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Sample records for intrinsic asymmetry parameter

  1. Asymmetry parameter of peaked Fano line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierott, S.; Hotz, T.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.

    2016-10-01

    The spectroscopic line shape of electronic and vibrational excitations is ubiquitously described by a Fano profile. In the case of nearly symmetric and peaked Fano line shapes, the fit of the conventional Fano function to experimental data leads to difficulties in unambiguously extracting the asymmetry parameter, which may vary over orders of magnitude without degrading the quality of the fit. Moreover, the extracted asymmetry parameter depends on initially guessed values. Using the spectroscopic signature of the single-Co Kondo effect on Au(110) the ambiguity of the extracted asymmetry parameter is traced to the highly symmetric resonance profile combined with the inevitable scattering of experimental data. An improved parameterization of the conventional Fano function is suggested that enables the nonlinear optimization in a reduced parameter space. In addition, the presence of a global minimum in the sum of squared residuals and thus the independence of start parameters may conveniently be identified in a two-dimensional plot. An angular representation of the asymmetry parameter is suggested in order to reliably determine uncertainty margins via linear error propagation.

  2. Regulation of branching dynamics by axon-intrinsic asymmetries in Tyrosine Kinase Receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zschätzsch, Marlen; Oliva, Carlos; Langen, Marion; De Geest, Natalie; Özel, Mehmet Neset; Williamson, W Ryan; Lemon, William C; Soldano, Alessia; Munck, Sebastian; Hiesinger, P Robin; Sanchez-Soriano, Natalia; Hassan, Bassem A

    2014-01-01

    Axonal branching allows a neuron to connect to several targets, increasing neuronal circuit complexity. While axonal branching is well described, the mechanisms that control it remain largely unknown. We find that in the Drosophila CNS branches develop through a process of excessive growth followed by pruning. In vivo high-resolution live imaging of developing brains as well as loss and gain of function experiments show that activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is necessary for branch dynamics and the final branching pattern. Live imaging also reveals that intrinsic asymmetry in EGFR localization regulates the balance between dynamic and static filopodia. Elimination of signaling asymmetry by either loss or gain of EGFR function results in reduced dynamics leading to excessive branch formation. In summary, we propose that the dynamic process of axon branch development is mediated by differential local distribution of signaling receptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01699.001 PMID:24755286

  3. Impact parameter dependent potentials and transverse single spin asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhalholy, Tareq

    Using the Eikonal approximation, we study single spin azimuthal asymmetry in elastic and in-elastic lepton-nucleon scattering for the case of transversely polarized nucleons with unpolarized lepton beam. We follow two different approaches to evaluate the asymmetry. In the first approach we utilize the convolution theory of Fourier transforms to express the nucleon potential that appears in the Coulomb phase formula in terms of the nucleon's Dirac and Pauli form factors in the nucleon current density for transversely polarized nucleons. In the second approach, we explicitly evaluate the potential due to transversely polarized nucleons in impact parameter space. The result shows that this potential is asymmetric about an axis normal to the transverse plane; a result that is consistent with the fact that the nucleon charge density (or the unpolarized impact parameter dependent parton distribution function) is transversely distorted for transverse nucleon polarization, which is not the case for longitudinal polarization of the nucleon. To further confirm this fact, we calculate the average transverse momentum experienced by the scattered electron. This quantity is zero considering scattering from a classical dipole moment while our results show a non-zero average transverse momentum even for scattering from a neutron; there we get a negative value for the average momentum, and a positive one (and larger in magnitude) for the case of a proton. The sign of the average transverse momentum is directly related to the sign of the single spin asymmetry, where it is negative in the case of a neutron target and positive for a proton. The expansion of the Eikonal amplitude reveals that the asymmetry is due to the interference of the one and two photon exchange Eikonal amplitudes. In both of the above mentioned approaches, we evaluate the one and two photon exchange amplitudes, from which the asymmetry is found for different parametrizations of the form factors.

  4. The beta decay asymmetry parameter of /sup 35/Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, J.D.

    1987-11-01

    The beta decay asymmetry parameter for /sup 35/Ar = /sup 35/Cl + e/sup +/ + nu/sub e/ has been remeasured in order to resolve a long standing puzzle. Previous asymmetry measurements, when combined with the comparative half-life, yield a value for the vector coupling constant, G/sub v/, that is in serious disagreement with the accepted value. We produced polarized /sup 35/Ar by a (p,n) reaction on /sup 35/Cl using the polarized proton beam provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. The polarization of the /sup 35/Ar was determined by measuring the asymmetry of the positrons produced in /sup 35/Ar decay to the first excited state in /sup 35/Cl (branching ratio = 1.3%) in coincidence with a 1219.4 keV gamma ray. Our result, A/sub 0/ = 0.49 +- 0.10, combined with the comparative half-life yields a value for G/sub v/ in agreement with the accepted value.

  5. Direction dependence of cosmological parameters due to cosmic hemispherical asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Suvodip; Aluri, Pavan K.; Das, Santanu; Shaikh, Shabbir; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Persistent evidence for a cosmic hemispherical asymmetry in the temperature field of cosmic microwave background (CMB) as observed by both WMAP as well as PLANCK increases the possibility of its cosmological origin. Presence of this signal may lead to different values for the standard model cosmological parameters in different directions, and that can have significant implications for other studies where they are used. We investigate the effect of this cosmic hemispherical asymmetry on cosmological parameters using non-isotropic Gaussian random simulations injected with both scale dependent and scale independent modulation strengths. Our analysis shows that As and ns are the most susceptible parameters to acquire position dependence across the sky for the kind of isotropy breaking phenomena under study. As expected, we find maximum variation arises for the case of scale independent modulation of CMB anisotropies. We find that scale dependent modulation profile as seen in PLANCK data could lead to only 1.25σ deviation in As in comparison to its estimate from isotropic CMB sky.

  6. The crystal structure of yeast CCT reveals intrinsic asymmetry of eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonins

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Carien; Roe, S Mark; McCormack, Elizabeth A; Beuron, Fabienne; Pearl, Laurence H; Willison, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The cytosolic chaperonin CCT is a 1-MDa protein-folding machine essential for eukaryotic life. The CCT interactome shows involvement in folding and assembly of a small range of proteins linked to essential cellular processes such as cytoskeleton assembly and cell-cycle regulation. CCT has a classic chaperonin architecture, with two heterogeneous 8-membered rings stacked back-to-back, enclosing a folding cavity. However, the mechanism by which CCT assists folding is distinct from other chaperonins, with no hydrophobic wall lining a potential Anfinsen cage, and a sequential rather than concerted ATP hydrolysis mechanism. We have solved the crystal structure of yeast CCT in complex with actin at 3.8 Å resolution, revealing the subunit organisation and the location of discrete patches of co-evolving ‘signature residues' that mediate specific interactions between CCT and its substrates. The intrinsic asymmetry is revealed by the structural individuality of the CCT subunits, which display unique configurations, substrate binding properties, ATP-binding heterogeneity and subunit–subunit interactions. The location of the evolutionarily conserved N-terminus of Cct5 on the outside of the barrel, confirmed by mutational studies, is unique to eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonins. PMID:21701561

  7. Relationship between the fraction of backscattered light and the asymmetry parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Helmuth

    2015-04-01

    The fraction of backscattered light is defined as the ratio of the integral of the volume scattering function over the backward half solid angle divided by the integral of the volume scattering function over the full solid angle. It can be measured with an integrating nephelometer. On the other hand the asymmetry parameter is the integral over the full solid angle of the volume scattering function weighted with the cosine of the scattering angle divided by the integral of the volume scattering function. To determine the asymmetry parameter the measurement of the angular dependence of the volume scattering function is needed, which can be obtained e.g. with a polar nephelometer. The asymmetry parameter is an important input parameter for radiative transfer calculations in order to obtain information of effects of the atmospheric aerosol effects (climate, screening, visibility, and others). Unfortunately measurements of the asymmetry parameter of the atmospheric aerosol are scarce. It is obvious, that a relation between the asymmetry parameter and the backscattered fraction should exist: the smaller the backscattered fraction, the more asymmetric the scattering, thus the larger the asymmetry parameter. A large set of 6500 angular scattering data have been obtained at various locations of the world: Vienna (Austria), Kyoto (Japan), Granada (Spain) and Palencia (Spain). The aerosols in these locations were considerably different, ranging from continental, urban, maritime, to desert dust. The volume scattering function has been measured between 5° and 175° , the values for 0° to 5° and 175° to 180° have been obtained by extrapolation of the shape of the curve, thus the whole range of scattering angles was available for calculating the backscattered fraction and the asymmetry parameter of the aerosol. PIC A summary of all data is shown in figure 1. The majority of the data points suggest an unanimous relation between backscattering and asymmetry parameter. The

  8. Conflict between Intrinsic Leaf Asymmetry and Phyllotaxis in the Resupinate Leaves of Alstroemeria psittacina

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, Daniel H.; Naylor, Daniel T.; Thammapichai, Paradee; Weeger, Axelle C. S.; Headland, Lauren R.; Sinha, Neelima R.

    2012-01-01

    Spiral phyllotactic patterning is the result of intricate auxin transport relationships in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) that act to place auxin maxima at the future sites of leaf initiation. Inherent to this process is a bias in auxin distribution in leaf primordia, such that increased auxin is found on the descending side of the leaf (toward the older neighbor) compared to the ascending side (toward the younger neighbor), creating phyllotactically dependent leaf asymmetry. Separate from phyllotactic-dependent asymmetry is handedness in plants – that is, genetically encoded, fixed chirality, such as the twining of certain vines and the torsions induced by microtubule mutations. Here, we perform a morphometric analysis on the resupinate leaves of Alstroemeria psittacina. Interestingly, the twist in leaves always occurs in a single direction, regardless of the phyllotactic direction of the plant. Because of the resupination, leaves in this species possess an inherent handedness. However, this asymmetry is modulated in a phyllotactic-dependent manner, consistent with the known developmental constraints of phyllotaxis upon leaf morphology. This creates the interesting circumstance in A. psittacina that leaves arising from plants with a counter-clockwise phyllotactic direction are (1) more asymmetric, (2) larger, and (3) possess symmetrical shape differences relative to leaves from plants with clockwise phyllotaxis. The mechanism underlying these differences likely involves a developmental delay in clockwise leaves caused by the conflict between the phyllotaxis-dependent asymmetry and asymmetry resulting from resupination. The evolutionary implications of a dimorphic population without a genetic basis for selection to act upon are discussed. PMID:22908025

  9. Genuine T, CP, CPT asymmetry parameters for the entangled B d system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Botella, Francisco J.; Nebot, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The precise connection between the theoretical T, CP, CPT asymmetries, in terms of transition probabilities between the filtered neutral meson B d states, and the experimental asymmetries, in terms of the double decay rate intensities for Flavour-CP eigenstate decay products in a B-factory of entangled states, is established. This allows the identification of genuine Asymmetry Parameters in the time distribution of the asymmetries and their measurability by disentangling genuine and possible fake terms. We express the nine asymmetry parameters — three different observables for each one of the three symmetries — in terms of the ingredients of the Weisskopf-Wigner dynamical description of the entangled B d -meson states and we obtain a global fit to their values from the BaBar collaboration experimental results. The possible fake terms are all compatible with zero and the information content of the nine asymmetry parameters is indeed different. The non-vanishing [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] are impressive separate direct evidence of Time-Reversal-violation and CP-violation in these transitions and compatible with Standard Model expectations. An intriguing 2 σ effect for the Re( θ) parameter responsible of CPT-violation appears which, interpreted as an upper limit, leads to |{M}_{{overline{B}}^0{overline{B}}^0}-{M}_B{{{}{^0}}_B}{^0}|<4.0× 1{0}^{-5} eV at 95% C.L. for the diagonal flavour terms of the mass matrix. It contributes to the CP-violating [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] asymmetry parameter in an unorthodox manner — in its cos(Δ M t) time dependence —, and it is accessible in facilities with non-entangled B d 's, like the LHCb experiment.

  10. Ensemble Calculation for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Using NMR Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kragelj, Jaka; Blackledge, Martin; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) perform their function despite their lack of well-defined tertiary structure. Residual structure has been observed in IDPs, commonly described as transient/dynamic or expressed in terms of fractional populations. In order to understand how the protein primary sequence dictates the dynamic and structural properties of IDPs and in general to understand how IDPs function, atomic-level descriptions are needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides information about local and long-range structure in IDPs at amino acid specific resolution and can be used in combination with ensemble descriptions to represent the dynamic nature of IDPs. In this chapter we describe sample-and-select approaches for ensemble modelling of local structural propensities in IDPs with specific emphasis on validation of these ensembles. PMID:26387101

  11. False asymmetry, pseudosymmetry, disorder, polymorphism and atomic displacement parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Giuseppe M.; Punzo, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    Two similar sugars, with chemical formulas differing only by the presence of a methyl group connected to the molecule backbones in different positions, crystallize in the monoclinic P21 space group giving rise to Z‧ = 2 structures. They both bear an azide side chain which is the principal responsible for the lack of a higher symmetry for one compound only. We analyzed their most relevant features by means of X-ray single crystal diffraction coupled with a quantitative estimation of their potential tendency to crystallize in a different space group with higher symmetry. The latter tendency of the most promising of the two compounds is commented in the light of the anisotropic behaviour of the atomic displacement parameters.

  12. Pion cloud and sea quark flavor asymmetry in the impact parameter representation

    SciTech Connect

    Strikman, Mark; Weiss, Christian

    2008-07-01

    We study large-distance contributions to the nucleon parton densities in the transverse coordinate (impact parameter) representation based on generalized parton distributions (GPDs). Chiral dynamics generates a distinct component of the partonic structure, located at momentum fractions x ~< M_pi / M_N and transverse distances b ~ 1/M_pi. We analyze the phenomenological "pion cloud" model of the flavor asymmetry dbar(x) - ubar(x) and quantify what fraction of the calculated asymmetry results from the universal large-distance region. Our findings indicate that a two-component picture of the nucleon's partonic structure -- a "core" antiquark distribution at b < b_core ~ 0.55 fm which vanishes at x -> 0, and the universal large-distance pion cloud at b > b_core -- could naturally account for the x-dependence of the measured asymmetry.

  13. Modeling and Extraction of Parasitic Thermal Conductance and Intrinsic Model Parameters of Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Minseob; Park, Hyunbin; Kim, Shiho

    2015-11-01

    We have presented both modeling and a method for extracting parasitic thermal conductance as well as intrinsic device parameters of a thermoelectric module based on information readily available in vendor datasheets. An equivalent circuit model that is compatible with circuit simulators is derived, followed by a methodology for extracting both intrinsic and parasitic model parameters. For the first time, the effective thermal resistance of the ceramic and copper interconnect layers of the thermoelectric module is extracted using only parameters listed in vendor datasheets. In the experimental condition, including under condition of varying electric current, the parameters extracted from the model accurately reproduce the performance of commercial thermoelectric modules.

  14. Critical parameters of unrestricted primitive model electrolytes with charge asymmetries up to 10:1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Daniel W.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2003-10-01

    The phase behavior of charge- and size-asymmetric primitive model electrolytes has been investigated using reservoir grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations rely on the insertion and removal of neutral ion clusters from a reservoir of possible configurations. We first validated our approach by investigating the effect of Rc, the maximum allowable distance between the central cation and its associated anions, on the critical parameters of 2:1 and 3:1 electrolytes. We have shown that the effect of Rc is weak and does not change the qualitative dependence of the critical parameters on size and charge asymmetry. The critical temperature for 2:1 and 3:1 electrolytes shows a maximum at Rc≈3, while the critical volume fraction decreases more or less monotonically, consistent with previous results for 1:1 electrolytes by Romero-Enrique et al. [Phys. Rev. E 66, 041204 (2002)]. We have used the reservoir method to obtain the critical parameters for 5:1 and 10:1 electrolytes. The critical temperature decreases with increasing charge asymmetry and shows a maximum as a function of δ, the size asymmetry parameter. The critical volume fraction however, defined as the volume occupied by ions divided by the total volume of the simulation box, increases with increasing charge asymmetry and exhibits a minimum as a function of δ. This trend is contrary to what is generally predicted by theories, although more recent approaches based on the Debye-Hückel theory reproduce this observed trend. Our results deviate somewhat from the predictions of Linse [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 359, 853 (2001)] for the scaling of the critical temperature for a system of macroions with point counterions.

  15. Fano interference at the excitation of coherent phonons: Relation between the asymmetry parameter and the initial phase of coherent oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Misochko, O. V. Lebedev, M. V.

    2015-04-15

    The theoretical assertion that the Fano asymmetry parameter and the asymptotic initial phase of a harmonic oscillator interacting with a continuum are interrelated is experimentally verified. By an example of coherent fully symmetric A{sub 1g} phonons in bismuth that are excited by ultrashort laser pulses at liquid helium temperature, it is demonstrated that, for negative values of the asymmetry parameter, the asymptotic phase increases as the modulus of the parameter decreases.

  16. Intrinsic parameters of periodic waves observed in the OI6300 over Brazilian equatorial region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Amauri; Buriti, Ricardo; Paulino, Igo; Meriwether, John; Takahashi, Hisao; Maranhão, Glelson

    2016-07-01

    Using two Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) deployed at São João do Cariri (36.5oW, 7.4oS) and Cajazeiras (38.6oW and 6.9oS ) and an all sky imager installed at São João do Cariri, the intrinsic parameters of 23 periodic waves, observed in the OI630.0 nm airglow layer, were estimated and studied. The observed horizontal parameters of these waves were estimated using two-dimensional Fourier analysis. In order to estimate the intrinsic parameters, simultaneous horizontal winds measurements performed by the FPI were used. The results show that the observed parameters of the waves were quite similar to the previous observation, indicating the sources of these waves are not changing along the time. The horizontal wavelengths were mostly found between 90 and 180 km, intrinsic periods ranged from 12 to 36 min and horizontal intrinsic phase speed from 50 to 200 ms-1. Furthermore, the wind was blowing almost perpendicular to the propagation direction of these waves, suggesting that the wind is as important factor to the filtering process of these waves in the lower thermosphere.

  17. Intrinsic parameter determination of a paracatadioptric camera by the intersection of two sphere projections.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Wang, Yalin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a linear calibration method is proposed for a paracatadioptric camera using the images of two spheres. Two spheres are selected in space, and the two groups of their projection circles on the unit viewing sphere are made to intersect at four points. The quadrilateral consisting of four points is a rectangle, so a group of orthogonal directions can be determined in space to obtain a group of orthogonal vanishing points in the paracatadioptric image plane. Because of the relationship between orthogonal vanishing points and intrinsic camera parameters, the intrinsic parameters of a paracatadioptric camera can be linearly solved by at least five views satisfying the above conditions. First, one estimates the sphere images and their antipodal sphere images. Second, by solving the intersection of the images of two spheres and the intersection of the images of their antipodal spheres, a group of orthogonal vanishing points can be obtained in the image plane. Finally, by taking the relationship between the orthogonal vanishing points and the intrinsic camera parameters as constraint conditions, the intrinsic parameters of the paracatadioptric camera can be obtained. Simulation results and real image data demonstrate the effectiveness of our new algorithms.

  18. Study of the decay asymmetry parameter and CP violation parameter in the Lambda(c)+ ---> Lambda pi+ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-09-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, we present a new measurement of the weak decay-asymmetry parameter a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} in {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup +} decay. Comparing particle with antiparticle decays, we obtain the first measurement of the CP violation parameter {Alpha} {triple_bond} a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} + a{sub {ovr {Lambda}{sub c}}}/a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} - a{sub {ovr {Lambda}{sub c}}}. We obtain a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.13 and {Alpha} = -0.07 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.12 where errors are statistical and systematic.

  19. Single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, apparent refractive index, and apparent soot content of dry atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Hänel, G

    1988-06-01

    Mean shortwave values of the single scattering albedo and the asymmetry parameter of dry atmospheric particles have been measured photometrically. From the single scattering albedo the mean shortwave value of the apparent complex refractive index and the apparent volume fraction of soot within the particulate matter are derived. From 275 measurements the mean value of the single scattering albedo is 0.835, the mean value of the apparent complex refractive index is 1.51-0.026i, and the mean value of the apparent volume fraction of soot is 5.8%. For seventy-seven cases of mostly urban particles the mean value of the asymmetry parameter is 0.39. The term apparent stands for appearing (but not necessarily) real or true. Reasons for this attribute are the idealizations necessary to get a value of the refractive index of atmospheric particles. Consequently the use of an apparent refractive index for modeling purposes is restricted as described in the concluding section.

  20. Simultaneous intrinsic and extrinsic parameter identification of a hand-mounted laser-vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Kwang; Kim, Kiho; Lee, Yongseok; Jeong, Taikyeong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a simultaneous intrinsic and extrinsic parameter identification of a hand-mounted laser-vision sensor (HMLVS). A laser-vision sensor (LVS), consisting of a camera and a laser stripe projector, is used as a sensor component of the robotic measurement system, and it measures the range data with respect to the robot base frame using the robot forward kinematics and the optical triangulation principle. For the optimal estimation of the model parameters, we applied two optimization techniques: a nonlinear least square optimizer and a particle swarm optimizer. Best-fit parameters, including both the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the HMLVS, are simultaneously obtained based on the least-squares criterion. From the simulation and experimental results, it is shown that the parameter identification problem considered was characterized by a highly multimodal landscape; thus, the global optimization technique such as a particle swarm optimization can be a promising tool to identify the model parameters for a HMLVS, while the nonlinear least square optimizer often failed to find an optimal solution even when the initial candidate solutions were selected close to the true optimum. The proposed optimization method does not require good initial guesses of the system parameters to converge at a very stable solution and it could be applied to a kinematically dissimilar robot system without loss of generality. PMID:22164104

  1. Simultaneous Intrinsic and Extrinsic Parameter Identification of a Hand-Mounted Laser-Vision Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Kwang; Kim, Kiho; Lee, Yongseok; Jeong, Taikyeong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a simultaneous intrinsic and extrinsic parameter identification of a hand-mounted laser-vision sensor (HMLVS). A laser-vision sensor (LVS), consisting of a camera and a laser stripe projector, is used as a sensor component of the robotic measurement system, and it measures the range data with respect to the robot base frame using the robot forward kinematics and the optical triangulation principle. For the optimal estimation of the model parameters, we applied two optimization techniques: a nonlinear least square optimizer and a particle swarm optimizer. Best-fit parameters, including both the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the HMLVS, are simultaneously obtained based on the least-squares criterion. From the simulation and experimental results, it is shown that the parameter identification problem considered was characterized by a highly multimodal landscape; thus, the global optimization technique such as a particle swarm optimization can be a promising tool to identify the model parameters for a HMLVS, while the nonlinear least square optimizer often failed to find an optimal solution even when the initial candidate solutions were selected close to the true optimum. The proposed optimization method does not require good initial guesses of the system parameters to converge at a very stable solution and it could be applied to a kinematically dissimilar robot system without loss of generality. PMID:22164104

  2. Hemispherical power asymmetry: parameter estimation from cosmic microwave background WMAP5 data

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, Bartosz

    2008-09-15

    We re-examine the evidence for hemispherical power asymmetry, detected in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe) data using a new method. We use a data filtering, preprocessing, and a statistical approach different from those used previously, and pursue an independent method of parameter estimation. First, we analyze the hemispherical variance ratios and compare these with simulated distributions. Secondly, working within a previously proposed CMB bipolar modulation model, we constrain model parameters: the amplitude and the orientation of the modulation field, as a function of various multipole bins. Finally, we select three ranges of multipoles leading to the most anomalous signals, and we process a hundred corresponding Gaussian random field (GRF) simulations, treated as observational data, to further test the statistical significance and robustness of the hemispherical power asymmetry. For our analysis we use the Internally Linearly Coadded (ILC) full sky map, and the KQ75 cut sky V channel foreground reduced map of the WMAP five-year data (V5). We constrain the modulation parameters using a generic maximum a posteriori method. In particular, we find differences in hemispherical power distribution, which when described in terms of a model with a bipolar modulation field, exclude the field amplitude value of the isotropic model, A = 0, at the confidence level of {approx}99.5% ({approx}99.4%) in the multipole range l element of [7,19] (l element of [7,79]) for the V5 data, and at the confidence level of {approx}99.9% in the multipole range l element of [7,39] for the ILC5 data, with best-fit (modal probability distribution function) values in these particular multipole ranges of A = 0.21 (A = 0.21) and A = 0.15 respectively. However, we also point out that similar or larger significances (in terms of rejecting the isotropic model) and large best-fit modulation amplitudes are obtained in GRF simulations as well, which

  3. CFHTLenS tomographic weak lensing cosmological parameter constraints: Mitigating the impact of intrinsic galaxy alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymans, Catherine; Grocutt, Emma; Heavens, Alan; Kilbinger, Martin; Kitching, Thomas D.; Simpson, Fergus; Benjamin, Jonathan; Erben, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Mellier, Yannick; Miller, Lance; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Brown, Michael L.; Coupon, Jean; Fu, Liping; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Hudson, Michael J.; Kuijken, Konrad; Rowe, Barnaby; Schrabback, Tim; Semboloni, Elisabetta; Vafaei, Sanaz; Velander, Malin

    2013-07-01

    We present a finely binned tomographic weak lensing analysis of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) mitigating contamination to the signal from the presence of intrinsic galaxy alignments via the simultaneous fit of a cosmological model and an intrinsic alignment model. CFHTLenS spans 154 square degrees in five optical bands, with accurate shear and photometric redshifts for a galaxy sample with a median redshift of zm = 0.70. We estimate the 21 sets of cosmic shear correlation functions associated with six redshift bins, each spanning the angular range of 1.5 < θ < 35 arcmin. We combine this CFHTLenS data with auxiliary cosmological probes: the cosmic microwave background with data from WMAP7, baryon acoustic oscillations with data from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and a prior on the Hubble constant from the Hubble Space Telescope distance ladder. This leads to constraints on the normalization of the matter power spectrum σ8 = 0.799 ± 0.015 and the matter density parameter Ωm = 0.271 ± 0.010 for a flat Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. For a flat wCDM cosmology, we constrain the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -1.02 ± 0.09. We also provide constraints for curved ΛCDM and wCDM cosmologies. We find the intrinsic alignment contamination to be galaxy-type dependent with a significant intrinsic alignment signal found for early-type galaxies, in contrast to the late-type galaxy sample for which the intrinsic alignment signal is found to be consistent with zero.

  4. Photoionization of He above the N =2 threshold. II. Angular distribution of photoelectrons and asymmetry parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, I.; Martin, F. )

    1992-04-01

    We report theoretical calculations for the {beta}{sub 2{ital p}}-asymmetry parameter in the photoionization of He(1{ital s}{sup 2}) above the {ital N}=2 ionization threshold. We use an extension of a method recently proposed (I. Sanchez and F. Martin, Phys. Rev. A 44, 7318 (1991)) that makes use of a Feshbach partitioning of the final-state wave function and an {ital L}{sup 2} representation of the coupled continuum states. Partial differential cross sections at emission angles 0{degree} and 90{degree} are also provided. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental data, thus showing the accuracy of the present method to study electron angular-distribution properties.

  5. Asymmetry parameter studies for systems containing the 35Cl nucleus from Zeeman NQR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, K. V.

    1995-02-01

    A review of Zeeman nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) work on systems containing the 35Cl nucleus is presented. In the case of the 35cl nucleus with spin I = {3}/{2}, owing to the existence of ± m degeneracy in the absence of a magnetic field (Kramer's degeneracy), there exists only one pure NQR frequency which is related to the two electric field gradient (EFG) parameters, η and e2qQ, by the formula, v = ( {e 2qQ }/{2h})(1 + ( {η 2}/{3})) {1}/{2}. Hence it is necessary to study the Zeeman effect to obtain both these parameters. Zeeman NQR studies have been carried out by many workers using single crystals and powder specimens, and these are discussed here. The computer simulation method for powder η values is also presented in this paper. The numerical computation program for an IBM 370-158 computer used to simulate the powder Zeeman spectrum is also discussed briefly. The paper also presents two-dimensional Zeeman NQR and Zeeman perturbed spin-echo envelope modulation (ZSEEM) studies on 35Cl systems. Very recently, two-dimensional NQR experiments based on the principle of nutation spectroscopy have been carried out with zero applied magnetic field on {3}/{2} spin nuclei. This method is also discussed in this review. The relationship between the asymmetry parameter (η) and bond properties is also discussed.

  6. Intrinsic viscosity and conformational parameters of xanthan in aqueous solutions: salt addition effect.

    PubMed

    Brunchi, Cristina-Eliza; Morariu, Simona; Bercea, Maria

    2014-10-01

    The intrinsic viscosity and conformational parameters of xanthan in aqueous solutions were investigated at 25°C as a function of salt nature (NaCl and KCl) and concentration (up to 3×10(-1)mol/L). The viscometric parameters were evaluated by applying semi-empirical equations proposed by Rao and Wolf. The results show that the new model proposed by Wolf provides accurate intrinsic viscosity values comparable with those obtained by using traditional methods. The experimental data were modeled with Boltzmann sigmoidal equation. The stiffness parameter, hydrodynamic volume and viscometric expansion factor were determined and discussed. With increasing salt concentration, the hydrodynamic volume and the viscometric expansion factor decrease and the critical overlap concentration increases, reaching limiting values above a given salt concentration. The high Huggins constant values suggest the existence of aggregates for salt concentrations above 5×10(-2) and 3×10(-3)mol/L for NaCl and KCl, respectively. Stiffness parameter was determined by Smidsrød and Haug method as being 5.45×10(-3), indicating a rigid conformation for xanthan macromolecules in solution.

  7. On the reliable measurement of specific absorption rates and intrinsic loss parameters in magnetic hyperthermia materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeboer, R. R.; Southern, P.; Pankhurst, Q. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the clinical application of magnetic hyperthermia, the heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field is used as a cancer treatment. The heating ability of the particles is quantified by the specific absorption rate (SAR), an extrinsic parameter based on the clinical response characteristic of power delivered per unit mass, and by the intrinsic loss parameter (ILP), an intrinsic parameter based on the heating capacity of the material. Even though both the SAR and ILP are widely used as comparative design parameters, they are almost always measured in non-adiabatic systems that make accurate measurements difficult. We present here the results of a systematic review of measurement methods for both SAR and ILP, leading to recommendations for a standardised, simple and reliable method for measurements using non-adiabatic systems. In a representative survey of 50 retrieved datasets taken from published papers, the derived SAR or ILP was found to be more than 5% overestimated in 24% of cases and more than 5% underestimated in 52% of cases.

  8. Determination of solubility parameters of ionic liquids and ionic liquid/solvent mixtures from intrinsic viscosity.

    PubMed

    Weerachanchai, Piyarat; Wong, Yuewen; Lim, Kok Hwa; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-11-10

    The total and partial solubility parameters (dispersion, polar and hydrogen-bonding solubility parameters) of ten ionic liquids were determined. Intrinsic viscosity approaches were used that encompassed a one-dimensional method (1D-Method), and two different three-dimensional methods (3D-Method1 and 3D-Method2). The effect of solvent type, the dimethylacetamide (DMA) fraction in the ionic liquid, and dissolution temperature on solubility parameters were also investigated. For all types of effect, both the 1D-Method and 3D-Method2 present the same trend in the total solubility parameter. The partial solubility parameters are influenced by the cation and anion of the ionic liquid. Considering the effect on partial solubility parameters of the solvent type in the ionic liquid, it was observed that in both 3D methods, the dispersion and polar parameters of a 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate/solvent (60:40 vol %) mixture tend to increase as the total solubility parameter of the solvent increases. PMID:25145759

  9. Opposite side jet charge tagging and measurement of CP asymmetry parameter $\\sin_{2\\beta}$ at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojian

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation describes the first CP asymmetry parameter sin(2β) measurement by the DO collaboration, sing the opposite side jet charge tagging algorithm in determining B-flavor. The time integrated measurement yields sin(2β) = 0.82 ± 1.80, and the time dependent measurement gives sin(2β) = 1.80 ± 1.15.

  10. Simultaneous calibration of the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of structured-light sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zexiao; Wang, Xiaomin; Chi, Shukai

    2014-07-01

    A novel approach for simultaneously calibrating the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of structured-light sensors is presented in this paper. A planar target etched with grid lines is adopted to generate calibration points. By intersecting the laser plane with the grid lines on the target some co-linear points are formed, and their 3-D coordinates are computed according to the rule of cross-ratio invariance. For obtaining non-colinear points in the laser plane, the sensor is located at several different positions by the moving of coordinate measuring machine (CMM). However, the co-linear points corresponding to different CMM positions locate at different coordinate frame. In order to establish conjugate pairs to calibrate the sensor, all of the generated points in the laser plane are transformed into the CMM machine coordinate frame. Then using the 3D points in this coordinate frame a 2D coordinate frame is established with determined direction vectors, i.e., the extrinsic parameters are calibrated. By transforming the 3D points in the CMM machine coordinate frame into the 2D coordinate frame, conjugate pairs for calibrating the intrinsic parameters are established. Experimental studies show that the planar target is simple, and it can be manufactured with high accuracy. The calibrating process is facilitating, and the calibration result possesses high accuracy.

  11. Consequences of Continuity: The Hunt for Intrinsic Properties within Parameters of Dynamics in Psychological Processes.

    PubMed

    Boker, Steven M

    2002-07-01

    A little over three hundred years ago Sir Isaac Newton wrote of a simple set of relations that could be used to predict the motions of objects relative to one another. The main advantage of this insight was that the relationship between the movements of the planets and stars could be predicted much more simply than with the accurate, but cumbersome Ptolemaic calculations. But perhaps the most important consequence of the acceptance of Newton's insight was that intrinsic properties such as mass could be distinguished from measurements such as weight. The success of Newtonian mechanics led directly to the widespread use of parameters such as force, relative speed, and momentum as a way of understanding the dynamics of moving objects. A similar revolution in thinking appears to be underway in the behavioral sciences. It is likely that intensive longitudinal measurement coupled with dynamical systems analyses will lead to simplified but powerful models of the evolution of psychological processes. In this case, it is reasonable to expect that a set of intrinsic psychological properties may be able to be extracted from the parameters of successful dynamical systems models. The purpose of this article is to issue an invitation to the hunt, to provide a tentative map as to where the game might likely be found, and blow a call on the hunting horn.

  12. Optimizing gravitational-wave searches for a population of coalescing binaries: Intrinsic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, T.; Veitch, J.

    2014-03-01

    We revisit the problem of searching for gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries in Gaussian colored noise. If the intrinsic parameters of a quasicircular, nonprecessing binary are known, then the optimal statistic for detecting the dominant mode signal in a single interferometer is given by the well-known two-phase matched filter. However, the matched filter signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is not in general an optimal statistic for an astrophysical population of signals, since their distribution over the intrinsic parameters will almost certainly not mirror that of noise events, which is determined by the (Fisher) information metric. Instead, the optimal statistic for a given astrophysical distribution will be the Bayes factor, which we approximate using the output of a standard template matched filter search. We then quantify the improvement in number of signals detected for various populations of nonspinning binaries: for a distribution of signals uniformly distributed in volume and with component masses distributed uniformly over the range 1≤m1,2/M⊙≤24, (m1+m2)/M⊙≤25 at fixed expected SNR, we find ≳20% more signals at a false alarm threshold of 10-6 Hz in a single detector. The method may easily be generalized to binaries with nonprecessing spins.

  13. Suction prevention and physiologic control of continuous flow left ventricular assist devices using intrinsic pump parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    The risk for left ventricular (LV) suction during left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) support has been a clinical concern. Current development efforts suggest LVAD suction prevention and physiologic control algorithms may require chronic implantation of pressure or flow sensors, which can be unreliable because of baseline drift and short lifespan. To overcome this limitation, we designed a sensorless suction prevention and physiologic control (eSPPC) algorithm that only requires LVAD intrinsic parameters (pump speed and power). Two gain-scheduled, proportional-integral controllers maintain a differential pump speed (ΔRPM) above a user-defined threshold to prevent LV suction while maintaining an average reference differential pressure (ΔP) between the LV and aorta. ΔRPM is calculated from noisy pump speed measurements that are low-pass filtered, and ΔP is estimated using an extended Kalman filter. Efficacy and robustness of the eSPPC algorithm were evaluated in silico during simulated rest and exercise test conditions for 1) excessive ΔP setpoint (ES); 2) rapid eightfold increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR); and 3) ES and PVR. Simulated hemodynamic waveforms (LV pressure and volume; aortic pressure and flow) using only intrinsic pump parameters showed the feasibility of our proposed eSPPC algorithm in preventing LV suction for all test conditions. PMID:25396276

  14. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  15. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  16. An effective technique for calibrating the intrinsic parameters of a vascular C-arm from a planar target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorges, Sébastien; Kerrien, Erwan; Berger, Marie-Odile; Trousset, Yves; Pescatore, Jérémie; Anxionnat, René; Picard, Luc

    2006-03-01

    The real time recovery of the projection geometry is a fundamental issue in interventional navigation applications (e.g. guide wire reconstruction, medical augmented reality). In most works, the intrinsic parameters are supposed to be constant and the extrinsic parameters (C-arm motion) are deduced either from the orientation sensors of the C-arm or from other additional sensors (eg. optical and/or electro-magnetic sensors). However, due to the weight of the X-ray tube and the C-arm, the system is undergoing deformations which induce variations of the intrinsic parameters as a function of the C-arm orientation. In our approach, we propose to measure the effects of the mechanical deformations onto the intrinsic parameters in a calibration procedure. Robust calibration methods exist (the gold standard is the multi-image calibration) but they are time consuming and too tedious to set up in a clinical context. For these reasons, we developed an original and easy to use method, based on a planar calibration target, which aims at measuring with a high level of accuracy the variation of the intrinsic parameters on a vascular C-arm. The precision of the planar-based method was evaluated by the mean of error propagation using techniques described in. 8 It appeared that the precision of the intrinsic parameters are comparable to the one obtained from the multi-image calibration method. The planar-based method was also successfully used to assess to behavior of the C-arm with respect to the C-arm orientations. Results showed a clear variation of the principal point when the LAO/RAO orientation was changed. In contrast, the intrinsic parameters do not change during a cranio-caudal C-arm motion.

  17. Vibrational branching ratios and asymmetry parameters in the photoionization of CO2 in the region between 650 Å and 840 Å

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 119 Vibrational branching ratios and asymmetry parameters in the photoionization of CO2 in the region between 650 Å and 840 Å (Web, free access)   CO2 is studied using dispersed synchrotron radiation in the 650 Å to 850 Å spectral region. The vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra are analyzed to generate relative vibrational transition amplitudes and the angular asymmetry parameters describing the various transitions observed.

  18. Correlation between nitrate concentration in groundwater and parameters affecting aquifer intrinsic vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debernardi, Laura; de Luca, Domenico Antonio; Lasagna, Manuela

    2008-08-01

    This paper is the result of a study which was carried out in order to verify if the traditional methods to evaluate the intrinsic vulnerability or vulnerability related parameters, are able to clarify the problem of nitrate pollution in groundwater. In particular, the aim was to evaluate limitations and problems connected to aquifer vulnerability methods applied to nitrate contamination prevision in groundwater. The investigation was carried out by comparing NO3 - concentrations, measured in March and November 2004 in the shallow aquifer, and the vulnerability classes, obtained by using GOD and TOT methods. Moreover, it deals with a comparison between NO3 - concentrations and single parameters (depth to water table, land use and nitrogen input). The study area is the plain sector of Piemonte (Northern Italy), where an unconfined aquifer nitrate contamination exists. In this area the anthropogenic presence is remarkable and the input of N-fertilizers and zootechnical effluents to the soil cause a growing amount of nitrates in groundwater. This approach, used in a large area (about 10,000 km2) and in several monitoring wells (about 500), allowed to compare the efficiency of different vulnerability methods and to verify the importance of every parameter on the nitrate concentrations in the aquifer. Furthermore it allowed to obtain interesting correlations in different hydrogeological situations. Correlations between depth to water table, land use and nitrogen input to the soil with nitrate concentrations in groundwater show unclear situations: in fact these comparisons describe the phenomenon trend and highlight the maximum nitrate concentrations for each circumstance but often show wide ranges of possible nitrate concentrations. The same situation could be observed by comparing vulnerability indexes and nitrate concentrations in groundwater. These results suggest that neither single parameters nor vulnerability methods (GOD and TOT) are able to describe individually

  19. Influences of process parameters of low frequency PECVD technology on intrinsic stress of silicon nitride thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weizhi; Kang, Zhe; Ye, Yun; Jiang, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    Silicon nitride (SiNx) thin films were deposited by low frequency (LF) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology. By systematic variation of the process parameters, e.g. reactive gas flow rate, LF power, chamber gas pressure and substrate temperature. Influences of above parameters on the intrinsic stress of SiNx films were studied and analyzed by combining with the measured refractive index (RI), density, infrared spectra results of deposited SiNx films. The results showed that intrinsic stress of SiNx film was roughly proportional to film density, which was inversely proportional to hydrogen content in the SiNx film. Substrate temperature during deposition was the most important factor affecting hydrogen content in deposited film and, accordingly, the density and intrinsic stress of SiNx film.

  20. Influence of coupling parameter on current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high- Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Mahfouzi, F.

    2006-02-01

    We study the current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high-Tc superconductors by numerical calculations and in framework of capacitively coupled Josephson junctions model we obtain the total number of branches. The influence of the coupling parameter α on the current-voltage characteristics at fixed parameter β (β2 = 1/βc, where βc is McCumber parameter) and the influence of α on β-dependence of the current-voltage characteristics are investigated. We obtain the α-dependence of the branch's slopes and branch's endpoints. The presented results show new features of the coupling effect on the scheme of hysteresis jumps in current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high-Tc superconductors.

  1. Morphometric hemispheric asymmetry of orbitofrontal cortex in women with borderline personality disorder: a multi-parameter approach

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Filho, Gerardo Maria; Abdallah, Chadi; Sato, João Ricardo; de Araujo, Thabata Bueno; Lisondo, Cláudio Mauricio; de Faria, Álvaro Ancona; Lin, Katia; Silva, Ivaldo; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonsecca; da Silva, Julieta Freitas Ramalho; Coplan, Jeremy; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin

    2014-01-01

    Functional imaging studies have implicated the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in the pathophysiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD). To date, however, volume-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have yielded mixed results. We used a surface-based processing approach that allowed us to measure five morphometric cortical features of the OFC, including volumetric (cortical thickness and surface area) and geometric (mean curvature, depth of sulcus, and metric distortion – three indicators of cortical folding) parameters. Participants comprised 25 female BPD patients with no other current psychiatric comorbidity and 25 age- and gender-matched healthy controls who received structural MRI scans. Images were processed using the Freesurfer package. All BPD patients had a history of comorbid psychiatric disorder(s) and were currently on medications. Compared with controls, the BPD group showed reduced cortical thickness, surface area, mean curvature, depth of sulcus, and metric distortion in the right medial OFC. In the left medial OFC, the BPD group had reduced cortical thickness and mean curvature, but increased metric distortion. This study confirmed the utility of surface-based analysis in the study of BPD cortical structures. In addition, we observed extensive structural abnormalities in the medial OFC of female subjects with BPD, findings that were most pronounced in the right OFC, with preliminary data suggesting hemispheric asymmetry. PMID:24882679

  2. Implementation of intrinsic lumped parameter modeling into computational fluid dynamics studies of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Tim A S; Neidlin, Michael; Büsen, Martin; Sonntag, Simon J; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    Stroke and cerebral hypoxia are among the main complications during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The two main reasons for these complications are the cannula jet, due to altered flow conditions and the sandblast effect, and impaired cerebral autoregulation which often occurs in the elderly. The effect of autoregulation has so far mainly been modeled using lumped parameter modeling, while Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been applied to analyze flow conditions during CPB. In this study, we combine both modeling techniques to analyze the effect of lumped parameter modeling on blood flow during CPB. Additionally, cerebral autoregulation is implemented using the Baroreflex, which adapts the cerebrovascular resistance and compliance based on the cerebral perfusion pressure. The results show that while a combination of CFD and lumped parameter modeling without autoregulation delivers feasible results for physiological flow conditions, it overestimates the loss of cerebral blood flow during CPB. This is counteracted by the Baroreflex, which restores the cerebral blood flow to native levels. However, the cerebral blood flow during CPB is typically reduced by 10-20% in the clinic. This indicates that either the Baroreflex is not fully functional during CPB, or that the target value for the Baroreflex is not a full native cerebral blood flow, but the plateau phase of cerebral autoregulation, which starts at approximately 80% of native flow.

  3. Analytical calculation of intrinsic shielding effectiveness for isotropic and anisotropic materials based on measured electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, M.; John, W.; Weigel, R.

    2014-11-01

    This contribution contains the mechanisms for calculation of magnetic shielding effectiveness from material samples, based on measured electrical parameters. For this, measurement systems for the electrical conductivity of high and low conductive material samples with respect to the direction of current flow are presented and discussed. Also a definition of isotropic and anisotropic materials with electrical circuit diagrams is given. For prediction of shielding effectiveness for isotropic and anisotropic materials, several analytical models are presented. Also adaptions to gain a near field solution are part of this contribution. All analytical models will also be validated with an adequate measurement system.

  4. Characterization of the oral absorption of several aminopenicillins: determination of intrinsic membrane absorption parameters in the rat intestine in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinko, P. J.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The absorption mechanism of several penicillins was characterized using in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in the rat. The intrinsic membrane parameters were determined using a modified boundary layer model (fitted value +/- S.E.): Jmax* = 11.78 +/- 1.88 mM, Km = 15.80 +/- 2.92 mM, Pm* = 0, Pc* = 0.75 +/- 0.04 for ampicillin; Jmax* = 0.044 +/- 0.018 mM, Km = 0.058 +/- 0.026 mM, Pm* = 0.558 +/- 0.051, Pc* = 0.757 +/- 0.088 for amoxicillin; and Jmax* = 16.30 +/- 3.40 mM, Km = 14.00 +/- 3.30 mM, Pm* = 0, Pc* = 1.14 +/- 0.05 for cyclacillin. All of the aminopenicillins studied demonstrated saturable absorption kinetics as indicated by their concentration-dependent wall permeabilities. Inhibition studies were performed to confirm the existence of a nonpassive absorption mechanism. The intrinsic wall permeability (Pw*) of 0.01 mM ampicillin was significantly lowered by 1 mM amoxicillin and the Pw* of 0.01 mM amoxicillin was reduced by 2 mM cephradine consistent with competitive inhibition.

  5. On metachronism in ciliary systems: a model describing the dependence of the metachronal wave properties on the intrinsic ciliary parameters.

    PubMed

    Gheber, L; Priel, Z

    1990-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to explain the dependence of the direction and the length of the metachronal wave on parameters that characterize the ciliary beat, the dimensions of the cilia, and the geometry of their arrangement on the ciliated surface. The metachronal wave is decomposed into two mutually perpendicular components, which are chosen in such a way that the direction of one of them is in the direction of the effective stroke. The magnitudes of the two components are determined by using the concept of the time of delay between adjacent cilia. The properties of the metachronal wave are then calculated as a function of the ciliary parameters. The results obtained with the present model predict that the direction of the wave propagation is strongly dependent on the type of metachronism in the direction of the effective stoke and the polarization in time and in space of the ciliary beat. The metachronal wavelength is found to depend on four parameters: the ciliary length, the angle of the arc projected on the cell surface by the ciliary tip during the recovery stroke, the degree of asymmetry of ciliary beat, and the portion of the cycle occupied by the pause. The metachronal wavelength is also found to be only weakly dependent on the ciliary frequency. At this stage there exists relatively little experimental information with which to characterize fully the metachronal properties of ciliary systems. Even when only partial information exists, the model allows prediction, to within a certain range, of the direction of the wave propagation. It also suggests a possible mechanism for the influence of changes in environmental conditions on wave direction and wavelength. In several cases in which full information does exist, good agreement between the experimental findings and the predictions of the model is found. According to this model it will be worthwhile to invest more effort in measuring the time and space polarization of ciliary beating and times of

  6. Simulation of characteristic variation in 16 nm gate FinFET devices due to intrinsic parameter fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Hwang, Chih-Hong; Han, Ming-Hung

    2010-03-01

    High-kappa/metal-gate and vertical channel transistors are well-known solutions to continue the device scaling. This work extensively explores the physics and mechanism of the intrinsic parameter fluctuations in nanoscale fin-type field-effect transistors by using an experimentally validated three-dimensional quantum-corrected device simulation. The dominance fluctuation sources in threshold voltage, gate capacitance and cutoff frequency have been found. The emerging fluctuation source, workfunction fluctuation, shows significant impacts on DC characteristics; however, its impact is reduced in AC characteristics due to the screening effect of the inversion layer. Additionally, the channel discrete dopant may enhance the electric field and therefore make the averaged cutoff frequency of fluctuated devices larger than the nominal value of cutoff frequency. PMID:20124665

  7. A Method for Modeling the Intrinsic Dynamics of Intraindividual Variability: Recovering the Parameters of Simulated Oscillators in Multi-Wave Panel Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boker, Steven M.; Nesselroade, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Examined two methods for fitting models of intrinsic dynamics to intraindividual variability data by testing these techniques' behavior in equations through simulation studies. Among the main results is the demonstration that a local linear approximation of derivatives can accurately recover the parameters of a simulated linear oscillator, with…

  8. Vibrational Branching Ratios and Asymmetry Parameters in the Photoionization of CO2 in the Region Between 650 Å and 840 Å

    PubMed Central

    Parr, A. C.; West, J. B.; King, M. R. F.; Ueda, K.; Dehmer, P. M.; Dehmer, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The vibrational branching ratios and asymmetry parameters for CO2 have been determined in the wavelength region of 650 Å to near the ionization onset at about 840 Å. The study was performed using synchrotron radiation from the Daresbury storage ring that was dispersed with a 5 m grating monochomator that afforded resolution of 0.1 Å to 0.2 Å. This resolution allowed the study of the branching ratios and asymmetry parameters with enough detail to see the changes in the parameters within the pronounced autoionization structure in CO2 in this wavelength region. While the electron spectrometer resolution was not sufficient to resolve the spin orbit and Renner-Teller splitting in the photoelectron spectra, we are able to fit the data with a model that identifies the major structure in terms of the symmetric stretch and elements of the asymmetric stretch and bending modes. A calculation of the expected relative vibrational excitations based upon the Franck-Condon principle clearly showed non-Franck-Condon behavior in some of the vibrational-electronic transitions. PMID:27500048

  9. Effects of the transport site conformation on the binding of external NAP-taurine to the human erythrocyte anion exchange system: evidence for intrinsic asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Knauf, P.A.; Law, F.Y.; Tarshis, T.; Furuya, W.

    1984-05-01

    External N-(4-azido (NAP-taurine) inhibits human red cell chloride exchange by binding to a site that is distinct from the chloride transport site. Increases in the intracellular chloride concentration (at constant external chloride) cause an increase in the inhibitory potency of external NAP-taurine. This effect is not due to the changes in pH or membrane potential that usually accompany a chloride gradient, since even when these changes are reversed or eliminated the inhibitory potency remains high. According to the ping-pong model for anion exchange, such transmembrane effects of intracellular chloride on external NAP-taurine can be explained if NAP-taurine only binds to its site when the transport site is in the outward-facing (E/sub o/ or ECl/sub o/) form. Since NAP-taurine prevents the conformational change from ECl/sub o/ to ECl/sub i/, it must lock the system in the outward-facing form. NAP-taurine can therefore be used just like the competitive inhibitor H/sub 2/DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyano-1,2-diphenylethane-2,2'-disulfonic acid) to monitor the fraction of transport sites that face outward. A quantitative analysis of the effects of chloride gradients on the inhibitory potency of NAP-taurine and H/sub 2/DIDS reveals that the transport system is intrinsically asymmetric, such that when Cl/sub i/ = Cl/sub o/, most of the unloaded transport sites face the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. 30 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Electrochemical characterization of an asymmetric nanofiltration membrane with NaCl and KCl solutions: influence of membrane asymmetry on transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Cañas, A; Benavente, J

    2002-02-15

    Electrochemical characterization of a nanofiltration asymmetric membrane was carried out by measuring membrane potential, salt diffusion, and electrical parameters (membrane electrical resistance and capacitance) with the membrane in contact with NaCl and KCl solutions at different concentrations (10(-3)< or =c(M)< or =5 x 10(-2)). From these experiments characteristic parameters such as the effective concentration of charge in the membrane, ionic transport numbers, and salt and ionic permeabilities across the membrane were determined. Membrane electrical resistance and capacitance were obtained from impedance spectroscopy (IS) measurements by using equivalent circuits as models. This technique allows the determination of the electrical contribution associated with each sublayer; then, assuming that the dense sublayer behaves as a plane capacitor, its thickness can be estimated from the capacitance value. The influence of membrane asymmetry on transport parameters have been studied by carrying out measurements for the two opposite external conditions. Results show that membrane asymmetry strongly affects membrane potential, which is attributed to the Donnan exclusion when the solutions in contact with the dense layer have concentrations lower than the membrane fixed charge (X(ef) approximately -0.004 M), but for the reversal experimental condition (high concentration in contact with the membrane dense sublayer) the membrane potential is practically similar to the solution diffusion potential. The comparison of results obtained for both electrolytes agrees with the higher conductivity of KCl solutions. On the other hand, the influence of diffusion layers at the membrane/solution interfaces in salt permeation was also studied by measuring salt diffusion at a given NaCl concentration gradient but at five different solutions stirring rates.

  11. The regime of aerosol asymmetry parameter over Europe, Mediterranean and Middle East based on MODIS satellite data: evaluation against surface AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras-Carraca, M. B.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Gkikas, A.; Papadimas, C. D.

    2014-09-01

    Atmospheric particulates are a significant forcing agent for the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. The particulates' interaction with radiation, which defines their climate effect, is strongly dependent on their optical properties. In the present work, we study one of the most important optical properties of aerosols, the asymmetry parameter (gaer), in the region comprised of North Africa, the Arabian peninsula, Europe, and the Mediterranean basin. These areas are of great interest, because of the variety of aerosol types they host, both anthropogenic and natural. Using satellite data from the collection 051 of MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Terra and Aqua), we investigate the spatio-temporal characteristics of the asymmetry parameter. We generally find significant spatial variability, with larger values over regions dominated by larger size particles, e.g. outside the Atlantic coasts of north-western Africa, where desert-dust outflow is taking place. The gaer values tend to decrease with increasing wavelength, especially over areas dominated by small particulates. The intra-annual variability is found to be small in desert-dust areas, with maximum values during summer, while in all other areas larger values are reported during the cold season and smaller during the warm. Significant intra-annual and inter-annual variability is observed around the Black Sea. However, the inter-annual trends of gaer are found to be generally small. Although satellite data have the advantage of broad geographical coverage, they have to be validated against reliable surface measurements. Therefore, we compare satellite-based values with gaer values measured at 69 stations of the global surface network AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), located within our region of interest. This way, we provide some insight on the quality and reliability of MODIS data. We report generally better agreement at the wavelength of 870 nm (correlation coefficient

  12. The regime of aerosol asymmetry parameter over Europe, the Mediterranean and the Middle East based on MODIS satellite data: evaluation against surface AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras-Carraca, M. B.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Gkikas, A.; Papadimas, C. D.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric particulates are a significant forcing agent for the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. The particulates' interaction with radiation, which defines their climate effect, is strongly dependent on their optical properties. In the present work, we study one of the most important optical properties of aerosols, the asymmetry parameter (gaer), over sea surfaces of the region comprising North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Europe, and the Mediterranean Basin. These areas are of great interest, because of the variety of aerosol types they host, both anthropogenic and natural. Using satellite data from the collection 051 of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Terra and Aqua), we investigate the spatiotemporal characteristics of the asymmetry parameter. We generally find significant spatial variability, with larger values over regions dominated by larger size particles, e.g., outside the Atlantic coasts of northwestern Africa, where desert-dust outflow takes place. The gaer values tend to decrease with increasing wavelength, especially over areas dominated by small particulates. The intra-annual variability is found to be small in desert-dust areas, with maximum values during summer, while in all other areas larger values are reported during the cold season and smaller during the warm. Significant intra-annual and inter-annual variability is observed around the Black Sea. However, the inter-annual trends of gaer are found to be generally small. Although satellite data have the advantage of broad geographical coverage, they have to be validated against reliable surface measurements. Therefore, we compare satellite-measured values with gaer values measured at 69 stations of the global surface AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), located within our region of interest. This way, we provide some insight on the quality and reliability of MODIS data. We report generally better agreement at the wavelength of 860 nm (correlation

  13. Intrinsically incompatible crystal (ligand) field parameter sets for transition ions at orthorhombic and lower symmetry sites in crystals and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, C.; Gnutek, P.

    2010-01-01

    Central quantities in spectroscopy and magnetism of transition ions in crystals are crystal (ligand) field parameters (CFPs). For orthorhombic, monoclinic, and triclinic site symmetry CF analysis is prone to misinterpretations due to large number of CFPs and existence of correlated sets of alternative CFPs. In this review, we elucidate the intrinsic features of orthorhombic and lower symmetry CFPs and their implications. The alternative CFP sets, which yield identical energy levels, belong to different regions of CF parameter space and hence are intrinsically incompatible. Only their ‘images’ representing CFP sets expressed in the same region of CF parameter space may be directly compared. Implications of these features for fitting procedures and meaning of fitted CFPs are categorized into negative: pitfalls and positive: blessings. As a case study, the CFP sets for Tm 3+ ions in KLu(WO 4) 2 are analysed and shown to be intrinsically incompatible. Inadvertent, so meaningless, comparisons of incompatible CFP sets result in various pitfalls, e.g., controversial claims about the values of CFPs obtained by other researchers as well as incorrect structural conclusions or faulty systematics of CF parameters across rare-earth ion series based on relative magnitudes of incompatible CFPs. Such pitfalls bear on interpretation of, e.g., optical spectroscopy, inelastic neutron scattering, and magnetic susceptibility data. An extensive survey of pertinent literature was carried out to assess recognition of compatibility problems. Great portion of available orthorhombic and lower symmetry CFP sets are found intrinsically incompatible, yet these problems and their implications appear barely recognized. The considerable extent and consequences of pitfalls revealed by our survey call for concerted remedial actions of researchers. A general approach based on the rhombicity ratio standardization may solve compatibility problems. Wider utilization of alternative CFP sets in the

  14. Estimation of scattering and intrinsic seismic attenuation parameters with radiative transfer theory: Application to fluid-induced seismicity at the KTB Deep Drilling Hole, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielitz, D.; Wegler, U.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneity and seismic absorption properties of a geothermal reservoir may be estimated by inverting seismogram envelopes of fluid-induced micro-earthquakes occurring during hydraulic stimulation and/or production. Synthetic coda envelopes are computed using radiative transfer theory (RTT). RTT describes the propagation of wave energy in scattering random media and has the important advantage of being adapted from a physical model of the scattering process that produces the seismic coda. The heterogeneous medium is characterized by the total scattering coefficient g0 and intrinsic absorption coefficient b. In addition, information about effective source energy W and site response factors R can also be obtained by means of seismogram envelopes inversion. Nevertheless, the present study focuses on the properties of the propagation medium. It aims to separate the effects of intrinsic and scattering attenuation in order to characterize the small-scale heterogeneities that are the fractured geothermal reservoir. The inversion uses grid search over the model space for scattering coefficient, and least-square inversion for the remaining parameters. The merit of this integrated approach is to be independent of external information and applicable to smaller events, likely to occur during hydraulic fracturing. To speed up inversion we use an analytic approximation to the equation of radiative transfer. Currently, we restrict ourselves to isotropic scattering of S-waves in a half-space with an isotropic source. In the framework of adapting seismological techniques to the field of geothermal reservoir characterization (part of the German research program "Geothermal Energy and High Performance Drilling"), the method is applied to a passive seismic data set obtained during the hydraulic fracturing treatment at the KTB Deep Drilling Hole in 2000. During the long-term stimulation experiment (August to November 2000), seismicity was recorded downhole with a borehole sonde at 4

  15. Doping influence on Sm1 - x Th x OFeAs superconducting properties: Observation of the effect of intrinsic multiple Andreev reflections and determination of the superconducting parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmicheva, T. E.; Kuzmichev, S. A.; Zhigadlo, N. D.

    2014-04-01

    We studied SNS and S-N-S-N-...-S contacts (where S is a superconductor and N is a normal metal) formed by "break-junction" technique in polycrystalline Sm1 - x Th x OFeAs superconductor samples with critical temperatures T C = 34-45 K. In such contacts (intrinsic) multiple Andreev reflections effects were observed. Using spectroscopies based on these effects, we detected two independent bulk order parameters and determined their magnitudes. Theoretical analysis of the large and the small gap temperature dependences revealed superconducting properties of Sm1 - x Th x OFeAs to be driven by intraband coupling, and (where V ij are the electron-boson interaction matrix elements), whereas the ratio between density of states for the bands with the small and the large gap, N 2/ N 1, correspondingly, was roughly of an order. We estimated "solo" BCS-ratio values in a hypothetic case of zero interband coupling ( V i ≠ j = 0) for each condensate as 2ΔL, S/ k B T {C/L,S} ≤ 4.5. The values are constant within the range of critical temperatures studied, and correspond to a case of strong intraband electron-phonon coupling.

  16. No Evidence of Intrinsic Optical/Near-infrared Linear Polarization for V404 Cygni during Its Bright Outburst in 2015: Broadband Modeling and Constraint on Jet Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Itoh, R.; Uemura, M.; Inoue, Y.; Cheung, C. C.; Watanabe, M.; Kawabata, K. S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Yatsu, Y.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Saito, Y.; Kawai, N.; Kimura, M.; Isogai, K.; Kato, T.; Akitaya, H.; Kawabata, M.; Nakaoka, T.; Shiki, K.; Takaki, K.; Yoshida, M.; Imai, M.; Gouda, S.; Gouda, Y.; Akimoto, H.; Honda, S.; Hosoya, K.; Ikebe, A.; Morihana, K.; Ohshima, T.; Takagi, Y.; Takahashi, J.; Watanabe, K.; Kuroda, D.; Morokuma, T.; Murata, K.; Nagayama, T.; Nogami, D.; Oasa, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.

    2016-05-01

    We present simultaneous optical and near-infrared (NIR) polarimetric results for the black hole binary V404 Cyg spanning the duration of its seven-day-long optically brightest phase of its 2015 June outburst. The simultaneous R- and K s -band light curves showed almost the same temporal variation except for the isolated (˜30-minute duration) orphan K s -band flare observed at MJD 57193.54. We did not find any significant temporal variation of polarization degree (PD) and position angle (PA) in both R and K s bands throughout our observations, including the duration of the orphan NIR flare. We show that the observed PD and PA are predominantly interstellar in origin by comparing the V404 Cyg polarimetric results with those of the surrounding sources within the 7‧ × 7‧ field of view. The low intrinsic PD (less than a few percent) implies that the optical and NIR emissions are dominated by either disk or optically thick synchrotron emission, or both. We also present the broadband spectra of V404 Cyg during the orphan NIR flare and a relatively faint and steady state by including quasi-simultaneous Swift/XRT and INTEGRAL fluxes. By adopting a single-zone synchrotron plus inverse-Compton model as widely used in modeling of blazars, we constrained the parameters of a putative jet. Because the jet synchrotron component cannot exceed the Swift/XRT disk/corona flux, the cutoff Lorentz factor in the electron energy distribution is constrained to be <102, suggesting that particle acceleration is less efficient in this microquasar jet outburst compared to active galactic nucleus jets. We also suggest that the loading of the baryon component inside the jet is inevitable based on energetic arguments.

  17. On perturbative azimuthal asymmetry at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaeian, A. H.

    2008-10-13

    We investigate the azimuthal asymmetry of partons and photons produced at the initial stage of nuclear collisions at the RHIC energy originating from quark-nucleus collisions. In our approach, the azimuthal asymmetry results from the correlation between color dipole orientation and impact parameter of the collision. The asymmetry is sensitive to the rapid variation of the nuclear density at the nuclear periphery. We either introduce the color-dipole orientation into the improved Born approximation, or model the dipole partial amplitude which satisfies available DIS data. We conclude that the azimuthal asymmetry coming from these mechanisms can be sizable.

  18. beta. -decay asymmetry of the free neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, P.; Dubbers, D.; Klemt, E.; Last, J.; Schuetze, H.; Weibler, W.; Freedman, S.J.; Schaerpf, O.

    1983-01-01

    The ..beta..-decay of polarized neutrons has been studied with the new superconducting spectrometer PERKEO at the ILL. The energy dependence of the ..beta..-decay asymmetry has been measured for the first time. From the measured ..beta..-asymmetry parameter we obtain a new value for the ratio of weak coupling constants g/sub A//g/sub V/. 11 references.

  19. Strength Training for the Intrinsic Flexor Muscles of the Foot: Effects on Muscle Strength, the Foot Arch, and Dynamic Parameters Before and After the Training

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takayuki; Sakuraba, Keishoku

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to verify the effects of intrinsic foot flexor strength training. [Subjects] The subjects were 12 healthy males without motor system disease. [Methods] A training method that involved flexion of all toe interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints against a 3-kg load was implemented and was performed for 200 repetitions once per day, three times per week, for a period of eight weeks. [Results] Significant changes were observed for intrinsic foot flexor strength scores, foot arches, vertical jumping, 1-legged long jumping, and 50-m dash time. [Conclusion] This muscle strength training method significantly improved muscle strength scores, foot arch shape, and movement performance. PMID:24707086

  20. Strength training for the intrinsic flexor muscles of the foot: effects on muscle strength, the foot arch, and dynamic parameters before and after the training.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takayuki; Sakuraba, Keishoku

    2014-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to verify the effects of intrinsic foot flexor strength training. [Subjects] The subjects were 12 healthy males without motor system disease. [Methods] A training method that involved flexion of all toe interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints against a 3-kg load was implemented and was performed for 200 repetitions once per day, three times per week, for a period of eight weeks. [Results] Significant changes were observed for intrinsic foot flexor strength scores, foot arches, vertical jumping, 1-legged long jumping, and 50-m dash time. [Conclusion] This muscle strength training method significantly improved muscle strength scores, foot arch shape, and movement performance.

  1. The regime of aerosol asymmetry parameter and Angstrom exponent over Europe, Mediterranean and Middle East based on MODIS satellite data. Intercomparison of MODIS-Aqua C051 and C006 retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras-Carraca, Marios Bruno; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Gkikas, Antonis; Papadimas, Christos; Sayers, Andy

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. In the present work, we study two of the most important optical properties of aerosols, the asymmetry parameter (gaer) and the Angstrom exponent (α). Both gaer and α are related with aerosol size, which is a very important parameter for climate and human health. The study region comprises North Africa, the Arabian peninsula, Europe, and the Mediterranean basin. These areas are of great interest, because of the variety of aerosol types they host, both anthropogenic and natural. Urban, industrial or biomass-burning aerosols are usually fine, while desert dust or sea-salt are basically coarse, making thus possible the establishment of a relationship between the type and the size of aerosols. Using satellite data from the collection 051 of MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Aqua), we investigate the spatio-temporal characteristics of the asymmetry parameter and Angstrom exponent. We generally find significant spatial variability, with larger gaer values over regions dominated by larger size particles, e.g. outside the Atlantic coasts of north-western Africa, where desert-dust outflow is taking place. The gaer values tend to decrease with increasing wavelength, especially over areas dominated by small particulates. The intra-annual variability is found to be small in desert-dust areas, with maximum values during summer, while in all other areas larger values are reported during the cold season and smaller during the warm. Significant intra-annual and inter-annual variability is observed around the Black Sea. However, the inter-annual trends of gaer are found to be generally small. The geographical distributions for α (given for the pair of wavelengths 550-865 nm) affirm the conclusions drawn from the asymmetry parameter as regards the aerosol size over

  2. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence

    1982-01-01

    Hemispheric specialization tasks were given to different-aged boys. Asymmetries were demonstrated on manual, visual, and auditory tasks; however, the degree of asymmetries did not change across age groups. There appears to be a dissociation between visual and auditory perceptual asymmetries. (Author/RD)

  3. Geometric measure of quantum correlation: The influence of the asymmetry environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qinsheng; Ding, Changchun; Wu, Shaoyi; Lai, Wei

    2016-09-01

    The quantum correlation in open quantum systems is of fundamental and practical importance for quantum information processing and controllable nanometer devices. And the properties of quantum correlation can be influenced by the information flow between systems and environments. In this study, we investigated the geometric measure discord of quantum correlation of a two qubits system, interacting with two independent and intrinsic interacting spin-environments, respectively. Based on the asymmetry environments with comparable parameters, the different properties of the geometric measure of entanglement and quantum discord are displayed and discussed for initial Bell states.

  4. Asymmetry of Blinking

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Iris S.; Evinger, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Too investigate asymmetry in eyelid movements with blinking, the stability of the asymmetry, and its modifiability in normal humans. Methods Differences in the start time and amplitude between the two eyelids were assessed for voluntary blinks and reflex blinks evoked by supraorbital trigeminal nerve stimulation. These variables were also measured before and up to 18 months after 2 hours of unilateral upper lid restraint. Results With voluntary blinks, one eyelid consistently began to close earlier and made a larger eyelid movement than the other eyelid. Stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve evoked relatively larger amplitude blinks in one eyelid that correlated with the asymmetries of voluntary blinks. There was a continuum of eyelid asymmetry across all subjects that was stable and independent of other biological asymmetries, such as handedness. Briefly reducing eyelid mobility created a long-lasting change in eyelid asymmetry with blinking. Conclusions Eyelid asymmetry results from differences in the excitability of motoneurons in the left and right facial motor nuclei and does not appear to involve asymmetries in cortical inputs to the brain stem. Because adaptive processes modify the motoneuron excitability that creates eyelid asymmetry, these processes may underlie changes in blinking associated with facial palsy and may play a role in the development of disorders that affect one side of the face, such as hemifacial spasm. PMID:16384962

  5. Asymmetries at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, Pavol

    2014-10-28

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark pair production asymmetry and present the new result of bottom-quark pair production asymmetry. By looking at the results obtained by the CDF experiment, one can see a discrepancy in both $t\\bar{t}$ inclusive and lepton-based measurements. The D0 results of the $t\\bar{t}$ production asymmetry are compatible with the standard-model predictions as well as with the CDF results. The CDF measurement of $b\\bar{b}$ production asymmetry presents consistency with both zero and with the standard-model predictions.

  6. Angular distribution measurements of the xenon N{sub 4,5}O{sub 2,3}O{sub 2,3} Auger electrons: Determination of alignment and intrinsic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, G.; Kukk, E.; Berrah, N.

    2000-04-01

    In the framework of the two-step model of Auger decay the alignment of the xenon 4d{sup -1} primary hole states has been derived as a function of photon energy. This quantity was obtained from angular distribution measurements of the N{sub 4,5}O{sub 2,3}O{sub 2,3} Auger lines after ionization of free atoms by monochromatized synchrotron radiation of 80-250 eV photon energy. The data show a minimum of the alignment parameter in the Cooper minimum of the 4d photoionization cross section, which proves the vanishing of the outgoing {epsilon}f electron wave. Furthermore, the intrinsic parameters for all lines in this Auger group were determined and are compared with previous experiments and calculations. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  7. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger lengths). This…

  8. Measurement of time dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B0 meson decays to ωKS0, η'K0, and π0KS0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Schott, G.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    We present measurements of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C in the decays B0→ωKS0, B0→η'K0, reconstructed as η'KS0 and η'KL0, and B0→π0KS0. The data sample corresponds to the full BABAR dataset of 467×106 B Bmacr pairs produced at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The results are SωKS0=0.55-0.29+0.26±0.02, CωKS0=-0.52-0.20+0.22±0.03, Sη'K0=0.57±0.08±0.02, Cη'K0=-0.08±0.06±0.02, Sπ0KS0=0.55±0.20±0.03, and Cπ0KS0=0.13±0.13±0.03, where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic. These results are consistent with our previous measurements and the world average of sin⁡2β measured in B0→J/ψKS0.

  9. Asymmetries between strange and antistrange particle production inpion-proton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, T.D.; Vogt, R.

    2002-01-29

    Recent measurements of the asymmetries between Feynman x-distributions of strange and antistrange hadrons in {pi}{sup -}A interactions show a strong effect as a function of x{sub F}. We calculate strange hadron production in the context of the intrinsic model and make predictions for particle/antiparticle asymmetries in these interactions.

  10. The small scale power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Flender, Samuel; Hotchkiss, Shaun E-mail: shaun.hotchkiss@helsinki.fi

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the hemispherical power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background on small angular scales. We find an anomalously high asymmetry in the multipole range l = 601−2048, with a naive statistical significance of 6.5σ. However, we show that this extreme anomaly is simply a coincidence of three other effects, relativistic power modulation, edge effects from the mask applied, and inter-scale correlations. After correcting for all of these effects, the significance level drops to ∼ 1σ, i.e., there is no anomalous intrinsic asymmetry in the small angular scales. Using this null result, we derive a constraint on a potential dipolar modulation amplitude, A(k) < 0.0045 on the ∼ 10 Mpc-scale, at 95% C.L. This new constraint must be satisfied by any theoretical model attempting to explain the hemispherical asymmetry at large angular scales.

  11. Intrinsic anion oxidation potentials.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Patrik

    2006-11-01

    Anions of lithium battery salts have been investigated by electronic structure calculations with the objective to find a computational measure to correlate with the observed (in)stability of nonaqueous lithium battery electrolytes vs oxidation often encountered in practice. Accurate prediction of intrinsic anion oxidation potentials is here made possible by computing the vertical free energy difference between anion and neutral radical (Delta Gv) and further strengthened by an empirical correction using only the anion volume as a parameter. The 6-311+G(2df,p) basis set, the VSXC functional, and the C-PCM SCRF algorithm were used. The Delta Gv calculations can be performed using any standard computational chemistry software. PMID:17078600

  12. Geometric intrinsic symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, A. Szulerecka, A.; Pedrak, A.

    2013-08-15

    The problem of geometric symmetries in the intrinsic frame of a many-body system (nucleus) is considered. An importance of symmetrization group notion is discussed. Ageneral structure of the intrinsic symmetry group structure is determined.

  13. Asymmetry through time dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantzaris, Alexander V.; Higham, Desmond J.

    2016-03-01

    Given a single network of interactions, asymmetry arises when the links are directed. For example, if protein A upregulates protein B and protein B upregulates protein C, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may affect C but not vice versa. This type of imbalance is reflected in the associated adjacency matrix, which will lack symmetry. A different type of imbalance can arise when interactions appear and disappear over time. If A meets B today and B meets C tomorrow, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may pass a message or disease to C, but not vice versa. Hence, even when each interaction is a two-way exchange, the effect of time ordering can introduce asymmetry. This observation is very closely related to the fact that matrix multiplication is not commutative. In this work, we describe a method that has been designed to reveal asymmetry in static networks and show how it may be combined with a measure that summarizes the potential information flow between nodes in the temporal case. This results in a new method that quantifies the asymmetry arising through time ordering. We show by example that the new tool can be used to visualize and quantify the amount of asymmetry caused by the arrow of time.

  14. Nuclear asymmetry enthalpy

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L. G.

    2011-07-15

    Recent work has sought to extract the asymmetry energy at very low density from observables in heavy-ion collisions. The logic employed starts from the assumption that the fragment yields are determined by a minimization of the Helmholtz free energy. As volume is in reality unconstrained, nor can a single freeze-out volume be expected, the physical relevance of the Helmholtz free energy must be questioned. If, for example, the identical logic were used, but the Gibbs free energy was the more relevant quantity to minimize, it would be the asymmetry enthalpy that would be extracted. The purpose of this report is to provide one measure of the difference between the asymmetry energy and enthalpy.

  15. Issues in Purchasing and Maintaining Intrinsic Standards

    SciTech Connect

    PETTIT,RICHARD B.; JAEGER,KLAUS; EHRLICH,CHARLES D.

    2000-09-12

    Intrinsic standards are widely used in the metrology community because they realize the best level uncertainty for many metrology parameters. For some intrinsic standards, recommended practices have been developed to assist metrologists in the selection of equipment and the development of appropriate procedures in order to realize the intrinsic standard. As with the addition of any new standard, the metrology laboratory should consider the pros and cons relative to their needs before purchasing the standard so that the laboratory obtains the maximum benefit from setting up and maintaining these standards. While the specific issues that need to be addressed depend upon the specific intrinsic standard and the level of realization, general issues that should be considered include ensuring that the intrinsic standard is compatible with the laboratory environment, that the standard is compatible with the current and future workload, and whether additional support standards will be required in order to properly maintain the intrinsic standard. When intrinsic standards are used to realize the best level of uncertainty for a specific metrology parameter, they usually require critical and important maintenance activities. These activities can including training of staff in the system operation, as well as safety procedures; performing periodic characterization measurements to ensure proper system operation; carrying out periodic intercomparisons with similar intrinsic standards so that proper operation is demonstrated; and maintaining control or trend charts of system performance. This paper has summarized many of these important issues and therefore should be beneficial to any laboratory that is considering the purchase of an intrinsic standard.

  16. Challenging Postural Tasks Increase Asymmetry in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Beretta, Victor Spiandor; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Simieli, Lucas; Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto

    2015-01-01

    The unilateral predominance of Parkinson's disease (PD) symptoms suggests that balance control could be asymmetrical during static tasks. Although studies have shown that balance control asymmetries exist in patients with PD, these analyses were performed using only simple bipedal standing tasks. Challenging postural tasks, such as unipedal or tandem standing, could exacerbate balance control asymmetries. To address this, we studied the impact of challenging standing tasks on postural control asymmetry in patients with PD. Twenty patients with PD and twenty neurologically healthy individuals (control group) participated in this study. Participants performed three 30s trials for each postural task: bipedal, tandem adapted and unipedal standing. The center of pressure parameter was calculated for both limbs in each of these conditions, and the asymmetry between limbs was assessed using the symmetric index. A significant effect of condition was observed, with unipedal standing and tandem standing showing greater asymmetry than bipedal standing for the mediolateral root mean square (RMS) and area of sway parameters, respectively. In addition, a group*condition interaction indicated that, only for patients with PD, the unipedal condition showed greater asymmetry in the mediolateral RMS and area of sway than the bipedal condition and the tandem condition showed greater asymmetry in the area of sway than the bipedal condition. Patients with PD exhibited greater asymmetry while performing tasks requiring postural control when compared to neurologically healthy individuals, especially for challenging tasks such as tandem and unipedal standing.

  17. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to η' K0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Biassoni, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10-6), using a statistics of 465.0 x 106 B$\\bar{B}$ pairs: β(B0 → ηK0) < 1.6 β(B0 → ηη) < 1.4 β(B0 → η'η') < 2.1 β(B0 → ηΦ) < 0.52 β(B0 → ηω) < 1.6 β(B0 → η'Φ) < 1.2 β(B0 → η'ω) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5σ evidence for B → ηω and a 3.1 σ evidence for B → η'ω. The absence of observation of the B0 → ηK0 open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B+ → ηK+ branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 ± 0.4 ± 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 ± 48 flavor-tagged B0 → η'K0 events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 106 B$\\bar{B}$ pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 ± 0.08 ± 0.02, and C = -0.06 ± 0.06 ± 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B0 → η'K0, while S would be equal to sin2β measured in B0 → J/ΨKs0 [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the

  18. Electroweak asymmetries from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Bellodi, G.

    2002-06-01

    We present a summary of the results on electroweak asymmetries performed by the SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Most of these results are final and are based, unless otherwise stated, on the full 1993-1998 data set of approximately 550,000 hadronic decays of Z{sup 0} bosons, produced with an average electron beam polarization of 73%.

  19. Asymmetry in elite rowers: effect of ergometer design and stroke rate.

    PubMed

    Fohanno, Vincent; Nordez, Antoine; Smith, Richard; Colloud, Floren

    2015-09-01

    Between limb movement asymmetries and foot force production asymmetries are thought to be detrimental for both rower's performance and risk of injury, particularly when rowing frequently on ergometers. Several ergometers with different designs can be used by rowers as part of their indoor training. Hence, this study aimed to compare asymmetries in lower limb joint kinematics and foot force production with respect to ergometer design and rowing intensity. A new symmetry index was proposed to assess these asymmetries in elite rowers during a test on three ergometers. Additionally, the asymmetry in lower limb length was assessed to investigate its relationship with kinematic and kinetic asymmetries. Parameters describing medium (5-10%) or high (>10%) asymmetries were compared between rowing ergometers and intensities. Results indicated medium asymmetries for the ankle joint angle and hip-knee joint accelerations and high asymmetries for the resultant force and the ankle joint acceleration associated with a low inter-stroke variability. Kinetic asymmetry was neither correlated to kinematic asymmetry nor with lower limb length asymmetry. The use of a mobile ergometer led to higher joint acceleration asymmetries. Further studies are necessary to investigate the relation between these findings and muscular adaptations that may increase the risk of lower-back injury. PMID:26266336

  20. Asymmetry of White Matter Pathways in Developing Human Brains.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae W; Mitchell, Paul D; Kolasinski, James; Ellen Grant, P; Galaburda, Albert M; Takahashi, Emi

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the emergence of structural asymmetry of white matter tracts during early brain development. We examined whether and when asymmetry in diffusion parameters of limbic and association white matter pathways emerged in humans in 23 brains ranging from 15 gestational weeks (GW) up to 3 years of age (11 ex vivo and 12 in vivo cases) using high-angular resolution diffusion imaging tractography. Age-related development of laterality was not observed in a limbic connectional pathway (cingulum bundle or fornix). Among the studied cortico-cortical association pathways (inferior longitudinal fasciculus [ILF], inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and arcuate fasciculus), only the ILF showed development of age-related laterality emerging as early as the second trimester. Comparisons of ages older and younger than 40 GW revealed a leftward asymmetry in the cingulum bundle volume and a rightward asymmetry in apparent diffusion coefficient and leftward asymmetry in fractional anisotropy in the ILF in ages older than 40 GW. These results suggest that morphometric asymmetry in cortical areas precedes the emergence of white matter pathway asymmetry. Future correlative studies will investigate whether such asymmetry is anatomically/genetically driven or associated with functional stimulation.

  1. Lunar asymmetry and palaeomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1980-10-01

    A model is proposed for the early lunar evolution which accounts for the compositional asymmetry between the nearside and farside of the moon and the natural remanent magnetism of lunar rocks. According to the model, the preferred gravitational energy state consisted of an asymmetric accumulation of a liquid iron alloy (Fe-Ni and a small amount of sulfur) which displaces upwards the cold primordial undifferentiated core. The resulting depth asymmetry of the outer partially molten zone leads eventually to the subcrustal accumulation of light magnesium-rich pyroxenes and olivine, preferentially in one hemisphere, sufficient to explain the offset and also indirectly providing a possible explanation for the nearside concentration of KREEP and mass basalt. Slow downward migration of iron releases gravitational energy sufficient for convection and dynamo generation in an iron layer for about a billion years.

  2. A Justifiable Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Brudney, Daniel; Siegler, Mark

    2015-01-01

    It is a clinician's cliché that a physician only challenges a patient's capacity to make a treatment decision if that decision is not what the physician wants. Agreement is proof of decisional capacity; disagreement is proof or at least evidence of capacity's absence. It is assumed that this asymmetry cannot be justified, that the asymmetry must be a form of physicians' paternalism. Instead what is at issue when patient and physician disagree are usually two laudable impulses. The first is physicians' commitment to patients' well-being: physicians have a professional obligation as well as, ideally, a personal commitment to take care of patients--to do their best to bring about a positive medical outcome. The second impulse is common to much of human life, namely, the urge to find and to understand the source of our disagreements with one another. In this article we argue that, jointly, these impulses justify the asymmetry with regard to examining patients' capacity. PMID:26132055

  3. Intrinsic Analysis Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, Doris T.

    This manual is for the training of linking agents between Education R&D and schools and for training teachers in the process of intrinsic analysis of curriculum materials. Intrinsic analysis means analysis of the instruction or process through examination of the materials, or artifacts, including teacher and student materials, developer's…

  4. Poloidal rotation, density asymmetries and momentum confinement in tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.; Jackson, D.R.

    1992-08-01

    Poloidal rotation speeds and density asymmetries are calculated for the deuterium and dominant carbon (oxygen) impurity ions in discharges in ASDEX, DIII, ISX-B, JET, and TFTR for which {upsilon}{sub {phi}} {approximately} {upsilon}{sub th} for the ions. These poloidal rotation speeds and density asymmetries are used to evaluate the neoclassical gyroviscous model for the momentum confinement time. The rather good agreement with experimental momentum confinement times obtained over this wide range of plasma parameters provides a measure of confidence in the calculated density asymmetries and poloidal rotation, as well as arguing for a neoclassical explanation for momentum confinement in tokamaks.

  5. Phase asymmetry of heart rate variability signal.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, C K; Khandoker, A H; Palaniswami, M

    2015-02-01

    Heart rate asymmetry (HRA) is considered as a physiological phenomenon in healthy subjects. In this article, we propose a novel HRA index, Slope Index (SI), to quantify phase asymmetry of heart rate variability (HRV) system. We assessed the performance of proposed index in comparison with conventional (Guzik's Index (GI) and Porta's Index (PI)) HRA indices. As illustrative examples, we used two case studies: (i) differentiate physiologic RR series from synthetic RR series; and (ii) discriminate arrhythmia subjects from Healthy using beat-to-beat heart rate time series. The results showed that SI is a superior parameter than GI and PI for both case studies with maximum ROC area of 0.84 and 0.82 respectively. In contrast, GI and PI had ROC areas {0.78, 0.61} and {0.50, 0.56} in two case studies respectively. We also performed surrogate analysis to show that phase asymmetry is caused by a physiologic phenomena rather than a random nature of the signal. In conclusion, quantification of phase asymmetry of HRV provides additional information on HRA, which might have a potential clinical use to discriminate pathological HRV in future.

  6. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Facial asymmetry: a current review

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The term "asymmetry" is used to make reference to dissimilarity between homologous elements, altering the balance between structures. Facial asymmetry is common in the overall population and is often presented subclinically. Nevertheless, on occasion, significant facial asymmetry results not only in functional, but also esthetic issues. Under these conditions, its etiology should be carefully investigated in order to achieve an adequate treatment plan. Facial asymmetry assessment comprises patient's first interview, extra- as well as intraoral clinical examination, and supplementary imaging examination. Subsequent asymmetry treatment depends on patient's age, the etiology of the condition and on the degree of disharmony, and might include from asymmetrical orthodontic mechanics to orthognathic surgery. Thus, the present study aims at addressing important aspects to be considered by the orthodontist reaching an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan of facial asymmetry, in addition to reporting treatment of some patients carriers of such challenging disharmony. PMID:26691977

  8. White matter microstructure asymmetry: effects of volume asymmetry on fractional anisotropy asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Takao, H; Hayashi, N; Ohtomo, K

    2013-02-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information regarding white matter microstructure; however, macroscopic fiber architectures can affect DTI measures. A larger brain (fiber tract) has a 'relatively' smaller voxel size, and the voxels are less likely to contain more than one fiber orientation and more likely to have higher fractional anisotropy (FA). Previous DTI studies report left-to-right differences in the white matter; however, these may reflect true microscopic differences or be caused purely by volume differences. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated left-to-right differences in white matter microstructure across the whole brain. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a large number of white matter volume asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. In many white matter regions, FA asymmetry was positively correlated with volume asymmetry. Voxel-wise analysis with adjustment for volume asymmetry revealed many white matter FA asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. The voxel-wise analysis showed a reduced number of regions with significant FA asymmetry compared with analysis performed without adjustment for volume asymmetry; however, the overall trend of the results was unchanged. The results of the present study suggest that these FA asymmetries are not caused by volume differences and reflect microscopic differences in the white matter.

  9. The area asymmetry in bipolar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T. T.

    2012-03-01

    Context. The area asymmetry between the preceding and following regions of opposite magnetic polarity in a bipolar sunspot group has been known since the studies of Hale and his colleagues in the early 20th century. This area asymmetry, however, has not yet been investigated quantitatively using magnetograms. Aims: We quantitatively define the area asymmetry of bipolar magnetic fields in the photosphere of active regions on the Sun, and investigate correlations between the area asymmetry and other parameters. Methods: We selected 138 bipolar regions including eleven recurrent regions from magnetograms observed by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) from 23 April 1996 to 2 September 2001. These regions are on the southern hemisphere and around the solar meridian. The area asymmetry (A), tilt angle (θ), and magnetic orientation (M) are investigated separately in the preceding and following polarities of the respective active regions. Results: It is found that in 37% (51/138) of our events the preceding polarity regions have larger areas than the following polarity regions. The ratio of the area of the preceding and following polarity regions become close to be unity in four recurrent active regions. In the other four regions, the area ratios do not change, and in three regions, the area ratios become far from unity. Conclusions: Our results quantitatively confirmed our impression that areas of the preceding polarities are lower than those of the following polarities in many bipolar magnetic regions. Table 3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/539/A13

  10. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G. H.; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance. PMID:27558009

  11. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G. H.; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-08-01

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance.

  12. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G H; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C P

    2016-08-25

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance.

  13. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G H; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C P

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance. PMID:27558009

  14. Single transverse-spin asymmetry in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    So far large single transverse-spin asymmetries (SSA) have been observed in many high-energy processes such as semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and proton-proton collisions. Since the conventional parton model and perturbative QCD can not accomodate such large SSAs, the framework for QCD hard processes had to be extended to understand the mechanism of SSA. In this extended frameworks of QCD, intrinsic transverse momentum of partons and the multi-parton (quark-gluon and pure-gluonic) correlations in the hadrons, which were absent in the conventional framework, play a crucial role to cause SSAs, and well-defined formulation of these effects has been a big challenge for QCD theorists. Study on these effects has greatly promoted our understanding on QCD dynamics and hadron structure. In this talk, I will present an overview on these theoretical activity, emphasizing the important role of the Drell-Yan process.

  15. Dark matter assimilation into the baryon asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Fei, Lin; Thaler, Jesse E-mail: lfei@mit.edu

    2012-03-01

    Pure singlets are typically disfavored as dark matter candidates, since they generically have a thermal relic abundance larger than the observed value. In this paper, we propose a new dark matter mechanism called {sup a}ssimilation{sup ,} which takes advantage of the baryon asymmetry of the universe to generate the correct relic abundance of singlet dark matter. Through assimilation, dark matter itself is efficiently destroyed, but dark matter number is stored in new quasi-stable heavy states which carry the baryon asymmetry. The subsequent annihilation and late-time decay of these heavy states yields (symmetric) dark matter as well as (asymmetric) standard model baryons. We study in detail the case of pure bino dark matter by augmenting the minimal supersymmetric standard model with vector-like chiral multiplets. In the parameter range where this mechanism is effective, the LHC can discover long-lived charged particles which were responsible for assimilating dark matter.

  16. Lip asymmetry and smile aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Batwa, Waeil; McDonald, Fraser; Cash, Alex

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To determine if lip asymmetry can affect lip aesthetics. Setting and Participants : A group of dentists (n = 40) and cleft patients (n = 40) were recruited from the dental hospital and cleft service. Interventions : Still photographic digital images of lips and teeth were manipulated to produce a computerized gradient of smile appearance with different degrees of upper-lip vertical asymmetry. These five photographs (with 0 mm representing "symmetry," and 1, 2, 2.5, and 3 mm, asymmetries) were assessed by participants using a 5-point Likert scale. Statistics : Descriptive statistics in addition to chi-square test were used to analyze the data. In order to satisfy the requirement of the chi-square test, the five smile ratings were reduced to three. Results : Lip asymmetry did affect relative smile aesthetics, as determined by dentists and cleft patients. Both the dentists and cleft patients rated the 0-mm photograph more attractive than the 2.5-mm and 3-mm smiles (P < .05). The 0-, 1-, and 2-mm smiles were indistinguishable for both dentists and cleft patients. Conclusion : Lip asymmetry affects smile aesthetics. However, cleft patients and dentists were tolerant of minor asymmetries. This suggests that small degrees of lip asymmetry do not affect relative smile aesthetics as much as large degrees of lip asymmetry (2.5 mm or more).

  17. Facial asymmetry in ocular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Khorrami Nejad, Masoud; Askarizadeh, Farshad; Pour, Fatemeh Farahbakhsh; Ranjbar Pazooki, Mahsa; Moeinitabar, Mohamad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Torticollis can arise from nonocular (usually musculoskeletal) and ocular conditions. Some facial asymmetries are correlated with a history of early onset ocular torticollis supported by the presence of torticollis on reviewing childhood photographs. When present in an adult, this type of facial asymmetry with an origin of ocular torticollis should help to confirm the chronicity of the defect and prevent unnecessary neurologic evaluation in patients with an uncertain history. Assessment of facial asymmetry consists of a patient history, physical examination, and medical imaging. Medical imaging and facial morphometry are helpful for objective diagnosis and measurement of the facial asymmetry, as well as for treatment planning. The facial asymmetry in congenital superior oblique palsy is typically manifested by midfacial hemihypoplasia on the side opposite the palsied muscle, with deviation of the nose and mouth toward the hypoplastic side. Correcting torticollis through strabismus surgery before a critical developmental age may prevent the development of irreversible facial asymmetry. Mild facial asymmetry associated with congenital torticollis has been reported to resolve with continued growth after early surgery, but if asymmetry is severe or is not treated in the appropriate time, it might remain even with continued growth after surgery.

  18. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbauer, J. L.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  19. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  20. Theoretical morphology and development of flight feather vane asymmetry with experimental tests in parrots.

    PubMed

    Feo, Teresa J; Prum, Richard O

    2014-06-01

    Asymmetry in flight feather vane width is a major functional innovation associated with the evolution of flight in the ancestors of birds. However, the developmental and morphological basis of feather shape is not simple, and the developmental processes involved in vane width asymmetry are poorly understood. We present a theoretical model of feather morphology and development that describes the possible ways to modify feather development and produce vane asymmetry. Our model finds that the theoretical morphospace of feather shape is redundant, and that many different combinations of parameters could be responsible for vane asymmetry in a given feather. Next, we empirically measured morphological and developmental model parameters in asymmetric and symmetric feathers from two species of parrots to identify which combinations of parameters create vane asymmetry in real feathers. We found that both longer barbs, and larger barb angles in the relatively wider trailing vane drove asymmetry in tail feathers. Developmentally, longer barbs were the result of an offset of the radial position of the new barb locus, whereas larger barb angles were produced by differential expansion of barbs as the feather unfurls from the tubular feather germ. In contrast, the helical angle of barb ridge development did not contribute to vane asymmetry and could be indicative of a constraint. This research provides the first comprehensive description of both the morphological and developmental modifications responsible for vane asymmetry within real feathers, and identifies key steps that must have occurred during the evolution of vane asymmetry.

  1. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Akrami, Yashar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Solomon, Adam R.; Wang, Yi E-mail: yashar.akrami@astro.uio.no E-mail: a.r.solomon@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fit to the data. We further derive analytic expressions for the corrections to the CMB temperature covariance matrix, or angular power spectra, which can be used in future statistical analysis of the model in spherical harmonic space.

  2. Measurement of Z{sup 0} lepton coupling asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Smy, M.B.

    1997-07-01

    Polarized Z{sup 0}`s from e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) have been used to determine the asymmetry parameters A{sub e}, A{sub {mu}} and A{sub {tau}} from the leptonic decay channels. This is the first direct measurement of A{sub {mu}}. The data have been gathered by the SLC Large Detector (SLD) with the electron polarization averaging 63% during the 1993 data taking period and 77% in 1994-95. A maximum likelihood procedure as well as cross section asymmetries was used to measure the asymmetry parameters from the differential cross sections for equal luminosities of left- and right-handed electron beams. The polarization-dependent muon-pair distributions give A{sub {mu}} = 0.102 {+-}0.034 and the tau-pairs give A{sub {tau}} = 0.195 {+-}0.034. The initial state electronic couplings in all three leptonic channels as well as the final state angular distribution in the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} final state measure A{sub e} to be A{sub e} = 0.152{+-}0.012. Assuming lepton universality and defining a global leptonic asymmetry parameter A{sub e-{mu}-{tau}} = 0.151{+-}0.011. This global leptonic asymmetry value translates directly into sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff}=0.2310{+-}0.0014 at the Z{sup 0} pole.

  3. Quantifying asymmetry: ratios and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Franks, Erin M; Cabo, Luis L

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, the study of metric skeletal asymmetry has relied largely on univariate analyses, utilizing ratio transformations when the goal is comparing asymmetries in skeletal elements or populations of dissimilar dimensions. Under this approach, raw asymmetries are divided by a size marker, such as a bilateral average, in an attempt to produce size-free asymmetry indices. Henceforth, this will be referred to as "controlling for size" (see Smith: Curr Anthropol 46 (2005) 249-273). Ratios obtained in this manner often require further transformations to interpret the meaning and sources of asymmetry. This model frequently ignores the fundamental assumption of ratios: the relationship between the variables entered in the ratio must be isometric. Violations of this assumption can obscure existing asymmetries and render spurious results. In this study, we examined the performance of the classic indices in detecting and portraying the asymmetry patterns in four human appendicular bones and explored potential methodological alternatives. Examination of the ratio model revealed that it does not fulfill its intended goals in the bones examined, as the numerator and denominator are independent in all cases. The ratios also introduced strong biases in the comparisons between different elements and variables, generating spurious asymmetry patterns. Multivariate analyses strongly suggest that any transformation to control for overall size or variable range must be conducted before, rather than after, calculating the asymmetries. A combination of exploratory multivariate techniques, such as Principal Components Analysis, and confirmatory linear methods, such as regression and analysis of covariance, appear as a promising and powerful alternative to the use of ratios. PMID:24842694

  4. Predicting Intrinsic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation can be predicted from participants' perceptions of the social environment and the task environment (Ryan & Deci, 2000)in terms of control, relatedness and competence. To determine the degree of independence of these factors 251 students in higher vocational education (physiotherapy and hotel management) indicated the extent to…

  5. Gaussian quantum steering and its asymmetry in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieci; Cao, Haixin; Jing, Jiliang; Fan, Heng

    2016-06-01

    We study Gaussian quantum steering and its asymmetry in the background of a Schwarzschild black hole. We present a Gaussian channel description of quantum state evolution under the influence of Hawking radiation. We find that thermal noise introduced by the Hawking effect will destroy the steerability between an inertial observer Alice and an accelerated observer Bob who hovers outside the event horizon, while it generates steerability between Bob and a hypothetical observer anti-Bob inside the event horizon. Unlike entanglement behaviors in curved spacetime, here the steering from Alice to Bob suffers from a "sudden death" and the steering from anti-Bob to Bob experiences a "sudden birth" with increasing Hawking temperature. We also find that the Gaussian steering is always asymmetric and the maximum steering asymmetry cannot exceed ln 2 , which means the state never evolves to an extremal asymmetry state. Furthermore, we obtain the parameter settings that maximize steering asymmetry and find that (i) s =arccosh cosh/2r 1 -sinh2r is the critical point of steering asymmetry and (ii) the attainment of maximal steering asymmetry indicates the transition between one-way steerability and both-way steerability for the two-mode Gaussian state under the influence of Hawking radiation.

  6. Characterization of Asymmetry in Magnetoacoustic Emission Burst by Numerical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.; DeNale, R.

    1991-01-01

    It has been well known that the pattern of the magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) burst observed during the sweep over one half-cycle of the hysteresis loop becomes asymmetric depending on the strength of the magnetic domain wall-defect interaction and the state of residual stresses in a ferromagnet. The ascending asymmetry due to the former has been observed at a very low frequency (.7 Hz) of applied AC magnetic field at a given amplitude. The descending asymmetry due to uniaxial compressive stress has been typically observed at the AC applied magnetic field frequency of 20 Hz. The physical interpretation of both types of asymmetry has been well established. It is, however, necessary to perform investigations of the dependence of asymmetry on externally controlled parameters such as the amplitude and frequency of the AC applied magnetic fields. The purpose of the present study is therefore to devise a mathematical means that describes the degree of asymmetry of the MAE burst and apply this scheme to investigate the AC magnetic field amplitude dependence of the asymmetry.

  7. Polarization asymmetry zero in heavy quark photoproduction and leptoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Schmidt, Ivan

    1998-03-01

    We demonstrate two novel features of the sea-quark contributions to the polarized structure functions and photoproduction cross sections, a zero sum rule and a zero crossing point of the polarization asymmetry, which can be traced directly to the dynamics of the perturbative tree-graph gluon-splitting contributions. In particular, we show that the Born contribution of massive quarks arising from photon-gluon fusion gives zero contribution to the logarithmic integral over the polarization asymmetry ∫dν/νΔσ(ν,Q2) for any photon virtuality. The vanishing of this integral in the Bjorken scaling limit then implies a zero gluon-splitting Born contribution to the Gourdin-Ellis-Jaffe sum rule for polarized structure functions from massive sea quarks. The vanishing of the polarization asymmetry at or near the canonical position predicted by perturbative QCD provides an important tool for verifying the dominance of the photon-gluon fusion contribution to charm photoproduction and for validating the effectiveness of this process as a measure of the gluon polarization ΔG(x,Q2) in the nucleon. The displacement of the asymmetry zero from its canonical position is sensitive to the virtuality of the gluon in the photon-gluon fusion subprocess, and it can provide a measure of intrinsic and higher-order sea quark contributions. © 1998

  8. Hemispheric Asymmetries: The Comparative View

    PubMed Central

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Güntürkün, Onur

    2012-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetries play an important role in almost all cognitive functions. For more than a century, they were considered to be uniquely human but now an increasing number of findings in all vertebrate classes make it likely that we inherited our asymmetries from common ancestors. Thus, studying animal models could provide unique insights into the mechanisms of lateralization. We outline three such avenues of research by providing an overview of experiments on left–right differences in the connectivity of sensory systems, the embryonic determinants of brain asymmetries, and the genetics of lateralization. All these lines of studies could provide a wealth of insights into our own asymmetries that should and will be exploited by future analyses. PMID:22303295

  9. [Dreams and interhemispheric asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Korabel'nikova, E A; Golubev, V L

    2001-01-01

    The dreams of 103 children and adolescents, aged 10-17 years, have been studied. The test group included 78 patients with neurotic disorders; control one consisted of 25 healthy subjects. Dream features, which were common for those with preferentially left asymmetry profile both in patients as well as in healthy subjects, were: less expressed novelty factor and frequent appearance of rare phenomena, such as "déjà vu in wakefulness", reality, "mixed" (overlapped) dreams, prolonged dreams in repeat sleep, frequent changes of personages and scenes of action. Left-hander dream peculiarities, being detected only in neurotic patients but not in healthy subjects, emerged as lucid phenomena deficit, "dream in dreams" and "dream reminiscence in dream" syndrome, which have been found only in left-handers. Right and left hemispheres seem to contribute in different ways to a dream formation. In authors believe that the left hemisphere seems to provide dream origin while the right hemisphere provides dream vividness, figurativeness and affective activation level. PMID:11811128

  10. Asymmetry of the heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Suess, S.T.; Hathaway, D.H.; Dressler, A.J.

    1987-09-01

    The outflowing solar wind interacts with the local interstellar medium to form the heliospheric cavity within which the solar wind is supersonic. Because the interstellar medium is moving with respect to the Sun, and because the solar wind has a latitude dependence, the heliosphere is asymmetric. The flow of the interstellar medium past the heliosphere produces an asymmetry because of the Bernoulli effect, which draws the heliosphere out in a direction orthogonal to the upstream-downstream axis, and because of a viscous interaction, which draws out the heliosphere downstream. We consider a variety of cases and find the effects to be significant with, typically, the upstream direction having a heliospheric dimension that is 2/3 the downstream dimension. Suggestions have been put forth to the effect that a spacecraft penetration of the heliospheric shock wave may be imminent. Because one of the most distant spacecraft is moving roughly in the upstream direction relative to the interstellar flow, and the other is moving in the downstream direction, the distance to their encounters with the heliospheric shock may differ by as much as 40 AU. Copyright American Geophyscial Union 1987

  11. [Dreams and interhemispheric asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Korabel'nikova, E A; Golubev, V L

    2001-01-01

    The dreams of 103 children and adolescents, aged 10-17 years, have been studied. The test group included 78 patients with neurotic disorders; control one consisted of 25 healthy subjects. Dream features, which were common for those with preferentially left asymmetry profile both in patients as well as in healthy subjects, were: less expressed novelty factor and frequent appearance of rare phenomena, such as "déjà vu in wakefulness", reality, "mixed" (overlapped) dreams, prolonged dreams in repeat sleep, frequent changes of personages and scenes of action. Left-hander dream peculiarities, being detected only in neurotic patients but not in healthy subjects, emerged as lucid phenomena deficit, "dream in dreams" and "dream reminiscence in dream" syndrome, which have been found only in left-handers. Right and left hemispheres seem to contribute in different ways to a dream formation. In authors believe that the left hemisphere seems to provide dream origin while the right hemisphere provides dream vividness, figurativeness and affective activation level.

  12. Asymmetries during molluscan embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, J A

    1991-01-01

    In some molluscan species the unfertilized egg is symmetrical around its centre. The maturation divisions provide the egg with an axial symmetry with an animal-vegetal asymmetry. During the first two cleavages the egg loses its axial symmetry by the formation of unequal quadrants. The size differences may be very pronounced in species where the first two cleavages are accompanied by the formation of a polar lobe or where the first two cleavages are very unequal. There are some molluscan species in which at first glance the four quadrants appear equal. Exact measurements of the relative volumes have shown that the spiral character of the cleavages gives rise to minor differences between the quadrants. During further division this difference is limited to the vegetal macromeres; other corresponding blastomeres in the four quadrants are mutually equal. Therefore the absolute difference between the macromeres increases after each division. The size difference between the macromeres predisposes the biggest macromere to attain a central position and to become induced to develop the stem cell of the mesoderm. The bilateral symmetry is later lost by the counterclockwise rotation through 180 degrees of the visceral mass in relation to the head and foot. PMID:1802639

  13. Measurement of the parity-violation parameter {ital A}{sub {ital b}} from the left-right forward-backward asymmetry of {ital b} quark production in {ital Z}{sup 0} decays using a momentum-weighted track-charge technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Bacchetta, N.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Dasu, S.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Pescara, L.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; Saxton, O.H.; Schalk, T.; (SLD Collaborat...

    1995-04-10

    Using an impact parameter tag to select an enriched sample of {ital Z}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{ital bb}{ovr bar} events, and the net momentum-weighted track charge to identify the sign of the charge of the underlying {ital b} quark, we have measured the left-right forward-backward asymmetry for {ital b} quark production as a function of polar angle. Based on 1.8pb{sup {minus}1} of {ital Z}{sup 0} decay data produced with a mean electron beam polarization of {ital P}{sub {ital e}}=63%, this yields a direct measurement of the extent of parity violation in the {ital Zbb} coupling of {ital A}{sub {ital b}}=0.87{plus_minus}0.11(stat){plus_minus}0.09(syst).

  14. Two-dimensional chiral asymmetry in unidirectional magnetic anisotropy structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, P.; Ajejas, F.; Maccariello, D.; Cuñado, J. L.; Guerrero, R.; Niño, M. A.; Muñoz, M.; Prieto, J. L.; Miranda, R.; Camarero, J.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the symmetry-breaking effects of magnetic nanostructures that present unidirectional (one-fold) magnetic anisotropy. Angular and field dependent transport and magnetic properties have been studied in two different exchange-biased systems, i.e. ferromagnetic (FM)/ antiferromagnetic (AFM) bilayer and spin-valve structures. We experimentally show the direct relationships between the magnetoresistance (MR) response and the magnetization reversal pathways for any field value and direction. We demonstrate that even though the MR signals are related to different transport phenomena, namely anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and giant magnetoresistance (GMR), chiral asymmetries are found around the magnetization hard-axis direction, in both cases originated from the one-fold symmetry of the interfacial exchange coupling. Our results indicate that the chiral asymmetry of transport and magnetic behaviors are intrinsic of systems with an unidirectional contribution.

  15. Deformity, Erosion, Lesion, and Tumor Occurrence, Fluctuating Asymmetry, and Population Parameters for Bluntnose Minnow (Pimephales notatus) as Indicators of Recovering Water Quality in a Great Lakes Area of Concern, USA.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas P; Burskey, Jacob L

    2016-02-01

    The Grand Calumet River is an industrial river and a Great Lakes Area of Concern in southwestern Lake Michigan, USA. Recovery end points require well-formulated designs to assess the use of occurrence of internal and external anomalies, fluctuating asymmetry, and population indicators to determine recovery from the water-quality Beneficial Use Impairments of fish tumors and deformities. A paired-watershed approach using three reaches within the study area was sampled weekly and separated into near- and far-field reaches, whereas the Little Calumet River, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, served as a control. Field-collected Pimephales notatus were inspected for occurrence of deformities, erosion, lesion, and tumor (DELT) anomalies, measured for body symmetry, and dissected to ascertain sex and the condition of internal organs. Morphometric measurements (p ≤ 0.000), internal organ conditions (p = 0.001), and sex ratios of the fish (p = 0.001) were significantly different between the control and P. notatus test populations. The near-field individuals had the highest incidence of DELT occurrence (70 %) followed by the far-field reaches at Roxana Marsh (45 %) and Kennedy Avenue (41.9 %). Morphometric analysis showed significant differences between body size and shape and age class structure between populations. No test-reach individual lived to reach age >2 years. Gonads and livers from Grand Calumet individuals were found to be blackened, ruptured, and decreased in thickness. None of the fish from test study reaches displayed sexual structure in a 1:1 ratio. High sediment-contaminant concentrations for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metals in the Grand Calumet River correlated (r (2) = 0.998) with decreased population fitness and decreased individual reproductive health.

  16. Cerebral Asymmetry in Insomnia Sufferers

    PubMed Central

    St-Jean, Geneviève; Turcotte, Isabelle; Bastien, Célyne H.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetry is used to describe the differences in electroencephalographic activity between regions of the brain. The objective of this study was to document frontal, central, and parietal asymmetry in psychophysiological (Psy-I) and paradoxical (Para-I) insomnia sufferers as well as good sleeper (GS) controls, and to compare their patterns of asymmetry to others already found in anxiety and depression. Additionally, asymmetry variations between nights were assessed. Participants were 17 Psy-I, 14 Para-I, and 19 GS (mean age = 40 years, SD = 9.4). They completed three nights of polysomnography (PSG) recordings following a clinical evaluation in a sleep laboratory. All sleep cycles of Nights 2 and 3 were retained for power spectral analysis. The absolute activity in frequency bands (0.00–125.00 Hz) was computed at multiple frontal, central, and parietal sites in rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep to provide cerebral asymmetry measures. Mixed model ANOVAs were computed to assess differences between groups and nights. Correlations were performed with asymmetry and symptoms of depression and anxiety from self-reported questionnaires. Over the course of the two nights, Para-I tended to present hypoactivation of their left frontal region but hyperactivation of their right one compared with GS. As for Psy-I, they presented increased activation of their right parietal region compared with Para-I. Asymmetry at frontal, central, and parietal region differed between nights. On a more disrupted night of sleep, Psy-I had increased activity in their right parietal region while Para-I presented a decrease in cerebral activity in the right central region on their less disrupted night of sleep. Anxious and depressive symptoms did not correlate with asymmetry at any region. Therefore, Psy-I and Para-I present unique patterns of cerebral asymmetry that do not relate to depression or anxiety, and asymmetry varies between nights, maybe as a

  17. Direct Mapping of Hippocampal Surfaces with Intrinsic Shape Context

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Rose, Stephen E.; Tu, Zhuowen; Dinov, Ivo; Toga, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    We propose in this paper a new method for the mapping of hippocampal (HC) surfaces to establish correspondences between points on HC surfaces and enable localized HC shape analysis. A novel geometric feature, the intrinsic shape context, is defined to capture the global characteristics of the HC shapes. Based on this intrinsic feature, an automatic algorithm is developed to detect a set of landmark curves that are stable across population. The direct map between a source and target HC surface is then solved as the minimizer of a harmonic energy function defined on the source surface with landmark constraints. For numerical solutions, we compute the map with the approach of solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces. The direct mapping method has the following properties: 1) it has the advantage of being automatic; 2) it is invariant to the pose of HC shapes. In our experiments, we apply the direct mapping method to study temporal changes of HC asymmetry in Alzheimer disease (AD) using HC surfaces from 12 AD patients and 14 normal controls. Our results show that the AD group has a different trend in temporal changes of HC asymmetry than the group of normal controls. We also demonstrate the flexibility of the direct mapping method by applying it to construct spherical maps of HC surfaces. Spherical harmonics (SPHARM) analysis is then applied and it confirms our results about temporal changes of HC asymmetry in AD. PMID:17625918

  18. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  19. Tubulin polyglutamylation is essential for airway ciliary function through the regulation of beating asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Koji; Sato, Showbu; Nakamura, Kenji; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2010-01-01

    Airway epithelial cilia protect the mammalian respiratory system from harmful inhaled materials by providing the force necessary for effective mucociliary clearance. Ciliary beating is asymmetric, composed of clearly distinguished effective and recovery strokes. Neither the importance of nor the essential components responsible for the beating asymmetry has been directly elucidated. We report here that the beating asymmetry is crucial for ciliary function and requires tubulin glutamylation, a unique posttranslational modification that is highly abundant in cilia. WT murine tracheal cilia have an axoneme-intrinsic structural curvature that points in the direction of effective strokes. The axonemal curvature was lost in tracheal cilia from mice with knockout of a tubulin glutamylation-performing enzyme, tubulin tyrosine ligase-like protein 1. Along with the loss of axonemal curvature, the axonemes and tracheal epithelial cilia from these knockout (KO) mice lost beating asymmetry. The loss of beating asymmetry resulted in a reduction of cilia-generated fluid flow in trachea from the KO mice. The KO mice displayed a significant accumulation of mucus in the nasal cavity, and also emitted frequent coughing- or sneezing-like noises. Thus, the beating asymmetry is important for airway ciliary function. Our find-ings provide evidence that tubulin glutamylation is essential for ciliary function through the regulation of beating asymmetry, and provides insight into the molecular basis underlying the beating asymmetry. PMID:20498047

  20. Decision making in noisy bistable systems with time-dependent asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Nené, Nuno R; Zaikin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Our work draws special attention to the importance of the effects of time-dependent parameters on decision making in bistable systems. Here, we extend previous studies of the mechanism known as speed-dependent cellular decision making in genetic circuits by performing an analytical treatment of the canonical supercritical pitchfork bifurcation problem with an additional time-dependent asymmetry and control parameter. This model has an analogous behavior to the genetic switch. In the presence of transient asymmetries and fluctuations, slow passage through the critical region in both systems increases substantially the probability of specific decision outcomes. We also study the relevance for attractor selection of reaching maximum values for the external asymmetry before and after the critical region. Overall, maximum asymmetries should be reached at an instant where the position of the critical point allows for compensation of the detrimental effects of noise in retaining memory of the transient asymmetries. PMID:23410367

  1. Primary structure and solution conditions determine conformational ensemble properties of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hsuan-Han Alberto

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a class of proteins that do not exhibit well-defined three-dimensional structures. The absence of structure is intrinsic to their amino acid sequences, which are characterized by low hydrophobicity and high net charge per residue compared to folded proteins. Contradicting the classic structure-function paradigm, IDPs are capable of interacting with high specificity and affinity, often acquiring order in complex with protein and nucleic acid binding partners. This phenomenon is evident during cellular activities involving IDPs, which include transcriptional and translational regulation, cell cycle control, signal transduction, molecular assembly, and molecular recognition. Although approximately 30% of eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, the nature of IDP conformational ensembles remains unclear. In this dissertation, we describe relationships connecting characteristics of IDP conformational ensembles to their primary structures and solution conditions. Using molecular simulations and fluorescence experiments on a set of base-rich IDPs, we find that net charge per residue segregates conformational ensembles along a globule-to-coil transition. Speculatively generalizing this result, we propose a phase diagram that predicts an IDP's average size and shape based on sequence composition and use it to generate hypotheses for a broad set of intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Simulations reveal that acid-rich IDRs, unlike their oppositely charged base-rich counterparts, exhibit disordered globular ensembles despite intra-chain repulsive electrostatic interactions. This apparent asymmetry is sensitive to simulation parameters for representing alkali and halide salt ions, suggesting that solution conditions modulate IDP conformational ensembles. We refine the ion parameters using a calibration procedure that relies exclusively on crystal lattice properties. Simulations with these parameters recover swollen

  2. Line asymmetry in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 3783

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, J. M.; Bautista, Manuel; Kallman, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    We have reanalyzed the 900 ks Chandra X-ray spectrum of NGC 3783, finding evidence on the asymmetry of the spectral absorption lines. The lines are fitted with a parametric expression that results from an analytical treatment of radiatively driven winds. The line asymmetry distribution derived from the spectrum is consistent with a non-spherical outflow with a finite optical depth. Within this scenario, our model explains the observed correlations between the line velocity shifts and the ionization parameter and between the line velocity shift and the line asymmetry. The present results may provide a framework for detailed testing of models for the dynamic and physical properties of warm absorber in Seyfert galaxies.

  3. Intrinsically Disordered Energy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such ‘intrinsically disordered’ landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an -helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium.

  4. Intrinsically disordered energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such 'intrinsically disordered' landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an α-helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium. PMID:25999294

  5. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-oddmore » since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.« less

  6. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-odd since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.

  7. Lepton asymmetry and the cosmic QCD transition

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Dominik J.; Stuke, Maik E-mail: mstuke@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2009-11-01

    We study the influence of lepton asymmetries on the evolution of the early Universe. The lepton asymmetry l is poorly constrained by observations and might be orders of magnitudes larger than the observed baryon asymmetry b ≅ 10{sup −10}, |l|/b ≤ 2 × 10{sup 8}. We find that lepton asymmetries that are large compared to the tiny baryon asymmetry, can influence the dynamics of the QCD phase transition significantly. The cosmic trajectory in the μ{sub B}−T phase diagram of strongly interacting matter becomes a function of lepton (flavour) asymmetry. For tiny or vanishing baryon and lepton asymmetries lattice QCD simulations show that the cosmic QCD transition is a rapid crossover. However, for large lepton asymmetry, the order of the cosmic transition remains unknown.

  8. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  9. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  10. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over timemore » can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.« less

  11. A Global Gait Asymmetry Index.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Silvia; Resende, Renan A; Clansey, Adam C; Deluzio, Kevin J; Selbie, W Scott; Veloso, António P

    2016-04-01

    High levels of gait asymmetry are associated with many pathologies. Our long-term goal is to improve gait symmetry through real-time biofeedback of a symmetry index. Symmetry is often reported as a single metric or a collective signature of multiple discrete measures. While this is useful for assessment, incorporating multiple feedback metrics presents too much information for most subjects to use as visual feedback for gait retraining. The aim of this article was to develop a global gait asymmetry (GGA) score that could be used as a biofeedback metric for gait retraining and to test the effectiveness of the GGA for classifying artificially-induced asymmetry. Eighteen participants (11 males; age 26.9 y [SD = 7.7]; height 1.8 m [SD = 0.1]; body mass 72.7 kg [SD = 8.9]) walked on a treadmill in 3 symmetry conditions, induced by wearing custom-made sandals: a symmetric condition (identical sandals) and 2 asymmetric conditions (different sandals). The GGA score was calculated, based on several joint angles, and compared between conditions. Significant differences were found among all conditions (P < .001), meaning that the GGA score is sensitive to different levels of asymmetry, and may be useful for rehabilitation and assessment.

  12. A Global Gait Asymmetry Index.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Silvia; Resende, Renan A; Clansey, Adam C; Deluzio, Kevin J; Selbie, W Scott; Veloso, António P

    2016-04-01

    High levels of gait asymmetry are associated with many pathologies. Our long-term goal is to improve gait symmetry through real-time biofeedback of a symmetry index. Symmetry is often reported as a single metric or a collective signature of multiple discrete measures. While this is useful for assessment, incorporating multiple feedback metrics presents too much information for most subjects to use as visual feedback for gait retraining. The aim of this article was to develop a global gait asymmetry (GGA) score that could be used as a biofeedback metric for gait retraining and to test the effectiveness of the GGA for classifying artificially-induced asymmetry. Eighteen participants (11 males; age 26.9 y [SD = 7.7]; height 1.8 m [SD = 0.1]; body mass 72.7 kg [SD = 8.9]) walked on a treadmill in 3 symmetry conditions, induced by wearing custom-made sandals: a symmetric condition (identical sandals) and 2 asymmetric conditions (different sandals). The GGA score was calculated, based on several joint angles, and compared between conditions. Significant differences were found among all conditions (P < .001), meaning that the GGA score is sensitive to different levels of asymmetry, and may be useful for rehabilitation and assessment. PMID:26502455

  13. From symmetry to asymmetry: Phylogenetic patterns of asymmetry variation in animals and their evolutionary significance

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A. Richard

    1996-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of asymmetry variation offer a powerful tool for exploring the interplay between ontogeny and evolution because (i) conspicuous asymmetries exist in many higher metazoans with widely varying modes of development, (ii) patterns of bilateral variation within species may identify genetically and environmentally triggered asymmetries, and (iii) asymmetries arising at different times during development may be more sensitive to internal cytoplasmic inhomogeneities compared to external environmental stimuli. Using four broadly comparable asymmetry states (symmetry, antisymmetry, dextral, and sinistral), and two stages at which asymmetry appears developmentally (larval and postlarval), I evaluated relations between ontogenetic and phylogenetic patterns of asymmetry variation. Among 140 inferred phylogenetic transitions between asymmetry states, recorded from 11 classes in five phyla, directional asymmetry (dextral or sinistral) evolved directly from symmetrical ancestors proportionally more frequently among larval asymmetries. In contrast, antisymmetry, either as an end state or as a transitional stage preceding directional asymmetry, was confined primarily to postlarval asymmetries. The ontogenetic origin of asymmetry thus significantly influences its subsequent evolution. Furthermore, because antisymmetry typically signals an environmentally triggered asymmetry, the phylogenetic transition from antisymmetry to directional asymmetry suggests that many cases of laterally fixed asymmetries evolved via genetic assimilation. PMID:8962039

  14. Intrinsic formulation of the equation of Szebehely

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puel, F.

    1984-03-01

    The first-order linear partial differential equation developed by Szebehely (1974) for the potentials generating one-given-parameter family of plane orbits, expanded by Broucke (1980), Mertens (1981), and Erdi (1982) to the 3D case, is investigated analytically. An intrinsic formulation permitting the use of various coordinate systems is obtained for the plane case, and analogous techniques are applied in separate treatments of the 3D and N-dimensional cases.

  15. Permeability Asymmetry in Composite Porous Ceramic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurcharov, I. M.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Uvarov, V. I.; Kurchatova, O. V.

    The results from the investigation of transport characteristics and gas transport asymmetry in bilayer composite membranes are submitted. These membranes are produced by SHS method. Asymmetric effect and hysteresis of permeability in nanoporous membranes are detected. It's shown, that permeability ratio (asymmetry value of permeability) increases up to several times. The asymmetry of permeability usually decreases monotonically with the pressure decrease.

  16. On the Origin of System III Asymmetries in the Io Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, N. M.; Delamere, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    The Io plasma torus exhibits several intriguing asymmetries which offer insights to the processes that transport mass and energy through the system. While these asymmetries are increasingly well described observationally, most still lack physical explanations. One important asymmetry is fixed in the coordinate system corotating with Jupiter's magnetic field. Space-based and ground-based observations have shown that torus ions are hotter and more highly ionized around System III 20 deg. Our simulations show that this type of torus asymmetry can be caused by enhanced pickup of fresh ions from Io's neutral clouds near these longitudes. The enhancement is caused primarily by the tilt and offset of the torus relative to the neutral clouds. We will report on the model parameters required to match the observed asymmetries, and offer predictions which will allow a test of this hypothesis.

  17. Intrinsic Chevrolets at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Collins, J.C.; Ellis, S.D.; Gunion, J.F.; Mueller, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of the production at high energy of heavy quarks, supersymmetric particles and other large mass colored systems via the intrinsic twist-six components in the proton wave function is discussed. While the existing data do not rule out the possible relevance of intrinsic charm production at present energies, the extrapolation of such intrinsic contributions to very high masses and energies suggests that they will not play an important role at the SSC.

  18. Qutrit teleportation under intrinsic decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarpour, Mojtaba; Naderi, Negar

    2016-08-01

    We study qutrit teleportation and its fidelity in the presence and absence of intrinsic decoherence through a qutrit channel. The channel consists of a Heisenberg chain with xyz interaction model and the intrinsic decoherence is implemented through the Milburn model. It is shown that while the fidelity diminishes due to intrinsic decoherence, it may be enhanced if the channel is initially in an entangled state. It is also observed that, for stronger intrinsic decoherence, the initial entanglement of the channel is more effective in enhancing of fidelity.

  19. The Intrinsic Connectome of the Rat Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Oliver; Eipert, Peter; Philipp, Konstanze; Kettlitz, Richard; Fuellen, Georg; Wree, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The connectomes of nervous systems or parts there of are becoming important subjects of study as the amount of connectivity data increases. Because most tract-tracing studies are performed on the rat, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of the amygdala connectome of this species resulting in a meta-study. The data were imported into the neuroVIISAS system, where regions of the connectome are organized in a controlled ontology and network analysis can be performed. A weighted digraph represents the bilateral intrinsic (connections of regions of the amygdala) and extrinsic (connections of regions of the amygdala to non-amygdaloid regions) connectome of the amygdala. Its structure as well as its local and global network parameters depend on the arrangement of neuronal entities in the ontology. The intrinsic amygdala connectome is a small-world and scale-free network. The anterior cortical nucleus (72 in- and out-going edges), the posterior nucleus (45), and the anterior basomedial nucleus (44) are the nuclear regions that posses most in- and outdegrees. The posterior nucleus turns out to be the most important nucleus of the intrinsic amygdala network since its Shapley rate is minimal. Within the intrinsic amygdala, regions were determined that are essential for network integrity. These regions are important for behavioral (processing of emotions and motivation) and functional (memory) performances of the amygdala as reported in other studies. PMID:23248583

  20. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1984-01-01

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. the second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

  1. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-12-25

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat. 11 figs.

  2. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-01-01

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

  3. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, data analysis, Videos S

  4. Slonczewski windmill with dissipation and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazaliy, Yaroslaw

    2009-03-01

    J. Slonczewski invented spin-transfer effect in layered systems in 1996. Among his first predictions was the regime of the ``windmill motion'' of a perfectly symmetric spin valve. In this regime magnetizations of the layers rotate in a fixed plane keeping the angle between them constant. Since ``windmill'' was predicted to happen in the case of zero magnetic anisotropy, while in most experimental setups the anisotropy is significant, the phenomenon was not a subject of much research. However, the behavior of the magnetically isotropic device is related to the interesting question of current induced ferromagnetism and is worth more attention. Here we study the windmill regime in the presence of dissipation, exchange interaction, and layer asymmetry. It is shown that the windmill rotation is almost always destroyed by those effects, except for a narrow interval of electric current, determined by the parameters of the device.

  5. Z Boson Asymmetry Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, B.

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (A_fb) in dilepton pair decays of Z bosons produced in ppbar collisions using the full Tevatron dataset. The CDF experiment extracts a value for the effective weak mixing angle parameter sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} of 0.2315 +/- 0.0010 from the A_fb distribution of dimuon events in 9.2 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity. From dielectron events in 9.7 fb^{-1} of data, the D0 experiment finds sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} = 0.23106 +/- 0.00053, the world's most precise measurement of sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} from hadron colliders and with light quark couplings.

  6. Measurement of the parity-violation parameters {ital A}{sub {ital b}} and {ital A}{sub {ital c}} from the left-right forward-backward asymmetry of leptons in hadronic events at the {ital Z}{sup 0} resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Bacchetta, N.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Dasu, S.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Pescara, L.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; Saxton, O.H.; Schalk, T.; (SLD Collaborat...

    1995-04-10

    The parity-violating parameters {ital A}{sub {ital b}} and {ital A}{sub {ital c}} are directly measured by the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider in {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} collisions with polarized electrons at the {ital Z}{sup 0} resonance. Leptons with distinctive total and transverse momenta are used to select and analyze {ital Z}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{ital bc}{ovr bar} events. {ital A}{sub {ital b}} and {ital A}{sub {ital c}} are extracted by forming the left-right forward-backward asymmetry in electron beam polarization and quark polar angle. From our 1993 sample of 1.8 pb{sup --1} of {ital Z}{sup 0} decay data with an average electron beam polarization of 63% we find {ital A}{sub {ital b}}=0.91{plus_minus}0.14 (stat) {plus_minus}0.07 (syst) and {ital A}{sub {ital c}}=0.37{plus_minus}0.23 (stat) {plus_minus}0.21 (syst).

  7. CP violation, single lepton polarization asymmetry, and polarized CP asymmetry in B{yields}K{sup *}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay in the four-generation standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Bashiry, V.; Shirkhanghah, N.; Zeynali, K.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we present a study of CP asymmetry, single lepton polarization asymmetry and polarized CP asymmetry in B{yields}K*l{sup +}l{sup -} decay within the four-generation standard model. Taking |V{sub t{sup '}}{sub s}*V{sub t{sup '}}{sub b}|=0.01, 0.02, 0.03 with phase {l_brace}60 deg. -120 deg.{r_brace}, which is consistent with the b{yields}sl{sup +}l{sup -} rate and the Bs mixing parameter {delta}m{sub Bs}, we find that CP asymmetry, single lepton polarization asymmetry and polarized CP asymmetry are sensitive to the existence of the fourth generation. This can serve as an indirect method to search for new physics effects, in particular, to search for the fourth-generation quarks(t{sup '},b{sup '}) via their indirect manifestations in loop diagrams.

  8. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  9. Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence Driven Intrinsic Rotation in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2011-02-07

    Recent progress from global gyrokinetic simulations in understanding the origin of intrinsic rotation in toroidal plasmas is reported with emphasis on electron thermal transport dominated regimes. The turbulence driven intrinsic torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation by the fluctuation intensity and the intensity gradient in the presence of zonal flow shear induced asymmetry in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is shown to scale close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current. These results qualitatively reproduce empirical scalings of intrinsic rotation observed in various experiments. The origin of current scaling is found to be due to enhanced kll symmetry breaking induced by the increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The physics origin for the linear dependence of intrinsic torque on pressure gradient is that both turbulence intensity and the zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving residual stress, increase with the strength of turbulence drive, which is R0/LTe and R0/Lne for the trapped electron mode. __________________________________________________

  10. Significance of postshunt ventricular asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Linder, M; Diehl, J T; Sklar, F H

    1981-08-01

    Ventricular asymmetries after shunt surgery were studied. Right and left ventricular areas from pre-and postoperative computerized tomography scans were measured with a computer digitizing technique, and the respective areas were expressed as a ratio. Measurements were made from the scans of 15 hydrocephalic children selected at random. Ages at surgery ranged from 1 to 101 weeks. The results indicate a significantly greater decrease in ventricular size on the side of the ventricular shunt catheter. Multiple regression analysis showed no relationship between the magnitude of change in ventricular size and either the patients' age orn the time intervals between surgery and follow-up scans. Possible mechanisms for these postshunt ventricular asymmetries are discussed.

  11. Parameterization of asymmetry in magnetoacoustic emission by numerical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birt, E. A.; Yost, W. T.; Denale, R.; Grainger, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Two methods for processing the digitized waveform data obtained from magnetoacoustic emission measurements on a high-strength steel are investigated. Two different techniques to obtain an asymmetry parameter are presented. It is shown that the variation in this asymmetry parameter from five embrittled samples and one unembrittled steel sample can be related to the impact toughness and is not dependent on the magnetic field strength. This technique is nondestructive and is shown to determine the normalized impact toughness of a high-strength steel to better than 14 percent in the decade of interest. A comparison of a magnetoacoustic emission burst and pickup coil output from an unembrittled steel sample and an embrittled sample is illustrated.

  12. Lean Mass Asymmetry Influences Force and Power Asymmetry During Jumping in Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David R.; Sanfilippo, Jennifer L.; Binkley, Neil; Heiderscheit, Bryan C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to: (1) examine how asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass influenced force and power asymmetry during jumping, (2) determine how power and force asymmetry affected jump height, and (3) report normative values in collegiate athletes. Force and power were assessed from each limb using bilateral force plates during a countermovement jump in 167 Division 1 athletes (mass=85.7±20.3kg, age=20.0±1.2years, 103M/64F). Lean mass of the pelvis, thigh, and shank was assessed via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Percent asymmetry was calculated for lean mass at each region (pelvis, thigh, and shank) as well as force and power. Forward stepwise regressions were performed to determine the influence of lean mass asymmetry on force and power asymmetry. Thigh and shank lean mass asymmetry explained 20% of the variance in force asymmetry (R2=0.20, P<0.001), while lean mass asymmetry of the pelvis, thigh and shank explained 25% of the variance in power asymmetry (R2=0.25, P<0.001). Jump height was compared across level of force and power asymmetry (P>0.05) and greater than 10% asymmetry in power tended to decrease performance (effect size>1.0). Ninety-five percent of this population (2.5th to 97.5th percentile) displayed force asymmetry between −11.8 to 16.8% and a power asymmetry between −9.9 to 11.5%. A small percentage (<4%) of these athletes displayed more than 15% asymmetry between limbs. These results demonstrate that lean mass asymmetry in the lower extremity is at least partially responsible for asymmetries in force and power. However, a large percentage remains unexplained by lean mass asymmetry. PMID:24402449

  13. Lean mass asymmetry influences force and power asymmetry during jumping in collegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Bell, David R; Sanfilippo, Jennifer L; Binkley, Neil; Heiderscheit, Bryan C

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to (a) examine how asymmetry in lower extremity lean mass influenced force and power asymmetry during jumping, (b) determine how power and force asymmetry affected jump height, and (c) report normative values in collegiate athletes. Force and power were assessed from each limb using bilateral force plates during a countermovement jump in 167 division 1 athletes (mass = 85.7 ± 20.3 kg, age = 20.0 ± 1.2 years; 103 men and 64 women). Lean mass of the pelvis, thigh, and shank was assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Percent asymmetry was calculated for lean mass at each region (pelvis, thigh, and shank) as well as force and power. Forward stepwise regressions were performed to determine the influence of lean mass asymmetry on force and power asymmetry. Thigh and shank lean mass asymmetry explained 20% of the variance in force asymmetry (R = 0.20, p < 0.001), whereas lean mass asymmetry of the pelvis, thigh, and shank explained 25% of the variance in power asymmetry (R = 0.25, p < 0.001). Jump height was compared across level of force and power asymmetry (p > 0.05) and greater than 10% asymmetry in power tended to decrease the performance (effect size >1.0). Ninety-five percent of this population (2.5th to 97.5th percentile) displayed force asymmetry between -11.8 and 16.8% and a power asymmetry between -9.9 and 11.5%. A small percentage (<4%) of these athletes displayed more than 15% asymmetry between limbs. These results demonstrate that lean mass asymmetry in the lower extremity is at least partially responsible for asymmetries in force and power. However, a large percentage remains unexplained by lean mass asymmetry.

  14. $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Salamu, Yusupujiang; Ji, Chueng -Ryong; Melnitchouk, W.; Wang, P.

    2015-03-25

    We compute the $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory, including both nucleon and Δ degrees of freedom, within both relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. In addition to the distribution at $x>0$, we estimate the correction to the integrated asymmetry arising from zero momentum contributions from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at $x=0$, which have not been accounted for in previous analyses. In conclusion, we find that the empirical $x$ dependence of $\\bar d - \\bar u$ as well as the integrated asymmetry can be well reproduced in terms of a transverse momentum cutoff parameter.

  15. Fluctuating asymmetry and testing isolation of Montana grizzly bear populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Picton, Harold D.; Palmisciano, D.A.; Nelson, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry of adult skulls was used to test he genetic isolation of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population from its nearest neighbor. An overall summary statistic was used in addition to 16 other parameters. Tests found the males of the Yellowstone populaion to be more vaiable than those of the North Conitinental Divide Exosystem. Evidence for precipitaiton effects is also included. This test tends to support the existing management haypothesis that the Yellowstone population is isolatied.

  16. Fully Differential Monte-Carlo Generator Dedicated to TMDs and Bessel-Weighted Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Aghasyan, Mher M.; Avakian, Harut A.

    2013-10-01

    We present studies of double longitudinal spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator, which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model based on the fully differential cross section for the process. Additionally, we apply Bessel-weighting to the simulated events to extract transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and also discuss possible uncertainties due to kinematic correlation effects.

  17. Beta-decay asymmetry of the neutron and g/sub A//g/sub V/

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, P.; Dubbers, D.; Hornig, L.; Klemt, E.; Last, J.; Schuetze, H.; Freedman, S.J.; Scharpf, O.

    1986-03-03

    The ..beta..-decay asymmetry of the free neutron is measured by use of a beam of polarized neutrons and a long solenoidal ..beta.. spectrometer with 4..pi.. solid angle for electron detection. The asymmetry parameter corrected for recoil and weak magnetism is A/sub 0/ = -0.1146 +- 0.0019, implying g/sub A//g/sub V/ = -1.262 +- 0.005 for the ratio of the axial-vector to the vector weak-coupling constants.

  18. Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in b {yields} s Penguins

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, H.

    2006-07-11

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}(1020)K{sup 0}, {eta}'K{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0}, {omega}(782)K{sub S}{sup 0} and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays based on a sample of 386 x 106BB(bar sign) pairs collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e+e- collider. These decays are dominated by the b {yields} s gluonic penguin transition and are sensitive to new CP-violating phases from physics beyond the standard model. One neutral meson is fully reconstructed in one of the specified decay channels, and the flavor of the accompanying B meson is identified from its decay products. CP-violation parameters are obtained from the asymmetries in the distributions of the proper-time intervals between the two B decays. We also perform measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma} decay that is dominated by the b {yields} s radiative penguin.

  19. Intrinsic Negative Mass from Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mei, F.; Caramazza, P.; Pierangeli, D.; Di Domenico, G.; Ilan, H.; Agranat, A. J.; Di Porto, P.; DelRe, E.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and provide experimental evidence of a mechanism able to support negative intrinsic effective mass. The idea is to use a shape-sensitive nonlinearity to change the sign of the mass in the leading linear propagation equation. Intrinsic negative-mass dynamics is reported for light beams in a ferroelectric crystal substrate, where the diffusive photorefractive nonlinearity leads to a negative-mass Schrödinger equation. The signature of inverted dynamics is the observation of beams repelled from strongly guiding integrated waveguides irrespective of wavelength and intensity and suggests shape-sensitive nonlinearity as a basic mechanism leading to intrinsic negative mass.

  20. Dentofacial Asymmetries: Challenging Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Manish; Agrawal, Jiwan Asha; Nanjannawar, Lalita; Fulari, Sangamesh; Kagi, Vishwal

    2015-01-01

    Dentofacial asymmetry is quite common and when sufficiently severe can require surgical orthodontic intervention. Asymmetries can be classified according to the structures involved into skeletal, dental and functional. In diagnosing asymmetries, a thorough clinical examination and radiographic survey are essential to determine the extent of soft tissue, skeletal, dental and functional involvement. Dental asymmetries, as well as a variety of functional deviations, can be managed orthodontically, whereas significant structural facial asymmetries require a comprehensive orthodontic and orthognathic management. With less severe dental, skeletal and soft tissue deviations the advisability of treatment should be carefully considered. The following article also contains a case report highlighting the importance of proper diagnosis in treatment plan for management of dentofacial asymmetry. PMID:26229387

  1. Long-term changes in Jovian synchrotron radio emission - Intrinsic variations or effects of viewing geometry?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Lon L.

    1993-01-01

    Possible causes of the observed long-term variation of Jovian synchrotron radio emission, including both intrinsic changes in the Jovian radiation belts and apparent changes due to variations in the Jovigraphic declination of the earth, D sub E, are investigated. An increase in diffusion rate with other parameters held constant results in an inward displacement of the peak emission radial distance that is not observed. Effects of viewing geometry changes are examined. The possible importance of such effects is suggested by a correlation between the total decimetric radio flux and D sub E, which varies between -3.3 and +3.3 deg during one Jovian orbital period. Because the Jovian central meridian longitudes where the magnetic latitude passes through zero during a given Jovian rotation change substantially with D sub E and since significant longitudinal asymmetries exist in both the volume emissivity and the latitudinal profile of the beam, the total intensity should be at least a partial function of D sub E.

  2. WIMP abundance and lepton (flavour) asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Stuke, Maik; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2012-03-01

    We investigate how large lepton asymmetries affect the evolution of the early universe at times before big bang nucleosynthesis and in particular how they influence the relic density of WIMP dark matter. In comparison to the standard calculation of the relic WIMP abundance we find a decrease, depending on the lepton flavour asymmetry. We find an effect of up to 20 per cent for lepton flavour asymmetries l{sub f} = O(0.1)

  3. Quasiparticle and Josephson Current in the Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in Htsc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Namiranian, A.; Najafi, A.

    2000-09-01

    The tunneling properties of the model structure consisting of HTSC and normal metal are studied. The influence of the impurity concentration in CuO2 layers on the high energy features is investigated, taking into account tight binding band structure, d-wave gap symmetry, group velocity and tunneling directionality. The increasing of the impurity lifetime broadening factor changes the degree of tunneling conductance peaks asymmetry, leads to nonequal shifting of the quasiparticle peaks and their width. We consider that the underlying asymmetry of the conductance peaks is primarily due to the features of quasiparticle energy spectrum and the d-wave symmetry enhances the degree of the peaks asymmetry. The analysis of c-axis transport of quasiparticles and Cooper pairs of stacked intrinsic junctions in HTSC is done.

  4. Congenital craniofacial asymmetry: early treatment.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, L A; Schut, L; Rosen, H M

    1981-01-01

    Congenital craniofacial asymmetry has two dominant causes: isolated synostosis and craniofacial clefts. Treatment considerations in these problems differ from those with isolated cranial or isolated facial defects. Isolated cranial defects are most frequently treated by the neurosurgeon with craniectomy alone. Isolated facial asymmetry when congenital in origin usually manifests as hemifacial microsomia and based on our experience with 40 such patients, is best treated in later childhood. Treatment timing of craniofacial asymmetry varies with the cause, but is best done in the first two years of life. Nasofrontal encephaloceles are usually best treated in the first few weeks of life; synostosis syndromes are treated at six months of age after the facial sutures have had time to stabilize sufficiently for adequate dissection and mobilization; and other craniofacial clefts at approximately two years of age following descent of the teeth and better homeostatic capability of the patient. Based on our series of 58 patients, 40 treated with isolated synostosis at less than one year of age, eight at more than one year of age, and ten patients with craniofacial clefts, the guidelines for timing and methods of treatment have evolved. Liberal use of craniectomy bone with expected regrowth is possible in the first year of life, and more limited use in the second year of life. This bone is used to hold the repositioned orbit, augment hypoplastic zygomas, and reconstruct noses, or for other uses. In isolated synostosis, repositioning provides a form of immediate catch-up growth then proceeds normally. In craniofacial clefts, repositioning puts structures into normal relations and growth likewise proceeds normally. The isolated synostosis syndromes treated at a later age are done with more difficulty, though may be effectively cared for. Complications other than incomplete structural correction have been nonexistent in the group two years of age and less.

  5. Quantum speed limits, coherence, and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Iman; Spekkens, Robert W.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    The resource theory of asymmetry is a framework for classifying and quantifying the symmetry-breaking properties of both states and operations relative to a given symmetry. In the special case where the symmetry is the set of translations generated by a fixed observable, asymmetry can be interpreted as coherence relative to the observable eigenbasis, and the resource theory of asymmetry provides a framework to study this notion of coherence. We here show that this notion of coherence naturally arises in the context of quantum speed limits. Indeed, the very concept of speed of evolution, i.e., the inverse of the minimum time it takes the system to evolve to another (partially) distinguishable state, is a measure of asymmetry relative to the time translations generated by the system Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the celebrated Mandelstam-Tamm and Margolus-Levitin speed limits can be interpreted as upper bounds on this measure of asymmetry by functions which are themselves measures of asymmetry in the special case of pure states. Using measures of asymmetry that are not restricted to pure states, such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information, we obtain extensions of the Mandelstam-Tamm bound which are significantly tighter in the case of mixed states. We also clarify some confusions in the literature about coherence and asymmetry, and show that measures of coherence are a proper subset of measures of asymmetry.

  6. Measuring Asymmetry in Time-Stamped Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Dearlove, Bethany L; Frost, Simon D W

    2015-07-01

    Previous work has shown that asymmetry in viral phylogenies may be indicative of heterogeneity in transmission, for example due to acute HIV infection or the presence of 'core groups' with higher contact rates. Hence, evidence of asymmetry may provide clues to underlying population structure, even when direct information on, for example, stage of infection or contact rates, are missing. However, current tests of phylogenetic asymmetry (a) suffer from false positives when the tips of the phylogeny are sampled at different times and (b) only test for global asymmetry, and hence suffer from false negatives when asymmetry is localised to part of a phylogeny. We present a simple permutation-based approach for testing for asymmetry in a phylogeny, where we compare the observed phylogeny with random phylogenies with the same sampling and coalescence times, to reduce the false positive rate. We also demonstrate how profiles of measures of asymmetry calculated over a range of evolutionary times in the phylogeny can be used to identify local asymmetry. In combination with different metrics of asymmetry, this combined approach offers detailed insights of how phylogenies reconstructed from real viral datasets may deviate from the simplistic assumptions of commonly used coalescent and birth-death process models.

  7. UV Observations of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Romeo, G.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetry in the auroral patterns can be an important diagnostic for understanding the dynamics of solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system (e.g., Newel and Meng, 1998; Fillingrim et al., 2005). Molecular nitrogen emission in the UV Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands can be used to determine energy flux and electron mean energy (Sotirelis, et al, 2013) and thereby Hall and Pederson integrated conductances (Gjerloev, et al., 2014). UV imagery provided by the 4 SSUSI instruments on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16-F19 spacecraft provide two dimensional maps of this emission at different local times. Often there are near simultaneous observations of both poles by some combination of the satellites. (see figure 1) The SSUSI auroral data products are well suited to this study, as they have the following features.: - dayglow has been subtracted on dayside aurora - electron energy flux and mean energy are pre-calculated - individual arcs have been identified through image processing. In order to intercompare data from multiple satellites, we must first ensure that the instrument calibrations are consistent. In this work we show that the instruments are consistently calibrated, and that results generated from the SSUSI data products can be trusted. Several examples of storm time asymmetries captured by the SSUSI instruments will be discussed. Fillingim, M. O., G. K. Parks, H. U. Frey, T. J. Immel, and S. B. Mende (2005), Hemispheric asymmetry of the afternoon electron aurora, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L03113, doi:10.1029/2004GL021635. Gjerloev, J., Schaefer, R., Paxton, L, and Zhang, Y. (2014), A comprehensive empirical model of the ionospheric conductivity derived from SSUSI/GUVI, SuperMAG and SuperDARN data, SM51G-4339, Fall 2014 AGU meeting, San Francisco. Newell, P. T., and C.-I. Meng (1988), Hemispherical asymmetry in cusp precipitation near solstices, J. Geophys. Res., 93(A4), 2643-2648, doi:10.1029/JA093iA04p02643

  8. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  9. Intrinsic Mean Square Displacement in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vural, Derya; Glyde, Henry R.

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of biological molecules is investigated in neutron scattering experiments, in molecular dynamics simulations, and using analytical theory. Specifically, the mean square displacement (MSD), exp, of hydrogen in proteins is determined from measurements of the incoherent elastic neutron scattering intensity (ENSI). The MSD, exp, is usually obtained from the dependence of the ENSI on the scattering wave vector Q. The MSD increases with increasing temperature reaching large values at room temperature. Large MSD is often associated with and used as an indicator of protein function. The observed MSD, however, depends on the energy resolution of the neutron spectrometer employed. We present a method, a first attempt, to extract the intrinsic MSD of hydrogen in protein from measurements, one that is independent of the instrument resolution. The method consists of a model of the ENSI that contains (1) the intrinsic MSD, (2) the instrument resolution width and (3) a parameter describing the motional processes that contribute to the MSD. Several examples of intrinsic MSDs in proteins obtained from fitting to data in the existing literature will be presented.

  10. Learning intrinsic excitability in medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    We present an unsupervised, local activation-dependent learning rule for intrinsic plasticity (IP) which affects the composition of ion channel conductances for single neurons in a use-dependent way. We use a single-compartment conductance-based model for medium spiny striatal neurons in order to show the effects of parameterization of individual ion channels on the neuronal membrane potential-curent relationship (activation function). We show that parameter changes within the physiological ranges are sufficient to create an ensemble of neurons with significantly different activation functions. We emphasize that the effects of intrinsic neuronal modulation on spiking behavior require a distributed mode of synaptic input and can be eliminated by strongly correlated input. We show how modulation and adaptivity in ion channel conductances can be utilized to store patterns without an additional contribution by synaptic plasticity (SP). The adaptation of the spike response may result in either "positive" or "negative" pattern learning. However, read-out of stored information depends on a distributed pattern of synaptic activity to let intrinsic modulation determine spike response. We briefly discuss the implications of this conditional memory on learning and addiction. PMID:25520776

  11. X-ray spectra of Hercules X-1. 2: Intrinsic beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of Hercules X-1 was observed in the energy range 2-24 keV with sufficient temporal resolution to allow detailed study of spectral correlations with the 1.24 sec pulse phase. A region of spectral hardening which extends over approximately the 1/10 pulse phase may be associated with the underlying beam. The pulse shape stability and its asymmetry relative to this intrinsic beam are discussed.

  12. Chiral asymmetry in spiral galaxies?

    PubMed

    Kondepudi, D K; Durand, D J

    2001-07-01

    Spiral galaxies are chiral entities when coupled with the direction of their recession velocity. As viewed from the Earth, the S-shaped and Z-shaped spiral galaxies are two chiral forms. What is the nature of chiral symmetry in spiral galaxies? In the Carnegie Atlas of Galaxies that lists photographs of a total of 1,168 galaxies, we found 540 galaxies, classified as normal or barred spirals, that are clearly identifiable as S- or Z- type. The recession velocities for 538 of these galaxies could be obtained from this atlas and other sources. A statistical analysis of this sample reveals no overall asymmetry but there is a significant asymmetry in certain subclasses: dominance of S-type galaxies in the Sb class of normal spiral galaxies and a dominance of Z-type in the SBb class of barred spiral galaxies. Both S- and Z-type galaxies seem to have similar velocity distribution, indicating no spatial segregation of the two chiral forms.

  13. Whistled Turkish alters language asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Güntürkün, Onur; Güntürkün, Monika; Hahn, Constanze

    2015-08-17

    Whistled languages represent an experiment of nature to test the widely accepted view that language comprehension is to some extent governed by the left hemisphere in a rather input-invariant manner. Indeed, left-hemisphere superiority has been reported for atonal and tonal languages, click consonants, writing and sign languages. The right hemisphere is specialized to encode acoustic properties like spectral cues, pitch, and melodic lines and plays a role for prosodic communicative cues. Would left hemisphere language superiority change when subjects had to encode a language that is constituted by acoustic properties for which the right hemisphere is specialized? Whistled Turkish uses the full lexical and syntactic information of vocal Turkish, and transforms this into whistles to transport complex conversations with constrained whistled articulations over long distances. We tested the comprehension of vocally vs. whistled identical lexical information in native whistle-speaking people of mountainous Northeast Turkey. We discovered that whistled language comprehension relies on symmetric hemispheric contributions, associated with a decrease of left and a relative increase of right hemispheric encoding mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that a language that places high demands on right-hemisphere typical acoustical encoding creates a radical change in language asymmetries. Thus, language asymmetry patterns are in an important way shaped by the physical properties of the lexical input. PMID:26294179

  14. Asymmetry in bicycle ergometer pedalling.

    PubMed

    Daly, D J; Cavanagh, P R

    1976-01-01

    The effects of changes in speed and resistance setting on the bilateral symmetry of work output on the bicycle ergometer were studied. The cranks of a Monarch bicycle ergometer were instrumented with foil strain gauges and the bridge outputs were integrated on-line and analyzed by a program running in a Hewlett Packard 2115A computer. Twenty male subjects performed three thirty-second trials at each of nine speed and resistance combinations. Indices of asymmetry from 66-178 were found using kicking dominance (n = 20) and 56-135 using a strength dominance classification (n = 13). Day to day reliability of the index of asymmetry was found to be only 0.47; within day reliability was 0.87 for day one and 0.79 for day two. No significant effects for speed or resistance changes were shown on either day for the strength dominant subjects. When kicking dominance was considered main effects were encountered on both days for speed although there was no clear directional trend. The findings of these experiments have important implications for studies where measurements are made on the lower extremity during cycle ergometer exercise, and for competitive cyclists engaged in endurance competition.

  15. Asymmetry in the epithalamus of vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    L. CONCHA, MIGUEL; W. WILSON, STEPHEN

    2001-01-01

    The epithalamus is a major subdivision of the diencephalon constituted by the habenular nuclei and pineal complex. Structural asymmetries in this region are widespread amongst vertebrates and involve differences in size, neuronal organisation, neurochemistry and connectivity. In species that possess a photoreceptive parapineal organ, this structure projects asymmetrically to the left habenula, and in teleosts it is also situated on the left side of the brain. Asymmetries in size between the left and right sides of the habenula are often associated with asymmetries in neuronal organisation, although these two types of asymmetry follow different evolutionary courses. While the former is more conspicuous in fishes (with the exception of teleosts), asymmetries in neuronal organisation are more robust in amphibia and reptiles. Connectivity of the parapineal organ with the left habenula is not always coupled with asymmetries in habenular size and/or neuronal organisation suggesting that, at least in some species, assignment of parapineal and habenular asymmetries may be independent events. The evolutionary origins of epithalamic structures are uncertain but asymmetry in this region is likely to have existed at the origin of the vertebrate, perhaps even the chordate, lineage. In at least some extant vertebrate species, epithalamic asymmetries are established early in development, suggesting a genetic regulation of asymmetry. In some cases, epigenetic factors such as hormones also influence the development of sexually dimorphic habenular asymmetries. Although the genetic and developmental mechanisms by which neuroanatomical asymmetries are established remain obscure, some clues regarding the mechanisms underlying laterality decisions have recently come from studies in zebrafish. The Nodal signalling pathway regulates laterality by biasing an otherwise stochastic laterality decision to the left side of the epithalamus. This genetic mechanism ensures a consistency of

  16. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  17. The asymmetry of telomere replication contributes to replicative senescence heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Bourgeron, Thibault; Xu, Zhou; Doumic, Marie; Teixeira, Maria Teresa

    2015-10-15

    In eukaryotes, the absence of telomerase results in telomere shortening, eventually leading to replicative senescence, an arrested state that prevents further cell divisions. While replicative senescence is mainly controlled by telomere length, the heterogeneity of its onset is not well understood. This study proposes a mathematical model based on the molecular mechanisms of telomere replication and shortening to decipher the causes of this heterogeneity. Using simulations fitted on experimental data obtained from individual lineages of senescent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, we decompose the sources of senescence heterogeneity into interclonal and intraclonal components, and show that the latter is based on the asymmetry of the telomere replication mechanism. We also evidence telomere rank-switching events with distinct frequencies in short-lived versus long-lived lineages, revealing that telomere shortening dynamics display important variations. Thus, the intrinsic heterogeneity of replicative senescence and its consequences find their roots in the asymmetric structure of telomeres.

  18. Background check for anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2010-10-01

    The D0 Collaboration has reported an excess of roughly 1% of {mu}{sup -{mu}-} pairs over {mu}{sup +{mu}+} pairs in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=1.96 GeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, when known backgrounds are subtracted. This excess, if ascribed to CP violation in meson-antimeson mixing of nonstrange or strange neutral B mesons, is about 40 times that expected in the standard model. We propose a null test, based on a tight restriction on the muon impact parameter b, to confirm that this excess is indeed due to B mesons. If the asymmetry is due to anomalous CP violation in B{sub s}-B{sub s} mixing, then a tight restriction on b would increase by a factor 2 the net asymmetry from neutral B mixing, while the sample of dimuons from neutral B decays will be reduced significantly relative to background events.

  19. Repeated Split-BeltTreadmill Training Improves Poststroke Step Length Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Reisman, Darcy S.; McLean, Heather; Keller, Jennifer; Danks, Kelly A.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective Previous studies suggest that error augmentation may be used as a strategy to achieve longer-term changes in gait deficits after stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine whether longer-term improvements in step length asymmetry could be achieved with repeated split-belt treadmill walking practice using an error augmentation strategy. Methods 13 persons with chronic stroke (>6 months) participated in testing: (1) prior to 12 sessions of split-belt treadmill training, (2) after the training, and (3) in follow-up testing at 1 and 3 months. Step length asymmetry was the target of training, so belt speeds were set to augment step length asymmetry such that aftereffects resulted in reduced step length asymmetry during overground walking practice. Each individual was classified as a “responder” or “nonresponder” based on whether their reduction in step length asymmetry exceeded day-to-day variability. Results For the group and for the responders (7 individuals), step length asymmetry improved from baseline to posttesting (P < .05) through an increased step length on both legs but a relatively larger change on the shorter step side (P < .05). Other parameters that were not targeted (eg, stance time asymmetry) did not change over the intervention. Conclusions This study demonstrates that short-term adaptations can be capitalized on through repetitive practice and can lead to longer-term improvements in gait deficits poststroke. The error augmentation strategy, which promotes stride-by-stride adjustment to reduce asymmetry and results in improved asymmetry during overground walking practice, appears to be critical for obtaining the improvements observed. PMID:23392918

  20. A collection of intrinsic disorder characterizations from eukaryotic proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Michael; Schnell, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and protein regions lack a stable three-dimensional structure under physiological conditions. Several proteomic investigations of intrinsic disorder have been performed to date and have found disorder to be prevalent in eukaryotic proteomes. Here we present descriptive statistics of intrinsic disorder features for ten model eukaryotic proteomes that have been calculated from computational disorder prediction algorithms. The data descriptor also provides consensus disorder annotations as well as additional physical parameters relevant to protein disorder, and further provides protein existence information for all proteins included in our analysis. The complete datasets can be downloaded freely, and it is envisaged that they will be updated periodically with new proteomes and protein disorder prediction algorithms. These datasets will be especially useful for assessing protein disorder, and conducting novel analyses that advance our understanding of intrinsic disorder and protein structure. PMID:27326998

  1. Asymmetry and Performance: Toward a Neurodevelopmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, David B.; Barth, Joan M.; Merrill, Edward C.

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry implies the existence of developmental influences that affect one hemisphere more than the other. However, those influences are poorly understood. One simple view is that asymmetry may exist because of a relationship between a mental process' degree of lateralization and how well it functions. Data scaling issues have largely…

  2. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  3. The evolution and genetics of cerebral asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Corballis, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Handedness and cerebral asymmetry are commonly assumed to be uniquely human, and even defining characteristics of our species. This is increasingly refuted by the evidence of behavioural asymmetries in non-human species. Although complex manual skill and language are indeed unique to our species and are represented asymmetrically in the brain, some non-human asymmetries appear to be precursors, and others are shared between humans and non-humans. In all behavioural and cerebral asymmetries so far investigated, a minority of individuals reverse or negate the dominant asymmetry, suggesting that such asymmetries are best understood in the context of the overriding bilateral symmetry of the brain and body, and a trade-off between the relative advantages and disadvantages of symmetry and asymmetry. Genetic models of handedness, for example, typically postulate a gene with two alleles, one disposing towards right-handedness and the other imposing no directional influence. There is as yet no convincing evidence as to the location of this putative gene, suggesting that several genes may be involved, or that the gene may be monomorphic with variations due to environmental or epigenetic influences. Nevertheless, it is suggested that, in behavioural, neurological and evolutionary terms, it may be more profitable to examine the degree rather than the direction of asymmetry. PMID:19064358

  4. Visual Search Asymmetry with Uncertain Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiki, Jun; Koike, Takahiko; Takahashi, Kohske; Inoue, Tomoko

    2005-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of search asymmetry is still unknown. Many computational models postulate top-down selection of target-defining features as a crucial factor. This feature selection account implies, and other theories implicitly assume, that predefined target identity is necessary for search asymmetry. The authors tested the validity of…

  5. Asymmetry in zeta Auriage chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, I. A.

    1988-01-01

    Asymmetry in the ultraviolet spectra of zeta-Aur, similar to that reported in optical observations, was studied using IUE data. A plot of the integrated flux of zeta Aurigae from 1625 to 1675 A as a function of absolute phase shows no significant difference between the ingress and egress phases. A plot of the integrated flux from 1625 to 1675 A for 22 Vul as a function of absolute phase for both ingress and egress confirms that the atmospheric eclipse is asymmetric in 22 Vul. The eclipse in 22 Vul begins symmetrically but departs from symmetry at a phase greater than 0.05. The pronounced dip at ingress suggests a feature in the chromosphere.

  6. Collins Asymmetry at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-01-17

    We study the Collins effect in the azimuthal asymmetricdistribution of hadrons inside a high energy jet in the single transversepolarized proton proton scattering. From the detailed analysis ofone-gluon and two-gluon exchange diagrams contributions, the Collinsfunction is found the same as that in the semi-inclusive deep inelasticscattering and e+e- annihilations. The eikonal propagators in thesediagrams do not contribute to the phase needed for the Collins-typesingle spin asymmetry, and the universality is derived as a result of theWard identity. We argue that this conclusion depends on the momentum flowof the exchanged gluon and the kinematic constraints in the fragmentationprocess, and is generic and model-independent.

  7. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  8. A scaler-based data acquisition system for measuring parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, R.; Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Deng, X.; Michaels, R.; Reimer, P. E.; Shahinyan, A.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.

    2013-10-01

    An experiment that measured the parity-violating asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering was completed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in experimental Hall A. From these asymmetries, a combination of the quark weak axial charge could be extracted with a factor of five improvement in precision over world data. To achieve this, asymmetries at the 10-4 level needed to be measured at event rates up to 600 kHz and the high pion background typical to deep inelastic scattering experiments needed to be rejected efficiently. A specialized data acquisition (DAQ) system with intrinsic particle identification (PID) was successfully developed and used: the pion contamination in the electron samples was controlled at the order of 2×10-4 or below with an electron efficiency of higher than 91% during most of the production period of the experiment, the systematic uncertainty in the measured asymmetry due to DAQ deadtime was below 0.5%, and the statistical quality of the asymmetry measurement agreed with the Gaussian distribution to over five orders of magnitudes. The DAQ system is presented here with an emphasis on its design scheme, the achieved PID performance, deadtime effect and the capability of measuring small asymmetries.

  9. A scaler-based data acquisition system for measuring parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Ramesh R.; Wang, Diancheng; Pan, Kai; Deng, Xiaoyan; Michaels, Robert W.; Shahinyan, Albert; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2013-10-01

    An experiment that measured the parity violating asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering was completed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in experimental Hall A. From these asymmetries, a combination of the quark weak axial charge could be extracted with a factor of five improvement in precision over world data. To achieve this, asymmetries at the 10^-4 level needed to be measured at event rates up to 500 kHz and the high pion background typical to deep inelastic scattering experiments needed to be rejected efficiently. A specialized data acquisition (DAQ) system with intrinsic particle identification (PID) was successfully developed and used: The pion contamination in the electron samples was controlled at the order of 2 × 10^-4 or below with an electron efficiency of higher than 91% throughout the production period of the experiment, the systematic uncertainty in the measured asymmetry due to DAQ deadtime was below 0.2%, and the statistical quality of the asymmetry measurement agreed with the Gaussian distribution to over five orders of magnitudes. The DAQ system is presented here with an emphasis on its design scheme, the achieved PID performance, deadtime effect and the capability of measuring small asymmetries.

  10. Solar Asymmetry and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian; Javaraiah, Javaraiah

    The way in which solar activity affects a number of terrestrial phenomena has been shown to depend on solar activity asymmetry. An important mediator between the Sun and the Earth is the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) which is an extension of the large-scale coronal field. The behavior of the B coefficient of the solar differential rotation is particularly important with relation to the dynamo theory of the solar magnetic field. We use Bn and Bs coefficients of solar differential rotation in the Northern and Southern solar hemispheres respectively derived by Mt Wilson Doppler shift measurements of photospheric line for 1967-1994 and from the Greenwich Photoheliospheric Results from 1881 to 1976 and compare them to the IMF parameters at Earth's orbit measured directly since the beginning of the satellite era and for the earlier period - to the aa index of geomagnetic activity related to the IMF. In the period 1881-1912 more active is the Southern solar hemisphere in 1913-1966 - the Northern hemisphere and since 1967 - again the Southern hemisphere. We show that in all three periods the dominant periodicity in the IMF is the dominant periodicity of the differential rotation of the more active solar hemisphere.

  11. Abnormal Asymmetry of Brain Connectivity in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ribolsi, Michele; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown a significant reduction of leftward asymmetry in some key white-matter tracts in SCZ. In this paper, we review the studies that investigated both structural brain asymmetry and asymmetry of functional connectivity in healthy subjects and SCZ. From an analysis of the existing literature on this topic, we can hypothesize an overall generally attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in SCZ compared to healthy controls. Such attenuated asymmetry increases with the duration of the disease and correlates with psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that structural deficits across the corpus callosum may contribute to the abnormal asymmetry of intra-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia. PMID:25566030

  12. Intrinsic Motivation in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Benjamin; Nambiar, Nathan; Hemphill, Caroline; Devietti, Elizabeth; Massengale, Alexandra; McCredie, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This article describes ways in which educators can use Harter's perceived competence motivation theory, the achievement goal theory, and self-determination theory to develop students' intrinsic motivation to maintain physical fitness, as demonstrated by the Sound Body Sound Mind curriculum and proven effective by the 2013 University of…

  13. Evaluating asymmetry in prosthetic gait with step-length asymmetry alone is flawed.

    PubMed

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Roeles, Sanne; van der Pas, Sanne C H; Bosboom, Otelie; Beek, Peter J

    2012-03-01

    Prosthetic gait is often asymmetric in step length, but the direction of this asymmetry varies inconsistently across amputees. This situation is akin to that seen in stroke patients, where step-length asymmetry has been shown to be the additive result of asymmetries in trunk progression and asymmetries in forward foot placement relative to the trunk. The present study examined the validity of this notion in three trans-tibial and seven trans-femoral amputees wearing a unilateral prosthesis while walking over a walkway at a comfortable and slower-than-comfortable speed. The latter manipulation was added to examine the expectation that the magnitude of the trunk-progression asymmetry - attributable to a weaker propulsion generating capacity on the prosthetic side - would be smaller when walking slower because of the diminished propulsion demands. Step length, forward foot placement relative to the trunk, and trunk progression of prosthetic and non-prosthetic steps, as well as asymmetries therein, were quantified. The direction of step-length and forward foot placement asymmetries varied inconsistently across (but consistently within) participants. As expected, step-length asymmetry depended on the combination of asymmetries in forward foot placement and trunk progression, with a smaller contribution of trunk-progression asymmetry at slow speed. These results extend our previous finding for hemiplegic patients that an analysis of gait asymmetry in terms of step length alone is flawed to prosthetic gait, implying that knowledge of asymmetries in trunk progression and forward foot placement relative to the trunk is required to help elucidate the contribution of underlying impairments (viz. propulsion generating capacity) and adopted compensations on prosthetic gait asymmetry.

  14. Asymmetry in Time Evolution of Magnetization in Magnetic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóbik, Jaroslav; Cambel, Vladimir; Karapetrov, Goran

    2015-07-01

    Strong interest in nanomagnetism stems from the promise of high storage densities of information through control of ever smaller and smaller ensembles of spins. There is a broad consensus that the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation reliably describes the magnetization dynamics on classical phenomenological level. On the other hand, it is not so evident that the magnetization dynamics governed by this equation contains built-in asymmetry in the case of broad topology sets of symmetric total energy functional surfaces. The magnetization dynamics in such cases shows preference for one particular state from many energetically equivalent available minima. We demonstrate this behavior on a simple one-spin model which can be treated analytically. Depending on the ferromagnet geometry and material parameters, this asymmetric behavior can be robust enough to survive even at high temperatures opening simplified venues for controlling magnetic states of nanodevices in practical applications. Using micromagnetic simulations we demonstrate the asymmetry in magnetization dynamics in a real system with reduced symmetry such as Pacman-like nanodot. Exploiting the built-in asymmetry in the dynamics could lead to practical methods of preparing desired spin configurations on nanoscale.

  15. Asymmetry in Time Evolution of Magnetization in Magnetic Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Tóbik, Jaroslav; Cambel, Vladimir; Karapetrov, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Strong interest in nanomagnetism stems from the promise of high storage densities of information through control of ever smaller and smaller ensembles of spins. There is a broad consensus that the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation reliably describes the magnetization dynamics on classical phenomenological level. On the other hand, it is not so evident that the magnetization dynamics governed by this equation contains built-in asymmetry in the case of broad topology sets of symmetric total energy functional surfaces. The magnetization dynamics in such cases shows preference for one particular state from many energetically equivalent available minima. We demonstrate this behavior on a simple one-spin model which can be treated analytically. Depending on the ferromagnet geometry and material parameters, this asymmetric behavior can be robust enough to survive even at high temperatures opening simplified venues for controlling magnetic states of nanodevices in practical applications. Using micromagnetic simulations we demonstrate the asymmetry in magnetization dynamics in a real system with reduced symmetry such as Pacman-like nanodot. Exploiting the built-in asymmetry in the dynamics could lead to practical methods of preparing desired spin configurations on nanoscale. PMID:26198544

  16. Asymmetry in Time Evolution of Magnetization in Magnetic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Tóbik, Jaroslav; Cambel, Vladimir; Karapetrov, Goran

    2015-07-22

    Strong interest in nanomagnetism stems from the promise of high storage densities of information through control of ever smaller and smaller ensembles of spins. There is a broad consensus that the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation reliably describes the magnetization dynamics on classical phenomenological level. On the other hand, it is not so evident that the magnetization dynamics governed by this equation contains built-in asymmetry in the case of broad topology sets of symmetric total energy functional surfaces. The magnetization dynamics in such cases shows preference for one particular state from many energetically equivalent available minima. We demonstrate this behavior on a simple one-spin model which can be treated analytically. Depending on the ferromagnet geometry and material parameters, this asymmetric behavior can be robust enough to survive even at high temperatures opening simplified venues for controlling magnetic states of nanodevices in practical applications. Using micromagnetic simulations we demonstrate the asymmetry in magnetization dynamics in a real system with reduced symmetry such as Pacman-like nanodot. Exploiting the built-in asymmetry in the dynamics could lead to practical methods of preparing desired spin configurations on nanoscale.

  17. Gravitaxis in motile micro-organisms: the role of fore aft body asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A. M.; Deacon, F. M.

    2002-02-01

    Scale model experiments on axially symmetric bodies exhibiting fore aft asymmetry are described. Body shapes are specified by a three parameter equation: two of the parameters (a and b) describe the length and breadth of the body and the third (c) the degree of asymmetry. Objects of this shape orientate as they sediment downwards under gravity until the narrower end lies uppermost, after which they fall vertically downward with no further change in orientation. For the range of parameters investigated the sedimentation velocities, both when vertical and horizontal, are governed principally by a and b, while the rate of orientation is determined by c. The sedimentation characteristics of bodies which cannot be described exactly by the equation can be predicted approximately using best-fit values for a, b and c. These results are applied to consider the role of front rear asymmetry in ciliated free-swimming micro-organisms. The shape asymmetry is probably sufficient to account for the observed orientation rates in the ciliated protozoan Paramecium. It is suggested that these results may be used to deduce the sedimentation behaviour of ciliates from microscope images of individual cells. In small flagellates such as Chlamydomonas the orientating effects of the protruding flagella are much larger than the effects of cell body asymmetry. The extreme sensitivity of the orientation rate to slight changes in body shape and flagellar beat patterns may explain why experiments to distinguish between various orientational mechanisms involved in gravitaxis have in the past produced equivocal results.

  18. Relic Density of Neutrinos with Primordial Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, Sergio; Pinto, Teguayco; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2009-06-19

    We study flavor oscillations in the early Universe, assuming primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries. Including collisions and pair processes in the kinetic equations, we not only estimate the degree of flavor equilibration, but for the first time also kinetic equilibration among neutrinos and with the ambient plasma. Typically, the restrictive big-bang nucleosynthesis bound on the nu{sub e}nu{sub e} asymmetry indeed applies to all flavors as claimed in the previous literature, but fine-tuned initial asymmetries always allow for a large surviving neutrino excess radiation that may show up in precision cosmological data.

  19. Relic density of neutrinos with primordial asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Sergio; Pinto, Teguayco; Raffelt, Georg G

    2009-06-19

    We study flavor oscillations in the early Universe, assuming primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries. Including collisions and pair processes in the kinetic equations, we not only estimate the degree of flavor equilibration, but for the first time also kinetic equilibration among neutrinos and with the ambient plasma. Typically, the restrictive big-bang nucleosynthesis bound on the nu_{e}nu[over]_{e} asymmetry indeed applies to all flavors as claimed in the previous literature, but fine-tuned initial asymmetries always allow for a large surviving neutrino excess radiation that may show up in precision cosmological data. PMID:19658994

  20. Management of Asymmetry After Breast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Onelio

    2016-04-01

    Breast reduction surgery has achieved one of the highest patient satisfaction rates among plastic surgery procedures. Most of the complications encountered are usually minor and related to wound healing. Revision surgery to address these problems is common and usually consists of scar revisions. Postoperative breast asymmetry of a mild degree is also common; however, postoperative asymmetry severe enough to warrant surgical revision is a rare event, occurring in less than 1% of cases. Postmammaplasty revision surgery needs to be individualized. The asymmetry could be the result of nipple malposition or it could consist of a volume or shape discrepancy between the breast mounds.

  1. Management of Asymmetry After Breast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Onelio

    2016-04-01

    Breast reduction surgery has achieved one of the highest patient satisfaction rates among plastic surgery procedures. Most of the complications encountered are usually minor and related to wound healing. Revision surgery to address these problems is common and usually consists of scar revisions. Postoperative breast asymmetry of a mild degree is also common; however, postoperative asymmetry severe enough to warrant surgical revision is a rare event, occurring in less than 1% of cases. Postmammaplasty revision surgery needs to be individualized. The asymmetry could be the result of nipple malposition or it could consist of a volume or shape discrepancy between the breast mounds. PMID:27012796

  2. Quantifying intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting soil erodibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erodibility has traditionally been conceived as a soil dependent parameter that can be quantified from intrinsic soil properties that usually stay constant. Development of erosion prediction equations, from the empirical-based Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) to a more processed-based Water ...

  3. Beam spin asymmetries of charged and neutral pion production in semi-inclusive DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenjuan; Lu, Zhun

    2013-09-01

    We present a study on the beam single spin asymmetries of π +, π - and π 0 production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering process, by considering Collins effect and the g ⊥ D 1 term simultaneously. We calculate the twist-3 distributions and for the valence quarks inside the proton in a spectator model. We consider two different options for the form of diquark propagator, as well as two different choices for the model parameters in the calculation. Using the model results, we estimate the beam spin asymmetries for the charged and neutral pions and compare the results with the measurement from the HERMES Collaboration. We also make predictions on the asymmetries at CLAS with a 5.5 GeV beam using the same model results. It is found that different choices for the diquark propagator will not only lead to different expressions for the distribution functions, but also result in different sizes of the asymmetries. Our study also shows that, although the spectator model calculation can describe the asymmetries for certain pion production in some kinematic regions, it seems difficult to explain the asymmetries of pion production for all three pions in a consistent way from the current versions.

  4. Experimental Characterization Of The Asymmetry And The Dip Form Of The H{sub {beta}}-Line Profiles In Microwave-Produced Plasmas At Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Palomares, J. M.; Torres, J.; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.; Gigosos, M. A.; Mullen, J. J. A. M. van der

    2008-10-22

    An experimental study on the asymmetry of the Balmer H{sub {beta}} profile in plasmas produced by microwaves at atmospheric pressure is presented. The asymmetry of the whole profile is studied with the help of one function that quantified this characteristic. The asymmetry and shape of the central valley is also studied with the definition of several parameters. The study shows the presence of the Stark asymmetry in plasmas with electron density of the order of 10{sup 21}m{sup -3}.

  5. Dual radio frequency plasma source: Understanding via electrical asymmetry effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-04-21

    On the basis of the global model, the influences of driving voltage and frequency on electron heating in geometrically symmetrical dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma have been investigated. Consistent with the experimental and simulation results, non-monotonic behavior of dc self bias and plasma heating with increasing high frequency is observed. In addition to the local maxima of plasma parameters for the integer values of the ratio between the frequencies ({xi}), ourstudies also predict local maxima for odd integer values of 2{xi} as a consequence of the electrical asymmetry effect produced by dual frequency voltage sources.

  6. Associative asymmetry of compound words.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Jeremy B; Boulton, Kathy L; Gagné, Christina L

    2014-07-01

    Early verbal-memory researchers assumed participants represent memory of a pair of unrelated items with 2 independent, separately modifiable, directional associations. However, memory for pairs of unrelated words (A-B) exhibits associative symmetry: a near-perfect correlation between accuracy on forward (A →?) and backward (?← B) cued recall. This was viewed as arguing against the independent-associations hypothesis and in favor of the hypothesis that associations are remembered as holistic units. Here we test the Holistic Representation hypothesis further by examining cued recall of compound words. If we suppose preexisting words are more unitized than novel associations, the Holistic Representation hypothesis predicts compound words (e.g., ROSE BUD) will have a higher forward-backward correlation than novel compounds (e.g., BRIEF TAX). We report the opposite finding: Compound words, as well as noncompound words, exhibited less associative symmetry than novel compounds. This challenges the Holistic Representation account of associative symmetry. Moreover, preexperimental associates (positional family size) influenced associative symmetry-but asymmetrically: Increasing family size of the last constituent increasing decoupled forward and backward recall, but family size of the 1st constituent had no such effect. In short, highly practiced, meaningful associations exhibit associative asymmetry, suggesting associative symmetry is not diagnostic of holistic representations but, rather, is a characteristic of ad hoc associations. With additional learning, symmetric associations may be replaced by directional, independently modifiable associations as verbal associations become embedded within a rich knowledge structure.

  7. Di-hadron asymmetry and interplay between transversity induced asymmetries in hadron leptoproduction at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbrizzai, Giulio

    2016-02-01

    New results on the transverse spin azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive DIS reactions extracted by the COMPASS Collaboration from the data collected with a transversely polarised proton target are presented. A noticeable similarity between the Collins asymmetry and the dihadron asymmetry, already been observed and reported, triggered a more deep investigation on the angular correlations and the relevant kinematical variables. The resulting phenomenological analysis of the transversity induced asymmetries, presented in this talk, allows to establish quantitative relationships, providing strong indication that the underlying fragmentation mechanisms are all driven by a common physical process.

  8. Intrinsic adaptation in autonomous recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Marković, Dimitrije; Gros, Claudius

    2012-02-01

    A massively recurrent neural network responds on one side to input stimuli and is autonomously active, on the other side, in the absence of sensory inputs. Stimuli and information processing depend crucially on the quality of the autonomous-state dynamics of the ongoing neural activity. This default neural activity may be dynamically structured in time and space, showing regular, synchronized, bursting, or chaotic activity patterns. We study the influence of nonsynaptic plasticity on the default dynamical state of recurrent neural networks. The nonsynaptic adaption considered acts on intrinsic neural parameters, such as the threshold and the gain, and is driven by the optimization of the information entropy. We observe, in the presence of the intrinsic adaptation processes, three distinct and globally attracting dynamical regimes: a regular synchronized, an overall chaotic, and an intermittent bursting regime. The intermittent bursting regime is characterized by intervals of regular flows, which are quite insensitive to external stimuli, interceded by chaotic bursts that respond sensitively to input signals. We discuss these findings in the context of self-organized information processing and critical brain dynamics. PMID:22091667

  9. Case report: treatment of dental asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, A; Melsen, B

    1995-01-01

    The treatment of dental asymmetries often comprises several treatment alternatives. This case report describes the treatment alternatives for an asymmetry generated secondary to surgical removal of an odontoma that included the germ of the lower left lateral incisor. The opening of the space was chosen based on the patient's wish. The asymmetrical biomechanical force system used for the correction of the midline is presented as free-body diagram. PMID:7486238

  10. Baryon asymmetry, inflation and squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Bambah, Bindu A. . E-mail: bbsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Chaitanya, K.V.S. Shiv; Mukku, C.

    2007-04-15

    We use the general formalism of squeezed rotated states to calculate baryon asymmetry in the wake of inflation through parametric amplification. We base our analysis on a B and CP violating Lagrangian in an isotropically expanding universe. The B and CP violating terms originate from the coupling of complex fields with non-zero baryon number to a complex background inflaton field. We show that a differential amplification of particle and antiparticle modes gives rise to baryon asymmetry.

  11. What is intrinsic atopic dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Roguedas-Contios, Anne-Marie; Misery, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    Many authors favor a distinction between the extrinsic and intrinsic forms of atopic dermatitis. In this review, the controversy is discussed and several definitions are presented. After reviewing many papers on this topic, it is our opinion that it is useful to separate the intrinsic and extrinsic forms of atopic dermatitis or atopic eczema and atopiform dermatitis because the pathophysiology appears to be different between them. However, these terms require concrete definition and clarification of the distinction between these two concepts. This debate is a new step in the history of atopic dermatitis. It is possible that a single patient could suffer from one form and then from another but genetic differences suggest that two types could really exist.

  12. Quasar redshifts: the intrinsic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    The large observed redshift of quasars has suggested large cosmological distances and a corresponding enormous energy output to explain the brightness or luminosity as seen at earth. Alternative or complementary sources of redshift have not been identified by the astronomical community. This study examines one possible source of additional redshift: an intrinsic component based on the plasma characteristics of high temperature and high electron density which are believed to be present.

  13. A robust quantification of galaxy cluster morphology using asymmetry and central concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Nurgaliev, D.; Stubbs, C. W.; McDonald, M.; Miller, E. D.; Benson, B. A.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2013-12-20

    We present a novel quantitative scheme of cluster classification based on the morphological properties that are manifested in X-ray images. We use a conventional radial surface brightness concentration parameter (c {sub SB}) as defined previously by others and a new asymmetry parameter, which we define in this paper. Our asymmetry parameter, which we refer to as photon asymmetry (A {sub phot}), was developed as a robust substructure statistic for cluster observations with only a few thousand counts. To demonstrate that photon asymmetry exhibits better stability than currently popular power ratios and centroid shifts, we artificially degrade the X-ray image quality by (1) adding extra background counts, (2) eliminating a fraction of the counts, (3) increasing the width of the smoothing kernel, and (4) simulating cluster observations at higher redshift. The asymmetry statistic presented here has a smaller statistical uncertainty than competing substructure parameters, allowing for low levels of substructure to be measured with confidence. A {sub phot} is less sensitive to the total number of counts than competing substructure statistics, making it an ideal candidate for quantifying substructure in samples of distant clusters covering a wide range of observational signal-to-noise ratios. Additionally, we show that the asymmetry-concentration classification separates relaxed, cool-core clusters from morphologically disturbed mergers, in agreement with by-eye classifications. Our algorithms, freely available as Python scripts (https://github.com/ndaniyar/aphot), are completely automatic and can be used to rapidly classify galaxy cluster morphology for large numbers of clusters without human intervention.

  14. Asymmetries of solar oscillation line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Jefferies, S. M.; Harvey, J. W.; Osaki, Y.; Pomerantz, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Asymmetries of the power spectral line profiles of solar global p-modes are detected in full-disk intensity observations of the Ca II K Fraunhofer line. The asymmetry is a strong function of temporal frequency being strongest at the lowest frequencies observed and vanishing near the peak of the power distribution. The variation with spherical harmonic degree is small. The asymmetry is interpreted in terms of a model in which the solar oscillation cavity is compared to a Fabry-Perot interferometer with the source slightly outside the cavity. A phase difference between an outward direct wave and a corresponding inward wave that passes through the cavity gives rise to the asymmetry. The asymmetry is different in velocity and intensity observations. Neglecting the asymmetry when modeling the power spectrum can lead to systematic errors in the measurement of mode frequencies of as much as 10 exp -4 of the mode frequency. The present observations and interpretation locate the source of the oscillations to be approximately 60 km beneath the photosphere, the shallowest position suggested to date.

  15. Poloidal asymmetries in edge transport barriersa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, R. M.; Theiler, C.; Lipschultz, B.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Hughes, J. W.; Catto, P.; Landreman, M.; Ernst, D.; Chang, C. S.; Hager, R.; Hubbard, A.; Ennever, P.; Walk, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of impurities in Alcator C-Mod indicate that in the pedestal region, significant poloidal asymmetries can exist in the impurity density, ion temperature, and main ion density. In light of the observation that ion temperature and electrostatic potential are not constant on a flux surface [Theiler et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 083017 (2014)], a technique based on total pressure conservation to align profiles measured at separate poloidal locations is presented and applied. Gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations with XGCa support the observed large poloidal variations in ion temperature and density, and that the total pressure is approximately constant on a flux surface. With the updated alignment technique, the observed in-out asymmetry in impurity density is reduced from previous publishing [Churchill et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 122002 (2013)], but remains substantial ( n z , H / n z , L ˜ 6 ). Candidate asymmetry drivers are explored, showing that neither non-uniform impurity sources nor localized fluctuation-driven transport are able to explain satisfactorily the impurity density asymmetry. Since impurity density asymmetries are only present in plasmas with strong electron density gradients, and radial transport timescales become comparable to parallel transport timescales in the pedestal region, it is suggested that global transport effects relating to the strong electron density gradients in the pedestal are the main driver for the pedestal in-out impurity density asymmetry.

  16. Broca's area: nomenclature, anatomy, typology and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Keller, Simon S; Crow, Timothy; Foundas, Anne; Amunts, Katrin; Roberts, Neil

    2009-04-01

    In this review, we (i) describe the nomenclature of Broca's area and show how the circumscribed definition of Broca's area is disassociated from Broca's aphasia, (ii) describe in detail how the gross anatomy of Broca's area varies between people, and how the definitions vary between studies, (iii) attempt to reconcile the findings of structural asymmetry of Broca's area with the differences in methodological approaches, (iv) consider the functional significance of cytoarchitectonic definitions of Broca's area, and (v) critically elucidate the significance of circumscribed regions of cortex for language lateralisation and language development. Contrary to what has previously been reported in the literature, asymmetry of Broca's area has not been reproducibly demonstrated, particularly on a gross morphological level. This may be due to major inconsistencies in methodology (including different anatomical boundaries, measurement techniques and samples studied) or that the sulcal contours defining Broca's area are so naturally variable between people making a standard definition difficult. Cytoarchitectonic analyses more often than not report leftward asymmetry of some component of area 44 and/or area 45. If a structural asymmetry of Broca's area does exist, it is variable, which differs from that of the functional asymmetry of language, which is more consistent. One reason for this might be that the link between cellular architecture, connectivity and language function still remains to be elucidated. There is currently no convincing explanation to associate asymmetry of Broca's area with the lateralisation of language.

  17. Decoherence: Intrinsic, Extrinsic, and Environmental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamp, Philip

    2012-02-01

    Environmental decoherence times have been difficult to predict in solid-state systems. In spin systems, environmental decoherence is predicted to arise from nuclear spins, spin-phonon interactions, and long-range dipolar interactions [1]. Recent experiments have confirmed these predictions quantitatively in crystals of Fe8 molecules [2]. Coherent spin dynamics was observed over macroscopic volumes, with a decoherence Q-factor Qφ= 1.5 x10^6 (the upper predicted limit in this system being Qφ= 6 x10^7). Decoherence from dipolar interactions is particularly complex, and depends on the shape and the quantum state of the system. No extrinsic ``noise'' decoherence was observed. The generalization to quantum dot and superconducting qubit systems is also discussed. We then discuss searches for ``intrinsic'' decoherence [3,4], coming from non-linear corrections to quantum mechanics. Particular attention is paid to condensed matter tests of such intrinsic decoherence, in hybrid spin/optomechanical systems, and to ways of distinguishing intrinsic decoherence from environmental and extrinsic decoherence sources. [4pt] [1] Morello, A. Stamp, P. C. E. & Tupitsyn, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 207206 (2006).[0pt] [2] S. Takahashi et al., Nature 476, 76 (2011).[0pt] [3] Stamp, P. C. E., Stud. Hist. Phil. Mod. Phys. 37, 467 (2006). [0pt] [4] Stamp, P.C.E., Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A (to be published)

  18. Troponins, intrinsic disorder, and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Kong, Min J; Straight, Shelby; Pinto, Jose R; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac troponin is a dynamic complex of troponin C, troponin I, and troponin T (TnC, TnI, and TnT, respectively) found in the myocyte thin filament where it plays an essential role in cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in troponin subunits are found in inherited cardiomyopathies, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The highly dynamic nature of human cardiac troponin and presence of numerous flexible linkers in its subunits suggest that understanding of structural and functional properties of this important complex can benefit from the consideration of the protein intrinsic disorder phenomenon. We show here that mutations causing decrease in the disorder score in TnI and TnT are significantly more abundant in HCM and DCM than mutations leading to the increase in the disorder score. Identification and annotation of intrinsically disordered regions in each of the troponin subunits conducted in this study can help in better understanding of the roles of intrinsic disorder in regulation of interactomes and posttranslational modifications of these proteins. These observations suggest that disease-causing mutations leading to a decrease in the local flexibility of troponins can trigger a whole plethora of functional changes in the heart. PMID:27074551

  19. Phenomenological analysis of azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, V.; Boglione, M.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. O.; Melis, S.

    2015-04-01

    We present a phenomenological analysis of the cos ϕ and cos 2 ϕ asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, based on the recent multidimensional data released by the COMPASS and HERMES collaborations. In the transverse-momentum-dependent framework, valid at relatively low transverse momenta, these asymmetries arise from intrinsic transverse momentum and transverse spin effects, and from their correlations. The role of the Cahn and Boer-Mulders effects in both azimuthal moments is explored up to order 1 /Q . As the kinematics of the present experiments is dominated by the low-Q2 region, higher-twist contributions turn out to be important, affecting the results of our fits.

  20. New Lower-Limb Gait Asymmetry Indices Based on a Depth Camera

    PubMed Central

    Auvinet, Edouard; Multon, Franck; Meunier, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various asymmetry indices have been proposed to compare the spatiotemporal, kinematic and kinetic parameters of lower limbs during the gait cycle. However, these indices rely on gait measurement systems that are costly and generally require manual examination, calibration procedures and the precise placement of sensors/markers on the body of the patient. Methods: To overcome these issues, this paper proposes a new asymmetry index, which uses an inexpensive, easy-to-use and markerless depth camera (Microsoft Kinect™) output. This asymmetry index directly uses depth images provided by the Kinect™ without requiring joint localization. It is based on the longitudinal spatial difference between lower-limb movements during the gait cycle. To evaluate the relevance of this index, fifteen healthy subjects were tested on a treadmill walking normally and then via an artificially-induced gait asymmetry with a thick sole placed under one shoe. The gait movement was simultaneously recorded using a Kinect™ placed in front of the subject and a motion capture system. Results: The proposed longitudinal index distinguished asymmetrical gait (p < 0.001), while other symmetry indices based on spatiotemporal gait parameters failed using such Kinect™ skeleton measurements. Moreover, the correlation coefficient between this index measured by Kinect™ and the ground truth of this index measured by motion capture is 0.968. Conclusion: This gait asymmetry index measured with a Kinect™ is low cost, easy to use and is a promising development for clinical gait analysis. PMID:25719863

  1. Intrinsic Patterns of Human Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Chen, Zhi; Hilton, Michael; Stanley, H. Eugene; Shea, Steven

    2003-03-01

    Activity is one of the defining features of life. Control of human activity is complex, being influenced by many factors both extrinsic and intrinsic to the body. The most obvious extrinsic factors that affect activity are the daily schedule of planned events, such as work and recreation, as well as reactions to unforeseen or random events. These extrinsic factors may account for the apparently random fluctuations in human motion observed over short time scales. The most obvious intrinsic factors are the body clocks including the circadian pacemaker that influences our sleep/wake cycle and ultradian oscillators with shorter time scales [2, 3]. These intrinsic rhythms may account for the underlying regularity in average activity level over longer periods of up to 24 h. Here we ask if the known extrinsic and intrinsic factors fully account for all complex features observed in recordings of human activity. To this end, we measure activity over two weeks from forearm motion in subjects undergoing their regular daily routine. Utilizing concepts from statistical physics, we demonstrate that during wakefulness human activity possesses previously unrecognized complex dynamic patterns. These patterns of activity are characterized by robust fractal and nonlinear dynamics including a universal probability distribution and long-range power-law correlations that are stable over a wide range of time scales (from minutes to hours). Surprisingly, we find that these dynamic patterns are unaffected by changes in the average activity level that occur within individual subjects throughout the day and on different days of the week, and between subjects. Moreover, we find that these patterns persist when the same subjects undergo time-isolation laboratory experiments designed to account for the phase of the circadian pacemaker, and control the known extrinsic factors by restricting behaviors and manipulating scheduled events including the sleep/wake cycle. We attribute these newly

  2. Increasing the Intrinsic Reward Value in Jobs and Careers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Bernard M.; Barrett, Gerald V.

    The basic parameters of intrinsic motivation to work are explored. Principles are sought relevant to ways of redesigning jobs to increase their intrinsic motivation properties and to avoid task overload and boredom. Coordinated field and experimental laboratory studies are described. (Author)

  3. Intrinsic versus extrinsic variability of analogue sand-box experiments - Insights from statistical analysis of repeated accretionary sand wedge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santimano, Tasca; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2015-06-01

    Analogue models are not perfectly reproducible even under controlled boundary conditions which make their interpretation and application not always straight forward. As any scientific experiment they include some random component which can be influenced both by intrinsic (inherent processes) and extrinsic (boundary conditions, material properties) sources. In order to help in the assessment of analogue model results, we discriminate and quantify the intrinsic versus extrinsic variability of results from "sandbox" models of accretionary wedges that were repeated in a controlled environment. The extrinsic source of variability, i.e. the parameter varied is the nature of the décollement (material, friction and thickness). Experiment observables include geometric properties of the faults (lifetime, spacing, dip) as well as wedge geometry (height, slope, length). For each variable we calculated the coefficient of variance (CV) and quantified the variability as a symmetric distribution (Normal, Laplacian) or asymmetric distribution (Gamma) using a Chi squared test (χ2). Observables like fault dip/back thrust dip (CV = 0.6-0.7/0.2-0.6) are less variable and decrease in magnitude with decreasing basal friction. Variables that are time dependent like fault lifetime (CV = 0.19-0.56) and fault spacing (CV = 0.12 - 0.36) have a higher CV consequently affecting the variability of wedge slope (CV = 0.12-0.33). These observables also increase in magnitude with increasing basal friction. As the mechanical complexity of the evolving wedge increases over time so does the CV and asymmetry of the distribution. In addition, we confirm the repeatability of experiments using an ANOVA test. Through the statistical analysis of results from repeated experiments we present a tool to quantify variability and an alternative method to gaining better insights into the dynamic mechanics of deformation in analogue sand wedges.

  4. On the NuTeV anomaly and the asymmetry of the strange sea in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, M.

    2005-03-01

    Our recent theoretical analysis based on the flavor SU(3) chiral quark soliton model predicts fairly large particle-antiparticle asymmetry of the strange sea in the nucleon. We point out that the predicted magnitude of asymmetry is large enough to solely resolve the so-called NuTeV anomaly on the fundamental parameter sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} in the standard model.

  5. Competition asymmetry with taxon divergence.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A

    2003-03-22

    Most organisms experience competition for resources, probably most of the time. As the structure and requirements of closely related species are generally liable to be more similar than in distantly linked species, Darwin suggested that the potential for competition was greater in the former. Since that time, studies have concentrated on interactions of either conspecifics or congeneric species. Shared critical resources, which organisms compete for, are generally mates, food and space (for access to the former). Whilst mates are valued only within species, in that the definition of a species requires it so, both food and space have the potential to be shared by very different organisms. It is now clear that vertebrates may compete with remotely related species: e.g. with squid for krill and with insects for nectar or seeds. Diamond suggested that (i) mutual aggression, (ii) displacement and (iii) evolutionary change in morphology would be increasingly asymmetric with competitor dissimilarity. Thus, with increasing taxonomic distance between two competitors (A and B), increasing aggression is exhibited between them and, increasingly, one consistently displaces the other. Here, Darwin's suggestion and Diamond's first two theories are tested across a taxonomic spectrum for the first time to the best of the author's knowledge. The proportion of spatial competitors in two different marine invertebrate groups demonstrating mutual aggression and displacement increases with taxon divergence (Nei's genetic identity). Congenerics were twice as likely to fight as conspecifics, and confamilial competitors were three times as likely to fight as conspecifics. This relationship seems robust to taxonomic and environmental variability. Competitors do not need to be as distant as birds and bees for complete asymmetry, a different family seems sufficient.

  6. Probing intrinsic anisotropies of fluorescence: Mueller matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudipta; Soni, Jalpa; Chandel, Shubham; Kumar, Uday; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate that information on “intrinsic” anisotropies of fluorescence originating from preferential orientation/organization of fluorophore molecules can be probed using a Mueller matrix of fluorescence. For this purpose, we have developed a simplified model to decouple and separately quantify the depolarization property and the intrinsic anisotropy properties of fluorescence from the experimentally measured fluorescence Mueller matrix. Unlike the traditionally defined fluorescence anisotropy parameter, the Mueller matrix-derived fluorescence polarization metrics, namely, fluorescence diattenuation and polarizance parameters, exclusively deal with the intrinsic anisotropies of fluorescence. The utility of these newly derived fluorescence polarimetry parameters is demonstrated on model systems exhibiting multiple polarimetry effects, and an interesting example is illustrated on biomedically important fluorophores, collagen. PMID:26301796

  7. Turbulent momentum transport and intrinsic rotation in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Michael

    2012-03-01

    parameters and their relative importance for generating intrinsic rotation.

  8. Balance training exercises decrease lower-limb strength asymmetry in young tennis players.

    PubMed

    Sannicandro, Italo; Cofano, Giacomo; Rosa, Rosa A; Piccinno, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    The issue of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs has been the subject of numerous recent investigations concerning many different contact, limited-contact and non-contact sports. The presence of strength asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young athletes practicing various sporting disciplines is considered an intrinsic risk factor for injury; in such cases, compensation strategies should thus be implemented aimed at eliminating, or at least limiting, the degree of asymmetry in order to avoid the negative consequences asymmetries can have upon the health of young sportsmen and women on the long-term. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young tennis players in strength and speed drill performance and to test a specific balance-training programme in its capacity to effectively reduce such asymmetries. Twenty-three young tennis players were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group (EG) (n = 11: 4 females, 7 males; 13.2 ± 0.9 years; 50.8 ± 8.9 Kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m) or Comparison Group (CG) (n = 12: 4 females, 8 males; 13.0 ± 0.9 years; 51.1 ± 9.2 Kg; 1.61 ± 0.09 m). To quantify percent asymmetries in lower-limb strength before (T0) and following (T1) training, performances were assessed in the one-leg hop test (OLH), side-hop test (SH) and side steps and forward 4.115-m test (4m-SSF). Performances in the 10 and 20m sprint tests and the Foran test were also assessed. The EG completed a total of 12 training sessions directed at balance training: two 30-minute sessions/week over a 6-week period. The CG followed an identical training schedule, but training sessions consisted of tennis-specific drills only. The results reveal significant differences between pre- and post-training tests in the EG only: the degree of lower-limb asymmetry was decreased in the EG following completion of the training programme, as assessed using the OLH test (p < 0.001), SH test (p < 0.001) and 4m-SSF test (p < 0

  9. Balance Training Exercises Decrease Lower-Limb Strength Asymmetry in Young Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Sannicandro, Italo; Cofano, Giacomo; Rosa, Rosa A.; Piccinno, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The issue of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs has been the subject of numerous recent investigations concerning many different contact, limited-contact and non-contact sports. The presence of strength asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young athletes practicing various sporting disciplines is considered an intrinsic risk factor for injury; in such cases, compensation strategies should thus be implemented aimed at eliminating, or at least limiting, the degree of asymmetry in order to avoid the negative consequences asymmetries can have upon the health of young sportsmen and women on the long-term. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young tennis players in strength and speed drill performance and to test a specific balance-training programme in its capacity to effectively reduce such asymmetries. Twenty-three young tennis players were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group (EG) (n = 11: 4 females, 7 males; 13.2 ± 0.9 years; 50.8 ± 8.9 Kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m) or Comparison Group (CG) (n = 12: 4 females, 8 males; 13.0 ± 0.9 years; 51.1 ± 9.2 Kg; 1.61 ± 0.09 m). To quantify percent asymmetries in lower-limb strength before (T0) and following (T1) training, performances were assessed in the one-leg hop test (OLH), side-hop test (SH) and side steps and forward 4.115-m test (4m-SSF). Performances in the 10 and 20m sprint tests and the Foran test were also assessed. The EG completed a total of 12 training sessions directed at balance training: two 30-minute sessions/week over a 6-week period. The CG followed an identical training schedule, but training sessions consisted of tennis-specific drills only. The results reveal significant differences between pre- and post-training tests in the EG only: the degree of lower-limb asymmetry was decreased in the EG following completion of the training programme, as assessed using the OLH test (p < 0.001), SH test (p < 0.001) and 4m-SSF test (p < 0

  10. Balance training exercises decrease lower-limb strength asymmetry in young tennis players.

    PubMed

    Sannicandro, Italo; Cofano, Giacomo; Rosa, Rosa A; Piccinno, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    The issue of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs has been the subject of numerous recent investigations concerning many different contact, limited-contact and non-contact sports. The presence of strength asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young athletes practicing various sporting disciplines is considered an intrinsic risk factor for injury; in such cases, compensation strategies should thus be implemented aimed at eliminating, or at least limiting, the degree of asymmetry in order to avoid the negative consequences asymmetries can have upon the health of young sportsmen and women on the long-term. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young tennis players in strength and speed drill performance and to test a specific balance-training programme in its capacity to effectively reduce such asymmetries. Twenty-three young tennis players were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group (EG) (n = 11: 4 females, 7 males; 13.2 ± 0.9 years; 50.8 ± 8.9 Kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m) or Comparison Group (CG) (n = 12: 4 females, 8 males; 13.0 ± 0.9 years; 51.1 ± 9.2 Kg; 1.61 ± 0.09 m). To quantify percent asymmetries in lower-limb strength before (T0) and following (T1) training, performances were assessed in the one-leg hop test (OLH), side-hop test (SH) and side steps and forward 4.115-m test (4m-SSF). Performances in the 10 and 20m sprint tests and the Foran test were also assessed. The EG completed a total of 12 training sessions directed at balance training: two 30-minute sessions/week over a 6-week period. The CG followed an identical training schedule, but training sessions consisted of tennis-specific drills only. The results reveal significant differences between pre- and post-training tests in the EG only: the degree of lower-limb asymmetry was decreased in the EG following completion of the training programme, as assessed using the OLH test (p < 0.001), SH test (p < 0.001) and 4m-SSF test (p < 0

  11. An intrinsic timer specifies distal structures of the vertebrate limb

    PubMed Central

    Saiz-Lopez, Patricia; Chinnaiya, Kavitha; Campa, Victor M.; Delgado, Irene; Ros, Maria A.; Towers, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    How the positional values along the proximo-distal axis (stylopod-zeugopod-autopod) of the limb are specified is intensely debated. Early work suggested that cells intrinsically change their proximo-distal positional values by measuring time. Recently, however, it is suggested that instructive extrinsic signals from the trunk and apical ectodermal ridge specify the stylopod and zeugopod/autopod, respectively. Here, we show that the zeugopod and autopod are specified by an intrinsic timing mechanism. By grafting green fluorescent protein-expressing cells from early to late chick wing buds, we demonstrate that distal mesenchyme cells intrinsically time Hoxa13 expression, cell cycle parameters and the duration of the overlying apical ectodermal ridge. In addition, we reveal that cell affinities intrinsically change in the distal mesenchyme, which we suggest results in a gradient of positional values along the proximo-distal axis. We propose a complete model in which a switch from extrinsic signalling to intrinsic timing patterns the vertebrate limb. PMID:26381580

  12. Nuclear Filtering of Intrinsic Charm

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2010-11-12

    Nuclei are transparent for a heavy intrinsic charm (IC) component of the beam hadrons, what leads to an enhanced nuclear dependence of open charm production at large Feynman x{sub F}. Indeed, such an effect is supported by data from the SELEX experiment published recently [1]. Our calculations reproduce well the data, providing strong support for the presence of IC in hadrons in amount less than 1%. Moreover, we performed an analysis of nuclear effects in J/{Psi} production and found at large x{sub F} a similar, albeit weaker effect, which does not contradict data.

  13. Analytical formulation of lunar cratering asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2016-10-01

    Context. The cratering asymmetry of a bombarded satellite is related to both its orbit and impactors. The inner solar system impactor populations, that is, the main-belt asteroids (MBAs) and the near-Earth objects (NEOs), have dominated during the late heavy bombardment (LHB) and ever since, respectively. Aims: We formulate the lunar cratering distribution and verify the cratering asymmetries generated by the MBAs as well as the NEOs. Methods: Based on a planar model that excludes the terrestrial and lunar gravitations on the impactors and assuming the impactor encounter speed with Earth venc is higher than the lunar orbital speed vM, we rigorously integrated the lunar cratering distribution, and derived its approximation to the first order of vM/venc. Numerical simulations of lunar bombardment by the MBAs during the LHB were performed with an Earth-Moon distance aM = 20-60 Earth radii in five cases. Results: The analytical model directly proves the existence of a leading/trailing asymmetry and the absence of near/far asymmetry. The approximate form of the leading/trailing asymmetry is (1 + A1cosβ), which decreases as the apex distance β increases. The numerical simulations show evidence of a pole/equator asymmetry as well as the leading/trailing asymmetry, and the former is empirically described as (1 + A2cos2ϕ), which decreases as the latitude modulus | ϕ | increases. The amplitudes A1,2 are reliable measurements of asymmetries. Our analysis explicitly indicates the quantitative relations between cratering distribution and bombardment conditions (impactor properties and the lunar orbital status) like A1 ∝ vM/venc, resulting in a method for reproducing the bombardment conditions through measuring the asymmetry. Mutual confirmation between analytical model and numerical simulations is found in terms of the cratering distribution and its variation with aM. Estimates of A1 for crater density distributions generated by the MBAs and the NEOs are 0.101-0.159 and 0

  14. Updated measurement of the anamalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, Penelope; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    We present an updated measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry performed using 9 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measured value of (-0.787 {+-} 0.172(stat) {+-} 0.093(syst))% is 3.9 standard deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predicted value. We also present a study which shows that the dependence of the asymmetry on the muon impact parameter is consistent with the hypothesis that it originates from semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  15. The influence of asymmetry on a magnetized proto-neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, I.; Brzezina, A.; Mańka, R.; Zastawny-Kubica, M.

    2003-03-01

    Using the Relativistic Mean Field Theory (RMF) it is shown that different proton fraction which is directly connected with the neutron excess and with the asymmetry of the system affects proto-neutron stars parameters and changes their composition. The obtained form of the equation of state allows to construct the mass-radius relations and shows that the increasing asymmetry creates more compact stars. The inclusion of /δ meson together with nonlinear vector meson interaction terms and magnetic field make this effect even stronger.

  16. Quantum asymmetry between time and space

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An asymmetry exists between time and space in the sense that physical systems inevitably evolve over time, whereas there is no corresponding ubiquitous translation over space. The asymmetry, which is presumed to be elemental, is represented by equations of motion and conservation laws that operate differently over time and space. If, however, the asymmetry was found to be due to deeper causes, this conventional view of time evolution would need reworking. Here we show, using a sum-over-paths formalism, that a violation of time reversal (T) symmetry might be such a cause. If T symmetry is obeyed, then the formalism treats time and space symmetrically such that states of matter are localized both in space and in time. In this case, equations of motion and conservation laws are undefined or inapplicable. However, if T symmetry is violated, then the same sum over paths formalism yields states that are localized in space and distributed without bound over time, creating an asymmetry between time and space. Moreover, the states satisfy an equation of motion (the Schrödinger equation) and conservation laws apply. This suggests that the time–space asymmetry is not elemental as currently presumed, and that T violation may have a deep connection with time evolution. PMID:26997899

  17. Toroidal current asymmetry in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-10-15

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current I{sub ϕ}. It was found that the toroidal current asymmetry was proportional to the vertical current moment asymmetry with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was observed that greater displacement leads to greater measured I{sub ϕ} asymmetry. Here, it is shown that this is essentially a kinematic effect produced by a VDE interacting with three dimensional MHD perturbations. The relation of toroidal current asymmetry and vertical current moment is calculated analytically and is verified by numerical simulations. It is shown analytically that the toroidal variation of the toroidal plasma current is accompanied by an equal and opposite variation of the toroidal current flowing in a thin wall surrounding the plasma. These currents are connected by 3D halo current, which is π/2 radians out of phase with the n = 1 toroidal current variations.

  18. Corrections to quark asymmetries at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, A.; Monig, K.; /DESY, Zeuthen

    2004-11-01

    The most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} at LEP is from the forward-backward asymmetry e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} b{bar b} at the Z-pole. In this note the QED and electroweak radiative corrections to obtain the pole asymmetry from the measured asymmetry for b- and c-quarks have been calculated using ZFITTER, which has been amended to allow a consistent treatment of partial two-loop corrections for the b-quark final asymmetries. A total correction of {delta}A{sub FB}{sup b} = 0.0019 {+-} 0.0002 and {delta}A{sub FB}{sup c} = 0.0064 {+-} 0.0001 has been found, where the remaining theoretical uncertainty is much too small to explain the apparent discrepancy between sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup l} obtained from A{sub FB}{sup b} and from the left-right asymmetry at SLD.

  19. On the physical mechanism of front-back asymmetry of nonlinear gravity-capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosaev, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yulia; Shrira, Victor

    2016-04-01

    In nature wind waves of all scales are asymmetric both with respect to the horizontal and vertical axes. The front-back (or fore-aft asymmetry), i.e. the asymmetry with respect to the vertical axis, manifests itself in steeper front slopes. Although it can be important for remote sensing of sea surface and wave field interaction with wind, especially for the waves of gravity-capillary range, at present the understanding of physical mechanisms causing the gravity-capillary waves asymmetry and its dependence on parameters is very poor; there has been no study dedicated to this problem. Here we address this gap. The decimetre-range water waves in many respects essentially differ from the waves of other ranges: wind forcing is stronger, steep waves develop a characteristic pattern of capillary ripples on their forward slopes. These 'parasitic capillaries', generated by a narrow pressure distribution associated with an underlying longer wave' crest, remain quasi-stationary with regard to the longer wave. The train of capillaries is localised on the front slope and decays towards the trough. We investigate the nature of the asymmetry of such waves by extensive numerical simulations of the Euler equations employing the method of conformal mapping for two-dimensional potential flow and taking into account wave generation by wind and dissipation due to molecular viscosity. We examine the role of various factors contributing to the wave profile asymmetry: wind pumping, viscous stresses, the Reynolds stresses caused by ripples and found the latter to be by far the most important. It is the lop-sided ripple distribution which leads to noticeable fore-aft asymmetry of the mean wave profile. We also found how the asymmetry depends on wavelength, steepness, wind and viscosity, which enables us to parametrize these dependencies for applications in microwave remote sensing and wave generation.

  20. Is The Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect Measurable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoyang

    2005-03-01

    Despite of the large intrinsic spin Hall conductivity in a spin- orbit coupled material predicted theoretically, we show that the intrinsic spin Hall effect in any diffusive sample is not measurable via conventional transport methods, thus the research on the intrinsic spin Hall effect is limited at the pure theoretical content. After generally defining the intrinsic and extrinsic transport coefficients, we show that the intrinsic magnetization Hall current, which is the sum of the intrinsic spin and intrinsic orbit-angular-momentum Hall currents, is identically zero. More importantly, we demonstrate that the equation of motion for the spin density does not depend on the intrinsic spin Hall current, therefore the transverse spin accumulation is solely determined by the extrinsic spin Hall current. The zero intrinsic magnetization Hall current and the independence of the spin accumulation on the intrinsic spin Hall effect lead us to conclude that the intrinsic spin Hall effect can not be assessed by conventional spin transport experiments based on the measurement of the magnetization current and the spin accumulation at the edge of the sample.

  1. ICA-fNORM: Spatial Normalization of fMRI Data Using Intrinsic Group-ICA Networks.

    PubMed

    Khullar, Siddharth; Michael, Andrew M; Cahill, Nathan D; Kiehl, Kent A; Pearlson, Godfrey; Baum, Stefi A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2011-01-01

    A common pre-processing challenge associated with group level fMRI analysis is spatial registration of multiple subjects to a standard space. Spatial normalization, using a reference image such as the Montreal Neurological Institute brain template, is the most common technique currently in use to achieve spatial congruence across multiple subjects. This method corrects for global shape differences preserving regional asymmetries, but does not account for functional differences. We propose a novel approach to co-register task-based fMRI data using resting state group-ICA networks. We posit that these intrinsic networks (INs) can provide to the spatial normalization process with important information about how each individual's brain is organized functionally. The algorithm is initiated by the extraction of single subject representations of INs using group level independent component analysis (ICA) on resting state fMRI data. In this proof-of-concept work two of the robust, commonly identified, networks are chosen as functional templates. As an estimation step, the relevant INs are utilized to derive a set of normalization parameters for each subject. Finally, the normalization parameters are applied individually to a different set of fMRI data acquired while the subjects performed an auditory oddball task. These normalization parameters, although derived using rest data, generalize successfully to data obtained with a cognitive paradigm for each subject. The improvement in results is verified using two widely applied fMRI analysis methods: the general linear model and ICA. Resulting activation patterns from each analysis method show significant improvements in terms of detection sensitivity and statistical significance at the group level. The results presented in this article provide initial evidence to show that common functional domains from the resting state brain may be used to improve the group statistics of task-fMRI data.

  2. [The meaning of the auditory sensory systems asymmetry in highly coordinated manual movement].

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, P V; Bobyntsev, I I

    2012-02-01

    Analysis of the stable correlation of asymmetry of the acoustic stem evoked potentials intervals with parameters of bimanual coordination was performed. Different mechanisms of the auditory asymmetry at the stem level were found in men and women. Optimum bimanual performance in men is provided by adequate co-adjustment of sensor-motor system elements, and is connected with sensory input and the feature of its bilateral irradiation through the right input. The left channel input and its sensory asymmetry is much more important in women. Bilateral irradiation in this case does not lead to adequate integration of the systems elements in performance of the motor task, that indicates the lower level of bimanual coordination.

  3. Measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->D*(+/-)D(-/+).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-08-17

    We present updated measurements of CP-violating asymmetries in the decays B0-->D*(+/-)D(-/+) and B0-->D+D- using (383+/-4) x 10(6)B(B) pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory. We determine the time-integrated CP asymmetry A(D*(+/-)D(-/+))=0.12+/-0.06+/-0.02, and the time-dependent asymmetry parameters to be C(D*+D-)=0.18+/-0.15+/-0.04, S(D*+D-)=-0.79+/-0.21+/-0.06, C(D*-D+)=0.23+/-0.15+/-0.04, S(D*-D+)=-0.44+/-0.22+/-0.06, C(D+D-)=0.11+/-0.22+/-0.07, and S(D+D-)=-0.54+/-0.34+/-0.06, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. PMID:17930885

  4. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0-->D(*)+/-D+/- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Buono, L Del; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Marco, E Di; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-09-23

    We present a first measurement of CP asymmetries in neutral B decays to D+D-, and updated CP asymmetry measurements in decays to D(*+)D- and D(*-)D+. We use fully reconstructed decays collected in a data sample of (232+/-3) x 10(6) gamma(4S)-->BB events in the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We determine the time-dependent asymmetry parameters to be SD(*+)(D-)=-0.54+/-0.35+/-0.07, CD(*+)(D-)=0.09+/-0.25+/-0.06, SD(*-)(D+)=-0.29+/-0.33+/-0.07, CD(*-)(D+)=0.17+/-0.24+/-0.04, SD+(D-)=-0.29+/-0.63+/-0.06, and CD+(D-)=0.11+/-0.35+/-0.06, where in each case the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  5. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  6. Azimuthal Asymmetries in Meson Electroproduction at HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasch, Delia

    2003-07-01

    The measurement of single-spin azimuthal asymmetries for pseudoscalar meson production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 27.6 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarised hydrogen and deuterium target is reported by the HERMES experiment. A significant target-spin asymmetry amplitude in the azimuthal distribution of charged and neutral pions and positively charged kaons relative to the lepton scattering plane has been observed. The dependence on the relevant kinematic variables which are the Bjorken variable x, the meson fractional energy z and the meson transverse momentum P⊥ has been investigated as well. The results are compared to predictions of model calculations which are base on a fragmentation function that varies with the transverse polarisation of the struck quark. In addition, data from the measurement of a single beam-spin azimuthal asymmetry in the electroproduction of positive pions in semi-inclusive and semi-exclusive deep-inelastic scattering will be presented.

  7. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running

    PubMed Central

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A.; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback. PMID:26488484

  8. Particle-antiparticle asymmetries from annihilations.

    PubMed

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F; Petraki, Kalliopi; Volkas, Raymond R

    2014-10-31

    An extensively studied mechanism to create particle-antiparticle asymmetries is the out-of-equilibrium and CP violating decay of a heavy particle. We, instead, examine how asymmetries can arise purely from 2→2 annihilations rather than from the usual 1→2 decays and inverse decays. We review the general conditions on the reaction rates that arise from S-matrix unitarity and CPT invariance, and show how these are implemented in the context of a simple toy model. We formulate the Boltzmann equations for this model, and present an example solution. PMID:25396359

  9. Single hadron transverse spin asymmetries from COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Bradamante, Franco

    2007-06-13

    Transverse spin physics is an important part of the scientific programme of the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The analysis of the data taken with the target polarized orthogonally to the 160 GeV/c muon beam momentum has allowed to measure for the first time the Collins and Sivers asymmetries of the deuteron. Both for the positive and the negative hadrons produced in semi-inclusive DIS the measured asymmetries are small and, within errors, compatible with zero. New results for {pi}{+-} ans K{+-} are presented here.

  10. Particle-antiparticle asymmetries from annihilations.

    PubMed

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F; Petraki, Kalliopi; Volkas, Raymond R

    2014-10-31

    An extensively studied mechanism to create particle-antiparticle asymmetries is the out-of-equilibrium and CP violating decay of a heavy particle. We, instead, examine how asymmetries can arise purely from 2→2 annihilations rather than from the usual 1→2 decays and inverse decays. We review the general conditions on the reaction rates that arise from S-matrix unitarity and CPT invariance, and show how these are implemented in the context of a simple toy model. We formulate the Boltzmann equations for this model, and present an example solution.

  11. Introducing Charge Hydration Asymmetry into the Generalized Born Model.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Aguilar, Boris H; Tolokh, Igor S; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-04-01

    The effect of charge hydration asymmetry (CHA)-non-invariance of solvation free energy upon solute charge inversion-is missing from the standard linear response continuum electrostatics. The proposed charge hydration asymmetric-generalized Born (CHA-GB) approximation introduces this effect into the popular generalized Born (GB) model. The CHA is added to the GB equation via an analytical correction that quantifies the specific propensity of CHA of a given water model; the latter is determined by the charge distribution within the water model. Significant variations in CHA seen in explicit water (TIP3P, TIP4P-Ew, and TIP5P-E) free energy calculations on charge-inverted "molecular bracelets" are closely reproduced by CHA-GB, with the accuracy similar to models such as SEA and 3D-RISM that go beyond the linear response. Compared against reference explicit (TIP3P) electrostatic solvation free energies, CHA-GB shows about a 40% improvement in accuracy over the canonical GB, tested on a diverse set of 248 rigid small neutral molecules (root mean square error, rmse = 0.88 kcal/mol for CHA-GB vs 1.24 kcal/mol for GB) and 48 conformations of amino acid analogs (rmse = 0.81 kcal/mol vs 1.26 kcal/mol). CHA-GB employs a novel definition of the dielectric boundary that does not subsume the CHA effects into the intrinsic atomic radii. The strategy leads to finding a new set of intrinsic atomic radii optimized for CHA-GB; these radii show physically meaningful variation with the atom type, in contrast to the radii set optimized for GB. Compared to several popular radii sets used with the original GB model, the new radii set shows better transferability between different classes of molecules.

  12. Structural asymmetry of cortical visual areas is related to ocular dominance.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bettina H; Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal M; Larsson, Henrik B W; Ashina, Messoud

    2015-12-01

    The grey matter of the human brain is asymmetrically distributed between the cerebral hemispheres. This asymmetry includes visual areas, but its relevance to visual function is not understood. Voxel-based morphometry is a well-established technique for localization and quantification of cerebral grey matter on the basis of MR images. This method has been used previously for interhemispheric comparison, but without examining the functional implications of the identified anatomical asymmetries of the visual system. The aim of the present study was to relate anatomical interhemispheric asymmetries to asymmetries of visual function. We examined grey matter asymmetries of visual areas in a large population (n=56) of ophthalmologically and neurologically healthy individuals. We used state-of-the-art 3 T MRI and voxel-based morphometry to relate the visual parameters, (a) ocular dominance, (b) interocular difference in visual acuity and (c) visual attention (i.e. deviation on a line-bisection task), to interhemispheric differences in grey matter volume. As most visual input from one eye is processed in the contralateral hemisphere, ocular features may also depend on cerebral lateralization. Several lateralized visual areas were identified, both right>left and left>right. When correlating the asymmetries to the functional parameters, we found a significant correlation to ocular dominance (P<0.05), whereas visual acuity and visual attention showed no such relationship. The lateral occipital complex was identified to be significantly larger in the left hemisphere for right-eyed participants and vice versa. These results suggest a cerebral basis for ocular dominance.

  13. Intrinsic rotation with gyrokinetic models

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael; Catto, Peter J.; Calvo, Ivan

    2012-05-15

    The generation of intrinsic rotation by turbulence and neoclassical effects in tokamaks is considered. To obtain the complex dependences observed in experiments, it is necessary to have a model of the radial flux of momentum that redistributes the momentum within the tokamak in the absence of a preexisting velocity. When the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation is used, a symmetry of the model precludes this possibility, making small effects in the gyroradius over scale length expansion necessary. These effects that are usually small become important for momentum transport because the symmetry of the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation leads to the cancellation of the lowest order momentum flux. The accuracy to which the gyrokinetic equation needs to be obtained to retain all the physically relevant effects is discussed.

  14. Hemispheric asymmetries and the control of motor sequences.

    PubMed

    Serrien, Deborah J; Sovijärvi-Spapé, Michiel M

    2015-04-15

    Sequencing of finger positions reflects a prototype of skilled behaviour. In order to perform sequencing, cognitive control supports the requirements and postural transitions. In this electroencephalography (EEG) study, we evaluate the effects of hand dominance and assess the neural correlates of unimanual and bimanual sequencing in left- and right-handers. The behavioural measurements provided an index of response planning (response time to first key press) and response execution (time between successive key presses, taps/s and percentage of correct responses), whereas the neural dynamics was determined by means of EEG coherence, expressing the functional connectivity between brain areas. Correlations between brain activity and behaviour were calculated for exploring the neural correlates that are functionally relevant for sequencing. Brain-behavioural correlations during response planning and execution revealed the significance of circuitry in the left hemisphere, underlining its significant role in the organisation of goal-directed behaviour. This lateralisation profile was independent of intrinsic constraints (hand dominance) and extrinsic demands (task requirements), suggesting essential higher-order computations in the left hemisphere. Overall, the observations highlight that the left hemisphere is specialised for sequential motor organisation in left- and right-handers, suggesting an endogenous hemispheric asymmetry for compound actions and the representation of skill; processes that can be separated from those that are involved in hand dominance. PMID:25617529

  15. Matter-antimatter asymmetry and dark matter from torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popławski, Nikodem J.

    2011-04-01

    We propose a simple scenario which explains the observed matter-antimatter imbalance and the origin of dark matter in the Universe. We use the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity which naturally extends general relativity to include the intrinsic spin of matter. Spacetime torsion produced by spin generates, in the classical Dirac equation, the Hehl-Datta term which is cubic in spinor fields. We show that under a charge-conjugation transformation this term changes sign relative to the mass term. A classical Dirac spinor and its charge conjugate therefore satisfy different field equations. Fermions in the presence of torsion have higher energy levels than antifermions, which leads to their decay asymmetry. Such a difference is significant only at extremely high densities that existed in the very early Universe. We propose that this difference caused a mechanism, according to which heavy fermions existing in such a Universe and carrying the baryon number decayed mostly to normal matter, whereas their antiparticles decayed mostly to hidden antimatter which forms dark matter. The conserved total baryon number of the Universe remained zero.

  16. Matter-antimatter asymmetry and dark matter from torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawski, Nikodem J.

    2011-04-15

    We propose a simple scenario which explains the observed matter-antimatter imbalance and the origin of dark matter in the Universe. We use the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity which naturally extends general relativity to include the intrinsic spin of matter. Spacetime torsion produced by spin generates, in the classical Dirac equation, the Hehl-Datta term which is cubic in spinor fields. We show that under a charge-conjugation transformation this term changes sign relative to the mass term. A classical Dirac spinor and its charge conjugate therefore satisfy different field equations. Fermions in the presence of torsion have higher energy levels than antifermions, which leads to their decay asymmetry. Such a difference is significant only at extremely high densities that existed in the very early Universe. We propose that this difference caused a mechanism, according to which heavy fermions existing in such a Universe and carrying the baryon number decayed mostly to normal matter, whereas their antiparticles decayed mostly to hidden antimatter which forms dark matter. The conserved total baryon number of the Universe remained zero.

  17. Search Asymmetry, Sustained Attention, and Response Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Hugh; Russell, Paul N.; Helton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In the present experiment, we used search asymmetry to test whether the sustained attention to response task is a better measure of response inhibition or sustained attention. Participants performed feature present and feature absent target detection tasks using either a sustained attention to response task (SART; high Go low No-Go) or a…

  18. Asymmetry of selected Fraunhofer lines, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, R. I.; Orlova, T. V.

    1973-01-01

    The profiles of 20 Fraunhofer lines at the center of the solar disk and near the limb (cos theta = 0.44) were obtained, using the double-pass system. After correcting for the influence of the apparatus, the line profiles were investigated for the asymmetry run.

  19. Phonological and Phonetic Asymmetries of Cw Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Yunju

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the relationship between the phonological distribution of Cw combinations, and the acoustic/perceptual distinctiveness between syllables with plain C onsets and with Cw combination onsets. Distributional asymmetries of Cw combinations discussed in this thesis include the avoidance of Cw combinations in the labial consonant…

  20. On the nature of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Whether the baryon asymmetry in the universe is a locally varying or universally fixed number is examined with focus on the existence of a possible matter antimatter domain structure in the universe arising from a GUT with spontaneous CP symmetry breaking. Theoretical considerations and observational data and astrophysical tests relating to this fundamental question are reviewed.

  1. Asymmetry of free-space optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucouvalas, Anthony C.

    1995-12-01

    The concept of asymmetry in free space optical links is discussed. Simple equations describing the minimum carrier sense distance, the minimum and maximum distance of reliable link, and maximum interference distance are derived. Examples from the recently drafted IRDA specification for IR links are given. A solution is presented to the parity variation problem by controlling the field of view of such transceivers.

  2. Infant Frontal Asymmetry Predicts Child Emotional Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Maria; Paulus, Markus; Kühn-Popp, Nina; Meinhardt, Jorg; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    While factors influencing maternal emotional availability (EA) have been well investigated, little is known about the development of child EA. The present longitudinal study investigated the role of frontal brain asymmetry in young children with regard to child EA (child responsiveness and involvement) in mother-child interaction in a sample of 28…

  3. Sources of Local Time Asymmetries in Magnetodiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; Kane, M.; Sergis, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Jackman, C. M.

    2015-04-01

    The rapidly rotating magnetospheres at Jupiter and Saturn contain a near-equatorial thin current sheet over most local times known as the magnetodisc, resembling a wrapped-up magnetotail. The Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo, Cassini and New Horizons spacecraft at Jupiter and Saturn have provided extensive datasets from which to observationally identify local time asymmetries in these magnetodiscs. Imaging in the infrared and ultraviolet from ground- and space-based instruments have also revealed the presence of local time asymmetries in the aurora which therefore must map to local time asymmetries in the magnetosphere. Asymmetries are found in (i) the configuration of the magnetic field and magnetospheric currents, where a thicker disc is found in the noon and dusk sectors; (ii) plasma flows where the plasma flow has local time-dependent radial components; (iii) a thicker plasma sheet in the dusk sector. Many of these features are also reproduced in global MHD simulations. Several models have been developed to interpret these various observations and typically fall into two groups: ones which invoke coupling with the solar wind (via reconnection or viscous processes) and ones which invoke internal rotational processes operating inside an asymmetrical external boundary. In this paper we review these observational in situ findings, review the models which seek to explain them, and highlight open questions and directions for future work.

  4. [Hand Preference: Cognitive Development, Asymmetry, and Consistency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bathurst, Kay; And Others

    Reported are results of three studies: (1) Hand Preference Consistency during Infancy and Preschool Years (K. Bathurst and A. W. Gottfried), (2) Asymmetry of Verbal Processing: Influence of Family Handedness (K. Bathurst and D. W. Kee), (3) Consistency of Hand Preference and Cognitive Development in Young Children (K. Bathurst and A. W.…

  5. Neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2008-01-22

    Using a simple model for nuclear GPDs, we study the role of the neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS observables. As an example, we use the beam-spin asymmetry $A_{LU}^A$ measured in coherent and incoherent DVCS on a wide range of nuclear targets in the HERMES and JLab kinematics. We find that at small values of the momentum transfer $t$, $A_{LU}^A$ is dominated by the coherent-enriched contribution, which enhances $A_{LU}^A$ compared to the free proton asymmetry $A_{LU}^p$, $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=1.8-2.2$. At large values of $t$, the nuclear asymmetry is dominated by the incoherent contribution and $A_{LU}^A/(\\phi)A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=0.66-0.74$. The deviation of $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)$ from unity at large $t$ is a result of the neutron contribution, which gives a possibility to constain neutron GPDs in incoherent nuclear DVCS. A similar trend is expected for other DVCS asymmetries.

  6. CP and charge asymmetries at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2007-11-01

    We present CDF results on the branching fractions and time-integrated direct CP asymmetries for B0 and B0s decay modes into pairs of charmless charged hadrons (pions or kaons). We report also the first observation of B0s->DsK mode and the measurement of its branching fraction.

  7. The Energy of Substituted Ethanes. Asymmetry Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Lionel; Hoffmann, Roald; Otto, Peter

    1973-01-01

    The leading terms in the energy of a general substituted ethane are derived in explicit form as a function of the torsional angle θ, the substituent electronegativities, and their mutual overlaps. The energy is found to be the sum of all four overlaps between pairs of asymmetry orbitals, and satisfies the requisite symmetry properties. PMID:16592060

  8. Auxin asymmetry during gravitropism by tomato hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. A.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropic asymmetry of auxin was observed in hypocotyls of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) soon after horizontal placement: the ratio of apically supplied [3H]IAA collected from the lower sides to that from the upper sides was about 1.4 between 5 and 10 minutes. This was adequately early to account for the beginning of curvature. The auxin asymmetry ratio rose to about 2.5 between 20 and 25 minutes, and to 3.5 during the main phase of curvature. This compares reasonably well with the roughly 3.9 ratio for elongation on the lower side to elongation on the upper side that is the basis for the curvature. These data extend evidence that the Went-Cholodny theory for the mediation of tropisms is valid for dicot stems. Also consistent with the theory, an auxin asymmetry ratio of 2.5 was observed when wrong-way gravitropic curvature developed following application of a high level of auxin. In addition to reversing the asymmetry of elongation, the large supplement of auxin resulted in lower net elongation. Previous data established that ethylene is not involved in this decrease of growth as a function of increasing level of auxin.

  9. Parallel Processing in Visual Search Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosher, Barbara Anne; Han, Songmei; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2004-01-01

    The difficulty of visual search may depend on assignment of the same visual elements as targets and distractors-search asymmetry. Easy C-in-O searches and difficult O-in-C searches are often associated with parallel and serial search, respectively. Here, the time course of visual search was measured for both tasks with speed-accuracy methods. The…

  10. Improved renormalization group theory for critical asymmetry of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Liang; Li, Liyan; Cai, Jun

    2013-09-01

    We develop an improved renormalization group (RG) approach incorporating the critical vapor-liquid equilibrium asymmetry. In order to treat the critical asymmetry of vapor-liquid equilibrium, the integral measure is introduced in the Landau-Ginzbug partition function to achieve a crossover between the local order parameter in Ising model and the density of fluid systems. In the implementation of the improved RG approach, we relate the integral measure with the inhomogeneous density distribution of a fluid system and combine the developed method with SAFT-VR (statistical associating fluid theory of variable range) equation of state. The method is applied to various fluid systems including square-well fluid, square-well dimer fluid and real fluids such as methane (CH4), ethane (C2H6), trifluorotrichloroethane (C2F3Cl3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). The descriptions of vapor-liquid equilibria provided by the developed method are in excellent agreement with simulation and experimental data. Furthermore, the improved method predicts accurate and qualitatively correct behavior of coexistence diameter near the critical point and produces the non-classical 3D Ising criticality.

  11. Outcomes of asymmetry in infants with congenital muscular torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, KyeongSoo; Chung, EunJung; Koh, SeongEun; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes of asymmetry in infants with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). [Subjects] A total of 102 patients with CMT under the age of 6 months were studied. [Methods] Asymmety was evaluated by determining the difference in the thicknesses of the two sternocleidomastoid muscles (DTSM) using ultrasonography, head tilt (HT) based on a physical examination, and the torticollis overall assessment (TOA). Patients received ultrasound and massage therapy for 30 minutes, in conjunction with passive stretching exercises, 3 times a week. [Results] The DTSM, HT, and TOA scores were significantly different after treatment. Pretest DTSM, HT, and TOA scores and pre-posttest change scores for DTSM, HT, and TOA scores were correlated with treatment duration in infants with CMT. [Conclusion] The findings of this study suggest that treatment duration is correlated with asymmetry evaluation parameters (DTSM, HT, and TOA) in infants with CMT. We propose that these results will help in reducing the treatment duration, and also in improving communication between doctors and therapists during the diagnosis and evaluation of torticollis. PMID:25729191

  12. Outcomes of asymmetry in infants with congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Lee, KyeongSoo; Chung, EunJung; Koh, SeongEun; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes of asymmetry in infants with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). [Subjects] A total of 102 patients with CMT under the age of 6 months were studied. [Methods] Asymmety was evaluated by determining the difference in the thicknesses of the two sternocleidomastoid muscles (DTSM) using ultrasonography, head tilt (HT) based on a physical examination, and the torticollis overall assessment (TOA). Patients received ultrasound and massage therapy for 30 minutes, in conjunction with passive stretching exercises, 3 times a week. [Results] The DTSM, HT, and TOA scores were significantly different after treatment. Pretest DTSM, HT, and TOA scores and pre-posttest change scores for DTSM, HT, and TOA scores were correlated with treatment duration in infants with CMT. [Conclusion] The findings of this study suggest that treatment duration is correlated with asymmetry evaluation parameters (DTSM, HT, and TOA) in infants with CMT. We propose that these results will help in reducing the treatment duration, and also in improving communication between doctors and therapists during the diagnosis and evaluation of torticollis.

  13. Spin-Azimuthal Asymmetries in DIS at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harut

    2003-01-01

    We present latest measurements of beam and target single-spin asymmetries in the single pion electroproduction in the DIS. In addition to significant target single-spin asymmetries the CLAS detector at Jlab also measures a significant beam-spin asymmetry when the analysis is restricted to events for which the pion carries a large fraction of the virtual photon momentum.

  14. Intrinsic motivation in a competitive setting.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, R S

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the effects of success-failure and monetary reward on intrinsic motivation of males and females competing on a motor task. Results indicated a significant main effect for feedback with subjects exhibiting more intrinsic motivation after success than after failure. The Sex x Feedback interaction showed that males displayed more intrinsic motivation than females after success whereas females exhibited more intrinsic motivation than males after failure. Results are discussed in terms of Deci's cognitive evaluation theory and sex-role appropriate behaviors for males and females. Implications for competitive physical activity are drawn.

  15. LHC Predictions from a Tevatron Anomaly in the Top Quark Forward-Backward Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Kaplan, Jared; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    We examine the implications of the recent CDF measurement of the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry, focusing on a scenario with a new color octet vector boson at 1-3 TeV. We study several models, as well as a general effective field theory, and determine the parameter space which provides the best simultaneous fit to the CDF asymmetry, the Tevatron top pair production cross section, and the exclusion regions from LHC dijet resonance and contact interaction searches. Flavor constraints on these models are more subtle and less severe than the literature indicates. We find a large region of allowed parameter space at high axigluon mass and a smaller region at low mass; we match the latter to an SU(3){sub 1} x SU(3){sub 2}/SU(3){sub c} coset model with a heavy vector-like fermion. Our scenario produces discoverable effects at the LHC with only 1-2 inverse femtobarns of luminosity at 7-8 TeV. Lastly, we point out that a Tevatron measurement of the b-quark forward-backward asymmetry would be very helpful in characterizing the physics underlying the top-quark asymmetry.

  16. Symmetric States Requiring System Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous synchronization has long served as a paradigm for behavioral uniformity that can emerge from interactions in complex systems. When the interacting entities are identical and their coupling patterns are also identical, the complete synchronization of the entire network is the state inheriting the system symmetry. As in other systems subject to symmetry breaking, such symmetric states are not always stable. Here, we report on the discovery of the converse of symmetry breaking-the scenario in which complete synchronization is not stable for identically coupled identical oscillators but becomes stable when, and only when, the oscillator parameters are judiciously tuned to nonidentical values, thereby breaking the system symmetry to preserve the state symmetry. Aside from demonstrating that diversity can facilitate and even be required for uniformity and consensus, this suggests a mechanism for convergent forms of pattern formation in which initially asymmetric patterns evolve into symmetric ones. PMID:27661690

  17. Symmetric States Requiring System Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous synchronization has long served as a paradigm for behavioral uniformity that can emerge from interactions in complex systems. When the interacting entities are identical and their coupling patterns are also identical, the complete synchronization of the entire network is the state inheriting the system symmetry. As in other systems subject to symmetry breaking, such symmetric states are not always stable. Here, we report on the discovery of the converse of symmetry breaking—the scenario in which complete synchronization is not stable for identically coupled identical oscillators but becomes stable when, and only when, the oscillator parameters are judiciously tuned to nonidentical values, thereby breaking the system symmetry to preserve the state symmetry. Aside from demonstrating that diversity can facilitate and even be required for uniformity and consensus, this suggests a mechanism for convergent forms of pattern formation in which initially asymmetric patterns evolve into symmetric ones.

  18. Intrinsic Localized Modes in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Delarue, Patrice; Senet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Protein dynamics is essential for proteins to function. Here we predicted the existence of rare, large nonlinear excitations, termed intrinsic localized modes (ILMs), of the main chain of proteins based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of two fast-folder proteins and of a rigid α/β protein at 300 K and at 380 K in solution. These nonlinear excitations arise from the anharmonicity of the protein dynamics. The ILMs were detected by computing the Shannon entropy of the protein main-chain fluctuations. In the non-native state (significantly explored at 380 K), the probability of their excitation was increased by a factor between 9 and 28 for the fast-folder proteins and by a factor 2 for the rigid protein. This enhancement in the non-native state was due to glycine, as demonstrated by simulations in which glycine was mutated to alanine. These ILMs might play a functional role in the flexible regions of proteins and in proteins in a non-native state (i.e. misfolded or unfolded states). PMID:26658321

  19. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Michael Tri Hoang; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-10-01

    Life on earth is subject to alternating cycles of day and night imposed by the rotation of the earth. Consequently, living things have evolved photodetective systems to synchronize their physiology and behavior with the external light-dark cycle. This form of photodetection is unlike the familiar "image vision," in that the basic information is light or darkness over time, independent of spatial patterns. "Nonimage" vision is probably far more ancient than image vision and is widespread in living species. For mammals, it has long been assumed that the photoreceptors for nonimage vision are also the textbook rods and cones. However, recent years have witnessed the discovery of a small population of retinal ganglion cells in the mammalian eye that express a unique visual pigment called melanopsin. These ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive and drive a variety of nonimage visual functions. In addition to being photoreceptors themselves, they also constitute the major conduit for rod and cone signals to the brain for nonimage visual functions such as circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex. Here we review what is known about these novel mammalian photoreceptors. PMID:20959623

  20. Equinoctial asymmetry in low latitude ionosphere as observed by SROSS-C2 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Ananna; Aggarwal, Malini; Sharma, D. K.; Rai, J.

    2014-09-01

    The ionospheric plasma parameters (electron, ion temperatures and ion composition-Te, Ti, O+ and H+) measured by SROSS-C2 satellite at an average altitude of ~500 km has been investigated to study the behaviour of the ionosphere in equinoxes during half a solar cycle (year 1995-2000, F10.7 ~70-195). The region under study spans over 5-35°N geog. latitude and 65-95°E geog. longitude in the Indian sector. We found an equinoctial asymmetry in the diurnal behaviour of Te, Ti, O+ and H+ varying with increase in solar activity. The strength of equinoctial asymmetry in Te and Ti is strong during early morning and daytime and strength decreases with increase in solar activity whereas during night time no asymmetry/weaker is observed in low/high solar activity respectively. During the day time, a very strong equinoctial asymmetry in O+ is observed during solar minimum which diminishes with increase in solar activity. The similar diurnal behaviour of H+ as that of O+ is observed during low solar activity but no clear equinoctial asymmetry is observed during solar maximum, as H+ being highly dynamic. The transition height (O+/H+) is the lowest in early morning during solar minimum, which increases during local day-time. The rate of increase in transition height is different in both the equinoxes (higher in vernal than autumn) with respect to dependence on the solar activity, during daytime. Hence equinoctial asymmetry is stronger during solar minimum period than maximum, with higher/lower transition height in vernal during daytime/nighttime respectively.

  1. Evaluation of Intereye Corneal Asymmetry in Patients with Keratoconus. A Scheimpflug Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Dienes, Lóránt; Kránitz, Kinga; Juhász, Éva; Gyenes, Andrea; Takács, Ágnes; Miháltz, Kata; Nagy, Zoltán Z.; Kovács, Illés

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the correlation between keratoconus severity and intereye asymmetry of pachymetric data and posterior elevation values and to evaluate their combined accuracy in discriminating normal corneas from those with keratoconus. Methods This study included 97 patients: 65 subjects with bilateral normal corneas (NC) and 32 with keratoconus (KC). Central corneal thickness (CCT), thinnest corneal thickness (ThCT) and posterior elevation (PE) at the thinnest point of the cornea were measured in both eyes using Scheimpflug imaging. Intereye asymmetry and its correlation with keratoconus severity were calculated for each variable. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) was used to compare predictive accuracy of different variables for keratoconus. Results In normal eyes, intereye differences were significantly lower compared with the keratoconus eyes (p<0.001, for CCT, ThCT and PE). There was a significant exponential correlation between disease severity and intereye asymmetry of steep keratometry (r2 = 0.55, p<0.001), CCT (r2 = 0.39, p<0.001), ThCT (r2 = 0.48, p<0.001) and PE (r2 = 0.64, p<0.001). After adjustment for keratoconus severity, asymmetry in thinnest pachymetry proved to be the best parameter to characterize intereye corneal asymmetry in keratoconus. This variable had high accuracy and significantly better discriminating ability (AUROC: 0.99) for KC than posterior elevation (AUROC: 0.96), ThCT (AUROC: 0.94) or CCT (AUROC: 0.92) alone. Conclusions There is an increased intereye asymmetry in keratometry, pachymetry and posterior corneal elevation values in keratoconic patients compared to subjects with normal corneas. Keratoconus patients with more severe disease are also more asymmetric in their disease status which should be taken into account during clinical care. PMID:25296183

  2. Three-dimensional assessment of facial asymmetry: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Akhil, Gopi; Senthil Kumar, Kullampalayam Palanisamy; Raja, Subramani; Janardhanan, Kumaresan

    2015-01-01

    For patients with facial asymmetry, complete and precise diagnosis, and surgical treatments to correct the underlying cause of the asymmetry are significant. Conventional diagnostic radiographs (submento-vertex projections, posteroanterior radiography) have limitations in asymmetry diagnosis due to two-dimensional assessments of three-dimensional (3D) images. The advent of 3D images has greatly reduced the magnification and projection errors that are common in conventional radiographs making it as a precise diagnostic aid for assessment of facial asymmetry. Thus, this article attempts to review the newly introduced 3D tools in the diagnosis of more complex facial asymmetries. PMID:26538893

  3. Adaptive Responses Limited by Intrinsic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Prabhat; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems have mechanisms to respond to the external environment and adapt to them. Such adaptive responses are effective for a wide dynamic range of sensing and perception of temporal change in stimulus. However, noise generated by the adaptation system itself as well as extrinsic noise in sensory inputs may impose a limit on the ability of adaptation systems. The relation between response and noise is well understood for equilibrium systems in the form of fluctuation response relation. However, the relation for nonequilibrium systems, including adaptive systems, are poorly understood. Here, we systematically explore such a relation between response and fluctuation in adaptation systems. We study the two network motifs, incoherent feedforward loops (iFFL) and negative feedback loops (nFBL), that can achieve perfect adaptation. We find that the response magnitude in adaption systems is limited by its intrinsic noise, implying that higher response would have higher noise component as well. Comparing the relation of response and noise in iFFL and nFBL, we show that whereas iFFL exhibits adaptation over a wider parameter range, nFBL offers higher response to noise ratio than iFFL. We also identify the condition that yields the upper limit of response for both network motifs. These results may explain the reason of why nFBL seems to be more abundant in nature for the implementation of adaption systems. PMID:26305221

  4. The intrinsic shape of NGC 3379

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Thomas S.

    1994-01-01

    Photometric and kinematic data from the literature are combined with new dynamical models to derive the intrinsic shape of the 'standard' elliptical galaxy NGC 3379. The parameters that are best constrained are the dynamical triaxiality T (essentially the triaxiality of the total mass distribution) and the short-to long axis ratio of the light distribution c(sub L). The inferred shape is given by a Bayesian probability distribution in the (T, c(sub L) plane. Assuming a uniform prior, the most probable shape is oblate with a flattening of c(sub L) = 87. The distribution is strongly non-Gaussian, however, and the expectation values, (T) = .31 (c(sub L) = .75, imply a flatter and more triaxial figure. The 68% highest posterior density region allows more triaxial shapes as long as they are fairly round, or flatter shapes as long as they are nearly oblate. These results are essentially unchanged if the galaxy is assumed to rotate about its short axis, or if it is modeled as an S0 with a negligible-mass disk rather than as an elliptical. The suggestion of Capaccioli et al. (ApJ, 371, 535 (1991)) that NGC 3379 is a rather flat, triaxial S0 galaxy is found to be improbable at the 98% level; this conclusion is largely independent of the bulge-to-disk ratio or the relative rotation speeds of the two components.

  5. Molecular Weight and Charge Density Asymmetry in Polyelectrolyte Complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audus, Debra; Fredrickson, Glenn; Duechs, Dominik

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the phase diagram of oppositely charged polymers in a good solvent using a field-theoretic model. Mean-field solutions fail to predict the experimentally observed macroscopic phase separation into a solvent-rich phase and a dense liquid aggregate of polymers - a ``complex coacervate.'' We therefore study the model within a one-loop approximation, which accounts for Gaussian fluctuations in electrostatic and chemical potentials. Our particular focus is the effect of molecular weight, ionic strength, and charge asymmetry on the phase envelope. A set of dimensionless parameters is identified that dictate the size and shape of the two-phase region. Our results should be helpful in guiding experimental studies of coacervation.

  6. Axial asymmetry for improved sensitivity in MEMS piezoresistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuvra, Pranoy Deb; McNamara, Shamus; Lin, Ji-Tzuoh; Alphenaar, Bruce; Walsh, Kevin; Davidson, Jim

    2016-09-01

    The strain induced resistance change is compared for asymmetric, symmetric and diffused piezoresistive elements. Finite element analysis is used to simulate the performance of a T-shaped piezoresistive MEMS cantilever, including a lumped parameter model to show the effect of geometric asymmetry on the piezoresistor sensitivity. Asymmetric piezoresistors are found to be much more sensitive to applied load than the typical symmetric design producing about two orders of magnitude higher resistance change. This is shown to be due to the difference in the stress distribution in the symmetric and asymmetric geometries resulting in less resistance change cancellation in the asymmetric design. Although still less sensitive than diffused piezoresistors, asymmetric piezoresistors are sensitive enough for many applications, and are much easier to fabricate and integrate into MEMS devices.

  7. Hypermagnetic gyrotropy, inflation, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the production of the hypermagnetic gyrotropy when the electric and magnetic gauge couplings evolve at different rates, as it happens in the relativistic theory of the van der Waals forces. If a pseudoscalar interaction breaks the duality symmetry of the corresponding equations, the gyrotropic configurations of the hypermagnetic fields can be amplified from the vacuum during an inflationary stage of expansion. After charting the parameter space of the model in terms of the rates of evolution of the magnetic and electric gauge couplings, we identify the regions where the gyrotropy is sufficiently intense to seed the baryon asymmetry of the Universe at the electroweak epoch while the backreaction constraints, the strong coupling bounds and the other astrophysical limits are concurrently satisfied.

  8. GRAND MINIMA AND NORTH-SOUTH ASYMMETRY OF SOLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olemskoy, S. V.; Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2013-11-01

    A solar-type dynamo model in a spherical shell is developed with allowance for random dependence of the poloidal field generation mechanism on time and latitude. The model shows repeatable epochs of a strongly decreased amplitude of magnetic cycles similar to the Maunder minimum of solar activity. Random dependence of dynamo parameters on latitude breaks the equatorial symmetry of generated fields. The model shows the correlation of the occurrence of grand minima with deviations in the dynamo field from dipolar parity. An increased north-south asymmetry of magnetic activity can, therefore, be an indicator of transitions to grand minima. Qualitative interpretation of this correlation is suggested. Statistics of grand minima in the model are close to the Poisson random process, indicating that the onset of a grand minimum is statistically independent of preceding minima.

  9. Handedness of a motor program in C. elegans is independent of left-right body asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Downes, Joanna C; Birsoy, Bilge; Chipman, Kyle C; Rothman, Joel H

    2012-01-01

    Complex animals display bilaterally asymmetric motor behavior, or "motor handedness," often revealed by preferential use of limbs on one side. For example, use of right limbs is dominant in a strong majority of humans. While the mechanisms that establish bilateral asymmetry in motor function are unknown in humans, they appear to be distinct from those for other handedness asymmetries, including bilateral visceral organ asymmetry, brain laterality, and ocular dominance. We report here that a simple, genetically homogeneous animal comprised of only ~1000 somatic cells, the nematode C. elegans, also shows a distinct motor handedness preference: on a population basis, males show a pronounced right-hand turning bias during mating. The handedness bias persists through much of adult lifespan, suggesting that, as in more complex animals, it is an intrinsic trait of each individual, which can differ from the population mean. Our observations imply that the laterality of motor handedness preference in C. elegans is driven by epigenetic factors rather than by genetic variation. The preference for right-hand turns is also seen in animals with mirror-reversed anatomical handedness and is not attributable to stochastic asymmetric loss of male sensory rays that occurs by programmed cell death. As with C. elegans, we also observed a substantial handedness bias, though not necessarily the same preference in direction, in several gonochoristic Caenorhabditis species. These findings indicate that the independence of bilaterally asymmetric motor dominance from overall anatomical asymmetry, and a population-level tendency away from ambidexterity, occur even in simple invertebrates, suggesting that these may be common features of bilaterian metazoans.

  10. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-07-14

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

  11. Is there an association between skeletal asymmetry and tooth absence?

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Pereira, Keila Cristina Rausch; Freitas, Maria Perpetua Mota

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Facial skeletal asymmetry is commonly found in humans and its main characteristic is menton deviation. The literature suggests that occlusal and masticatory problems arising from tooth absence could be related to the development of such asymmetries. Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of mandibular skeletal asymmetries and to investigate its association with posterior tooth absences. Methods: Tomographic images of 952 individuals aged from 18 to 75 years old were used. Asymmetry was the analyzed outcome, and it was categorized into three groups according to gnathion displacement in relation to the midsagittal plane (relative symmetry, moderate asymmetry, and severe asymmetry). Patients were sorted by the presence of all posterior teeth, unilateral posterior tooth absence, or bilateral posterior tooth absence. Chi-square test with a significance level of 5% was used to verify the association between posterior tooth absence and asymmetry. Results: Results show relative symmetry present in 55.3% of the sample, as well as the prevalence of 27.3% for moderate mandibular asymmetry and 17.4% for severe asymmetry. Moderate and severe mandibular asymmetries occurred in a higher proportion in patients with unilateral posterior tooth absence. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the analyzed groups (p = 0.691). Conclusions: In this study, mandibular asymmetries did not present any association with the absence of teeth on the posterior area of the arch. PMID:27653267

  12. Mandibular asymmetry in patients with the crouzon or apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elmi, P; Reitsma, J H; Buschang, P H; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe directional and fluctuating mandibular asymmetry over time in children with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Mandibular asymmetry of children between 7.5 and 14 years of age with Crouzon syndrome (n = 35) and Apert syndrome (n = 24) were compared with controls (n = 327). From panoramic radiographs, mandibular directional and fluctuating asymmetry was determined for the three groups. Multilevel statistical techniques were used to describe mandibular asymmetry changes over time. Patients with Crouzon and Apert syndromes showed statistically significant more fluctuating asymmetry for mandibular measures than did controls. Between the Crouzon and Apert syndromes groups, no statistical differences were found in directional and fluctuating asymmetry. The control group showed statistically significantly more directional asymmetry than did patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. The controls showed no change over time for the directional asymmetry of condylar-ramal height; however, the directional asymmetry of the gonial angle increased. Patients with Crouzon syndrome showed side dominance for only condylar-ramal height; whereas, patients with Apert syndrome did not show dominance for any of the measurements. Apert and Crouzon syndromes showed developmental instability, in contrast to the controls. No statistically significant longitudinal differences were found for either the directional or the fluctuating asymmetry between Crouzon and Apert syndromes. Findings for fluctuating and directional asymmetry for both syndromes may indicate an inability to cope with genetic and environmental stress during development and treatment, compared with untreated nonsyndromic individuals. PMID:24878346

  13. Bilateral asymmetry of the humerus during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Amanda

    2011-08-01

    The development of handedness throughout growth can be investigated by using bilateral asymmetry of the humerus as a proxy for this trait. A large skeletal sample of nonadults from English archaeological sites was examined using standard metric techniques to assess when right-sided asymmetry first appears in the human skeleton. Results of this work indicate a change in directional asymmetry during growth and development, with infants and young children exhibiting no significant asymmetry and older children and adolescents demonstrating right-sidedness. This trend is consistent with what has been observed in previous studies of upper limb asymmetry in skeletal material and behaviorally in living children, adding further strength to the premise that biomechanical forces strongly influence bilateral asymmetry in the upper limb bones. Variability in the magnitude of asymmetry between different features of the humerus was also noted. This characteristic can be explained by differing degrees of genetic canalization, with length and articular dimensions being more strongly canalized than diaphyseal properties.

  14. Predictions of the poloidal asymmetries and transport frequencies in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, C. Lee, S. G.; Terzolo, L.; Stacey, W. M.

    2014-01-15

    The extended neoclassical rotation theory formulated in Miller flux surface geometry enables unprecedented neoclassical calculations of the poloidal asymmetries in density, rotation velocities, electrostatic potential along the flux surfaces, and of the inertial (Reynolds stress) and gyroviscous transport frequencies, which are strong functions of these asymmetries. This paper presents such calculations of the poloidal asymmetries and non-negligible inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies in two KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 094006 (2011)] Neutral Beam Injection H-mode discharges. The in-out asymmetries in the velocities are an order of magnitude larger than their up-down asymmetries. The magnitudes of the predicted inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies depend on the magnitudes of the density and velocity asymmetries. The neoclassically predicted density asymmetries are shown to correspond with the reported measurements in tokamaks and the predicted carbon toroidal velocities agree very well with the measurements in KSTAR.

  15. Collider-independent tt forward-backward asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Juste, A

    2012-11-21

    We introduce the forward-backward asymmetries A(u), A(d) corresponding to uū, dd → tt production, respectively, at hadron colliders. These are collider and center-of-mass independent observables, directly related to the forward-backward and charge asymmetries measured at the Tevatron and the LHC, respectively. We discuss how to extract these asymmetries from data. Because these asymmetries are collider independent, their measurement at these two colliders could elucidate the nature of the anomalous forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron. Our framework also shows in a model independent fashion that a positive Tevatron asymmetry exceeding the standard model expectation is compatible with the small asymmetry measured at the LHC.

  16. The Epigenesis of Planum Temporale Asymmetry in Twins

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.; Leonard, Christiana M.; Molloy, Elizabeth A.; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Zijdenbos, Alex; Giedd, Jay N.

    2009-01-01

    Variation in hemispheric asymmetry of the planum temporale (PT) has been related to verbal ability. The degree to which genetic and environmental factors mediate PT asymmetry is not known. This study examined the heritability for planar asymmetry in 12 dizygotic (DZ) and 27 monozygotic (MZ) male twin pairs who were between 6 and 16 years of age. There was weak but positive evidence for heritability of planar asymmetry. Co-twin similarity for planar asymmetry and Sylvian fissure morphology increased when excluding twins discordant for writing hand and when excluding twins exhibiting birth weight differences >20% from the analyses. Birth weight differences were also related to twin differences in total cerebral volume, but not central sulcus asymmetry. These results suggest that exogenous perinatal factors affect the epigenesis of planar asymmetry development. PMID:12050086

  17. Morphologies of ABC Triblock Terpolymer Melts Containing Poly(Cyclohexadiene): Effects of Conformational Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajeev; Sides, Scott W.; Goswami, Monojoy; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Hong, Kunlun; Wu, Xiaodong; Russell, Thomas P.; Gido, Samuel P.; Misichronis, Konstantinos; Rangou, Sofia; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Tsoukatos, Thodoris; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Beyer, Frederick L.; Mays, Jimmy W.

    2013-02-12

    We have synthesized linear ABC triblock terpolymers containing poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene), PCHD, as an end block and characterized their morphologies in the melt. Specifically, we have studied terpolymers containing polystyrene (PS), polybutadiene (PB), and polyisoprene (PI) as the other blocks. Systematically varying the ratio of 1,2- /1,4-microstructures of poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene), we have studied the effects of conformational asymmetry among the three blocks on the morphologies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and self-consistent field theory (SCFT) performed with PolySwift++. Our work reveals that the triblock terpolymer melts containing a high percentage of 1,2-microstructures in the PCHD block are disordered at 110 °C for all the samples, independent of sequence and volume fraction of the blocks. In contrast, the triblock terpolymer melts containing a high percentage of 1,4-microstructure form regular morphologies known from the literature. The accuracy of the SCFT calculations depends on calculating the χ parameters that quantify the repulsive interactions between different monomers. Simulations using χ values obtained from solubility parameters and group contribution methods are unable to reproduce the morphologies as seen in the experiments. However, SCFT calculations accounting for the enhancement of the χ parameter with an increase in the conformational asymmetry lead to an excellent agreement between theory and experiments. These results highlight the importance of conformational asymmetry in tuning the χ parameter and, in turn, morphologies in block copolymers.

  18. Morphologies of ABC triblock terpolymer melts containing poly(cyclohexadiene): effects of conformational asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Sides, Scott W; Goswami, Monojoy; Sumpter, Bobby G; Hong, Kunlun; Wu, Xiaodong; Russell, Thomas P; Gido, Samuel P; Misichronis, Konstantinos; Rangou, Sofia; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Tsoukatos, Thodoris; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Beyer, Frederick L; Mays, Jimmy W

    2013-02-12

    We have synthesized linear ABC triblock terpolymers containing poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene), PCHD, as an end block and characterized their morphologies in the melt. Specifically, we have studied terpolymers containing polystyrene (PS), polybutadiene (PB), and polyisoprene (PI) as the other blocks. Systematically varying the ratio of 1,2- /1,4-microstructures of poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene), we have studied the effects of conformational asymmetry among the three blocks on the morphologies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and self-consistent field theory (SCFT) performed with PolySwift++. Our work reveals that the triblock terpolymer melts containing a high percentage of 1,2-microstructures in the PCHD block are disordered at 110 °C for all the samples, independent of sequence and volume fraction of the blocks. In contrast, the triblock terpolymer melts containing a high percentage of 1,4-microstructure form regular morphologies known from the literature. The accuracy of the SCFT calculations depends on calculating the χ parameters that quantify the repulsive interactions between different monomers. Simulations using χ values obtained from solubility parameters and group contribution methods are unable to reproduce the morphologies as seen in the experiments. However, SCFT calculations accounting for the enhancement of the χ parameter with an increase in the conformational asymmetry lead to an excellent agreement between theory and experiments. These results highlight the importance of conformational asymmetry in tuning the χ parameter and, in turn, morphologies in block copolymers. PMID:23259866

  19. Separating Scattering from Intrinsic Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijk, K.; Scales, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The subsurface appears disordered at all length-scales. Therefore, wave propatation at seismic or ultrasonic frequencies is subject to complicated scatterings. A pulse propagating in the subsurface loses energy at each scattering off an impedance contrast, but also decreases in amplitude as the impulse interacts with fluids in the rock. We call the latter non-elastic effect "intrinsic Q", while the former is "scattering Q". It is often the fluids in the rocks that are of interest, but conventional reflection and transmission of the incident pulse only cannot deceipher the individual components of Q due to scattering and fluid movement in the pore-space. We present an approach that can unravel these two mechanisms, allowing a separate estimate of absorption. This method treats the propagation of the average intensity in the framework of radiative transfer (RT); the arrival of (what is left of) the incident pulse is modeled as the coherent energy, whereas the later arriving multiply scattered events form the incoherent intensity. The coherent pulse decays exponentially due to a combination of scattering and absorption, and so does the incoherent intensity. However, multiple scattering can re-direct energy back to the receiver, supplying a gain-term at later times that makes up the incoherent intensity. Strictly speaking, one can invert for scattering and absorption from the intensity at late times only, often modeled with the late-time equivalent of RT, diffusion. However, we will show that fitting both early- and late-time signal with RT constrains absorption and scattering constants more rigorously. These ideas are illustrated by laboratory and sonic-logging measurements.

  20. The dawn-dusk asymmetry of ion density in the dayside magnetosheath and its annual variability measured by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, Andrew P.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.; Osmane, Adnane; Nykyri, Katariina

    2016-05-01

    The local and global plasma properties in the magnetosheath play a fundamental role in regulating solar wind-magnetosphere coupling processes. However, the magnetosheath is a complex region to characterise as it has been shown theoretically, observationally and through simulations that plasma properties are inhomogeneous, non-isotropic and asymmetric about the Sun-Earth line. To complicate matters, dawn-dusk asymmetries are sensitive to various changes in the upstream conditions on an array of timescales. The present paper focuses exclusively on dawn-dusk asymmetries, in particularly that of ion density. We present a statistical study using THEMIS data of the dawn-dusk asymmetry of ion density in the dayside magnetosheath and its long-term variations between 2009 and 2015. Our data suggest that, in general, the dawn-side densities are higher, and the asymmetry grows from noon towards the terminator. This trend was only observed close to the magnetopause and not in the central magnetosheath. In addition, between 2009 and 2015, the largest asymmetry occurred around 2009 decreasing thereafter. We also concluded that no single parameter such as the Alfvén Mach number, plasma velocity, or the interplanetary magnetic field strength could exclusively account for the observed asymmetry. Interestingly, the dependence on Alfvén Mach number differed between data sets from different time periods. The asymmetry obtained in the THEMIS data set is consistent with previous studies, but the solar cycle dependence was opposite to an analysis based on IMP-8 data. We discuss the physical mechanisms for this asymmetry and its temporal variation. We also put the current results into context with the existing literature in order to relate THEMIS era measurements to those made during earlier solar cycles.

  1. Resonant Tunneling and Intrinsic Bistability in Twisted Graphene Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Levitov, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    Bistable systems exhibit several distinct macroscopic states and can switch between them upon variation of some control parameter. Nonvolatile electronic systems that exhibit intrinsic bistability and fast switching times are desirable for low-power memory and logic. Experimental realizations of such systems, however, are scarce. We propose a novel mechanism for intrinsic bistability in van der Waals heterostructures formed by twisted graphene monolayers. Bistability in these systems originates from resonant tunneling and charge coupling between different graphene layers. These characteristics, governed by Dirac-like spectrum and Moiré periodicity of the tunneling Hamiltonian, allow multiple stable states in the sequential tunneling regime. In the bistability region, an intermediate electrically decoupled graphene layer can, for the same external bias, be either in a resonant or non-resonant state with respect to the top/bottom layer. Features of interest, such as resonant tunneling, negative differential resistance and bistability, are controlled by parameters easily accessible in experiments, namely the twist angle and interlayer conductances. We estimate the power required to retain this state, switching times, and assess volatility of such intrinsically bistable systems.

  2. Collective Dynamics of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in HTSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Mahfouzi, F.

    2006-06-01

    The dynamics of a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) in the high-Tc superconductors is theoretically investigated with both the quasineutrality breakdown effect and quasiparticle charge imbalance effect taken into account. The current-voltage characteristics (IVC) of IJJ are numerically calculated in the framework of capacitively coupled Josephson junctions model and charge imbalance model including set of differential equations for phase differences, kinetic equations and generalized Josephson relations. We obtain the branch structure in IVC and investigate it as a function of model parameters such as coupling constant, McCumber parameter and number of junctions in the stack. The dependence of branch slopes and branch endpoints on the coupling and disequilibrium parameters are found. We study the nonequilibrium effects created by current injection and show that the increase in the disequilibrium parameter changes essentially the character of IVC. The new features of the hysteresis behavior of IVC of IJJ are obtained.

  3. GDH Integral on the Proton from Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2004-05-01

    Inclusive double spin electron asymmetries have been measured by scattering polarized electrons off the solid polarized {sup 15}NH{sub 3} target in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2000-2001. The virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 1} (x), the longitudinal spin structure function, g{sub 1} (x, Q{sup 2}), and the first moment, {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}, have been evaluated for a kinematic range of 0.05 {ge} Q{sup 2} {ge} 4.5 GeV{sup 2}. The extracted results complement the existing data in the resonance region, extending it to lower and higher Q{sup 2} regions. The results are important in the study of Q{sup 2} evolution of nucleon structure from the hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom.

  4. Single spin asymmetries in electroproduction at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Harut Avakian; Latifa Elouadrhiri

    2004-06-02

    We present measurements of spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive processes in hard scattering kinematics using a 5.7 GeV electron beam and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at JLab. Scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons of an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen and off a polarized NH{sub 3} targets was studied over a wide range of kinematics. Non-zero single-beam and single-target spin asymmetries have been observed in semi-inclusive pion production in hard-scattering kinematics (Q{sup 2} > 1.2 GeV{sup 2}, W{sup 4} > 4 GeV{sup 2}). Systematic studies of factorization of x and z dependences have been done for different spin-dependent and spin-independent observables. No significant x/z dependence has been observed within statistical uncertainties, which is consistent with factorization of hard scattering and fragmentation processes.

  5. CLAS: Double-Pion Beam Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen Strauch

    2005-10-01

    Beam-helicity asymmetries for the gamma+p -> pi+ + pi- + p reaction have been measured for center-of-mass energies between 1.35 GeV and 2.30 GeV at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer using circularly polarized tagged photons. The beam-helicity asymmetries vary with kinematics and exhibit strong sensitivity to the dynamics of the reaction, as demonstrated in the comparison of the data with results of various phenomenological model calculations. These models currently do not provide an adequate description of the data over the entire kinematic range covered in this experiment. Additional polarization observables are accessible in an upcoming experiment at Jefferson Lab with polarized beam and target.

  6. Beam-Spin Asymmetry Measurement at CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasyan, M.

    2009-08-01

    Beam Single Spin Asymmetries in single neutral semi-inclusive pion electroproduction off an unpolarized hydrogen target in the deep inelastic scattering regime (Q2>1 GeV2, W2>4 GeV2) have been measured using a polarized electron beam of 5.776 GeV with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The measured kinematical dependences are compared with published data and existing theoretical predictions.

  7. Effects of asymmetry in string fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, N.L. ); Csoergoe, T.; Lukacs, B.; Zimanyi, J. )

    1991-06-01

    The general solution of the one flavor integral equation for string fragmentation is presented and is approximated by a finite sum. The N pion phase space distribution is calculated for the emission points; thence the hadronic fragmentation function, the number density, and the energy density vs. rapidity are obtained. The authors discuss the effects of the left-right asymmetry embedded into the integral equation, and present numerical results based on the Lund fragmentation function.

  8. Exponential Gaussian approach for spectral modelling: The EGO algorithm II. Band asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompilio, Loredana; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Cloutis, Edward A.; Craig, Michael A.; Roush, Ted L.

    2010-08-01

    The present investigation is complementary to a previous paper which introduced the EGO approach to spectral modelling of reflectance measurements acquired in the visible and near-IR range (Pompilio, L., Pedrazzi, G., Sgavetti, M., Cloutis, E.A., Craig, M.A., Roush, T.L. [2009]. Icarus, 201 (2), 781-794). Here, we show the performances of the EGO model in attempting to account for temperature-induced variations in spectra, specifically band asymmetry. Our main goals are: (1) to recognize and model thermal-induced band asymmetry in reflectance spectra; (2) to develop a basic approach for decomposition of remotely acquired spectra from planetary surfaces, where effects due to temperature variations are most prevalent; (3) to reduce the uncertainty related to quantitative estimation of band position and depth when band asymmetry is occurring. In order to accomplish these objectives, we tested the EGO algorithm on a number of measurements acquired on powdered pyroxenes at sample temperature ranging from 80 up to 400 K. The main results arising from this study are: (1) EGO model is able to numerically account for the occurrence of band asymmetry on reflectance spectra; (2) the returned set of EGO parameters can suggest the influence of some additional effect other than the electronic transition responsible for the absorption feature; (3) the returned set of EGO parameters can help in estimating the surface temperature of a planetary body; (4) the occurrence of absorptions which are less affected by temperature variations can be mapped for minerals and thus used for compositional estimates. Further work is still required in order to analyze the behaviour of the EGO algorithm with respect to temperature-induced band asymmetry using powdered pyroxene spanning a range of compositions and grain sizes and more complex band shapes.

  9. The intrinsic bispectrum of the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Pettinari, Guido W.; Fidler, Christian; Crittenden, Robert; Koyama, Kazuya; Wands, David E-mail: Christian.Fidler@port.ac.uk E-mail: Kazuya.Koyama@port.ac.uk

    2013-04-01

    We develop a new, efficient code for solving the second-order Einstein-Boltzmann equations, and use it to estimate the intrinsic CMB non-Gaussianity arising from the non-linear evolution of density perturbations. The full calculation involves contributions from recombination and less tractable contributions from terms integrated along the line of sight. We investigate the bias that this intrinsic bispectrum implies for searches of primordial non-Gaussianity. We find that the inclusion or omission of certain line of sight terms can make a large impact. When including all physical effects but lensing and time-delay, we find that the local-type f{sub NL} would be biased by f{sub NL}{sup intra} = 0.5, below the expected sensitivity of the Planck satellite. The speed of our code allows us to confirm the robustness of our results with respect to a number of numerical parameters.

  10. Functional brain asymmetry, handedness and menarcheal age.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, P; Stoyanov, Z; Negrev, N

    1994-12-01

    Functional brain asymmetry influences many functions of the organism; the neuroendocrine axis is one that has received insufficient attention. In this study we set us as the goal of studying the link between functional brain asymmetry and menarcheal age in females with left versus right manual dominance. The appearance of the first menarche was used as a natural model of functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. 1695 females, aged between 16 and 25 years, were interviewed by questionnaire about manual dominance and menarcheal age. 182 women were selected and divided into 2 groups: all left-handers (n = 91), and a control group of 91 right-handers. We found a significantly lower average age of menarcheal appearance in the left-handers' age of 12.09 +/- 0.16 years compared to the right-handers' age of 13.32 +/- 0.12 years (p < 0.001). The earliest menarcheal age in left-handers was 8 years and the peak of appearance at age 13 (in 30.76% of the cases). In right-handers these values were 10 and 14 years (in 40.60% of the cases), respectively. The data allow us to accept the existence of a link between functional brain asymmetry and menarche, which causes earlier activation of the HPG axis in left-handed females.

  11. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  12. IS THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ASYMMETRY DUE TO THE KINEMATIC DIPOLE?

    SciTech Connect

    Naselsky, P.; Zhao, W.; Kim, J.; Chen, S.

    2012-04-10

    Parity violation found in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is a crucial clue for the non-standard cosmological model or the possible contamination of various foreground residuals and/or calibration of the CMB data sets. In this paper, we study the directional properties of the CMB parity asymmetry by excluding the m = 0 modes in the definition of parity parameters. We find that the preferred directions of the parity parameters coincide with the CMB kinematic dipole, which implies that the CMB parity asymmetry may be connected with the possible contamination of the residual dipole component. We also find that such tendency is not only localized at l = 2, 3, but in the extended multipole ranges up to l {approx} 22.

  13. How the Intrinsic Shapes of Galaxy Clusters Influence Distance Determinations using the SZ Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. P.

    1999-05-01

    The intrinsic 3-D shape of the hot gas in clusters of galaxies has a critical influence on the interpretation of X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect data for cosmological parameter estimation. I present a study of the intrinsic shapes of galaxy clusters under the axisymmetric hypothesis based on two X-ray cluster samples, using a nonparametric approach and the technique of ``maximum penalized likelihood'' for function estimation. In this talk, the uncertainty in H_0 from unknown geometry for any observed cluster axial ratio is quantified. I conclude with some general comments on the intrinsic shape of X-ray galaxy clusters.

  14. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  15. Evidence for joint moment asymmetry in healthy populations during gait.

    PubMed

    Lathrop-Lambach, Rebecca L; Asay, Jessica L; Jamison, Steve T; Pan, Xueliang; Schmitt, Laura C; Blazek, Katerina; Siston, Robert A; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the presence and prevalence of asymmetry in lower extremity joint moments within and across healthy populations during overground walking. Bilateral gait data from several studies performed at two institutions were pooled from 182 healthy, pain-free subjects. Four distinct populations were identified based on age, activity level and body mass index. Mean peak external joint moments were calculated from three to six trials of level overground walking at self-selected speed for each subject. Right and left limb moments were reclassified as "greater" or "lesser" moment for each subject to prevent obscuring absolute asymmetry due to averaging over positive and negative asymmetries across subjects. A clinically relevant asymmetry measure was calculated from the peak joint moments with an initial chosen cutoff value of 10%. Confidence intervals for the proportion of subjects with greater than 10% asymmetry between limbs were estimated based on the binomial distribution. We found a high amount of asymmetry between the limbs in healthy populations. More than half of our overall population exceeded 10% asymmetry in peak hip and knee flexion and adduction moments. Group medians exceeded 10% asymmetry for all variables in all populations. This may have important implications on gait evaluations, particularly clinical evaluations or research studies where asymmetry is used as an outcome. Additional research is necessary to determine acceptable levels of joint moment asymmetry during gait and to determine whether asymmetrical joint moments influence the development of symptomatic pathology or success of lower extremity rehabilitation. PMID:25035185

  16. Downscaling Smooth Tomographic Models: Separating Intrinsic and Apparent Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Thomas; Capdeville, Yann; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, a number of tomographic models based on full waveform inversion have been published. Due to computational constraints, the fitted waveforms are low pass filtered, which results in an inability to map features smaller than half the shortest wavelength. However, these tomographic images are not a simple spatial average of the true model, but rather an effective, apparent, or equivalent model that provides a similar 'long-wave' data fit. For example, it can be shown that a series of horizontal isotropic layers will be seen by a 'long wave' as a smooth anisotropic medium. In this way, the observed anisotropy in tomographic models is a combination of intrinsic anisotropy produced by lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of minerals, and apparent anisotropy resulting from the incapacity of mapping discontinuities. Interpretations of observed anisotropy (e.g. in terms of mantle flow) requires therefore the separation of its intrinsic and apparent components. The "up-scaling" relations that link elastic properties of a rapidly varying medium to elastic properties of the effective medium as seen by long waves are strongly non-linear and their inverse highly non-unique. That is, a smooth homogenized effective model is equivalent to a large number of models with discontinuities. In the 1D case, Capdeville et al (GJI, 2013) recently showed that a tomographic model which results from the inversion of low pass filtered waveforms is an homogenized model, i.e. the same as the model computed by upscaling the true model. Here we propose a stochastic method to sample the ensemble of layered models equivalent to a given tomographic profile. We use a transdimensional formulation where the number of layers is variable. Furthermore, each layer may be either isotropic (1 parameter) or intrinsically anisotropic (2 parameters). The parsimonious character of the Bayesian inversion gives preference to models with the least number of parameters (i.e. least number of layers, and

  17. Just noticeable differences of open quotient and asymmetry coefficient in singing voice.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Nathalie; Sundin, Gunilla; Ambroise, Daniel; d'Alessandro, Christophe; Castellengo, Michèle; Doval, Boris

    2003-12-01

    This study aims to explore the perceptual relevance of the variations of glottal flow parameters and to what extent a small variation can be detected. Just Noticeable Differences (JNDs) have been measured for three values of open quotient (0.4, 0.6, and 0.8) and two values of asymmetry coefficient (2/3 and 0.8), and the effect of changes of vowel, pitch, vibrato, and amplitude parameters has been tested. Two main groups of subjects have been analyzed: a group of 20 untrained subjects and a group of 10 trained subjects. The results show that the JND for open quotient is highly dependent on the target value: an increase of the JND is noticed when the open quotient target value is increased. The relative JND is constant: deltaOq/Oq = 14% for the untrained and 10% for the trained. In the same way, the JND for asymmetry coefficient is also slightly dependent on the target value--an increase of the asymmetry coefficient value leads to a decrease of the JND. The results show that there is no effect from the selected vowel or frequency (two values have been tested), but that the addition of a vibrato has a small effect on the JND of open quotient. The choice of an amplitude parameter also has a great effect on the JND of open quotient. PMID:14740930

  18. Asymmetry in prefrontal resting-state EEG spectral power underlies individual differences in phasic and sustained cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Ettore; Vallesi, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    In our daily life, we constantly exert sustained and phasic cognitive control processes to manage multiple competing task sets and rapidly switch between them. Increasing research efforts are attempting to unveil how the brain mediates these processes, highlighting the importance of the prefrontal cortex. An intriguing question concerns the influence of hemispheric asymmetries and whether it may be generalized to different cognitive domains depending on lateralized processing. Another currently open question concerns the underlying causes of the observed huge inter-individual variability in cognitive control abilities. Here we tackle these issues by investigating whether participants' hemispheric asymmetry in intrinsic (i.e., resting-state-related) brain dynamics can reflect differences in their phasic and/or sustained cognitive control abilities regardless of the cognitive domain. To this aim, we recorded human participants' resting-state electroencephalographic activity and performed a source-based spectral analysis to assess their lateralized brain dynamics at rest. Moreover, we used three task-switching paradigms involving different cognitive domains to assess participants' domain-general phasic and sustained cognitive control abilities. By performing a series of correlations and an intersection analysis, we showed that participants with stronger left- and right-lateralized intrinsic brain activity in the middle frontal gyrus were more able, respectively, to exert phasic and sustained cognitive control. We propose that the variability in participants' prefrontal hemispheric asymmetry in the intrinsic electrophysiological spectral profile reflects individual differences in preferentially engaging either the left-lateralized, phasic or the right-lateralized, sustained cognitive control processes to regulate their behavior in response to changing task demands, regardless of the specific cognitive domain involved. PMID:26416650

  19. Asymmetry in prefrontal resting-state EEG spectral power underlies individual differences in phasic and sustained cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Ettore; Vallesi, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    In our daily life, we constantly exert sustained and phasic cognitive control processes to manage multiple competing task sets and rapidly switch between them. Increasing research efforts are attempting to unveil how the brain mediates these processes, highlighting the importance of the prefrontal cortex. An intriguing question concerns the influence of hemispheric asymmetries and whether it may be generalized to different cognitive domains depending on lateralized processing. Another currently open question concerns the underlying causes of the observed huge inter-individual variability in cognitive control abilities. Here we tackle these issues by investigating whether participants' hemispheric asymmetry in intrinsic (i.e., resting-state-related) brain dynamics can reflect differences in their phasic and/or sustained cognitive control abilities regardless of the cognitive domain. To this aim, we recorded human participants' resting-state electroencephalographic activity and performed a source-based spectral analysis to assess their lateralized brain dynamics at rest. Moreover, we used three task-switching paradigms involving different cognitive domains to assess participants' domain-general phasic and sustained cognitive control abilities. By performing a series of correlations and an intersection analysis, we showed that participants with stronger left- and right-lateralized intrinsic brain activity in the middle frontal gyrus were more able, respectively, to exert phasic and sustained cognitive control. We propose that the variability in participants' prefrontal hemispheric asymmetry in the intrinsic electrophysiological spectral profile reflects individual differences in preferentially engaging either the left-lateralized, phasic or the right-lateralized, sustained cognitive control processes to regulate their behavior in response to changing task demands, regardless of the specific cognitive domain involved.

  20. Asymmetry and structural changes in ECF1 examined by cryoelectronmicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, S; Capaldi, R A

    1994-01-01

    The Escherichia coli ATPase (ECF1) has been studied by cryoelectronmicroscopy and an intrinsic asymmetry of the molecule in the hexagonal projection identified. The three beta subunits could be distinguished. One, which we have called beta 1, has a greater density in projection than the other two; the second, beta 2, is of intermediate density in projection, while the third, beta 3, is smeared out in density. These different features of the beta subunits were used to orient images, and the positions of the gamma and epsilon subunits then established. The location of the gamma subunit, as monitored by the central mass, was not fixed. This subunit could be found in positions that followed an arc from close to beta 2 to close to beta 3, a shift of around 10A, with respect to the center of the mass. The location of the epsilon subunit was monitored after reconstituting a complex of epsilon subunit-depleted ECF1 with a mutant epsilon subunit in which His at residue 38 had been replaced by Cys, and this Cys labeled with an approximately 14A gold particle. The epsilon subunit was found in positions described by an arc between an alpha subunit (alpha 1) and the neighboring beta subunit (beta 1), a shift of around 20A, with respect to the center of the gold particle. A nucleotide dependence of the position of the gamma subunit has been established by Gogol, E.P., Johnston, E., Aggeler, R. and Capaldi, R.A. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87, 9585-9589. A nucleotide dependence of the position of the epsilon subunit is shown here.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8003256

  1. The intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Jorge; Bernardini, Alejandra; Garcia-Leon, Guillermo; Corona, Fernando; B. Sanchez, Maria; Martinez, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically resistant bacteria have emerged as a relevant health problem in the last years. Those bacterial species, several of them with an environmental origin, present naturally low-level susceptibility to several drugs. It has been proposed that intrinsic resistance is mainly the consequence of the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or the lack of appropriate targets for a given family of drugs. However, recently published articles indicate that the characteristic phenotype of susceptibility to antibiotics of a given bacterial species depends on the concerted activity of several elements, what has been named as intrinsic resistome. These determinants comprise not just classical resistance genes. Other elements, several of them involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes, are of relevance for the intrinsic resistance of bacterial pathogens. In the present review we analyze recent publications on the intrinsic resistomes of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present as well information on the role that global regulators of bacterial metabolism, as Crc from P. aeruginosa, may have on modulating bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, we discuss the possibility of searching inhibitors of the intrinsic resistome in the aim of improving the activity of drugs currently in use for clinical practice. PMID:23641241

  2. Refining the intrinsic chimera flap: a review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Jayant P; Agarwal, Shailesh; Adler, Neta; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    2009-10-01

    Reconstruction of complex tissue deficiencies in which each missing component is in a different spatial relationship to each other can be particularly challenging, especially in patients with limited recipient vessels. The chimera flap design is uniquely suited to reconstruct these deformities. Chimera flaps have been previously defined in many ways with 2 main categories: prefabricated or intrinsic. Herein we attempt to clarify the definition of a true intrinsic chimeric flap and provide examples of how these constructs provide a method for reconstruction of complex defects. The versatility of the intrinsic chimera flap and its procurement from 7 different vascular systems is described. A clarification of the definition of a true intrinsic chimera flap is described. In addition, construction of flaps from the lateral femoral circumflex, deep circumflex iliac, inferior gluteal, peroneal, subscapular, thoracodorsal, and radial arterial systems is described to showcase the versatility of these chimera flaps. A true intrinsic chimera flap must consist of more than a single tissue type. Each of the tissue components receives its blood flow from separate vascular branches or perforators that are connected to a single vascular source. These vascular branches must be of appropriate length to allow for insetting with 3-dimensional spatial freedom. There are a multitude of sites from which true intrinsic chimera flaps may be harvested.

  3. Rare decays and CP asymmetries in charged B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of loop induced rare decays and the rate asymmetry due to CP violation in charged B Decays in reviewed. After considering b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} se{sup +}e{sup {minus}} decays, the asymmetries for pure penguin process are estimated first. A larger asymmetry can result in those modes where a tree diagram and a penguin diagram interfere, however these estimates are necessarily model dependent. Estimates of Cabbibo suppressed penguins are also considered.

  4. CPT violation and particle-antiparticle asymmetry in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2010-04-15

    General features of generation of the cosmological charge asymmetry in CPT noninvariant world are discussed. If the effects of CPT violationmanifest themselves only inmass differences of particles and antiparticles, the baryon asymmetry of the Universe hardly can be explained solely by breaking of CPT invariance. However, CPT noninvariant theories may lead to a new effect of distorting the usual equilibrium distributions. If this takes place, CPT violation may explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe.

  5. Intrinsic geometry of a tidally deformed Kerr horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    The intrinsic metric of a tidally deformed black-hole horizon can be presented in a coordinate system adapted to the horizon's null generators, with one coordinate acting as a running parameter along each generator, and two coordinates acting as constant generator labels. The metric is invariant under reparametrizations of the generators, and as such the horizon's intrinsic geometry is known to be gauge invariant. We consider a Kerr black hole deformed by a slowly-evolving external tidal field, and describe the intrinsic geometry of its event horizon in terms of the electric and magnetic tidal moments that characterize the tidal environment. When the black hole is slowly rotating, the horizon's geometry can be described in terms of a deviation from an otherwise spherical surface, and the deformation can be characterized by gauge invariant Love numbers. Some aspects of this tidal deformation have direct analogues in Newtonian physics. Some do not, and I will describe the similarities and differences between the tidal deformation of rotating black holes in general relativity and rotating fluid bodies in Newtonian physics.

  6. Hemispheric Asymmetries of the Subauroral Ion Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, F.; Zhang, X.; Wang, W.; Chen, B.

    2015-12-01

    A large database of subauroral ion drifts (SAID) events from DMSP observations from 1987 to 2012 is used to systematically investigate the features of SAID. SAID occurs mostly at ~ 62° / -60° magnetic latitude (MLAT) and ~ 2215 / 2245 magnetic local time (MLT) for geomagnetically quiet conditions and at ~ 58°/ -56° MLAT and ~ 2215 / 2245 MLT for geomagnetically disturbed conditions in the North Hemisphere (NH) / South Hemisphere (SH), respectively. Significant north-south asymmetries in SAID occurrence, shape, and geomagnetic activity variations are found in this statistical study. The latitudinal width of a SAID is larger in the NH than in the SH. An interesting finding of this work is that the SAID occurrence probability peaks have a ~ 180° difference in longitude between the two hemispheres in the geographic coordinates for both geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions. The SAID width peaks in almost the same geomagnetic meridian zone with a geomagnetic longitude of ~ 80°-120° in both hemispheres. Significant hemispheric asymmetries and spike signatures with sharpe dips are found in all the latitudinal profiles of the horizontal velocities of SAIDs.The SAID is highly correlated to geomagnetic activity, indicating that the location and evolution of the SAID might be influenced by global geomagnetic activity, auroral dynamics, and the dynamics of ring currents. The hemispheric asymmetries of SAID may possibly be related with the differences of the hemispheric power, the cross-polar cap potential, and the density of region-2 field-aligned currents in the two hemispheres. Detailed investigations will be presented in future.

  7. Single transverse spin asymmetry of prompt photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamberg, Leonard; Kang, Zhong-Bo

    2012-11-01

    We study the single transverse spin asymmetry of prompt photon production in high energy proton-proton scattering. We include the contributions from both the direct and fragmentation photons. While the asymmetry for direct photon production receives only the Sivers type of contribution, the asymmetry for fragmentation photons receives both the Sivers and Collins types of contributions. We make a model calculation for quark-to-photon Collins function, which is then used to estimate the Collins asymmetry for fragmentation photons. We find that the Collins asymmetry for fragmentation photons is very small, thus the single transverse spin asymmetry of prompt photon production is mainly coming from the Sivers asymmetry in direct and fragmentation photons. We make predictions for the prompt photon spin asymmetry at RHIC energy, and emphasize the importance of such a measurement. The asymmetry of prompt photon production can provide a good measurement for the important twist-three quark-gluon correlation function, which is urgently needed in order to resolve the "sign mismatch" puzzle.

  8. [Asymmetry of antennal grooming in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana)].

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the key features of antennal grooming of male American cockroaches in neutral circumstances. It was shown for the first time that the right antenna was cleaned significantly more often than the left one, which indicates the presence of functional asymmetry of antennal grooming in this insect species. At the same time, no statistically significant asymmetry was found for grooming of antennal bases and legs. Morphological asymmetries of antennae and legs and/or brain lateralization are the plausible sources of observed behavioral asymmetry in antennal grooming.

  9. Control of tension-compression asymmetry in Ogden hyperelasticity with application to soft tissue modelling.

    PubMed

    Moerman, Kevin M; Simms, Ciaran K; Nagel, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses tension-compression asymmetry properties of Ogden hyperelastic formulations. It is shown that if all negative or all positive Ogden coefficients are used, tension-compression asymmetry occurs the degree of which cannot be separately controlled from the degree of non-linearity. A simple hybrid form is therefore proposed providing separate control over the tension-compression asymmetry. It is demonstrated how this form relates to a newly introduced generalised strain tensor class which encompasses both the tension-compression asymmetric Seth-Hill strain class and the tension-compression symmetric Bažant strain class. If the control parameter is set to q=0.5 a tension-compression symmetric form involving Bažant strains is obtained with the property Ψ(λ1,λ2,λ3)=Ψ(1λ1,1λ2,1λ3). The symmetric form may be desirable for the definition of ground matrix contributions in soft tissue modelling allowing all deviation from the symmetry to stem solely from fibrous reinforcement. Such an application is also presented demonstrating the use of the proposed formulation in the modelling of the non-linear elastic and transversely isotropic behaviour of skeletal muscle tissue in compression (the model implementation and fitting procedure have been made freely available). The presented hyperelastic formulations may aid researchers in independently controlling the degree of tension-compression asymmetry from the degree of non-linearity, and in the case of anisotropic materials may assist in determining the role played by, either the ground matrix, or the fibrous reinforcing structures, in generating asymmetry.

  10. Control of tension-compression asymmetry in Ogden hyperelasticity with application to soft tissue modelling.

    PubMed

    Moerman, Kevin M; Simms, Ciaran K; Nagel, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses tension-compression asymmetry properties of Ogden hyperelastic formulations. It is shown that if all negative or all positive Ogden coefficients are used, tension-compression asymmetry occurs the degree of which cannot be separately controlled from the degree of non-linearity. A simple hybrid form is therefore proposed providing separate control over the tension-compression asymmetry. It is demonstrated how this form relates to a newly introduced generalised strain tensor class which encompasses both the tension-compression asymmetric Seth-Hill strain class and the tension-compression symmetric Bažant strain class. If the control parameter is set to q=0.5 a tension-compression symmetric form involving Bažant strains is obtained with the property Ψ(λ1,λ2,λ3)=Ψ(1λ1,1λ2,1λ3). The symmetric form may be desirable for the definition of ground matrix contributions in soft tissue modelling allowing all deviation from the symmetry to stem solely from fibrous reinforcement. Such an application is also presented demonstrating the use of the proposed formulation in the modelling of the non-linear elastic and transversely isotropic behaviour of skeletal muscle tissue in compression (the model implementation and fitting procedure have been made freely available). The presented hyperelastic formulations may aid researchers in independently controlling the degree of tension-compression asymmetry from the degree of non-linearity, and in the case of anisotropic materials may assist in determining the role played by, either the ground matrix, or the fibrous reinforcing structures, in generating asymmetry. PMID:26719933

  11. Charge asymmetry in charmed-meson photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, A. V. Likhoded, A. K.

    2006-01-15

    Within the perturbative-recombination model, the charge asymmetries in the D*{sup +}-D*{sup -}, D*{sup 0}-D*{sup 0}, and D{sup +}{sub s}-D{sup -}{sub s} yields are estimated under the kinematical conditions of the COMPASS experiment. Corrections that arise owing to the mass of a light quark in a charmed meson are taken into account. The yield of D{sup +}{sub s} mesons is predicted to be large in relation to the yield of D{sup -}{sub s} mesons.

  12. Asymmetries in gamma scattering by Fe-57.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. Y.; Goodman, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with a setup in which a Co-57 single-line source was driven by a constant-acceleration motor. The 14.4-keV gamma rays emitted from the iron foil scatterer were detected by a proportional counter filled with krypton and carbon dioxide. The interference for individual Zeeman hyperfine transitions in a magnetic field was calculated. It was found that beside the cos phi angular dependence of line shape asymmetry, there exists a sin phi intensity dependence for some of the hyperfine transitions.

  13. Asymmetry in ferroelectric polymer laminate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, B.A.; Scheinbeim, J.I.; Su, Ji

    1996-10-01

    Studies of the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of composite bilaminates of poly(vinylidene fluoride) and nylon 11 films have shown that the properties of the bilaminates cannot be understood solely in terms of the properties of the individual components. Further, the properties of films which are polarized with the positive voltage on the nylon 11 side are different from those having the positive voltage on the poly(vinylidene fluoride) side. This asymmetry is interpreted as resulting from a region of space charge trapped at the interface between the two layers.

  14. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  15. Parametric resonance of intrinsic localized modes in coupled cantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masayuki; Matsushita, Yasuo; Hikihara, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the parametric resonances of pinned intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) were investigated by computing the unstable regions in parameter space consisting of parametric excitation amplitude and frequency. In the unstable regions, the pinned ILMs were observed to lose stability and begin to fluctuate. A nonlinear Klein-Gordon, Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-like, and mixed lattices were investigated. The pinned ILMs, particularly in the mixed lattice, were destabilized by parametric resonances, which were determined by comparing the shapes of the unstable regions with those in the Mathieu differential equation. In addition, traveling ILMs could be generated by parametric excitation.

  16. Resonant tunneling and intrinsic bistability in twisted graphene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Levitov, L. S.

    2016-08-01

    We predict that vertical transport in heterostructures formed by twisted graphene layers can exhibit a unique bistability mechanism. Intrinsically bistable I -V characteristics arise from resonant tunneling and interlayer charge coupling, enabling multiple stable states in the sequential tunneling regime. We consider a simple trilayer architecture, with the outer layers acting as the source and drain and the middle layer floating. Under bias, the middle layer can be either resonant or nonresonant with the source and drain layers. The bistability is controlled by geometric device parameters easily tunable in experiments. The nanoscale architecture can enable uniquely fast switching times.

  17. Semantic Asymmetries Are Modulated by Phonological Asymmetries: Evidence from the Disambiguation of Homophonic versus Heterophonic Homographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peleg, Orna; Eviatar, Zohar

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated cerebral asymmetries in accessing multiple meanings of two types of homographs: homophonic homographs (e.g., "bank") and heterophonic homographs (e.g., "tear"). Participants read homographs preceded by either a biasing or a non-biasing sentential context and performed a lexical decision on lateralized targets…

  18. Associations between Muscle Strength Asymmetry and Impairments in Gait and Posture in Young Brain-Injured Patients.

    PubMed

    Drijkoningen, David; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Vander Linden, Catharine; Van Herpe, Katrin; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to deficits in gait and posture, which are often asymmetric. A possible factor mediating these deficits may be asymmetry in strength of the leg muscles. However, muscle strength in the lower extremities has rarely been investigated in (young) TBI patients. Here, we investigated associations between lower-extremity muscle weakness, strength asymmetry, and impairments in gait and posture in young TBI patients. A group of young patients with moderate-to-severe TBI (n=19; age, 14 years 11 months ±2 years) and a group of typically developing subjects (n=31; age, 14 years 1 month±3 years) participated in this study. A force platform was used to measure postural sway to quantify balance control during normal standing and during conditions of compromised visual and/or somatosensory feedback. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were assessed during comfortable and fast-speed walking, using an electronic walkway. Muscle strength in four lower-extremity muscle groups was measured bilaterally using a handheld dynamometer. Findings revealed that TBI patients had poorer postural balance scores across all sensory conditions, as compared to typically developing subjects. During comfortable and fast gait, TBI patients demonstrated a lower gait velocity, longer double-support phase, and increased step-length asymmetry. Further, TBI patients had a reduced strength of leg muscles and an increased strength asymmetry. Correlation analyses revealed that asymmetry in muscle strength was predictive of a poorer balance control and a more variable and asymmetric gait. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to measure strength asymmetry in leg muscles of a sample of TBI patients and illustrate the importance of muscular asymmetry as a potential marker and possible risk factor of impairments in control of posture and gait.

  19. Intrinsic alignments of BOSS LOWZ galaxies - II. Impact of shape measurement methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sukhdeep; Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes with the large-scale density field, and the inferred intrinsic alignments model parameters, are sensitive to the shape measurement methods used. In this paper, we measure the intrinsic alignments of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) low redshift (LOWZ) galaxies using three different shape measurement methods (re-Gaussianization, isophotal, and de Vaucouleurs), identifying a variation in the inferred intrinsic alignments amplitude at the 40 per cent level between these methods, independent of the galaxy luminosity or other properties. We also carry out a suite of systematics tests on the shapes and their two-point correlation functions, identifying a pronounced contribution from additive point spread function systematics in the de Vaucouleurs shapes. Since different methods measure galaxy shapes at different effective radii, the trends we identify in the intrinsic alignments amplitude are consistent with the interpretation that the outer regions of galaxy shapes are more responsive to tidal fields, resulting in isophote twisting and stronger alignments for isophotal shapes. We observe environment dependence of ellipticity, with brightest galaxies in groups being rounder on average compared to satellite and field galaxies. We also study the anisotropy in intrinsic alignments measurements introduced by projected shapes, finding effects consistent with predictions of the non-linear alignment model and hydrodynamic simulations. The large variations seen using the different shape measurement methods have important implications for intrinsic alignments forecasting and mitigation with future surveys.

  20. Asymmetry of reinforcement and punishment in human choice.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Erin B; Newland, M Christopher

    2008-03-01

    The hypothesis that a penny lost is valued more highly than a penny earned was tested in human choice. Five participants clicked a computer mouse under concurrent variable-interval schedules of monetary reinforcement. In the no-punishment condition, the schedules arranged monetary gain. In the punishment conditions, a schedule of monetary loss was superimposed on one response alternative. Deviations from generalized matching using the free parameters c (sensitivity to reinforcement) and log k (bias) were compared in the no-punishment and punishment conditions. The no-punishment conditions yielded values of log k that approximated zero for all participants, indicating no bias. In the punishment condition, values of log k deviated substantially from zero, revealing a 3-fold bias toward the unpunished alternative. Moreover, the c parameters were substantially smaller in punished conditions. The values for bias and sensitivity under punishment did not change significantly when the measure of net reinforcers (gains minus losses) was applied to the analysis. These results mean that punishment reduced the sensitivity of behavior to reinforcement and biased performance toward the unpunished alternative. We concluded that a single punisher subtracted more value than a single reinforcer added, indicating an asymmetry in the law of effect. PMID:18422016

  1. Asymmetry of reinforcement and punishment in human choice.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Erin B; Newland, M Christopher

    2008-03-01

    The hypothesis that a penny lost is valued more highly than a penny earned was tested in human choice. Five participants clicked a computer mouse under concurrent variable-interval schedules of monetary reinforcement. In the no-punishment condition, the schedules arranged monetary gain. In the punishment conditions, a schedule of monetary loss was superimposed on one response alternative. Deviations from generalized matching using the free parameters c (sensitivity to reinforcement) and log k (bias) were compared in the no-punishment and punishment conditions. The no-punishment conditions yielded values of log k that approximated zero for all participants, indicating no bias. In the punishment condition, values of log k deviated substantially from zero, revealing a 3-fold bias toward the unpunished alternative. Moreover, the c parameters were substantially smaller in punished conditions. The values for bias and sensitivity under punishment did not change significantly when the measure of net reinforcers (gains minus losses) was applied to the analysis. These results mean that punishment reduced the sensitivity of behavior to reinforcement and biased performance toward the unpunished alternative. We concluded that a single punisher subtracted more value than a single reinforcer added, indicating an asymmetry in the law of effect.

  2. Cholesterol Asymmetry in Synaptic Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, W. Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Müller, Walter E.; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2010-01-01

    Lipids are essential for the structural and functional integrity of membranes. Membrane lipids are not randomly distributed but are localized in different domains. A common characteristic of these membrane domains is their association with cholesterol. Lipid rafts and caveolae are examples of cholesterol enriched domains, which have attracted keen interest. However, two other important cholesterol domains are the exofacial and cytofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane. The two leaflets that make up the bilayer differ in their fluidity, electrical charge, lipid distribution, and active sites of certain proteins. The synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) cytofacial leaflet contains over 85% of the total SPM cholesterol as compared with the exofacial leaflet. This asymmetric distribution of cholesterol is not fixed or immobile but can be modified by different conditions in vivo: 1) chronic ethanol consumption; 2) statins; 3) aging; and 4) apoE isoform. Several potential candidates have been proposed as mechanisms involved in regulation of SPM cholesterol asymmetry: apoE, low-density-lipoprotein receptor, sterol carrier protein-2, fatty acid binding proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, p-glycoprotein and caveolin-1. This review examines cholesterol asymmetry in SPM, potential mechanisms of regulation and impact on membrane structure and function. PMID:21214553

  3. Westward drift, rift asymmetry and continental uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Bonatti, E.

    2003-04-01

    Although not predicted by classic plate tectonics theory, the topography of ocean ridges and rifts show a distinct asymmetry, when depth is plotted both vs. distance from the ridge and square root of the age of the oceanic crust. The eastern sides of the East Pacific Rise, of the mid Atlantic ridge, of the NW Indian ridge are in average more elevated than the conjugate flank to the west and eastern sides show slower subsidence rates. A similar asymmetry can be observed across the Red Sea and Baikal rifts. We suggest that depleted and lighter asthenosphere generated by partial melting below the ocean ridges shifts 'eastward' relative to the lithosphere, determining a density deficit below the eastern flank. The 'eastward' migration of the lighter Atlantic asthenosphere under the African continent, could eventually have contributed to the anomalous post-rift uplift of Africa and explain the anomalously higher topography of Africa with respect to other continents. This model suggests that the 'westward' drift of the lithosphere relative to the underlying mantle might be a global phenomenon and not just a mean delay.

  4. Line profile asymmetries in chromospherically active stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Robert C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Granados, Arno F.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1992-01-01

    A powerful, new probe of chromospheric activity, cross-correlation, has been developed and applied to a variety of stars. In this particular application, an entire CCD spectrum of an active star is correlated with the spectrum of a narrow-line, inactive star of similar spectral type and luminosity class. Using a number of strong lines in this manner enables the detection of absorption profile asymmetries at moderate resolution (lambda/Delta lambda about 40,000) and S/N 150:1. This technique has been applied to 14 systems mostly RS CVn's, with 10 not greater than nu sin i not greater than 50 km/s and P not less than 7 d. Distortions were detected for the first time in five systems: Sigma Gem, IM Peg, GX Lib, UV Crb, and Zeta And. Detailed modeling, incorporating both spectral line profiles and broad-band photometry, is applied to Sigma Gem. Profile asymmetries for this star are fitted by two high-latitude spots covering 5 percent of the stellar surface. The derived spot temperature of 3400 K is lower than found in previous studies. In addition, two well-known systems have been studied: HD 199178 and V711 Tau. Polar spots are found on both.

  5. A Search for Hemispheric Asymmetry on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, C. M.; Storrs, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    We will present reconstructed images of Neptune's largest satellite Triton as part of an investigation of hemispheric asymmetry. The images we observed from the Hubble Space Telescope in July of 1997, using the Wide Field/Planetary Camera. The images were taken in several filters: F439W, F555W, and F791W. Image restoration was performed using the MISTRAL program (Mugnier, Fusco, and Conan 2003). We present the ratio between the filters to determine if there is any hemispheric color asymmetry at this time. The photometry of Triton appears normal in this data although Hicks and Buratti (2004) observe Triton to be anomalously red in August of 1997. References: Hicks, M.D., and Buratti, B.J. (2004): "The Spectral Variability of Triton from 1997-2000", Icarus 171 pp. 210-218 Mugnier, L.M., T. Fusco, and J.-M. Conan, 2003. "MISTRAL: a Myopic Edge-Preserving Image Restoration Method. Applicaton to Astronomical Adaptive Optics Corrected Long-Exposure Images." JOSA A (submitted)

  6. Amygdala kindling modifies interhemispheric dopaminergic asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Mintz, M; Tomer, R; Houpt, S; Herberg, L J

    1987-04-01

    Brain dopamine is known to retard the development of kindled seizures, but it is uncertain whether kindling affects dopamine function. In the present study, rats were screened for cerebral dominance by recording their preferred direction of rotation when injected with d-amphetamine. Bipolar stimulating electrodes were then implanted in the amygdaloid complex of either the dominant or nondominant hemisphere (i.e., respectively, contra- and ipsilateral to the preferred direction of rotation; the dominant hemisphere identified in this way has been shown to contain higher concentrations of dopamine than the nondominant hemisphere). Kindling stimulation (or sham-kindling, in control rats) was applied through the electrodes two or three times daily for 21 days, and the rats were reassessed for amphetamine- and apomorphine-induced rotation, during and after the course of treatment. Kindling of the originally dominant hemisphere caused a diminution of rotational asymmetry as measured in tests 2 to 3 h after stimulation sessions, and in some rats led to a reversal in the preferred direction of amphetamine-induced rotation. Kindling of the nondominant hemisphere tended to accentuate the original amphetamine-induced asymmetry. The direction of rotation induced by a direct postsynaptic DA-receptor agonist (apomorphine) was not significantly affected by kindling of either hemisphere. It appears that kindling stimulation brings about a relatively inferior level of DA function on the stimulated vs. the nonstimulated side of the brain, and that this process depends mainly on changes occurring at a presynaptic level.

  7. [Effect of environmental cyclicity on appearance of human brain functional asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Volchek, O D

    1995-01-01

    The indices of the brain functional asymmetry of 4373 persons, born in 1920-1984 were studied in connection with parameters of the environment during the periods of birth and conception. The trustworthy valuable seasonal and long-term variations of the brain functional asymmetry indices were discovered. Their correlation with the cosmo-physical fluctuations is maximum for the 10-year cycle of the oriental calendar elements and the month of conception. The leading factors of the environment are: the parameters of the interplanetary magnetic field; the long-period part's potential of the high-tide forming strength of the Moon and the Sun G; geomagnetic perturbation Kp; the joined location of the planets in relation of the Moon, the Earth and the Sun. The results trace the distinctly marked sexual dimorphism. The variability of the brain functional asymmetry appears to be the display of the human individuality diversity in time and is attended by the changes in the dominating type of the universe cognition in the society-logical, intuitive, sensual, combined. The long-term and century-old cycles of social development seem to be the consequence of this phenomenon.

  8. Two Higgs Doublet Model III and Double-Lepton Polarization Asymmetries in Λ b → Λμ+μ- Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai-Wei; Huang, Jin-Shu

    2016-08-01

    Using the form factors calculated both in lattice QCD and HQET, we analyze the branching ratio, double-lepton polarization asymmetries and averaged double-lepton polarization asymmetries of Λb Λμ+μ- decay in the 2HDM III, respectively. Combining the experimental constrains on the 2HDM III parameters, we take two set of representative parameter spaces in our calculations. For the branching ratio of Λb → Λμ+μ- decay, considering the uncertainties of the form factors and input parameters, we find the results of both SM and 2HDM III can satisfy the current experimental data in the framework of lattice QCD, but not in HQET. Then we calculate the double-lepton polarization asymmetries Pij and their averaged values

    , we find the double-lepton polarization asymmetries P LT , P NN , and P TT are sensitive to the 2HDM III. However, P LN , P NL , P NT , and P TN show the opposite results. The contribution of the 2HDM III to their averaged values have similar results. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11345005 and Key Scientific Research projects of Henan Educational Committee (13A140814), and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. U1332103

  9. Gait asymmetry: composite scores for mechanical analyses of sprint running.

    PubMed

    Exell, T A; Gittoes, M J R; Irwin, G; Kerwin, D G

    2012-04-01

    Gait asymmetry analyses are beneficial from clinical, coaching and technology perspectives. Quantifying overall athlete asymmetry would be useful in allowing comparisons between participants, or between asymmetry and other factors, such as sprint running performance. The aim of this study was to develop composite kinematic and kinetic asymmetry scores to quantify athlete asymmetry during maximal speed sprint running. Eight male sprint trained athletes (age 22±5 years, mass 74.0±8.7 kg and stature 1.79±0.07 m) participated in this study. Synchronised sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic data were collected via a CODA motion analysis system, synchronised to two Kistler force plates. Bilateral, lower limb data were collected during the maximal velocity phase of sprint running (velocity=9.05±0.37 ms(-1)). Kinematic and kinetic composite asymmetry scores were developed using the previously established symmetry angle for discrete variables associated with successful sprint performance and comparisons of continuous joint power data. Unlike previous studies quantifying gait asymmetry, the scores incorporated intra-limb variability by excluding variables from the composite scores that did not display significantly larger (p<0.05) asymmetry than intra-limb variability. The variables that contributed to the composite scores and the magnitude of asymmetry observed for each measure varied on an individual participant basis. The new composite scores indicated the inter-participant differences that exist in asymmetry during sprint running and may serve to allow comparisons between overall athlete asymmetry with other important factors such as performance.

  10. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Intrinsic stability of an HBT based on a small signal equivalent circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanhu, Chen; Huajun, Shen; Xinyu, Liu; Huijun, Li; Hui, Xu; Ling, Li

    2010-12-01

    Intrinsic stability of the heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) was analyzed and discussed based on a small signal equivalent circuit model. The stability factor of the HBT device was derived based on a compact T-type small signal equivalent circuit model of the HBT. The effect of the mainly small signal model parameters of the HBT on the stability of the HBT was thoroughly examined. The discipline of parameter optimum to improve the intrinsic stability of the HBT was achieved. The theoretic analysis results of the stability were also used to explain the experimental results of the stability of the HBT and they were verified by the experimental results.

  11. Patterns of fluctuating asymmetry and shape variation in Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) exposed to nonylphenol or lead.

    PubMed

    Arambourou, Hélène; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Branchu, Philippe; Debat, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Deformities and fluctuating asymmetry in chironomid larvae have been proposed as sensitive indicators of biological stress and are commonly used to assess the ecological impact of human activities. In particular, they have been associated in Chironomus riparius, the most commonly used species, with heavy metal and pesticide river pollution. In this study, the effect of lead and 4-nonylphenol on mouthpart morphological variation of Chironomus riparius larvae was investigated by traditional and geometric morphometrics. For this purpose, first to fourth instar larvae were exposed to sediment spiked with lead (from 3.0 to 456.9 mg/kg dry weight) or 4-NP (from 0.1 to 198.8 mg/kg dry weight). Mentum phenotypic response to pollutants was assessed by four parameters: (1) the frequency of deformities, (2) fluctuating asymmetry of mentum length, (3) fluctuating asymmetry of mentum shape and (4) the mentum mean shape changes. Despite the bioaccumulation of pollutants in the chironomid's body, no significant differences between control and stressed groups were found for mouthpart deformities and fluctuating asymmetry of mentum length. Slight effects on mentum shape fluctuating asymmetry were observed for two stressed groups. Significant mean shape changes, consisting of tooth size increase and tooth closing, were detected for lead and 4-NP exposure respectively. Those variations, however, were negligible in comparison to mentum shape changes due to genetic effects. These results suggest that the use of mentum variation as an indicator of toxic stress in Chironomus riparius should be considered cautiously. PMID:23133660

  12. Patterns of Fluctuating Asymmetry and Shape Variation in Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) Exposed to Nonylphenol or Lead

    PubMed Central

    Arambourou, Hélène; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Branchu, Philippe; Debat, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Deformities and fluctuating asymmetry in chironomid larvae have been proposed as sensitive indicators of biological stress and are commonly used to assess the ecological impact of human activities. In particular, they have been associated in Chironomus riparius, the most commonly used species, with heavy metal and pesticide river pollution. In this study, the effect of lead and 4-nonylphenol on mouthpart morphological variation of Chironomus riparius larvae was investigated by traditional and geometric morphometrics. For this purpose, first to fourth instar larvae were exposed to sediment spiked with lead (from 3.0 to 456.9 mg/kg dry weight) or 4-NP (from 0.1 to 198.8 mg/kg dry weight). Mentum phenotypic response to pollutants was assessed by four parameters: (1) the frequency of deformities, (2) fluctuating asymmetry of mentum length, (3) fluctuating asymmetry of mentum shape and (4) the mentum mean shape changes. Despite the bioaccumulation of pollutants in the chironomid’s body, no significant differences between control and stressed groups were found for mouthpart deformities and fluctuating asymmetry of mentum length. Slight effects on mentum shape fluctuating asymmetry were observed for two stressed groups. Significant mean shape changes, consisting of tooth size increase and tooth closing, were detected for lead and 4-NP exposure respectively. Those variations, however, were negligible in comparison to mentum shape changes due to genetic effects. These results suggest that the use of mentum variation as an indicator of toxic stress in Chironomus riparius should be considered cautiously. PMID:23133660

  13. Intrinsic delay of permeable base transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wenchao; Guo, Jing; So, Franky

    2014-07-28

    Permeable base transistors (PBTs) fabricated by vacuum deposition or solution process have the advantages of easy fabrication and low power operation and are a promising device structure for flexible electronics. Intrinsic delay of PBT, which characterizes the speed of the transistor, is investigated by solving the three-dimensional Poisson equation and drift-diffusion equation self-consistently using finite element method. Decreasing the emitter thickness lowers the intrinsic delay by improving on-current, and a thinner base is also preferred for low intrinsic delay because of fewer carriers in the base region at off-state. The intrinsic delay exponentially decreases as the emitter contact Schottky barrier height decreases, and it linearly depends on the carrier mobility. With an optimized emitter contact barrier height and device geometry, a sub-nano-second intrinsic delay can be achieved with a carrier mobility of ∼10 cm{sup 2}/V/s obtainable in solution processed indium gallium zinc oxide, which indicates the potential of solution processed PBTs for GHz operations.

  14. Independent component analysis and multiresolution asymmetry ratio for brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Yen

    2013-04-01

    This study proposes a brain-computer interface (BCI) system for the recognition of single-trial electroencephalogram (EEG) data. With the combination of independent component analysis (ICA) and multiresolution asymmetry ratio, a support vector machine (SVM) is used to classify left and right finger lifting or motor imagery. First, ICA and similarity measures are proposed to eliminate the electrooculography (EOG) artifacts automatically. The features are then extracted from the wavelet data by means of an asymmetry ratio. Finally, the SVM classifier is used to discriminate between the features. Compared to the EEG data without EOG artifact removal, band power, and adoptive autoregressive (AAR) parameter features, the proposed system achieves promising results in BCI applications.

  15. Empirical evidence for latitude dependence and asymmetry of geomagnetic spatial variation in mainland China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shikun; Zhang, Hao; Li, Xihai; Liu, Daizhi; Wang, Xiqin

    2016-05-01

    Spatiotemporal geomagnetic variation is a significant research topic of geomagnetism and space physics. Generated by convection and flows within the fluid outer core, latitude dependence and asymmetry, as the inherent spatiotemporal properties of geomagnetic field, have been extensively studied. We apply and modify an extension of existing method, Hidden Markov Model (HMM), which is an efficient tool for modeling the statistical properties of time series. Based on ground magnetic measurement data set in mainland China, first, we find the parameters of HMM can be used as the geomagnetic statistical signature to represent the spatiotemporal geomagnetic variations for each site. The results also support the existence of the geomagnetic latitude dependence more apparently. Furthermore, we provide solid empirical evidence for geomagnetic asymmetry relying on such ground magnetic measurement data set.

  16. Effects of compositional asymmetry in phase behavior of ABA triblock copolymer melts from Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Wołoszczuk, S; Banaszak, M

    2010-12-01

    We simulate ABA triblock copolymer melts using a lattice Monte Carlo method, known as cooperative motion algorithm, probing various degrees of compositional asymmetry. Selected order-disorder transition lines are determined in terms of the segment incompatibility, quantified by product χN , and the triblock asymmetry parameters, α and β. We correlate the results of the simulation with the self-consistent field theory and an experimental study of polyisoprene-polystyrene-polyisoprene triblock melt by Hamersky and coworkers. In particular, we confirm the mean-field prediction that for highly asymmetric triblocks the short A -block is localized in the middle of the B -domain due to an entropic advantage. This results in the middle block relaxation and is consistent with the experimental data indicating that as the relatively short A -blocks are grown into AB diblock, from the B -block side, the order-disorder transition temperature is considerably depressed.

  17. ${{\\bar{d}} - {\\bar{u}}}$ Flavor Asymmetry in the Proton in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Salamu, Y.; Ji, Cheung-Ryong; Melnitchouk, Wally; Wang, P.

    2015-09-01

    The ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton arising from pion loops is computed using chiral effective field theory. The calculation includes both nucleon and Δ intermediate states, and uses both the fully relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. The x dependence of ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ extracted from the Fermilab E866 Drell–Yan data can be well reproduced in terms of a single transverse momentum cutoff parameter regulating the ultraviolet behavior of the loop integrals. In addition to the distribution at x > 0, corrections to the integrated asymmetry from zero momentum contributions are computed, which arise from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at x = 0. These have not been accounted for in previous analyses, and can make important contributions to the lowest moment of ${\\bar d-\\bar u}$ .

  18. Implications of the cosmic microwave background power asymmetry for the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Christian T.; Regan, Donough; Seery, David; Tarrant, Ewan R. M.

    2016-06-01

    Observations of the microwave background fluctuations suggest a scale-dependent amplitude asymmetry of roughly 2.5 σ significance. Inflationary explanations for this "anomaly" require non-Gaussian fluctuations which couple observable modes to those on much larger scales. In this paper, we describe an analysis of such scenarios which significantly extends previous treatments. We identify the non-Gaussian "response function" which characterizes the asymmetry and show that it is nontrivial to construct a model which yields a sufficient amplitude; many independent fine-tunings are required, often making such models appear less likely than the anomaly they seek to explain. We present an explicit model satisfying observational constraints and determine for the first time how large its bispectrum would appear to a Planck-like experiment. Although this model is merely illustrative, we expect it is a good proxy for the bispectrum in a sizeable class of models which generate a scale-dependent response using a large η parameter.

  19. Solar neutrinos: Near-far asymmetry and just-so oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Faied, B.; Fogli, G.L.; Montanino, D.

    1997-02-01

    We propose to study possible signals of just-so oscillations in new-generation solar neutrino experiments by separating the events detected when the Earth is nearest to the Sun (perihelion {plus_minus} 3 months) from those detected when the Earth is farthest from the Sun (aphelion {plus_minus} 3 months). We introduce a solar-model-independent near-far asymmetry, which is nonzero if just-so oscillations occur. We apply our calculations to the kinetic energy spectra of electrons induced by {sup 8}B solar neutrino interactions in the SuperKamiokande and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiments. We show that the sensitivity to the neutrino oscillation parameters can be increased by probing the near-far asymmetry in selected parts of the electron energy spectra. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Absence of a day-night asymmetry in the 7Be solar neutrino rate in Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonetti, S.; Bonfini, G.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Carraro, C.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, E.; Hardy, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Koshio, Y.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Lombardi, F.; Ludhova, L.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Peña-Garay, C.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Sabelnikov, A.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Xu, J.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the result of a search for a day-night asymmetry in the 7Be solar neutrino interaction rate in the Borexino detector at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy. The measured asymmetry is Adn = 0.001 ± 0.012 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst), in agreement with the prediction of MSW-LMA solution for neutrino oscillations. This result disfavors MSW oscillations with mixing parameters in the LOW region at more than 8.5 σ. This region is, for the first time, strongly disfavored without the use of reactor anti-neutrino data and therefore the assumption of CPT symmetry. The result can also be used to constrain some neutrino oscillation scenarios involving new physics.

  1. CP-conserving unparticle phase effects on the unpolarized and polarized direct CP asymmetry in b{yields}dl{sup +}l{sup -} transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bashiry, V.

    2008-05-01

    We examine the unparticle CP-conserving phase effects on the direct CP asymmetry for both polarized and unpolarized leptons in the inclusive b{yields}dl{sup +}l{sup -} transition, where the flavor-changing neutral currents are forbidden at tree level but are induced by one-loop penguin diagrams. The averaged polarized and unpolarized CP asymmetries depict strong dependency on the unparticle parameters. In particular, a sizable discrepancy corresponding to the standard model is achieved when the scale dimension value is 1asymmetry depending on the definite value of the scaling dimension d{sub U}. Especially, when d{sub U}{approx}1.1 the CP asymmetries vanish.

  2. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-08-18

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual's quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies.

  3. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Wafai, Linah; Zayegh, Aladin; Woulfe, John; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Begg, Rezaul

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual’s quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies) support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3) and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies. PMID:26295239

  4. Fluctuating Asymmetry and General Intelligence: No Genetic or Phenotypic Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Segal, Nancy L.; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is the non-pathological left-right asymmetry of body traits that are usually left-right symmetrical, such as eye breadths and elbow to wrist lengths in humans, but which can be affected by developmental stressors. It is generally considered throughout biology to be an indicator of developmental instability and thus of…

  5. Asymmetries for the Visual Expression and Perception of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Michael E. R.; Searle, Dara A.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored asymmetries for movement, expression and perception of visual speech. Sixteen dextral models were videoed as they articulated: "bat," "cat," "fat," and "sat." Measurements revealed that the right side of the mouth was opened wider and for a longer period than the left. The asymmetry was accentuated at the beginning and ends of…

  6. Asymmetries of Knowledge and Epistemic Change in Social Gaming Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piirainen-Marsh, Arja; Tainio, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    While a growing number of studies investigate the role of knowledge and interactional management of knowledge asymmetries in conversation analysis, the epistemic organization of multilingual and second language interactions is still largely unexplored. This article addresses this issue by investigating how knowledge asymmetries and changing…

  7. Disentangling the Relationship between Hemispheric Asymmetry and Cognitive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirnstein, Marco; Leask, Stuart; Rose, Jonas; Hausmann, Markus

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that advantages of hemispheric asymmetries originated in better cognitive processing, hence it is often implied that the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry and cognitive performance is linearly positive: the higher the degree of lateralization in a specific cognitive domain, the better the performance in a…

  8. A Hemispheric Asymmetry for the Unconscious Perception of Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stephen D.; Bulman-Fleming, M. Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that hemispheric asymmetries for conscious visual perception do not lead to asymmetries for unconscious visual perception. These studies utilized emotionally neutral items as stimuli. The current research utilized both emotionally negative and neutral stimuli to assess hemispheric differences for conscious and…

  9. Information Asymmetries as Trade Barriers: ISO 9000 Increases International Commerce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potoski, Matthew; Prakash, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Spatial, cultural, and linguistic barriers create information asymmetries between buyers and sellers that impede international trade. The International Organization for Standardization's ISO 9000 program is designed to reduce these information asymmetries by providing assurance about the product quality of firms that receive its certification.…

  10. On reducing information asymmetry in U.S. health care.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Oswald A J; Kesavan, Ram; Bernacchi, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Information asymmetry is a significant issue facing the U.S. health care system. In this article, we investigate some methods of reducing this asymmetry. We trace the information asymmetry using the "wicked problem" of the health care distribution system. An information asymmetry reduction method requiring joint responsibilities among health care stakeholders is developed. It is argued that information asymmetry is a contributor to enormous health care inflation. Hence, any reduction in such asymmetry will reduce health care costs. Concepts from both signaling and corrective justice theories are integrated in this article to help reduce the information asymmetry that exists in the U.S. health care system. Getting health care costs in line with other "advanced" nations, is the long-term solution to the wicked problem that currently exists in the U.S. health care system. There is an immediate need for a centralized health care database with adequate provisions for individual privacy. Both processes as well as an outcome-based control system are essential for reducing information asymmetries in the U.S. health care system.

  11. Robustness of asymmetry and coherence of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piani, Marco; Cianciaruso, Marco; Bromley, Thomas R.; Napoli, Carmine; Johnston, Nathaniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-04-01

    Quantum states may exhibit asymmetry with respect to the action of a given group. Such an asymmetry of states can be considered a resource in applications such as quantum metrology, and it is a concept that encompasses quantum coherence as a special case. We introduce explicitly and study the robustness of asymmetry, a quantifier of asymmetry of states that we prove to have many attractive properties, including efficient numerical computability via semidefinite programming and an operational interpretation in a channel discrimination context. We also introduce the notion of asymmetry witnesses, whose measurement in a laboratory detects the presence of asymmetry. We prove that properly constrained asymmetry witnesses provide lower bounds to the robustness of asymmetry, which is shown to be a directly measurable quantity itself. We then focus our attention on coherence witnesses and the robustness of coherence, for which we prove a number of additional results; these include an analysis of its specific relevance in phase discrimination and quantum metrology, an analytical calculation of its value for a relevant class of quantum states, and tight bounds that relate it to another previously defined coherence monotone.

  12. Pulsar Kicks via Chiral Asymmetry of Magnetized Stellar Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shovkovy, I.

    2015-11-01

    Unusual chiral properties of the ground state of relativistic matter in a strong magnetic field are briefly reviewed. The main emphasis is placed on the dynamical generation of the chiral asymmetry in dense stellar matter. The corresponding asymmetry provides a natural mechanism for the strong pulsar kicks.

  13. Genome-Wide Prediction of Intrinsic Disorder; Sequence Alignment of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midic, Uros

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) is defined as a lack of stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are highly abundant in nature. IDPs possess a number of crucial biological functions, being involved in regulation, recognition, signaling and control, e.g. their functional…

  14. Plastic-casting intrinsic-surface unique identifier (tag)

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, R.G.; De Volpi, A.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes the development of an authenticated intrinsic-surf ace tagging method for unique- identification of controlled items. Although developed for control of items limited by an arms control treaty, this method has other potential applications to keep track of critical or high-value items. Each tag (unique-identifier) consists of the intrinsic, microscopic surface topography of a small designated area on a controlled item. It is implemented by making a baseline plastic casting of the designated tag area and usually placing a cover (for example, a bar-code label) over this area to protect the surface from environmental alteration. The plastic casting is returned to a laboratory and prepared for high-resolution scanning electron microscope imaging. Several images are digitized and stored for use as a standard for authentication of castings taken during future inspections. Authentication is determined by numerically comparing digital images. Commercially available hardware and software are used for this tag. Tag parameters are optimized, so unique casting images are obtained from original surfaces, and images obtained from attempted duplicate surfaces are detected. This optimization uses the modulation transfer function, a first principle of image analysis, to determine the parameters. Surface duplication experiments confirmed the optimization.

  15. MUON DECAY ASYMMETRIES FROM KOL YIELDS POM+M-DECAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN, M.V.; MA, H.; TRUEMAN, T.L.

    2001-06-12

    We have examined the decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -} in which the branching ratio, the muon energy asymmetry and the muon decay asymmetry could be measured. In particular, we find that within the Standard Model the longitudinal polarization (PL) of the muon is proportional to the direct CP violating amplitude. On the other hand the energy asymmetry and the out-of-plane polarization (P{sub N}) depend on both indirect and direct CP violating amplitudes. Although the branching ratio is small and difficult to measure because of background, the asymmetries could be large {Omicron}(1) in the Standard Model. A combined analysis of the energy asymmetry, P{sub L} and P{sub N} could be used to separate indirect, CPV, direct CPV, and CP conserving contributions to the decay.

  16. Extrapolation technique pitfalls in asymmetry measurements at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Hong, Ziqing; Toback, David; Wilson, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetry measurements are common in collider experiments and can sensitively probe particle properties. Typically, data can only be measured in a finite region covered by the detector, so an extrapolation from the visible asymmetry to the inclusive asymmetry is necessary. Often a constant multiplicative factor is advantageous for the extrapolation and this factor can be readily determined using simulation methods. However, there is a potential, avoidable pitfall involved in the determination of this factor when the asymmetry in the simulated data sample is small. We find that to obtain a reliable estimate of the extrapolation factor, the number of simulated events required rises as the inverse square of the simulated asymmetry; this can mean that an unexpectedly large sample size is required when determining the extrapolation factor.

  17. Asymmetry and modulation of spike timing in electrically coupled neurons.

    PubMed

    Sevetson, Jessica; Haas, Julie S

    2015-03-15

    Electrical coupling mediates interactions between neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), which play a critical role in regulating thalamocortical and corticothalamic communication by inhibiting thalamic relay cells. Accumulating evidence has shown that asymmetry of electrical synapses is a fundamental and dynamic property, but the effect of asymmetry on coupled networks is unexplored. Recording from patched pairs in rat brain slices, we investigate asymmetry in the subthreshold regime and show that electrical synapses can exert powerful effects on the spike times of coupled neighbors. Electrical synaptic signaling modulates spike timing by 10-20 ms, in an effect that also exhibits asymmetry. Furthermore, we show through modeling that coupling asymmetry expands the set of outputs for pairs of coupled neurons through enhanced regions of synchrony and reversals of spike order. These results highlight the power and specificity of signaling exerted by electrical synapses, which contribute to information flow across the brain.

  18. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 {+-} 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 {+-} 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 {+-} 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  19. Transverse single-spin asymmetries: Challenges and recent progress

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schafer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    2014-11-25

    In this study, transverse single-spin asymmetries are among the most intriguing observables in hadronic physics. Though such asymmetries were already measured for the first time about four decades ago, their origin is still under debate. Here we consider transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering, in nucleon–nucleon scattering, and in inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering. It is argued that, according to recent work, the single-spin asymmetries for those three processes may be simultaneously described in perturbative QCD, where the re-scattering of the active partons plays a crucial role. A comparison of single-spin asymmetries in different reactions can also shed light on the universality of transverse momentum dependent parton correlation functions. In particular, we discuss what existing data may tell us about the predicted process dependence of the Sivers function.

  20. Transverse single-spin asymmetries: Challenges and recent progress

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schafer, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner; Zhou, Jian

    2014-11-25

    In this study, transverse single-spin asymmetries are among the most intriguing observables in hadronic physics. Though such asymmetries were already measured for the first time about four decades ago, their origin is still under debate. Here we consider transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering, in nucleon–nucleon scattering, and in inclusive lepton–nucleon scattering. It is argued that, according to recent work, the single-spin asymmetries for those three processes may be simultaneously described in perturbative QCD, where the re-scattering of the active partons plays a crucial role. A comparison of single-spin asymmetries in different reactions can also shed light on themore » universality of transverse momentum dependent parton correlation functions. In particular, we discuss what existing data may tell us about the predicted process dependence of the Sivers function.« less

  1. Mechanism of terahertz electromagnetic wave emission from intrinsic Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Tachiki, Masashi; Fukuya, Shouta; Koyama, Tomio

    2009-03-27

    Using a 3D parallelepiped model of the stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions, we calculate the cavity resonance modes of Josephson plasma waves excited by external electric currents. The cavity modes accompanied by static phase kinks of the order parameter have been intensively investigated. Our calculation shows that the kink phase state is unfavorable, since the static phase kinks reduce the order parameter amplitude and thus the superconducting condensation energy. We point out that the oscillating magnetic field of the cavity mode penetrates the vacuum from the sample surfaces and the energy of the magnetic field plays an important role to determine the orientation of the cavity resonance mode. On the basis of the above discussions, we calculate the I-V characteristic curve, the THz wave emission intensity and the other physical quantities.

  2. Intrinsic plasticity: an emerging player in addiction.

    PubMed

    Kourrich, Saïd; Calu, Donna J; Bonci, Antonello

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, leads to plastic changes in the activity of brain circuits, and a prevailing view is that these changes play a part in drug addiction. Notably, there has been intense focus on drug-induced changes in synaptic excitability and much less attention on intrinsic excitability factors (that is, excitability factors that are remote from the synapse). Accumulating evidence now suggests that intrinsic factors such as K+ channels are not only altered by cocaine but may also contribute to the shaping of the addiction phenotype.

  3. Bootstrapped models for intrinsic random functions

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.

    1988-08-01

    Use of intrinsic random function stochastic models as a basis for estimation in geostatistical work requires the identification of the generalized covariance function of the underlying process. The fact that this function has to be estimated from data introduces an additional source of error into predictions based on the model. This paper develops the sample reuse procedure called the bootstrap in the context of intrinsic random functions to obtain realistic estimates of these errors. Simulation results support the conclusion that bootstrap distributions of functionals of the process, as well as their kriging variance, provide a reasonable picture of variability introduced by imperfect estimation of the generalized covariance function.

  4. Bootstrapped models for intrinsic random functions

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.

    1987-01-01

    The use of intrinsic random function stochastic models as a basis for estimation in geostatistical work requires the identification of the generalized covariance function of the underlying process, and the fact that this function has to be estimated from the data introduces an additional source of error into predictions based on the model. This paper develops the sample reuse procedure called the ''bootstrap'' in the context of intrinsic random functions to obtain realistic estimates of these errors. Simulation results support the conclusion that bootstrap distributions of functionals of the process, as well as of their ''kriging variance,'' provide a reasonable picture of the variability introduced by imperfect estimation of the generalized covariance function.

  5. Facial asymmetry and genetic ancestry in Latin American admixed populations.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Cintas, Celia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio Cesar; Ramallo, Virginia; Castillo, Lucia; Farrera, Arodi; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, Williams; Fuentes, Macarena; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gomez-Valdés, Jorge; Hünemeier, Tábita; Gibbon, Shara; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; González-José, Rolando

    2015-05-01

    Fluctuating and directional asymmetry are aspects of morphological variation widely used to infer environmental and genetic factors affecting facial phenotypes. However, the genetic basis and environmental determinants of both asymmetry types is far from being completely known. The analysis of facial asymmetries in admixed individuals can be of help to characterize the impact of a genome's heterozygosity on the developmental basis of both fluctuating and directional asymmetries. Here we characterize the association between genetic ancestry and individual asymmetry on a sample of Latin-American admixed populations. To do so, three-dimensional (3D) facial shape attributes were explored on a sample of 4,104 volunteers aged between 18 and 85 years. Individual ancestry and heterozygosity was estimated using more than 730,000 genome-wide markers. Multivariate techniques applied to geometric morphometric data were used to evaluate the magnitude and significance of directional and fluctuating asymmetry (FA), as well as correlations and multiple regressions aimed to estimate the relationship between facial FA scores and heterozygosity and a set of covariates. Results indicate that directional and FA are both significant, the former being the strongest expression of asymmetry in this sample. In addition, our analyses suggest that there are some specific patterns of facial asymmetries characterizing the different ancestry groups. Finally, we find that more heterozygous individuals exhibit lower levels of asymmetry. Our results highlight the importance of including ancestry-admixture estimators, especially when the analyses are aimed to compare levels of asymmetries on groups differing on socioeconomic levels, as a proxy to estimate developmental noise. PMID:25582401

  6. Single-Spin Asymmetries at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harutyun

    2003-05-01

    Single spin asymmetries (SSA) are crucial tools in the study of the spin structure of hadrons in pion electroproduction, since they are directly related to some hot topics,including transverse polarization distribution functions, fragmentation of polarized quarks and generalized parton distribution functions. At low beam energies, when the virtual photon has a relatively large angle with respect to the initial spin direction, the measured single-target spin-dependent sin φ moment in the cross section for the longitudinally polarized target contain contributions from the target spin components, both longitudinal and transverse with respect to the photon direction.This contribution presents preliminary results from Jefferson Lab's CLAS detector on beam and target SSA in pion azimuthal distributions in one particle inclusive electroproduction in the DIS regime (Q2 > 1GeV 2,W > 2GeV ) off a polarized NH3 target.

  7. Dark Atoms: Asymmetry and Direct Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a simple UV completion of Atomic Dark Matter (aDM) in which heavy right-handed neutrinos decay to induce both dark and lepton number densities. This model addresses several outstanding cosmological problems: the matter/anti-matter asymmetry, the dark matter abundance, the number of light degrees of freedom in the early universe, and the smoothing of small-scale structure. Additionally, this realization of aDM may reconcile the CoGeNT excess with recently published null results and predicts a signal in the CRESST Oxygen band. We also find that, due to unscreened long-range interactions, the residual un recombined dark ions settle into a diffuse isothermal halo.

  8. On the matter-antimatter asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, W. A.

    2015-08-01

    Although the big bang should have produced equal amounts of matter and antimatter, there is evidence that the universe does not contain significant amounts of antimatter. The usual explanations for this matter-antimatter asymmetry involve finding causes for Sakharov’s three conditions to be satisfied. However, if the composite photon theory is correct, antimatter galaxies should appear to us as dark matter, neither emitting light (that we can detect) or reflecting ordinary light. Thus the presence of antimatter galaxies may be harder to detect than previously thought. The large clumps of dark matter that have been observed by weak gravitation lensing could be clusters of antimatter galaxies. “Dark photons,” that are hypothesized to cause self-interactions between dark matter particles, are identified as antiphotons in the composite photon theory. The possibility of a patchwork universe, that had been previously excluded, is also re-examined.

  9. Time-reversal asymmetry in financial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the large-fluctuation dynamics in financial markets, based on the minute-to-minute and daily data of the Chinese Indices and the German DAX. The dynamic relaxation both before and after the large fluctuations is characterized by a power law, and the exponents p± usually vary with the strength of the large fluctuations. The large-fluctuation dynamics is time-reversal symmetric at the time scale in minutes, while asymmetric at the daily time scale. Careful analysis reveals that the time-reversal asymmetry is mainly induced by external forces. It is also the external forces which drive the financial system to a non-stationary state. Different characteristics of the Chinese and German stock markets are uncovered.

  10. Electric Field Effect in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.

    The electric field effect in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks (IJJ's) is investigated on the basis of the capacitively-coupled IJJ model. We clarify the current-voltage characteristics of the IJJ's in the presence of an external electric field. It is predicted that the IJJ's show a dynamical transition to the voltage state as the external electric field is increased.

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Intrinsic Josephson junctions: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurgens, A. A.

    2000-08-01

    Some recent developments in the fabrication of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) and their application for studying high-temperature superconductors are discussed. The major advantages of IJJ and unsolved problems are outlined. The feasibility of three-terminal devices based on the stacked IJJ is briefly evaluated.

  12. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation among Collegiate Instrumentalists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather and compare information on measures of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among instrumentalists enrolled in collegiate ensembles. A survey instrument was developed to gather information concerning demographic data and responses to questions on motivational preference. Participants were undergraduate and…

  13. Disrupted Intrinsic Local Synchronization in Poststroke Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mi; Li, Jiao; Yao, Dezhong; Chen, Huafu

    2016-03-01

    Evidence has accumulated from the task-related and task-free (i.e., resting state) studies that alternations of intrinsic neural networks exist in poststroke aphasia (PSA) patients. However, information is lacking on the changes in the local synchronization of spontaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging blood-oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in PSA at rest. We investigated the altered intrinsic local synchronization using regional homogeneity (ReHo) on PSA (n = 17) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) (n = 20). We examined the correlations between the abnormal ReHo values and the aphasia severity and language performance in PSA. Compared with HCs, the PSA patients exhibited decreased intrinsic local synchronization in the right lingual gyrus, the left calcarine, the left cuneus, the left superior frontal gyrus (SFG), and the left medial of SFG. The local synchronization (ReHo value) in the left medial of SFG was positively correlated with aphasia severity (r = 0.55, P = 0.027) and the naming scores of Aphasia Battery of Chinese (r = 0.66, P = 0.005). This result is consistent with the important role of this value in language processing even in the resting state. The pathogenesis of PSA may be attributed to abnormal intrinsic local synchronous in multiple brain regions. PMID:26986152

  14. Advancing polymers of intrinsic microporosity by mechanochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengfei; Jiang, Xueguang; Wan, Shun; Dai, Sheng

    2015-02-20

    Herein, we report a fast (15 min) and solvent-free mechanochemical approach to construct polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) with high molecular mass and low polydispersity by solid grinding. The enhanced reaction efficiency results from the instantaneous frictional heating and continuous exposure of active sites within those solid reactants.

  15. Intrinsic novobiocin resistance in Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Anna A; Chopra, Ian; O'Neill, Alex J

    2007-12-01

    Intrinsic novobiocin resistance in Staphylococcus saprophyticus was associated with expression of a novobiocin-resistant form of the drug target protein (GyrB). Site-directed mutagenesis established that resistance depends upon the presence of two specific amino acid residues in GyrB: a glycine at position 85 and a lysine at position 140.

  16. Electroneutral intrinsic point defects in cadmium chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Kharif, Ya.L.; Kudryashov, N.I.; Strunilina, T.A.

    1987-12-01

    Low-mobility electrically neutral intrinsic point defects were observed in cadmium chalcogenides. It was shown that the concentration of these defects is proportional to the cadmium vapor pressure to the 1/3 power at a constant temperature, and a mechanism for the formation of these defects were proposed.

  17. Visual stimuli recruit intrinsically generated cortical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jae-eun Kang; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-09-23

    The cortical microcircuit is built with recurrent excitatory connections, and it has long been suggested that the purpose of this design is to enable intrinsically driven reverberating activity. To understand the dynamics of neocortical intrinsic activity better, we performed two-photon calcium imaging of populations of neurons from the primary visual cortex of awake mice during visual stimulation and spontaneous activity. In both conditions, cortical activity is dominated by coactive groups of neurons, forming ensembles whose activation cannot be explained by the independent firing properties of their contributing neurons, considered in isolation. Moreover, individual neurons flexibly join multiple ensembles, vastly expanding the encoding potential of the circuit. Intriguingly, the same coactive ensembles can repeat spontaneously and in response to visual stimuli, indicating that stimulus-evoked responses arise from activating these intrinsic building blocks. Although the spatial properties of stimulus-driven and spontaneous ensembles are similar, spontaneous ensembles are active at random intervals, whereas visually evoked ensembles are time-locked to stimuli. We conclude that neuronal ensembles, built by the coactivation of flexible groups of neurons, are emergent functional units of cortical activity and propose that visual stimuli recruit intrinsically generated ensembles to represent visual attributes. PMID:25201983

  18. Organisational Learning and Employees' Intrinsic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remedios, Richard; Boreham, Nick

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of organisational learning initiatives on employee motivation. Four initiatives consistent with theories of organisational learning were a priori ranked in terms of concepts that underpin intrinsic-motivation theory. Eighteen employees in a UK petrochemical company were interviewed to ascertain their experiences of…

  19. Disrupted Intrinsic Local Synchronization in Poststroke Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mi; Li, Jiao; Yao, Dezhong; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Evidence has accumulated from the task-related and task-free (i.e., resting state) studies that alternations of intrinsic neural networks exist in poststroke aphasia (PSA) patients. However, information is lacking on the changes in the local synchronization of spontaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging blood–oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in PSA at rest. We investigated the altered intrinsic local synchronization using regional homogeneity (ReHo) on PSA (n = 17) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) (n = 20). We examined the correlations between the abnormal ReHo values and the aphasia severity and language performance in PSA. Compared with HCs, the PSA patients exhibited decreased intrinsic local synchronization in the right lingual gyrus, the left calcarine, the left cuneus, the left superior frontal gyrus (SFG), and the left medial of SFG. The local synchronization (ReHo value) in the left medial of SFG was positively correlated with aphasia severity (r = 0.55, P = 0.027) and the naming scores of Aphasia Battery of Chinese (r = 0.66, P = 0.005). This result is consistent with the important role of this value in language processing even in the resting state. The pathogenesis of PSA may be attributed to abnormal intrinsic local synchronous in multiple brain regions. PMID:26986152

  20. Intrinsic Motivation, Organizational Justice, and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannam, Kalli; Narayan, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    For employees to generate creative ideas that are not only original, but also useful to their company, they must interact with their workplace environment to determine organizational needs. Therefore, it is important to consider aspects of the individual as well as their environment when studying creativity. Intrinsic motivation, a predictor of…

  1. Sex Differences, Positive Feedback and Intrinsic Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deci, Edward L.; And Others

    The paper presents two experiments which test the "change in feelings of competence and self-determination" proposition of cognitive evaluation theory. This proposition states that when a person receives feedback about his performance on an intrinsically motivated activity this information will affect his sense of competence and…

  2. Effects of Reinforcemnt Programs on Intrinsic Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sushinsky, Leonard W.

    Attribution Theory has led to predictions that the use of material reward may impair intrinsic motivation in the rewarded activity (decreased play effects). A review of the pertinent literature reveals, however, (a) that attribution research has failed to reliably demonstrate that decreased play effects occur in minimal-trial studies (b) that for…

  3. Simple intrinsic defects in InAs :

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in indium arsenide, InAs, as computed by density functional theory using semi-local density functionals, intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

  4. Intrinsic toroidal rotation in the scrape-off layer of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Loizu, J. Ricci, P.; Halpern, F. D.; Jolliet, S.; Mosetto, A.

    2014-06-15

    The origin and nature of intrinsic toroidal plasma rotation in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of tokamaks is investigated both analytically and through numerical simulations. It is shown that the equilibrium poloidal E × B flow, the sheath physics, and the presence of poloidal asymmetries in the pressure profile act as sources of momentum, while turbulence provides the mechanism for the radial momentum transport. An equation for the radial and poloidal dependence of the equilibrium parallel ion flow is derived, and a simple analytical solution is presented. This solution reproduces and explains the main experimental trends for the Mach number found in the SOL of tokamaks. Global, three-dimensional fluid simulations of SOL turbulence in different limiter configurations confirm the validity of the analytical theory.

  5. Projectile - Mass asymmetry systematics for low energy incomplete fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pushpendra P.; Yadav, Abhishek; Sharma, Vijay R.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Kumar, Pawan; Sahoo, Rudra N.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, B. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Prasad, R.

    2015-06-01

    In the present work, low energy incomplete fusion (ICF) in which only a part of projectile fuses with target nucleus has been investigated in terms of various entrance channel parameters. The ICF strength function has been extracted from the analysis of experimental excitation functions (EFs) measured for different projectile-target combinations from near- to well above- barrier energies in 12C,16O(from 1.02Vb to 1.64Vb)+169Tm systems. Experimental EFs have been analysed in the framework statistical model code PACE4 based on the idea of equilibrated compound nucleus decay. It has been found that the value of ICF fraction (FICF) increases with incident projectile energy. A substantial fraction of ICF (FICF ≈ 7 %) has been accounted even at energy as low as ≈ 7.5% above the barrier (at relative velocity νrel ≈0.027) in 12C+169Tm system, and FICF ≈ 10 % at νrel ≈0.014 in 16O+169Tm system. The probability of ICF is discussed in light of the Morgenstern's mass-asymmetry systematics. The value of FICF for 16O+169Tm systems is found to be 18.3 % higher than that observed for 12C+169Tm systems. Present results together with the re-analysis of existing data for nearby systems conclusively demonstrate strong competition of ICF with CF even at slightly above barrier energies, and strong projectile dependence that seems to supplement the Morgenstern's systematics.

  6. Magnetic fields and chiral asymmetry in the early hot universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydorenko, Maksym; Tomalak, Oleksandr; Shtanov, Yuri

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study analytically the process of external generation and subsequent free evolution of the lepton chiral asymmetry and helical magnetic fields in the early hot universe. This process is known to be affected by the Abelian anomaly of the electroweak gauge interactions. As a consequence, chiral asymmetry in the fermion distribution generates magnetic fields of non-zero helicity, and vice versa. We take into account the presence of thermal bath, which serves as a seed for the development of instability in magnetic field in the presence of externally generated lepton chiral asymmetry. The developed helical magnetic field and lepton chiral asymmetry support each other, considerably prolonging their mutual existence, in the process of `inverse cascade' transferring magnetic-field power from small to large spatial scales. For cosmologically interesting initial conditions, the chiral asymmetry and the energy density of helical magnetic field are shown to evolve by scaling laws, effectively depending on a single combined variable. In this case, the late-time asymptotics of the conformal chiral chemical potential reproduces the universal scaling law previously found in the literature for the system under consideration. This regime is terminated at lower temperatures because of scattering of electrons with chirality change, which exponentially washes out chiral asymmetry. We derive an expression for the termination temperature as a function of the chiral asymmetry and energy density of helical magnetic field.

  7. Evaluation of Limb Load Asymmetry Using Two New Mathematical Models

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil NS; Omar, Baharudin; Joseph, Leonard H.; Htwe, Ohnmar; Jagannathan, K.; Hamdan, Nor M Y; Rajalakshmi, D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of limb loading is important in orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation. In current practice, mathematical models such as Symmetry index (SI), Symmetry ratio (SR), and Symmetry angle (SA) are used to quantify limb loading asymmetry. Literatures have identified certain limitations with the above mathematical models. Hence this study presents two new mathematical models Modified symmetry index (MSI) and Limb loading error (LLE) that would address these limitations. Furthermore, the current mathematical models were compared against the new model with the goal of achieving a better model. This study uses hypothetical data to simulate an algorithmic preliminary computational measure to perform with all numerical possibilities of even and uneven limb loading that can occur in human legs. Descriptive statistics are used to interpret the limb loading patterns: symmetry, asymmetry and maximum asymmetry. The five mathematical models were similar in analyzing symmetry between limbs. However, for asymmetry and maximum asymmetry data, the SA and SR values do not give any meaningful interpretation, and SI gives an inflated value. The MSI and LLE are direct, easy to interpret and identify the loading patterns with the side of asymmetry. The new models are notable as they quantify the amount and side of asymmetry under different loading patterns. PMID:25716372

  8. Unilateral Condylar Hyperplasia: A 3-Dimensional Quantification of Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Maal, Thomas J. J.; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Becking, Alfred G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Objective quantifications of facial asymmetry in patients with Unilateral Condylar Hyperplasia (UCH) have not yet been described in literature. The aim of this study was to objectively quantify soft-tissue asymmetry in patients with UCH and to compare the findings with a control group using a new method. Material and Methods Thirty 3D photographs of patients diagnosed with UCH were compared with 30 3D photographs of healthy controls. As UCH presents particularly in the mandible, a new method was used to isolate the lower part of the face to evaluate asymmetry of this part separately. The new method was validated by two observers using 3D photographs of five patients and five controls. Results A significant difference (0.79 mm) between patients and controls whole face asymmetry was found. Intra- and inter-observer differences of 0.011 mm (−0.034–0.011) and 0.017 mm (−0.007–0.042) respectively were found. These differences are irrelevant in clinical practice. Conclusion After objective quantification, a significant difference was identified in soft-tissue asymmetry between patients with UCH and controls. The method used to isolate mandibular asymmetry was found to be valid and a suitable tool to evaluate facial asymmetry. PMID:23544063

  9. Shifting brain asymmetry: the link between meditation and structural lateralization.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Florian; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan; Toga, Arthur W; Luders, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed an increased fractional anisotropy and greater thickness in the anterior parts of the corpus callosum in meditation practitioners compared with control subjects. Altered callosal features may be associated with an altered inter-hemispheric integration and the degree of brain asymmetry may also be shifted in meditation practitioners. Therefore, we investigated differences in gray matter asymmetry as well as correlations between gray matter asymmetry and years of meditation practice in 50 long-term meditators and 50 controls. We detected a decreased rightward asymmetry in the precuneus in meditators compared with controls. In addition, we observed that a stronger leftward asymmetry near the posterior intraparietal sulcus was positively associated with the number of meditation practice years. In a further exploratory analysis, we observed that a stronger rightward asymmetry in the pregenual cingulate cortex was negatively associated with the number of practice years. The group difference within the precuneus, as well as the positive correlations with meditation years in the pregenual cingulate cortex, suggests an adaptation of the default mode network in meditators. The positive correlation between meditation practice years and asymmetry near the posterior intraparietal sulcus may suggest that meditation is accompanied by changes in attention processing.

  10. Learned control of slow potential interhemispheric asymmetry in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gruzelier, J; Hardman, E; Wild, J; Zaman, R

    1999-12-01

    We report on the feasibility of teaching 16 (DSM-IV) schizophrenic patients, subdivided by syndrome, self-regulation of interhemispheric asymmetry having demonstrated efficient learning of interhemispheric control in normal subjects. Reversal of asymmetry may be important to treatment and recovery in schizophrenia for following improvement on neuroleptic drugs functional hemispheric asymmetries have reversed, with directions of reversal and pre-existing asymmetry dependent on syndrome. Asymmetry reversal in animals, manifested by spatial turning tendencies, has been used as a marker of neuroleptic action and involves striatal dopamine under reciprocal hemispheric control. We gave as feedback the left right asymmetry in slow potential negativity recorded from the sensory motor strip (C3,4). Feedback took the form of a rocket on a screen which rose or fell with leftward or rightward shifts in negativity. Patients were able to learn control (P < 0.01). In those patients with lesser ability this was due to inability to sustain concentration throughout the session rather than slow initial learning. Active syndrome patients were better able to shift negativity rightward and withdrawn patients leftward, directions associated with drug reversal of functional asymmetry and symptom recovery for each syndrome. Accordingly our demonstration that many symptomatic schizophrenic patients are capable of learning control opens the door to electrocortical operant conditioning training in schizophrenia with therapeutic regimens.

  11. Breast asymmetry pattern in women with idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Norma I; Korchin, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Breast asymmetry is frequent in women with idiopathic scoliosis. To understand the pattern of breast asymmetry in these women a clinical study was performed in which 54 female patients with idiopathic scoliosis were evaluated. The information recorded for each patient included: age, weight, height, scoliosis type, Cobb angle, breast measurements, and presence of rib cage asymmetry. Breast volume was calculated using anatomic measurements (anthropomorphic method). The mean age of the group was 25 +/- 7 years. A right convex thoracic curve occurred in 85%, with a mean Cobb angle of 32 +/- 15 degrees. Our study indicated that women with idiopathic scoliosis consistently presented breast asymmetry that followed a predictable pattern. The breast on the side of the convex thoracic scoliosis curve is always smaller in volume (mean difference 59 +/- 39 mi). The affected side also presents a smaller areola, a higher position of the nipple (mean difference 2.2 +/- 1.3 cm) and a higher position of the inframammary fold (mean difference 2.1 +/- 1.4 cm) when compared to the opposite breast. Though the asymmetry is predictable, the degree to which the patient presents these changes does not correlate with the severity of the scoliosis (Cobb angle). We believe that the severity of the asymmetry is a result of the difference between the hypoplastic breast and the normal breasts. In women with very large opposite breasts the asymmetry appears to be worse.

  12. Hα LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES AND THE CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE VELOCITY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kennedy, M.; Keenan, F. P.; Simões, P. J. A.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Fletcher, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Graham, D.

    2015-11-10

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  13. The use of three-dimensional imaging to evaluate the effect of conventional orthodontic approach in treating a subject with facial asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Nadia Abou; Kau, Chung How

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the craniofacial skeleton takes place from the 3rd week of intra-uterine life until 18 years of age. During this period, the craniofacial complex is affected by extrinsic and intrinsic factors which guide or alter the pattern of growth. Asymmetry can be encountered due to these multifactorial effects or as the normal divergence of the hemifacial counterpart occurs. At present, an orthodontist plays a major role not only in diagnosing dental asymmetry but also facial asymmetry. However, an orthodontist's role in treating or camouflaging the asymmetry can be limited due to the severity. The aim of this research is to report a technique for facial three-dimensional (3D) analysis used to measure the progress of nonsurgical orthodontic treatment approach for a subject with maxillary asymmetry combined with mandibular angular asymmetry. The facial analysis was composed of five parts: Upper face asymmetry analysis, maxillary analysis, maxillary cant analysis, mandibular cant analysis, and mandibular asymmetry analysis which were applied using 3D software InVivoDental 5.2.3 (Anatomage Company, San Jose, CA, USA). The five components of the facial analysis were applied in the initial cone-beam computed tomography (T1) for diagnosis. Maxillary analysis, maxillary cant analysis, and mandibular cant analysis were applied to measure the progress of the orthodontics treatment (T2). Twenty-two linear measurements bilaterally and sixteen angular criteria were used to analyze the facial structures using different anthropometric landmarks. Only angular mandibular asymmetry was reported. However, the subject had maxillary alveolar ridge cant of 9.96°and dental maxillary cant was 2.95° in T1. The mandibular alveolar ridge cant was 7.41° and the mandibular dental cant was 8.39°. Highest decrease in the cant was reported maxillary alveolar ridge around 2.35° and in the mandibular alveolar ridge around 3.96° in T2. Facial 3D analysis is considered a useful adjunct in

  14. The use of three-dimensional imaging to evaluate the effect of conventional orthodontic approach in treating a subject with facial asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Kheir, Nadia Abou; Kau, Chung How

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the craniofacial skeleton takes place from the 3(rd) week of intra-uterine life until 18 years of age. During this period, the craniofacial complex is affected by extrinsic and intrinsic factors which guide or alter the pattern of growth. Asymmetry can be encountered due to these multifactorial effects or as the normal divergence of the hemifacial counterpart occurs. At present, an orthodontist plays a major role not only in diagnosing dental asymmetry but also facial asymmetry. However, an orthodontist's role in treating or camouflaging the asymmetry can be limited due to the severity. The aim of this research is to report a technique for facial three-dimensional (3D) analysis used to measure the progress of nonsurgical orthodontic treatment approach for a subject with maxillary asymmetry combined with mandibular angular asymmetry. The facial analysis was composed of five parts: Upper face asymmetry analysis, maxillary analysis, maxillary cant analysis, mandibular cant analysis, and mandibular asymmetry analysis which were applied using 3D software InVivoDental 5.2.3 (Anatomage Company, San Jose, CA, USA). The five components of the facial analysis were applied in the initial cone-beam computed tomography (T1) for diagnosis. Maxillary analysis, maxillary cant analysis, and mandibular cant analysis were applied to measure the progress of the orthodontics treatment (T2). Twenty-two linear measurements bilaterally and sixteen angular criteria were used to analyze the facial structures using different anthropometric landmarks. Only angular mandibular asymmetry was reported. However, the subject had maxillary alveolar ridge cant of 9.96°and dental maxillary cant was 2.95° in T1. The mandibular alveolar ridge cant was 7.41° and the mandibular dental cant was 8.39°. Highest decrease in the cant was reported maxillary alveolar ridge around 2.35° and in the mandibular alveolar ridge around 3.96° in T2. Facial 3D analysis is considered a useful adjunct

  15. Role of asymmetry in competition for light in a model of annual plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droz, Michel; Pȩkalski, Andrzej

    2012-02-01

    We propose and discuss a model describing dynamics of annual plants competing with their nearest neighbours for sunlight. The effect of the competition determines the size, or equivalently, the biomass of each plant and the number of seeds it produces. At the end of a period (year) plants distribute their seeds over the sites in the Moore neighbourhood and then die. They leave their biomass in the form of litter, which hinders germination of the seeds. We show that the dynamical behaviour depends crucially on two parameters-litter reduction rate and the plants' growth rate. Larger litter reduction rate and smaller growth rate lead to the population of few plants, producing more biomass than when more smaller plants are present and the litter reduction rate is low and growth rate is high. We show that asymmetry in the competition, which could favour bigger plants, have rather weak effect on the dynamical behaviour. The distribution of the biomass depends on the asymmetry. When larger plants receive much more sunlight than the smaller ones, the latter are quite often eliminated from the neighbourhood. For weaker asymmetry smaller plants could survive, producing however less biomass than the larger plants.

  16. Quantifying the influence of flow asymmetries on glottal sound sources in speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron; Plesniak, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Human speech is made possible by the air flow interaction with the vocal folds. During phonation, asymmetries in the glottal flow field may arise from flow phenomena (e.g. the Coanda effect) as well as from pathological vocal fold motion (e.g. unilateral paralysis). In this study, the effects of flow asymmetries on glottal sound sources were investigated. Dynamically-programmable 7.5 times life-size vocal fold models with 2 degrees-of-freedom (linear and rotational) were constructed to provide a first-order approximation of vocal fold motion. Important parameters (Reynolds, Strouhal, and Euler numbers) were scaled to physiological values. Normal and abnormal vocal fold motions were synthesized, and the velocity field and instantaneous transglottal pressure drop were measured. Variability in the glottal jet trajectory necessitated sorting of the data according to the resulting flow configuration. The dipole sound source is related to the transglottal pressure drop via acoustic analogies. Variations in the transglottal pressure drop (and subsequently the dipole sound source) arising from flow asymmetries are discussed.

  17. Branching ratios and direct CP asymmetries in D→PV decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qin; Li, Hsiang-nan; Lü, Cai-Dian; Yu, Fu-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    We study the two-body hadronic D→PV decays, where P (V) denotes a pseudoscalar (vector) meson, in the factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach proposed in our previous work. This approach is based on the factorization of short-distance and long-distance dynamics into Wilson coefficients and hadronic matrix elements of four-fermion operators, respectively, with the latter being parametrized in terms of several nonperturbative quantities. We further take into account the ρ-ω mixing effect, which improves the global fit to the branching ratios involving the ρ0 and ω mesons. Combining short-distance dynamics associated with penguin operators and the hadronic parameters determined from the global fit to branching ratios, we predict direct CP asymmetries. In particular, the direct CP asymmetries in the D0→K0K¯*0, K¯0K*0, D+→π+ρ0, and Ds+→K+ω, K+ϕ decays are found to be of O(10-3), which can be observed at the LHCb and future Belle II experiment. We also predict the CP asymmetry observables of some neutral D meson decays.

  18. Reversal of the asymmetry in a cylindrical coaxial capacitively coupled Ar/Cl2 plasma

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Im, Do; Popović, Svetozar; Vušković, Leposava; Valente-Feliciano, Anne -Marie; Phillips, Larry

    2015-10-08

    The reduction of the asymmetry in the plasma sheath voltages of a cylindrical coaxial capacitively coupled plasma is crucial for efficient surface modification of the inner surfaces of concave three-dimensional structures, including superconducting radio frequency cavities. One critical asymmetry effect is the negative dc self-bias, formed across the inner electrode plasma sheath due to its lower surface area compared to the outer electrode. The effect on the self-bias potential with the surface enhancement by geometric modification on the inner electrode structure is studied. The shapes of the inner electrodes are chosen as cylindrical tube, large and small pitch bellows, andmore » disc-loaded corrugated structure (DLCS). The dc self-bias measurements for all these shapes were taken at different process parameters in Ar/Cl2 discharge. Lastly, the reversal of the negative dc self-bias potential to become positive for a DLCS inner electrode was observed and the best etch rate is achieved due to the reduction in plasma asymmetry.« less

  19. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in B0 to D(*)D Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Oregon U. /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-06-24

    The authors present a first measurement of CP asymmetries in neutral B decays to D{sup +}D{sup -}, and updated CP asymmetry measurements in decays to D*{sup +}D{sup -} and D*{sup -}D{sup +}. They use fully-reconstructed decays collected in a data sample of (232 {+-} 3) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events in the BABAR detector at the PEp-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. they determine the time-dependent asymmetry parameters to be S{sub D*{sup +}D{sup -}} = -0.54 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 0.07, C{sub D*{sup +}D{sup -}} = 0.09 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.06, S{sub D*{sup -}D{sup +}} = -0.29 {+-} 0.33 {+-} 0.07, C{sub D*{sup -}D{sup +}} = 0.17 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.04, S{sub D{sup +}D{sup -}} = -0.29 {+-} 0.63 {+-} 0.06, and C{sub D{sup +}D{sup -}} = 0.11 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 0.06, where in each case the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  20. Leptogenesis in the symmetric phase of the early universe: Baryon asymmetry and hypermagnetic helicity evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Semikoz, V. B. Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2015-02-15

    We investigate the evolution of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe (BAU) in its symmetric phase before the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) induced by leptogenesis in the hypermagnetic field of an arbitrary structure and with a maximum hypermagnetic helicity density. The novelty of this work is that the BAU has been calculated for a continuous hypermagnetic helicity spectrum. The observed BAU B{sub obs} = 10{sup −10} that can be in large-scale hypermagnetic fields satisfying the wave number inequality k ≤ k{sub max} grows with increasing k{sub max}. We will also show that the initial right-handed electron asymmetry ξ{sub eR}(η{sub 0}) used in our leptogenesis model as a free parameter cannot take too large values, ξ{sub eR}(η{sub 0}) = 10{sup −4}, because this leads to a negative BAU by the EWPT time. In contrast, a sufficiently small initial right-handed electron asymmetry, ξ{sub eR}(η{sub 0}), provides its further growth and the corresponding BAU growth from zero to some positive value, including the observed B{sub obs} = 10{sup −10}.

  1. Polarized-target asymmetry in pion-proton bremsstrahlung at 298 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bosshard, A.; Amsler, C.; Bistirlich, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Crowe, K.M.; Doebeli, M.; Doser, M.; Haddock, R.P.; Konter, J.A.; Ljungfelt, S.; Loude, J.F.; Mango, S.; Meyer, C.A.; Perroud, J.P.; Riedlberger, J.; Renker, D.; Schaad, M.; Sober, D.I.; Truoel, P.; Weymuth, P. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley California 94720 Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen, Paul Scherrer Institut, Department of Physics, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 10024 )

    1990-05-28

    First data are presented for the polarized-target asymmetry in the reaction {pi}{sup +}{ital p}{r arrow}{pi}{sup +}{ital p}{gamma} at an incident pion energy of 298 MeV. The geometry was chosen to maximize the sensitivity to the radiation of the magnetic dipole moment {mu}{sub {Delta}} of the {Delta}{sup ++}(1232 MeV). A fit of the asymmetry in the cross section {ital d}{sup 5}{sigma}/{ital d}{Omega}{sub {pi}} {ital d}{Omega}{sub {gamma}} {ital dk} as a function of the photon energy {ital k} to predictions from a recent isobar-model calculation with {mu}{sub {Delta}} as the only free parameter yields {mu}{sub {Delta}}=1.64({plus minus}0.19exp{Delta},{plus minus}0.14 theor){mu}{sub {ital p}}. Though this value agrees with bag-model corrections to the SU(6) prediction {mu}{sub {Delta}}=2{mu}{sub {ital p}}, further clarifications on the model dependence of the result are needed, in particular since the isobar model fails to describe both the cross section and the asymmetry at the highest photon energies.

  2. Parton Distributions in the Impact Parameter Space

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias Burkardt

    2009-08-01

    Parton distributions in impact parameter space, which are obtained by Fourier transforming GPDs, exhibit a significant deviation from axial symmetry when the target and/or quark is transversely polarized. In combination with the final state interactions, this transverse deformation provides a natural mechanism for naive-T odd transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive DIS. The deformation can also be related to the transverse force acting on the active quark in polarized DIS at higher twist.

  3. On the Intrinsic Diversity of Type II-Plateau Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen-rich Type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe) exhibit correlations between the plateau luminosity {L}{pl}, the nickel mass {M}{Ni}, the explosion energy {E}{exp}, and the ejecta mass {M}{ej}. Using our global, self-consistent, multi-band model of nearby well-observed SNe, we find that the covariances of these quantities are strong and that the confidence ellipsoids are oriented in the direction of the correlations, which reduces their significance. By proper treatment of the covariance matrix of the model, we discover a significant intrinsic width to the correlations between {L}{pl}, {E}{exp} and {M}{Ni}, where the uncertainties due to the distance and the extinction dominate. For fixed {E}{exp}, the spread in {M}{Ni} is about 0.25 dex, which we attribute to the differences in the progenitor internal structure. We argue that the effects of incomplete γ-ray trapping are not important in our sample. Similarly, the physics of the Type II-Plateau SN light curves leads to inherently degenerate estimates of {E}{exp} and {M}{ej}, which makes their observed correlation weak. Ignoring the covariances of SN parameters or the intrinsic width of the correlations causes significant biases in the slopes of the fitted relations. Our results imply that Type II-Plateau SN explosions are not described by a single physical parameter or a simple one-dimensional trajectory through the parameter space, but instead reflect the diversity of the core and surface properties of their progenitors. We discuss the implications for the physics of the explosion mechanism and possible future observational constraints.

  4. The Carnegie Supernova Project: Intrinsic colors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, S. E.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, M. M.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Boldt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Morrell, Nidia; Salgado, Francisco; Folatelli, Gaston; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2014-07-01

    We present an updated analysis of the intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) using the latest data release of the Carnegie Supernova Project. We introduce a new light-curve parameter very similar to stretch that is better suited for fast-declining events, and find that these peculiar types can be seen as extensions to the population of 'normal' SNe Ia. With a larger number of objects, an updated fit to the Lira relation is presented along with evidence for a dependence on the late-time slope of the B – V light-curves with stretch and color. Using the full wavelength range from u to H band, we place constraints on the reddening law for the sample as a whole and also for individual events/hosts based solely on the observed colors. The photometric data continue to favor low values of R{sub V} , though with large variations from event to event, indicating an intrinsic distribution. We confirm the findings of other groups that there appears to be a correlation between the derived reddening law, R{sub V} , and the color excess, E(B – V), such that larger E(B – V) tends to favor lower R{sub V} . The intrinsic u-band colors show a relatively large scatter that cannot be explained by variations in R{sub V} or by the Goobar power-law for circumstellar dust, but rather is correlated with spectroscopic features of the supernova and is therefore likely due to metallicity effects.

  5. Functional asymmetry of posture and body system regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boloban, V. N.; Otsupok, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    The manifestation of functional asymmetry during the regulation of an athlete's posture and a system of bodies and its effect on the execution of individual and group acrobatic exercises were studied. Functional asymmetry of posture regulation was recorded in acrobats during the execution of individual and group exercises. It was shown that stability is maintained at the expense of bending and twisting motions. It is important to consider whether the functional asymmetry of posture regulation is left or right sided in making up pairs and groups of acrobats.

  6. Lepton asymmetry in the primordial gravitational wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'Ichi

    2007-04-15

    Effects of neutrino free streaming are evaluated on the primordial spectrum of gravitational radiation taking both neutrino chemical potential and masses into account. The former or the lepton asymmetry induces two competitive effects, namely, to increase anisotropic stress, which damps the gravitational wave more, and to delay the matter-radiation equality time, which reduces the damping. The latter effect is more prominent and a large lepton asymmetry would reduce the damping. We may thereby be able to measure the magnitude of lepton asymmetry from the primordial gravitational wave spectrum.

  7. Asymmetry in children with cerebral palsy and oral structure.

    PubMed

    Haberfellner, H; Richter, M

    1980-12-01

    Twenty-six children with cerebral palsy were examined with respect to structural asymmetry of the mouth. In 19 children there were clear cut correlations between symmetry/asymmetry of voluntary function and the oral findings. Patients with symmetrical patterns of movements had symmetrical dentition, while in those with asymmetrical function the favoured side corresponded to the side with structural changes. Apparent exceptions to this rule in 7 children could be resolved in 6 by analysis of their complex case histories. Fifty normal controls showed oral asymmetries of nearly identical frequency and magnitude. In this respect there is no difference between the normal and handicapped group.

  8. Measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0 --> D(*)+D(*)- decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-02-12

    We present new measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries for B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)+}d{sup (*)-} decays using (467 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector located at the PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We determine the CP-odd fraction of the B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} decays to be R{perpendicular} = 0.158 {+-} 0.028 {+-} 0.006 and find CP asymmetry parameters for the CP-even component of the decay S{sub +} = -0.76 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.04 and C{sub +} = 0.00 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.02. We measure S = -0.63{+-}0.36{+-}0.05 and C = -0.07{+-}0.23{+-}0.03 for B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}D{sup -}, S = -0.62{+-}0.21{+-}0.03 and C = 0.08 {+-} 0.17 {+-} 0.04 for B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}D{sup -}, and S = -0.73 {+-} 0.23 {+-} 0.05 and C = 0.00 {+-} 0.17 {+-} 0.03 for B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}D*{sup -}. For the B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup {+-}}D{sup {-+}} decays, we also determine the CP-violating asymmetry A = 0.008 {+-} 0.048 {+-} 0.013. In each case, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The measured values for the asymmetries are all consistent with the Standard Model.

  9. Measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0→D(*)+D(*)- decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Schott, G.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-02-01

    We present new measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries for B0→D(*)+D(*)- decays using (467±5)×106 B Bmacr pairs collected with the BABAR detector located at the PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We determine the CP-odd fraction of the B0→D*+D*- decays to be R⊥=0.158±0.028±0.006 and find CP asymmetry parameters S+=-0.76±0.16±0.04 and C+=+0.00±0.12±0.02 for the CP-even component of this decay and S⊥=-1.80±0.70±0.16 and C⊥=+0.41±0.49±0.08 for the CP-odd component. We measure S=-0.63±0.36±0.05 and C=-0.07±0.23±0.03 for B0→D+D-, S=-0.62±0.21±0.03 and C=+0.08±0.17±0.04 for B0→D*+D-, and S=-0.73±0.23±0.05 and C=+0.00±0.17±0.03 for B0→D+D*-. For the B0→D*±D∓ decays, we also determine the CP-violating asymmetry A=+0.008±0.048±0.013. In each case, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The measured values for the asymmetries are all consistent with the standard model.

  10. Optimizing chirped laser pulse parameters for electron acceleration in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Akhyani, Mina; Jahangiri, Fazel; Niknam, Ali Reza; Massudi, Reza

    2015-11-14

    Electron dynamics in the field of a chirped linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated. Variations of electron energy gain versus chirp parameter, time duration, and initial phase of laser pulse are studied. Based on maximizing laser pulse asymmetry, a numerical optimization procedure is presented, which leads to the elimination of rapid fluctuations of gain versus the chirp parameter. Instead, a smooth variation is observed that considerably reduces the accuracy required for experimentally adjusting the chirp parameter.

  11. Variations in size, shape and asymmetries of the third frontal convolution in hominids: paleoneurological implications for hominin evolution and the origin of language.

    PubMed

    Balzeau, Antoine; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Holloway, Ralph L; Prima, Sylvain; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    The study of brain structural asymmetries as anatomical substrates of functional asymmetries in extant humans, great apes, and fossil hominins is of major importance in understanding the structural basis of modern human cognition. We propose methods to quantify the variation in size, shape and bilateral asymmetries of the third frontal convolution (or posterior inferior frontal gyrus) among recent modern humans, bonobos and chimpanzees, and fossil hominins using actual and virtual endocasts. These methodological improvements are necessary to extend previous qualitative studies of these features. We demonstrate both an absolute and relative bilateral increase in the size of the third frontal convolution in width and length between Pan species, as well as in hominins. We also observed a global bilateral increase in the size of the third frontal convolution across all species during hominin evolution, but also non-allometric intra-group variations independent of brain size within the fossil samples. Finally, our results show that the commonly accepted leftward asymmetry of Broca's cap is biased by qualitative observation of individual specimens. The trend during hominin evolution seems to be a reduction in size on the left compared with the right side, and also a clearer definition of the area. The third frontal convolution considered as a whole projects more laterally and antero-posteriorly in the right hemisphere. As a result, the left 'Broca's cap' looks more globular and better defined. Our results also suggest that the pattern of brain asymmetries is similar between Pan paniscus and hominins, leaving the gradient of the degree of asymmetry as the only relevant structural parameter. As the anatomical substrate related to brain asymmetry has been present since the appearance of the hominin lineage, it is not possible to prove a direct relationship between the extent of variations in the size, shape, and asymmetries of the third frontal convolution and the origin of

  12. Variations in size, shape and asymmetries of the third frontal convolution in hominids: paleoneurological implications for hominin evolution and the origin of language.

    PubMed

    Balzeau, Antoine; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Holloway, Ralph L; Prima, Sylvain; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    The study of brain structural asymmetries as anatomical substrates of functional asymmetries in extant humans, great apes, and fossil hominins is of major importance in understanding the structural basis of modern human cognition. We propose methods to quantify the variation in size, shape and bilateral asymmetries of the third frontal convolution (or posterior inferior frontal gyrus) among recent modern humans, bonobos and chimpanzees, and fossil hominins using actual and virtual endocasts. These methodological improvements are necessary to extend previous qualitative studies of these features. We demonstrate both an absolute and relative bilateral increase in the size of the third frontal convolution in width and length between Pan species, as well as in hominins. We also observed a global bilateral increase in the size of the third frontal convolution across all species during hominin evolution, but also non-allometric intra-group variations independent of brain size within the fossil samples. Finally, our results show that the commonly accepted leftward asymmetry of Broca's cap is biased by qualitative observation of individual specimens. The trend during hominin evolution seems to be a reduction in size on the left compared with the right side, and also a clearer definition of the area. The third frontal convolution considered as a whole projects more laterally and antero-posteriorly in the right hemisphere. As a result, the left 'Broca's cap' looks more globular and better defined. Our results also suggest that the pattern of brain asymmetries is similar between Pan paniscus and hominins, leaving the gradient of the degree of asymmetry as the only relevant structural parameter. As the anatomical substrate related to brain asymmetry has been present since the appearance of the hominin lineage, it is not possible to prove a direct relationship between the extent of variations in the size, shape, and asymmetries of the third frontal convolution and the origin of

  13. Current voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions with charge-imbalance effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Mahfouzi, F.

    2007-09-01

    The current-voltage characteristics (IVC) of intrinsic Josephson junctions are numerically calculated taking into account the quasiparticle charge-imbalance effect. We solve numerically the full set of the equations including second order differential equations for phase differences, kinetic equations and generalized Josephson relations for a stack of Josephson junctions. The boundary conditions due to the proximity effect are used. We obtain the branch structure of IVC and investigate it as a function of disequilibrium parameter at different values of coupling constant and McCumber parameter. An increase in the disequilibrium parameter essentially changes the character of IVC at large values of McCumber parameter.

  14. Size Scaling of Intrinsic Rotation in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrassie, J. S.; Solomon, W. M.

    2015-11-01

    Despite the richness in the variety of the profiles of intrinsic rotation in axisymmetric tokamaks, a common feature is a co-Ip directed toroidal velocity on the outboard midplane in the region of ρ ~ 0 . 8 in DIII-D. This feature showed a ``Rice scaling'' (RS) in DIII-D and led to similarity experiments with C-Mod. RS correlates toroidal velocity with W/Ip, where W is the total plasma kinetic energy and Ip the plasma current. Subsequent analysis from DIII-D shows a clear ρ * dimensionless scaling of this intrinsic velocity in DIII-D, where ρ * ~ √Ti / aB , multiplying the βq scaling indicative of RS. The DIII-D scaling is MA ~βN ρ * , where MA is the Alfvén ``Mach'' value and βN is normalized β. In machine parameters it is very similar to the theoretical ``Parra scaling,'' which emphasizes the correlation of toroidal velocity with ion temperature as seen experimentally, but in this DIII-D scaling having an additional critical dependence on √β . Published data from C-Mod and low power ICRF in JET also fit with this DIII-D scaling. The relation to the RS will be described. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 & DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Cachexia - an intrinsic factor in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ng, Michael F Y

    2010-04-01

    Systemic diseases are intrinsic factors that alter and may impair the wound healing process. Cachexia is a manifestation of systemic, often chronic, diseases and is characterised by systemic inflammation, appetite suppression and skeletal muscle wasting. Anorexia in cachectic states is commonly associated with malnutrition. Malnutrition may cause impaired healing. Therefore, it would follow that cachexia could influence wound healing because of reduced food intake. However, the lack of response to measures to reverse cachexia, such as supported nutrition, would suggest that a direct causal link between anorexia and weight loss in cachexia is too simple a model. To date, there is no published literature that examines the role of cachexia in human wound healing specifically. This article aims to demonstrate that cachexia is an intrinsic factor in wound healing. The role of the common mediators in wound healing and in cachexia are compared - specifically inflammation, including the nitric oxide synthase pathway, collagen deposition and reepithelialisation.

  16. Intrinsic two-dimensional features as textons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, E.; Zetzsche, C.; Rentschler, I.

    1998-01-01

    We suggest that intrinsic two-dimensional (i2D) features, computationally defined as the outputs of nonlinear operators that model the activity of end-stopped neurons, play a role in preattentive texture discrimination. We first show that for discriminable textures with identical power spectra the predictions of traditional models depend on the type of nonlinearity and fail for energy measures. We then argue that the concept of intrinsic dimensionality, and the existence of end-stopped neurons, can help us to understand the role of the nonlinearities. Furthermore, we show examples in which models without strong i2D selectivity fail to predict the correct ranking order of perceptual segregation. Our arguments regarding the importance of i2D features resemble the arguments of Julesz and co-workers regarding textons such as terminators and crossings. However, we provide a computational framework that identifies textons with the outputs of nonlinear operators that are selective to i2D features.

  17. Cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Puram, Sidharth V.; Bonni, Azad

    2013-01-01

    The proper formation and morphogenesis of dendrites is fundamental to the establishment of neural circuits in the brain. Following cell cycle exit and migration, neurons undergo organized stages of dendrite morphogenesis, which include dendritic arbor growth and elaboration followed by retraction and pruning. Although these developmental stages were characterized over a century ago, molecular regulators of dendrite morphogenesis have only recently been defined. In particular, studies in Drosophila and mammalian neurons have identified numerous cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis that include transcriptional regulators, cytoskeletal and motor proteins, secretory and endocytic pathways, cell cycle-regulated ubiquitin ligases, and components of other signaling cascades. Here, we review cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite patterning and discuss how the characterization of such crucial regulators advances our understanding of normal brain development and pathogenesis of diverse cognitive disorders. PMID:24255095

  18. Intrinsic remediation of an industrial waste impoundment

    SciTech Connect

    Swindoll, C.M.; Lee, M.D.; Wood, K.N.; Hartten, A.S.; Bishop, A.L.; Connor, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Intrinsic remediation, also known as natural restoration, was evaluated as a potential corrective action alternative for an industrial surface impoundment previously used for the disposal of waste treatment biosolids, organic wastes, and fly ash. Organic waste constituents included chlorobenzene, aniline, xylenes, benzene, toluene, acetone, p-cresol, 2-butanone, fluorene, and ethylbenzene. The evaluation demonstrated that the impoundment contains an active microbial community including aerobic, denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microbes, and that environmental conditions were favorable for their growth. Laboratory studies confirmed that these microbes could biodegrade the organic waste constituents under varying redox conditions. The sorptive properties of the residual biosolids and fly ash contribute to the immobilization of chemical constituents and may enhance biodegradation by sequestering chemicals onto surfaces where microbes grow. Based on this field and laboratory evaluation, it was concluded that intrinsic remediation offers significant environmental benefits over other corrective action alternatives that would not allow these natural restoration processes to continue in the surface impoundment.

  19. Extrinsic and intrinsic curvatures in thermodynamic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Mansoori, Seyed Ali; Mirza, Behrouz; Sharifian, Elham

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures of a certain hypersurface in thermodynamic geometry of a physical system and show that they contain useful thermodynamic information. For an anti-Reissner-Nordström-(A)de Sitter black hole (Phantom), the extrinsic curvature of a constant Q hypersurface has the same sign as the heat capacity around the phase transition points. The intrinsic curvature of the hypersurface can also be divergent at the critical points but has no information about the sign of the heat capacity. Our study explains the consistent relationship holding between the thermodynamic geometry of the KN-AdS black holes and those of the RN (J-zero hypersurface) and Kerr black holes (Q-zero hypersurface) ones [1]. This approach can easily be generalized to an arbitrary thermodynamic system.

  20. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeri; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  1. Observation of intrinsic inverse spin Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Werake, Lalani K; Ruzicka, Brian A; Zhao, Hui

    2011-03-11

    We report observation of intrinsic inverse spin Hall effect in undoped GaAs multiple quantum wells with a sample temperature of 10 K. A transient ballistic pure spin current is injected by a pair of laser pulses through quantum interference. By time resolving the dynamics of the pure spin current, the momentum relaxation time is deduced, which sets the lower limit of the scattering time between electrons and holes. The transverse charge current generated by the pure spin current via the inverse spin Hall effect is simultaneously resolved. We find that the charge current is generated well before the first electron-hole scattering event. Generation of the transverse current in the scattering-free ballistic transport regime provides unambiguous evidence for the intrinsic inverse spin Hall effect. PMID:21469830

  2. Disentangling the Effects of Attentional and Amplitude Asymmetries on Relative Phase Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Poel, Harjo J.; Peper, C. E.; Beek, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Attentional asymmetry in rhythmic interlimb coordination induces an asymmetry in relative phase dynamics, allegedly reflecting an asymmetry in coupling strength. However, relative phase asymmetries may also be engendered by an attention-induced difference between the amplitudes (and hence the preferred frequencies) of the limb movements. The…

  3. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, C. A. F.; Walker, F. J.; Ahn, C. H.; Ismail-Beigi, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  4. Fluctuating asymmetry as an indicator of mercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, L.A. |; Newman, M.C.; Mulvey, M.

    1995-12-31

    Developmental stability is the ability of a developing organism to produce a consistent phenotype in a given environment. It provides a simple method of detecting stressed populations and monitoring their recovery. Laboratory experiments have documented the effect of environmental stress on developmental stability as demonstrated by amounts of fluctuating asymmetry. Fluctuating asymmetry assesses the amount of deviation from perfect bilateral symmetry in traits that would normally be symmetrical. Fluctuating asymmetry was examined for chironomid larvae (Chironomus plumosus) collected from a mercury contaminated lake. Larvae were collected from a gradient of mercury concentrations ranging from 2.6--106 mg/kg (DW). Numerous characters were examined for evidence of fluctuating asymmetry and for their utility as indicators of chronic mercury stress.

  5. Flare asymmetry as seen in offband H-alpha filtergrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1983-01-01

    Narrow-band H-alpha filtergrams at + or - 1 A and + or - 2 A from the line center were used to study the asymmetry of flares. Of the 60 flares studied, 92% show red asymmetry while 5% show blue asymmetry. Typically, the filtergrams show a striking dominance of the red wing over the blue wing from onset until late in the decay phase. The difference in intensity of the flare emissions is further augmented by the extensiveness of the emission area in the brighter wing. New kernel-like emissions were often found many minutes after the flare maximum. Spatially, they are displaced from the previous kernels. The late emissions show the same asymmetry as that of the earlier part of the flare.

  6. Birth order and fluctuating asymmetry: a first look.

    PubMed Central

    Lalumière, M L; Harris, G T; Rice, M E

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that maternal immunoreactivity to male-specific features of the foetus can increase developmental instability. We predicted that the participants' number of older brothers would be positively related to the fluctuating asymmetry of ten bilateral morphological traits. The participants were 40 adult male psychiatric patients and 31 adult male hospital employees. Consistent with the hypothesis, the participants' number of older brothers--but not number of older sisters, younger brothers or younger sisters--was positively associated with fluctuating asymmetry. The patients had significantly larger fluctuating asymmetry scores and tended to have more older brothers than the employees, but the positive relationship between the number of older brothers and fluctuating asymmetry was observed in both groups. PMID:10643079

  7. Cell polarity determinants establish asymmetry in MEN signaling

    PubMed Central

    Monje-Casas, Fernando; Amon, Angelika

    2009-01-01

    Summary Components of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), a signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis, localize to the spindle pole body (SPB) that migrates into the daughter cell during anaphase but are largely absent from the SPB that remains in the mother cell. Through the analysis of one of the determinants of this asymmetry, Bfa1, we find that the machinery responsible for establishing cell polarity and cytoplasmic microtubules collaborate to establish MEN asymmetry. In cells defective in the Cdc42 signaling pathway or the formin Bni1, Bfa1 localizes to both SPBs. The quantitative analysis of Bfa1 localization further shows that Bfa1 can associate with both SPBs in a transient and highly dynamic fashion, but the protein is stabilized on the SPB that migrates into the daughter cell during anaphase through microtubule – bud cortex interactions. Our results indicate that mother – daughter cell asymmetry determinants establish MEN signaling asymmetry through microtubule – bud cortex interactions. PMID:19154724

  8. Cerebral blood flow asymmetries in headache-free migraineurs

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Welch, K.M.; Ewing, J.R.; Joseph, R.; D'Andrea, G.

    1987-11-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) asymmetries were studied in controls and patients with common and classic/complicated migraine using /sup 133/Xe inhalation with 8 homologously situated external collimators over each cerebral hemisphere. Migraine patients as a group more frequently had posterior rCBF asymmetries than controls (p less than 0.03). Although there were no differences in the number of anterior rCBF asymmetries, migraine patients had 2 or more asymmetric probe pairs more often than controls (p less than 0.02). The posterior rCBF asymmetries, consistent with the site of activation of many migraine attacks, may be related to more labile control of the cerebral circulation.

  9. Frustration driven stock market dynamics: Leverage effect and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlgren, Peter Toke Heden; Jensen, Mogens H.; Simonsen, Ingve; Donangelo, Raul; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-09-01

    By applying inverse statistics to financial data it has recently been found from empirical studies that indices exhibit a pronounced gain-loss asymmetry [M.H. Jensen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 76; I. Simonsen, M.H. Jensen, A. Johansen, Eur. Phys. J. B 27 (2002) 583; M.H. Jensen, A. Johansen, I. Simonsen, Physica A 324 (2003) 338]. This gain-loss asymmetry appears to have some similarities with the stylized fact leverage effect and we investigate if they could be of same origin. For this purpose we introduce the Frustration Governed Market model which includes correlations in time between a model index and its individual stocks. It is shown that the model reproduces very well the empirical findings with respect to gain-loss asymmetry and leverage. In special cases, however, the model may produce leverage without a pronounced gain-loss asymmetry.

  10. Condylar hyperplasia and facial asymmetry: report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Divya; Dhasmana, Satish; Kamboj, Mala; Gambhir, Gautam

    2011-03-01

    Condylar hyperplasia of mandible is overdevelopment of condyle, unilaterally or bilaterally, leading to facial asymmetry, mandibular deviation, malocclusion and articular dysfunction. This is a series of five such patients managed at our centre. PMID:22379321

  11. Impurity poloidal asymmetries and plasma rotation in the PDX Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brau, K.

    Vertical poloidal asymmetries of carbon and oxygen in the PDX Tokamak were monitored under a variety of discharge conditions in circular plasmas. Near the edge of the plasma and in the region beyond the limiter, the asymmetries appear to be caused by local impurity recycling, variations in the length of the emitting region, and effects due to vertical ion drifts. In the case of C V impurities, the sign and magnitude of the asymmetry is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of a quasi-neoclassical fluid model of impurity transport. A two dimensional computer code is used to simulate different models of poloidal asymmetries, including: (1) poloidally asymmetric source function, (2) charge exchange recombination with neutral hydrogen, (3) poloidally asymmetric electron ensity and temperature profiles, (4) poloidally varying anomalous radial diffusion coefficient, and (5) the quasi-neoclassical fluid model.

  12. Amplitude and polarization asymmetries in a ring laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, L. L.; Buholz, N. E.

    1971-01-01

    Asymmetric amplitude effects between the oppositely directed traveling waves in a He-Ne ring laser are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. These effects make it possible to detect angular orientations of an inner-cavity bar with respect to the plane of the ring cavity. The amplitude asymmetries occur when a birefringent bar is placed in the three-mirror ring cavity, and an axial magnetic field is applied to the active medium. A simplified theoretical analysis is performed by using a first order perturbation theory to derive an expression for the polarization of the active medium, and a set of self-consistent equations are derived to predict threshold conditions. Polarization asymmetries between the oppositely directed waves are also predicted. Amplitude asymmetries similar in nature to those predicted at threshold occur when the laser is operating in 12-15 free-running modes, and polarization asymmetry occurs simultaneously.

  13. Poloidal rotation, density asymmetries and momentum confinement in tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.; Jackson, D.R.

    1992-08-01

    Poloidal rotation speeds and density asymmetries are calculated for the deuterium and dominant carbon (oxygen) impurity ions in discharges in ASDEX, DIII, ISX-B, JET, and TFTR for which [upsilon][sub [phi

  14. Directional left-sided asymmetry of adrenals in experimentally domesticated animals.

    PubMed

    Trut, L N; Prasolova, L A; Kharlamova, A V; Plyusnina, I Z

    2002-05-01

    Directional left-sided asymmetry of the adrenals was typical of black and silver foxes, American minks, and gray rats selected by their behavior. In domesticated, but to a greater extent, in aggressive animals, the weight of the left adrenal and the width of its medulla and cortex markedly surpassed the corresponding parameters of the right adrenal. In aggressive animals enlargement of the left adrenal cortex was associated with widening of the zona reticularis, while in domesticated animals with enlargement of the zona fasciculata. PMID:12420075

  15. Measurement of Parity-Violating Neutron Capture Gamma Asymmetries at Low-Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Barron-Palos, L.; Bowman, James D; Fomin, Nadia; Greene, G. L.; Penttila, Seppo I

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive measurement of parity-violating (PV) observables in few-nucleon systems can shed light on our current understanding of the hadronic weak interaction at low momentum transfers. Theoretical models describe the nucleon-nucleon weak interaction at low energies with 6 parameters that need, in principle, to be determined in the same number of independent experiments. In this context, a series of experiments with cold neutrons are being proposed and developed. Particularly, experiments that aim to measure the parity-violating asymmetry in the distribution of the gamma-rays emitted in the capture of polarized neutrons by protons and deuterium, will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Processing circuit with asymmetry corrector and convolutional encoder for digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfiffner, Harold J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A processing circuit is provided for correcting for input parameter variations, such as data and clock signal symmetry, phase offset and jitter, noise and signal amplitude, in incoming data signals. An asymmetry corrector circuit performs the correcting function and furnishes the corrected data signals to a convolutional encoder circuit. The corrector circuit further forms a regenerated clock signal from clock pulses in the incoming data signals and another clock signal at a multiple of the incoming clock signal. These clock signals are furnished to the encoder circuit so that encoded data may be furnished to a modulator at a high data rate for transmission.

  17. Theory of absorption bands in molecular dimers: Interpolating between optical asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenknecht, Hans; Esser, Bernd

    2003-02-01

    Absorption band shapes of an asymmetric dimer system constituted by monomers with different excitation energies and optical transition matrix elements are considered in the semiclassical parameter region. Optical transition matrix elements originating from arbitrary initial vibrational states are analyzed on the basis of a spin representation of the eigenstates of an associated symmetry broken spin-boson Hamiltonian. Correlations between the spin-down and spin-up coefficients of these eigenstates are shown to exist and investigated in detail. Using these correlations, an asymmetry interpolation of the intensity of absorption lines between dimer configurations with different optical monomer transition matrix elements is proposed.

  18. Sibling temperaments, conflict, warmth, and role asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Stoneman, Z; Brody, G H

    1993-12-01

    The association between sibling temperament combinations (activity and adaptability) and qualitative aspects of the sibling relationship were examined, including in-home observations of sibling positivity/warmth, negativity/conflict, social engagement, and role asymmetry and older sibling perceptions of warmth/closeness, conflict, and status/power. The sample consisted of 67 same-gender, school-aged sibling pairs. Highest levels of negativity/conflict occurred when both siblings were high in activity and when the older sibling was rated as more active than the younger. Conflict was lowest when both siblings were low in activity. Warmth/positivity was greatest when both children were similar in activity level. Siblings were more socially engaged when the older sibling was more adaptable than the younger. Perceived status/power was greatest when younger siblings were low in adaptability. When between-temperament-dimension relationships were examined, observed conflict was greatest when older siblings were high in activity and younger siblings were nonadaptable. Gender and age-related findings are also reported. Findings highlight the importance of identifying the complex ways in which varying dimensions of sibling temperaments combine to influence specific aspects of the sibling relationship.

  19. Functional chiral asymmetry in descending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Frazin, L J; Lanza, G; Vonesh, M; Khasho, F; Spitzzeri, C; McGee, S; Mehlman, D; Chandran, K B; Talano, J; McPherson, D

    1990-12-01

    To determine whether rotational blood flow or chiral asymmetry exists in the human descending thoracic aorta, we established the ability of color Doppler ultrasound to detect rotational flow in a tornado tube model of a vortex descending fluid column. In a model of the human aortic arch with a pulse duplicator, color Doppler was then used to demonstrate that rotational flow occurs first in the transverse arch and then in the proximal descending thoracic aorta. With the use of color Doppler esophageal echocardiography, 53 patients (age range, 25-78 years; mean age, 56.4 years) were prospectively examined for rotational flow in the descending thoracic aorta. At 10 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 22 of 38 patients (58%) revealed rotational flow with obvious diastolic counterclockwise rotation but less obvious systolic clockwise rotation. At 5 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 29 of 46 patients (63%) revealed rotational flow with a tendency toward systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise rotation. At the retro-left ventricular position, 47 of 53 patients (89%) revealed rotational flow, usually of a clockwise direction, occurring in systole. Our data suggest that aortic flow is not purely pulsatile and axial but has a rotational component. Rotational flow begins in the aortic arch and is carried through to the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is chirally asymmetric with systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise components. These data demonstrate an aortic rotational flow component that may have physiological implications for organ perfusion. PMID:2242523

  20. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry of Pedersen conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Lu, Y.; Sheng, C.; Yue, X.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric conductance is very important to the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the high latitude region, since it connects the polar cap potential with the currents. Meanwhile, the altitudinal distribution of Pederson conductance gives us a rough idea about the altitudinal distribution of Joule heating at high latitudes. Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites observations of electron density profiles from 2009-2014, Pedersen conductivity has been calculated. A climatologic study of the height-integrated Pedersen conductivities in both E (100-150 km) and F (150-600 km) regions and their ratio in different seasons, solar and geomagnetic conditions have been conducted. A significant inter-hemispheric asymmetry is identified in the seasonal variation. Meanwhile, the conductance in both regions and the conductance ratio show a strong dependence on F10.7 and Ap indices. This result will strongly help our understanding of the inter-hemispheric difference in the high-latitude electrodynamics.

  1. Visual field asymmetries in visual evoked responses

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral responses to visual stimuli exhibit visual field asymmetries, but cortical folding and the close proximity of visual cortical areas make electrophysiological comparisons between different stimulus locations problematic. Retinotopy-constrained source estimation (RCSE) uses distributed dipole models simultaneously constrained by multiple stimulus locations to provide separation between individual visual areas that is not possible with conventional source estimation methods. Magnetoencephalography and RCSE were used to estimate time courses of activity in V1, V2, V3, and V3A. Responses to left and right hemifield stimuli were not significantly different. Peak latencies for peripheral stimuli were significantly shorter than those for perifoveal stimuli in V1, V2, and V3A, likely related to the greater proportion of magnocellular input to V1 in the periphery. Consistent with previous results, sensor magnitudes for lower field stimuli were about twice as large as for upper field, which is only partially explained by the proximity to sensors for lower field cortical sources in V1, V2, and V3. V3A exhibited both latency and amplitude differences for upper and lower field responses. There were no differences for V3, consistent with previous suggestions that dorsal and ventral V3 are two halves of a single visual area, rather than distinct areas V3 and VP. PMID:25527151

  2. Lepton asymmetry from mixing and oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavtsev, A.; Millington, P.; Vogel, H.

    2016-06-01

    We show how the two physically-distinct sources of CP -asymmetry relevant to scenarios of leptogenesis: (i) resonant mixing and (ii) oscillations between different flavours can be unambiguously identified within the Kadanoff-Baym formalism. These contributions are isolated by analyzing the spectral structure of the non-equilibrium propagators without relying on the definition of particle number densities. The mixing source is associated with the usual mass shells, whereas the oscillation source is identified with a third intermediate shell. In addition, we identify terms lying on the oscillation shell that can be interpreted as the destructive interference between mixing and oscillation. We confirm that identical shell structure is obtained in both the Heisenberg- and interaction-picture realizations of the Kadanoff-Baym formalism. In so doing, we illustrate the self-consistency and complementarity of these two approaches. The interaction-picture approach in particular has the advantage that it may be used to analyze all forms of mass spectra from quasi-degenerate through to hierarchical.

  3. Asymmetry of normal mandibular condylar shape.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Sigurtà, D

    1997-01-01

    Morphological studies of the facial skeleton in human beings are usually made from radiographs (frontal and lateral projections and orthopantomographs). The conventional linear and angular measurements provide quantitative information only about size, and fail to define the shape and form of the skeletal features and their variations. Mathematical methods such as the Fourier series allow a correct quantitative analysis of the shape and its variations. The outlines of the mandibular condyles in the orthopantomographs of 20 men and 20 women (mean age 29 years) were traced and digitized. All subjects had a good dentition, no temporomandibular joint problems, and were referred to a dental surgery for periodontal problems. A Fourier analysis of the outlines was performed. Fourier coefficients and reconstructed outlines were compared to analyze the condylar symmetry of shape on an intra- and intersubject basis. A significant condylar asymmetry for shape as distinct from size was found on an intrasubject basis, i.e. the left and right condyles of a single individual had a different shape with a large interindividual variability. Conversely, the mean condyle shape of the male and female groups was symmetric.

  4. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Mercury’s Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Baumgardner, J.; Mendillo, M.

    2012-10-01

    Observations of Mercury’s sodium tail by Potter and Killen (2008) frequently show enhanced emission in the northern lobe. Anderson et al. (2011) have established that Mercury’s magnetic dipole is offset from the planet’s center by .2 RM to the north, while approximately aligned with the spin axis. Such a configuration produces an asymmetry in the magnetosphere cusp whereby more plasma has direct access to the planet’s southern hemisphere than in the north (Winslow et al., 2012). Using time-dependent, 3-D simulations, we demonstrate that ion precipitation, enlarged in the south, can actually result in the observed profiles across the tail, which are typically brighter to the north. Additionally, sources located at high latitude cusp footprints at on the dayside were unable match the observed width of the asymmetric profiles across the tail. Instead, our simulations provide evidence for sources near the dawn terminator at lower latitudes, resulting from the accumulation of sodium during the night. Desorption, rather than ion sputtering, is determined to be the responsible mechanism for this sodium population’s release and escape from the planet surface.

  5. Value, obligation and the asymmetry question.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Michael

    1998-04-01

    Is there a prima facie obligation to produce additional individuals whose lives would be worth living? In his paper 'Is it good to make happy people?', Stuart Rachels argues not only that there is, but, also, that precisely as much weight should be assigned to the quality of life that would be enjoyed by such potential persons, if they were to be actualized, as to the quality of life enjoyed by actually existing persons. In response, I shall argue, first, that Rachels' view is exposed to very serious objections, and secondly, that his arguments in support of his position involve a crucial assumption, which cannot be sustained, concerning the relation between, on the one hand, propositions about good-making and bad-making properties, and, on the other, propositions about right-making and wrong-making ones. I shall then argue that there is a very plausible position concerning the conditions under which an action can be morally wrong which entails the following asymmetry: there is a prima facie obligation not to bring into existence individuals whose lives are not worth living, but there is no corresponding obligation to create additional individuals whose lives would be worth living.

  6. Impact of rheological layering on rift asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquet, Yoann; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Duretz, Thibault

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous models of rift formation have been proposed, what triggers asymmetry of rifted margins remains unclear. Parametrized material softening is often employed to induce asymmetric fault patterns in numerical models. Here, we use thermo-mechanical finite element models that allow softening via thermal weakening. We investigate the importance of lithosphere rheology and mechanical layering on rift morphology. The numerical code is based on the MILAMIN solver and uses the Triangle mesh generator. Our model configuration consists of a visco-elasto-platic layered lithosphere comprising either (1) only one brittle-ductile transition (in the mantle) or (2) three brittle-ductile transitions (one in the upper crust, one in the lower crust and one in the mantle). We perform then two sets of simulations characterized by low and high extensional strain rates (5*10-15 s-1, 2*10-14 s-1). The results show that the extension of a lithosphere comprising only one brittle-ductile transition produces a symmetric 'neck' type rift. The upper and lower crusts are thinned until the lithospheric mantle is exhumed to the seafloor. A lithosphere containing three brittle-ductile transitions favors strain localization. Shear zones at different horizontal locations and generated in the brittle levels of the lithosphere get connected by the weak ductile layers. The results suggest that rheological layering of the lithosphere can be a reason for the generation of asymmetric rifting and subsequent rift morphology.

  7. On facial asymmetry and self-perception.

    PubMed

    Lu, Stephen M; Bartlett, Scott P

    2014-06-01

    Self-perception has been an enduring human concern since ancient times and remains a significant component of the preoperative and postoperative consultation. Despite modern technological attempts to reproduce the first-hand experience, there is no perfect substitute for human, stereoscopic, three-dimensional vision in evaluating appearance. Nowadays, however, the primary tools available to a patient for examining his or her own appearance, particularly the face, are photographs and mirrors. Patients are often unaware of how cameras and photographs can distort and degrade image quality, leading to an inaccurate representation of true appearance. Everyone knows that mirrors reverse an image, left and right, and most people recognize their own natural facial asymmetry at some level. However, few realize that emotions are not only expressed unequally by the left and right sides of the face but also perceived unequally by others. The impact and effect of this "facedness" is completely reversed by mirrors, potentially creating a significant discrepancy between what a patient perceives of himself or herself and what the surgeon or other third party sees. This article ties together the diverse threads leading to this problem and suggests several ways of mitigating the issue through technology and patient counseling.

  8. Moral Distress, Workplace Health, and Intrinsic Harm.

    PubMed

    Weber, Elijah

    2016-05-01

    Moral distress is now being recognized as a frequent experience for many health care providers, and there's good evidence that it has a negative impact on the health care work environment. However, contemporary discussions of moral distress have several problems. First, they tend to rely on inadequate characterizations of moral distress. As a result, subsequent investigations regarding the frequency and consequences of moral distress often proceed without a clear understanding of the phenomenon being discussed, and thereby risk substantially misrepresenting the nature, frequency, and possible consequences of moral distress. These discussions also minimize the intrinsically harmful aspects of moral distress. This is a serious omission. Moral distress doesn't just have a negative impact on the health care work environment; it also directly harms the one who experiences it. In this paper, I claim that these problems can be addressed by first clarifying our understanding of moral distress, and then identifying what makes moral distress intrinsically harmful. I begin by identifying three common mistakes that characterizations of moral distress tend to make, and explaining why these mistakes are problematic. Next, I offer an account of moral distress that avoids these mistakes. Then, I defend the claim that moral distress is intrinsically harmful to the subject who experiences it. I conclude by explaining how acknowledging this aspect of moral distress should reshape our discussions about how best to deal with this phenomenon. PMID:26308751

  9. Etiology of dental erosion--intrinsic factors.

    PubMed

    Scheutzel, P

    1996-04-01

    Dental erosion due to intrinsic factors is caused by gastric acid reaching the oral cavity and the teeth as a result of vomiting or gastroesophageal reflux. Since clinical manifestation of dental erosion does not occur until gastric acid has acted on the dental hard tissues regularly over a period of several years, dental erosion caused by intrinsic factors has been observed only in those diseases which are associated with chronic vomiting or persistent gastroesophageal reflux over a long period. Examples of such conditions include disorders of the upper alimentary tract, specific metabolic and endocrine disorders, cases of medication side-effects and drug abuse, and certain psychosomatic disorders, e.g. stress-induced psychosomatic vomiting, anorexia and bulimia nervosa or rumination. Based on a review of the medical and dental literature, the main symptoms of all disorders which must be taken into account as possible intrinsic etiological factors of dental erosion are thoroughly discussed with respect to the clinical picture, prevalence and risk of erosion.

  10. Intrinsic radio-sensitivity of tumours to low let radiations: a mathematical model in LQ formalism.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Sk Ayasuddin

    2013-12-01

    Intrinsic radio-sensitivity is the determinant of differential response of tumours to low LET ionising radiations. The probabilistic DNA fibril both model shows intrinsic radio-sensitivity factor [I] as function of nuclear diameter (Nd) and intra cellular hydrogen ion concentration [H+]. Linking probabilities of lethal and sub-lethal events to [I] further results in equations which show the LQ parameters namely alpha and beta are functions of (Nd), [H+] and repair constant (μ) mu. This model is able to explain radiobiological phenomena of OER and Do value of lymphocytes.

  11. Cyclic-loading Induced Lattice-Strain Asymmetry in Loading and Transverse Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E-Wen; Barabash, Rozaliya; Clausen, Bjorn; Liaw, Peter K

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic-loading effects on a nickel-based superalloy are investigated with in-situ neutron-diffraction measurements. The thermoelastic-temperature evolution subjected to cyclic loading is estimated based on the lattice-strain evolution. The atomic thermoelastic responses are compared with the measured bulk temperature evolution. Two transitions in the temperature-evolution are observed. The first transition, observed with the neutron-measurement results, is associated with the cyclic hardening/softening-structural transformation. The second transition is observed at larger number of fatigue cycles. It has a distinct origin and is related to the start of irreversible structural transformations during fatigue. A lattice-strain asymmetry behavior is observed. The lattice-strain asymmetry is quantified as a grain-orientation-dependent transverse/loading parameter (P-ratio). The P-ratio parameter evolution reveals the irreversible plastic deformation subjected to the fatigue. The irreversible fatigue phenomena might relate to the formation of the microcracks. At elevated temperatures the cyclic hardening/softening transition starts at lower fatigue cycles as compared to room temperature. A comparison between the room-temperature and the elevated-temperature fatigue experiments is performed. The P-ratio parameters show the same irreversible trends at both the room and the elevated temperatures.

  12. Measurements of CP-Violating Asymmetries in B^0 toa_1^+(1260) \\pi^- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-01-05

    The authors present measurements of CP-violating asymmetries in the decay B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}(1260){pi}{sup {-+}} with a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}(1260) {yields} {pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}. The data sample corresponds to 384 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B-factory at SLAC. They measure the CP-violating asymmetry {Alpha}{sub CP}{sup a{sub 1}{pi}} = -0.07 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.02, the mixing-induced CP violation parameter S{sub a{sub 1}{pi}} = 0.37 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.07, the direct Cp violation parameter C{sub a{sub 1}{pi}} = -0.10 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.09, and the parameters {Delta}C{sub a{sub 1}{pi}} = 0.26 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.07 and {Delta}S{sub a{sub 1}{pi}} = -0.14 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.06. From these measured quantities they determine the angle {alpha}{sub eff} = 78.6{sup o} {+-} 7.3{sup o}.

  13. Measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->rho(+/-)h(-/+) decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Aspinwall, M L; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-11-14

    We present measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->rho(+/-)pi(-/+) and B0-->rho-K+ decays. The results are obtained from a data sample of 88.9 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. From a time-dependent maximum likelihood fit we measure the branching fractions B(B0-->rho(+/-)pi(-/+))=[22.6+/-1.8 (stat)+/-2.2 (syst)]x10(-6) and B(B0-->rho-K+)=(7.3 -1.2( +1.3)+/-1.3)x10(-6), and the CP-violating charge asymmetries A(rhopi)(CP)=-0.18+/-0.08+/-0.03 and A(rhoK)(CP)=0.28+/-0.17+/-0.08, the direct CP violation parameter C(rhopi)=0.36+/-0.18+/-0.04 and the mixing-induced CP violation parameter S(rhopi)=0.19+/-0.24+/-0.03, and the dilution parameters DeltaC(rhopi)=0.28 -0.19( +0.18)+/-0.04 and DeltaS(rhopi)=0.15+/-0.25+/-0.03.

  14. Collins Fragmentation and the Single Transverse Spin Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng; Zhou, Jian

    2009-03-26

    We study the Collins mechanism for the single transverse spin asymmetry in the collinear factorization approach. The correspondent twist-three fragmentation function is identified. We show that the Collins function calculated in this approach is universal.We further examine its contribution to the single transverse spin asymmetry of semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering and demonstrate that the transverse momentum dependent and twist-three collinear approaches are consistent in the intermediate transverse momentum region where both apply.

  15. Tuning piezoresistive transduction in nanomechanical resonators by geometrical asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Llobet, J.; Sansa, M.; Lorenzoni, M.; Pérez-Murano, F.; Borrisé, X.; San Paulo, A.

    2015-08-17

    The effect of geometrical asymmetries on the piezoresistive transduction in suspended double clamped beam nanomechanical resonators is investigated. Tapered silicon nano-beams, fabricated using a fast and flexible prototyping method, are employed to determine how the asymmetry affects the transduced piezoresistive signal for different mechanical resonant modes. This effect is attributed to the modulation of the strain in pre-strained double clamped beams, and it is confirmed by means of finite element simulations.

  16. Unpolarized Azimuthal Asymmetries from the COMPASS Experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Joosten, Rainer

    2009-12-17

    Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized SIDIS can be used to probe the transverse momentum of the quarks inside the nucleon. Furthermore, they give access to the so-far unmeasured Boer-Mulders function. In this contribution, results on these asymmetries, extracted separately for positive and negative hadrons, from the COMPASS data taken with a 160 GeV/c {mu}{sup +} beam on a deuteron target will be reported and compared to theoretical predictions.

  17. Time-integrated charge asymmetries at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Cheu, E.; /Arizona U.

    2006-10-01

    We have measured the time-integrated charge asymmetries in dimuon events and semileptonic B{sub s} decays. These results are the most precise semileptonic charge asymmetries in B decays to date. We combine these results with measurements from the decay B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} to determine the CP-violating phase {phi}{sub s}. They find {phi}{sub s} = -0.56{sub -0.41}{sup +0.44}.

  18. Craniofacial Asymmetry in Adults With Neglected Congenital Muscular Torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kil-Yong; Min, Kyung-Jay; Woo, Jieun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the craniofacial asymmetry in adults with neglected congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) by quantitative assessment based on craniofacial three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT). Methods Preoperative craniofacial asymmetry was measured by 3D-CT for 31 CMT subjects ≥18 years of age who visited a tertiary medical center and underwent 3D-CT between January 2009 and December 2013. The relationship between the age and the severity of craniofacial asymmetry was analyzed in reference to anteroposterior length asymmetry of the frontal bone and zygomatic arch, vertical and lateral displacements of the facial landmarks, and mandibular axis rotation. Results The age at CT was 27.71±7.02 years (range, 18-44 years). All intra-class correlation coefficients were higher than 0.7, suggesting good inter-rater reliability (p<0.05) of all the measurements. The frontal and the zygomatic length ratio (i.e., the anteroposterior length asymmetry on the axial plane) was 1.06±0.03 and 1.07±0.03, respectively, which was increased significantly with age in the linear regression analysis (r2=0.176, p=0.019 and r2=0.188, p=0.015, respectively). The vertical or lateral displacement of the facial landmarks and rotation of the mandibular axis did not significantly correlate with age (p>0.05). Conclusion Craniofacial asymmetry of neglected CMT became more severe with age in terms of anteroposterior length asymmetry of the ipsilateral frontal bone and zygomatic arch on the axial plane even after growth cessation. This finding may enhance the understanding of therapeutic strategies for craniofacial asymmetry in adults with neglected CMT. PMID:26161351

  19. Intrinsic common noise in a system of two coupled Brusselators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Amitabha; Lindner, Benjamin

    2010-10-01

    We investigate effects of coupling two chemical subsystems through diffusion of chemical species. We consider the Langevin description of the actual microscopic dynamics and show that diffusive coupling gives rise to a common noise term along with the deterministic interaction. As a model example, we study two diffusively coupled Brusselator systems. By numerical Langevin simulations, we inspect the effect of the common noise term on the total correlation between the two Brusselators; we also verify the validity of the Langevin approach by comparison to simulations of the more accurate master equation. The intrinsic common noise has its strongest effect for the Brusselator dynamics operating at a stable fixed point far from the Hopf bifurcation; in this case, the common noise reduces the correlation of the Brusselators significantly. We also show that for specific parameter sets the covariance between the systems is maximized (or minimized) at a finite system size.

  20. First Intrinsic Anisotropy Observations With the Cosmic Background Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padin, S.; Cartwright, J. K.; Mason, B. S.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Shepherd, M. C.; Sievers, J.; Udomprasert, P. S.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Myers, S. T.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present the first results of observations of the intrinsic anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation with the Cosmic Background Imager from a site at 5080 in altitude in northern Chile. Our observations show a sharp decrease in C_l in the range l = 400 - 1500. Such a decrease in power at high l is one of the fundamental predictions of the standard cosmological model, and these are the first observations which cover a broad enough 1-range to show this decrease in a single experiment. The power, C_l, at l approximately 600 is higher than measured by Boomerang and Maxima, with the differences being significant at the 2.7sigma and 1.9sigma levels, respectively. The C_l we have measured enable us to place limits on the density parameter, Omega(tot) <= 0.4 or Omega(tot) >= 0.7 (90% confidence).

  1. Intrinsic optical bistability in a strongly driven Rydberg ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, Natalia R.; Wade, Christopher G.; Šibalić, Nikola; Kondo, Jorge M.; Adams, Charles S.; Weatherill, Kevin J.

    2016-06-01

    We observe and characterize intrinsic optical bistability in a dilute Rydberg vapor. The bistability is characterized by sharp jumps between states of low and high Rydberg occupancy with jump-up and -down positions displaying hysteresis depending on the direction in which the control parameter is changed. We find that the shift in frequency of the jump point scales with the fourth power of the principal quantum number. Also, the width of the hysteresis window increases with increasing principal quantum number, before reaching a peak and then closing again. The experimental results are consistent with predictions from a simple theoretical model based on semiclassical Maxwell-Bloch equations including the effects of interaction-induced broadening and level shifts. These results provide insight into the dynamics of driven dissipative systems.

  2. Intrinsic barriers for H-atom transfer reactions involving hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M.; Autrey, S.T.; Franz, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    Intrinsic barriers (formally the barrier in the absence of driving force) for H-atom transfer reactions are key parameters in Evans-Polyanyi and Marcus equations for estimating exothermic reaction barriers and are fundamentally significant for the insight they provide about bond reorganization energies for formation of transition state structures. Although knowable from experiment, relatively few of these barriers have been measured due to experimental difficulties in measuring rates for identity reactions. Thus, the authors have used semiempirical Molecular Orbital theoretical methods (MNDO/PM3) to calculate barriers for a series of H-atom transfer identity reactions involving alkyl, alkenyl, arylalkyl and hydroaryl radicals and donors. Briefly stated, they find that barriers decrease with the degree of alkyl substitution at the radical site whereas barriers increase with the degree of conjugation with the radical site. Details of the methodology and analyses of how these barrier heights correlate with reactant and transition state properties will be presented and discussed.

  3. Intrinsic uncertainty on the nature of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkenburg, Wessel; Kunz, Martin; Marra, Valerio

    2013-12-01

    We argue that there is an intrinsic noise on measurements of the equation of state parameter w = p/ρ from large-scale structure around us. The presence of the large-scale structure leads to an ambiguity in the definition of the background universe and thus there is a maximal precision with which we can determine the equation of state of dark energy. To study the uncertainty due to local structure, we model density perturbations stemming from a standard inflationary power spectrum by means of the exact Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi solution of Einstein’s equation, and show that the usual distribution of matter inhomogeneities in a ΛCDM cosmology causes a variation of w - as inferred from distance measures - of several percent. As we observe only one universe, or equivalently because of the cosmic variance, this uncertainty is systematic in nature.

  4. isoSTED nanoscopy with intrinsic beam alignment.

    PubMed

    Curdt, Franziska; Herr, Simon J; Lutz, Tobias; Schmidt, Roman; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W

    2015-11-30

    Despite the need for isotropic optical resolution in a growing number of applications, the majority of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy setups still do not attain an axial resolution comparable to that in the lateral dimensions. Three-dimensional (3D) nanoscopy implementations that employ only a single objective lens typically feature a trade-off between axial and lateral resolution. 4Pi arrangements, in which the sample is illuminated coherently through two opposing lenses, have proven their potential for rendering the resolution isotropic. However, instrument complexity due to a large number of alignment parameters has so far thwarted the dissemination of this approach. Here, we present a 4Pi-STED setup combination, also called isoSTED nanoscope, where the STED and excitation beams are intrinsically co-aligned. A highly robust and convenient 4Pi cavity allows easy handling without the need for readjustments during imaging experiments.

  5. Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides inhibit the intrinsic tenase complex.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, J P; Lan, H C

    1998-09-01

    Systemic administration of ISIS 2302, a 20-mer antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide targeting human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 mRNA, causes prolongation of plasma clotting times in both monkey and human studies. The anticoagulant effects of ISIS 2302 were investigated with both in vitro coagulation assays in human plasma and purified enzyme systems. At high oligonucleotide plasma concentrations (>100 microgram/mL), prolongation of the prothrombin and thrombin times was observed. In a thrombin time assay using purified components, high concentrations of ISIS 2302 inhibited thrombin clotting activity both by stimulating inhibition by heparin cofactor II and directly competing with fibrinogen for binding to anion binding exosite I. In contrast, low concentrations of ISIS 2302 (<100 microgram/mL) showed a selective, linear prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time (PTT). The rate limiting effect of 50 microgram/mL ISIS 2302, which prolonged the PTT to 1.5 times control, was identified by sequential modification of the clotting assay. Delaying addition of oligonucleotide until after contact activation failed to correct prolongation of the PTT. The calcium-dependent steps of the intrinsic pathway were individually assessed by adding sufficient activated coagulation factor to correct the PTT in plasma deficient in that specific factor. Addition of factor XIa, IXa, VIIIa, or Va failed to correct the PTT in the presence of ISIS 2302. In contrast, 0.2 nmol/L factor Xa corrected prolongation of the PTT in factor X-deficient plasma with or without oligonucleotide present. ISIS 2302 (50 microgram/mL) did not prolong a modified Russel viper venom time, suggesting no significant inhibition of prothrombinase. Thus, 50 microgram/mL ISIS 2302 prolonged the PTT by selectively inhibiting intrinsic tenase activity. ISIS 2302 showed partial inhibition of intrinsic tenase activity (to approximately 35% of control) at clinically relevant oligonucleotide

  6. The validity of individual frontal alpha asymmetry EEG neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Quaedflieg, C W E M; Smulders, F T Y; Meyer, T; Peeters, F; Merckelbach, H; Smeets, T

    2016-01-01

    Frontal asymmetry in alpha oscillations is assumed to be associated with psychopathology and individual differences in emotional responding. Brain-activity-based feedback is a promising tool for the modulation of cortical activity. Here, we validated a neurofeedback protocol designed to change relative frontal asymmetry based on individual alpha peak frequencies, including real-time average referencing and eye-correction. Participants (N = 60) were randomly assigned to a right, left or placebo neurofeedback group. Results show a difference in trainability between groups, with a linear change in frontal alpha asymmetry over time for the right neurofeedback group during rest. Moreover, the asymmetry changes in the right group were frequency and location specific, even though trainability did not persist at 1 week and 1 month follow-ups. On the behavioral level, subjective stress on the second test day was reduced in the left and placebo neurofeedback groups, but not in the right neurofeedback group. We found individual differences in trainability that were dependent on training group, with participants in the right neurofeedback group being more likely to change their frontal asymmetry in the desired direction. Individual differences in trainability were also reflected in the ability to change frontal asymmetry during the feedback.

  7. North-south asymmetries in magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaland, S.; Foerster, M.; Laundal, K.; McCracken, K. G.; Maes, L.; Lybekk, B.; Pedersen, A.

    2015-12-01

    Interaction between the solar wind and the dayside terrestrial magnetopause causes a transfer of energy and momentum from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. Consequently, a large scale circulation - the Dungey cycle - is set up in the magnetosphere. Since the magnetosphere is magnetically connected to the ionosphere, a corresponding circulation of plasma is also set up in the high-latitude ionosphere. Influences from external drivers, in particular the orientation of the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field as well as daily and seasonal variations in the Earth's tilt angle are known to set up temporal north-south asymmetries in the magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma circulation. There are also persistent north-south asymmetries, which cannot easily be explained by the influence of external drivers. In this presentation, we show examples of such asymmetries in ionospheric convection and asymmetries in magnetospheric lobe density, presumably related to hemispheric asymmetries in ion outflow. We infer that these persistent asymmetries are mainly caused by differences in the strength and configuration of the geomagnetic field between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Since the ionosphere is magnetically connected to the magnetosphere, this difference will also be reflected in the magnetosphere in the form of different feedback from the two hemispheres.

  8. Boer-Mulders effect in unpolarized SIDIS: An analysis of the COMPASS and HERMES data on the $\\cos 2 \\phi$ asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vincenzo Barone; Melis, Stefano; Prokudin, Alexei

    2010-06-17

    We present a phenomenological analysis of the $\\cos 2 \\phi$ asymmetry recently measured by the COMPASS and HERMES collaborations in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. In the kinematical regimes explored by these experiments the asymmetry arises from transverse-spin and intrinsic transverse-momentum effects. We consider the leading-twist contribution, related to the so-called Boer-Mulders transverse-polarization distribution $h_1^{\\perp}(x, k_T^2)$, and the twist-4 Cahn contribution, involving unpolarized transverse-momentum distribution functions. We show that a reasonably good fit of the data is achieved with a Boer-Mulders function consistent with the main theoretical expectations. Lastly, our conclusion is that the COMPASS and HERMES measurements represent the first experimental evidence of the Boer-Mulders effect in SIDIS.

  9. Boer-Mulders effect in unpolarized SIDIS: An analysis of the COMPASS and HERMES data on the cos2{phi} asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Vincenzo; Melis, Stefano; Prokudin, Alexei

    2010-06-01

    We present a phenomenological analysis of the cos2{phi} asymmetry recently measured by the COMPASS and HERMES collaborations in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. In the kinematical regimes explored by these experiments the asymmetry arises from transverse-spin and intrinsic transverse-momentum effects. We consider the leading-twist contribution, related to the so-called Boer-Mulders transverse-polarization distribution h{sub 1}{sup perpendicular}(x,k{sub T}{sup 2}), and the twist-4 Cahn contribution, involving unpolarized transverse-momentum distribution functions. We show that a reasonably good fit of the preliminary data sets from COMPASS and HERMES is achieved with a Boer-Mulders function consistent with the main theoretical expectations. Our conclusion is that the COMPASS and HERMES measurements represent the first experimental evidence of the Boer-Mulders effect in SIDIS.

  10. Boer-Mulders effect in unpolarized SIDIS: An analysis of the COMPASS and HERMES data on the $$\\cos 2 \\phi$$ asymmetry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vincenzo Barone; Melis, Stefano; Prokudin, Alexei

    2010-06-17

    We present a phenomenological analysis of themore » $$\\cos 2 \\phi$$ asymmetry recently measured by the COMPASS and HERMES collaborations in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. In the kinematical regimes explored by these experiments the asymmetry arises from transverse-spin and intrinsic transverse-momentum effects. We consider the leading-twist contribution, related to the so-called Boer-Mulders transverse-polarization distribution $$h_1^{\\perp}(x, k_T^2)$$, and the twist-4 Cahn contribution, involving unpolarized transverse-momentum distribution functions. We show that a reasonably good fit of the data is achieved with a Boer-Mulders function consistent with the main theoretical expectations. Lastly, our conclusion is that the COMPASS and HERMES measurements represent the first experimental evidence of the Boer-Mulders effect in SIDIS.« less

  11. Effects of azimuth-symmetric acceptance cutoffs on the measured asymmetry in unpolarized Drell-Yan fixed-target experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, A.; Bussa, M. P.; Destefanis, M.; Ferrero, L.; Greco, M.; Maggiora, M.; Spataro, S.

    2013-04-01

    Fixed-target unpolarized Drell-Yan experiments often feature an acceptance depending on the polar angle of the lepton tracks in the laboratory frame. Typically leptons are detected in a defined angular range, with a dead zone in the forward region. If the cutoffs imposed by the angular acceptance are independent of the azimuth, at first sight they do not appear dangerous for a measurement of the cos(2 φ) asymmetry, which is relevant because of its association with the violation of the Lam-Tung rule and with the Boer-Mulders function. On the contrary, direct simulations show that up to 10 percent asymmetries are produced by these cutoffs. These artificial asymmetries present qualitative features that allow them to mimic the physical ones. They introduce some model dependence in the measurements of the cos(2 φ) asymmetry, since a precise reconstruction of the acceptance in the Collins-Soper frame requires a Monte Carlo simulation, that in turn requires some detailed physical input to generate event distributions. Although experiments in the eighties seem to have been aware of this problem, the possibility of using the Boer-Mulders function as an input parameter in the extraction of transversity has much increased the requirements of precision on this measurement. Our simulations show that the safest approach to these measurements is a strong cutoff on the Collins-Soper polar angle. This reduces statistics, but does not necessarily decrease the precision in a measurement of the Boer-Mulders function.

  12. Correction of facial asymmetry associated with vertical maxillary excess and mandibular prognathism by combined orthognathic surgery and guiding templates and splints fabricated by rapid prototyping technique.

    PubMed

    Ying, B; Ye, N; Jiang, Y; Liu, Y; Hu, J; Zhu, S

    2015-11-01

    The facial asymmetry associated with vertical maxillary excess and mandibular prognathism is one of the more complicated types in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of combined orthognathic surgeries, together with guiding templates and splints fabricated by rapid prototyping technique, for the correction of facial asymmetry. Fourteen patients with facial asymmetry associated with vertical maxillary excess and mandibular prognathism were included. A maxillary Le Fort I osteotomy, a sagittal split ramus osteotomy on the shorter side of the face, and an intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy on the longer side of the face were performed with the aid of guiding templates and splints fabricated by rapid prototyping technique. Parameters reflecting maxillary canting, ramal inclination, mandibular deviation, and chin inclination were measured before surgery, 7 days after surgery, and 1 year after surgery, and compared. Significant differences in these parameters were found between the two sides preoperatively, whereas no differences were observed postoperatively. Facial asymmetry was corrected in all patients with satisfactory outcomes. In conclusion, combined orthognathic surgery and guiding templates and splints can offer improvements in accuracy, complexity, and duration over traditional procedures for the correction of facial asymmetry associated with vertical maxillary excess and mandibular prognathism.

  13. European Starlings Are Capable of Discriminating Subtle Size Asymmetries in Paired Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Swaddle, John P; Johnson, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    Small deviations from bilateral symmetry (fluctuating asymmetries) are cues to fitness differences in some animals. Therefore, researchers have considered whether animals use these small asymmetries as visual cues to determine appropriate behavioral responses (e.g., mate preferences). However, there have been few systematic studies of animals' abilities to visually discriminate such minor asymmetries. If the asymmetries cannot be discriminated, fluctuating asymmetry can not be a visual cue. Here, we report an investigation of European starlings' (Sturnus vulgaris) abilities to discriminate small size asymmetries. We trained starlings, through operant conditioning in a free-flight aviary, to discriminate achromatic, symmetric paired stimuli from size-matched asymmetric stimuli. By starting the learning process with a large asymmetry and progressing through sequential trials of decreasing asymmetry, we elucidated a behavioral limit to asymmetry discrimination. We found that starlings are capable of discriminating a 10% size asymmetry. There was weaker evidence for discrimination of 5% asymmetry but no evidence for signal discrimination at 2.5% size asymmetry. This level of asymmetry discrimination suggests that many size asymmetry cues in nature can be discriminated by birds. At each level of asymmetry discrimination, we also tested whether starlings could generalize their learned symmetry preference to unreinforced novel images. Consistent with previous findings, we found that starlings could generalize their symmetry preferences. PMID:17345950

  14. Importance and challenges of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrinsic foot muscle weakness has been implicated in a range of foot deformities and disorders. However, to establish a relationship between intrinsic muscle weakness and foot pathology, an objective measure of intrinsic muscle strength is needed. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the anatomy and role of intrinsic foot muscles, implications of intrinsic weakness and evaluate the different methods used to measure intrinsic foot muscle strength. Method Literature was sourced from database searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PEDro and CINAHL up to June 2012. Results There is no widely accepted method of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength. Methods to estimate toe flexor muscle strength include the paper grip test, plantar pressure, toe dynamometry, and the intrinsic positive test. Hand-held dynamometry has excellent interrater and intrarater reliability and limits toe curling, which is an action hypothesised to activate extrinsic toe flexor muscles. However, it is unclear whether any method can actually isolate intrinsic muscle strength. Also most methods measure only toe flexor strength and other actions such as toe extension and abduction have not been adequately assessed. Indirect methods to investigate intrinsic muscle structure and performance include CT, ultrasonography, MRI, EMG, and muscle biopsy. Indirect methods often discriminate between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, but lack the ability to measure muscle force. Conclusions There are many challenges to accurately measure intrinsic muscle strength in isolation. Most studies have measured toe flexor strength as a surrogate measure of intrinsic muscle strength. Hand-held dynamometry appears to be a promising method of estimating intrinsic muscle strength. However, the contribution of extrinsic muscles cannot be excluded from toe flexor strength measurement. Future research should clarify the relative contribution of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles

  15. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, Shelley A.

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  16. Up-down Asymmetries in Speed Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Peter; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    We compared speed matches for pairs of stimuli that moved in opposite directions (upward and downward). Stimuli were elliptical patches (2 deg horizontally by 1 deg vertically) of horizontal sinusoidal gratings of spatial. frequency 2 cycles/deg. Two sequential 380 msec reveal presentations were compared. One of each pair of gratings (the standard) moved at 4 Hz (2 deg/sec), the other (the test) moved at a rate determined by a simple up-down staircase. The point of subjectively equal speed was calculated from the average of the last eight reversals. The task was to fixate a central point and to determine which one of the pair appeared to move faster. Eight of 10 observers perceived the upward drifting grating as moving faster than a grating moving downward but otherwise identical. on average (N = 10), when the standard moved downward, it was matched by a test moving upward at 94.7+/-1.7(SE)% of the standard speed, and when the standard moved upward it was matched by a test moving downward at 105.1+/-2.3(SE)% of the standard speed. Extending this paradigm over a range of spatial (1.5 to 13.5 c/d) and temporal (1.5 to 13.5 Hz) frequencies, preliminary results (N = 4) suggest that, under the conditions of our experiment, upward matter is seen as faster than downward for speeds greater than approx.1 deg/sec, but the effect appears to reverse at speeds below approx.1 deg/sec with downward motion perceived as faster. Given that an up-down asymmetry has been observed for the optokinetic response, both perceptual and oculomotor contributions to this phenomenon deserve exploration.

  17. Arterial tree asymmetry reduces cerebral pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Vrselja, Zvonimir; Brkic, Hrvoje; Curic, Goran

    2015-11-01

    With each heartbeat, pressure wave (PW) propagates from aorta toward periphery. In cerebral circulation, at the level of circle of Willis (CW), four arteries and four PWs converge. Since the interference is an elemental property of the wave, PWs interfere at the level of CW. We hypothesize that the asymmetry of brain-supplying arteries (that join to form CW) creates phase difference between the four PWs that interfere at the level of CW and reduce downstream cerebral pulsatility. To best of our knowledge, the data about the sequence of PWs' arrival into the cerebral circulation is lacking. Evident imperfect bilateral symmetry of the vessels results with different path length of brain-supplying arteries, hence, PWs should arrive into the head at different times. The probabilistic calculation shows that asynchronous arrival is more probable than synchronous. The importance of PWs for the cerebral circulation is highlighted by the observation that barotrauma protection mechanisms are more influenced by the crest of PW (pulse pressure) than by the mean arterial pressure. In addition, an increased arterial pulsatility is associated with several brain pathologies. We created simple computational models of four converging arteries and found that asynchronous arrival of the PWs results with lower maximum pressure, slower rate of pressure amplification and lower downstream pulsatility. In analogy, the asynchronous arrival of the pressure waves into the cerebral circulation should decrease blood flow pulsatility and lower transmission of kinetic energy on arterial wall. We conclude that asynchronous arrival of PWs into the cerebral circulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and represents a physiological necessity.

  18. Observation of the intrinsic rotation in KSTAR Ohmic L-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, D. H.; Na, Yong-Su; Lee, S. G.; Angioni, C.; Yang, S. M.; Kim, H.-S.; Hahm, T. S.; Ko, W. H.; Jhang, H.; Lee, W. J.; KSTAR Team

    2016-03-01

    Two types of experiments were carried out to conduct an intrinsic rotation study in KSTAR. The first was a density ramp-up experiment without neutral beam injection, and the second was an experiment with beam blip technique. In these experiments, some characteristics of the intrinsic rotation were observed in the KSTAR Ohmic L-mode plasmas including: (i) a non-monotonic dependence of the core intrinsic rotation, called U-curve behaviour, with respect to the electron density and the collisionality related to the gradient of the toroidal rotation profile; and (ii) the behaviour of the anchor point in the intrinsic rotation profile for which the region exhibits a roughly flat shape and stays at nearly the same value even if the gradient of the toroidal rotation changes significantly in the core region. The location of the anchor point seems to be related to the q profile, and the toroidal rotation at the anchor point changes with the plasma operation parameters. These observations in the KSTAR Ohmic L-mode plasmas seem to be related to the rotation reversal phenomenon. A transport analysis was performed for the beam blip experiments in order to evaluate the intrinsic torque so that the U-curve behaviour can be further understood. The first results of the transport analysis in the KSTAR Ohmic L-mode plasmas show a correlation of the momentum fluxes and the intrinsic torques with the electron density and the collisionality. The rough magnitude and profiles of the intrinsic torque was experimentally obtained, and their possible mechanism is briefly discussed.

  19. 46 CFR 111.105-11 - Intrinsically safe systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... required by this subpart to be intrinsically safe must use approved components meeting UL 913 or IEC 60079-11 (both incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1). (b) Each electric cable of an intrinsically safe system must— (1) Be 50 mm (2 inches) or more from cable of non-intrinsically safe...

  20. 46 CFR 111.105-11 - Intrinsically safe systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... required by this subpart to be intrinsically safe must use approved components meeting UL 913 or IEC 60079-11 (both incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1). (b) Each electric cable of an intrinsically safe system must— (1) Be 50 mm (2 inches) or more from cable of non-intrinsically safe...