid, oxacillin, and vancomycin. This approach allowed us to assess the relative fitness of many mutants simultaneously within these libraries. We identified pathways/genes previously known to be involved in resistance to individual antibiotics, including graRS and vraFG (graRS/vraFG), mprF, and fmtA, validating the approach, and found several to be important across multiple classes of antibiotics. We also identified two new, previously uncharacterized genes, SAOUHSC_01025 and SAOUHSC_01050, encoding polytopic membrane proteins, as important in limiting the effectiveness of multiple antibiotics. Machine learning identified similarities in the fitness profiles of graXRS/vraFG, SAOUHSC_01025, and SAOUHSC_01050 mutants upon antibiotic treatment, connecting these genes of unknown function to modulation of crucial cell envelope properties. Therapeutic strategies that combine a known antibiotic with a compound that targets these or other intrinsic resistance factors may be of value for enhancing the activity of existing antibiotics for treating otherwise-resistant S. aureus strains. PMID:27531908

  16. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria: There is Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Argues that reduction in the use of antibiotics would enable antibiotic-sensitive bacteria to flourish. Presents an activity designed to show students how a small, seemingly unimportant difference in doubling time can, over a period of time, make an enormous difference in population size. (DDR)

  17. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria: There is Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Argues that reduction in the use of antibiotics would enable antibiotic-sensitive bacteria to flourish. Presents an activity designed to show students how a small, seemingly unimportant difference in doubling time can, over a period of time, make an enormous difference in population size. (DDR)

  18. Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria in Water Containing Ornamental Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Trust, T. J.; Whitby, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Water containing ornamental fishes was found to frequently contain countable numbers of bacteria that were resistant to one or more antibiotic or chemotherapeutic agents. The multidrug-resistant strains most commonly isolated were lactose-fermenting Citrobacter freundii. The overall resistance of these aquaria strains was greater than the previously described resistance of clinical isolates of C. freundii. Although the strains examined appeared to lack R-factors, this pool of resistant bacteria may have public health implications. PMID:988781

  19. The Ecology of Antibiotic Use in the ICU: Homogeneous Prescribing of Cefepime but Not Tazocin Selects for Antibiotic Resistant Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ginn, Andrew N.; Wiklendt, Agnieszka M.; Gidding, Heather F.; George, Narelle; O’Driscoll, James S.; Partridge, Sally R.; O’Toole, Brian I.; Perri, Rita A.; Faoagali, Joan; Gallagher, John E.; Lipman, Jeffrey; Iredell, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antibiotic homogeneity is thought to drive resistance but in vivo data are lacking. In this study, we determined the impact of antibiotic homogeneity per se, and of cefepime versus antipseudomonal penicillin/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations (APP-β), on the likelihood of infection or colonisation with antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or two commonly resistant nosocomial pathogens (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). A secondary question was whether antibiotic cycling was associated with adverse outcomes including mortality, length of stay, and antibiotic resistance. Methods We evaluated clinical and microbiological outcomes in two similar metropolitan ICUs, which both alternated cefepime with APP-β in four-month cycles. All microbiological isolates and commensal samples were analysed for the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria including MRSA and P. aeruginosa. Results Length of stay, mortality and overall antibiotic resistance were unchanged after sixteen months. However, increased colonisation and infection by antibiotic-resistant bacteria were observed in cefepime cycles, returning to baseline in APP-β cycles. Cefepime was the strongest risk factor for acquisition of antibiotic-resistant infection. Conclusions Ecological effects of different β-lactam antibiotics may be more important than specific activity against the causative agents or the effect of antibiotic homogeneity in selection for antibiotic resistance. This has important implications for antibiotic policy. PMID:22761698

  20. Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in herbal products.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joseph C; Jiang, Xiuping

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in various herbal products. Twenty-nine herbal supplements (18 traditional and 11 organic products) were purchased from stores and analyzed microbiologically. Total bacterial counts were determined by pour plate and surface spreading on tryptic soy agar (TSA). Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were enumerated on TSA supplemented with ceftriaxone (64 microg/ml) or tetracycline (16 microg/ml). Total bacterial counts ranged from <5 to 2.9 x 10(5) CFU/g. Ceftriaxone- and tetracycline-resistant bacteria were detected in ground garlic samples at 1.1 x 10(2) CFU/g and 3.0 x 102 CFU/g, respectively. Traditional and organic onion powder samples contained tetracycline-resistant bacteria at 17 and 28 CFU/g and ceftriaxone-resistant bacteria at 35 and 2.0 x 10(3) CFU/g, respectively. Other products such as ginger, rosemary, mustard, and goldenseal contained low levels of resistant bacteria. Fifty-two isolates were further evaluated against nine antibiotics, and the prevalence of antibiotic resistance was in the following order: ampicillin, nalidixic acid, trimethoprim, ceftriaxone, and streptomycin. Resistant bacteria were identified as Bacillus spp., Erwinia spp., and Ewingella americana. Staphylococcus spp., Enterobacter cloacae, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia also were isolated. The presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and pathogens in these herbal products suggests that production and use of these products may need further evaluation.

  1. Antibiotic Application and Emergence of Multiple Antibiotic Resistance (MAR) in Global Catfish Aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Li-Oon; Effarizah, M E; Goni, Abatcha Mustapha; Rusul, Gulam

    2016-06-01

    Catfish is one of the most cultivated species worldwide. Antibiotics are usually used in catfish farming as therapeutic and prophylactic agents. In the USA, only oxytetracycline, a combination of sulfadimethoxine and ormetoprim, and florfenicol are approved by the Food Drug Administration for specific fish species (e.g., catfish and salmonids) and their specific diseases. Misuse of antibiotics as prophylactic agents in disease prevention, however, is common and contributes in the development of antibiotic resistance. Various studies had reported on antibiotic residues and/or resistance in farmed species, feral fish, water column, sediments, and, in a lesser content, among farm workers. Ninety percent of the world aquaculture production is carried out in developing countries, which lack regulations and enforcement on the use of antibiotics. Hence, efforts are needed to promote the development and enforcement of such a regulatory structure. Alternatives to antibiotics such as antibacterial vaccines, bacteriophages and their lysins, and probiotics have been applied to curtail the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the imprudent application of antibiotics in aquaculture.

  2. Nosocomial infection and its molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jufeng; Gao, Jianjun; Tang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Nosocomial infection is a kind of infection, which is spread in various hospital environments, and leads to many serious diseases (e.g. pneumonia, urinary tract infection, gastroenteritis, and puerperal fever), and causes higher mortality than community-acquired infection. Bacteria are predominant among all the nosocomial infection-associated pathogens, thus a large number of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems, are adopted in clinical treatment. However, in recent years antibiotic resistance quickly spreads worldwide and causes a critical threat to public health. The predominant bacteria include Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In these bacteria, resistance emerged from antibiotic resistant genes and many of those can be exchanged between bacteria. With technical advances, molecular mechanisms of resistance have been gradually unveiled. In this review, recent advances in knowledge about mechanisms by which (i) bacteria hydrolyze antibiotics (e.g. extended spectrum β-lactamases, (ii) AmpC β-lactamases, carbapenemases), (iii) avoid antibiotic targeting (e.g. mutated vanA and mecA genes), (iv) prevent antibiotic permeation (e.g. porin deficiency), or (v) excrete intracellular antibiotics (e.g. active efflux pump) are summarized.

  3. Assessing antibiotic resistance of microorganisms in sanitary sewage.

    PubMed

    Kaeseberg, Thomas; Blumensaat, Frank; Zhang, Jin; Krebs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The release of antimicrobial substances into surface waters is of growing concern due to direct toxic effects on all trophic levels and the promotion of antibiotic resistance through sub-inhibitory concentration levels. This study showcases (1) the variation of antibiotics in sanitary sewage depending on different timescales and (2) a method to assess the antibiotic resistance based on an inhibition test. The test is based on the measurement of the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) in wastewater samples with increasing concentrations of the selected antibiotic agents. The following antibiotics were analysed in the present study: clarithromycin (CLA) was selected due to its high toxicity to many microorganisms (low EC50), ciprofloxacin (CIP) which is used to generally fight all bacteria concerning interstitial infections and doxycyclin (DOX) having a broad spectrum efficacy. Results show that CLA inhibited the OUR by approximately 50% at a concentration of about 10 mg L⁻¹, because Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli are resistant, whereas CIP inhibited about 90% of the OUR at a concentration equal to or greater than 10 mg L⁻¹. In the case of DOX, a moderate inhibition of about 38% at a concentration of 10 mg L⁻¹ was identified, indicating a significant antibiotic resistance. The results are consistent with the corresponding findings from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Thus, the presented inhibition test provides a simple but robust alternative method to assess antibiotic resistance in biofilms instead of more complex clinical tests.

  4. Plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance in isolated bacteria from burned patients.

    PubMed

    Beige, Fahimeh; Baseri Salehi, Majid; Bahador, Nima; Mobasherzadeh, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the treatment of burned patients is difficult because of the high frequency of infection with antibiotic resistance bacteria. This study was conducted to evaluate the level of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria and its relation with the existence of plasmid. The samples were collected from two hundred twenty hospitalized burned patients in Isfahan burn hospital during a three-month period (March 2012 to June 2012). The samples were isolated and the Gram-negative bacteria were identified using phenotypic method and API 20E System. Antibiotic susceptibility and plasmid profile were determined by standard Agar disc diffusion and plasmid spin column extraction methods. Totally 117 Gram-negative bacteria were isolated, the most common were Pseudomonas aerugionsa (37.6%), P. fluorescens (25.6%), Acinetobacter baumanii (20/5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.6%), respectively. The isolates showed high frequency of antibiotic resistance against ceftazidime and co-amoxiclave (100%) and low frequency of antibiotic resistance against amikacin with (70%).The results indicated that 60% of the isolates harboured plasmid. On the other hand, the patients infected with A. baumanii and P. aeruginosa were cured (with 60% frequency) whereas, those infected with P. fluorescens were not cured. Hence, probably antibiotic resistance markers of A. baumanii and P. aeruginosa are plasmid mediated; however, P. fluorescens is chromosomally mediated. Based on our findings, P. aerugionsa is a major causative agent of wound infections and amikacin could be considered as a more effective antibiotic for treatment of the burned patients.

  5. Antibiotic Resistance in India: Drivers and Opportunities for Action.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Chaudhury, Ranjit Roy

    2016-03-01

    Ramanan Laxminarayan and Ranjit Roy Chaudhury examine the factors encouraging the emergence of antibiotic resistance in India, the implications nationally and internationally, and what might be done to help.

  6. Collective Resistance in Microbial Communities by Intracellular Antibiotic Deactivation.

    PubMed

    Sorg, Robin A; Lin, Leo; van Doorn, G Sander; Sorg, Moritz; Olson, Joshua; Nizet, Victor; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2016-12-01

    The structure and composition of bacterial communities can compromise antibiotic efficacy. For example, the secretion of β-lactamase by individual bacteria provides passive resistance for all residents within a polymicrobial environment. Here, we uncover that collective resistance can also develop via intracellular antibiotic deactivation. Real-time luminescence measurements and single-cell analysis demonstrate that the opportunistic human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae grows in medium supplemented with chloramphenicol (Cm) when resistant bacteria expressing Cm acetyltransferase (CAT) are present. We show that CAT processes Cm intracellularly but not extracellularly. In a mouse pneumonia model, more susceptible pneumococci survive Cm treatment when coinfected with a CAT-expressing strain. Mathematical modeling predicts that stable coexistence is only possible when antibiotic resistance comes at a fitness cost. Strikingly, CAT-expressing pneumococci in mouse lungs were outcompeted by susceptible cells even during Cm treatment. Our results highlight the importance of the microbial context during infectious disease as a potential complicating factor to antibiotic therapy.

  7. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Culyba, Matthew J; Mo, Charlie Y; Kohli, Rahul M

    2015-06-16

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal.

  8. Antibiotic Resistance: The Need For a Global Strategy.

    PubMed

    Elder, David P; Kuentz, Martin; Holm, René

    2016-08-01

    The development of antibiotic resistance is a major problem for mankind and results in fatal consequences on a daily basis across the globe. There are a number of reasons for this situation including increasing globalization with worldwide travel, health tourism, over use and ineffective use (both in man and animals), and counterfeiting of the antimicrobial drug products we have available currently. Although there are huge economical, demographic, legal and logistic differences among the global communities, there are also differences regarding the best approach to dealing with antibiotic resistance. However, as resistant bacteria do not respect international borders, there is clearly a need for a global strategy to minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance, to optimize the use of antibiotics, and to facilitate the development of new and effective medications. This commentary provides an insight into the issues and some of the ongoing programs to ensure an effective treatment for the future.

  9. Bacterial antibiotic resistance in soils irrigated with reclaimed municipal wastewater

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wastewater reclamation for municipal irrigation and groundwater recharge is an increasingly attractive option for extending water supplies. However, public health concerns include the potential for development of antibiotic resistance (AR) in soil bacteria after exposure to residual chemicals in rec...

  10. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal. PMID:26016604

  11. Intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in murine osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, H; Kusuzaki, K; Ashihara, T; Gebhardt, M C; Mankin, H J; Hirasawa, Y

    2000-07-01

    There are two general categories of drug resistance: acquired and intrinsic. The mechanisms involved in acquired drug resistance have been extensively studied, and several mechanisms have been described. However, the mechanisms responsible for intrinsic drug resistance have not been elucidated, to our knowledge. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cytological and biochemical differences between acquired and intrinsic drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells. We previously isolated a clonal cell line (MOS/ADR1) to study acquired resistance in osteosarcoma by exposure of parental murine osteosarcoma cells (MOS) to doxorubicin. In the present study, we cloned a new, intrinsically resistant cell line (MOS/IR1) by single-cell culture of MOS cells and we investigated the differences in cell phenotype and the mechanisms of resistance in both of these resistant clones. The MOS/ADR1 and MOS/IR1 cells were sevenfold and fivefold more resistant to doxorubicin than the parental murine osteosarcoma cells. Morphologically, the MOS/ADR1 cell line was composed of polygonal cells, whereas the MOS/IR1 cell line consisted of plump spindle cells with long cytoplasmic processes. The MOS/IR1 cells showed a much lower level of alkaline phosphatase activity than did the MOS/ ADR1 and MOS cells. There were no substantial differences in the cellular DNA content or the doubling time among these three lines. Overexpression of the P-glycoprotein involved in the function of an energy-dependent drug-efflux pump was detected in the MOS/ADR1 cells but not in the MOS/ IR1 cells. After the cells were incubated with doxorubicin for one hour, the two resistant lines had less accumulation of the drug than did the parent line (p < 0.05). The addition of a P-glycoprotein antagonist, verapamil, or the depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate resulted in a marked increase in the accumulation of doxorubicin in the MOS/ADR1 cells (p < 0.05) but not in the MOS/ IR1 cells. The MOS/ADR1

  12. Epidemiological aspects of non-human antibiotic usage and resistance: implications for the control of antibiotic resistance in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Donkor, Eric S; Newman, Mercy J; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2012-04-01

    To provide insights into the epidemiology of antibiotic usage in animal husbandry in Ghana and its effect on resistance. Three hundred and ninety-five randomly sampled commercial livestock keepers who practised intensive or extensive farming were interviewed about their antibiotic usage practices using a structured questionnaire. Escherichia coli isolated from stool specimens of farmers and their animals were tested against eight antibiotics using the Kirby Bauer method. Ninety-eight percent (387) of the farmers used antibiotics on animals and the main purpose was to prevent infections in animals; 41% applied antibiotics monthly. The overall prevalence of multiple drug resistance among the E. coli isolates was 91.6%; rates in human and animal isolates were 70.6% and 97.7%, respectively. The prevalence of resistance in animal isolates to the various drugs ranged from 60.8% (amikacin) to 95.7% (ampicillin); the prevalence of resistance in human isolates to the drugs ranged from 2% (cefuroxime) to 94.1% (gentamicin). Animal E. coli isolates showed higher resistance than that of human isolates for five of eight drugs tested. It is concluded that antibiotic usage in animal husbandry in Ghana is more driven by the interest of livestock keepers to prevent and treat animal infections than growth enhancement. Both animal and human E. coli showed high levels of antibiotic resistance, although resistance of animal isolates appeared to be higher than that of humans. There is the need for the development of an antibiotic-resistance management programme in Ghana that will focus simultaneously on human and animal use of antibiotics. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Chloroquinolines block antibiotic efflux pumps in antibiotic-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes isolates.

    PubMed

    Ghisalberti, Didier; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Baitiche, Milad; Martino, Michèle; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Barbe, Jacques

    2006-06-01

    Efflux mechanisms protect bacterial cells by pumping out toxic compounds and actively contribute to bacterial multidrug resistance. Agents inhibiting efflux pumps are of interest for the control of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Herein we report the effects of new chloroquinoline derivatives that render resistant Enterobacter aerogenes isolates noticeably more susceptible to structurally unrelated antibiotics. In addition, some of these chloroquinolines increase the intracellular concentration of chloramphenicol. Some of the molecules tested in this work are able to inhibit the main efflux pump (AcrAB-TolC), which is involved in E. aerogenes antibiotic resistance.

  14. Antibiotic resistance of microorganisms in agricultural soils in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilova, Natasha; Galitskaya, Polina; Selivanovskaya, Svetlana

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotics are medicines widely used to treat and prevent bacterial infections not only in human medicine but also in veterinary. Besides, in animal husbandry antibiotics are often used in for stimulation of animal's growth. Many antibiotics used for veterinary purposes are weakly absorbed in the animal's gut. So up to 90% of the administered antibiotics are excreted with manure and urine. Therefore use of manure as an organic fertilizer leads to formation and spreading of antibiotic resistance among soil microbes. Another reason of such spreading is the horizontal transfer of genes encoding antibiotic resistance from manure to soil microflora. The level of antibiotic resistance genes pollution of soils has not been properly studied yet. The aim of this study was to estimate the contamination of agricultural soils by antibiotic resistant genes. 30 samples of agricultural soils were selected around of Kazan city (Tatarstan Republic) with 1.3 Mio citizens. Since tetracycline is reported to be the most wide spread veterinary antibiotic in Russia, we estimated the level of soil contamination by tet(X) gene encoding tetracycline decomposition in microbial cell. Real time PCR method with specific primers was used as a method of investigation. Particle size type distribution of 31% of soil samples was estimated to be sandy clay, and 69% of soil samples - to silty clay. Content of dissoluble organic carbon ranged from 0,02 mg g -1 (sample 20) to 0,46 mg g -1 (sample 16). Respiration activity and microbial biomass of soils were estimated to be 0,80-5,28 CO2 C mg g -1 h-1 and 263,51-935,77 µg kg - 1 respectively. The values presented are typical for soils of Tatarstan Republic. In terms of the antibiotic resistant gene content, 27 of 30 samples investigated contained tet(X) gene, while 52% of the samples were highly contaminated, 34% of samples were middle contaminated and 14% of samples - weakly contaminated.

  15. Contribution of Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Efflux Systems to Antibiotic Resistance and Biofilm Formation in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Nait Chabane, Yassine; Goussard, Sylvie; Snesrud, Erik; Courvalin, Patrice; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen of increasing importance due to its multiple resistance to antibiotics and ability to survive in the hospital environment linked to its capacity to form biofilms. To fully characterize the contribution of AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems to acquired and intrinsic resistance, we constructed, from an entirely sequenced susceptible A. baumannii strain, a set of isogenic mutants overexpressing each system following introduction of a point mutation in their cognate regulator or a deletion for the pump by allelic replacement. Pairwise comparison of every derivative with the parental strain indicated that AdeABC and AdeFGH are tightly regulated and contribute to acquisition of antibiotic resistance when overproduced. AdeABC had a broad substrate range, including β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines-tigecycline, macrolides-lincosamides, and chloramphenicol, and conferred clinical resistance to aminoglycosides. Importantly, when combined with enzymatic resistance to carbapenems and aminoglycosides, this pump contributed in a synergistic fashion to the level of resistance of the host. In contrast, AdeIJK was expressed constitutively and was responsible for intrinsic resistance to the same major drug classes as AdeABC as well as antifolates and fusidic acid. Surprisingly, overproduction of AdeABC and AdeIJK altered bacterial membrane composition, resulting in decreased biofilm formation but not motility. Natural transformation and plasmid transfer were diminished in recipients overproducing AdeABC. It thus appears that alteration in the expression of efflux systems leads to multiple changes in the relationship between the host and its environment, in addition to antibiotic resistance. PMID:25805730

  16. Antibiotic resistance and virulence genes in coliform water isolates.

    PubMed

    Stange, C; Sidhu, J P S; Tiehm, A; Toze, S

    2016-11-01

    Widespread fecal pollution of surface water may present a major health risk and a significant pathway for dissemination of antibiotic resistance bacteria. The River Rhine is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe and an important raw water source for drinking water production. A total of 100 coliform isolates obtained from River Rhine (Germany) were examined for their susceptibility to seven antimicrobial agents. Resistances against amoxicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline were detected in 48%, 11% and 9% of isolates respectively. The antibiotic resistance could be traced back to the resistance genes blaTEM, blaSHV, ampC, sul1, sul2, dfrA1, tet(A) and tet(B). Whereby, the ampC gene represents a special case, because its presence is not inevitably linked to a phenotypic antibiotic resistance. Multiple antibiotics resistance was often accompanied by the occurrence of class 1 or 2 integrons. E. coli isolates belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1 (commensal) were more predominant (57%) compared to B2 and D groups (43%) which are known to carry virulent genes. Additionally, six E. coli virulence genes were also detected. However, the prevalence of virulence genes in the E. coli isolates was low (not exceeding 4.3% per gene) and no diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes were detected. This study demonstrates that surface water is an important reservoir of ARGs for a number of antibiotic classes such as sulfonamide, trimethoprim, beta-lactam-antibiotics and tetracycline. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance in coliform bacteria isolated from River Rhine provides evidence for the need to develop management strategies to limit the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria in aquatic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Antibiotic resistance among Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Valdivieso, Manuel; Bussalleu, Alejandro; Sexton, Rachael; Thompson, Kathryn C; Osorio, Soledad; Reyes, Italo Novoa; Crowley, John J; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Gastric carcinoma is the most common cancer and cause of cancer mortality in Peru. Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach, is a Group 1 carcinogen due to its causal relationship to gastric carcinoma. While eradication of H. pylori can help prevent gastric cancer, characterizing regional antibiotic resistance patterns is necessary to determine targeted treatment for each region. Thus, we examined primary antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of H. pylori in Lima, Peru. Materials and methods H. pylori strains were isolated from gastric biopsies of patients with histologically proven H. pylori infection. Primary antibiotic resistance among isolates was examined using E-test strips. Isolates were examined for the presence of the cagA pathogenicity island and the vacA m1/m2 alleles via polymerase chain reaction. Results Seventy-six isolates were recovered from gastric biopsies. Clinical isolates showed evidence of antibiotic resistance to 1 (27.6%, n=21/76), 2 (28.9%, n=22/76), or ≥3 antibiotics (40.8%). Of 76 isolates, eight (10.5%) were resistant to amoxicillin and clarithromycin, which are part of the standard triple therapy for H. pylori infection. No trends were seen between the presence of cagA, vacA m1, or vacA m2 and antibiotic resistance. Conclusion The rate of antibiotic resistance among H. pylori isolates in Lima, Peru, is higher than expected and presents cause for concern. To develop more targeted eradication therapies for H. pylori in Peru, more research is needed to better characterize antibiotic resistance among a larger number of clinical isolates prospectively. PMID:28331349

  18. Assessment of Antibiotic Resistant Commensal Bacteria in Food

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni in the absence of antibiotic selection pressure. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 102: 541–546. 12. Nandi, S., J.J. Maurer, C. Hofacre...Michel, L., and Zhang, Q. (2005) Enhanced in vivo fitness of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni in the absence of antibiotic selection...S. Pereira, O. Shin, J. Lin, S. Huang, L. Michel, and Q. Zhang. 2005a. Enhanced in vivo fitness of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni

  19. Rapid methods for detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    March-Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto

    2017-03-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. Here we review the main techniques for rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, microarrays, commercial methods used in work routine, immunochromatographic methods, colorimetric methods, image methods, nephelometry, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence and bioluminescence, microfluids and methods based on cell disruption are analysed in detail.

  20. Children as agents of change in combatting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Andreea

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide problem and changes are needed in the way antibiotics are used. The value of engaging children as key contributors in health care campaigns to increase the appropriate use of antibiotics has not been fully recognized. Little is known about how to design educational materials for children in order to enable them to be agents of change in their communities. Science education needs to improve the way it engages children so as to give them the tools needed to make responsible decisions on antibiotic use.

  1. Antibiotic resistance genes and residual antimicrobials in cattle feedlot surface soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle feedlot soils receive manure containing both antibiotic residues and antibiotic resistant bacteria. The fates of these constituents are largely unknown with potentially serious consequences for increased antibiotic resistance in the environment. Determine if common antimicrobials (tetracycl...

  2. Antibiotic consumption and its influence on the resistance in Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Sedláková, Miroslava Htoutou; Urbánek, Karel; Vojtová, Vladimíra; Suchánková, Hana; Imwensi, Peter; Kolář, Milan

    2014-07-16

    Increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics is one of the most serious problems in current medicine. An important factor contributing to the growing prevalence of multiresistant bacteria is application of antibiotics. This study aimed at analyzing the development of resistance of Enterobacteriaceae to selected beta-lactam, fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics in the University Hospital Olomouc and assessing the effect of selection pressure of these antibiotics. For the period between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2011, resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae and Proteus mirabilis to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides was retrospectively studied. For the assessment of selection pressure of antibiotics, a parameter of defined daily dose in absolute annual consumption (DDDatb) based on the ATC/DDD classification and in relative annual consumption (RDDDatb) as the number of defined daily doses per 100 bed-days was used. The relationship between frequency of strains resistant to a particular antibiotic and antibiotic consumption was assessed by linear regression analysis using Spearman's correlation. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. A total of 113,027 isolates from the Enterobacteriaceae family were analyzed. There was a significant effect of selection pressure of the primary antibiotic in the following cases: piperacillin/tazobactam in Klebsiella pneumoniae, gentamicin in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli and amikacin in Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae. Also, there was significant correlation between resistance to ceftazidime and consumption of piperacillin/tazobactam in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. No relationship was found between consumption of third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins and resistance to ceftazidime or between fluoroquinolone consumption and resistance to

  3. Antibiotic consumption and its influence on the resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics is one of the most serious problems in current medicine. An important factor contributing to the growing prevalence of multiresistant bacteria is application of antibiotics. This study aimed at analyzing the development of resistance of Enterobacteriaceae to selected beta-lactam, fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics in the University Hospital Olomouc and assessing the effect of selection pressure of these antibiotics. Methods For the period between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2011, resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae and Proteus mirabilis to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides was retrospectively studied. For the assessment of selection pressure of antibiotics, a parameter of defined daily dose in absolute annual consumption (DDDatb) based on the ATC/DDD classification and in relative annual consumption (RDDDatb) as the number of defined daily doses per 100 bed-days was used. The relationship between frequency of strains resistant to a particular antibiotic and antibiotic consumption was assessed by linear regression analysis using Spearman’s correlation. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results A total of 113,027 isolates from the Enterobacteriaceae family were analyzed. There was a significant effect of selection pressure of the primary antibiotic in the following cases: piperacillin/tazobactam in Klebsiella pneumoniae, gentamicin in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli and amikacin in Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae. Also, there was significant correlation between resistance to ceftazidime and consumption of piperacillin/tazobactam in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. No relationship was found between consumption of third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins and resistance to ceftazidime or between fluoroquinolone

  4. Antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae: what impact on the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in colorectal surgery?

    PubMed

    Kirby, A; Santoni, N

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis, introduced in the 1940s, brought in an era of relatively safe colorectal surgery. This was achieved in part due to the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs) caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Since then, Enterobacteriaceae have become increasingly resistant to the antibiotics commonly used for prophylaxis. The impact of being colonized preoperatively with resistant Enterobacteriaceae on the efficacy of colorectal SSI prophylaxis, if any, is unknown. It is also difficult to predict the likely impact of resistance as the exposure‒response relationships have not been determined for antibiotic surgical prophylaxis. Neither is it known which test for resistance to use; the importance of the concentration of Enterobacteriaceae in the colon, the ability of different species of Enterobacteriaceae to cause SSIs, and the comparative ability of minimum inhibitory concentration or presence of a resistance mechanism in predicting SSI risk have yet to be established. Clinical research is urgently needed to answer these questions.

  5. Horizontal gene transfer and antibiotic resistance plasmids in multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens pose serious public health concerns and increase the burden of disease treatment. Antibiotic resistance genes can reside on the bacterial chromosome or on other self-replicating DNA molecules such as plasmids. The resistance genes/DNA can be transferred int...

  6. Co-occurrence of antibiotic drugs, resistant bacteria and resistance genes in runoff from cattle feedlots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agricultural uses of antibiotics raises concerns about the development of antibiotic resistance in food animals, and the potential to transmit resistance to human clinical settings via fecal contamination of surface and ground water. Although there is broad agreement that agricultural resistance can...

  7. Antibiotic resistance: shifting the paradigm in topical acne treatment.

    PubMed

    Andriessen, Anneke; Lynde, Charles W

    2014-11-01

    Multiple topical therapies are available for mild to moderate acne vulgaris. The role of antibiotics and their resistance in the treatment of acne was reviewed by an expert panel of dermatologists who practice in Canada. Prior to the consensus meeting, the panel members filled out a survey on their current practice using topical treatment for acne. A literature review was carried out using information obtained from PubMed, Cochrane Library, Medline, and EMBASE. During a consensus meeting organized at the Spring Dermatology Update on April 27, 2014 in Toronto, ON, the panel had a blind vote on the issues at hand. The panel reached consensus on: 1) Antibiotics are an integral part of acne treatment not only due to their antibiotic effect but also by their anti-inflammatory action. 2) Oral antibiotics should be used for a short period of time if possible. 3) Topical antibiotics should not be used in monotherapy. 4) Retinoids are effective in reducing antibiotic resistance. 5) A benzoyl peroxide wash is as effective as topical benzoyl peroxide in reducing antibiotic resistance. 6) Therapy needs to be re-evaluated in 6-8 weeks versus 12 weeks. The recommendations given by the panel are to be disseminated to both general practitioners and dermatologists. For mild to moderate acne treatment, topical antibiotics in monotherapy are not to be used but may be combined with a retinoid or BPO to safely achieve more successful outcomes.

  8. Antibiotic resistance - is resistance detected by surveillance relevant to predicting resistance in the clinical setting?

    PubMed

    Karlowsky, James A; Sahm, Daniel F

    2002-10-01

    Local, regional, national and global surveillance initiatives have several important functions, which include identifying shifts in antibiotic resistance, detecting the emergence of new resistance mechanisms and monitoring the impact of changes made to empiric prescribing, infection control and public health guidelines. Although the need for surveillance is indubitable and its use in the treatment of individual patients important, it cannot unequivocally predict outcomes in patients with infections. Treatment regimens for individual patients with suspected or demonstrated infections should be developed following consideration of symptoms, laboratory findings and relevant medical history, and in the context of appropriate local and widespread antibiotic resistance trends.

  9. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of antibiotic consumption on antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Bell, Brian G; Schellevis, Francois; Stobberingh, Ellen; Goossens, Herman; Pringle, Mike

    2014-01-09

    Greater use of antibiotics during the past 50 years has exerted selective pressure on susceptible bacteria and may have favoured the survival of resistant strains. Existing information on antibiotic resistance patterns from pathogens circulating among community-based patients is substantially less than from hospitalized patients on whom guidelines are often based. We therefore chose to assess the relationship between the antibiotic resistance pattern of bacteria circulating in the community and the consumption of antibiotics in the community. Both gray literature and published scientific literature in English and other European languages was examined. Multiple regression analysis was used to analyse whether studies found a positive relationship between antibiotic consumption and resistance. A subsequent meta-analysis and meta-regression was conducted for studies for which a common effect size measure (odds ratio) could be calculated. Electronic searches identified 974 studies but only 243 studies were considered eligible for inclusion by the two independent reviewers who extracted the data. A binomial test revealed a positive relationship between antibiotic consumption and resistance (p < .001) but multiple regression modelling did not produce any significant predictors of study outcome. The meta-analysis generated a significant pooled odds ratio of 2.3 (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 2.5) with a meta-regression producing several significant predictors (F(10,77) = 5.82, p < .01). Countries in southern Europe produced a stronger link between consumption and resistance than other regions. Using a large set of studies we found that antibiotic consumption is associated with the development of antibiotic resistance. A subsequent meta-analysis, with a subsample of the studies, generated several significant predictors. Countries in southern Europe produced a stronger link between consumption and resistance than other regions so efforts at reducing antibiotic consumption

  10. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of antibiotic consumption on antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Greater use of antibiotics during the past 50 years has exerted selective pressure on susceptible bacteria and may have favoured the survival of resistant strains. Existing information on antibiotic resistance patterns from pathogens circulating among community-based patients is substantially less than from hospitalized patients on whom guidelines are often based. We therefore chose to assess the relationship between the antibiotic resistance pattern of bacteria circulating in the community and the consumption of antibiotics in the community. Methods Both gray literature and published scientific literature in English and other European languages was examined. Multiple regression analysis was used to analyse whether studies found a positive relationship between antibiotic consumption and resistance. A subsequent meta-analysis and meta-regression was conducted for studies for which a common effect size measure (odds ratio) could be calculated. Results Electronic searches identified 974 studies but only 243 studies were considered eligible for inclusion by the two independent reviewers who extracted the data. A binomial test revealed a positive relationship between antibiotic consumption and resistance (p < .001) but multiple regression modelling did not produce any significant predictors of study outcome. The meta-analysis generated a significant pooled odds ratio of 2.3 (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 2.5) with a meta-regression producing several significant predictors (F(10,77) = 5.82, p < .01). Countries in southern Europe produced a stronger link between consumption and resistance than other regions. Conclusions Using a large set of studies we found that antibiotic consumption is associated with the development of antibiotic resistance. A subsequent meta-analysis, with a subsample of the studies, generated several significant predictors. Countries in southern Europe produced a stronger link between consumption and resistance than other

  11. [Update on antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacteria].

    PubMed

    Lozano, Carmen; Torres, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among Gram-positive bacteria, especially in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a serious threat to public health. These microorganisms have multiple resistance mechanisms to agents currently used in clinical practice. Many of these resistance mechanisms are common to all 4 of these bacterial species, but other mechanisms seem to be more specific. The prevalence and dissemination of these mechanisms varies considerably, depending on the microorganism. This review discusses the resistance mechanisms to the most clinically relevant antibiotics, with particular emphasis on the new mechanisms described for widely used antibiotics and for newer agents such as lipopeptides, lipoglycopeptides, glycylcyclines and oxazolidinones.

  12. Indirect Selection for Antibiotic Resistance in Multiple Stream Microhabitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, M. S.; Peltier, G. L.; McArthur, J.

    2005-05-01

    One aspect challenging public health efforts to minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) is the prevalence of resistant bacteria in the environment. Anthropogenic-derived sources of selection are typically implicated as mechanisms for maintaining AR in the environment. Here we report an additional mechanism for maintaining AR in the environment through co- or cross-resistance to heavy metals. Using culture-independent techniques, bacteria isolated from heavy-metal contaminated sites were more tolerant of antibiotics and metals compared to those bacteria from a reference site. This evidence supports our hypothesis that metal contamination directly selects for metal tolerant bacteria while indirectly selecting for antibiotic tolerant bacteria. Additionally, to assess how antibiotic- and metal-tolerance may be transported through a stream network, we studied antibiotic and metal-tolerance patterns over four months in bacteria collected from multiple stream microhabitats including water column, biofilm, sediment, and Corbicula fluminea (Asiatic clam) digestive tracts. Sediment bacteria were the most tolerant to antibiotics and metals, while bacteria from Corbicula were the least tolerant. Differences between these microhabitats may be important for predicting antibiotic resistance transfer and transport in stream environments. Further, temporal dynamics suggest that tolerance patterns within microhabitats are linked to physico-chemical characteristics of the stream.

  13. Role of porins in intrinsic antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas cepacia.

    PubMed Central

    Parr, T R; Moore, R A; Moore, L V; Hancock, R E

    1987-01-01

    The measured outer membrane permeability of Pseudomonas cepacia to the beta-lactam nitrocefin was low: approximately 10 times less than that of Escherichia coli and comparable to that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The purified P. cepacia porin demonstrated an average single channel conductance in 1 M KCl of 0.23 nS. Images PMID:3032087

  14. Public Beliefs about Antibiotics, Infection and Resistance: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Pauline; Chamberlain, Kerry; Dew, Kevin; Gabe, Jonathan; Hodgetts, Darrin; Madden, Helen

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to gain an in-depth understanding of public views and ways of talking about antibiotics. Four focus groups were held with members of the public. In addition, 39 households were recruited and interviews, diaries of medicine taking, diaries of any contact with medication were used to explore understanding and use of medication. Discussions related to antibiotics were identified and analyzed. Participants in this study were worried about adverse effects of antibiotics, particularly for recurrent infections. Some were concerned that antibiotics upset the body’s “balance”, and many used strategies to try to prevent and treat infections without antibiotics. They rarely used military metaphors about infection (e.g., describing bacteria as invading armies) but instead spoke of clearing infections. They had little understanding of the concept of antibiotic resistance but they thought that over-using antibiotics was unwise because it would reduce their future effectiveness. Previous studies tend to focus on problems such as lack of knowledge, or belief in the curative powers of antibiotics for viral illness, and neglect the concerns that people have about antibiotics, and the fact that many people try to avoid them. We suggest that these concerns about antibiotics form a resource for educating patients, for health promotion and social marketing strategies. PMID:27029314

  15. Antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori to 16 antibiotics in clinical patients.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yongfu; Lu, Rongdan; Yang, Yunben; Xu, Qiancheng; Wang, Bojun; Ye, Guoliang

    2017-10-06

    Resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to antibiotics is increasing worldwide. To determine the status of H. pylori resistance and its patterns in clinical patients, an investigation utilizing susceptibility testing for commonly used antibiotics was needed. Total of 2283 H. pylori strains were collected from 2013 to 2016. The resistance and its patterns of these strains were tested by agar dilution method. The resistance rate and minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) in different gender groups were also analyzed. The overall resistance rates were as following: amoxicillin (1.58%), clarithromycin (22.73%), levofloxacin (24.75%), furazolidone (1.49%), doxycycline (9.20%), cefetamet (97.20%), ceftriaxone (49.60%), cefuroxime (25.20%), gentamicin (3.73%), azithromycin (85.60%), rifampicin (2.80%), metronidazole (92.53%), ornidazole (94.27%), tinidazole (87.20%), ciprofloxacin (43.20%), and moxifloxacin (38.53%). There were only 64.08% strains pan-susceptible to amoxicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, and furazolidone, followed by mono resistance (23.17%), double resistance (11.13%), triple resistance (1.36%), and quadruple resistance (0.26%). Significant differences in the resistance rate and MIC were also observed in different gender groups. Antibiotic resistance trends of H. pylori is increasing in clinical patients. With the increasing resistance, it is imperative to individualized therapy based on the results of drug susceptibility testing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Water Disinfection Byproducts Induce Antibiotic Resistance-Role of Environmental Pollutants in Resistance Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zeng, Siyu; He, Miao; Gu, April Z

    2016-03-15

    The spread of antibiotic resistance represents a global threat to public health, and has been traditionally attributed to extensive antibiotic uses in clinical and agricultural applications. As a result, researchers have mostly focused on clinically relevant high-level resistance enriched by antibiotics above the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Here, we report that two common water disinfection byproducts (chlorite and iodoacetic acid) had antibiotic-like effects that led to the evolution of resistant E. coli strains under both high (near MICs) and low (sub-MIC) exposure concentrations. The subinhibitory concentrations of DBPs selected strains with resistance higher than those evolved under above-MIC exposure concentrations. In addition, whole-genome analysis revealed distinct mutations in small sets of genes known to be involved in multiple drug and drug-specific resistance, as well as in genes not yet identified to play role in antibiotic resistance. The number and identities of genetic mutations were distinct for either the high versus low sub-MIC concentrations exposure scenarios. This study provides evidence and mechanistic insight into the sub-MIC selection of antibiotic resistance by antibiotic-like environmental pollutants such as disinfection byproducts in water, which may be important contributors to the spread of global antibiotic resistance. The results from this study open an intriguing and profound question on the roles of large amount and various environmental contaminants play in selecting and spreading the antibiotics resistance in the environment.

  17. Antibiotics, bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes: aerial transport from cattle feed yards via particulate matter.

    PubMed

    McEachran, Andrew D; Blackwell, Brett R; Hanson, J Delton; Wooten, Kimberly J; Mayer, Gregory D; Cox, Stephen B; Smith, Philip N

    2015-04-01

    Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance has become a global health threat and is often linked with overuse and misuse of clinical and veterinary chemotherapeutic agents. Modern industrial-scale animal feeding operations rely extensively on veterinary pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, to augment animal growth. Following excretion, antibiotics are transported through the environment via runoff, leaching, and land application of manure; however, airborne transport from feed yards has not been characterized. The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), and ruminant-associated microbes are aerially dispersed via particulate matter (PM) derived from large-scale beef cattle feed yards. PM was collected downwind and upwind of 10 beef cattle feed yards. After extraction from PM, five veterinary antibiotics were quantified via high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, ARG were quantified via targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and microbial community diversity was analyzed via 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing. Airborne PM derived from feed yards facilitated dispersal of several veterinary antibiotics, as well as microbial communities containing ARG. Concentrations of several antibiotics in airborne PM immediately downwind of feed yards ranged from 0.5 to 4.6 μg/g of PM. Microbial communities of PM collected downwind of feed yards were enriched with ruminant-associated taxa and were distinct when compared to upwind PM assemblages. Furthermore, genes encoding resistance to tetracycline antibiotics were significantly more abundant in PM collected downwind of feed yards as compared to upwind. Wind-dispersed PM from feed yards harbors antibiotics, bacteria, and ARGs.

  18. Inhibition of Mutation and Combating the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cirz, Ryan T; Chin, Jodie K; Andes, David R; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Craig, William A

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant bacteria poses a serious threat to human health. In the case of several antibiotics, including those of the quinolone and rifamycin classes, bacteria rapidly acquire resistance through mutation of chromosomal genes during therapy. In this work, we show that preventing induction of the SOS response by interfering with the activity of the protease LexA renders pathogenic Escherichia coli unable to evolve resistance in vivo to ciprofloxacin or rifampicin, important quinolone and rifamycin antibiotics. We show in vitro that LexA cleavage is induced during RecBC-mediated repair of ciprofloxacin-mediated DNA damage and that this results in the derepression of the SOS-regulated polymerases Pol II, Pol IV and Pol V, which collaborate to induce resistance-conferring mutations. Our findings indicate that the inhibition of mutation could serve as a novel therapeutic strategy to combat the evolution of antibiotic resistance. PMID:15869329

  19. [Antibiotic Consumption and the Development of Antibiotic Resistance in Surgical Units].

    PubMed

    Tammer, I; Geginat, G; Lange, S; Kropf, S; Lodes, U; Schlüter, D; Lippert, H; Meyer, F

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotic resistence is increasing worldwide. A longitudinal analysis of the influence of the density of antibiotic use on the development of resistance in surgical units was undertaken. Over five years the incidence of pathogens and the resistance rates of isolates from patients of normal surgical units and those of a surgical ICU at a university hospital were examined. The resistence rates were correlated with the density of antibiotic use - calculated from the antibiotic consumption (in DDD) and the number of patient-days. At both units, Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococci were mostly cultured. Among the Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, Klebsiella spp., Proteus mirabilis and Enterobacter predominated. In the group of Enterococci, E. faecalis predominated at wards whereas at ICU E. faecium was the most frequent. Anaerobes ranked third at normal wards and Candida spp. at ICU. From 2007 to 2011, there was an increasing resistance against ciprofloxacin in P. mirabilis (r = 0.87; p = 0.054) and against imipenem (r = 0.86; p = 0.06) and piperacillin (r = 0.81; p = 0.09) in P. aeruginosa at normal wards. At ICU, the resistance rates of imipenem in P. aeruginosa rose (r = 0.88; p = 0.049). Resistance against ciprofloxacin in E. coli increased (r = 0.65; p = 0.23). Due to the increasing use of ciprofloxacin and meropenem at normal wards, the density of antibiotic usage rose 1.4 %/year (r = 0.94; p = 0.02). Despite the increase of meropenem use at ICU (r = 0.9; p = 0.035), the total antibiotic uptake rate remained almost constant. The antibiotic usage density was 3-fold higher at ICU than at normal wards. At normal wards, the ciprofloxacin usage correlated with the rate of resistance against ciprofloxacin in P. mirabilis P. m. At ICU, an association was detected between the uptake rate of ceftazidime and the rate of resistance against cefotaxime in the CES group. In P. aeruginosa, the use of piperacillin and the rate

  20. Antibiotic resistance amongst healthcare-associated pathogens in China.

    PubMed

    Yezli, Saber; Li, Han

    2012-11-01

    The People's Republic of China, commonly known as China, comprises approximately one-fifth of the world's population. Because of the expanding size and density of its population and the frequent interaction of people with animals, China is a hotspot for the emergence and spread of new microbial threats and is a major contributor to the worldwide infectious disease burden. In recent years, the emergence and rapid spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) generated considerable interest in the Chinese healthcare system and its infection control and prevention measures. This review examines antibiotic misuse and the status of antibiotic resistance in the Chinese healthcare system. China has high rates of antibiotic resistance driven by misuse of these agents in a healthcare system that provides strong incentives for overprescribing and in a country where self-medication is common. Tuberculosis remains a serious problem in China, with a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant strains. Drug resistance amongst nosocomial bacteria has been on a rapid upward trend with a strong inclination towards multidrug resistance. There is a need for effective infection prevention and control measures and strict use of antibiotics in China to control the rise and spread of antibiotic resistance in the country. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  1. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Sharkey et al.

  2. Increases of Antibiotic Resistance in Excessive Use of Antibiotics in Smallholder Dairy Farms in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Suriyasathaporn, W.; Chupia, V.; Sing-Lah, T.; Wongsawan, K.; Mektrirat, R.; Chaisri, W.

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial isolates from both quarter teat-tip swabs and their quarter milk samples were evaluated in smallholder dairy farms in northern Thailand with excessive use of antibiotics (HIGH) compared with normal use (NORM). Results from teat-tip swab samples showed that the percentage of Bacillus spp. resistance to overall antibiotics was significantly lower in the NORM group than that of the HIGH group, whereas, the resistance percentage of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the NORM group was higher than that of the HIGH one. The overall mastitis-causing bacteria isolated from milk samples were environmental streptococci (13.8%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (9.9%), Staphylococcus aureus (5.4%), and Corynebacterium bovis (4.5%). Both staphylococci and streptococci had significantly higher percentages of resistance to cloxacillin and oxacillin in the HIGH group when compared to the NORM one. An occurrence of vancomycin-resistant bacteria was also observed in the HIGH group. In conclusion, the smallholder dairy farms with excessive use of antibiotics had a higher probability of antibiotic-resistant pattern than the farms with normal use. PMID:25049697

  3. The use of platensimycin and platencin to fight antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Melahat; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Ates, Sezen Canim; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Miraloglu, Meral; Elcicek, Serhat; Yaman, Serkan; Unal, Gokce

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases are known as one of the most life-threatening disabilities worldwide. Approximately 13 million deaths related to infectious diseases are reported each year. The only way to combat infectious diseases is by chemotherapy using antimicrobial agents and antibiotics. However, due to uncontrolled and unnecessary use of antibiotics in particular, surviving bacteria have evolved resistance against several antibiotics. Emergence of multidrug resistance in bacteria over the past several decades has resulted in one of the most important clinical health problems in modern medicine. For instance, approximately 440,000 new cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are reported every year leading to the deaths of 150,000 people worldwide. Management of multidrug resistance requires understanding its molecular basis and the evolution and dissemination of resistance; development of new antibiotic compounds in place of traditional antibiotics; and innovative strategies for extending the life of antibiotic molecules. Researchers have begun to develop new antimicrobials for overcoming this important problem. Recently, platensimycin – isolated from extracts of Streptomyces platensis – and its analog platencin have been defined as promising agents for fighting multidrug resistance. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that these new antimicrobials have great potential to inhibit methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae by targeting type II fatty acid synthesis in bacteria. Showing strong efficacy without any observed in vivo toxicity increases the significance of these antimicrobial agents for their use in humans. However, at the present time, clinical trials are insufficient and require more research. The strong antibacterial efficacies of platensimycin and platencin may be established in clinical trials and their use in humans for coping with multidrug resistance may be

  4. Antibiotic resistance in primary and persistent endodontic infections

    PubMed Central

    Jungermann, Gretchen B.; Burns, Krystal; Nandakumar, Renu; Tolba, Mostafa; Venezia, Richard A.; Fouad, Ashraf F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The presence of antibiotic resistance genes in endodontic microorganisms may render the infection resistant to common antibiotics. The aims of this project were to identify selected antibiotics resistance genes in primary and persistent endodontic infections and determine the effectiveness of contemporary endodontic procedures in eliminating bacteria with these genes. Methods In patients undergoing primary endodontic treatment or retreatment, the root canals were aseptically accessed and sampled prior to endodontic procedures as well as following contemporary chemomechanical preparation and medication with calcium hydroxide. Identification of the following antibiotics resistance genes was performed using PCR: blaTEM−1, cfxA, blaZ, tetM, tetW, tetQ, vanA, vanD, and vanE. Limited phenotypic identification and antibiotic susceptibility verification was also performed. Results Overall, there were 45 specimens available for analysis: 30 from primary and 15 from persistent endodontic infections. In preoperative specimens, only blaTEM-1 was significantly more prevalent in primary vs. persistent infections (p=0.04). Following contemporary treatment procedures, there was an overall reduction in prevalence of these genes (p<0.001). blaTEM-1 and tetW were significantly reduced (p<0.05), cfxA, blaZ and tetQ were eliminated, but there was no change in tetM. No specimens contained vanA, vanD, or vanE. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed significant differences among the antibiotics (p<0.001) and general concordance with the gene findings. Conclusions blaTEM-1 was more prevalent in primary than persistent infections. Vancomycin resistance was not present. The genes identified were reduced with treatment except for tetM. Genetic testing may be useful as a screening tool for antibiotic resistance. PMID:21924178

  5. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolates in surface water of Taihu Lake Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song He; Lv, Xiaoyang; Han, Bing; Gu, Xiucong; Wang, Pei Fang; Wang, Chao; He, Zhenli

    2015-08-01

    The rapid development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) has been of concern worldwide. In this study, antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were investigated in antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from surface water samples (rivers, n = 17; Taihu Lake, n = 16) and from human, chicken, swine, and Egretta garzetta sources in the Taihu Basin. E. coli showing resistance to at least five drugs occurred in 31, 67, 58, 27, and 18% of the isolates from surface water (n = 665), chicken (n = 27), swine (n = 29), human (n = 45), and E. garzetta (n = 15) sources, respectively. The mean multi-antibiotic resistance (MAR) index of surface water samples (0.44) was lower than that of chicken (0.64) and swine (0.57) sources but higher than that of human (0.30) and E. garzetta sources (0.15). Ten tetracycline, four sulfonamide, four quinolone, five β-lactamase, and two streptomycin resistance genes were detected in the corresponding antibiotic-resistant isolates. Most antibiotic-resistant E. coli harbored at least two similar functional ARGs. Int-I was detected in at least 57% of MAR E. coli isolates. The results of multiple correspondence analysis and Spearman correlation analysis suggest that antibiotic-resistant E. coli in water samples were mainly originated from swine, chicken, and/or human sources. Most of the ARGs detected in E. garzetta sources were prevalent in other sources. These data indicated that human activities may have contributed to the spread of ARB in the aquatic environment.

  6. Surveillance and Control of Antibiotic Resistance in the Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardi, Walter; Giubbini, Gabriele; Laurenti, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most relevant problems in the healthcare: the growth of resistant microorganisms in healthcare settings is a worrisome threat, raising length to stay (LOS), morbidity and mortality in those patients. The importance of the antibiotic resistance and its spread around the world, gave rise to the activation of several surveillance systems, based especially on the collection of laboratory data to local or national level. The objective of this work is to carry out a review of the scientific literature existing on the topic and scientific activities related to surveillance of antibiotic resistance in the countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Recent Data from European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (November 2015) show, for different combinations bacterium-drug, an increase of resistance from North to South and from West to East of Europe. It is of particular concern the phenomenon of resistance carried out by some gram-negative, specifically Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli to third-generation cephalosporin, often combined in opposition to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Is particularly high the incidence of resistance to carbapenems by strains of Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella included). The resistance exerted by MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) continues to be relevant, albeit showing some decline in recent years. The incidence of resistance carried on by Streptococcus pneumoniae is stable and is mainly relevant to macrolides. Finally, a significant increase in recording relatively exercised by Enterococcus faecium to Vancomycin. Detecting, preventing, and controlling antibiotic resistance requires strategic, coordinated, and sustained efforts. It also depends on the engagement of governments, academia, industry, healthcare providers, the general public, and the agricultural community, as well as international partners. Committing to combating antibiotic-resistant microbes does support

  7. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  8. Ultraviolet disinfection of antibiotic resistant bacteria and their antibiotic resistance genes in water and wastewater.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Chad W; Pruden, Amy

    2012-12-18

    Disinfection of wastewater treatment plant effluent may be an important barrier for limiting the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARBs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). While ideally disinfection should destroy ARGs, to prevent horizontal gene transfer to downstream bacteria, little is known about the effect of conventional water disinfection technologies on ARGs. This study examined the potential of UV disinfection to damage four ARGs, mec(A), van(A), tet(A), and amp(C), both in extracellular form and present within a host ARBs: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), Escherichia coli SMS-3-5, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 01, respectively. An extended amplicon-length quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was developed to enhance capture of ARG damage events and also to normalize to an equivalent length of target DNA (∼1000 bp) for comparison. It was found that the two Gram-positive ARBs (MRSA and VRE) were more resistant to UV disinfection than the two Gram-negative ARBs (E. coli and P. aeruginosa). The two Gram-positive organisms also possessed smaller total genome sizes, which could also have reduced their susceptibility to UV because of fewer potential pyrimidine dimer targets. An effect of cell type on damage to ARGs was only observed in VRE and P. aeruginosa, the latter potentially because of extracellular polymeric substances. In general, damage of ARGs required much greater UV doses (200-400 mJ/cm² for 3- to 4-log reduction) than ARB inactivation (10-20 mJ/cm² for 4- to 5-log reduction). The proportion of amplifiable ARGs following UV treatment exhibited a strong negative correlation with the number of adjacent thymines (Pearson r < -0.9; p < 0.0001). ARBs surviving UV treatment were negatively correlated with total genome size (Pearson r < -0.9; p < 0.0001) and adjacent cytosines (Pearson r < -0.88; p < 0.0001) but positively correlated with adjacent thymines (Pearson r

  9. Adaptive Landscapes of Resistance Genes Change as Antibiotic Concentrations Change.

    PubMed

    Mira, Portia M; Meza, Juan C; Nandipati, Anna; Barlow, Miriam

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on the evolution of antibiotic resistance are focused on selection for resistance at lethal antibiotic concentrations, which has allowed the detection of mutant strains that show strong phenotypic traits. However, solely focusing on lethal concentrations of antibiotics narrowly limits our perspective of antibiotic resistance evolution. New high-resolution competition assays have shown that resistant bacteria are selected at relatively low concentrations of antibiotics. This finding is important because sublethal concentrations of antibiotics are found widely in patients undergoing antibiotic therapies, and in nonmedical conditions such as wastewater treatment plants, and food and water used in agriculture and farming. To understand the impacts of sublethal concentrations on selection, we measured 30 adaptive landscapes for a set of TEM β-lactamases containing all combinations of the four amino acid substitutions that exist in TEM-50 for 15 β-lactam antibiotics at multiple concentrations. We found that there are many evolutionary pathways within this collection of landscapes that lead to nearly every TEM-genotype that we studied. While it is known that the pathways change depending on the type of β-lactam, this study demonstrates that the landscapes including fitness optima also change dramatically as the concentrations of antibiotics change. Based on these results we conclude that the presence of multiple concentrations of β-lactams in an environment result in many different adaptive landscapes through which pathways to nearly every genotype are available. Ultimately this may increase the diversity of genotypes in microbial populations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Ready for a world without antibiotics? The Pensières Antibiotic Resistance Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics has increased dramatically over the past few years and has now reached a level that places future patients in real danger. Microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which are commensals and pathogens for humans and animals, have become increasingly resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. Moreover, in certain countries, they are also resistant to carbapenems and therefore susceptible only to tigecycline and colistin. Resistance is primarily attributed to the production of beta-lactamase genes located on mobile genetic elements, which facilitate their transfer between different species. In some rare cases, Gram-negative rods are resistant to virtually all known antibiotics. The causes are numerous, but the role of the overuse of antibiotics in both humans and animals is essential, as well as the transmission of these bacteria in both the hospital and the community, notably via the food chain, contaminated hands, and between animals and humans. In addition, there are very few new antibiotics in the pipeline, particularly for Gram-negative bacilli. The situation is slightly better for Gram-positive cocci as some potent and novel antibiotics have been made available in recent years. A strong and coordinated international programme is urgently needed. To meet this challenge, 70 internationally recognized experts met for a two-day meeting in June 2011 in Annecy (France) and endorsed a global call to action ("The Pensières Antibiotic Resistance Call to Action"). Bundles of measures that must be implemented simultaneously and worldwide are presented in this document. In particular, antibiotics, which represent a treasure for humanity, must be protected and considered as a special class of drugs. PMID:22958833

  11. Potential impact of environmental bacteriophages in spreading antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Muniesa, Maite; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan

    2013-06-01

    The idea that bacteriophage transduction plays a role in the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes is gaining momentum. Such transduction might be vital in horizontal transfer from environmental to human body-associated biomes and here we review many lines of evidence supporting this notion. It is well accepted that bacteriophages are the most abundant entities in most environments, where they have been shown to be quite persistent. This fact, together with the ability of many phages to infect bacteria belonging to different taxa, makes them suitable vehicles for gene transfer. Metagenomic studies confirm that substantial percentages of the bacteriophage particles present in most environments contain bacterial genes, including mobile genetic elements and antibiotic resistance genes. When specific genes of resistance to antibiotics are detected by real-time PCR in the bacteriophage populations of different environments, only tenfold lower numbers of these genes are observed, compared with those found in the corresponding bacterial populations. In addition, the antibiotic resistance genes from these bacteriophages are functional and generate resistance to the bacteria when these genes are transfected. Finally, reports about the transduction of antibiotic resistance genes are on the increase.

  12. Parallel evolutionary pathways to antibiotic resistance selected by biocide exposure

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Mark A.; Whitehead, Rebekah N.; Mount, Manuella; Loman, Nick J.; Pallen, Mark J.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Biocides are widely used to prevent infection. We aimed to determine whether exposure of Salmonella to various biocides could act as a driver of antibiotic resistance. Methods Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was exposed to four biocides with differing modes of action. Antibiotic-resistant mutants were selected during exposure to all biocides and characterized phenotypically and genotypically to identify mechanisms of resistance. Results All biocides tested selected MDR mutants with decreased antibiotic susceptibility; these occurred randomly throughout the experiments. Mutations that resulted in de-repression of the multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC were seen in MDR mutants. A novel mutation in rpoA was also selected and contributed to the MDR phenotype. Other mutants were highly resistant to both quinolone antibiotics and the biocide triclosan. Conclusions This study shows that exposure of bacteria to biocides can select for antibiotic-resistant mutants and this is mediated by clinically relevant mechanisms of resistance prevalent in human pathogens. PMID:25953808

  13. Multidrug efflux pumps as main players in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Corona, Fernando; Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Sánchez, María B; Martínez, José L

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps constitute a group of transporters that are ubiquitously found in any organism. In addition to other functions with relevance for the cell physiology, efflux pumps contribute to the resistance to compounds used for treating different diseases, including resistance to anticancer drugs, antibiotics or antifungal compounds. In the case of antimicrobials, efflux pumps are major players in both intrinsic and acquired resistance to drugs currently in use for the treatment of infectious diseases. One important aspect not fully explored of efflux pumps consists on the identification of effectors able to induce their expression. Indeed, whereas the analysis of clinical isolates have shown that mutants overexpressing these resistance elements are frequently found, less is known on the conditions that may trigger expression of efflux pumps, hence leading to transient induction of resistance in vivo, a situation that is barely detectable using classical susceptibility tests. In the current article we review the structure and mechanisms of regulation of the expression of bacterial and fungal efflux pumps, with a particular focus in those for which a role in clinically relevant resistance has been reported.

  14. Mycobacterium abscessus WhiB7 regulates a species -specific repertoire of genes to confer extreme antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Hurst-Hess, Kelley; Rudra, Paulami; Ghosh, Pallavi

    2017-09-05

    Mycobacterium abscessus causes acute and chronic broncho-pulmonary infection in patients with chronic lung damage, of which cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are particularly vulnerable. The major threat posed by this organism is its high intrinsic antibiotic resistance. A typical treatment regimen involves a 6-12 month long combination therapy of clarithromycin and amikacin, with cure rates below 50% and multiple side effects, especially due to amikacin. In the present work we show that M. abscessuswhiB7, a homologue of M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis whiB7 with previously demonstrated effects on intrinsic antibiotic resistance, is strongly induced when exposed to clinically relevant antibiotics that target the ribosome - erythromycin, clarithromycin, amikacin, tetracycline and spectinomycin. Deletion of M. abscessuswhiB7 results in sensitivity to all of the above antibiotics. Further, we have defined and compared the whiB7 regulon of M. abscessus with the closely related (non-tuberculous mycobacterium) NTM, M. smegmatis to demonstrate the induction of species-specific repertoire of genes. Further we show that one such gene, eis2, is specifically induced in M. abscessus by whiB7, and contributes to its higher levels of intrinsic amikacin resistance. This species-specific pattern of gene induction could account for the differences in drug susceptibilities to other antibiotics and between different mycobacterial species. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Antibiotic resistance and irrational prescribing in paediatric clinics in Greece.

    PubMed

    Toska, Aikaterini; Geitona, Mary

    Greece is among the countries with the highest rates of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and simultaneous antibiotic consumption. The aim of this study was to assess the perceptions and knowledge of AMR and irrational antibiotic prescribing of nurses working in paediatric hospitals in Greece. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to nurses in paediatric hospitals and paediatric clinics in Greece. Descriptive and multivariate statistical analyses were performed. Levels of significance were two-tailed and statistical significance was p=0.05. A total of 87% of participants reported irrational prescribing to be an important cause of AMR. Diagnostic uncertainty was stated by 55.5% as the main cause of irrational antibiotic prescribing and 94% suggested the use of protocols and guidelines as the main measure to control overprescribing. Parental demand for antibiotics in hospitals has increased according to 51.8% of respondents. Strong correlation was observed between social-demographic characteristics and antibiotic resistance, as well as irrational prescribing. Assessing nurses' knowledge and perceptions of antimicrobial resistance and irrational prescribing is vital as nurses actively participate in the antibiotics administration process and antimicrobial management in Greece. Their involvement could contribute to educate patients and parents on the public-health implications of overprescribing and antimicrobial resistance.

  16. The epidemiology of antibiotic resistance in hospitals: paradoxes and prescriptions.

    PubMed

    Lipsitch, M; Bergstrom, C T; Levin, B R

    2000-02-15

    A simple mathematical model of bacterial transmission within a hospital was used to study the effects of measures to control nosocomial transmission of bacteria and reduce antimicrobial resistance in nosocomial pathogens. The model predicts that: (i) Use of an antibiotic for which resistance is not yet present in a hospital will be positively associated at the individual level (odds ratio) with carriage of bacteria resistant to other antibiotics, but negatively associated at the population level (prevalence). Thus inferences from individual risk factors can yield misleading conclusions about the effect of antibiotic use on resistance to another antibiotic. (ii) Nonspecific interventions that reduce transmission of all bacteria within a hospital will disproportionately reduce the prevalence of colonization with resistant bacteria. (iii) Changes in the prevalence of resistance after a successful intervention will occur on a time scale of weeks to months, considerably faster than in community-acquired infections. Moreover, resistance can decline rapidly in a hospital even if it does not carry a fitness cost. The predictions of the model are compared with those of other models and published data. The implications for resistance control and study design are discussed, along with the limitations and assumptions of the model.

  17. Plant derived compounds inactivate antibiotic resistant Campylobacter jejuni strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sixty-three Campylobacter isolates were screened for their resistance to the antibiotics ampicillin, cefaclor, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, gentamycin, tetracycline, and trimethroprim/sulfamethoxazole. Based on this screen, the resistant strains D28a and H2a and the nonresistant strain A24a were se...

  18. Nationwide survey of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Gumnarai, Pornpen; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Mahachai, Varocha

    2013-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to survey the antibiotic-resistant pattern of Helicobacter pylori infection in different geographical locations in Thailand and to determine factors associated with antibiotic resistance. Dyspeptic patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy from the Northern, Northeastern, Central, and Southern regions of Thailand between January 2004 and December 2012 were enrolled in this study. Two antral gastric biopsies were obtained for culture; susceptibility tests were performed using E-test. A total of 3964 were enrolled, and 1350 patients (34.1%) were infected with H. pylori as identified by rapid urease test. Cultures were positive in 619 isolates. E-test for amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and tetracycline were successful in 400 isolates and for levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in 208 isolates. Antibiotic resistance was present in 50.3% including amoxicillin 5.2%, tetracycline 1.7%, clarithromycin 3.7%, metronidazole 36%, ciprofloxacin 7.7%, levofloxacin 7.2%, and multi-drugs in 4.2%. Clarithromycin resistance was significantly more common in those older than 40 years (i.e., 100% versus 0%; P = 0.04). The prevalence of metronidazole resistant in Southern Thailand was significantly higher than in the Northeastern region (66.7% versus 33.3% P = 0.04). Metronidazole resistance remains the most common antibiotic resistant type of H. pylori in Thailand. The pattern of H. pylori antibiotic resistance over 9 years demonstrated a fall in clarithromycin resistance such that currently age >40 years is a predictor for clarithromycin resistance in Thailand. Quinolone resistance is a growing problem. © 2013.

  19. Occurrence and distribution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and transfer of resistance genes in Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian; Yue, Dongmei; Peng, Yuke; Liu, Ying; Xiao, Lin

    2013-01-01

    The overuse of antibiotics has accelerated antibiotic resistance in the natural environment, especially fresh water, generating a potential risk for public health around the world. In this study, antibiotic resistance in Lake Taihu was investigated and this was the first thorough data obtained through culture-dependent methods. High percentages of resistance to streptomycin and ampicillin among bacterial isolates were detected, followed by tetracycline and chloramphenicol. Especially high levels of ampicillin resistance in the western and northern regions were illustrated. Bacterial identification of the isolates selected for further study indicated the prevalence of some opportunistic pathogens and 62.0% of the 78 isolates exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance. The presence of ESBLs genes was in the following sequence: bla(TEM) > bla(SHV) > bla(CTMX) and 38.5% of the isolates had a class I integrase gene. Of all tested strains, 80.8% were able to transfer antibiotic resistance through conjugation. We also concluded that some new families of human-associated ESBLs and AmpC genes can be found in natural environmental isolates. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance and the dissemination of transferable antibiotic resistance in bacterial isolates (especially in opportunistic pathogens) was alarming and clearly indicated the urgency of realizing the health risks of antibiotic resistance to human and animal populations who are dependent on Lake Taihu for water consumption.

  20. The hidden societal cost of antibiotic resistance per antibiotic prescribed in the United States: an exploratory analysis.

    PubMed

    Michaelidis, Constantinos I; Fine, Michael J; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Linder, Jeffrey A; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Shields, Ryan K; Zimmerman, Richard K; Smith, Kenneth J

    2016-11-08

    Ambulatory antibiotic prescribing contributes to the development of antibiotic resistance and increases societal costs. Here, we estimate the hidden societal cost of antibiotic resistance per antibiotic prescribed in the United States. In an exploratory analysis, we used published data to develop point and range estimates for the hidden societal cost of antibiotic resistance (SCAR) attributable to each ambulatory antibiotic prescription in the United States. We developed four estimation methods that focused on the antibiotic-resistance attributable costs of hospitalization, second-line inpatient antibiotic use, second-line outpatient antibiotic use, and antibiotic stewardship, then summed the estimates across all methods. The total SCAR attributable to each ambulatory antibiotic prescription was estimated to be $13 (range: $3-$95). The greatest contributor to the total SCAR was the cost of hospitalization ($9; 69 % of the total SCAR). The costs of second-line inpatient antibiotic use ($1; 8 % of the total SCAR), second-line outpatient antibiotic use ($2; 15 % of the total SCAR) and antibiotic stewardship ($1; 8 %). This apperars to be an error.; of the total SCAR) were modest contributors to the total SCAR. Assuming an average antibiotic cost of $20, the total SCAR attributable to each ambulatory antibiotic prescription would increase antibiotic costs by 65 % (range: 15-475 %) if incorporated into antibiotic costs paid by patients or payers. Each ambulatory antibiotic prescription is associated with a hidden SCAR that substantially increases the cost of an antibiotic prescription in the United States. This finding raises concerns regarding the magnitude of misalignment between individual and societal antibiotic costs.

  1. Excretion of Antibiotic Resistance Genes by Dairy Calves Fed Milk Replacers with Varying Doses of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Thames, Callie H.; Pruden, Amy; James, Robert E.; Ray, Partha P.; Knowlton, Katharine F.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in soil and water have been linked to livestock farms and in some cases feed antibiotics may select for antibiotic resistant gut microbiota. The purpose of this study was to examine the establishment of ARGs in the feces of calves receiving milk replacer containing no antibiotics versus subtherapeutic or therapeutic doses of tetracycline and neomycin. The effect of antibiotics on calf health was also of interest. Twenty-eight male and female dairy calves were assigned to one of the three antibiotic treatment groups at birth and fecal samples were collected at weeks 6, 7 (prior to weaning), and 12 (5 weeks after weaning). ARGs corresponding to the tetracycline (tetC, tetG, tetO, tetW, and tetX), macrolide (ermB, ermF), and sulfonamide (sul1, sul2) classes of antibiotics along with the class I integron gene, intI1, were monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction as potential indicators of direct selection, co-selection, or horizontal gene transfer of ARGs. Surprisingly, there was no significant effect of antibiotic treatment on the absolute abundance (gene copies per gram wet manure) of any of the ARGs except ermF, which was lower in the antibiotic-treated calf manure, presumably because a significant portion of host bacterial cells carrying ermF were not resistant to tetracycline or neomycin. However, relative abundance (gene copies normalized to 16S rRNA genes) of tetO was higher in calves fed the highest dose of antibiotic than in the other treatments. All genes, except tetC and intI1, were detectable in feces from 6 weeks onward, and tetW and tetG significantly increased (P < 0.10), even in control calves. Overall, the results provide new insight into the colonization of calf gut flora with ARGs in the early weeks. Although feed antibiotics exerted little effect on the ARGs monitored in this study, the fact that they also provided no health benefit suggests that the greater than conventional

  2. Diversity and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas spp. from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2012-06-01

    Pseudomonas spp. are common inhabitants of aquatic environments, including drinking water. Multi-antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa is widely reported and deeply characterized. However, the information regarding other species and environmental isolates of this genus is scant. This study was designed based on the hypothesis that members of the genus Pseudomonas given their high prevalence, wide distribution in waters and genetic plasticity can be important reservoirs of antibiotic resistance in drinking water. With this aim, the diversity and antibiotic resistance phenotypes of Pseudomonas isolated from different drinking water sources were evaluated. The genotypic diversity analyses were based on six housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, rpoD, rpoB, gyrB, recA and ITS) and on pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Susceptibility to 21 antibiotics of eight classes was tested using the ATB PSE EU (08) and disk diffusion methods. Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from 14 of the 32 sampled sites. A total of 55 non-repetitive isolates were affiliated to twenty species. Although the same species were isolated from different sampling sites, identical genotypes were never observed in distinct types of water (water treatment plant/distribution system, tap water, cup fillers, biofilm, and mineral water). In general, the prevalence of antibiotic resistance was low and often the resistance patterns were related with the species and/or the strain genotype. Resistance to ticarcillin, ticarcillin with clavulanic acid, fosfomycin and cotrimoxazol were the most prevalent (69-84%). No resistance to piperacillin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, imipenem or meropenem was observed. This study demonstrates that Pseudomonas spp. are not so widespread in drinking water as commonly assumed. Nevertheless, it suggests that water Pseudomonas can spread acquired antibiotic resistance, preferentially via vertical transmission. Copyright

  3. Antibiotic concentration and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in two shallow urban lakes after stormwater event.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songhe; Pang, Si; Wang, PeiFang; Wang, Chao; Han, Nini; Liu, Bin; Han, Bing; Li, Yi; Anim-Larbi, Kwaku

    2016-05-01

    Stormwater runoff is generally characterized as non-point source pollution. In the present study, antibiotic concentration and antibiotic susceptibilities of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria were investigated in two small shallow urban lakes before and after strong storm event. Several antibiotics, lactose-fermenting bacteria and cultivable heterotrophic bacteria concentrations increased in surface water and/or surface sediment of two small urban lakes (Lake Xuanwu and Wulongtan) after strong storm event. In general, the frequencies of bacteria showing resistance to nine antibiotics increased after storm event. Based on the 16S rRNA genes of 50 randomly selected isolates from each water sample of two lakes, Aeromonas and Bacillus were dominant genera in samples from two lakes, while genera Proteus and Lysinibacillus were the third abundant genera in Lake Xuanwu and Wulongtu, respectively. Presences of nine antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the 100 isolates were detected and most of these isolates harbored at least two ARGs with different functions. The detection frequency of ARGs in Gram-negative isolates was higher than that in Gram-positive isolates. The most prevalent integron in 100 isolates was int(II) (n = 28), followed by int(I) (n = 17) and int(III) (n = 17). Our results indicate that strong storm events potentially contribute to the transfer of ARGs and antibiotic-resistant bacteria from land-sewer system to the urban Lakes.

  4. Modelling the impact of curtailing antibiotic usage in food animals on antibiotic resistance in humans.

    PubMed

    van Bunnik, B A D; Woolhouse, M E J

    2017-04-01

    Consumption of antibiotics in food animals is increasing worldwide and is approaching, if not already surpassing, the volume consumed by humans. It is often suggested that reducing the volume of antibiotics consumed by food animals could have public health benefits. Although this notion is widely regarded as intuitively obvious there is a lack of robust, quantitative evidence to either support or contradict the suggestion. As a first step towards addressing this knowledge gap, we develop a simple mathematical model for exploring the generic relationship between antibiotic consumption by food animals and levels of resistant bacterial infections in humans. We investigate the impact of restricting antibiotic consumption by animals and identify which model parameters most strongly determine that impact. Our results suggest that, for a wide range of scenarios, curtailing the volume of antibiotics consumed by food animals has, as a stand-alone measure, little impact on the level of resistance in humans. We also find that reducing the rate of transmission of resistance from animals to humans may be more effective than an equivalent reduction in the consumption of antibiotics in food animals. Moreover, the response to any intervention is strongly determined by the rate of transmission from humans to animals, an aspect which is rarely considered.

  5. Childhood infections, antibiotics, and resistance: what are parents saying now?

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Dutta-Linn, Maya; Meyer, Robert; Goldman, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Parental misconceptions and even “demand” for unnecessary antibiotics were previously viewed as contributors to overuse of these agents. We conducted focus groups to explore the knowledge and attitudes surrounding common infections and antibiotic use in the current era of more judicious prescribing. Among diverse groups of parents, we found widespread use of home remedies and considerable concern regarding antibiotic resistance. Parents generally expressed the desire to use antibiotics only when necessary. There was appreciation of inherent error in the diagnosis of common infections, with most trust placed in providers with whom parents had longstanding relationships. While some parents had experience with “watchful waiting” for otitis media, there was little enthusiasm for this approach. While there may still be room for further education, it appears that parents have become more informed and sophisticated regarding appropriate uses of antibiotics. This has likely contributed to the declines seen in their use nationally. PMID:24137024

  6. Antibiotic resistance potential of the healthy preterm infant gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alexander G.; Sim, Kathleen; Wooldridge, David J.; Li, Ming-Shi; Gharbia, Saheer; Misra, Raju; Kroll, John Simon

    2017-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the gut microbiome of infants, fewer still preterm infants. In this study we sought to quantify and interrogate the resistome within a cohort of premature infants using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. We describe the gut microbiomes from preterm but healthy infants, characterising the taxonomic diversity identified and frequency of antibiotic resistance genes detected. Results Dominant clinically important species identified within the microbiomes included C. perfringens, K. pneumoniae and members of the Staphylococci and Enterobacter genera. Screening at the gene level we identified an average of 13 antimicrobial resistance genes per preterm infant, ranging across eight different antibiotic classes, including aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. Some antibiotic resistance genes were associated with clinically relevant bacteria, including the identification of mecA and high levels of Staphylococci within some infants. We were able to demonstrate that in a third of the infants the S. aureus identified was unrelated using MLST or metagenome assembly, but low abundance prevented such analysis within the remaining samples. Conclusions We found that the healthy preterm infant gut microbiomes in this study harboured a significant diversity of antibiotic resistance genes. This broad picture of resistances and the wider taxonomic diversity identified raises further caution to the use of antibiotics without consideration of the resident microbial communities. PMID:28149696

  7. Simultaneous breakdown of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Kaneti, Galoz; Sarig, Hadar; Marjieh, Ibrahim; Fadia, Zaknoon; Mor, Amram

    2013-12-01

    In previous studies, the oligo-acyl-lysyl (OAK) C12(ω7)K-β12 added to cultures of gram-positive bacteria exerted a bacteriostatic activity that was associated with membrane depolarization, even at high concentrations. Here, we report that multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, unlike other gram-positive species, have reverted to the sensitive phenotype when exposed to subminimal inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of the OAK, thereby increasing antibiotics potency by up to 3 orders of magnitude. Such chemosensitization was achieved using either cytoplasm or cell-wall targeting antibiotics. Moreover, eventual emergence of resistance to antibiotics was significantly delayed. Using the mouse peritonitis-sepsis model, we show that on single-dose administration of oxacillin and OAK combinations, death induced by a lethal staphylococcal infection was prevented in a synergistic manner, thereby supporting the likelihood for synergism to persist under in vivo conditions. Toward illuminating the molecular basis for these observations, we present data arguing that sub-MIC OAK interactions with the plasma membrane can inhibit proton-dependent signal transduction responsible for expression and export of resistance factors, as demonstrated for β-lactamase and PBP2a. Collectively, the data reveal a potentially useful approach for overcoming antibiotic resistance and for preventing resistance from emerging as readily as when bacteria are exposed to an antibiotic alone.

  8. The intestinal microbiota: Antibiotics, colonization resistance, and enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sohn; Covington, April; Pamer, Eric G

    2017-09-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a diverse network of microorganisms, collectively known as the microbiota that plays an important role in health and disease. For instance, the intestinal microbiota can prevent invading microbes from colonizing the gastrointestinal tract, a phenomenon known as colonization resistance. Perturbations to the microbiota, such as antibiotic administration, can alter microbial composition and result in the loss of colonization resistance. Consequently, the host may be rendered susceptible to colonization by a pathogen. This is a particularly relevant concern in the hospital setting, where antibiotic use and antibiotic-resistant pathogen exposure are more frequent. Many nosocomial infections arise from gastrointestinal colonization. Due to their resistance to antibiotics, treatment is often very challenging. However, recent studies have demonstrated that manipulating the commensal microbiota can prevent and treat various infections in the intestine. In this review, we discuss the members of the microbiota, as well as the mechanisms, that govern colonization resistance against specific pathogens. We also review the effects of antibiotics on the microbiota, as well as the unique epidemiology of immunocompromised patients that renders them a particularly high-risk population to intestinal nosocomial infections. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sponge Microbiota Are a Reservoir of Functional Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Versluis, Dennis; Rodriguez de Evgrafov, Mari; Sommer, Morten O. A.; Sipkema, Detmer; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Wide application of antibiotics has contributed to the evolution of multi-drug resistant human pathogens, resulting in poorer treatment outcomes for infections. In the marine environment, seawater samples have been investigated as a resistance reservoir; however, no studies have methodically examined sponges as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance. Sponges could be important in this respect because they often contain diverse microbial communities that have the capacity to produce bioactive metabolites. Here, we applied functional metagenomics to study the presence and diversity of functional resistance genes in the sponges Aplysina aerophoba, Petrosia ficiformis, and Corticium candelabrum. We obtained 37 insert sequences facilitating resistance to D-cycloserine (n = 6), gentamicin (n = 1), amikacin (n = 7), trimethoprim (n = 17), chloramphenicol (n = 1), rifampicin (n = 2) and ampicillin (n = 3). Fifteen of 37 inserts harbored resistance genes that shared <90% amino acid identity with known gene products, whereas on 13 inserts no resistance gene could be identified with high confidence, in which case we predicted resistance to be mainly mediated by antibiotic efflux. One marine-specific ampicillin-resistance-conferring β-lactamase was identified in the genus Pseudovibrio with 41% global amino acid identity to the closest β-lactamase with demonstrated functionality, and subsequently classified into a new family termed PSV. Taken together, our results show that sponge microbiota host diverse and novel resistance genes that may be harnessed by phylogenetically distinct bacteria. PMID:27909433

  10. Oral antibiotics are effective for highly resistant hip arthroplasty infections.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Ampuero, José; Esteban, Jaime; García-Cimbrelo, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Infected arthroplasties reportedly have a lower eradication rate when caused by highly resistant and/or polymicrobial isolates and in these patients most authors recommend intravenous antibiotics. We asked whether two-stage revision with interim oral antibiotics could eradicate these infections. We prospectively followed 36 patients (mean age, 71.8 years) with late hip arthroplasty infections. Combinations of oral antibiotics were prescribed according to cultures, biofilm, and intracellular effectiveness. The minimum followup was 1 year (mean, 4.4 years; range, 1-12 years). We presumed eradication in the absence of clinical, serologic, and radiographic signs of infection. Infection was eradicated in all 13 patients with highly resistant bacteria who completed a two-stage protocol (10 with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci) and in eight of 11 patients treated with only the first stage (and six of nine with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci). Infection was eradicated in six of six patients with polymicrobial isolates (of sensitive and/or resistant bacteria) who completed a two-stage protocol and in five of seven with polymicrobial isolates treated with only the first surgery. The Harris hip score averaged 88.1 (range, 70-98) in patients who underwent reimplantation and 56.8 (range, 32-76) in patients who underwent resection arthroplasty. Long cycles of combined oral antibiotics plus a two-stage surgical exchange appear a promising alternative for infections by highly resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, and polymicrobial infections.

  11. Clinical, economic and societal impact of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Barriere, Steven L

    2015-02-01

    The concern over antibiotic resistance has been voiced since the discovery of modern antibiotics > 75 years ago. The concerns have only increased with time, with efforts to control resistance caused by widespread overuse of antibiotics in human medicine and far more than appreciated use in the feeding of animals for human consumption to promote growth. The problem is worldwide, but certain regions and selected health care institutions report far more resistance, including strains of Gram-negative bacteria that are susceptible only to the once discarded drugs polymyxin B or colistin, and pan-resistant strains are on the rise. One of the central efforts to control resistance, apart from antimicrobial stewardship, is the development of new antimicrobial agents. This has lagged significantly over the past 10 - 15 years, for a variety of reasons; but promising new agents are being developed, unfortunately none thus far addressing all potentially resistant strains. There is the unlikely, but not unreal, possibility that we could return to a pre-antibiotic era, where morbidity and mortality rates have risen dramatically and routine surgical procedures are not performed for fear of post-operative infections. The onus of control of resistance is a moral imperative that falls on the shoulders of all.

  12. Antibiotic resistance in healthcare-related and nosocomial spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Philipp; Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Krämer, Benjamin; Goeser, Felix; Kaczmarek, Dominik J; Schlabe, Stefan; Parcina, Marijo; Nattermann, Jacob; Hoerauf, Achim; Strassburg, Christian P; Spengler, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) can be life threatening in patients with liver cirrhosis. In contrast to community-acquired SBP, no standard treatment has been established for healthcare-related and nosocomial SBP. We prospectively collected healthcare-related and nosocomial SBP cases from March 2012 till February 2016 at the Department of Internal Medicine I of the University of Bonn and analysed the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among the isolated bacteria. SBP was diagnosed according to international guidelines. Ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone and meropenem were used as reference substance for resistance to quinolones, third-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems, respectively. Ninety-two SBP episodes in 86 patients were identified: 63 episodes (69%) were nosocomial. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species, enterococci and streptococci were most frequently isolated. Frequencies of these microorganisms were comparable for healthcare-related and nosocomial SBP (14% vs. 11%, 14% vs. 8%, 14% vs. 5% and 10% vs. 6%, respectively). In general, antibiotic resistance was higher in isolates from nosocomial than from healthcare-related SBP (50% vs. 18% for quinolones, 30% vs. 11% for piperacillin-tazobactam; P > 0·05), but comparable concerning third-generation cephalosporins (30% vs. 33%). All microorganisms were sensitive to carbapenems apart from nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecium (n = 3) and Candida albicans (n = 1) due to intrinsic resistance or lack of microbiological efficacy, respectively. No multidrug-resistant microorganisms were detected. Resistance to initial antibiotic treatment affected 30-day survival negatively (18% vs. 68%; P = 0·002). Resistance to initial antibiotic treatment was associated with increased mortality. With resistance to cephalosporins being frequent, piperacillin-tazobactam or carbapenems might be preferred as treatment of SBP. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  13. [Epidemiological overview of antibiotic resistance in France and worldwide].

    PubMed

    Arlet, Guillaume

    2012-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance appeared early after the introduction of these molecules in therapeutic. But, this resistance has long been confined to care facilities. Twenty years ago, resistance emerged in community with the methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and also with the reduced susceptibility to penicillin in pneumococci, which are good examples. Fortunately, for these two species, in France, the situation appears to be controlled. The most worrying now is the emergence of resistance to major antimicrobial agents in Escherichia coli both in community and in hospitals. The third-generation cephalosporins and the fluoroquinolones are concerned. This situation is currently not well controlled here and worldwide. The only recourse remaining carbapenems, antibiotics reserved for hospital use. Unfortunately, new mechanisms of resistance to these molecules are emerging.

  14. Antibiotics in animal feed and their role in resistance development.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Henrik C

    2003-10-01

    Animals and humans constitute overlapping reservoirs of resistance, and consequently use of antimicrobials in animals can impact on public health. For example, the occurrence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in food-animals is associated with the use of avoparcin, a glycopeptide antibiotic used as a feed additive for the growth promotion of animals. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci and vancomycin resistance determinants can therefore spread from animals to humans. The bans on avoparcin and other antibiotics as growth promoters in the EU have provided scientists with a unique opportunity to investigate the effects of the withdrawal of a major antimicrobial selective pressure on the occurrence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. The data shows that although the levels of resistance in animals and food, and consequently in humans, has been markedly reduced after the termination of use, the effects on animal health and productivity have been very minor.

  15. Diverse and abundant antibiotic resistance genes in Chinese swine farms.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Johnson, Timothy A; Su, Jian-Qiang; Qiao, Min; Guo, Guang-Xia; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Hashsham, Syed A; Tiedje, James M

    2013-02-26

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging contaminants posing a potential worldwide human health risk. Intensive animal husbandry is believed to be a major contributor to the increased environmental burden of ARGs. Despite the volume of antibiotics used in China, little information is available regarding the corresponding ARGs associated with animal farms. We assessed type and concentrations of ARGs at three stages of manure processing to land disposal at three large-scale (10,000 animals per year) commercial swine farms in China. In-feed or therapeutic antibiotics used on these farms include all major classes of antibiotics except vancomycins. High-capacity quantitative PCR arrays detected 149 unique resistance genes among all of the farm samples, the top 63 ARGs being enriched 192-fold (median) up to 28,000-fold (maximum) compared with their respective antibiotic-free manure or soil controls. Antibiotics and heavy metals used as feed supplements were elevated in the manures, suggesting the potential for coselection of resistance traits. The potential for horizontal transfer of ARGs because of transposon-specific ARGs is implicated by the enrichment of transposases--the top six alleles being enriched 189-fold (median) up to 90,000-fold in manure--as well as the high correlation (r(2) = 0.96) between ARG and transposase abundance. In addition, abundance of ARGs correlated directly with antibiotic and metal concentrations, indicating their importance in selection of resistance genes. Diverse, abundant, and potentially mobile ARGs in farm samples suggest that unmonitored use of antibiotics and metals is causing the emergence and release of ARGs to the environment.

  16. Antibiotic resistance genes and residual antimicrobials in cattle feedlot surface soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic residues and resistant bacteria in cattle feedlot manure may impact antibiotic resistance in the environment. This study investigated common antimicrobials (tetracyclines and monensin) and associated resistance genes in cattle feedlot soils over time. Animal diets and other feedlot soil...

  17. Control of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Control of the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is essential for the appropriate use of antibiotics for prophylaxis and treatment of infections. Hospitals are regarded as the place where antibiotic-resistant bacteria might often develop. Control of antibiotic use in hospitals is therefore one of the most important measures for effective control of antibiotic resistance. Another effective means to control antibiotic resistance is to develop a surveillance programme on a national, and international scale. This would be of great assistance, especially for forecasting future changes in the resistance of bacteria. The prevention of disease by measures other than the use of antibiotics could also reduce antibiotic resistance. This Memorandum of the WHO Scientific Working Group on Antibiotic Resistance describes the measures for controlling the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by (a) the surveillance of antibiotic resistance, including surveillance of resistance in human pathogens and resistance determinants in the general population, and (b) control of antibiotic use in hospitals, the essential elements of which are the establishment of appropriate hospital antibiotic policy, elaboration of general strategy, and the monitoring of antibiotic use. Further research needs are also described and a number of areas are indicated where research might lead to improvements in antibiotic use and in methods for the containment of resistance. Guidelines for the appropriate use of antibiotics are presented in an Annex. PMID:6603916

  18. In tepid defense of population health: physicians and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Saver, Richard S

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance menaces the population as a dire public health threat and costly social problem. Recent proposals to combat antibiotic resistance focus to a large degree on supply side approaches. Suggestions include tinkering with patent rights so that pharmaceutical companies have greater incentives to discover novel antibiotics as well as to resist overselling their newer drugs already on market. This Article argues that a primarily supply side emphasis unfortunately detracts attention from physicians' important demand side influences. Physicians have a vital and unavoidably necessary role to play in ensuring socially optimal access to antibiotics. Dismayingly, physicians' management of the antibiotic supply has been poor and their defense of population health tepid at best. Acting as a prudent steward of the antibiotic supply often seems to be at odds with a physician's commonly understood fiduciary duties, ethical obligations, and professional norms, all of which traditionally emphasize the individual health paradigm as opposed to population health responsibilities. Meanwhile, physicians face limited incentives for antibiotic conservation from other sources, such as malpractice liability, regulatory standards, and reimbursement systems. While multifaceted efforts are needed to combat antibiotic resistance effectively, physician gatekeeping behavior should become a priority area of focus. This Article considers how health law and policy tools could favorably change the incentives physicians face for antibiotic conservation. A clear lesson from the managed care reform battles of the recent past is that interventions, to have the best chance of success, need to respect physician interest in clinical autonomy and individualized medicine even if, somewhat paradoxically, vigorously promoting population health perspectives. Also, physicians' legal and ethical obligations need to be reconceptualized in the antibiotic context in order to better support

  19. Pervasive selection for and against antibiotic resistance in inhomogeneous multistress environments.

    PubMed

    Chait, Remy; Palmer, Adam C; Yelin, Idan; Kishony, Roy

    2016-01-20

    Antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant bacteria coexist in natural environments with low, if detectable, antibiotic concentrations. Except possibly around localized antibiotic sources, where resistance can provide a strong advantage, bacterial fitness is dominated by stresses unaffected by resistance to the antibiotic. How do such mixed and heterogeneous conditions influence the selective advantage or disadvantage of antibiotic resistance? Here we find that sub-inhibitory levels of tetracyclines potentiate selection for or against tetracycline resistance around localized sources of almost any toxin or stress. Furthermore, certain stresses generate alternating rings of selection for and against resistance around a localized source of the antibiotic. In these conditions, localized antibiotic sources, even at high strengths, can actually produce a net selection against resistance to the antibiotic. Our results show that interactions between the effects of an antibiotic and other stresses in inhomogeneous environments can generate pervasive, complex patterns of selection both for and against antibiotic resistance.

  20. Identification of intrinsically metronidazole-resistant clades of Gardnerella vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Schuyler, Jessica A; Mordechai, Eli; Adelson, Martin E; Sobel, Jack D; Gygax, Scott E; Hilbert, David W

    2016-01-01

    Gardnerella vaginalis is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), the most common cause of vaginal discharge. Metronidazole is a front-line therapy for BV, and treatment failure and recurrent disease are common problems. Whole-genome sequencing studies have revealed that G. vaginalis has a population structure that consists of 4 clades: clades 1 and 3 are associated with BV, whereas clades 2 and 4 are not. To determine if metronidazole susceptibility is associated with population structure, we analyzed 87 clinical isolates and found that metronidazole resistance (MIC ≥32 μg/mL) was highly associated with clade (P<0.0001), as 14/14 clade 3 isolates (100%) and 22/22 clade 4 isolates (100%) exhibited resistance, compared to only 16/37 clade 1 isolates (35%) and 1/14 clade 2 isolates (7.1%). The identification of intrinsically metronidazole-resistant G. vaginalis clades will facilitate future studies on the relationship between metronidazole resistance and BV treatment failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions.

  2. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions. PMID:27938628

  3. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Köhler, Thilo; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloé; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Llanes, Catherine; Bogaerts, Pierre; Chatellier, Sonia; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC β-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it with RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction.

  4. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Charretier, Yannick; Köhler, Thilo; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloé; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Llanes, Catherine; Bogaerts, Pierre; Chatellier, Sonia; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC β-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it with RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction. PMID:25713571

  5. [Antibiotic resistance of conjunctival bacterial flora in children].

    PubMed

    Prost, Marek E; Semczuk, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate conjunctival bacterial flora in children and its resistance to the most frequently antibiotics used by the ophthalmologists in Poland. Bacterial conjuntival cultures obtained in 593 children without ocular infections. Pathogenic bacterial isolates were identified in 26.3% children. Most frequently isolated were Gram-positive cocci (70.5%). Significant resistance of Gram-positive cocci to aminoglicosides (5% to 65%) was observed. Emerging resistance to fluoroquinolones, especially of coagulase-negative staphylococci (in 21%), was also observed.

  6. Feasibility of Screening for Antibiotic Resistance-Part II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    antibiotic resistance - T +31 15 28 43000 F +31 152843991 part II Info-DenV@tno.nl Date August 2005 Author(s) M.P. Broekhuijsen, W.C.M. van Dijk...ciprofloxacineresistentie. Beide, De ontworpen methode kan nog verder methoden werden getest op kunstmatig worden verbeterd, en worden toegepast op een resistent ...resultaat te zettn. c otworen ethd erken ood behalen is. Deze mutatie-analysemethode is op de twee kunstmatig resistent gemaalcte tevens geschikter voor

  7. Antibiotic contamination and occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in aquatic environments of northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hoa, Phan Thi Phuong; Managaki, Satoshi; Nakada, Norihide; Takada, Hideshige; Shimizu, Akiko; Anh, Duong Hong; Viet, Pham Hung; Suzuki, Satoru

    2011-07-01

    The ubiquitous application and release of antibiotics to the environment can result in bacterial antibiotic resistance, which in turn can be a serious risk to humans and other animals. Southeast Asian countries commonly apply an integrated recycling farm system called VAC (Vegetable, Aquaculture and Caged animal). In the VAC environment, antibiotics are released from animal and human origins, which would cause antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB). This study evaluated occurrence of ARB in the VAC environment in northern Vietnam, with quantitative analysis of antibiotic pollution. We found that sulfonamides were commonly detected at all sites. In dry season, while sulfamethazine was a major contaminant in pig farm pond (475-6662 ng/l) and less common in city canal and aquaculture sites, sulfamethoxazole was a major one in city canal (612-4330 ng/l). Erythromycin (154-2246 ng/l) and clarithromycin (2.8-778 ng/ml) were the common macrolides in city canal, but very low concentrations in pig farm pond and aquaculture sites. High frequencies of sulfamethoxazole-resistant bacteria (2.14-94.44%) were found whereas the occurrence rates of erythromycin-resistant bacteria were lower (<0.01-38.8%). A positive correlation was found between sulfamethoxazole concentration and occurrence of sulfamethoxazole-resistant bacteria in dry season. The sulfamethoxazole-resistant isolates were found to belong to 25 genera. Acinetobacter and Aeromonas were the major genera. Twenty three of 25 genera contained sul genes. This study showed specific contamination patterns in city and VAC environments and concluded that ARB occurred not only within contaminated sites but also those less contaminated. Various species can obtain resistance in VAC environment, which would be reservoir of drug resistance genes. Occurrence of ARB is suggested to relate with rainfall condition and horizontal gene transfer in diverse microbial community. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibiotic resistance awareness: a public engagement approach for all pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Allison, David G; Higginson, Paula; Martin, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to promote knowledge about antibiotic resistance development and good stewardship principles amongst the general population through pharmacy student-led public engagement workshops in high schools. Structured questionnaires, based on the Key Stage 4 curriculum were initially used to assess awareness and knowledge of antibiotic resistance issues amongst year 10 and 11 (GCSE stage) high school pupils. A Prezi-style presentation (https://prezi.com/) was subsequently developed to deliver a positive message that the young learners could share with friends and family. Misconceptions still exist regarding the correct and appropriate use of antibiotics. The person-person approach adopted by this study was well received, key antibiotic stewardship messages being delivered to the general population through either educational surveys or hands-on workshops. It is widely acknowledged that antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats facing society today. As healthcare professionals, pharmacists in all sectors have a crucial role to play in educating the public about antibiotics and how to use them effectively. This article describes the different ways by which all pharmacists can help educate the public on key issues, with particular emphasis on the next generation. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. A new antibiotic kills pathogens without detectable resistance.

    PubMed

    Ling, Losee L; Schneider, Tanja; Peoples, Aaron J; Spoering, Amy L; Engels, Ina; Conlon, Brian P; Mueller, Anna; Schäberle, Till F; Hughes, Dallas E; Epstein, Slava; Jones, Michael; Lazarides, Linos; Steadman, Victoria A; Cohen, Douglas R; Felix, Cintia R; Fetterman, K Ashley; Millett, William P; Nitti, Anthony G; Zullo, Ashley M; Chen, Chao; Lewis, Kim

    2015-01-22

    Antibiotic resistance is spreading faster than the introduction of new compounds into clinical practice, causing a public health crisis. Most antibiotics were produced by screening soil microorganisms, but this limited resource of cultivable bacteria was overmined by the 1960s. Synthetic approaches to produce antibiotics have been unable to replace this platform. Uncultured bacteria make up approximately 99% of all species in external environments, and are an untapped source of new antibiotics. We developed several methods to grow uncultured organisms by cultivation in situ or by using specific growth factors. Here we report a new antibiotic that we term teixobactin, discovered in a screen of uncultured bacteria. Teixobactin inhibits cell wall synthesis by binding to a highly conserved motif of lipid II (precursor of peptidoglycan) and lipid III (precursor of cell wall teichoic acid). We did not obtain any mutants of Staphylococcus aureus or Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to teixobactin. The properties of this compound suggest a path towards developing antibiotics that are likely to avoid development of resistance.

  10. Rapid determination of antibiotic resistance in E. coli using dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoettges, Kai F.; Dale, Jeremy W.; Hughes, Michael P.

    2007-09-01

    In recent years, infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria such as methillicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli are on the rise, and with them the demand for rapid antibiotic testing is also rising. Conventional tests, such as disc diffusion testing, require a primary sample to be tested in the presence of a number of antibiotics to verify which antibiotics suppress growth, which take approximately 24 h to complete and potentially place the patient at severe risk. In this paper we describe the use of dielectrophoresis as a rapid marker of cell death, by detecting changes in the electrophysiology of the cell caused by the administration of an antibiotic. In contrast to other markers, the electrophysiology of the cell changes rapidly during cell death allowing live cells to be distinguished from dead (or dying) cells without the need for culturing. Using polymyxin B as an example antibiotic, our studies indicate that significant changes in cell characteristics can be observed as soon as 1 h passes after isolating a culture from nutrient broth.

  11. Antibiotic resistance in hospitals: a ward-specific random effect model in a low antibiotic consumption environment.

    PubMed

    Aldrin, Magne; Raastad, Ragnhild; Tvete, Ingunn Fride; Berild, Dag; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Leegaard, Truls; Monnet, Dominique L; Walberg, Mette; Müller, Fredrik

    2013-04-15

    Association between previous antibiotic use and emergence of antibiotic resistance has been reported for several microorganisms. The relationship has been extensively studied, and although the causes of antibiotic resistance are multi-factorial, clear evidence of antibiotic use as a major risk factor exists. Most studies are carried out in countries with high consumption of antibiotics and corresponding high levels of antibiotic resistance, and currently, little is known whether and at what level the associations are detectable in a low antibiotic consumption environment. We conduct an ecological, retrospective study aimed at determining the impact of antibiotic consumption on antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in three hospitals in Norway, a country with low levels of antibiotic use. We construct a sophisticated statistical model to capture such low signals. To reduce noise, we conduct our study at hospital ward level. We propose a random effect Poisson or binomial regression model, with a reparametrisation that allows us to reduce the number of parameters. Inference is likelihood based. Through scenario simulation, we study the potential effects of reduced or increased antibiotic use. Results clearly indicate that the effects of consumption on resistance are present under conditions with relatively low use of antibiotic agents. This strengthens the recommendation on prudent use of antibiotics, even when consumption is relatively low. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Genomic and metagenomic technologies to explore the antibiotic resistance mobilome.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Coque, Teresa M; Lanza, Val F; de la Cruz, Fernando; Baquero, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a relevant problem for human health that requires global approaches to establish a deep understanding of the processes of acquisition, stabilization, and spread of resistance among human bacterial pathogens. Since natural (nonclinical) ecosystems are reservoirs of resistance genes, a health-integrated study of the epidemiology of antibiotic resistance requires the exploration of such ecosystems with the aim of determining the role they may play in the selection, evolution, and spread of antibiotic resistance genes, involving the so-called resistance mobilome. High-throughput sequencing techniques allow an unprecedented opportunity to describe the genetic composition of a given microbiome without the need to subculture the organisms present inside. However, bioinformatic methods for analyzing this bulk of data, mainly with respect to binning each resistance gene with the organism hosting it, are still in their infancy. Here, we discuss how current genomic methodologies can serve to analyze the resistance mobilome and its linkage with different bacterial genomes and metagenomes. In addition, we describe the drawbacks of current methodologies for analyzing the resistance mobilome, mainly in cases of complex microbiotas, and discuss the possibility of implementing novel tools to improve our current metagenomic toolbox.

  13. Antibiotic administration routes significantly influence the levels of antibiotic resistance in gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Yang; Buckley, Timothy; Wang, Hua H

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the impact of oral exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic administration methods on antibiotic resistance (AR) gene pools and the profile of resistant bacteria in host gastrointestinal (GI) tracts using C57BL/6J mice with natural gut microbiota. Mice inoculated with a mixture of tet(M)-carrying Enterococcus spp. or blaCMY-2-carrying Escherichia coli were treated with different doses of tetracycline hydrochloride (Tet) or ampicillin sodium (Amp) and delivered via either feed or intravenous (i.v.) injection. Quantitative PCR assessment of mouse fecal samples revealed that (i) AR gene pools were below the detection limit in mice without prior inoculation of AR gene carriers regardless of subsequent exposure to corresponding antibiotics; (ii) oral exposure to high doses of Tet and Amp in mice inoculated with AR gene carriers led to rapid enrichment of corresponding AR gene pools in feces; (iii) significantly less or delayed development of AR in the GI tract of the AR carrier-inoculated mice was observed when the same doses of antibiotics were administered via i.v. injection rather than oral administration; and (iv) antibiotic dosage, and maybe the excretion route, affected AR in the GI tract. The shift of dominant AR bacterial populations in the gut microbiota was consistent with the dynamics of AR gene pools. The emergence of endogenous resistant bacteria in the gut microbiota corresponding to drug exposure was also observed. Together, these data suggest that oral administration of antibiotics has a prominent effect on AR amplification and development in gut microbiota, which may be minimized by alternative drug administration approaches, as illustrated by i.v. injection in this study and proper drug selection.

  14. Antibiotic Administration Routes Significantly Influence the Levels of Antibiotic Resistance in Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Yang; Buckley, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of oral exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic administration methods on antibiotic resistance (AR) gene pools and the profile of resistant bacteria in host gastrointestinal (GI) tracts using C57BL/6J mice with natural gut microbiota. Mice inoculated with a mixture of tet(M)-carrying Enterococcus spp. or blaCMY-2-carrying Escherichia coli were treated with different doses of tetracycline hydrochloride (Tet) or ampicillin sodium (Amp) and delivered via either feed or intravenous (i.v.) injection. Quantitative PCR assessment of mouse fecal samples revealed that (i) AR gene pools were below the detection limit in mice without prior inoculation of AR gene carriers regardless of subsequent exposure to corresponding antibiotics; (ii) oral exposure to high doses of Tet and Amp in mice inoculated with AR gene carriers led to rapid enrichment of corresponding AR gene pools in feces; (iii) significantly less or delayed development of AR in the GI tract of the AR carrier-inoculated mice was observed when the same doses of antibiotics were administered via i.v. injection rather than oral administration; and (iv) antibiotic dosage, and maybe the excretion route, affected AR in the GI tract. The shift of dominant AR bacterial populations in the gut microbiota was consistent with the dynamics of AR gene pools. The emergence of endogenous resistant bacteria in the gut microbiota corresponding to drug exposure was also observed. Together, these data suggest that oral administration of antibiotics has a prominent effect on AR amplification and development in gut microbiota, which may be minimized by alternative drug administration approaches, as illustrated by i.v. injection in this study and proper drug selection. PMID:23689712

  15. World alliance against antibiotic resistance: The WAAAR declaration against antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Carlet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We must change how antibiotics are used and adopt proactive strategies, similar to those used to save endangered species. Preservation of the efficacy of antibiotics and to stabilization of antibiotic-susceptible bacterial ecosystems should be global goals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Properties of Achromobacter xylosoxidans highly resistant to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Sachiko; Goda, Natsumi; Hayabuchi, Tatsuya; Tamaki, Hiroo; Ishida, Ayami; Suzuki, Ayaka; Nakano, Kaori; Yui, Shoko; Katsumata, Yuto; Yamagami, Yuki; Burioka, Naoto; Chikumi, Hiroki; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    We herein discovered a highly resistant clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MICs to amikacin, gentamicin, and arbekacin of 128 μg/mL or higher in a drug sensitivity survey of 92 strains isolated from the specimens of Yoka hospital patients between January 2009 and October 2010, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans was separated from this P. aeruginosa isolate. The sensitivity of this bacterium to 29 antibiotics was investigated. The MICs of this A. xylosoxidans strain to 9 aminoglycoside antibiotics were: amikacin, gentamicin, arbekacin, streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, and spectinomycin, 1,024 μg/mL or ≥ 1,024 μg/mL; netilmicin, 512 μg/mL; and tobramycin, 256 μg/mL. This strain was also resistant to dibekacin. This aminoglycoside antibiotic resistant phenotype is very rare, and we are the first report the emergence of A. xylosoxidans with this characteristic.

  17. Antibiotic resistance: challenges and successes in respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjay; Bryan, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    European Respiratory Society Congress, Amsterdam, 26-30 September 2015, and CHEST 2015, Montréal, Canada, 24-28 October 2015 With approximately 50,000 deaths in the US and EU attributed to antibacterial resistance each year, together with several million days of hospital care [1], the need to address resistance mechanisms and find new targets for novel antibiotics has never been greater. At the annual congresses of the European Respiratory Society and the American College of Chest Physicians, presenters reported advances in understanding of the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and how these may be overcome. The latest clinical trial data on antibiotic treatment for hospital- and community-acquired pneumonia, including the potential for novel nebulized forms of therapy, were also discussed.

  18. Urinary tract infections: bacteriology and antibiotic resistance patterns.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, Rasoul Yousefi; Babalhavaeji, Hooshang; Yousef, Javad

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the bacteria causing community acquired urinary tract infections (UTI) and detection of antibiotics resistance of isolates in 912 children below 18 years in the west of Iran. Data were analyzed for 4 age groups: infants, toddlers, preteens and teens. Fourteen antibiotics were tested by gel-diffusion method. Of 912 patients, 34.2% had positive bacterial cultures. The most common isolates were E. coli (57.4 %), K. pneumoniae (9.7 %), S. aureus (5.8%) and A. baumannii (2.2%). Most isolates showed high resistance against ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, nalidixic acid, tobramycin and nitrofurantoin. Klebsiella isolates showed more resistance against tested antibiotics than E. coli isolates.

  19. Genetic Regulation of Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Carsten; Kary, Stefani C; Schauer, Kristina; Cameron, Andrew D S

    2016-12-28

    Multidrug resistant microorganisms are forecast to become the single biggest challenge to medical care in the 21st century. Over the last decades, members of the genus Acinetobacter have emerged as bacterial opportunistic pathogens, in particular as challenging nosocomial pathogens because of the rapid evolution of antimicrobial resistances. Although we lack fundamental biological insight into virulence mechanisms, an increasing number of researchers are working to identify virulence factors and to study antibiotic resistance. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the regulation of virulence genes and antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii. A survey of the two-component systems AdeRS, BaeSR, GacSA and PmrAB explains how each contributes to antibiotic resistance and virulence gene expression, while BfmRS regulates cell envelope structures important for pathogen persistence. A. baumannii uses the transcription factors Fur and Zur to sense iron or zinc depletion and upregulate genes for metal scavenging as a critical survival tool in an animal host. Quorum sensing, nucleoid-associated proteins, and non-classical transcription factors such as AtfA and small regulatory RNAs are discussed in the context of virulence and antibiotic resistance.

  20. Genetic Regulation of Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Carsten; Kary, Stefani C.; Schauer, Kristina; Cameron, Andrew D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant microorganisms are forecast to become the single biggest challenge to medical care in the 21st century. Over the last decades, members of the genus Acinetobacter have emerged as bacterial opportunistic pathogens, in particular as challenging nosocomial pathogens because of the rapid evolution of antimicrobial resistances. Although we lack fundamental biological insight into virulence mechanisms, an increasing number of researchers are working to identify virulence factors and to study antibiotic resistance. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the regulation of virulence genes and antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii. A survey of the two-component systems AdeRS, BaeSR, GacSA and PmrAB explains how each contributes to antibiotic resistance and virulence gene expression, while BfmRS regulates cell envelope structures important for pathogen persistence. A. baumannii uses the transcription factors Fur and Zur to sense iron or zinc depletion and upregulate genes for metal scavenging as a critical survival tool in an animal host. Quorum sensing, nucleoid-associated proteins, and non-classical transcription factors such as AtfA and small regulatory RNAs are discussed in the context of virulence and antibiotic resistance. PMID:28036056

  1. The Complex Relationship between Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Meredith; Brooks, Benjamin D.; Brooks, Amanda E.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, prompted by the overuse of antimicrobial agents, may arise from a variety of mechanisms, particularly horizontal gene transfer of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes, which is often facilitated by biofilm formation. The importance of phenotypic changes seen in a biofilm, which lead to genotypic alterations, cannot be overstated. Irrespective of if the biofilm is single microbe or polymicrobial, bacteria, protected within a biofilm from the external environment, communicate through signal transduction pathways (e.g., quorum sensing or two-component systems), leading to global changes in gene expression, enhancing virulence, and expediting the acquisition of antibiotic resistance. Thus, one must examine a genetic change in virulence and resistance not only in the context of the biofilm but also as inextricably linked pathologies. Observationally, it is clear that increased virulence and the advent of antibiotic resistance often arise almost simultaneously; however, their genetic connection has been relatively ignored. Although the complexities of genetic regulation in a multispecies community may obscure a causative relationship, uncovering key genetic interactions between virulence and resistance in biofilm bacteria is essential to identifying new druggable targets, ultimately providing a drug discovery and development pathway to improve treatment options for chronic and recurring infection. PMID:28106797

  2. Epidemiological interpretation of studies examining the effect of antibiotic usage on resistance.

    PubMed

    Schechner, Vered; Temkin, Elizabeth; Harbarth, Stephan; Carmeli, Yehuda; Schwaber, Mitchell J

    2013-04-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a growing clinical problem and public health threat. Antibiotic use is a known risk factor for the emergence of antibiotic resistance, but demonstrating the causal link between antibiotic use and resistance is challenging. This review describes different study designs for assessing the association between antibiotic use and resistance and discusses strengths and limitations of each. Approaches to measuring antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance are presented. Important methodological issues such as confounding, establishing temporality, and control group selection are examined.

  3. Epidemiological Interpretation of Studies Examining the Effect of Antibiotic Usage on Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schechner, Vered; Temkin, Elizabeth; Harbarth, Stephan; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a growing clinical problem and public health threat. Antibiotic use is a known risk factor for the emergence of antibiotic resistance, but demonstrating the causal link between antibiotic use and resistance is challenging. This review describes different study designs for assessing the association between antibiotic use and resistance and discusses strengths and limitations of each. Approaches to measuring antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance are presented. Important methodological issues such as confounding, establishing temporality, and control group selection are examined. PMID:23554418

  4. Antibiotic Resistance in Enterococcus faecalis Isolated from Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Balaei Gajan, Esrafil; Shirmohammadi, Adileh; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Mohammad; Sighari Deljavan, Alireza; Ahmadpour, Farzin

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Enterococci are Gram-positive cocci that often occur in pairs (diplococci) or short chains. Be-side developing high level of antibiotic resistance, these bacteria can cause wide range of disease in human, thus to help provide an effective treatment for infections caused by this genus, this study was conceived to provide information on Enterococcus faecalis Antibiotic resistance to widely used antibiotics in hospitalized patients. Materials and methods Disk diffusion agar and Broth dilution methods were used to perform Antibiogram test on isolated Enterococcus faecalis. Culture medium used for Disk diffusion agar test was Muller Hinton agar, and for Broth dilution methods, Muller Hinton broth culture medium was utilized. In disk diffusion agar method, different commercial antibiotics disks produced by Pharmaceutical companies were used. Microsoft Excel software was used to perform statistical analysis. Results Based on antibiograms of 105 cases, a high resistance to Synercid, Nalidixic acid, Oxacillin and Teofilin was de-tected whereas the lowest resistance observed in Nitrofurantoin, Vancomycin, Linezolid and Teicoplanin antibiotics. Conclusion According to the results, Teicoplanin, Vancomycin, Linezolid and Nitrofurantoin are recommended against E. faecalis species. PMID:23875089

  5. Nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii Infections and Changing Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Necati Hakyemez, Ismail; Kucukbayrak, Abdulkadir; Tas, Tekin; Burcu Yikilgan, Aslihan; Akkaya, Akcan; Yasayacak, Aliye; Akdeniz, Hayrettin

    2013-09-01

    In the intensive care setting, Acinetobacter baumannii causes ventilator-associated pneumonia and other nosocomial infections that are difficult to treat. Objective of this study was to investigate nosocomial A. baumannii infections and its changing antibiotic resistance. A total of 56 patients diagnosed with A.baumannii infections between January 2009 and December 2011 were included in the study. Diagnosis for nosocomial infections was established according to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) criteria. Identification of the agents isolated was carried out using conventional methods and VITEK 2 automated system, while antibiotic sensitivity testing was performed through VITEK 2 AST-N090 automated system. The most common infection was nosocomial pneumonia by 43%, among which 46% were ventilator-associated pneumonia. Considering all years, the most effective antibiotics on the isolated strains were found as colistin, tigecycline, imipenem and meropenem. However resistance to imipenem and meropenem was observed to increase over years. The issue of increased resistance to antibiotics poses difficulty in treatment of A. baumannii infections which in turn increases the rate of mortality and cost. In order to prevent development of resistance, antibiotics must be used in an appropriate way in accompanied with proper guidance.

  6. Enhancement of antibiotic activity by efflux inhibitors against multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Tatiane; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Maschmann, Raquel; Ramos, Daniela; von Groll, Andrea; Rossetti, Maria L.; Silva, Pedro A.; Viveiros, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis continues to increase and new approaches for its treatment are necessary. The identification of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates presenting efflux as part of their resistant phenotype has a major impact in tuberculosis treatment. In this work, we used a checkerboard procedure combined with the tetrazolium microplate-based assay (TEMA) to study single combinations between antituberculosis drugs and efflux inhibitors (EIs) against multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates using the fully susceptible strain H37Rv as reference. Efflux activity was studied on a real-time basis by a fluorometric method that uses ethidium bromide as efflux substrate. Quantification of efflux pump genes mRNA transcriptional levels were performed by RT-qPCR. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC) indicated synergistic activity for the interactions between isoniazid, rifampicin, amikacin, ofloxacin, and ethidium bromide plus the EIs verapamil, thioridazine and chlorpromazine. The FICs ranged from 0.25, indicating a four-fold reduction on the MICs, to 0.015, 64-fold reduction. The detection of active efflux by real-time fluorometry showed that all strains presented intrinsic efflux activity that contributes to the overall resistance which can be inhibited in the presence of the EIs. The quantification of the mRNA levels of the most important efflux pump genes on these strains shows that they are intrinsically predisposed to expel toxic compounds as the exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were not necessary to increase the pump mRNA levels when compared with the non-exposed counterpart. The results obtained in this study confirm that the intrinsic efflux activity contributes to the overall resistance in multidrug resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and that the inhibition of efflux pumps by the EIs can enhance the clinical effect of antibiotics that are their substrates. PMID:25972842

  7. Enhancement of antibiotic activity by efflux inhibitors against multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Tatiane; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Maschmann, Raquel; Ramos, Daniela; von Groll, Andrea; Rossetti, Maria L; Silva, Pedro A; Viveiros, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis continues to increase and new approaches for its treatment are necessary. The identification of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates presenting efflux as part of their resistant phenotype has a major impact in tuberculosis treatment. In this work, we used a checkerboard procedure combined with the tetrazolium microplate-based assay (TEMA) to study single combinations between antituberculosis drugs and efflux inhibitors (EIs) against multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates using the fully susceptible strain H37Rv as reference. Efflux activity was studied on a real-time basis by a fluorometric method that uses ethidium bromide as efflux substrate. Quantification of efflux pump genes mRNA transcriptional levels were performed by RT-qPCR. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC) indicated synergistic activity for the interactions between isoniazid, rifampicin, amikacin, ofloxacin, and ethidium bromide plus the EIs verapamil, thioridazine and chlorpromazine. The FICs ranged from 0.25, indicating a four-fold reduction on the MICs, to 0.015, 64-fold reduction. The detection of active efflux by real-time fluorometry showed that all strains presented intrinsic efflux activity that contributes to the overall resistance which can be inhibited in the presence of the EIs. The quantification of the mRNA levels of the most important efflux pump genes on these strains shows that they are intrinsically predisposed to expel toxic compounds as the exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were not necessary to increase the pump mRNA levels when compared with the non-exposed counterpart. The results obtained in this study confirm that the intrinsic efflux activity contributes to the overall resistance in multidrug resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and that the inhibition of efflux pumps by the EIs can enhance the clinical effect of antibiotics that are their substrates.

  8. Molecular basis of NDM-1, a new antibiotic resistance determinant.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhongjie; Li, Lianchun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Limin; Kong, Xiangqian; Hong, Yao; Lan, Lefu; Zheng, Mingyue; Guang-Yang, Cai; Liu, Hong; Shen, Xu; Luo, Cheng; Li, Keqin Kathy; Chen, Kaixian; Jiang, Hualiang

    2011-01-01

    The New Delhi Metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) was first reported in 2009 in a Swedish patient. A recent study reported that Klebsiella pneumonia NDM-1 positive strain or Escherichia coli NDM-1 positive strain was highly resistant to all antibiotics tested except tigecycline and colistin. These can no longer be relied on to treat infections and therefore, NDM-1 now becomes potentially a major global health threat.In this study, we performed modeling studies to obtain its 3D structure and NDM-1/antibiotics complex. It revealed that the hydrolytic mechanisms are highly conserved. In addition, the detailed analysis indicates that the more flexible and hydrophobic loop1, together with the evolution of more positive-charged loop2 leads to NDM-1 positive strain more potent and extensive in antibiotics resistance compared with other MBLs. Furthermore, through biological experiments, we revealed the molecular basis for antibiotics catalysis of NDM-1 on the enzymatic level. We found that NDM-1 enzyme was highly potent to degrade carbapenem antibiotics, while mostly susceptible to tigecycline, which had the ability to slow down the hydrolysis velocity of meropenem by NDM-1. Meanwhile, the mutagenesis experiments, including D124A, C208A, K211A and K211E, which displayed down-regulation on meropenem catalysis, proved the accuracy of our model.At present, there are no effective antibiotics against NDM-1 positive pathogen. Our study will provide clues to investigate the molecular basis of extended antibiotics resistance of NDM-1 and then accelerate the search for new antibiotics against NDM-1 positive strain in clinical studies.

  9. Contribution of phenotypic heterogeneity to adaptive antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Romero, María Antonia; Casadesús, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica were selected on plates containing lethal concentrations of rifampicin, kanamycin, and nalidixic acid. The stability of the resistance phenotype was scored after nonselective growth. Rifampicin-resistant (Rifr) isolates were stable, suggesting that they had arisen by mutation. Mutations in the rpoB gene were detected indeed in Rifr mutants. In contrast, a fraction of kanamycin-resistant (Kmr) and nalidixic acid-resistant (Nalr) isolates showed reduced resistance after nonselective growth, suggesting that mechanisms other than mutation had contributed to bacterial survival upon lethal selection. Single-cell analysis revealed heterogeneity in expression of the porin gene ompC, and subpopulation separation provided evidence that reduced ompC expression confers adaptive resistance to kanamycin. In the case of Nalr isolates, mutations in the gyrA gene were present in most nalidixic acid-resistant isolates. However, the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide (PAβN) reduced the level of resistance in Nalr mutants, indicating that active efflux contributes to the overall level of nalidixic acid resistance. Heterogeneous efflux pump activity was detected in single cells and colonies, and a correlation between high efflux and increased resistance to nalidixic acid was found. These observations suggest that fluctuations in the expression and the activity of critical functions of the bacterial cell, alone or combined with mutations, can contribute to adaptive resistance to antibiotics. PMID:24351930

  10. Contribution of phenotypic heterogeneity to adaptive antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Romero, María Antonia; Casadesús, Josep

    2014-01-07

    Antibiotic-resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica were selected on plates containing lethal concentrations of rifampicin, kanamycin, and nalidixic acid. The stability of the resistance phenotype was scored after nonselective growth. Rifampicin-resistant (Rif(r)) isolates were stable, suggesting that they had arisen by mutation. Mutations in the rpoB gene were detected indeed in Rif(r) mutants. In contrast, a fraction of kanamycin-resistant (Km(r)) and nalidixic acid-resistant (Nal(r)) isolates showed reduced resistance after nonselective growth, suggesting that mechanisms other than mutation had contributed to bacterial survival upon lethal selection. Single-cell analysis revealed heterogeneity in expression of the porin gene ompC, and subpopulation separation provided evidence that reduced ompC expression confers adaptive resistance to kanamycin. In the case of Nal(r) isolates, mutations in the gyrA gene were present in most nalidixic acid-resistant isolates. However, the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide (PAβN) reduced the level of resistance in Nal(r) mutants, indicating that active efflux contributes to the overall level of nalidixic acid resistance. Heterogeneous efflux pump activity was detected in single cells and colonies, and a correlation between high efflux and increased resistance to nalidixic acid was found. These observations suggest that fluctuations in the expression and the activity of critical functions of the bacterial cell, alone or combined with mutations, can contribute to adaptive resistance to antibiotics.

  11. Toward a quantitative understanding of antibiotic resistance evolution.

    PubMed

    Lukačišinová, Marta; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2017-03-11

    The rising prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria is an increasingly serious public health challenge. To address this problem, recent work ranging from clinical studies to theoretical modeling has provided valuable insights into the mechanisms of resistance, its emergence and spread, and ways to counteract it. A deeper understanding of the underlying dynamics of resistance evolution will require a combination of experimental and theoretical expertise from different disciplines and new technology for studying evolution in the laboratory. Here, we review recent advances in the quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and evolution of antibiotic resistance. We focus on key theoretical concepts and new technology that enables well-controlled experiments. We further highlight key challenges that can be met in the near future to ultimately develop effective strategies for combating resistance.

  12. Bacteriophage therapy: a potential solution for the antibiotic resistance crisis.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Zhabiz; Bagasra, Omar; Pace, Donald Gene

    2014-02-13

    The emergence of multiple drug-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional antimicrobials. One of the possible replacement options for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. Phage therapy is an important alternative to antibiotics in the current era of drug-resistant pathogens. Bacteriophages have played an important role in the expansion of molecular biology and have been used as antibacterial agents since 1966. In this review, we describe a brief history of bacteriophages and clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophages as therapeutic agents in this regard.

  13. Consolidating and Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Gene Data Resources

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Basil Britto; Das, Anupam J.; Cochrane, Guy; De Ganck, Sandra; Kumar-Singh, Samir; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Goossens, Herman

    2016-01-01

    The unrestricted use of antibiotics has resulted in rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance (AR) and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies and their application in understanding MDR pathogen dynamics, it has become imperative to unify AR gene data resources for easy accessibility for researchers. However, due to the absence of a centralized platform for AR gene resources, availability, consistency, and accuracy of information vary considerably across different databases. In this article, we explore existing AR gene data resources in order to make them more visible to the clinical microbiology community, to identify their limitations, and to propose potential solutions. PMID:26818666

  14. Addressing Antibiotic Resistance Requires Robust International Accountability Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Steven J; Ottersen, Trygve

    2015-01-01

    A proposed international agreement on antibiotic resistance will depend on robust accountability mechanisms for real-world impact. This article examines the central aspects of accountability relationships in international agreements and lays out ways to strengthen them. We provide a menu of accountability mechanisms that facilitate transparency, oversight, complaint, and enforcement, describe how these mechanisms can promote compliance, and identify key considerations for a proposed international agreement on antibiotic resistance. These insights can be useful for bringing about the revolutionary changes that new international agreements aspire to achieve. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  15. Assessment of antibiotic resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae exposed to sequential in vitro antibiotic treatments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongjin; Jo, Ara; Chukeatirote, Ekachai; Ahn, Juhee

    2016-12-09

    Bacteria treated with different classes of antibiotics exhibit changes in susceptibility to successive antibiotic treatments. This study was designed to evaluate the influence of sequential antibiotic treatments on the development of antibiotic resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae associated with β-lactamase and efflux pump activities. The antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase activity, and efflux activity were determined in K. pneumoniae grown at 37 °C by adding initial (0 h) and second antibiotics (8 or 12 h). Treatments include control (CON; no first and second antibiotic addition), no initial antibiotic addition followed by 1 MIC ciprofloxacin addition (CON-CIP), no initial antibiotic addition followed by 1 MIC meropenem addition (CON-MER), initial 1/4 MIC ciprofloxacin addition followed by no antibiotic addition (1/4CIP-CON), initial 1/4 MIC ciprofloxacin addition followed by 1 MIC ciprofloxacin addition (1/4CIP-CIP), and initial 1/4 MIC ciprofloxacin addition followed by 1 MIC meropenem addition (1/4CIP-MER). Compared to the CON, the initial addition of 1/4 MIC ciprofloxacin inhibited the growth of K. pneumoniae throughout the incubation period. The ciprofloxacin treatments (CON-CIP and 1/4CIP-CIP) showed significant reduction in the number of K. pneumoniae cells compared to meropenem (CON-MER and 1/4CIP-MER). The 1/4CIP-CIP achieved a further 1 log reduction of K. pneumoniae, when compared to the 1/4CIP-CON and 1/CIP-MER. The increase in sensitivity of K. pneumoniae to cefotaxime, kanamycin, levofloxacin, nalidixic acid was observed for CON-CIP. Noticeable cross-resistance pattern was observed at the 1/4CIP-CIP, showing the increased resistance of K. pneumoniae to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, levofloxacin, nalidixic acid norfloxacin, sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, and tetracycline. The levels of β-lactamase activities were estimated to be 8.4 μmol/min/ml for CON, 7.7 μmol/min/ml for 1/4CIP-CON and as low as 2.9 μmol/min/ml for CON

  16. Sensitivity and resistance of Legionella pneumophila to some antibiotics and combinations of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moffie, B G; Mouton, R P

    1988-10-01

    For the treatment of Legionella pneumophila infections erythromycin and rifampicin are the antibiotics of choice. In view of reported therapy failures other antibiotics, e.g. the quinolones, are currently under investigation. The sensitivity of L. pneumophila to four antibiotics and to combinations of antibiotics was investigated and the rate of mutations was calculated. For 20 L. pneumophila strains we determined the MIC of rifampicin (0.002-0.004 mg/l), erythromycin (0.063-0.125 mg/l), norfloxacin (0.125 mg/l) and ciprofloxacin (0.016-0.032 mg/l). Mutation rates ranged from 1 x 10(-8) for ciprofloxacin to greater than 1 x 10(-7) for erythromycin, resulting in high-level resistance to rifampicin in most strains and erythromycin resistance in one strain, but not in resistance to the quinolones. The combination of erythromycin and rifampicin was synergistic (FIC index less than 0.5) against four of the L. pneumophila strains and showed indifference (FIC index 0.5-2.0) for the remainder (mean FIC index 0.79). Combinations of ciprofloxacin and erythromycin and of rifampicin and ciprofloxacin showed only indifference (mean FIC index respectively 1.05 and 1.21). Combining rifampicin with ciprofloxacin was not effective in reducing the number of mutants for either of these antibiotics, whereas the other combinations did prevent this.

  17. Primary Antibiotic Resistance of Helicobacter pylori in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Zhu, Yin; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is the most important factor leading to the failure of eradication regimens; thus, it is important to obtain regional antibiotic resistance information. This review focuses on the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and furazolidone in China. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biomedical databases from the earliest date of each database to October 2016. The search terms included the following: H. pylori, antibiotic (including clarithromycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and furazolidone) resistance with or without China or different regions of China. The data analysis was performed using MedCalc 15.2.2. Each article was weighted according to the number of isolated H. pylori strains. A pooled proportion analysis was performed. Twenty-three studies (14 studies in English and 9 in Chinese) were included in this review. A total of 6274, 6418, 3921, 5468, 2802, and 275 H. pylori strains were included in this review to evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone, respectively. Overall, the primary resistance rates of clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were 28.9, 63.8, 28.0, 3.1, 3.9, and 1.7%, respectively. In China, the prevalence of H. pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin was high and increased over time, whereas the resistance rates to amoxicillin, tetracycline, and furazolidone were low and stable over time.

  18. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance: Are We Born with It? ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Kinkelaar, Daniel; Huang, Ying; Li, Yingli; Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Hua H.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance (AR) is a major public health concern. Recent findings on the prevalence of food-borne antibiotic-resistant (ART) com