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Sample records for intrinsically disordered protein

  1. Biophysical characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eliezer, David

    2009-01-01

    Summary The challenges associated with the structural characterization of disordered proteins have resulted in the application of a host of biophysical methods to such systems. NMR spectroscopy is perhaps the most readily suited technique for providing high-resolution structural information on disordered protein states in solution. Optical methods, solid state NMR, ESR and x-ray scattering can also provide valuable information regarding the ensemble of conformations sampled by disordered states. Finally, computational studies have begun to assume an increasingly important role in interpreting and extending the impact of experimental data obtained for such systems. This article discusses recent advances in the applications of these methods to intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:19162471

  2. Unusual biophysics of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-05-01

    Research of a past decade and a half leaves no doubt that complete understanding of protein functionality requires close consideration of the fact that many functional proteins do not have well-folded structures. These intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and proteins with intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are highly abundant in nature and play a number of crucial roles in a living cell. Their functions, which are typically associated with a wide range of intermolecular interactions where IDPs possess remarkable binding promiscuity, complement functional repertoire of ordered proteins. All this requires a close attention to the peculiarities of biophysics of these proteins. In this review, some key biophysical features of IDPs are covered. In addition to the peculiar sequence characteristics of IDPs these biophysical features include sequential, structural, and spatiotemporal heterogeneity of IDPs; their rough and relatively flat energy landscapes; their ability to undergo both induced folding and induced unfolding; the ability to interact specifically with structurally unrelated partners; the ability to gain different structures at binding to different partners; and the ability to keep essential amount of disorder even in the bound form. IDPs are also characterized by the "turned-out" response to the changes in their environment, where they gain some structure under conditions resulting in denaturation or even unfolding of ordered proteins. It is proposed that the heterogeneous spatiotemporal structure of IDPs/IDPRs can be described as a set of foldons, inducible foldons, semi-foldons, non-foldons, and unfoldons. They may lose their function when folded, and activation of some IDPs is associated with the awaking of the dormant disorder. It is possible that IDPs represent the "edge of chaos" systems which operate in a region between order and complete randomness or chaos, where the complexity is maximal. This article is part of a Special Issue

  3. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-07-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  4. Conformational Recognition of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James M.; Fusco, Giuliana; Lewitzky, Marc; Simister, Philip C.; Marchant, Jan; Camilloni, Carlo; Feller, Stephan M.; De Simone, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest in understanding the properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs); however, the characterization of these states remains an open challenge. IDPs appear to have functional roles that diverge from those of folded proteins and revolve around their ability to act as hubs for protein-protein interactions. To gain a better understanding of the modes of binding of IDPs, we combined statistical mechanics, calorimetry, and NMR spectroscopy to investigate the recognition and binding of a fragment from the disordered protein Gab2 by the growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), a key interaction for normal cell signaling and cancer development. Structural ensemble refinement by NMR chemical shifts, thermodynamics measurements, and analysis of point mutations indicated that the population of preexisting bound conformations in the free-state ensemble of Gab2 is an essential determinant for recognition and binding by Grb2. A key role was found for transient polyproline II (PPII) structures and extended conformations. Our findings are likely to have very general implications for the biological behavior of IDPs in light of the evidence that a large fraction of these proteins possess a specific propensity to form PPII and to adopt conformations that are more extended than the typical random-coil states. PMID:24739176

  5. Structure and Dynamics of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, Biao; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are involved in a wide range of essential biological processes, including in particular signalling and regulation. We are only beginning, however, to develop a detailed knowledge of the structure and dynamics of these proteins. It is becoming increasingly clear that, as IDPs populate highly heterogeneous states, they should be described in terms of conformational ensembles rather than as individual structures, as is instead most often the case for the native states of globular proteins. Within this context, in this chapter we describe the conceptual tools and methodological aspects associated with the description of the structure and dynamics of IDPs in terms of conformational ensembles. A major emphasis is given to methods in which molecular simulations are used in combination with experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements, as they are emerging as a powerful route to achieve an accurate determination of the conformational properties of IDPs. PMID:26387099

  6. Stimuli-sensitive intrinsically disordered protein brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Nithya; Bhagawati, Maniraj; Ananthanarayanan, Badriprasad; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Grafting polymers onto surfaces at high density to yield polymer brush coatings is a widely employed strategy to reduce biofouling and interfacial friction. These brushes almost universally feature synthetic polymers, which are often heterogeneous and do not readily allow incorporation of chemical functionalities at precise sites along the constituent chains. To complement these synthetic systems, we introduce a biomimetic, recombinant intrinsically disordered protein that can assemble into an environment-sensitive brush. This macromolecule adopts an extended conformation and can be grafted to solid supports to form oriented protein brushes that swell and collapse dramatically with changes in solution pH and ionic strength. We illustrate the value of sequence specificity by using proteases with mutually orthogonal recognition sites to modulate brush height in situ to predictable values. This study demonstrates that stimuli-responsive brushes can be fabricated from proteins and introduces them as a new class of smart biomaterial building blocks.

  7. Genome-Wide Prediction of Intrinsic Disorder; Sequence Alignment of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midic, Uros

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) is defined as a lack of stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are highly abundant in nature. IDPs possess a number of crucial biological functions, being involved in regulation, recognition, signaling and control, e.g. their functional…

  8. Intrinsically Disordered Regions in Autophagy Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yang; Su, Minfei; Soni, Gaurav; Salem, Saeed; Colbert, Christopher L.; Sinha, Sangita C.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential eukaryotic pathway required for cellular homeostasis. Numerous key autophagy effectors and regulators have been identified, but the mechanism by which they carry out their function in autophagy is not fully understood. Our rigorous bioinformatic analysis shows that the majority of key human autophagy proteins include intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), which are sequences lacking stable secondary and tertiary structure; suggesting that IDRs play an important, yet hitherto uninvestigated, role in autophagy. Available crystal structures corroborate the absence of structure in some of these predicted IDRs. Regions of orthologs equivalent to the IDRs predicted in the human autophagy proteins are poorly conserved, indicating that these regions may have diverse functions in different homologs. We also show that IDRs predicted in human proteins contain several regions predicted to facilitate protein-protein interactions, and delineate the network of proteins that interact with each predicted IDR-containing autophagy protein, suggesting that many of these interactions may involve IDRs. Lastly, we experimentally show that a BCL2 homology 3 domain (BH3D), within the key autophagy effector BECN1 is an IDR. This BH3D undergoes a dramatic conformational change from coil to α-helix upon binding to BCL2s, with the C-terminal half of this BH3D constituting a binding motif, which serves to anchor the interaction of the BH3D to BCL2s. The information presented here will help inform future in-depth investigations of the biological role and mechanism of IDRs in autophagy proteins. PMID:24115198

  9. Disorder in milk proteins: caseins, intrinsically disordered colloids.

    PubMed

    Redwan, Elrashdy M; Xue, Bin; Almehdar, Hussein A; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    This article opens a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. The focus of this introductory article on caseins is symbolic, since caseins were among the first recognized functional unfolded proteins and since they are definitely the most disordered, the most abundant, and the most studied of all milk proteins. In eutherian milks, the casein family includes at least three and usually four major members (αs1-, αs2-, β-, and κ-caseins) that are unrelated in sequence. However, in some species, two different αS2-casein genes are active, and therefore the total number of caseins can be as high as five. These proteins have found a number of uses in food industry. The functional repertoire of caseins ranges from nutritional function to involvement in the improving and/or maintaining cardiovascular health, to crucial contribution to the milk capacity to transport calcium phosphate, to serve as molecular chaperones, and to protect the mother's mammary gland against amyloidoses and ectopic calcification. An intricate feature of caseins is their ability to assemble to colloidal protein particles, casein micelles, serving to sequester and transport amorphous calcium phosphate. These and many other functions of caseins are obviously dependent on their intrinsically disordered nature and are controlled by various posttranslational modifications. Since various aspects of casein structure and function are rather well studied and since several recent reviews emphasized the functional roles of caseins' intrinsic disorder, the major goal of this article is to show how intrinsic disorder is encoded in the amino acid sequences of these proteins.

  10. Characterization of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins by Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Scott, David J; Winzor, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins have traditionally been largely neglected by structural biologists because a lack of rigid structure precludes their study by X-ray crystallography. Structural information must therefore be inferred from physicochemical studies of their solution behavior. Analytical ultracentrifugation yields important information about the gross conformation of an intrinsically disordered protein. Sedimentation velocity studies provide estimates of the weight-average sedimentation and diffusion coefficients of a given macromolecular state of the protein. PMID:26412654

  11. Drugs for 'protein clouds': targeting intrinsically disordered transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2010-12-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are very attractive but difficult drug targets. The difficulties come from several directions including the binding promiscuity of TFs and the intrinsically disordered nature of their binding sites, which often resemble 'protein clouds'. For a long time the targeting of proteins without defined structures was considered infeasible. Data have now emerged showing that selective blocking of specific interactions of intrinsically disordered TFs with their protein binding partners is possible. Initial hits have been optimized to increase their specificity and affinity. Several strategies have been elaborated for elucidating the mechanisms of blocking of intrinsic disorder-based protein-protein interactions. However, challenges remain in the field of drug development for 'protein clouds'; such development is still in its earliest stage.

  12. Diffusion of Hydration Water around Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-10-22

    Hydration water dynamics around globular proteins have attracted considerable attention in the past decades. This work investigates the hydration water dynamics around partially/fully intrinsically disordered proteins and compares it to that of the globular proteins via molecular dynamics simulations. The translational diffusion of the hydration water is examined by evaluating the mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function, while the rotational diffusion is probed through the dipole-dipole time correlation function. The results reveal that the translational and rotational motions of water molecules at the surface of intrinsically disordered proteins/regions are less restricted as compared to those around globular proteins/ordered regions, which is reflected in their higher diffusion coefficient and lower orientational relaxation time. The restricted mobility of hydration water in the vicinity of the protein leads to a sublinear diffusion in a heterogeneous interface. A positive correlation between the mean number of hydrogen bonds and the diffusion coefficient of hydration water implies higher mobility of water molecules at the surface of disordered proteins, which is due to their higher number of hydrogen bonds. Enhanced hydration water mobility around disordered proteins/regions is also related to their higher hydration capacity, low hydrophobicity, and increased internal protein motions. Thus, we generalize that the intrinsically disordered proteins/regions are associated with higher hydration water mobility as compared to globular protein/ordered regions, which may help to elucidate their varied functional specificity.

  13. The unfoldomics decade: an update on intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dunker, A Keith; Oldfield, Christopher J; Meng, Jingwei; Romero, Pedro; Yang, Jack Y; Chen, Jessica Walton; Vacic, Vladimir; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2008-01-01

    Background Our first predictor of protein disorder was published just over a decade ago in the Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Neural Networks (Romero P, Obradovic Z, Kissinger C, Villafranca JE, Dunker AK (1997) Identifying disordered regions in proteins from amino acid sequence. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Neural Networks, 1: 90–95). By now more than twenty other laboratory groups have joined the efforts to improve the prediction of protein disorder. While the various prediction methodologies used for protein intrinsic disorder resemble those methodologies used for secondary structure prediction, the two types of structures are entirely different. For example, the two structural classes have very different dynamic properties, with the irregular secondary structure class being much less mobile than the disorder class. The prediction of secondary structure has been useful. On the other hand, the prediction of intrinsic disorder has been revolutionary, leading to major modifications of the more than 100 year-old views relating protein structure and function. Experimentalists have been providing evidence over many decades that some proteins lack fixed structure or are disordered (or unfolded) under physiological conditions. In addition, experimentalists are also showing that, for many proteins, their functions depend on the unstructured rather than structured state; such results are in marked contrast to the greater than hundred year old views such as the lock and key hypothesis. Despite extensive data on many important examples, including disease-associated proteins, the importance of disorder for protein function has been largely ignored. Indeed, to our knowledge, current biochemistry books don't present even one acknowledged example of a disorder-dependent function, even though some reports of disorder-dependent functions are more than 50 years old. The results from genome-wide predictions of intrinsic disorder and the

  14. Bioinformatical approaches to characterize intrinsically disordered/unstructured proteins.

    PubMed

    Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Mészáros, Bálint; Simon, István

    2010-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered/unstructured proteins exist without a stable three-dimensional (3D) structure as highly flexible conformational ensembles. The available genome sequences revealed that these proteins are surprisingly common and their frequency reaches high proportions in eukaryotes. Due to their vital role in various biological processes including signaling and regulation and their involvement in various diseases, disordered proteins and protein segments are the focus of many biochemical, molecular biological, pathological and pharmaceutical studies. These proteins are difficult to study experimentally because of the lack of unique structure in the isolated form. Their amino acid sequence, however, is available, and can be used for their identification and characterization by bioinformatic tools, analogously to globular proteins. In this review, we first present a small survey of current methods to identify disordered proteins or protein segments, focusing on those that are publicly available as web servers. In more detail we also discuss approaches that predict disordered regions and specific regions involved in protein binding by modeling the physical background of protein disorder. In our review we argue that the heterogeneity of disordered segments needs to be taken into account for a better understanding of protein disorder.

  15. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the "fly-casting" hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context.

  16. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M.; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the “fly-casting” hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context. PMID:27668217

  17. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the "fly-casting" hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context. PMID:27668217

  18. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M.; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the “fly-casting” hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context.

  19. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  20. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-07-03

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory's isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method.

  1. Computational approaches for inferring the functions of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Mihaly; Vranken, Wim; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are ubiquitously involved in cellular processes and often implicated in human pathological conditions. The critical biological roles of these proteins, despite not adopting a well-defined fold, encouraged structural biologists to revisit their views on the protein structure-function paradigm. Unfortunately, investigating the characteristics and describing the structural behavior of IDPs is far from trivial, and inferring the function(s) of a disordered protein region remains a major challenge. Computational methods have proven particularly relevant for studying IDPs: on the sequence level their dependence on distinct characteristics determined by the local amino acid context makes sequence-based prediction algorithms viable and reliable tools for large scale analyses, while on the structure level the in silico integration of fundamentally different experimental data types is essential to describe the behavior of a flexible protein chain. Here, we offer an overview of the latest developments and computational techniques that aim to uncover how protein function is connected to intrinsic disorder. PMID:26301226

  2. Elastin-like Polypeptides as Models of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Stefan; Dzuricky, Michael; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are a class of stimuli-responsive biopolymers inspired by the intrinsically disordered domains of tropoelastin that are composed of repeats of the VPGXG pentapeptide motif, where X is a “guest residue”. They undergo a reversible, thermally triggered lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase transition, which has been utilized for a variety of applications including protein purification, affinity capture, immunoassays, and drug delivery. ELPs have been extensively studied as protein polymers and as biomaterials, but their relationship to other disordered proteins has heretofore not been established. The biophysical properties of ELPs that lend them their unique material behavior are similar to the properties of many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP). Their low sequence complexity, phase behavior, and elastic properties make them an interesting “minimal” artificial IDP, and the study of ELPs can hence provide insights into the behavior of other more complex IDPs. Motivated by this emerging realization of the similarities between ELPs and IDPs, this review discusses the biophysical properties of ELPs, their biomedical utility, and their relationship to other disordered polypeptide sequences. PMID:26325592

  3. Intrinsic Structural Disorder Confers Cellular Viability on Oncogenic Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Hedi; Buday, László; Tompa, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations, which often generate chimeric proteins by fusing segments of two distinct genes, represent the single major genetic aberration leading to cancer. We suggest that the unifying theme of these events is a high level of intrinsic structural disorder, enabling fusion proteins to evade cellular surveillance mechanisms that eliminate misfolded proteins. Predictions in 406 translocation-related human proteins show that they are significantly enriched in disorder (43.3% vs. 20.7% in all human proteins), they have fewer Pfam domains, and their translocation breakpoints tend to avoid domain splitting. The vicinity of the breakpoint is significantly more disordered than the rest of these already highly disordered fusion proteins. In the unlikely event of domain splitting in fusion it usually spares much of the domain or splits at locations where the newly exposed hydrophobic surface area approximates that of an intact domain. The mechanisms of action of fusion proteins suggest that in most cases their structural disorder is also essential to the acquired oncogenic function, enabling the long-range structural communication of remote binding and/or catalytic elements. In this respect, there are three major mechanisms that contribute to generating an oncogenic signal: (i) a phosphorylation site and a tyrosine-kinase domain are fused, and structural disorder of the intervening region enables intramolecular phosphorylation (e.g., BCR-ABL); (ii) a dimerisation domain fuses with a tyrosine kinase domain and disorder enables the two subunits within the homodimer to engage in permanent intermolecular phosphorylations (e.g., TFG-ALK); (iii) the fusion of a DNA-binding element to a transactivator domain results in an aberrant transcription factor that causes severe misregulation of transcription (e.g. EWS-ATF). Our findings also suggest novel strategies of intervention against the ensuing neoplastic transformations. PMID:19888473

  4. Identification of Inhibitors of Biological Interactions Involving Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions involving disordered partners have unique features and represent prominent targets in drug discovery processes. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in cellular regulation, signaling and control: they bind to multiple partners and these high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases. Disordered regions, terminal tails and flexible linkers are particularly abundant in DNA-binding proteins and play crucial roles in the affinity and specificity of DNA recognizing processes. Protein complexes involving IDPs are short-lived and typically involve short amino acid stretches bearing few “hot spots”, thus the identification of molecules able to modulate them can produce important lead compounds: in this scenario peptides and/or peptidomimetics, deriving from structure-based, combinatorial or protein dissection approaches, can play a key role as hit compounds. Here, we propose a panoramic review of the structural features of IDPs and how they regulate molecular recognition mechanisms focusing attention on recently reported drug-design strategies in the field of IDPs. PMID:25849651

  5. Optimizing long intrinsic disorder predictors with protein evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith; Obradovic, Zoran

    2005-02-01

    Protein existing as an ensemble of structures, called intrinsically disordered, has been shown to be responsible for a wide variety of biological functions and to be common in nature. Here we focus on improving sequence-based predictions of long (>30 amino acid residues) regions lacking specific 3-D structure by means of four new neural-network-based Predictors Of Natural Disordered Regions (PONDRs): VL3, VL3H, VL3P, and VL3E. PONDR VL3 used several features from a previously introduced PONDR VL2, but benefitted from optimized predictor models and a slightly larger (152 vs. 145) set of disordered proteins that were cleaned of mislabeling errors found in the smaller set. PONDR VL3H utilized homologues of the disordered proteins in the training stage, while PONDR VL3P used attributes derived from sequence profiles obtained by PSI-BLAST searches. The measure of accuracy was the average between accuracies on disordered and ordered protein regions. By this measure, the 30-fold cross-validation accuracies of VL3, VL3H, and VL3P were, respectively, 83.6 +/- 1.4%, 85.3 +/- 1.4%, and 85.2 +/- 1.5%. By combining VL3H and VL3P, the resulting PONDR VL3E achieved an accuracy of 86.7 +/- 1.4%. This is a significant improvement over our previous PONDRs VLXT (71.6 +/- 1.3%) and VL2 (80.9 +/- 1.4%). The new disorder predictors with the corresponding datasets are freely accessible through the web server at http://www.ist.temple.edu/disprot.

  6. Chain Collapse of an Amyloidogenic Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neha; Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2011-01-01

    Natively unfolded or intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are under intense scrutiny due to their involvement in both normal biological functions and abnormal protein misfolding disorders. Polypeptide chain collapse of amyloidogenic IDPs is believed to play a key role in protein misfolding, oligomerization, and aggregation leading to amyloid fibril formation, which is implicated in a number of human diseases. In this work, we used bovine κ-casein, which serves as an archetypal model protein for amyloidogenic IDPs. Using a variety of biophysical tools involving both prediction and spectroscopic techniques, we first established that monomeric κ-casein adopts a collapsed premolten-globule-like conformational ensemble under physiological conditions. Our time-resolved fluorescence and light-scattering data indicate a change in the mean hydrodynamic radius from ∼4.6 nm to ∼1.9 nm upon chain collapse. We then took the advantage of two cysteines separated by 77 amino-acid residues and covalently labeled them using thiol-reactive pyrene maleimide. This dual-labeled protein demonstrated a strong excimer formation upon renaturation from urea- and acid-denatured states under both equilibrium and kinetic conditions, providing compelling evidence of polypeptide chain collapse under physiological conditions. The implication of the IDP chain collapse in protein aggregation and amyloid formation is also discussed. PMID:21961598

  7. Ensemble Calculation for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Using NMR Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kragelj, Jaka; Blackledge, Martin; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) perform their function despite their lack of well-defined tertiary structure. Residual structure has been observed in IDPs, commonly described as transient/dynamic or expressed in terms of fractional populations. In order to understand how the protein primary sequence dictates the dynamic and structural properties of IDPs and in general to understand how IDPs function, atomic-level descriptions are needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides information about local and long-range structure in IDPs at amino acid specific resolution and can be used in combination with ensemble descriptions to represent the dynamic nature of IDPs. In this chapter we describe sample-and-select approaches for ensemble modelling of local structural propensities in IDPs with specific emphasis on validation of these ensembles. PMID:26387101

  8. Molecular signaling involving intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Anna; Manna, Sara La; Novellino, Ettore; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Marasco, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on cellular protein interaction networks (PINs) reveal that proteins that constitute hubs in a PIN are notably enriched in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) compared to proteins that constitute edges, highlighting the role of IDPs in signaling pathways. Most IDPs rapidly undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their biological targets to perform their function. Conformational dynamics enables IDPs to be versatile and to interact with a broad range of interactors under normal physiological conditions where their expression is tightly modulated. IDPs are involved in many cellular processes such as cellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, and splicing; thus, their high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases including cancer. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in men worldwide. Therefore, identifying molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic signaling pathways that are involved in prostate carcinogenesis is crucial. In this review, we focus on the aspects of cellular pathways leading to PCa in which IDPs exert a primary role. PMID:27212129

  9. Pan1 is an intrinsically disordered protein with homotypic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, B. D.; Toptygin, D.; Wendland, B.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast scaffold protein Pan1 contains two EH domains at its N-terminus, a predicted coiled-coil central region, and a C-terminal proline-rich domain. Pan1 is also predicted to contain regions of intrinsic disorder, characteristic of proteins that have many binding partners. In vitro biochemical data suggest that Pan1 exists as a dimer, and we have identified amino acids 705–848 as critical for this homotypic interaction. Tryptophan fluorescence was used to further characterize Pan1 conformational states. Pan1 contains four endogenous tryptophans, each in a distinct region of the protein: Trp312 and Trp642 are each in an EH domain, Trp957 is in the central region, and Trp1280 is a critical residue in the Arp2/3 activation domain. To examine the local environment of each of these tryptophans, three of the four tryptophans were mutagenized to phenylalanine to create four proteins, each with only one tryptophan residue. When quenched with acrylamide, these single tryptophan mutants appeared to undergo collisional quenching exclusively and were moderately accessible to the acrylamide molecule. Quenching with iodide or cesium, however, revealed different Stern-Volmer constants due to unique electrostatic environments of the tryptophan residues. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data confirmed structural and disorder predictions of Pan1. Further experimentation to fully develop a model of Pan1 conformational dynamics will assist in a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of endocytosis. PMID:23801378

  10. A structural perspective of RNA recognition by intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sushmita; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-11-01

    Protein-RNA recognition is essential for gene expression and its regulation, which is indispensable for the survival of the living organism at one hand, on the other hand, misregulation of this recognition may lead to their extinction. Polymorphic conformation of both the interacting partners is a characteristic feature of such molecular recognition that promotes the assembly. Many RNA binding proteins (RBP) or regions in them are found to be intrinsically disordered, and this property helps them to play a central role in the regulatory processes. Sequence composition and the length of the flexible linkers between RNA binding domains in RBPs are crucial in making significant contacts with its partner RNA. Polymorphic conformations of RBPs can provide thermodynamic advantage to its binding partner while acting as a chaperone. Prolonged extensions of the disordered regions in RBPs also contribute to the stability of the large cellular machines including ribosome and viral assemblies. The involvement of these disordered regions in most of the significant cellular processes makes RBPs highly associated with various human diseases that arise due to their misregulation.

  11. Evolutionarily Conserved Network Properties of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Nivedita; Kulkarni, Prakash; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Background Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack a stable tertiary structure in isolation. Remarkably, however, a substantial portion of IDPs undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their cognate partners. Structural flexibility and binding plasticity enable IDPs to interact with a broad range of partners. However, the broader network properties that could provide additional insights into the functional role of IDPs are not known. Results Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of network properties of IDP-induced sub-networks in multiple species from yeast to human. Our results show that IDPs exhibit greater-than-expected modularity and are connected to the rest of the protein interaction network (PIN) via proteins that exhibit the highest betweenness centrality and connect to fewer-than-expected IDP communities, suggesting that they form critical communication links from IDP modules to the rest of the PIN. Moreover, we found that IDPs are enriched at the top level of regulatory hierarchy. Conclusion Overall, our analyses reveal coherent and remarkably conserved IDP-centric network properties, namely, modularity in IDP-induced network and a layer of critical nodes connecting IDPs with the rest of the PIN. PMID:25974317

  12. High-throughput characterization of intrinsic disorder in proteins from the Protein Structure Initiative.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derrick E; Xue, Bin; Sickmeier, Megan D; Meng, Jingwei; Cortese, Marc S; Oldfield, Christopher J; Le Gall, Tanguy; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2012-10-01

    The identification of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) among the targets that fail to form satisfactory crystal structures in the Protein Structure Initiative represents a key to reducing the costs and time for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins. To help in this endeavor, several Protein Structure Initiative Centers were asked to send samples of both crystallizable proteins and proteins that failed to crystallize. The abundance of intrinsic disorder in these proteins was evaluated via computational analysis using predictors of natural disordered regions (PONDR®) and the potential cleavage sites and corresponding fragments were determined. Then, the target proteins were analyzed for intrinsic disorder by their resistance to limited proteolysis. The rates of tryptic digestion of sample target proteins were compared to those of lysozyme/myoglobin, apomyoglobin, and α-casein as standards of ordered, partially disordered and completely disordered proteins, respectively. At the next stage, the protein samples were subjected to both far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism (CD) analysis. For most of the samples, a good agreement between CD data, predictions of disorder and the rates of limited tryptic digestion was established. Further experimentation is being performed on a smaller subset of these samples in order to obtain more detailed information on the ordered/disordered nature of the proteins.

  13. Rapid Evolution of Virus Sequences in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hagai, Tzachi; LaBarbera, Anthony; Solovey, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Nodamura Virus (NoV) is a nodavirus originally isolated from insects that can replicate in a wide variety of hosts, including mammals. Because of their simplicity and ability to replicate in many diverse hosts, NoV, and the Nodaviridae in general, provide a unique window into the evolution of viruses and host-virus interactions. Here we show that the C-terminus of the viral polymerase exhibits extreme structural and evolutionary flexibility. Indeed, fewer than 10 positively charged residues from the 110 amino acid-long C-terminal region of protein A are required to support RNA1 replication. Strikingly, this region can be replaced by completely unrelated protein sequences, yet still produce a functional replicase. Structure predictions, as well as evolutionary and mutational analyses, indicate that the C-terminal region is structurally disordered and evolves faster than the rest of the viral proteome. Thus, the function of an intrinsically unstructured protein region can be independent of most of its primary sequence, conferring both functional robustness and sequence plasticity on the protein. Our results provide an experimental explanation for rapid evolution of unstructured regions, which enables an effective exploration of the sequence space, and likely function space, available to the virus. PMID:25502394

  14. Rapid evolution of virus sequences in intrinsically disordered protein regions.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hagai, Tzachi; LaBarbera, Anthony; Solovey, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2014-12-01

    Nodamura Virus (NoV) is a nodavirus originally isolated from insects that can replicate in a wide variety of hosts, including mammals. Because of their simplicity and ability to replicate in many diverse hosts, NoV, and the Nodaviridae in general, provide a unique window into the evolution of viruses and host-virus interactions. Here we show that the C-terminus of the viral polymerase exhibits extreme structural and evolutionary flexibility. Indeed, fewer than 10 positively charged residues from the 110 amino acid-long C-terminal region of protein A are required to support RNA1 replication. Strikingly, this region can be replaced by completely unrelated protein sequences, yet still produce a functional replicase. Structure predictions, as well as evolutionary and mutational analyses, indicate that the C-terminal region is structurally disordered and evolves faster than the rest of the viral proteome. Thus, the function of an intrinsically unstructured protein region can be independent of most of its primary sequence, conferring both functional robustness and sequence plasticity on the protein. Our results provide an experimental explanation for rapid evolution of unstructured regions, which enables an effective exploration of the sequence space, and likely function space, available to the virus. PMID:25502394

  15. Calibrated Langevin-dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. Wendell; Ho, Po-Yi; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2014-10-01

    We perform extensive coarse-grained (CG) Langevin dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which possess fluctuating conformational statistics between that for excluded volume random walks and collapsed globules. Our CG model includes repulsive steric, attractive hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions between residues and is calibrated to a large collection of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer data on the interresidue separations for 36 pairs of residues in five IDPs: α-, β-, and γ-synuclein, the microtubule-associated protein τ, and prothymosin α. We find that our CG model is able to recapitulate the average interresidue separations regardless of the choice of the hydrophobicity scale, which shows that our calibrated model can robustly capture the conformational dynamics of IDPs. We then employ our model to study the scaling of the radius of gyration with chemical distance in 11 known IDPs. We identify a strong correlation between the distance to the dividing line between folded proteins and IDPs in the mean charge and hydrophobicity space and the scaling exponent of the radius of gyration with chemical distance along the protein.

  16. Dihedral angle entropy measures for intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Cukier, Robert I

    2015-03-01

    Protein stability is based on a delicate balance between energetic and entropic factors. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) interacting with a folded partner protein in the act of binding can order the IDP to form the correct functional interface by decrease in the overall free energy. In this work, we evaluate the part of the entropic cost of ordering an IDP arising from their dihedral states. The IDP studied is a leucine zipper dimer that we simulate with molecular dynamics and find that it does show disorder in six phi and psi dihedral angles of the N terminal sequence of one monomer. Essential to ascertain is the degree of disorder in the IDP, and we do so by considering the entire, discretized probability distribution function of N dihedrals with M conformers per dihedral. A compositional clustering method is introduced, whereby the NS = N(M) states are formed from the Cartesian product of each dihedral's conformational space. Clustering is carried out with a version of a k-means algorithm that accounts for the circular nature of dihedral angles. For the 12 dihedrals each found to have three conformers, among the resulting 531441 states, their populations show that the first 100 (500) most populated states account for ∼65% (∼90%) of the entire population, indicating that there are strong dependencies among the dihedrals' conformations. These state populations are used to evaluate a Kullback-Leibler divergence entropy measure and obtain the dihedral configurational entropy S. At 300 K, TS ∼ 3 kcal/mol, showing that IDP entropy, while roughly half that would be expected from independently distributed dihedrals, can be a decisive contributor to the free energy of this IDP binding and ordering.

  17. Experimental Inferential Structure Determination of Ensembles for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Brookes, David H; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    We develop a Bayesian approach to determine the most probable structural ensemble model from candidate structures for intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that takes full advantage of NMR chemical shifts and J-coupling data, their known errors and variances, and the quality of the theoretical back-calculation from structure to experimental observables. Our approach differs from previous formulations in the optimization of experimental and back-calculation nuisance parameters that are treated as random variables with known distributions, as opposed to structural or ensemble weight optimization or use of a reference ensemble. The resulting experimental inferential structure determination (EISD) method is size extensive with O(N) scaling, with N = number of structures, that allows for the rapid ranking of large ensemble data comprising tens of thousands of conformations. We apply the EISD approach on singular folded proteins and a corresponding set of ∼25 000 misfolded states to illustrate the problems that can arise using Boltzmann weighted priors. We then apply the EISD method to rank IDP ensembles most consistent with the NMR data and show that the primary error for ranking or creating good IDP ensembles resides in the poor back-calculation from structure to simulated experimental observable. We show that a reduction by a factor of 3 in the uncertainty of the back-calculation error can improve the discrimination among qualitatively different IDP ensembles for the amyloid-beta peptide.

  18. Phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer: role of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Steven M; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Levine, Herbert; Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    A striking characteristic of cancer cells is their remarkable phenotypic plasticity, which is the ability to switch states or phenotypes in response to environmental fluctuations. Phenotypic changes such as a partial or complete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) that play important roles in their survival and proliferation, and development of resistance to therapeutic treatments, are widely believed to arise due to somatic mutations in the genome. However, there is a growing concern that such a deterministic view is not entirely consistent with multiple lines of evidence, which indicate that stochasticity may also play an important role in driving phenotypic plasticity. Here, we discuss how stochasticity in protein interaction networks (PINs) may play a key role in determining phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer (PCa). Specifically, we point out that the key players driving transitions among different phenotypes (epithelial, mesenchymal, and hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal), including ZEB1, SNAI1, OVOL1, and OVOL2, are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and discuss how plasticity at the molecular level may contribute to stochasticity in phenotypic switching by rewiring PINs. We conclude by suggesting that targeting IDPs implicated in EMT in PCa may be a new strategy to gain additional insights and develop novel treatments for this disease, which is the most common form of cancer in adult men. PMID:27427552

  19. Phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer: role of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Steven M; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Levine, Herbert; Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    A striking characteristic of cancer cells is their remarkable phenotypic plasticity, which is the ability to switch states or phenotypes in response to environmental fluctuations. Phenotypic changes such as a partial or complete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) that play important roles in their survival and proliferation, and development of resistance to therapeutic treatments, are widely believed to arise due to somatic mutations in the genome. However, there is a growing concern that such a deterministic view is not entirely consistent with multiple lines of evidence, which indicate that stochasticity may also play an important role in driving phenotypic plasticity. Here, we discuss how stochasticity in protein interaction networks (PINs) may play a key role in determining phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer (PCa). Specifically, we point out that the key players driving transitions among different phenotypes (epithelial, mesenchymal, and hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal), including ZEB1, SNAI1, OVOL1, and OVOL2, are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and discuss how plasticity at the molecular level may contribute to stochasticity in phenotypic switching by rewiring PINs. We conclude by suggesting that targeting IDPs implicated in EMT in PCa may be a new strategy to gain additional insights and develop novel treatments for this disease, which is the most common form of cancer in adult men. PMID:27427552

  20. Dancing Protein Clouds: The Strange Biology and Chaotic Physics of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-03-25

    Biologically active but floppy proteins represent a new reality of modern protein science. These intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and hybrid proteins containing ordered and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) constitute a noticeable part of any given proteome. Functionally, they complement ordered proteins, and their conformational flexibility and structural plasticity allow them to perform impossible tricks and be engaged in biological activities that are inaccessible to well folded proteins with their unique structures. The major goals of this minireview are to show that, despite their simplified amino acid sequences, IDPs/IDPRs are complex entities often resembling chaotic systems, are structurally and functionally heterogeneous, and can be considered an important part of the structure-function continuum. Furthermore, IDPs/IDPRs are everywhere, and are ubiquitously engaged in various interactions characterized by a wide spectrum of binding scenarios and an even wider spectrum of structural and functional outputs. PMID:26851286

  1. Dancing Protein Clouds: The Strange Biology and Chaotic Physics of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-03-25

    Biologically active but floppy proteins represent a new reality of modern protein science. These intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and hybrid proteins containing ordered and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) constitute a noticeable part of any given proteome. Functionally, they complement ordered proteins, and their conformational flexibility and structural plasticity allow them to perform impossible tricks and be engaged in biological activities that are inaccessible to well folded proteins with their unique structures. The major goals of this minireview are to show that, despite their simplified amino acid sequences, IDPs/IDPRs are complex entities often resembling chaotic systems, are structurally and functionally heterogeneous, and can be considered an important part of the structure-function continuum. Furthermore, IDPs/IDPRs are everywhere, and are ubiquitously engaged in various interactions characterized by a wide spectrum of binding scenarios and an even wider spectrum of structural and functional outputs.

  2. Autophagy-related intrinsically disordered proteins in intra-nuclear compartments.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Meng, Fanchi; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-16

    Recent analyses indicated that autophagy can be regulated via some nuclear transcriptional networks and many important players in the autophagy and other forms of programmed cell death are known to be intrinsically disordered. To this end, we analyzed similarities and differences in the intrinsic disorder distribution of nuclear and non-nuclear proteins related to autophagy. We also looked at the peculiarities of the distribution of the intrinsically disordered autophagy-related proteins in various intra-nuclear organelles, such as the nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinucleolar compartment. This analysis revealed that the autophagy-related proteins constitute about 2.5% of the non-nuclear proteins and 3.3% of the nuclear proteins, which corresponds to a substantial enrichment by about 32% in the nucleus. Curiously, although, in general, the autophagy-related proteins share similar characteristics of disorder with a generic set of all non-nuclear proteins, chromatin and nuclear speckles are enriched in the intrinsically disordered autophagy proteins (29 and 37% of these proteins are disordered, respectively) and have high disorder content at 0.24 and 0.27, respectively. Therefore, our data suggest that some of the nuclear disordered proteins may play important roles in autophagy.

  3. Origins of Myc Proteins – Using Intrinsic Protein Disorder to Trace Distant Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Mahani, Amir; Henriksson, Johan; Wright, Anthony P. H.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Myc proteins are important determinants of cell proliferation as well as the undifferentiated state of stem cells and their activity is frequently deregulated in cancer. Based mainly on conservation in the C-terminal DNA-binding and dimerization domain, Myc-like proteins have been reported in many simpler organisms within and outside the Metazoa but they have not been found in fungi or plants. Several important signature motifs defining mammalian Myc proteins are found in the N-terminal domain but the extent to which these are found in the Myc-like proteins from simpler organisms is not well established. The extent of N-terminal signature sequence conservation would give important insights about the evolution of Myc proteins and their current function in mammalian physiology and disease. In a systematic study of Myc-like proteins we show that N-terminal signature motifs are not readily detectable in individual Myc-like proteins from invertebrates but that weak similarities to Myc boxes 1 and 2 can be found in the N-termini of the simplest Metazoa as well as the unicellular choanoflagellate, Monosiga brevicollis, using multiple protein alignments. Phylogenetic support for the connections of these proteins to established Myc proteins is however poor. We show that the pattern of predicted protein disorder along the length of Myc proteins can be used as a complementary approach to making dendrograms of Myc proteins that aids the classification of Myc proteins. This suggests that the pattern of disorder within Myc proteins is more conserved through evolution than their amino acid sequence. In the disorder-based dendrograms the Myc-like proteins from simpler organisms, including M. brevicollis, are connected to established Myc proteins with a higher degree of certainty. Our results suggest that protein disorder based dendrograms may be of general significance for studying distant relationships between proteins, such as transcription factors, that have high

  4. Consequences of inducing intrinsic disorder in a high-affinity protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Grigorios; Sharma, Amit; Lancaster, Lorna E; Bowen, Rebecca; Kaminska, Renata; Leech, Andrew P; Walker, Daniel; Redfield, Christina; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-04-29

    The kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of intrinsic disorder in protein-protein recognition are controversial. We address this by inducing one partner of the high-affinity colicin E3 rRNase domain-Im3 complex (K(d) ≈ 10(-12) M) to become an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). Through a variety of biophysical measurements, we show that a single alanine mutation at Tyr507 within the hydrophobic core of the isolated colicin E3 rRNase domain causes the enzyme to become an IDP (E3 rRNase(IDP)). E3 rRNase(IDP) binds stoichiometrically to Im3 and forms a structure that is essentially identical to the wild-type complex. However, binding of E3 rRNase(IDP) to Im3 is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than that of the folded rRNase, with thermodynamic parameters reflecting the disorder-to-order transition on forming the complex. Critically, pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the E3 rRNase(IDP)-Im3 complex demonstrates that the decrease in affinity is mostly accounted for by a drop in the electrostatically steered association rate. Our study shows that, notwithstanding the advantages intrinsic disorder brings to biological systems, this can come at severe kinetic and thermodynamic cost. PMID:25856265

  5. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions. PMID:26712748

  6. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-12-25

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions.

  7. Protein intrinsic disorder within the Potyvirus genus: from proteome-wide analysis to functional annotation.

    PubMed

    Charon, Justine; Theil, Sébastien; Nicaise, Valérie; Michon, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    Within proteins, intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are devoid of stable secondary and tertiary structures under physiological conditions and rather exist as dynamic ensembles of inter-converting conformers. Although ubiquitous in all domains of life, the intrinsic disorder content is highly variable in viral genomes. Over the years, functional annotations of disordered regions at the scale of the whole proteome have been conducted for several animal viruses. But to date, similar studies applied to plant viruses are still missing. Based on disorder prediction tools combined with annotation programs and evolutionary studies, we analyzed the intrinsic disorder content in Potyvirus, using a 10-species dataset representative of this genus diversity. In this paper, we revealed that: (i) the Potyvirus proteome displays high disorder content, (ii) disorder is conserved during Potyvirus evolution, suggesting a functional advantage of IDRs, (iii) IDRs evolve faster than ordered regions, and (iv) IDRs may be associated with major biological functions required for the Potyvirus cycle. Notably, the proteins P1, Coat protein (CP) and Viral genome-linked protein (VPg) display a high content of conserved disorder, enriched in specific motifs mimicking eukaryotic functional modules and suggesting strategies of host machinery hijacking. In these three proteins, IDRs are particularly conserved despite their high amino acid polymorphism, indicating a link to adaptive processes. Through this comprehensive study, we further investigate the biological relevance of intrinsic disorder in Potyvirus biology and we propose a functional annotation of potyviral proteome IDRs. PMID:26699268

  8. Protein intrinsic disorder within the Potyvirus genus: from proteome-wide analysis to functional annotation.

    PubMed

    Charon, Justine; Theil, Sébastien; Nicaise, Valérie; Michon, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    Within proteins, intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are devoid of stable secondary and tertiary structures under physiological conditions and rather exist as dynamic ensembles of inter-converting conformers. Although ubiquitous in all domains of life, the intrinsic disorder content is highly variable in viral genomes. Over the years, functional annotations of disordered regions at the scale of the whole proteome have been conducted for several animal viruses. But to date, similar studies applied to plant viruses are still missing. Based on disorder prediction tools combined with annotation programs and evolutionary studies, we analyzed the intrinsic disorder content in Potyvirus, using a 10-species dataset representative of this genus diversity. In this paper, we revealed that: (i) the Potyvirus proteome displays high disorder content, (ii) disorder is conserved during Potyvirus evolution, suggesting a functional advantage of IDRs, (iii) IDRs evolve faster than ordered regions, and (iv) IDRs may be associated with major biological functions required for the Potyvirus cycle. Notably, the proteins P1, Coat protein (CP) and Viral genome-linked protein (VPg) display a high content of conserved disorder, enriched in specific motifs mimicking eukaryotic functional modules and suggesting strategies of host machinery hijacking. In these three proteins, IDRs are particularly conserved despite their high amino acid polymorphism, indicating a link to adaptive processes. Through this comprehensive study, we further investigate the biological relevance of intrinsic disorder in Potyvirus biology and we propose a functional annotation of potyviral proteome IDRs.

  9. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry of Intrinsically Unfolded Proteins: Trying to Put Order into Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Knapman, T. W; Valette, N. M; Warriner, S. L; Ashcroft, A. E

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins do not adopt well-defined native structures and therefore present an intriguing challenge in terms of structural elucidation as they are relatively inaccessible to traditional approaches such as NMR and X-ray crystallography. Many members of this important group of proteins have a distinct biological function and frequently undergo a conformational change on binding to their physiological targets which can in turn modulate their function. Furthermore, many intrinsically unstructured proteins are associated with a wide range of major diseases including cancer and amyloid-related disorders. Here, electrospray ionisation-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-MS) has been used to probe the conformational characteristics of two intrinsically disordered proteins: apo-cytochrome c and apo-osteocalcin. Both proteins are structured in their holo-states when bound to their respective substrates, but disordered in their apo-states. Here, the conformational properties of the holo- and the apo-protein forms for both species have been analysed and their mass spectral data and ion mobility spectrometry-derived collision cross-sectional areas, indicative of their physical size, compared to study the relationship between substrate binding and tertiary structure. In both cases, the intrinsically unstructured apo-states populated multiple conformations with larger cross-sectional areas than their holo-analogues, suggesting that intrinsic disorder in proteins does not preclude the formation of preferred conformations. Additionally, analysis of truncated analogues of osteocalcin has located the region of the protein responsible for the conformational changes detected upon metal cation binding. Together, the data illustrate the scope and utility of ESI-IMS-MS for studying the characteristics and properties of intrinsically disordered proteins whose analysis by other techniques is limited. PMID:23885220

  10. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J.; Weik, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity. PMID:25774711

  11. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J; Weik, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  12. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J.; Weik, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  13. MobiDB 2.0: an improved database of intrinsically disordered and mobile proteins

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Emilio; Domenico, Tomás Di; Walsh, Ian; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2015-01-01

    MobiDB (http://mobidb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of intrinsically disordered and mobile proteins. Intrinsically disordered regions are key for the function of numerous proteins. Here we provide a new version of MobiDB, a centralized source aimed at providing the most complete picture on different flavors of disorder in protein structures covering all UniProt sequences (currently over 80 million). The database features three levels of annotation: manually curated, indirect and predicted. Manually curated data is extracted from the DisProt database. Indirect data is inferred from PDB structures that are considered an indication of intrinsic disorder. The 10 predictors currently included (three ESpritz flavors, two IUPred flavors, two DisEMBL flavors, GlobPlot, VSL2b and JRONN) enable MobiDB to provide disorder annotations for every protein in absence of more reliable data. The new version also features a consensus annotation and classification for long disordered regions. In order to complement the disorder annotations, MobiDB features additional annotations from external sources. Annotations from the UniProt database include post-translational modifications and linear motifs. Pfam annotations are displayed in graphical form and are link-enabled, allowing the user to visit the corresponding Pfam page for further information. Experimental protein–protein interactions from STRING are also classified for disorder content. PMID:25361972

  14. Relating sequence encoded information to form and function of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Ruff, Kiersten M.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) showcase the importance of conformational plasticity and heterogeneity in protein function. We summarize recent advances that connect information encoded in IDP sequences to their conformational properties and functions. We focus on insights obtained through a combination of atomistic simulations and biophysical measurements that are synthesized into a coherent framework using polymer physics theories. PMID:25863585

  15. Functional Advantages of Conserved Intrinsic Disorder in RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Mihaly; Zsolyomi, Fruzsina; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Proteins form large macromolecular assemblies with RNA that govern essential molecular processes. RNA-binding proteins have often been associated with conformational flexibility, yet the extent and functional implications of their intrinsic disorder have never been fully assessed. Here, through large-scale analysis of comprehensive protein sequence and structure datasets we demonstrate the prevalence of intrinsic structural disorder in RNA-binding proteins and domains. We addressed their functionality through a quantitative description of the evolutionary conservation of disordered segments involved in binding, and investigated the structural implications of flexibility in terms of conformational stability and interface formation. We conclude that the functional role of intrinsically disordered protein segments in RNA-binding is two-fold: first, these regions establish extended, conserved electrostatic interfaces with RNAs via induced fit. Second, conformational flexibility enables them to target different RNA partners, providing multi-functionality, while also ensuring specificity. These findings emphasize the functional importance of intrinsically disordered regions in RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26439842

  16. Modulation of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Function by Post-translational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Bah, Alaji; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2016-03-25

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) produce significant changes in the structural properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) by affecting their energy landscapes. PTMs can induce a range of effects, from local stabilization or destabilization of transient secondary structure to global disorder-to-order transitions, potentially driving complete state changes between intrinsically disordered and folded states or dispersed monomeric and phase-separated states. Here, we discuss diverse biological processes that are dependent on PTM regulation of IDPs. We also present recent tools for generating homogenously modified IDPs for studies of PTM-mediated IDP regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26851279

  17. A critical evaluation of in silico methods for detection of membrane protein intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Edward E; Wiener, Michael C

    2014-04-15

    Intrinsically disordered regions in proteins possess important biological roles including transcriptional regulation, molecular recognition, and provision of sites for posttranslational modification. In three-dimensional crystallization of both soluble and membrane proteins, identification and removal of disordered regions is often necessary for obtaining crystals possessing sufficient long-range order for structure determination. Disordered regions can be identified experimentally, with techniques such as limited proteolysis coupled with mass spectrometry, or computationally, by using disorder prediction programs, of which many are available. Although these programs use various methods to predict disorder from a protein's primary sequence, they all were developed using information derived from soluble protein structures. Therefore, their performance and accuracy when applied to integral membrane proteins remained an open question. We evaluated the performance of 13 disorder prediction programs on a dataset containing 343 membrane proteins, and upon subdatasets containing only α-helical or β-barrel proteins. These programs were ranked using multiple metrics, including metrics specifically created for membrane proteins. Analysis of these data shows a clear distinction between programs that accurately predict disordered regions in membrane proteins and programs which perform poorly, and allows for the robust integration of in silico disorder prediction into our PSI:Biology membrane protein structural genomics pipeline.

  18. Expanding the proteome of an RNA virus by phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered viral protein.

    PubMed

    Cordek, Daniel G; Croom-Perez, Tayler J; Hwang, Jungwook; Hargittai, Michele R S; Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Han, Qingxia; Lodeiro, Maria Fernanda; Ning, Gang; McCrory, Thomas S; Arnold, Jamie J; Koc, Hasan; Lindenbach, Brett D; Showalter, Scott A; Cameron, Craig E

    2014-08-29

    The human proteome contains myriad intrinsically disordered proteins. Within intrinsically disordered proteins, polyproline-II motifs are often located near sites of phosphorylation. We have used an unconventional experimental paradigm to discover that phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA) occurs in the intrinsically disordered domain of hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) on Thr-2332 near one of its polyproline-II motifs. Phosphorylation shifts the conformational ensemble of the NS5A intrinsically disordered domain to a state that permits detection of the polyproline motif by using (15)N-, (13)C-based multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. PKA-dependent proline resonances were lost in the presence of the Src homology 3 domain of c-Src, consistent with formation of a complex. Changing Thr-2332 to alanine in hepatitis C virus genotype 1b reduced the steady-state level of RNA by 10-fold; this change was lethal for genotype 2a. The lethal phenotype could be rescued by changing Thr-2332 to glutamic acid, a phosphomimetic substitution. Immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy showed that the inability to produce Thr(P)-2332-NS5A caused loss of integrity of the virus-induced membranous web/replication organelle. An even more extreme phenotype was observed in the presence of small molecule inhibitors of PKA. We conclude that the PKA-phosphorylated form of NS5A exhibits unique structure and function relative to the unphosphorylated protein. We suggest that post-translational modification of viral proteins containing intrinsic disorder may be a general mechanism to expand the viral proteome without a corresponding expansion of the genome. PMID:25031324

  19. Structural Diversity in Free and Bound States of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.A.; Allaire, M.; Dancheck, B.; Ragusa, M.J.; Forman-Kay, J.D.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2010-09-08

    Complete folding is not a prerequisite for protein function, as disordered and partially folded states of proteins frequently perform essential biological functions. In order to understand their functions at the molecular level, we utilized diverse experimental measurements to calculate ensemble models of three nonhomologous, intrinsically disordered proteins: I-2, spinophilin, and DARPP-32, which bind to and regulate protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). The models demonstrate that these proteins have dissimilar propensities for secondary and tertiary structure in their unbound forms. Direct comparison of these ensemble models with recently determined PP1 complex structures suggests a significant role for transient, preformed structure in the interactions of these proteins with PP1. Finally, we generated an ensemble model of partially disordered I-2 bound to PP1 that provides insight into the relationship between flexibility and biological function in this dynamic complex.

  20. Intrinsic Disorder-Based Design of Stabilizing Disulphide Bridge in Gαo Protein.

    PubMed

    Nagibina, Galina S; Tin, Ulyana F; Glukhov, Anatoly S; Melnik, Tatiana N; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have used an approach that allows us to determine in what region of the polypeptide chain of protein it is required to insert a disulphide bond in order to stabilize it. In our previous paper [Melnik et al., JBSD. 2012] it was proposed that to search for a "weak" site in the protein, it is possible to use programs (for example, PONDR-FIT and IsUnstruct) finding intrinsic disorder protein regions. We suggested that in structured globular proteins, such programs predict not protein regions in the polypeptide chain disordered under native conditions, but "weakened", feebly stabilized ones. Accordingly, an artificial introduction of SS-bridges using mutations in such regions would reliably result in the protein stabilization. We have taken advantage of this approach to stabilize protein Gαo from Drosophila melanogaster. The designed SS-bridge increased by 4 degrees the melting temperature of one domain of protein Gαo.

  1. Direct correlation of consecutive C'-N groups in proteins: a method for the assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Santoro, Jorge

    2013-09-01

    Two novel 3D (13)C-detected experiments, hNcocaNCO and hnCOcaNCO, are proposed to facilitate the resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins. The experiments correlate the (15)N and (13)C' chemical shifts of two consecutive amide moieties without involving other nuclei, thus taking advantage of the good dispersion shown by the (15)N-(13)C' correlations, even for proteins that lack a well defined tertiary structure. The new pulse sequences were successfully tested using Nupr1, an intrinsically disordered protein of 93 residues.

  2. RNA chaperoning and intrinsic disorder in the core proteins of Flaviviridae

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Gabus, Caroline; Ficheux, Damien; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    RNA chaperone proteins are essential partners of RNA in living organisms and viruses. They are thought to assist in the correct folding and structural rearrangements of RNA molecules by resolving misfolded RNA species in an ATP-independent manner. RNA chaperoning is probably an entropy-driven process, mediated by the coupled binding and folding of intrinsically disordered protein regions and the kinetically trapped RNA. Previously, we have shown that the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a potent RNA chaperone that can drive profound structural modifications of HCV RNA in vitro. We now examined the RNA chaperone activity and the disordered nature of core proteins from different Flaviviridae genera, namely that of HCV, GBV-B (GB virus B), WNV (West Nile virus) and BVDV (bovine viral diarrhoea virus). Despite low-sequence similarities, all four proteins demonstrated general nucleic acid annealing and RNA chaperone activities. Furthermore, heat resistance of core proteins, as well as far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested that a well-defined 3D protein structure is not necessary for core-induced RNA structural rearrangements. These data provide evidence that RNA chaperoning—possibly mediated by intrinsically disordered protein segments—is conserved in Flaviviridae core proteins. Thus, besides nucleocapsid formation, core proteins may function in RNA structural rearrangements taking place during virus replication. PMID:18033802

  3. Ligand clouds around protein clouds: a scenario of ligand binding with intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fan; Yu, Chen; Lai, Luhua; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) were found to be widely associated with human diseases and may serve as potential drug design targets. However, drug design targeting IDPs is still in the very early stages. Progress in drug design is usually achieved using experimental screening; however, the structural disorder of IDPs makes it difficult to characterize their interaction with ligands using experiments alone. To better understand the structure of IDPs and their interactions with small molecule ligands, we performed extensive simulations on the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide and its binding to a reported small molecule inhibitor, ligand 10074-A4. We found that the conformational space of the apo c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide was rather dispersed and that the conformations of the peptide were stabilized mainly by charge interactions and hydrogen bonds. Under the binding of the ligand, c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ remained disordered. The ligand was found to bind to c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ at different sites along the chain and behaved like a 'ligand cloud'. In contrast to ligand binding to more rigid target proteins that usually results in a dominant bound structure, ligand binding to IDPs may better be described as ligand clouds around protein clouds. Nevertheless, the binding of the ligand and a non-ligand to the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ target could be clearly distinguished. The present study provides insights that will help improve rational drug design that targets IDPs.

  4. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease.

  5. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  6. Liquid demixing of intrinsically disordered proteins is seeded by poly(ADP-ribose)

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Neelsen, Kai J.; Teloni, Federico; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Pellegrino, Stefania; Grøfte, Merete; Rask, Maj-Britt Druedahl; Streicher, Werner; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Nielsen, Michael Lund; Lukas, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can phase separate from the soluble intracellular space, and tend to aggregate under pathological conditions. The physiological functions and molecular triggers of liquid demixing by phase separation are not well understood. Here we show in vitro and in vivo that the nucleic acid-mimicking biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) nucleates intracellular liquid demixing. PAR levels are markedly induced at sites of DNA damage, and we provide evidence that PAR-seeded liquid demixing results in rapid, yet transient and fully reversible assembly of various intrinsically disordered proteins at DNA break sites. Demixing, which relies on electrostatic interactions between positively charged RGG repeats and negatively charged PAR, is amplified by aggregation-prone prion-like domains, and orchestrates the earliest cellular responses to DNA breakage. We propose that PAR-seeded liquid demixing is a general mechanism to dynamically reorganize the soluble nuclear space with implications for pathological protein aggregation caused by derailed phase separation. PMID:26286827

  7. Intrinsic Disorder in Transmembrane Proteins: Roles in Signaling and Topology Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Bürgi, Jérôme; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are peculiar stretches of amino acids that lack stable conformations in solution. Intrinsic Disorder containing Proteins (IDP) are defined by the presence of at least one large IDR and have been linked to multiple cellular processes including cell signaling, DNA binding and cancer. Here we used computational analyses and publicly available databases to deepen insight into the prevalence and function of IDRs specifically in transmembrane proteins, which are somewhat neglected in most studies. We found that 50% of transmembrane proteins have at least one IDR of 30 amino acids or more. Interestingly, these domains preferentially localize to the cytoplasmic side especially of multi-pass transmembrane proteins, suggesting that disorder prediction could increase the confidence of topology prediction algorithms. This was supported by the successful prediction of the topology of the uncharacterized multi-pass transmembrane protein TMEM117, as confirmed experimentally. Pathway analysis indicated that IDPs are enriched in cell projection and axons and appear to play an important role in cell adhesion, signaling and ion binding. In addition, we found that IDP are enriched in phosphorylation sites, a crucial post translational modification in signal transduction, when compared to fully ordered proteins and to be implicated in more protein-protein interaction events. Accordingly, IDPs were highly enriched in short protein binding regions called Molecular Recognition Features (MoRFs). Altogether our analyses strongly support the notion that the transmembrane IDPs act as hubs in cellular signal events. PMID:27391701

  8. Intrinsically disordered proteins aggregate at fungal cell-to-cell channels and regulate intercellular connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Julian; Koh, Chuan Hock; Tjota, Monika; Pieuchot, Laurent; Raman, Vignesh; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Yang, Daiwen; Wong, Limsoon; Jedd, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Like animals and plants, multicellular fungi possess cell-to-cell channels (septal pores) that allow intercellular communication and transport. Here, using a combination of MS of Woronin body-associated proteins and a bioinformatics approach that identifies related proteins based on composition and character, we identify 17 septal pore-associated (SPA) proteins that localize to the septal pore in rings and pore-centered foci. SPA proteins are not homologous at the primary sequence level but share overall physical properties with intrinsically disordered proteins. Some SPA proteins form aggregates at the septal pore, and in vitro assembly assays suggest aggregation through a nonamyloidal mechanism involving mainly α-helical and disordered structures. SPA loss-of-function phenotypes include excessive septation, septal pore degeneration, and uncontrolled Woronin body activation. Together, our data identify the septal pore as a complex subcellular compartment and focal point for the assembly of unstructured proteins controlling diverse aspects of intercellular connectivity. PMID:22955885

  9. Test and Evaluation of ff99IDPs Force Field for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Ji, Dingjue; Wang, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-05-26

    Over 40% of eukaryotic proteomic sequences have been predicted to be intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) and confirmed to be associated with many diseases. However, widely used force fields cannot well reproduce the conformers of IDPs. Previously the ff99IDPs force field was released to simulate IDPs with CMAP energy corrections for the eight disorder-promoting residues. In order to further confirm the performance of ff99IDPs, three representative IDP systems (arginine-rich HIV-1 Rev, aspartic proteinase inhibitor IA3, and α-synuclein) were used to test and evaluate the simulation results. The results show that for free disordered proteins, the chemical shifts from the ff99IDPs simulations are in quantitative agreement with those from reported NMR measurements and better than those from ff99SBildn. Thus, ff99IDPs can sample more clusters of disordered conformers than ff99SBildn. For structural proteins, both ff99IDPs and ff99SBildn can well reproduce the conformations. In general, ff99IDPs can successfully be used to simulate the conformations of IDPs and IDRs in both bound and free states. However, relative errors could still be found at the boundaries of ordered residues scattered in long disorder-promoting sequences. Therefore, polarizable force fields might be one of the possible ways to further improve the performance on IDPs. PMID:25919886

  10. Conformational propensities of intrinsically disordered proteins influence the mechanism of binding and folding

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Munehito; Sugase, Kenji; Dyson, H. Jane; Wright, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) frequently function in protein interaction networks that regulate crucial cellular signaling pathways. Many IDPs undergo transitions from disordered conformational ensembles to folded structures upon binding to their cellular targets. Several possible binding mechanisms for coupled folding and binding have been identified: folding of the IDP after association with the target (“induced fit”), or binding of a prefolded state in the conformational ensemble of the IDP to the target protein (“conformational selection”), or some combination of these two extremes. The interaction of the intrinsically disordered phosphorylated kinase-inducible domain (pKID) of the cAMP-response element binding (CREB) protein with the KIX domain of a general transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) provides an example of the induced-fit mechanism. Here we show by NMR relaxation dispersion experiments that a different intrinsically disordered ligand, the transactivation domain of the transcription factor c-Myb, interacts with KIX at the same site as pKID but via a different binding mechanism that involves elements of conformational selection and induced fit. In contrast to pKID, the c-Myb activation domain has a strong propensity for spontaneous helix formation in its N-terminal region, which binds to KIX in a predominantly folded conformation. The C-terminal region of c-Myb exhibits a much smaller helical propensity and likely folds via an induced-fit process after binding to KIX. We propose that the intrinsic secondary structure propensities of pKID and c-Myb determine their binding mechanisms, consistent with their functions as inducible and constitutive transcriptional activators. PMID:26195786

  11. Conformational propensities of intrinsically disordered proteins influence the mechanism of binding and folding.

    PubMed

    Arai, Munehito; Sugase, Kenji; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) frequently function in protein interaction networks that regulate crucial cellular signaling pathways. Many IDPs undergo transitions from disordered conformational ensembles to folded structures upon binding to their cellular targets. Several possible binding mechanisms for coupled folding and binding have been identified: folding of the IDP after association with the target ("induced fit"), or binding of a prefolded state in the conformational ensemble of the IDP to the target protein ("conformational selection"), or some combination of these two extremes. The interaction of the intrinsically disordered phosphorylated kinase-inducible domain (pKID) of the cAMP-response element binding (CREB) protein with the KIX domain of a general transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) provides an example of the induced-fit mechanism. Here we show by NMR relaxation dispersion experiments that a different intrinsically disordered ligand, the transactivation domain of the transcription factor c-Myb, interacts with KIX at the same site as pKID but via a different binding mechanism that involves elements of conformational selection and induced fit. In contrast to pKID, the c-Myb activation domain has a strong propensity for spontaneous helix formation in its N-terminal region, which binds to KIX in a predominantly folded conformation. The C-terminal region of c-Myb exhibits a much smaller helical propensity and likely folds via an induced-fit process after binding to KIX. We propose that the intrinsic secondary structure propensities of pKID and c-Myb determine their binding mechanisms, consistent with their functions as inducible and constitutive transcriptional activators.

  12. Intrinsically disordered energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such 'intrinsically disordered' landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an α-helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium. PMID:25999294

  13. Intrinsic Disorder of the C-Terminal Domain of Drosophila Methoprene-Tolerant Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kolonko, Marta; Ożga, Katarzyna; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Taube, Michał; Kozak, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej; Greb-Markiewicz, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Methoprene tolerant protein (Met) has recently been confirmed as the long-sought juvenile hormone (JH) receptor. This protein plays a significant role in the cross-talk of the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and JH signalling pathways, which are important for control of insect development and maturation. Met belongs to the basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH-PAS) family of transcription factors. In these proteins, bHLH domains are typically responsible for DNA binding and dimerization, whereas the PAS domains are crucial for the choice of dimerization partner and the specificity of target gene activation. The C-terminal region is usually responsible for the regulation of protein complex activity. The sequence of the Met C-terminal region (MetC) is not homologous to any sequence deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and has not been structurally characterized to date. In this study, we show that the MetC exhibits properties typical for an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). The final averaged structure obtained with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments indicates that intrinsically disordered MetC exists in an extended conformation. This extended shape and the long unfolded regions characterise proteins with high flexibility and dynamics. Therefore, we suggest that the multiplicity of conformations adopted by the disordered MetC is crucial for its activity as a biological switch modulating the cross-talk of different signalling pathways in insects. PMID:27657508

  14. Targeting intrinsically disordered proteins in neurodegenerative and protein dysfunction diseases: another illustration of the D2 concept

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2010-01-01

    Many biologically active proteins, which are usually called intrinsically disordered or natively unfolded proteins, lack stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. Their functions complement the functional repertoire of ordered proteins, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) often being involved in regulation, signaling and control. Their amino acid sequences and compositions are very different from those of ordered proteins, making reliable identification of IDPs possible at the proteome level. IDPs are highly abundant in various human diseases, including neurodegeneration and other protein dysfunction maladies and, therefore, represent attractive novel drug targets. Some of the aspects of IDPs, as well as their roles in neurodegeneration and protein dysfunction diseases, are discussed in this article, together with the peculiarities of IDPs as potential drug targets. PMID:20653509

  15. High-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding regions mediated by intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhenling; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-10-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and regions (IDPs and IDRs) lack stable 3D structure under physiological conditions in-vitro, are common in eukaryotes, and facilitate interactions with RNA, DNA and proteins. Current methods for prediction of IDPs and IDRs do not provide insights into their functions, except for a handful of methods that address predictions of protein-binding regions. We report first-of-its-kind computational method DisoRDPbind for high-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding residues located in IDRs from protein sequences. DisoRDPbind is implemented using a runtime-efficient multi-layered design that utilizes information extracted from physiochemical properties of amino acids, sequence complexity, putative secondary structure and disorder and sequence alignment. Empirical tests demonstrate that it provides accurate predictions that are competitive with other predictors of disorder-mediated protein binding regions and complementary to the methods that predict RNA- and DNA-binding residues annotated based on crystal structures. Application in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster proteomes reveals that RNA- and DNA-binding proteins predicted by DisoRDPbind complement and overlap with the corresponding known binding proteins collected from several sources. Also, the number of the putative protein-binding regions predicted with DisoRDPbind correlates with the promiscuity of proteins in the corresponding protein-protein interaction networks. Webserver: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/DisoRDPbind/.

  16. Intrinsically Disordered Segments Affect Protein Half-Life in the Cell and during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    van der Lee, Robin; Lang, Benjamin; Kruse, Kai; Gsponer, Jörg; Sánchez de Groot, Natalia; Huynen, Martijn A.; Matouschek, Andreas; Fuxreiter, Monika; Babu, M. Madan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Precise control of protein turnover is essential for cellular homeostasis. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is well established as a major regulator of protein degradation, but an understanding of how inherent structural features influence the lifetimes of proteins is lacking. We report that yeast, mouse, and human proteins with terminal or internal intrinsically disordered segments have significantly shorter half-lives than proteins without these features. The lengths of the disordered segments that affect protein half-life are compatible with the structure of the proteasome. Divergence in terminal and internal disordered segments in yeast proteins originating from gene duplication leads to significantly altered half-life. Many paralogs that are affected by such changes participate in signaling, where altered protein half-life will directly impact cellular processes and function. Thus, natural variation in the length and position of disordered segments may affect protein half-life and could serve as an underappreciated source of genetic variation with important phenotypic consequences. PMID:25220455

  17. Biophysical Methods to Investigate Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Avoiding an "Elephant and Blind Men" Situation.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and hybrid proteins possessing ordered domains and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are highly abundant in various proteomes. They are different from ordered proteins at many levels, and an unambiguous representation of an IDP structure is a difficult task. In fact, IDPs show an extremely wide diversity in their structural properties, being able to attain extended conformations (random coil-like) or to remain globally collapsed (molten globule-like). Disorder can differently affect different parts of a protein, with some regions being more ordered than others. IDPs and IDPRs exist as dynamic ensembles, resembling "protein-clouds". IDP structures are best presented as conformational ensembles that contain highly dynamic structures interconverting on a number of timescales. The determination of a unique high-resolution structure is not possible for an isolated IDP, and a detailed structural and dynamic characterization of IDPs cannot typically be provided by a single tool. Therefore, accurate descriptions of IDPs/IDPRs rely on a multiparametric approach that includes a host of biophysical methods that can provide information on the overall compactness of IDPs and their conformational stability, shape, residual secondary structure, transient long-range contacts, regions of restricted or enhanced mobility, etc. The goal of this chapter is to provide a brief overview of some of the components of this multiparametric approach.

  18. Disease-associated mutations disrupt functionally important regions of intrinsic protein disorder.

    PubMed

    Vacic, Vladimir; Markwick, Phineus R L; Oldfield, Christopher J; Zhao, Xiaoyue; Haynes, Chad; Uversky, Vladimir N; Iakoucheva, Lilia M

    2012-01-01

    The effects of disease mutations on protein structure and function have been extensively investigated, and many predictors of the functional impact of single amino acid substitutions are publicly available. The majority of these predictors are based on protein structure and evolutionary conservation, following the assumption that disease mutations predominantly affect folded and conserved protein regions. However, the prevalence of the intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and regions (IDRs) in the human proteome together with their lack of fixed structure and low sequence conservation raise a question about the impact of disease mutations in IDRs. Here, we investigate annotated missense disease mutations and show that 21.7% of them are located within such intrinsically disordered regions. We further demonstrate that 20% of disease mutations in IDRs cause local disorder-to-order transitions, which represents a 1.7-2.7 fold increase compared to annotated polymorphisms and neutral evolutionary substitutions, respectively. Secondary structure predictions show elevated rates of transition from helices and strands into loops and vice versa in the disease mutations dataset. Disease disorder-to-order mutations also influence predicted molecular recognition features (MoRFs) more often than the control mutations. The repertoire of disorder-to-order transition mutations is limited, with five most frequent mutations (R→W, R→C, E→K, R→H, R→Q) collectively accounting for 44% of all deleterious disorder-to-order transitions. As a proof of concept, we performed accelerated molecular dynamics simulations on a deleterious disorder-to-order transition mutation of tumor protein p63 and, in agreement with our predictions, observed an increased α-helical propensity of the region harboring the mutation. Our findings highlight the importance of mutations in IDRs and refine the traditional structure-centric view of disease mutations. The results of this study offer a new

  19. GADIS: Algorithm for designing sequences to achieve target secondary structure profiles of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Tyler S; Crabtree, Michael D; Shammas, Sarah L; Posey, Ammon E; Clarke, Jane; Pappu, Rohit V

    2016-09-01

    Many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) participate in coupled folding and binding reactions and form alpha helical structures in their bound complexes. Alanine, glycine, or proline scanning mutagenesis approaches are often used to dissect the contributions of intrinsic helicities to coupled folding and binding. These experiments can yield confounding results because the mutagenesis strategy changes the amino acid compositions of IDPs. Therefore, an important next step in mutagenesis-based approaches to mechanistic studies of coupled folding and binding is the design of sequences that satisfy three major constraints. These are (i) achieving a target intrinsic alpha helicity profile; (ii) fixing the positions of residues corresponding to the binding interface; and (iii) maintaining the native amino acid composition. Here, we report the development of a G: enetic A: lgorithm for D: esign of I: ntrinsic secondary S: tructure (GADIS) for designing sequences that satisfy the specified constraints. We describe the algorithm and present results to demonstrate the applicability of GADIS by designing sequence variants of the intrinsically disordered PUMA system that undergoes coupled folding and binding to Mcl-1. Our sequence designs span a range of intrinsic helicity profiles. The predicted variations in sequence-encoded mean helicities are tested against experimental measurements. PMID:27503953

  20. Study conformational dynamics of intrinsically disordered protein by PET-FCS (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlein, Joerg; Zhou, Man; Van, Qui; Gregor, Ingo

    2016-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) form a large and functionally important class of proteins that lack an ordered three-dimensional structure. IDPs play an important role in cell signaling, transcription, or chromatin remodeling. The discovery of IDPs has challenged the traditional paradigm of protein structure which states that protein function depends on a well-defined three-dimensional structure. Due to their high conformational flexibility and the lack of ordered secondary structure, it is challenging to study the flexible structure, dynamics and energetics of these proteins with conventional methods. In our work, we employ photoinduced electron transfer (PET) combined with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for studying the conformational dynamics of one specific class of IDPs: phenylalanine-glycine rich protein domains (FG repeats) which are dominant building blocks within the pore of nuclear pore complexes. Nuclear pore complexes are large protein assemblies that cross the nuclear envelope and form selective barrier, which regulate bidirectional exchange between nucleus and cytoplasm.

  1. Intrinsically Disordered Energy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such ‘intrinsically disordered’ landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an -helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium.

  2. Correlating Flavivirus virulence and levels of intrinsic disorder in shell proteins: protective roles vs. immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-05-24

    Computational analyses revealed correlations between the intrinsic disorder propensity of shell proteins and case fatality rates (CFRs) among Flaviviruses and within at least two Flavivirus species, such as tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and dengue virus (DENV). The shell proteins analyzed in this study are capsid (C) and membrane (PrM, Pr, and M) proteins. The highest correlations can be found when regression analyses were conducted using Pr (Flavivirus: r(2) = 0.78, p < 0.01) or M (Flavivirus: r(2) = 0.91, p < 0.01) as an independent variable with C and CFR as co-explanatory and dependent variables, respectively. Interestingly, while predicted intrinsic disorder levels (PIDs) of both C and M are positively correlated with the virulence, the PIDs of Pr and CFR are negatively correlated. This is likely due to the fact that the Pr portion of PrM plays various roles in protecting the virion from damage, whereas M and C are assisted by greater potential in binding promiscuity as a result of greater disorder. The C protein of yellow fever virus (YFV), which is the most virulent virus in the sample, has the highest PID levels, whereas the second most virulent TBEV FE subtype has the second highest PID score due to its C protein, and the least virulent West Nile virus (WNV) has the least disordered C protein. This knowledge can be used while working on the development and identification of attenuated strains for vaccine. Curiously, unlike Flaviviruses, a disordered outer shell was described for hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and human simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), which currently have no effective vaccine.

  3. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level. PMID:26390327

  4. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level.

  5. Insights into the Immunological Properties of Intrinsically Disordered Malaria Proteins Using Proteome Scale Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Andrew J.; Irani, Vashti; MacRaild, Christopher A.; Anders, Robin F.; Norton, Raymond S.; Beeson, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a significant global health burden. The development of an effective malaria vaccine remains as a major challenge with the potential to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. While Plasmodium spp. have been shown to contain a large number of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or disordered protein regions, the relationship of protein structure to subcellular localisation and adaptive immune responses remains unclear. In this study, we employed several computational prediction algorithms to identify IDPs at the proteome level of six Plasmodium spp. and to investigate the potential impact of protein disorder on adaptive immunity against P. falciparum parasites. IDPs were shown to be particularly enriched within nuclear proteins, apical proteins, exported proteins and proteins localised to the parasitophorous vacuole. Furthermore, several leading vaccine candidates, and proteins with known roles in host-cell invasion, have extensive regions of disorder. Presentation of peptides by MHC molecules plays an important role in adaptive immune responses, and we show that IDP regions are predicted to contain relatively few MHC class I and II binding peptides owing to inherent differences in amino acid composition compared to structured domains. In contrast, linear B-cell epitopes were predicted to be enriched in IDPs. Tandem repeat regions and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be strongly associated with regions of disorder. In summary, immune responses against IDPs appear to have characteristics distinct from those against structured protein domains, with increased antibody recognition of linear epitopes but some constraints for MHC presentation and issues of polymorphisms. These findings have major implications for vaccine design, and understanding immunity to malaria. PMID:26513658

  6. The Intrinsically Disordered N-terminal Region of AtREM1.3 Remorin Protein Mediates Protein-Protein Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Macarena; Thallmair, Veronika; Ott, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The longstanding structure-function paradigm, which states that a protein only serves a biological function in a structured state, had to be substantially revised with the description of intrinsic disorder in proteins. Intrinsically disordered regions that undergo a stimulus-dependent disorder-to-order transition are common to a large number of signaling proteins. However, little is known about the functionality of intrinsically disordered regions in plant proteins. Here we investigated intrinsic disorder in a plant-specific remorin protein that has been described as a signaling component in plant-microbe interactions. Using bioinformatic, biochemical, and biophysical approaches, we characterized the highly abundant remorin AtREM1.3, showing that its N-terminal region is intrinsically disordered. Although only the AtREM1.3 C-terminal domain is essential for stable homo-oligomerization, the N-terminal region facilitates this interaction. Furthermore, we confirmed the stable interaction between AtREM1.3 and four isoforms of the importin α protein family in a yeast two-hybrid system and by an in planta bimolecular fluorescent complementation assay. Phosphorylation of Ser-66 in the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region decreases the interaction strength with the importin α proteins. Hence, the N-terminal region may constitute a regulatory domain, stabilizing these interactions. PMID:23027878

  7. The contribution of protein intrinsic disorder to understand the role of genetic variants uncovered by autism spectrum disorders exome studies.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Jaqueline Bohrer; Paixão-Côrtes, Vanessa Rodrigues; Friedrich, Deise C; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana

    2016-04-01

    Several autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exome studies suggest that coding single nucleotide variants (SNVs) play an important role on ASD etiology. Usually, the pathogenic effect of missense mutations is estimated through predictors that lose accuracy for those SNVs placed in intrinsically disordered regions of protein. Here, we used bioinformatics tools to investigate the effect of mutations described in ASD published exome studies (549 mutations) in protein disorder, considering post-translational modification, PEST and Molecular Recognition Features (MoRFs) motifs. Schizophrenia and type 2 diabetes (T2D) datasets were created for comparison purposes. The frequency of mutations predicted as disordered was comparable among the three datasets (38.1% in ASD, 35.7% in schizophrenia, 46.4% in T2D). However, the frequency of SNVs predicted to lead a gain or loss of functional sites or change intrinsic disorder tendencies was higher in ASD and schizophrenia than T2D (46.9%, 36.4%, and 23.1%, respectively). The results obtained by SIFT and PolyPhen-2 indicated that 38.9% and 34.4% of the mutations predicted, respectively, as tolerated and benign showed functional alterations in disorder properties. Given the frequency of mutations placed in IDRs and their functional impact, this study suggests that alterations in intrinsic disorder properties might play a role in ASD and schizophrenia etiologies. They should be taken into consideration when researching the pathogenicity of mutations in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric diseases. Finally, mutations with functional alterations in disorder properties must be potential targets for in vitro and in vivo functional studies. PMID:26892727

  8. Genome-scale prediction of proteins with long intrinsically disordered regions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhenling; Mizianty, Marcin J; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Proteins with long disordered regions (LDRs), defined as having 30 or more consecutive disordered residues, are abundant in eukaryotes, and these regions are recognized as a distinct class of biologically functional domains. LDRs facilitate various cellular functions and are important for target selection in structural genomics. Motivated by the lack of methods that directly predict proteins with LDRs, we designed Super-fast predictor of proteins with Long Intrinsically DisordERed regions (SLIDER). SLIDER utilizes logistic regression that takes an empirically chosen set of numerical features, which consider selected physicochemical properties of amino acids, sequence complexity, and amino acid composition, as its inputs. Empirical tests show that SLIDER offers competitive predictive performance combined with low computational cost. It outperforms, by at least a modest margin, a comprehensive set of modern disorder predictors (that can indirectly predict LDRs) and is 16 times faster compared to the best currently available disorder predictor. Utilizing our time-efficient predictor, we characterized abundance and functional roles of proteins with LDRs over 110 eukaryotic proteomes. Similar to related studies, we found that eukaryotes have many (on average 30.3%) proteins with LDRs with majority of proteomes having between 25 and 40%, where higher abundance is characteristic to proteomes that have larger proteins. Our first-of-its-kind large-scale functional analysis shows that these proteins are enriched in a number of cellular functions and processes including certain binding events, regulation of catalytic activities, cellular component organization, biogenesis, biological regulation, and some metabolic and developmental processes. A webserver that implements SLIDER is available at http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/SLIDER/.

  9. Rational design of antibodies targeting specific epitopes within intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sormanni, Pietro; Aprile, Francesco A.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are powerful tools in life sciences research, as well as in diagnostic and therapeutic applications, because of their ability to bind given molecules with high affinity and specificity. Using current methods, however, it is laborious and sometimes difficult to generate antibodies to target specific epitopes within a protein, in particular if these epitopes are not effective antigens. Here we present a method to rationally design antibodies to enable them to bind virtually any chosen disordered epitope in a protein. The procedure consists in the sequence-based design of one or more complementary peptides targeting a selected disordered epitope and the subsequent grafting of such peptides on an antibody scaffold. We illustrate the method by designing six single-domain antibodies to bind different epitopes within three disease-related intrinsically disordered proteins and peptides (α-synuclein, Aβ42, and IAPP). Our results show that all these designed antibodies bind their targets with good affinity and specificity. As an example of an application, we show that one of these antibodies inhibits the aggregation of α-synuclein at substoichiometric concentrations and that binding occurs at the selected epitope. Taken together, these results indicate that the design strategy that we propose makes it possible to obtain antibodies targeting given epitopes in disordered proteins or protein regions. PMID:26216991

  10. Rational design of antibodies targeting specific epitopes within intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Sormanni, Pietro; Aprile, Francesco A; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-08-11

    Antibodies are powerful tools in life sciences research, as well as in diagnostic and therapeutic applications, because of their ability to bind given molecules with high affinity and specificity. Using current methods, however, it is laborious and sometimes difficult to generate antibodies to target specific epitopes within a protein, in particular if these epitopes are not effective antigens. Here we present a method to rationally design antibodies to enable them to bind virtually any chosen disordered epitope in a protein. The procedure consists in the sequence-based design of one or more complementary peptides targeting a selected disordered epitope and the subsequent grafting of such peptides on an antibody scaffold. We illustrate the method by designing six single-domain antibodies to bind different epitopes within three disease-related intrinsically disordered proteins and peptides (α-synuclein, Aβ42, and IAPP). Our results show that all these designed antibodies bind their targets with good affinity and specificity. As an example of an application, we show that one of these antibodies inhibits the aggregation of α-synuclein at substoichiometric concentrations and that binding occurs at the selected epitope. Taken together, these results indicate that the design strategy that we propose makes it possible to obtain antibodies targeting given epitopes in disordered proteins or protein regions.

  11. The Intrinsically Disordered Regions of the Drosophila melanogaster Hox Protein Ultrabithorax Select Interacting Proteins Based on Partner Topology

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Hao-Ching; Gonzalez, Kim L.; Catanese, Daniel J.; Jordy, Kristopher E.; Matthews, Kathleen S.; Bondos, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between structured proteins require a complementary topology and surface chemistry to form sufficient contacts for stable binding. However, approximately one third of protein interactions are estimated to involve intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. The dynamic nature of disordered regions before and, in some cases, after binding calls into question the role of partner topology in forming protein interactions. To understand how intrinsically disordered proteins identify the correct interacting partner proteins, we evaluated interactions formed by the Drosophila melanogaster Hox transcription factor Ultrabithorax (Ubx), which contains both structured and disordered regions. Ubx binding proteins are enriched in specific folds: 23 of its 39 partners include one of 7 folds, out of the 1195 folds recognized by SCOP. For the proteins harboring the two most populated folds, DNA-RNA binding 3-helical bundles and α-α superhelices, the regions of the partner proteins that exhibit these preferred folds are sufficient for Ubx binding. Three disorder-containing regions in Ubx are required to bind these partners. These regions are either alternatively spliced or multiply phosphorylated, providing a mechanism for cellular processes to regulate Ubx-partner interactions. Indeed, partner topology correlates with the ability of individual partner proteins to bind Ubx spliceoforms. Partners bind different disordered regions within Ubx to varying extents, creating the potential for competition between partners and cooperative binding by partners. The ability of partners to bind regions of Ubx that activate transcription and regulate DNA binding provides a mechanism for partners to modulate transcription regulation by Ubx, and suggests that one role of disorder in Ubx is to coordinate multiple molecular functions in response to tissue-specific cues. PMID:25286318

  12. Primary structure and solution conditions determine conformational ensemble properties of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hsuan-Han Alberto

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a class of proteins that do not exhibit well-defined three-dimensional structures. The absence of structure is intrinsic to their amino acid sequences, which are characterized by low hydrophobicity and high net charge per residue compared to folded proteins. Contradicting the classic structure-function paradigm, IDPs are capable of interacting with high specificity and affinity, often acquiring order in complex with protein and nucleic acid binding partners. This phenomenon is evident during cellular activities involving IDPs, which include transcriptional and translational regulation, cell cycle control, signal transduction, molecular assembly, and molecular recognition. Although approximately 30% of eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, the nature of IDP conformational ensembles remains unclear. In this dissertation, we describe relationships connecting characteristics of IDP conformational ensembles to their primary structures and solution conditions. Using molecular simulations and fluorescence experiments on a set of base-rich IDPs, we find that net charge per residue segregates conformational ensembles along a globule-to-coil transition. Speculatively generalizing this result, we propose a phase diagram that predicts an IDP's average size and shape based on sequence composition and use it to generate hypotheses for a broad set of intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Simulations reveal that acid-rich IDRs, unlike their oppositely charged base-rich counterparts, exhibit disordered globular ensembles despite intra-chain repulsive electrostatic interactions. This apparent asymmetry is sensitive to simulation parameters for representing alkali and halide salt ions, suggesting that solution conditions modulate IDP conformational ensembles. We refine the ion parameters using a calibration procedure that relies exclusively on crystal lattice properties. Simulations with these parameters recover swollen

  13. An Overview of Predictors for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins over 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianzong; Feng, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Jing; Liu, Wen; Rong, Li; Bao, Jinku

    2015-01-01

    The sequence-structure-function paradigm of proteins has been changed by the occurrence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Benefiting from the structural disorder, IDPs are of particular importance in biological processes like regulation and signaling. IDPs are associated with human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, amyloidoses, and several other maladies. IDPs attract a high level of interest and a substantial effort has been made to develop experimental and computational methods. So far, more than 70 prediction tools have been developed since 1997, within which 17 predictors were created in the last five years. Here, we presented an overview of IDPs predictors developed during 2010–2014. We analyzed the algorithms used for IDPs prediction by these tools and we also discussed the basic concept of various prediction methods for IDPs. The comparison of prediction performance among these tools is discussed as well. PMID:26426014

  14. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed `clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length.

  15. Proteins with Intrinsically Disordered Domains Are Preferentially Recruited to Polyglutamine Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    O’Meally, Robert; Sonnenberg, Jason L.; Cole, Robert N.; Shewmaker, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregates formed by polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded proteins, such as Huntingtin, adopt amyloid-like structures that are resistant to denaturation. We used a novel purification strategy to isolate aggregates formed by human Huntingtin N-terminal fragments with expanded polyQ tracts from both yeast and mammalian (PC-12) cells. Using mass spectrometry we identified the protein species that are trapped within these polyQ aggregates. We found that proteins with very long intrinsically-disordered (ID) domains (≥100 amino acids) and RNA-binding proteins were disproportionately recruited into aggregates. The removal of the ID domains from selected proteins was sufficient to eliminate their recruitment into polyQ aggregates. We also observed that several neurodegenerative disease-linked proteins were reproducibly trapped within the polyQ aggregates purified from mammalian cells. Many of these proteins have large ID domains and are found in neuronal inclusions in their respective diseases. Our study indicates that neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins are particularly vulnerable to recruitment into polyQ aggregates via their ID domains. Also, the high frequency of ID domains in RNA-binding proteins may explain why RNA-binding proteins are frequently found in pathological inclusions in various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26317359

  16. A decade and a half of protein intrinsic disorder: Biology still waits for physics

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    The abundant existence of proteins and regions that possess specific functions without being uniquely folded into unique 3D structures has become accepted by a significant number of protein scientists. Sequences of these intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and IDP regions (IDPRs) are characterized by a number of specific features, such as low overall hydrophobicity and high net charge which makes these proteins predictable. IDPs/IDPRs possess large hydrodynamic volumes, low contents of ordered secondary structure, and are characterized by high structural heterogeneity. They are very flexible, but some may undergo disorder to order transitions in the presence of natural ligands. The degree of these structural rearrangements varies over a very wide range. IDPs/IDPRs are tightly controlled under the normal conditions and have numerous specific functions that complement functions of ordered proteins and domains. When lacking proper control, they have multiple roles in pathogenesis of various human diseases. Gaining structural and functional information about these proteins is a challenge, since they do not typically “freeze” while their “pictures are taken.” However, despite or perhaps because of the experimental challenges, these fuzzy objects with fuzzy structures and fuzzy functions are among the most interesting targets for modern protein research. This review briefly summarizes some of the recent advances in this exciting field and considers some of the basic lessons learned from the analysis of physics, chemistry, and biology of IDPs. PMID:23553817

  17. Intrinsic disorder in pathogen effectors: protein flexibility as an evolutionary hallmark in a molecular arms race.

    PubMed

    Marín, Macarena; Uversky, Vladimir N; Ott, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Effector proteins represent a refined mechanism of bacterial pathogens to overcome plants' innate immune systems. These modular proteins often manipulate host physiology by directly interfering with immune signaling of plant cells. Even if host cells have developed efficient strategies to perceive the presence of pathogenic microbes and to recognize intracellular effector activity, it remains an open question why only few effectors are recognized directly by plant resistance proteins. Based on in-silico genome-wide surveys and a reevaluation of published structural data, we estimated that bacterial effectors of phytopathogens are highly enriched in long-disordered regions (>50 residues). These structurally flexible segments have no secondary structure under physiological conditions but can fold in a stimulus-dependent manner (e.g., during protein-protein interactions). The high abundance of intrinsic disorder in effectors strongly suggests positive evolutionary selection of this structural feature and highlights the dynamic nature of these proteins. We postulate that such structural flexibility may be essential for (1) effector translocation, (2) evasion of the innate immune system, and (3) host function mimicry. The study of these dynamical regions will greatly complement current structural approaches to understand the molecular mechanisms of these proteins and may help in the prediction of new effectors.

  18. A decade and a half of protein intrinsic disorder: biology still waits for physics.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-06-01

    The abundant existence of proteins and regions that possess specific functions without being uniquely folded into unique 3D structures has become accepted by a significant number of protein scientists. Sequences of these intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and IDP regions (IDPRs) are characterized by a number of specific features, such as low overall hydrophobicity and high net charge which makes these proteins predictable. IDPs/IDPRs possess large hydrodynamic volumes, low contents of ordered secondary structure, and are characterized by high structural heterogeneity. They are very flexible, but some may undergo disorder to order transitions in the presence of natural ligands. The degree of these structural rearrangements varies over a very wide range. IDPs/IDPRs are tightly controlled under the normal conditions and have numerous specific functions that complement functions of ordered proteins and domains. When lacking proper control, they have multiple roles in pathogenesis of various human diseases. Gaining structural and functional information about these proteins is a challenge, since they do not typically "freeze" while their "pictures are taken." However, despite or perhaps because of the experimental challenges, these fuzzy objects with fuzzy structures and fuzzy functions are among the most interesting targets for modern protein research. This review briefly summarizes some of the recent advances in this exciting field and considers some of the basic lessons learned from the analysis of physics, chemistry, and biology of IDPs.

  19. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, J. Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G.; Sánchez, Ignacio E.

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage “Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis”. PMID:26674530

  20. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, J Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G; Sánchez, Ignacio E

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage "Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis".

  1. Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Stress Protein Alone and Bound to a Membrane Surface.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, John; Clarke, Matthew W; Warnica, Josephine M; Boddington, Kelly F; Graether, Steffen P

    2016-08-01

    Dehydrins are a group of intrinsically disordered proteins that protect plants from damage caused by drought, cold, and high salinity. Like other intrinsically disordered proteins, dehydrins can gain structure when bound to a ligand. Previous studies have shown that dehydrins are able to protect liposomes from cold damage, but the interactions that drive membrane binding and the detailed structure of the bound and unbound forms are not known. We use an ensemble-structure approach to generate models of a dehydrin known as K2 in the presence and absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles, and we docked the bound structure to the micelle. The collection of residual dipolar coupling data, amide protection factors, and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement distances, in combination with chemical shifts and relaxation measurements, allows for determining plausible structures that are not otherwise visible in time-averaged structural data. The results show that in the bound structure, the conserved lysines are important for membrane binding, whereas the flanking hydrophobic residues play a lesser role. The unbound structure shows a high level of disorder and an extended structure. We propose that the structural differences between bound and unbound forms allow dehydrins to act as molecular shields in their unbound state and as membrane protectants in their bound state. Unlike α-synuclein, the significant gain of α-helicity in K2 at low concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate is not due to a decrease in the critical micelle concentration. The study provides structural insight into how a disordered protein can interact with a membrane surface. PMID:27508433

  2. In-cell NMR of intrinsically disordered proteins in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yutaka; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Smith, Brian O

    2012-01-01

    In-cell NMR, i.e., the acquisition of heteronuclear multidimensional NMR of biomacromolecules inside living cells, is, to our knowledge, the only method for investigating the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of proteins at atomic detail in the intracellular environment. Since the inception of the method, intrinsically disordered proteins have been regarded as particular targets for in-cell NMR, due to their expected sensitivity to the molecular crowding in the intracellular environment. While both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells can be used as host cells for in-cell NMR, prokaryotic in-cell NMR, particularly employing commonly used protein overexpression systems in Escherichia coli cells, is the most accessible approach. In this chapter we describe general procedures for obtaining in-cell NMR spectra in E. coli cells.

  3. KMAD: knowledge-based multiple sequence alignment for intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Joanna; Wyrwicz, Lucjan S.; Vriend, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack tertiary structure and thus differ from globular proteins in terms of their sequence–structure–function relations. IDPs have lower sequence conservation, different types of active sites and a different distribution of functionally important regions, which altogether make their multiple sequence alignment (MSA) difficult. The KMAD MSA software has been written specifically for the alignment and annotation of IDPs. It augments the substitution matrix with knowledge about post-translational modifications, functional domains and short linear motifs. Results: MSAs produced with KMAD describe well-conserved features among IDPs, tend to agree well with biological intuition, and are a good basis for designing new experiments to shed light on this large, understudied class of proteins. Availability and implementation: KMAD web server is accessible at http://www.cmbi.ru.nl/kmad/. A standalone version is freely available. Contact: vriend@cmbi.ru.nl PMID:26568635

  4. Cooperative Unfolding of Compact Conformations of the Intrinsically Disordered Protein Osteopontin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) constitute a class of biologically active proteins that lack defined tertiary and often secondary structure. The IDP Osteopontin (OPN), a cytokine involved in metastasis of several types of cancer, is shown to simultaneously sample extended, random coil-like conformations and stable, cooperatively folded conformations. By a combination of two magnetic resonance methods, electron paramagnetic resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the OPN ensemble exhibits not only characteristics of an extended and flexible polypeptide, as expected for an IDP, but also simultaneously those of globular proteins, in particular sigmoidal structural denaturation profiles. Both types of states, extended and cooperatively folded, are populated simultaneously by OPN in its apo state. The heterogeneity of the structural properties of IDPs is thus shown to even involve cooperative folding and unfolding events. PMID:23848319

  5. Net charge per residue modulates conformational ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Albert H.; Crick, Scott L.; Vitalis, Andreas; Chicoine, Caitlin L.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) adopt heterogeneous ensembles of conformations under physiological conditions. Understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and conformational ensembles of IDPs can help clarify the role of disorder in physiological function. Recent studies revealed that polar IDPs favor collapsed ensembles in water despite the absence of hydrophobic groups—a result that holds for polypeptide backbones as well. By studying highly charged polypeptides, a different archetype of IDPs, we assess how charge content modulates the intrinsic preference of polypeptide backbones for collapsed structures. We characterized conformational ensembles for a set of protamines in aqueous milieus using molecular simulations and fluorescence measurements. Protamines are arginine-rich IDPs involved in the condensation of chromatin during spermatogenesis. Simulations based on the ABSINTH implicit solvation model predict the existence of a globule-to-coil transition, with net charge per residue serving as the discriminating order parameter. The transition is supported by quantitative agreement between simulation and experiment. Local conformational preferences partially explain the observed trends of polymeric properties. Our results lead to the proposal of a schematic protein phase diagram that should enable prediction of polymeric attributes for IDP conformational ensembles using easily calculated physicochemical properties of amino acid sequences. Although sequence composition allows the prediction of polymeric properties, interresidue contact preferences of protamines with similar polymeric attributes suggest that certain details of conformational ensembles depend on the sequence. This provides a plausible mechanism for specificity in the functions of IDPs. PMID:20404210

  6. The acidic domains of the Toc159 chloroplast preprotein receptor family are intrinsically disordered protein domains

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Toc159 family of proteins serve as receptors for chloroplast-destined preproteins. They directly bind to transit peptides, and exhibit preprotein substrate selectivity conferred by an unknown mechanism. The Toc159 receptors each include three domains: C-terminal membrane, central GTPase, and N-terminal acidic (A-) domains. Although the function(s) of the A-domain remains largely unknown, the amino acid sequences are most variable within these domains, suggesting they may contribute to the functional specificity of the receptors. Results The physicochemical properties of the A-domains are characteristic of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Using CD spectroscopy we show that the A-domains of two Arabidopsis Toc159 family members (atToc132 and atToc159) are disordered at physiological pH and temperature and undergo conformational changes at temperature and pH extremes that are characteristic of IDPs. Conclusions Identification of the A-domains as IDPs will be important for determining their precise function(s), and suggests a role in protein-protein interactions, which may explain how these proteins serve as receptors for such a wide variety of preprotein substrates. PMID:20042108

  7. Disordered nucleiome: Abundance of intrinsic disorder in the DNA- and RNA-binding proteins in 1121 species from Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in various proteomes, where they play numerous important roles and complement biological activities of ordered proteins. Among functions assigned to IDPs are interactions with nucleic acids. However, often, such assignments are made based on the guilty-by-association principle. The validity of the extension of these correlations to all nucleic acid binding proteins has never been analyzed on a large scale across all domains of life. To fill this gap, we perform a comprehensive computational analysis of the abundance of intrinsic disorder and intrinsically disordered domains in nucleiomes (∼548 000 nucleic acid binding proteins) of 1121 species from Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. Nucleiome is a whole complement of proteins involved in interactions with nucleic acids. We show that relative to other proteins in the corresponding proteomes, the DNA-binding proteins have significantly increased disorder content and are significantly enriched in disordered domains in Eukaryotes but not in Archaea and Bacteria. The RNA-binding proteins are significantly enriched in the disordered domains in Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota, while the overall abundance of disorder in these proteins is significantly increased in Bacteria, Archaea, animals and fungi. The high abundance of disorder in nucleiomes supports the notion that the nucleic acid binding proteins often require intrinsic disorder for their functions and regulation.

  8. Disordered nucleiome: Abundance of intrinsic disorder in the DNA- and RNA-binding proteins in 1121 species from Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in various proteomes, where they play numerous important roles and complement biological activities of ordered proteins. Among functions assigned to IDPs are interactions with nucleic acids. However, often, such assignments are made based on the guilty-by-association principle. The validity of the extension of these correlations to all nucleic acid binding proteins has never been analyzed on a large scale across all domains of life. To fill this gap, we perform a comprehensive computational analysis of the abundance of intrinsic disorder and intrinsically disordered domains in nucleiomes (∼548 000 nucleic acid binding proteins) of 1121 species from Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. Nucleiome is a whole complement of proteins involved in interactions with nucleic acids. We show that relative to other proteins in the corresponding proteomes, the DNA-binding proteins have significantly increased disorder content and are significantly enriched in disordered domains in Eukaryotes but not in Archaea and Bacteria. The RNA-binding proteins are significantly enriched in the disordered domains in Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota, while the overall abundance of disorder in these proteins is significantly increased in Bacteria, Archaea, animals and fungi. The high abundance of disorder in nucleiomes supports the notion that the nucleic acid binding proteins often require intrinsic disorder for their functions and regulation. PMID:27037624

  9. Intrinsically disordered protein threads through the bacterial outer-membrane porin OmpF.

    PubMed

    Housden, Nicholas G; Hopper, Jonathan T S; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Wojdyla, Justyna A; Klein, Alexander; Kaminska, Renata; Bayley, Hagan; Saibil, Helen R; Robinson, Carol V; Kleanthous, Colin

    2013-06-28

    Porins are β-barrel outer-membrane proteins through which small solutes and metabolites diffuse that are also exploited during cell death. We have studied how the bacteriocin colicin E9 (ColE9) assembles a cytotoxic translocon at the surface of Escherichia coli that incorporates the trimeric porin OmpF. Formation of the translocon involved ColE9's unstructured N-terminal domain threading in opposite directions through two OmpF subunits, capturing its target TolB on the other side of the membrane in a fixed orientation that triggers colicin import. Thus, an intrinsically disordered protein can tunnel through the narrow pores of an oligomeric porin to deliver an epitope signal to the cell to initiate cell death.

  10. Improving the chemical shift dispersion of multidimensional NMR spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Bermel, Wolfgang; Bruix, Marta; Felli, Isabella C; Kumar M V, Vasantha; Pierattelli, Roberta; Serrano, Soraya

    2013-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) have recently attracted the attention of the scientific community challenging the well accepted structure-function paradigm. In the characterization of the dynamic features of proteins nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is a strategic tool of investigation. However the peculiar properties of IDPs, with the lack of a unique 3D structure and their high flexibility, have a strong impact on NMR observables (low chemical shift dispersion, efficient solvent exchange broadening) and thus on the quality of NMR spectra. Key aspects to be considered in the design of new NMR experiments optimized for the study of IDPs are discussed. A new experiment, based on direct detection of (13)C(α), is proposed.

  11. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Involved in the Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Cino, Elio A.; Wong-ekkabut, Jirasak; Karttunen, Mikko; Choy, Wing-Yiu

    2011-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in cells and have central roles in protein-protein interaction networks. Interactions between the IDP Prothymosin alpha (ProTα) and the Neh2 domain of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with a common binding partner, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1(Keap1), are essential for regulating cellular response to oxidative stress. Misregulation of this pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases, premature aging and cancer. In order to understand the mechanisms these two disordered proteins employ to bind to Keap1, we performed extensive 0.5–1.0 microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to investigate the structure/dynamics of free-state ProTα and Neh2 and their thermodynamics of bindings. The results show that in their free states, both ProTα and Neh2 have propensities to form bound-state-like β-turn structures but to different extents. We also found that, for both proteins, residues outside the Keap1-binding motifs may play important roles in stabilizing the bound-state-like structures. Based on our findings, we propose that the binding of disordered ProTα and Neh2 to Keap1 occurs synergistically via preformed structural elements (PSEs) and coupled folding and binding, with a heavy bias towards PSEs, particularly for Neh2. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms Neh2 and ProTα bind to Keap1, information that is useful for developing therapeutics to enhance the oxidative stress response. PMID:22125611

  12. Wrecked regulation of intrinsically disordered proteins in diseases: pathogenicity of deregulated regulators

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-01

    Biologically active proteins without stable tertiary structure are common in all known proteomes. Functions of these intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are typically related to regulation, signaling, and control. Cellular levels of these important regulators are tightly regulated by a variety mechanisms ranging from firmly controlled expression to precisely targeted degradation. Functions of IDPs are controlled by binding to specific partners, alternative splicing, and posttranslational modifications among other means. In the norm, right amounts of precisely activated IDPs have to be present in right time at right places. Wrecked regulation brings havoc to the ordered world of disordered proteins, leading to protein misfolding, misidentification, and missignaling that give rise to numerous human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. Among factors inducing pathogenic transformations of IDPs are various cellular mechanisms, such as chromosomal translocations, damaged splicing, altered expression, frustrated posttranslational modifications, aberrant proteolytic degradation, and defective trafficking. This review presents some of the aspects of deregulated regulation of IDPs leading to human diseases. PMID:25988147

  13. How Random are Intrinsically Disordered Proteins? A Small Angle Scattering Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Durand, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    While the crucial role of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) in the cell cycle is now recognized, deciphering their molecular mode of action at the structural level still remains highly challenging and requires a combination of many biophysical approaches. Among them, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has been extremely successful in the last decade and has become an indispensable technique for addressing many of the fundamental questions regarding the activities of IDPs. After introducing some experimental issues specific to IDPs and in relation to the latest technical developments, this article presents the interest of the theory of polymer physics to evaluate the flexibility of fully disordered proteins. The different strategies to obtain 3-dimensional models of IDPs, free in solution and associated in a complex, are then reviewed. Indeed, recent computational advances have made it possible to readily extract maximum information from the scattering curve with a special emphasis on highly flexible systems, such as multidomain proteins and IDPs. Furthermore, integrated computational approaches now enable the generation of ensembles of conformers to translate the unique flexible characteristics of IDPs by taking into consideration the constraints of more and more various complementary experiment. In particular, a combination of SAXS with high-resolution techniques, such as x-ray crystallography and NMR, allows us to provide reliable models and to gain unique structural insights about the protein over multiple structural scales. The latest neutron scattering experiments also promise new advances in the study of the conformational changes of macromolecules involving more complex systems. PMID:22044150

  14. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Since the accumulation of such proteins is potentially harmful for the cell, their prompt removal is important. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases mediate substrate ubiquitination by bringing together the substrate with an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. For misfolded proteins, substrate recognition is generally delegated to molecular chaperones that subsequently interact with specific E3 ligases. An important exception is San1, a yeast E3 ligase. San1 harbors extensive regions of intrinsic disorder, which provide both conformational flexibility and sites for direct recognition of misfolded targets of vastly different conformations. So far, no mammalian ortholog of San1 is known, nor is it clear whether other E3 ligases utilize disordered regions for substrate recognition. Here, we conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology of their ordered regions, and did not capture the unique disorder patterns that encode the functional mechanism of San1. However, by searching specifically for key features of the San1 sequence, such as long regions of intrinsic disorder embedded with short stretches predicted to be suitable for substrate interaction, we identified several E3 ligases with these characteristics. Our initial analysis revealed that another remarkable trait of San1 is shared with several candidate E3 ligases: long stretches of complete lysine suppression, which in San1 limits auto-ubiquitination. We encode these characteristic features into a San1 similarity-score, and present a set of proteins that are plausible candidates as San1 counterparts in humans. In conclusion, our work indicates that San1 is

  15. Identification of Intrinsic Order and Disorder in the DNA Repair Protein XPA

    SciTech Connect

    Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Kimzey, Amy L.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Bruce, James E.; Garner, Ethan C.; Brown, Celeste J.; Dunker, A. K.; Smith, Richard D.; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2001-03-01

    The damage recognition protein XPA is required to recognize a wide variety of bulky lesions during nucleotide excision repair (NER). Independent NMR solution structures of a human XPA protein (hXPA) fragment comprising approximately one-third of the full-length protein, the minimal DNA-binding domain (MBD), revealed that ~30% of the molecule was structurally disordered. To better characterize structural features of XPA, we performed time-resolved trypsin proteolysis on active, full-length recombinant Xenopus XPA protein (xXPA). The resulting proteolytic fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization interface coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and selected N-terminal sequence determinations. The mass spectrum of the full-length xXPA was consistent with the predicted sequence, 30922.02 vs. 30922.45 Da; respectively. Moreover, the mass spectrometric data allowed the assignment of multiple xXPA fragments not resolvable by SDS PAGE. Full-length xXPA exhibited aberrant mobility on SDS-PAGE with an apparent MW of ~40 kDa. To test predictions that a Glu-rich region (E70-E76) or other local regions of high charge were responsible for this ~40% aberrant SDS-PAGE mobility, the MW's of partial proteolytic fragments from ~5 to 25 kDa precisely determined by ESI-FTICR MS were correlated with their gel positions. Surprisingly, all tested partial tryptic fragments within this size-range exhibited 10-42% divergence between calculated MW and that estimated by SDS-PAGE, thus indicating the origin of anomalous migration of XPA is not localized. The computer program Predictor of Natural Disordered Regions (PONDR) correctly identified several regions of xXPA either sensitive or resistant to partial proteolysis, thereby indicating that disorder in XPA shares sequence features with other well-characterized intrinsically unstructured proteins.

  16. pE-DB: a database of structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered and of unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Varadi, Mihaly; Kosol, Simone; Lebrun, Pierre; Valentini, Erica; Blackledge, Martin; Dunker, A Keith; Felli, Isabella C; Forman-Kay, Julie D; Kriwacki, Richard W; Pierattelli, Roberta; Sussman, Joel; Svergun, Dmitri I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Vendruscolo, Michele; Wishart, David; Wright, Peter E; Tompa, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The goal of pE-DB (http://pedb.vib.be) is to serve as an openly accessible database for the deposition of structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and of denatured proteins based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and other data measured in solution. Owing to the inherent flexibility of IDPs, solution techniques are particularly appropriate for characterizing their biophysical properties, and structural ensembles in agreement with these data provide a convenient tool for describing the underlying conformational sampling. Database entries consist of (i) primary experimental data with descriptions of the acquisition methods and algorithms used for the ensemble calculations, and (ii) the structural ensembles consistent with these data, provided as a set of models in a Protein Data Bank format. PE-DB is open for submissions from the community, and is intended as a forum for disseminating the structural ensembles and the methodologies used to generate them. While the need to represent the IDP structures is clear, methods for determining and evaluating the structural ensembles are still evolving. The availability of the pE-DB database is expected to promote the development of new modeling methods and leads to a better understanding of how function arises from disordered states.

  17. pE-DB: a database of structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered and of unfolded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Mihaly; Kosol, Simone; Lebrun, Pierre; Valentini, Erica; Blackledge, Martin; Dunker, A. Keith; Felli, Isabella C.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Pierattelli, Roberta; Sussman, Joel; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Wishart, David; Wright, Peter E.; Tompa, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The goal of pE-DB (http://pedb.vib.be) is to serve as an openly accessible database for the deposition of structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and of denatured proteins based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and other data measured in solution. Owing to the inherent flexibility of IDPs, solution techniques are particularly appropriate for characterizing their biophysical properties, and structural ensembles in agreement with these data provide a convenient tool for describing the underlying conformational sampling. Database entries consist of (i) primary experimental data with descriptions of the acquisition methods and algorithms used for the ensemble calculations, and (ii) the structural ensembles consistent with these data, provided as a set of models in a Protein Data Bank format. PE-DB is open for submissions from the community, and is intended as a forum for disseminating the structural ensembles and the methodologies used to generate them. While the need to represent the IDP structures is clear, methods for determining and evaluating the structural ensembles are still evolving. The availability of the pE-DB database is expected to promote the development of new modeling methods and leads to a better understanding of how function arises from disordered states. PMID:24174539

  18. Quantification of Compactness and Local Order in the Ensemble of the Intrinsically Disordered Protein FCP1.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Eric B; Showalter, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDRs) partially or completely lack a cooperatively folded structure under native conditions, preventing their equilibrium state from being adequately described by a single structural model. As a direct consequence of their disorder, remarkably few experimental studies have quantified the ensembles IDRs adopt in solution. Here, we conduct unbiased computer simulations of the RAP74 interaction motif from the human phosphatase FCP1 in the unbound state, which provides an ensemble in quantitative agreement with both experimental NMR chemical shift information and small-angle X-ray scattering data. The partially α-helical short linear motif found in the C-terminus of FCP1 has been the subject of extensive biophysical characterization aimed at developing a molecular description for the mechanism of coupled folding and binding and establishing the functional relevance of partial order in the unbound state. The analysis presented here yields a remarkably consistent molecular picture enumerating the diversity of structures present in a "partially formed" helix. Specific interactions, including anticorrelations in backbone dihedral angle fluctuations as well as the transient formation of a helix-stabilizing salt bridge, stabilize the preformed structure in the unbound state. The general consequences of these findings for mechanistic analysis of protein-protein interactions are discussed. PMID:27551949

  19. Intrinsically disordered human C/EBP homologous protein regulates biological activity of colon cancer cells during calcium stress

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vinay K.; Pacheco, Ivan; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Smith, Steven P.; MacLeod, R John; Jia, Zongchao

    2009-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are emerging as substantial functional constituents of mammalian proteomes. Although the abundance of these proteins has been established by bioinformatics approaches, the vast majority have not been characterized structurally and functionally. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) is a proto-oncogene, traditionally shown as a dominant-negative inhibitor of C/EBPs and a transcriptional activator of Activating Protein-1. We report here the in vitro characterization of CHOP, where our computational analyses and experimental evidences show for the first time that CHOP is an intrinsically disordered protein. Intrinsic fluorescence, NMR spectroscopy, and analytical size exclusion chromatography studies indicate that CHOP contains extensive disordered regions and self-associate in solution. Interestingly, the disordered N-terminal region plays a key role in the oligomerization of CHOP and is vital for its biological activity. We report the novel mechanistic role of CHOP in the inhibition of Wnt/TCF signaling and stimulation of c-Jun and sucrase-isomaltase reporter activity in intestinal colon cancer cells. These findings are discussed in the context of oligomerization of intrinsically disordered proteins as one of the mechanisms through which they exert their biological function. PMID:18534616

  20. Structure-based Inhibitor Design for the Intrinsically Disordered Protein c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chen; Niu, Xiaogang; Jin, Fan; Liu, Zhirong; Jin, Changwen; Lai, Luhua

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are associated with various diseases and have been proposed as promising drug targets. However, conventional structure-based approaches cannot be applied directly to IDPs, due to their lack of ordered structures. Here, we describe a novel computational approach to virtually screen for compounds that can simultaneously bind to different IDP conformations. The test system used c-Myc, an oncoprotein containing a disordered basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) domain that adopts a helical conformation upon binding to Myc-associated factor X (Max). For the virtual screen, we used three binding pockets in representative conformations of c-Myc370–409, which is part of the disordered bHLH-LZ domain. Seven compounds were found to directly bind c-Myc370–409 in vitro, and four inhibited the growth of the c-Myc-overexpressing cells by affecting cell cycle progression. Our approach of IDP conformation sampling, binding site identification, and virtual screening for compounds that can bind to multiple conformations provides a useful strategy for structure-based drug discovery targeting IDPs. PMID:26931396

  1. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    PubMed Central

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed ‘clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length. PMID:26027519

  2. Time Window Expansion for HDX Analysis of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Devrishi; Devarakonda, Srikripa; Chalmers, Michael J.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2013-10-01

    Application of typical HDX methods to examine intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP), proteins that are natively unstructured and highly dynamic at physiological pH, is limited because of the rapid exchange of unprotected amide hydrogens with solvent. The exchange rates of these fast exchanging amides are usually faster than the shortest time scale (10 s) employed in typical automated HDX-MS experiments. Considering the functional importance of IDPs and their association with many diseases, it is valuable to develop methods that allow the study of solution dynamics of these proteins as well as the ability to probe the interaction of IDPs with their wide range of binding partners. Here, we report the application of time window expansion to the millisecond range by altering the on-exchange pH of the HDX experiment to study a well-characterized IDP; the activation domain of the nuclear receptor coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α). This method enabled mapping the regions of PGC-1α that are stabilized upon binding the ligand binding domain (LBD) of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). We further demonstrate the method's applicability to other binding partners of the IDP PGC-1α and pave the way for characterizing many other biologically important ID proteins.

  3. An intrinsically disordered protein, CP12: jack of all trades and master of the Calvin cycle.

    PubMed

    Gontero, Brigitte; Maberly, Stephen C

    2012-10-01

    Many proteins contain disordered regions under physiological conditions and lack specific three-dimensional structure. These are referred to as IDPs (intrinsically disordered proteins). CP12 is a chloroplast protein of approximately 80 amino acids and has a molecular mass of approximately 8.2-8.5 kDa. It is enriched in charged amino acids and has a small number of hydrophobic residues. It has a high proportion of disorder-promoting residues, but has at least two (often four) cysteine residues forming one (or two) disulfide bridge(s) under oxidizing conditions that confers some order. However, CP12 behaves like an IDP. It appears to be universally distributed in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms and has recently been detected in a cyanophage. The best studied role of CP12 is its regulation of the Calvin cycle responsible for CO2 assimilation. Oxidized CP12 forms a supramolecular complex with two key Calvin cycle enzymes, GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and PRK (phosphoribulokinase), down-regulating their activity. Association-dissociation of this complex, induced by the redox state of CP12, allows the Calvin cycle to be inactive in the dark and active in the light. CP12 is promiscuous and interacts with other enzymes such as aldolase and malate dehydrogenase. It also plays other roles in plant metabolism such as protecting GAPDH from inactivation and scavenging metal ions such as copper and nickel, and it is also linked to stress responses. Thus CP12 seems to be involved in many functions in photosynthetic cells and behaves like a jack of all trades as well as being a master of the Calvin cycle.

  4. Troponins, intrinsic disorder, and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Kong, Min J; Straight, Shelby; Pinto, Jose R; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac troponin is a dynamic complex of troponin C, troponin I, and troponin T (TnC, TnI, and TnT, respectively) found in the myocyte thin filament where it plays an essential role in cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in troponin subunits are found in inherited cardiomyopathies, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The highly dynamic nature of human cardiac troponin and presence of numerous flexible linkers in its subunits suggest that understanding of structural and functional properties of this important complex can benefit from the consideration of the protein intrinsic disorder phenomenon. We show here that mutations causing decrease in the disorder score in TnI and TnT are significantly more abundant in HCM and DCM than mutations leading to the increase in the disorder score. Identification and annotation of intrinsically disordered regions in each of the troponin subunits conducted in this study can help in better understanding of the roles of intrinsic disorder in regulation of interactomes and posttranslational modifications of these proteins. These observations suggest that disease-causing mutations leading to a decrease in the local flexibility of troponins can trigger a whole plethora of functional changes in the heart. PMID:27074551

  5. Simple biophysics underpins collective conformations of the intrinsically disordered proteins of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Vovk, Andrei; Gu, Chad; Opferman, Michael G; Kapinos, Larisa E; Lim, Roderick YH; Coalson, Rob D; Jasnow, David; Zilman, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs) are key cellular transporter that control nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotic cells, but its transport mechanism is still not understood. The centerpiece of NPC transport is the assembly of intrinsically disordered polypeptides, known as FG nucleoporins, lining its passageway. Their conformations and collective dynamics during transport are difficult to assess in vivo. In vitro investigations provide partially conflicting results, lending support to different models of transport, which invoke various conformational transitions of the FG nucleoporins induced by the cargo-carrying transport proteins. We show that the spatial organization of FG nucleoporin assemblies with the transport proteins can be understood within a first principles biophysical model with a minimal number of key physical variables, such as the average protein interaction strengths and spatial densities. These results address some of the outstanding controversies and suggest how molecularly divergent NPCs in different species can perform essentially the same function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10785.001 PMID:27198189

  6. Actinidia DRM1--an intrinsically disordered protein whose mRNA expression is inversely correlated with spring budbreak in kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Wood, Marion; Rae, Georgina M; Wu, Rong-Mei; Walton, Eric F; Xue, Bin; Hellens, Roger P; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a relatively recently defined class of proteins which, under native conditions, lack a unique tertiary structure whilst maintaining essential biological functions. Functional classification of IDPs have implicated such proteins as being involved in various physiological processes including transcription and translation regulation, signal transduction and protein modification. Actinidia DRM1 (Ade DORMANCY ASSOCIATED GENE 1), represents a robust dormancy marker whose mRNA transcript expression exhibits a strong inverse correlation with the onset of growth following periods of physiological dormancy. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that DRM1 is plant specific and highly conserved at both the nucleotide and protein levels. It is predicted to be an intrinsically disordered protein with two distinct highly conserved domains. Several Actinidia DRM1 homologues, which align into two distinct Actinidia-specific families, Type I and Type II, have been identified. No candidates for the Arabidopsis DRM1-Homologue (AtDRM2) an additional family member, has been identified in Actinidia.

  7. High-order oligomers of intrinsically disordered brain proteins BASP1 and GAP-43 preserve the structural disorder.

    PubMed

    Forsova, Oksana S; Zakharov, Vladislav V

    2016-04-01

    Brain acid-soluble protein-1 (BASP1) and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) are presynaptic membrane proteins participating in axon guidance, neuroregeneration and synaptic plasticity. They are presumed to sequester phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 ) in lipid rafts. Previously we have shown that the proteins form heterogeneously sized oligomers in the presence of anionic phospholipids or SDS at submicellar concentration. BASP1 and GAP-43 are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In light of this, we investigated the structure of their oligomers. Using partial cross-linking of the oligomers with glutaraldehyde, the aggregation numbers of BASP1 and GAP-43 were estimated as 10-14 and 6-7 monomer subunits, respectively. The cross-linking pattern indicated that the subunits are circularly arranged. The circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the monomers were characteristic of coil-like IDPs showing unordered structure with a high population of polyproline-II conformation. The oligomerization was accompanied by a minor CD spectral change attributable to formation of a small amount of α-helix. The number of residues in the α-helical conformation was estimated as 13 in BASP1 and 18 in GAP-43. However, the overall structure of the oligomers remained disordered, indicating a high degree of 'fuzziness'. This was confirmed by measuring the hydrodynamic dimensions of the oligomers using polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis and size-exclusion chromatography, and by assaying their sensitivity to proteolytic digestion. There is evidence that the observed α-helical folding occurs within the basic effector domains, which are presumably tethered together via anionic molecules of SDS or PIP2 . We conclude that BASP1 and GAP-43 oligomers preserve a mostly disordered structure, which may be of great importance for their function in PIP2 signaling pathway. PMID:26918762

  8. Probing the Action of Chemical Denaturant on an Intrinsically Disordered Protein by Simulation and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenwei; Borgia, Alessandro; Buholzer, Karin; Grishaev, Alexander; Schuler, Benjamin; Best, Robert B

    2016-09-14

    Chemical denaturants are the most commonly used agents for unfolding proteins and are thought to act by better solvating the unfolded state. Improved solvation is expected to lead to an expansion of unfolded chains with increasing denaturant concentration, providing a sensitive probe of the denaturant action. However, experiments have so far yielded qualitatively different results concerning the effects of chemical denaturation. Studies using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and other methods found an increase in radius of gyration with denaturant concentration, but most small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies found no change. This discrepancy therefore challenges our understanding of denaturation mechanism and more generally the accuracy of these experiments as applied to unfolded or disordered proteins. Here, we use all-atom molecular simulations to investigate the effect of urea and guanidinium chloride on the structure of the intrinsically disordered protein ACTR, which can be studied by experiment over a wide range of denaturant concentration. Using unbiased molecular simulations with a carefully calibrated denaturant model, we find that the protein chain indeed swells with increasing denaturant concentration. This is due to the favorable association of urea or guanidinium chloride with the backbone of all residues and with the side-chains of almost all residues, with denaturant-water transfer free energies inferred from this association in reasonable accord with experimental estimates. Interactions of the denaturants with the backbone are dominated by hydrogen bonding, while interactions with side-chains include other contributions. By computing FRET efficiencies and SAXS intensities at each denaturant concentration, we show that the simulation trajectories are in accord with both experiments on this protein, demonstrating that there is no fundamental inconsistency between the two types of experiment. Agreement with experiment also supports the

  9. "CON-CON" assignment strategy for highly flexible intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Piai, Alessandro; Hošek, Tomáš; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Brutscher, Bernhard; Bermel, Wolfgang; Pierattelli, Roberta; Felli, Isabella C

    2014-12-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a class of highly flexible proteins whose characterization by NMR spectroscopy is complicated by severe spectral overlaps. The development of experiments designed to facilitate the sequence-specific assignment procedure is thus very important to improve the tools for the characterization of IDPs and thus to be able to focus on IDPs of increasing size and complexity. Here, we present and describe the implementation of a set of novel ¹H-detected 5D experiments, (HACA)CON(CACO)NCO(CA)HA, BT-(H)NCO(CAN)CONNH and BT-HN(COCAN)CONNH, optimized for the study of highly flexible IDPs that exploit the best resolved correlations, those involving the carbonyl and nitrogen nuclei of neighboring amino acids, to achieve sequence-specific resonance assignment. Together with the analogous recently proposed pulse schemes based on ¹³C detection, they form a complete set of experiments for sequence-specific assignment of highly flexible IDPs. Depending on the particular sample conditions (concentration, lifetime, pH, temperature, etc.), these experiments present certain advantages and disadvantages that will be discussed. Needless to say, that the availability of a variety of complementary experiments will be important for accurate determination of resonance frequencies in complex IDPs.

  10. Dynamical Coupling of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins and Their Hydration Water: Comparison with Folded Soluble and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallat, F.-X.; Laganowsky, A.; Wood, K.; Gabel, F.; van Eijck, L.; Wuttke, J.; Moulin, M.; Härtlein, M.; Eisenberg, D.; Colletier, J.-P.; Zaccai, G.; Weik, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hydration water is vital for various macromolecular biological activities, such as specific ligand recognition, enzyme activity, response to receptor binding, and energy transduction. Without hydration water, proteins would not fold correctly and would lack the conformational flexibility that animates their three-dimensional structures. Motions in globular, soluble proteins are thought to be governed to a certain extent by hydration-water dynamics, yet it is not known whether this relationship holds true for other protein classes in general and whether, in turn, the structural nature of a protein also influences water motions. Here, we provide insight into the coupling between hydration-water dynamics and atomic motions in intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP), a largely unexplored class of proteins that, in contrast to folded proteins, lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. We investigated the human IDP tau, which is involved in the pathogenic processes accompanying Alzheimer disease. Combining neutron scattering and protein perdeuteration, we found similar atomic mean-square displacements over a large temperature range for the tau protein and its hydration water, indicating intimate coupling between them. This is in contrast to the behavior of folded proteins of similar molecular weight, such as the globular, soluble maltose-binding protein and the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin, which display moderate to weak coupling, respectively. The extracted mean square displacements also reveal a greater motional flexibility of IDP compared with globular, folded proteins and more restricted water motions on the IDP surface. The results provide evidence that protein and hydration-water motions mutually affect and shape each other, and that there is a gradient of coupling across different protein classes that may play a functional role in macromolecular activity in a cellular context. PMID:22828339

  11. Phosphorylation Regulates the Bound Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: The p53-TAZ2 Case

    PubMed Central

    Ithuralde, Raúl Esteban; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Disordered regions and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in critical cellular processes and may acquire a stable three-dimensional structure only upon binding to their partners. IDPs may follow a folding-after-binding process, known as induced folding, or a folding-before-binding process, known as conformational selection. The transcription factor p53 is involved in the regulation of cellular events that arise upon stress or DNA damage. The p53 domain structure is composed of an N-terminal transactivation domain (p53TAD), a DNA Binding Domain and a tetramerization domain. The activity of TAD is tightly regulated by interactions with cofactors, inhibitors and phosphorylation. To initiate transcription, p53TAD binds to the TAZ2 domain of CBP, a co-transcription factor, and undergoes a folding and binding process, as revealed by the recent NMR structure of the complex. The activity of p53 is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites on the TAD domain and recent studies have shown that modifications at three residues affect the binding towards TAZ2. However, we still do not know how these phosphorylations affect the structure of the bound state and, therefore, how they regulate the p53 function. In this work, we have used computational simulations to understand how phosphorylation affects the structure of the p53TAD:TAZ2 complex and regulates the recognition mechanism. Phosphorylation has been proposed to enhance binding by direct interaction with the folded protein or by changing the unbound conformation of IDPs, for example by pre-folding the protein favoring the recognition mechanism. Here, we show an interesting turn in the p53 case: phosphorylation mainly affects the bound structure of p53TAD, highlighting the complexity of IDP protein-protein interactions. Our results are in agreement with previous experimental studies, allowing a clear picture of how p53 is regulated by phosphorylation and giving new insights into how post

  12. Hyperphosphorylation of Intrinsically Disordered Tau Protein Induces an Amyloidogenic Shift in Its Conformational Ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shaolong; Shala, Agnesa; Bezginov, Alexandr; Sljoka, Adnan; Audette, Gerald; Wilson, Derek J.

    2015-01-01

    Tau is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) whose primary physiological role is to stabilize microtubules in neuronal axons at all stages of development. In Alzheimer's and other tauopathies, tau forms intracellular insoluble amyloid aggregates known as neurofibrillary tangles, a process that appears in many cases to be preceded by hyperphosphorylation of tau monomers. Understanding the shift in conformational bias induced by hyperphosphorylation is key to elucidating the structural factors that drive tau pathology, however, as an IDP, tau is not amenable to conventional structural characterization. In this work, we employ a straightforward technique based on Time-Resolved ElectroSpray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TRESI-MS) and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange (HDX) to provide a detailed picture of residual structure in tau, and the shifts in conformational bias induced by hyperphosphorylation. By comparing the native and hyperphosphorylated ensembles, we are able to define specific conformational biases that can easily be rationalized as enhancing amyloidogenic propensity. Representative structures for the native and hyperphosphorylated tau ensembles were generated by refinement of a broad sample of conformations generated by low-computational complexity modeling, based on agreement with the TRESI-HDX profiles. PMID:25767879

  13. An Intrinsically Disordered Motif Mediates Diverse Actions of Monomeric C-reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yun; Wang, Jing; Meng, Fan; Jia, Zhe-Kun; Su, Yang; Bai, Qi-Feng; Lv, Ling-Ling; Ma, Fu-Rong; Potempa, Lawrence A; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Most proinflammatory actions of C-reactive protein (CRP) are only expressed following dissociation of its native pentameric assembly into monomeric form (mCRP). However, little is known about what underlies the greatly enhanced activities of mCRP. Here we show that a single sequence motif, i.e. cholesterol binding sequence (CBS; a.a. 35-47), is responsible for mediating the interactions of mCRP with diverse ligands. The binding of mCRP to lipoprotein component ApoB, to complement component C1q, to extracellular matrix components fibronectin and collagen, to blood coagulation component fibrinogen, and to membrane lipid component cholesterol, are all found to be markedly inhibited by the synthetic CBS peptide but not by other CRP sequences tested. Likewise, mutating CBS in mCRP also greatly impairs these interactions. Functional experiments further reveal that CBS peptide significantly reduces the effects of mCRP on activation of endothelial cells in vitro and on acute induction of IL-6 in mice. The potency and specificity of CBS are critically determined by the N-terminal residues Cys-36, Leu-37, and His-38; while the versatility of CBS appears to originate from its intrinsically disordered conformation polymorphism. Together, these data unexpectedly identify CBS as the major recognition site of mCRP and suggest that this motif may be exploited to tune the proinflammatory actions of mCRP.

  14. gH625 is a viral derived peptide for effective delivery of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Smaldone, Giovanni; Falanga, Annarita; Capasso, Domenica; Guarnieri, Daniela; Correale, Stefania; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Netti, Paolo A; Zollo, Massimo; Galdiero, Stefania; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Pedone, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    A genetically modified recombinant gH625-c-prune was prepared through conjugation of c-prune with gH625, a peptide encompassing 625–644 residues of the glycoprotein H of herpes simplex virus 1, which has been proved to possess the ability to carry cargo molecules across cell membranes. C-prune is the C-terminal domain of h-prune, overexpressed in breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers, interacting with multiple partners, and representing an ideal target for inhibition of cancer development. Its C-terminal domain results in an intrinsically disordered domain (IDD), and the peculiar properties of gH625 render it an optimal candidate to act as a carrier for this net negatively charged molecule by comparison with the positively charged TAT. A characterization of the recombinant gH625-c-prune fusion protein was conducted by biochemical, cellular biology and confocal microscopy means in comparison with TAT-c-prune. The results showed that the gH625-c-prune exhibited the ability to cross biomembranes, opening a new scenario on the use of gH625 as a novel multifunctional carrier. PMID:23901273

  15. The intrinsically disordered membrane protein selenoprotein S is a reductase in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Li, Fei; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Selenoprotein S (SelS, VIMP) is an intrinsically disordered membrane enzyme that provides protection against reactive oxidative species. SelS is a member of the endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation pathway but its precise enzymatic function is unknown. Since it contains the rare amino acid selenocysteine, it belongs to the family of selenoproteins, which are typically oxidoreductases. Its exact enzymatic function is key to understanding how the cell regulates the response to oxidative stress and thus influences human health and aging. In order to identify its enzymatic function, we have isolated the selenocysteine-containing enzyme by relying on the aggregation of forms that do not have this reactive residue. That allows us to establish that SelS is primarily a thioredoxin-dependent reductase. It is capable of reducing hydrogen peroxide but is not an efficient or broad-spectrum peroxidase. Only the selenocysteine-containing enzyme is active. In addition, the reduction potential of SelS was determined to be −234 mV using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. This value agrees with SelS being a partner of thioredoxin. Based on this information, SelS can directly combat reactive oxygen species but is also likely to participate in a signaling pathway, via a yet unidentified substrate. PMID:23566202

  16. An Intrinsically Disordered Motif Mediates Diverse Actions of Monomeric C-reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yun; Wang, Jing; Meng, Fan; Jia, Zhe-Kun; Su, Yang; Bai, Qi-Feng; Lv, Ling-Ling; Ma, Fu-Rong; Potempa, Lawrence A; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Most proinflammatory actions of C-reactive protein (CRP) are only expressed following dissociation of its native pentameric assembly into monomeric form (mCRP). However, little is known about what underlies the greatly enhanced activities of mCRP. Here we show that a single sequence motif, i.e. cholesterol binding sequence (CBS; a.a. 35-47), is responsible for mediating the interactions of mCRP with diverse ligands. The binding of mCRP to lipoprotein component ApoB, to complement component C1q, to extracellular matrix components fibronectin and collagen, to blood coagulation component fibrinogen, and to membrane lipid component cholesterol, are all found to be markedly inhibited by the synthetic CBS peptide but not by other CRP sequences tested. Likewise, mutating CBS in mCRP also greatly impairs these interactions. Functional experiments further reveal that CBS peptide significantly reduces the effects of mCRP on activation of endothelial cells in vitro and on acute induction of IL-6 in mice. The potency and specificity of CBS are critically determined by the N-terminal residues Cys-36, Leu-37, and His-38; while the versatility of CBS appears to originate from its intrinsically disordered conformation polymorphism. Together, these data unexpectedly identify CBS as the major recognition site of mCRP and suggest that this motif may be exploited to tune the proinflammatory actions of mCRP. PMID:26907682

  17. Selective transport control on molecular velcro made from intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Kai D; Dettmer, Simon L; Kapinos, Larisa E; Pagliara, Stefano; Keyser, Ulrich F; Jeney, Sylvia; Lim, Roderick Y H

    2014-07-01

    The selectivity and speed of many biological transport processes transpire from a 'reduction of dimensionality' that confines diffusion to one or two dimensions instead of three. This behaviour remains highly sought after on polymeric surfaces as a means to expedite diffusional search processes in molecular engineered systems. Here, we have reconstituted the two-dimensional diffusion of colloidal particles on a molecular brush surface. The surface is composed of phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups)--intrinsically disordered proteins that facilitate selective transport through nuclear pore complexes in eukaryotic cells. Local and ensemble-level experiments involving optical trapping using a photonic force microscope and particle tracking by video microscopy, respectively, reveal that 1-µm-sized colloidal particles bearing nuclear transport receptors called karyopherins can exhibit behaviour that varies from highly localized to unhindered two-dimensional diffusion. Particle diffusivity is controlled by varying the amount of free karyopherins in solution, which modulates the multivalency of Kap-binding sites within the molecular brush. We conclude that the FG Nups resemble stimuli-responsive molecular 'velcro', which can impart 'reduction of dimensionality' as a means of biomimetic transport control in artificial environments.

  18. Simulation of coupled folding and binding of an intrinsically disordered protein in explicit solvent with metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Han, Mengzhi; Xu, Ji; Ren, Ying; Li, Jinghai

    2016-07-01

    The C-terminal domain of measles virus nucleoprotein is an intrinsically disordered protein that could bind to the X domain (XD) of phosphoprotein P to exert its physiological function. Experiments reveal that the minimal binding unit is a 21-residue α-helical molecular recognition element (α-MoRE-MeV), which adopts a fully helical conformation upon binding to XD. Due to currently limited computing power, direct simulation of this coupled folding and binding process with atomic force field in explicit solvent cannot be achieved. In this work, two advanced sampling methods, metadynamics and parallel tempering, are combined to characterize the free energy surface of this process and investigate the underlying mechanism. Starting from an unbound and partially folded state of α-MoRE-MeV, multiple folding and binding events are observed during the simulation and the energy landscape was well estimated. The results demonstrate that the isolated α-MoRE-MeV resembles a molten globule and rapidly interconverts between random coil and multiple partially helical states in solution. The coupled folding and binding process occurs through the induced fit mechanism, with the residual helical conformations providing the initial binding sites. Upon binding, α-MoRE-MeV can easily fold into helical conformation without obvious energy barriers. Two mechanisms, namely, the system tending to adopt the structure in which the free energy of isolated α-MoRE-MeV is the minimum, and the binding energy of α-MoRE-MeV to its partner protein XD tending to the minimum, jointly dominate the coupled folding and binding process. With the advanced sampling approach, more IDP systems could be simulated and common mechanisms concerning the coupled folding and binding process could be investigated in the future. PMID:27423742

  19. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2013-01-01

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence–ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyampholytes. Using atomistic simulations, we show that weak polyampholytes form globules, whereas the conformational preferences of strong polyampholytes are determined by a combination of fraction of charged residues values and the linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues. We quantify the latter using a patterning parameter κ that lies between zero and one. The value of κ is low for well-mixed sequences, and in these sequences, intrachain electrostatic repulsions and attractions are counterbalanced, leading to the unmasking of preferences for conformations that resemble either self-avoiding random walks or generic Flory random coils. Segregation of oppositely charged residues within linear sequences leads to high κ-values and preferences for hairpin-like conformations caused by long-range electrostatic attractions induced by conformational fluctuations. We propose a scaling theory to explain the sequence-encoded conformational properties of strong polyampholytes. We show that naturally occurring strong polyampholytes have low κ-values, and this feature implies a selection for random coil ensembles. The design of sequences with different κ-values demonstrably alters the conformational preferences of polyampholytic IDPs, and this ability could become a useful tool for enabling direct inquiries into connections between sequence–ensemble relationships and functions of IDPs. PMID:23901099

  20. Intrinsically disordered segments and the evolution of protein half-life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, M.

    2013-03-01

    Precise turnover of proteins is essential for cellular homeostasis and is primarily mediated by the proteasome. Thus, a fundamental question is: What features make a protein an efficient substrate for degradation? Here I will present results that proteins with a long terminal disordered segment or internal disordered segments have a significantly shorter half-life in yeast. This relationship appears to be evolutionarily conserved in mouse and human. Furthermore, upon gene duplication, divergence in the length of terminal disorder or variation in the number of internal disordered segments results in significant alteration of the half-life of yeast paralogs. Many proteins that exhibit such changes participate in signaling, where altered protein half-life will likely influence their activity. We suggest that variation in the length and number of disordered segments could serve as a remarkably simple means to evolve protein half-life and may serve as an underappreciated source of genetic variation with important phenotypic consequences. MMB acknowledges the Medical Research Council for funding his research program.

  1. The Relationships Among MicroRNA Regulation, Intrinsically Disordered Regions, and Other Indicators of Protein Evolutionary Rate

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sean Chun-Chang; Chuang, Trees-Juen; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    Many indicators of protein evolutionary rate have been proposed, but some of them are interrelated. The purpose of this study is to disentangle their correlations. We assess the strength of each indicator by controlling for the other indicators under study. We find that the number of microRNA (miRNA) types that regulate a gene is the strongest rate indicator (a negative correlation), followed by disorder content (the percentage of disordered regions in a protein, a positive correlation); the strength of disorder content as a rate indicator is substantially increased after controlling for the number of miRNA types. By dividing proteins into lowly and highly intrinsically disordered proteins (L-IDPs and H-IDPs), we find that proteins interacting with more H-IDPs tend to evolve more slowly, which largely explains the previous observation of a negative correlation between the number of protein–protein interactions and evolutionary rate. Moreover, all of the indicators examined here, except for the number of miRNA types, have different strengths in L-IDPs and in H-IDPs. Finally, the number of phosphorylation sites is weakly correlated with the number of miRNA types, and its strength as a rate indicator is substantially reduced when other indicators are considered. Our study reveals the relative strength of each rate indicator and increases our understanding of protein evolution. PMID:21398349

  2. CP-HISQC: a better version of HSQC experiment for intrinsically disordered proteins under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2014-03-01

    (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectroscopy is a workhorse of protein NMR. However, under physiological conditions the quality of HSQC spectra tends to deteriorate due to fast solvent exchange. For globular proteins only a limited number of surface residues are affected, but in the case of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) HSQC spectra are thoroughly degraded, suffering from both peak broadening and loss of intensity. To alleviate this problem, we make use of the following two concepts. (1) Proton-decoupled HSQC. Regular HSQC and its many variants record the evolution of multi-spin modes, 2NxHz or 2NxHx, in indirect dimension. Under the effect of fast solvent exchange these modes undergo rapid decay, which results in severe line-broadening. In contrast, proton-decoupled HSQC relies on Nx coherence which is essentially insensitive to the effects of solvent exchange. Moreover, for measurements involving IDPs at or near physiological temperature, Nx mode offers excellent relaxation properties, leading to very sharp resonances. (2) Cross-polarization (1)H-to-(15)N transfer. If CP element is designed such as to lock both (1)H(N) and water magnetization, the following transfer is effected: [Formula: see text] Thus water magnetization is successfully exploited to boost the amount of signal. In addition, CP element suffers less loss from solvent exchange, conformational exchange, and dipolar relaxation compared to the more popular INEPT element. Combining these two concepts, we have implemented the experiment termed CP-HISQC (cross-polarization assisted heteronuclear in-phase single-quantum correlation). The pulse sequence has been designed such as to preserve water magnetization and therefore can be executed with reasonably short recycling delays. In the presence of fast solvent exchange, kex ~ 100 s(-1), CP-HISQC offers much better spectral resolution than conventional HSQC-type experiments. At the same time it offers up to twofold gain in sensitivity compared to plain proton

  3. Intrinsically disordered and pliable Starmaker-like protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes) controls the formation of calcium carbonate crystals.

    PubMed

    Różycka, Mirosława; Wojtas, Magdalena; Jakób, Michał; Stigloher, Christian; Grzeszkowiak, Mikołaj; Mazur, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Fish otoliths, biominerals composed of calcium carbonate with a small amount of organic matrix, are involved in the functioning of the inner ear. Starmaker (Stm) from zebrafish (Danio rerio) was the first protein found to be capable of controlling the formation of otoliths. Recently, a gene was identified encoding the Starmaker-like (Stm-l) protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes), a putative homologue of Stm and human dentine sialophosphoprotein. Although there is no sequence similarity between Stm-l and Stm, Stm-l was suggested to be involved in the biomineralization of otoliths, as had been observed for Stm even before. The molecular properties and functioning of Stm-l as a putative regulatory protein in otolith formation have not been characterized yet. A comprehensive biochemical and biophysical analysis of recombinant Stm-l, along with in silico examinations, indicated that Stm-l exhibits properties of a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein. Stm-l possesses an elongated and pliable structure that is able to adopt a more ordered and rigid conformation under the influence of different factors. An in vitro assay of the biomineralization activity of Stm-l indicated that Stm-l affected the size, shape and number of calcium carbonate crystals. The functional significance of intrinsically disordered properties of Stm-l and the possible role of this protein in controlling the formation of calcium carbonate crystals is discussed.

  4. Intrinsically Disordered and Pliable Starmaker-Like Protein from Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Controls the Formation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Różycka, Mirosława; Wojtas, Magdalena; Jakób, Michał; Stigloher, Christian; Grzeszkowiak, Mikołaj; Mazur, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Fish otoliths, biominerals composed of calcium carbonate with a small amount of organic matrix, are involved in the functioning of the inner ear. Starmaker (Stm) from zebrafish (Danio rerio) was the first protein found to be capable of controlling the formation of otoliths. Recently, a gene was identified encoding the Starmaker-like (Stm-l) protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes), a putative homologue of Stm and human dentine sialophosphoprotein. Although there is no sequence similarity between Stm-l and Stm, Stm-l was suggested to be involved in the biomineralization of otoliths, as had been observed for Stm even before. The molecular properties and functioning of Stm-l as a putative regulatory protein in otolith formation have not been characterized yet. A comprehensive biochemical and biophysical analysis of recombinant Stm-l, along with in silico examinations, indicated that Stm-l exhibits properties of a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein. Stm-l possesses an elongated and pliable structure that is able to adopt a more ordered and rigid conformation under the influence of different factors. An in vitro assay of the biomineralization activity of Stm-l indicated that Stm-l affected the size, shape and number of calcium carbonate crystals. The functional significance of intrinsically disordered properties of Stm-l and the possible role of this protein in controlling the formation of calcium carbonate crystals is discussed. PMID:25490041

  5. Monitoring structural changes in intrinsically disordered proteins using QCM-D: application to the bacterial cell division protein ZipA.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Tsortos, Achilleas; Vélez, Marisela; Gizeli, Electra

    2016-05-01

    The sensitivity of QCM-D to molecular hydrodynamic properties is applied in this work to study conformational changes of the intrinsically disordered protein ZipA. Acoustic measurements can clearly follow ZipA's unstructured domain expansion and contraction with salt content and be correlated with changes in the hydrodynamic radius of 1.8 nm or less.

  6. Monitoring structural changes in intrinsically disordered proteins using QCM-D: application to the bacterial cell division protein ZipA.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Tsortos, Achilleas; Vélez, Marisela; Gizeli, Electra

    2016-05-01

    The sensitivity of QCM-D to molecular hydrodynamic properties is applied in this work to study conformational changes of the intrinsically disordered protein ZipA. Acoustic measurements can clearly follow ZipA's unstructured domain expansion and contraction with salt content and be correlated with changes in the hydrodynamic radius of 1.8 nm or less. PMID:27109863

  7. Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase from Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.: an Intrinsically Disordered Protein.

    PubMed

    Montero-Morán, Gabriela M; Sampedro, José G; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Cervantes-González, Miguel A; Huerta-Ocampo, José Á; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P

    2015-08-01

    A novel Cu/ZnSOD from Amaranthus hypochondriacus was cloned, expressed, and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed an open reading frame (ORF) of 456 bp, which was predicted to encode a 15.6-kDa molecular weight protein with a pI of 5.4. Structural analysis showed highly conserved amino acid residues involved in Cu/Zn binding. Recombinant amaranth superoxide dismutase (rAhSOD) displayed more than 50 % of catalytic activity after incubation at 100 °C for 30 min. In silico analysis of Amaranthus hypochondriacus SOD (AhSOD) amino acid sequence for globularity and disorder suggested that this protein is mainly disordered; this was confirmed by circular dichroism, which showed the lack of secondary structure. Intrinsic fluorescence studies showed that rAhSOD undergoes conformational changes in two steps by the presence of Cu/Zn, which indicates the presence of two binding sites displaying different affinities for metals ions. Our results show that AhSOD could be classified as an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that is folded when metals are bound and with high thermal stability.

  8. Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase from Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.: an Intrinsically Disordered Protein.

    PubMed

    Montero-Morán, Gabriela M; Sampedro, José G; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Cervantes-González, Miguel A; Huerta-Ocampo, José Á; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P

    2015-08-01

    A novel Cu/ZnSOD from Amaranthus hypochondriacus was cloned, expressed, and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed an open reading frame (ORF) of 456 bp, which was predicted to encode a 15.6-kDa molecular weight protein with a pI of 5.4. Structural analysis showed highly conserved amino acid residues involved in Cu/Zn binding. Recombinant amaranth superoxide dismutase (rAhSOD) displayed more than 50 % of catalytic activity after incubation at 100 °C for 30 min. In silico analysis of Amaranthus hypochondriacus SOD (AhSOD) amino acid sequence for globularity and disorder suggested that this protein is mainly disordered; this was confirmed by circular dichroism, which showed the lack of secondary structure. Intrinsic fluorescence studies showed that rAhSOD undergoes conformational changes in two steps by the presence of Cu/Zn, which indicates the presence of two binding sites displaying different affinities for metals ions. Our results show that AhSOD could be classified as an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that is folded when metals are bound and with high thermal stability. PMID:26129702

  9. A collection of intrinsic disorder characterizations from eukaryotic proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Michael; Schnell, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and protein regions lack a stable three-dimensional structure under physiological conditions. Several proteomic investigations of intrinsic disorder have been performed to date and have found disorder to be prevalent in eukaryotic proteomes. Here we present descriptive statistics of intrinsic disorder features for ten model eukaryotic proteomes that have been calculated from computational disorder prediction algorithms. The data descriptor also provides consensus disorder annotations as well as additional physical parameters relevant to protein disorder, and further provides protein existence information for all proteins included in our analysis. The complete datasets can be downloaded freely, and it is envisaged that they will be updated periodically with new proteomes and protein disorder prediction algorithms. These datasets will be especially useful for assessing protein disorder, and conducting novel analyses that advance our understanding of intrinsic disorder and protein structure. PMID:27326998

  10. Discriminating binding mechanisms of an intrinsically disordered protein via a multi-state coarse-grained model

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, Michael; Best, Robert B.

    2014-05-07

    Many proteins undergo a conformational transition upon binding to their cognate binding partner, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) providing an extreme example in which a folding transition occurs. However, it is often not clear whether this occurs via an “induced fit” or “conformational selection” mechanism, or via some intermediate scenario. In the first case, transient encounters with the binding partner favour transitions to the bound structure before the two proteins dissociate, while in the second the bound structure must be selected from a subset of unbound structures which are in the correct state for binding, because transient encounters of the incorrect conformation with the binding partner are most likely to result in dissociation. A particularly interesting situation involves those intrinsically disordered proteins which can bind to different binding partners in different conformations. We have devised a multi-state coarse-grained simulation model which is able to capture the binding of IDPs in alternate conformations, and by applying it to the binding of nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) to either ACTR or IRF-3 we are able to determine the binding mechanism. By all measures, the binding of NCBD to either binding partner appears to occur via an induced fit mechanism. Nonetheless, we also show how a scenario closer to conformational selection could arise by choosing an alternative non-binding structure for NCBD.

  11. Conformational characterization of the intrinsically disordered protein Chibby: Interplay between structural elements in target recognition.

    PubMed

    Killoran, Ryan C; Sowole, Modupeola A; Halim, Mohammad A; Konermann, Lars; Choy, Wing-Yiu

    2016-08-01

    The protein Chibby (Cby) is an antagonist of the Wnt signaling pathway, where it inhibits the binding between the transcriptional coactivator β-catenin and the Tcf/Lef transcription factors. The 126 residue Cby is partially disordered; its N-terminal half is unstructured while its C-terminal half comprises a coiled-coil domain. Previous structural analyses of Cby using NMR spectroscopy suffered from severe line broadening for residues within the protein's C-terminal half, hindering detailed characterization of the coiled-coil domain. Here, we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to examine Cby's C-terminal half. Results reveal that Cby is divided into three structural elements: a disordered N-terminal half, a coiled-coil domain, and a C-terminal unstructured extension consisting of the last ∼ 25 residues (which we term C-terminal extension). A series of truncation constructs were designed to assess the roles of individual structural elements in protein stability and Cby binding to TC-1, a positive regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway. CD and NMR data show that Cby maintains coiled-coil structure upon deletion of either disordered region. NMR and ITC binding experiments between Cby and TC-1 illustrate that the interaction is retained upon deletion of either Cby's N-terminal half or its C-terminal extension. Intriguingly, Cby's C-terminal half alone binds to TC-1 with significantly greater affinity compared to full-length Cby, implying that target binding of the coiled-coil domain is affected by the flanking disordered regions. PMID:27082063

  12. Multi-scaled explorations of binding-induced folding of intrinsically disordered protein inhibitor IA3 to its target enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Yong; Chu, Xiakun; Hagen, Stephen J; Han, Wei; Wang, Erkang

    2011-04-01

    Biomolecular function is realized by recognition, and increasing evidence shows that recognition is determined not only by structure but also by flexibility and dynamics. We explored a biomolecular recognition process that involves a major conformational change - protein folding. In particular, we explore the binding-induced folding of IA3, an intrinsically disordered protein that blocks the active site cleft of the yeast aspartic proteinase saccharopepsin (YPrA) by folding its own N-terminal residues into an amphipathic alpha helix. We developed a multi-scaled approach that explores the underlying mechanism by combining structure-based molecular dynamics simulations at the residue level with a stochastic path method at the atomic level. Both the free energy profile and the associated kinetic paths reveal a common scheme whereby IA3 binds to its target enzyme prior to folding itself into a helix. This theoretical result is consistent with recent time-resolved experiments. Furthermore, exploration of the detailed trajectories reveals the important roles of non-native interactions in the initial binding that occurs prior to IA3 folding. In contrast to the common view that non-native interactions contribute only to the roughness of landscapes and impede binding, the non-native interactions here facilitate binding by reducing significantly the entropic search space in the landscape. The information gained from multi-scaled simulations of the folding of this intrinsically disordered protein in the presence of its binding target may prove useful in the design of novel inhibitors of aspartic proteinases.

  13. The Intrinsically Disordered Protein Atg13 Mediates Supramolecular Assembly of Autophagy Initiation Complexes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hayashi; Fujioka, Yuko; Suzuki, Sho W; Noshiro, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hironori; Kondo-Kakuta, Chika; Kimura, Yayoi; Hirano, Hisashi; Ando, Toshio; Noda, Nobuo N; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2016-07-11

    Autophagosome formation in yeast entails starvation-induced assembly of the pre-autophagosomal structure (PAS), in which multiple Atg1 complexes (composed of Atg1, Atg13, and the Atg17-Atg29-Atg31 subcomplex) are initially engaged. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the multimeric assembly of these complexes remain unclear. Using structural and biological techniques, we herein demonstrate that Atg13 has a large intrinsically disordered region (IDR) and interacts with two distinct Atg17 molecules using two binding regions in the IDR. We further reveal that these two binding regions are essential not only for Atg1 complex assembly in vitro, but also for PAS organization in vivo. These findings underscore the structural and functional significance of the IDR of Atg13 in autophagy initiation: Atg13 provides intercomplex linkages between Atg17-Atg29-Atg31 complexes, thereby leading to supramolecular self-assembly of Atg1 complexes, in turn accelerating the initial events of autophagy, including autophosphorylation of Atg1, recruitment of Atg9 vesicles, and phosphorylation of Atg9 by Atg1. PMID:27404361

  14. Role of Intrinsic Protein Disorder in the Function and Interactions of the Transcriptional Coactivators CREB-binding Protein (CBP) and p300.

    PubMed

    Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2016-03-25

    The transcriptional coactivators CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 undergo a particularly rich set of interactions with disordered and partly ordered partners, as a part of their ubiquitous role in facilitating transcription of genes. CBP and p300 contain a number of small structured domains that provide scaffolds for the interaction of disordered transactivation domains from a wide variety of partners, including p53, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), NF-κB, and STAT proteins, and are the targets for the interactions of disordered viral proteins that compete with cellular factors to disrupt signaling and subvert the cell cycle. The functional diversity of the CBP/p300 interactome provides an excellent example of the power of intrinsic disorder to facilitate the complexity of living systems.

  15. Structural models of intrinsically disordered and calcium-bound folded states of a protein adapted for secretion

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Darragh P.; Hernandez, Belen; Durand, Dominique; Hourdel, Véronique; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Vachette, Patrice; Ghomi, Mahmoud; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Ladant, Daniel; Brier, Sébastien; Chenal, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type I secretion systems, T1SS, to secrete virulence factors that contain calcium-binding Repeat-in-ToXin (RTX) motifs. Here, we present structural models of an RTX protein, RD, in both its intrinsically disordered calcium-free Apo-state and its folded calcium-bound Holo-state. Apo-RD behaves as a disordered polymer chain comprising several statistical elements that exhibit local rigidity with residual secondary structure. Holo-RD is a folded multi-domain protein with an anisometric shape. RTX motifs thus appear remarkably adapted to the structural and mechanistic constraints of the secretion process. In the low calcium environment of the bacterial cytosol, Apo-RD is an elongated disordered coil appropriately sized for transport through the narrow secretion machinery. The progressive folding of Holo-RD in the extracellular calcium-rich environment as it emerges form the T1SS may then favor its unidirectional export through the secretory channel. This process is relevant for hundreds of bacterial species producing virulent RTX proteins. PMID:26374675

  16. Are Charge-State Distributions a Reliable Tool Describing Molecular Ensembles of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins by Native MS?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalello, Antonino; Santambrogio, Carlo; Grandori, Rita

    2016-10-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a central tool of structural proteomics, but its applicability to the peculiar class of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is still object of debate. IDPs lack an ordered tridimensional structure and are characterized by high conformational plasticity. Since they represent valuable targets for cancer and neurodegeneration research, there is an urgent need of methodological advances for description of the conformational ensembles populated by these proteins in solution. However, structural rearrangements during electrospray-ionization (ESI) or after the transfer to the gas phase could affect data obtained by native ESI-MS. In particular, charge-state distributions (CSDs) are affected by protein conformation inside ESI droplets, while ion mobility (IM) reflects protein conformation in the gas phase. This review focuses on the available evidence relating IDP solution ensembles with CSDs, trying to summarize cases of apparent consistency or discrepancy. The protein-specificity of ionization patterns and their responses to ligands and buffer conditions suggests that CSDs are imprinted to protein structural features also in the case of IDPs. Nevertheless, it seems that these proteins are more easily affected by electrospray conditions, leading in some cases to rearrangements of the conformational ensembles.

  17. Combining a PagP fusion protein system with nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage to produce intrinsically disordered proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Somaya; Pan, Jonathan S; Liu, Philip B; Hwang, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions that are highly solvent-exposed and susceptible to post-translational modifications. Studying these protein segments is critical to understanding their physiologic regulation, but proteolytic degradation can make them difficult to express and purify. We have designed a new protein expression vector that fuses the target protein to the N-terminus of the integral membrane protein, PagP. The two proteins are connected by a short linker containing the sequence SRHW, previously shown to be optimal for nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage. The methodology is demonstrated for an intrinsically disordered segment of cardiac troponin I. cTnI[135-209]-SRHW-PagP-His6 fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, accumulating in insoluble inclusion bodies. The protein was solubilized, purified using nickel affinity chromatography, and then cleaved with 0.5mM NiSO4 at pH 9.0 and 45 °C, all in 6M guanidine-HCl. Nickel ion-catalyzed peptide bond hydrolysis is an effective chemical cleavage technique under denaturing conditions that preclude the use of proteases. Moreover, nickel-catalyzed cleavage is more specific than the most commonly used agent, cyanogen bromide, which cleaves C-terminal to methionine residues. We were able to produce 15 mg of purified cTnI[135-209] from 1L of M9 minimal media using this protocol. The methodology is more generally applicable to the production of intrinsically disordered protein segments.

  18. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  19. Identification of Atg3 as an intrinsically disordered polypeptide yields insights into the molecular dynamics of autophagy-related proteins in yeast.

    PubMed

    Popelka, Hana; Uversky, Vladimir N; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2014-06-01

    The mechanism of autophagy relies on complex cell signaling and regulatory processes. Each cell contains many proteins that lack a rigid 3-dimensional structure under physiological conditions. These dynamic proteins, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and protein regions (IDPRs), are predominantly involved in cell signaling and regulation. Yet, very little is known about their presence among proteins of the core autophagy machinery. In this work, we characterized the autophagy protein Atg3 from yeast and human along with 2 variants to show that Atg3 is an IDPRs-containing protein and that disorder/order predicted for these proteins from their amino acid sequence corresponds to their experimental characteristics. Based on this consensus, we applied the same prediction methods to all known Atg proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The data presented here provide an insight into the structural dynamics of each Atg protein. They also show that intrinsic disorder at various levels has to be taken into consideration for about half of the Atg proteins. This work should become a useful tool that will facilitate and encourage exploration of protein intrinsic disorder in autophagy. PMID:24879155

  20. Differential dynamical effects of macromolecular crowding on an intrinsically disordered protein and a globular protein: implications for in-cell NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Conggang; Charlton, Lisa M; Lakkavaram, Asha; Seagle, Christopher; Wang, Guifang; Young, Gregory B; Macdonald, Jeffrey M; Pielak, Gary J

    2008-05-21

    In-cell NMR provides a valuable means to assess how macromolecules, with concentrations up to 300 g/L in the cytoplasm, affect the structure and dynamics of proteins at atomic resolution. Here an intrinsically disordered protein, alpha-synuclein (alphaSN), and a globular protein, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) were examined by using in-cell NMR. High-resolution in-cell spectra of alphaSN can be obtained, but CI2 leaks from the cell and the remaining intracellular CI2 is not detectable. Even after stabilizing the cells from leakage by using alginate encapsulation, no CI2 signal is detected. From in vitro studies we conclude that this difference in detectability is the result of the differential dynamical response of disordered and ordered proteins to the changes of motion caused by the increased viscosity in cells.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Fluctuating Conformational Dynamics of the Intrinsically Disordered Proteins α-Synuclein and τ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.; Schreck, Carl; Nath, Abhinav; Rhoades, Elizabeth; O'Hern, Corey

    2013-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not possess well-defined three-dimensional structures in solution under physiological conditions. We develop united-atom and coarse-grained Langevin dynamics simulations for the IDPs α-synuclein and τ that include geometric,attractive hydrophobic, and screened electrostatic interactions and are calibrated to the inter-residue separations measured in recent smFRET experiments. We find that these IDPs have conformational statistics that are intermediate between random walk and collapsed globule behavior and demonstrate close resemblance to the known experimental data, with both electrostatics and hydrophobicity strongly influencing the dynamics. We investigate the propensity of α-synuclein to aggregate and form oligomers, and present preliminary results for the aggregation of τ and interactions between these IDPs and small molecules such as heparin and spermine which are known to induce aggregation.

  2. Hamiltonian Switch Metropolis Monte Carlo Simulations for Improved Conformational Sampling of Intrinsically Disordered Regions Tethered to Ordered Domains of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the topic of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Atomistic Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) simulations based on novel implicit solvation models have yielded useful insights regarding sequence-ensemble relationships for IDPs modeled as autonomous units. However, a majority of naturally occurring IDPs are tethered to ordered domains. Tethering introduces additional energy scales and this creates the challenge of broken ergodicity for standard MMC sampling or molecular dynamics that cannot be readily alleviated by using generalized tempering methods. We have designed, deployed, and tested our adaptation of the Nested Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithm. We refer to our adaptation as Hamiltonian Switch Metropolis Monte Carlo (HS-MMC) sampling. In this method, transitions out of energetic traps are enabled by the introduction of an auxiliary Markov chain that draws conformations for the disordered region from a Boltzmann distribution that is governed by an alternative potential function that only includes short-range steric repulsions and conformational restraints on the ordered domain. We show using multiple, independent runs that the HS-MMC method yields conformational distributions that have similar and reproducible statistical properties, which is in direct contrast to standard MMC for equivalent amounts of sampling. The method is efficient and can be deployed for simulations of a range of biologically relevant disordered regions that are tethered to ordered domains. PMID:25136274

  3. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-06-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution.

  4. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-01-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution. PMID:26042819

  5. Rethinking gene regulatory networks in light of alternative splicing, intrinsically disordered protein domains, and post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J.; Bondos, Sarah E.; Dunker, A. Keith; Newman, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Models for genetic regulation and cell fate specification characteristically assume that gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are essentially deterministic and exhibit multiple stable states specifying alternative, but pre-figured cell fates. Mounting evidence shows, however, that most eukaryotic precursor RNAs undergo alternative splicing (AS) and that the majority of transcription factors contain intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) domains whose functionalities are context dependent as well as subject to post-translational modification (PTM). Consequently, many transcription factors do not have fixed cis-acting regulatory targets, and developmental determination by GRNs alone is untenable. Modeling these phenomena requires a multi-scale approach to explain how GRNs operationally interact with the intra- and intercellular environments. Evidence shows that AS, IDP, and PTM complicate gene expression and act synergistically to facilitate and promote time- and cell-specific protein modifications involved in cell signaling and cell fate specification and thereby disrupt a strict deterministic GRN-phenotype mapping. The combined effects of AS, IDP, and PTM give proteomes physiological plasticity, adaptive responsiveness, and developmental versatility without inefficiently expanding genome size. They also help us understand how protein functionalities can undergo major evolutionary changes by buffering mutational consequences. PMID:25767796

  6. A novel hepacivirus with an unusually long and intrinsically disordered NS5A protein in a wild Old World primate.

    PubMed

    Lauck, Michael; Sibley, Samuel D; Lara, James; Purdy, Michael A; Khudyakov, Yury; Hyeroba, David; Tumukunde, Alex; Weny, Geoffrey; Switzer, William M; Chapman, Colin A; Hughes, Austin L; Friedrich, Thomas C; O'Connor, David H; Goldberg, Tony L

    2013-08-01

    GB virus B (GBV-B; family Flaviviridae, genus Hepacivirus) has been studied in New World primates as a model for human hepatitis C virus infection, but the distribution of GBV-B and its relatives in nature has remained obscure. Here, we report the discovery of a novel and highly divergent GBV-B-like virus in an Old World monkey, the black-and-white colobus (Colobus guereza), in Uganda. The new virus, guereza hepacivirus (GHV), clusters phylogenetically with GBV-B and recently described hepaciviruses infecting African bats and North American rodents, and it shows evidence of ancient recombination with these other hepaciviruses. Direct sequencing of reverse-transcribed RNA from blood plasma from three of nine colobus monkeys yielded near-complete GHV genomes, comprising two distinct viral variants. The viruses contain an exceptionally long nonstructural 5A (NS5A) gene, approximately half of which codes for a protein with no discernible homology to known proteins. Computational structure-based analyses indicate that the amino terminus of the GHV NS5A protein may serve a zinc-binding function, similar to the NS5A of other viruses within the family Flaviviridae. However, the 521-amino-acid carboxy terminus is intrinsically disordered, reflecting an unusual degree of structural plasticity and polyfunctionality. These findings shed new light on the natural history and evolution of the hepaciviruses and on the extent of structural variation within the Flaviviridae.

  7. Are there folding pathways in the functional stages of intrinsically disordered proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, N.; Liu, J.; Marinova, R.; Petkov, P.; Litov, L.; He, J.; Niemi, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    We proceed from the description of protein folding by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with all-atom force fields, with folding pathways interpreted in terms of soliton structures, to identify possible systematic dynamical patterns of self-organisation that govern protein folding process. We perform in silico investigations of the conformational transformations of three different proteins - MYC protein (an α-helical protein), amylin and indolicidin (IDPs with different length and binding dynamics). We discuss the emergence of soliton-mediated secondary motifs, in the case of IDPs - in the context of their functional activity. We hypothesize that soliton-like quasi-ordered conformations appear as an important intermediate stage in this process.

  8. Reconfiguration dynamics in folded and intrinsically disordered protein with internal friction: Effect of solvent quality and denaturant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Nairhita; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    We consider a flexible chain with internal friction in a harmonic confinement and extend it to include the effects of solvent quality at the mean field level by introducing a Flory type exponent ν. The strength of the harmonic confinement (kc) accounts for the denaturant concentration and connects to the internal friction of the chain (ξint) through an ansatz. Our calculated reconfiguration times falling in the range of 5-50 ns are found out to be within 10%-15% of the experimentally measured reconfiguration times of the folded cold shock protein and the intrinsically disordered protein prothymosin α. In addition, our calculations show that the reconfiguration time scales with the chain length N as ∼Nα, where α depends weakly on the internal friction but has rather stronger dependence on the solvent quality. In the absence of any internal friction, α = 2 ν + 1 and it goes down in the presence of internal friction, but chain reconfiguration slows down in general. On the contrary, in a poorer solvent chain reconfiguration and looping become faster even though the internal friction is higher in the collapsed state.

  9. Tunable Membrane Binding of the Intrinsically Disordered Dehydrin Lti30, a Cold-Induced Plant Stress Protein[W

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Sylvia K.; Kutzer, Michael; Procek, Jan; Gröbner, Gerhard; Harryson, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrins are intrinsically disordered plant proteins whose expression is upregulated under conditions of desiccation and cold stress. Their molecular function in ensuring plant survival is not yet known, but several studies suggest their involvement in membrane stabilization. The dehydrins are characterized by a broad repertoire of conserved and repetitive sequences, out of which the archetypical K-segment has been implicated in membrane binding. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of these K-segments, we examined the interaction between lipid membranes and a dehydrin with a basic functional sequence composition: Lti30, comprising only K-segments. Our results show that Lti30 interacts electrostatically with vesicles of both zwitterionic (phosphatidyl choline) and negatively charged phospholipids (phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl serine, and phosphatidic acid) with a stronger binding to membranes with high negative surface potential. The membrane interaction lowers the temperature of the main lipid phase transition, consistent with Lti30’s proposed role in cold tolerance. Moreover, the membrane binding promotes the assembly of lipid vesicles into large and easily distinguishable aggregates. Using these aggregates as binding markers, we identify three factors that regulate the lipid interaction of Lti30 in vitro: (1) a pH dependent His on/off switch, (2) phosphorylation by protein kinase C, and (3) reversal of membrane binding by proteolytic digest. PMID:21665998

  10. Origin of a folded repeat protein from an intrinsically disordered ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongbo; Sepulveda, Edgardo; Hartmann, Marcus D; Kogenaru, Manjunatha; Ursinus, Astrid; Sulz, Eva; Albrecht, Reinhard; Coles, Murray; Martin, Jörg; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive proteins are thought to have arisen through the amplification of subdomain-sized peptides. Many of these originated in a non-repetitive context as cofactors of RNA-based replication and catalysis, and required the RNA to assume their active conformation. In search of the origins of one of the most widespread repeat protein families, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR), we identified several potential homologs of its repeated helical hairpin in non-repetitive proteins, including the putatively ancient ribosomal protein S20 (RPS20), which only becomes structured in the context of the ribosome. We evaluated the ability of the RPS20 hairpin to form a TPR fold by amplification and obtained structures identical to natural TPRs for variants with 2–5 point mutations per repeat. The mutations were neutral in the parent organism, suggesting that they could have been sampled in the course of evolution. TPRs could thus have plausibly arisen by amplification from an ancestral helical hairpin. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16761.001 PMID:27623012

  11. Insights into the regulation of intrinsically disordered proteins in the human proteome by analyzing sequence and gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Yvonne JK; Lobley, Anna E; Pentony, Melissa M; Jones, David T

    2009-01-01

    Background Disordered proteins need to be expressed to carry out specified functions; however, their accumulation in the cell can potentially cause major problems through protein misfolding and aggregation. Gene expression levels, mRNA decay rates, microRNA (miRNA) targeting and ubiquitination have critical roles in the degradation and disposal of human proteins and transcripts. Here, we describe a study examining these features to gain insights into the regulation of disordered proteins. Results In comparison with ordered proteins, disordered proteins have a greater proportion of predicted ubiquitination sites. The transcripts encoding disordered proteins also have higher proportions of predicted miRNA target sites and higher mRNA decay rates, both of which are indicative of the observed lower gene expression levels. The results suggest that the disordered proteins and their transcripts are present in the cell at low levels and/or for a short time before being targeted for disposal. Surprisingly, we find that for a significant proportion of highly disordered proteins, all four of these trends are reversed. Predicted estimates for miRNA targets, ubiquitination and mRNA decay rate are low in the highly disordered proteins that are constitutively and/or highly expressed. Conclusions Mechanisms are in place to protect the cell from these potentially dangerous proteins. The evidence suggests that the enrichment of signals for miRNA targeting and ubiquitination may help prevent the accumulation of disordered proteins in the cell. Our data also provide evidence for a mechanism by which a significant proportion of highly disordered proteins (with high expression levels) can escape rapid degradation to allow them to successfully carry out their function. PMID:19432952

  12. Impact of hydrostatic pressure on an intrinsically disordered protein: a high-pressure NMR study of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Roche, Julien; Ying, Jinfa; Maltsev, Alexander S; Bax, Ad

    2013-09-23

    The impact of pressure on the backbone (15) N, (1) H and (13) C chemical shifts in N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein has been evaluated over a pressure range 1-2500 bar. Even while the chemical shifts fall very close to random coil values, as expected for an intrinsically disordered protein, substantial deviations in the pressure dependence of the chemical shifts are seen relative to those in short model peptides. In particular, the nonlinear pressure response of the (1) H(N) chemical shifts, which commonly is associated with the presence of low-lying "excited states", is much larger in α-synuclein than in model peptides. The linear pressure response of (1) H(N) chemical shift, commonly linked to H-bond length change, correlates well with those in short model peptides, and is found to be anticorrelated with its temperature dependence. The pressure dependence of (13) C chemical shifts shows remarkably large variations, even when accounting for residue type, and do not point to a clear shift in population between different regions of the Ramachandran map. However, a nearly universal decrease in (3) JHN-Hα by 0.22 ± 0.05 Hz suggests a slight increase in population of the polyproline II region at 2500 bar. The first six residues of N-terminally acetylated synuclein show a transient of approximately 15% population of α-helix, which slightly diminishes at 2500 bar. The backbone dynamics of the protein is not visibly affected beyond the effect of slight increase in water viscosity at 2500 bar. PMID:23813793

  13. Impact of Hydrostatic Pressure on an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: A High-Pressure NMR Study of α-Synuclein [a

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Julien; Ying, Jinfa; Maltsev, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of pressure on the backbone 15N, 1H and 13C chemical shifts in N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein has been evaluated over a pressure range spanning from 1–2500 bar. Even while the chemical shifts fall very close to random coil values, as expected for an intrinsically disordered protein, substantial deviations in the pressure dependence of the chemical shifts are seen relative to those in short model peptides. In particular, the non-linear pressure response of the 1HN chemical shifts, which commonly is associated with the presence of low-lying "excited states", is much larger in α-synuclein than in model peptides. The linear pressure response of 1HN chemical shift, commonly linked to H-bond length change, correlates well with those in short model peptides, and is found to be anti-correlated with its temperature dependence. The pressure dependence of 13C chemical shifts shows remarkably large variations, even when accounting for residue type, and do not point to a clear shift in population between different regions of the Ramachandran map. However, a nearly universal decrease in 3JHN-Hα by 0.22 ± 0.05 Hz suggests a slight increase in population of the polyproline II region at 2500 bar. The first six residues of N-terminally acetylated synuclein show a transient ca 15% population of α-helix, which slightly diminishes at 2500 bar. The backbone dynamics of the protein is not visibly affected beyond the effect of slight increase in water viscosity at 2500 bar. PMID:23813793

  14. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus - the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition.

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut.

  15. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut.

  16. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    PubMed Central

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut. PMID:27112540

  17. Clusters in an intrinsically disordered protein create a protein-binding site: the TolB-binding region of colicin E9.

    PubMed

    Tozawa, Kaeko; Macdonald, Colin J; Penfold, Christopher N; James, Richard; Kleanthous, Colin; Clayden, Nigel J; Moore, Geoffrey R

    2005-08-30

    The 61-kDa colicin E9 protein toxin enters the cytoplasm of susceptible cells by interacting with outer membrane and periplasmic helper proteins and kills them by hydrolyzing their DNA. The membrane translocation function is located in the N-terminal domain of the colicin, with a key signal sequence being a pentapeptide region that governs the interaction with the helper protein TolB (the TolB box). Previous NMR studies [Collins et al. (2002) J. Mol. Biol. 318, 787-904; MacDonald et al. (2004), J. Biomol. NMR 30, 81-96] have shown that the N-terminal 83 residues of colicin E9, which includes the TolB box, is intrinsically disordered and contains clusters of interacting side chains. To further define the properties of this region of colicin E9, we have investigated the effects on the dynamical and TolB-binding properties of three mutations of colicin E9 that inactivate it as a toxin. The mutations were contained in a fusion protein consisting of residues 1-61 of colicin E9 connected to the N terminus of the E9 DNase by an eight-residue linking sequence. The NMR data reveals that the mutations cause major alterations to the properties of some of the clusters, consistent with some form of association between them and other more distant parts of the amino acid sequence, particularly toward the N terminus of the protein. However, (15)N T(2) measurements indicates that residues 5-13 of the fusion protein bound to the 43-kDa TolB remain as flexible as they are in the free protein. The NMR data point to considerable dynamic ordering within the intrinsically disordered translocation domain of the colicin that is important for creating the TolB-binding site. Furthermore, amino acid sequence considerations suggest that the clusters of amino acids occur because of the size and polarities of the side chains forming them influenced by the propensities of the residues within the clusters and those immediately surrounding them in sequence space to form beta turns. PMID:16114886

  18. A New Family of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Structural Characterization of the Major Phasin PhaF from Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Maestro, Beatriz; Galán, Beatriz; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; Prieto, Maria A.; Sanz, Jesús M.

    2013-01-01

    Phasins are intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoat4e (PHA)-associated proteins involved in the stabilization of these bacterial carbon storage granules. Despite its importance in PHA metabolism and regulation, only few reports have focused so far on the structure of these proteins. In this work we have investigated the structure and stability of the PhaF phasin from Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a protein that is involved in PHA granule stabilization and distribution to daughter cells upon cell division. A structural, three-dimensional model of the protein was built from homology modeling procedures and consensus secondary structure predictions. The model predicts that PhaF is an elongated protein, with a long, amphipathic N-terminal helix with PHA binding capacity, followed by a short leucine zipper involved in protein oligomerization and a superhelical C-terminal domain wrapped around the chromosomal DNA. Hydrodynamic, spectroscopical and thermodynamic experiments validated the model and confirmed both that free PhaF is a tetramer in solution and that most part of the protein is intrinsically disordered in the absence of its ligands. The results lay a molecular basis for the explanation of the biological role of PhaF and, along with an exhaustive analysis of phasin sequence databases, suggest that intrinsic disorder and oligomerization through coiled-coils may be a widespread mechanism among these proteins. PMID:23457638

  19. A Proline-Tryptophan Turn in the Intrinsically Disordered Domain 2 of NS5A Protein Is Essential for Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Dujardin, Marie; Madan, Vanesa; Montserret, Roland; Ahuja, Puneet; Huvent, Isabelle; Launay, Helene; Leroy, Arnaud; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Penin, François; Lippens, Guy; Hanoulle, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) and its interaction with the human chaperone cyclophilin A are both targets for highly potent and promising antiviral drugs that are in the late stages of clinical development. Despite its high interest in regards to the development of drugs to counteract the worldwide HCV burden, NS5A is still an enigmatic multifunctional protein poorly characterized at the molecular level. NS5A is required for HCV RNA replication and is involved in viral particle formation and regulation of host pathways. Thus far, no enzymatic activity or precise molecular function has been ascribed to NS5A that is composed of a highly structured domain 1 (D1), as well as two intrinsically disordered domains 2 (D2) and 3 (D3), representing half of the protein. Here, we identify a short structural motif in the disordered NS5A-D2 and report its NMR structure. We show that this structural motif, a minimal Pro314–Trp316 turn, is essential for HCV RNA replication, and its disruption alters the subcellular distribution of NS5A. We demonstrate that this Pro-Trp turn is required for proper interaction with the host cyclophilin A and influences its peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity on residue Pro314 of NS5A-D2. This work provides a molecular basis for further understanding of the function of the intrinsically disordered domain 2 of HCV NS5A protein. In addition, our work highlights how very small structural motifs present in intrinsically disordered proteins can exert a specific function. PMID:26085105

  20. Intrinsic Disorder in the BK Channel and Its Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenling; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Kurgan, Lukasz; Sokolowski, Bernd; Uversky, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is broadly expressed in various mammalian cells and tissues such as neurons, skeletal and smooth muscles, exocrine cells, and sensory cells of the inner ear. Previous studies suggest that BK channels are promiscuous binders involved in a multitude of protein-protein interactions. To gain a better understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying BK interactions, we analyzed the abundance, distribution, and potential mechanisms of intrinsic disorder in 27 BK channel variants from mouse cochlea, 104 previously reported BK-associated proteins (BKAPS) from cytoplasmic and membrane/cytoskeletal regions, plus BK β- and γ-subunits. Disorder was evaluated using the MFDp algorithm, which is a consensus-based predictor that provides a strong and competitive predictive quality and PONDR, which can determine long intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Disorder-based binding sites or molecular recognition features (MoRFs) were found using MoRFpred and ANCHOR. BKAP functions were categorized based on Gene Ontology (GO) terms. The analyses revealed that the BK variants contain a number of IDRs. Intrinsic disorder is also common in BKAPs, of which ∼5% are completely disordered. However, intrinsic disorder is very differently distributed within BK and its partners. Approximately 65% of the disordered segments in BK channels are long (IDRs) (>50 residues), whereas >60% of the disordered segments in BKAPs are short IDRs that range in length from 4 to 30 residues. Both α and γ subunits showed various amounts of disorder as did hub proteins of the BK interactome. Our analyses suggest that intrinsic disorder is important for the function of BK and its BKAPs. Long IDRs in BK are engaged in protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, contain multiple post-translational modification sites, and are subjected to alternative splicing. The disordered structure of BK and its BKAPs suggests one of the underlying mechanisms of

  1. Biophysical characterization of the structural change of Nopp140, an intrinsically disordered protein, in the interaction with CK2α.

    PubMed

    Na, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Kim, Yuyoung; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Song, Seung Soo; Cha, Sun-Shin; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yu, Yeon Gyu

    2016-08-19

    Nucleolar phosphoprotein 140 (Nopp140) is a nucleolar protein, more than 80% of which is disordered. Previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Nopp140 (residues 568-596) interacts with protein kinase CK2α, and inhibits the catalytic activity of CK2. Although the region of Nopp140 responsible for the interaction with CK2α was identified, the structural features and the effect of this interaction on the structure of Nopp140 have not been defined due to the difficulty of structural characterization of disordered protein. In this study, the disordered feature of Nopp140 and the effect of CK2α on the structure of Nopp140 were examined using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The interaction with CK2α was increased conformational rigidity of the CK2α-interacting region of Nopp140 (Nopp140C), suggesting that the disordered and flexible conformation of Nopp140C became more rigid conformation as it binds to CK2α. In addition, site specific spin labeling and EPR analysis confirmed that the residues 574-589 of Nopp140 are critical for binding to CK2α. Similar technical approaches can be applied to analyze the conformational changes in other IDPs during their interactions with binding partners. PMID:27297113

  2. Intrinsic Localized Modes in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Delarue, Patrice; Senet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Protein dynamics is essential for proteins to function. Here we predicted the existence of rare, large nonlinear excitations, termed intrinsic localized modes (ILMs), of the main chain of proteins based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of two fast-folder proteins and of a rigid α/β protein at 300 K and at 380 K in solution. These nonlinear excitations arise from the anharmonicity of the protein dynamics. The ILMs were detected by computing the Shannon entropy of the protein main-chain fluctuations. In the non-native state (significantly explored at 380 K), the probability of their excitation was increased by a factor between 9 and 28 for the fast-folder proteins and by a factor 2 for the rigid protein. This enhancement in the non-native state was due to glycine, as demonstrated by simulations in which glycine was mutated to alanine. These ILMs might play a functional role in the flexible regions of proteins and in proteins in a non-native state (i.e. misfolded or unfolded states). PMID:26658321

  3. Regulation and aggregation of intrinsically disordered peptides.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary A; Larini, Luca; LaPointe, Nichole E; Feinstein, Stuart C; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2015-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a unique class of proteins that have no stable native structure, a feature that allows them to adopt a wide variety of extended and compact conformations that facilitate a large number of vital physiological functions. One of the most well-known IDPs is the microtubule-associated tau protein, which regulates microtubule growth in the nervous system. However, dysfunctions in tau can lead to tau oligomerization, fibril formation, and neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer's disease. Using a combination of simulations and experiments, we explore the role of osmolytes in regulating the conformation and aggregation propensities of the R2/wt peptide, a fragment of tau containing the aggregating paired helical filament (PHF6*). We show that the osmolytes urea and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) shift the population of IDP monomer structures, but that no new conformational ensembles emerge. Although urea halts aggregation, TMAO promotes the formation of compact oligomers (including helical oligomers) through a newly proposed mechanism of redistribution of water around the perimeter of the peptide. We put forth a "superposition of ensembles" hypothesis to rationalize the mechanism by which IDP structure and aggregation is regulated in the cell.

  4. Intrinsic disorder and metal binding in UreG proteins from Archae hyperthermophiles: GTPase enzymes involved in the activation of Ni(II) dependent urease.

    PubMed

    Miraula, Manfredi; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Urease is a Ni(II) enzyme present in every domain of life, in charge for nitrogen recycling through urea hydrolysis. Its activity requires the presence of two Ni(II) ions in the active site. These are delivered by the concerted action of four accessory proteins, named UreD, UreF, UreG and UreE. This process requires protein flexibility at different levels and some disorder-to-order transition events that coordinate the mechanism of protein-protein interaction. In particular, UreG, the GTPase in charge of nucleotide hydrolysis required for urease activation, presents a significant degree of intrinsic disorder, existing as a conformational ensemble featuring characteristics that recall a molten globule. Here, the folding properties of UreG were explored in Archaea hyperthermophiles, known to generally feature significantly low level of structural disorder in their proteome. UreG proteins from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (Mj) and Metallosphaera sedula (Ms) were structurally and functionally analyzed by integrating circular dichroism, NMR, light scattering and enzymatic assays. Metal-binding properties were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry. The results indicate that, as the mesophilic counterparts, both proteins contain a significant amount of secondary structure but maintain a flexible fold and a low GTPase activity. As opposed to other UreGs, secondary structure is lost at high temperatures (68 and 75 °C, respectively) with an apparent two-state mechanism. Both proteins bind Zn(II) and Ni(II), with affinities two orders of magnitude higher for Zn(II) than for Ni(II). No major modifications of the average conformational ensemble are observed, but binding of Zn(II) yields a more compact dimeric form in MsUreG. PMID:25846143

  5. Intrinsically Disordered Enamel Matrix Protein Ameloblastin Forms Ribbon-like Supramolecular Structures via an N-terminal Segment Encoded by Exon 5*

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Tomas; Osickova, Adriana; Sulc, Miroslav; Benada, Oldrich; Semeradtova, Alena; Rezabkova, Lenka; Veverka, Vaclav; Bednarova, Lucie; Maly, Jan; Macek, Pavel; Sebo, Peter; Slaby, Ivan; Vondrasek, Jiri; Osicka, Radim

    2013-01-01

    Tooth enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, is formed by the evolutionarily highly conserved biomineralization process that is controlled by extracellular matrix proteins. The intrinsically disordered matrix protein ameloblastin (AMBN) is the most abundant nonamelogenin protein of the developing enamel and a key element for correct enamel formation. AMBN was suggested to be a cell adhesion molecule that regulates proliferation and differentiation of ameloblasts. Nevertheless, detailed structural and functional studies on AMBN have been substantially limited by the paucity of the purified nondegraded protein. With this study, we have developed a procedure for production of a highly purified form of recombinant human AMBN in quantities that allowed its structural characterization. Using size exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron, and atomic force microscopy techniques, we show that AMBN self-associates into ribbon-like supramolecular structures with average widths and thicknesses of 18 and 0.34 nm, respectively. The AMBN ribbons exhibited lengths ranging from tens to hundreds of nm. Deletion analysis and NMR spectroscopy revealed that an N-terminal segment encoded by exon 5 comprises two short independently structured regions and plays a key role in self-assembly of AMBN. PMID:23782691

  6. Novel circular single-stranded DNA viruses identified in marine invertebrates reveal high sequence diversity and consistent predicted intrinsic disorder patterns within putative structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Karyna; Schenck, Ryan O.; Harbeitner, Rachel C.; Lawler, Stephanie N.; Breitbart, Mya

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics has recently revealed the ubiquitous and diverse nature of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses that encode a conserved replication initiator protein (Rep) in the marine environment. Although eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses were originally thought to only infect plants and vertebrates, recent studies have identified these viruses in a number of invertebrates. To further explore CRESS-DNA viruses in the marine environment, this study surveyed CRESS-DNA viruses in various marine invertebrate species. A total of 27 novel CRESS-DNA genomes, with Reps that share less than 60.1% identity with previously reported viruses, were recovered from 21 invertebrate species, mainly crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep revealed a novel clade of CRESS-DNA viruses that included approximately one third of the marine invertebrate associated viruses identified here and whose members may represent a novel family. Investigation of putative capsid proteins (Cap) encoded within the eukaryotic CRESS-DNA viral genomes from this study and those in GenBank demonstrated conserved patterns of predicted intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), which can be used to complement similarity-based searches to identify divergent structural proteins within novel genomes. Overall, this study expands our knowledge of CRESS-DNA viruses associated with invertebrates and explores a new tool to evaluate divergent structural proteins encoded by these viruses. PMID:26217327

  7. Fairy “tails”: flexibility and function of intrinsically disordered extensions in the photosynthetic world

    PubMed Central

    Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Avilan, Luisana; Kojadinovic, Mila; Gontero, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs), or protein fragments also called Intrinsically Disordered Regions (IDRs), display high flexibility as the result of their amino acid composition. They can adopt multiple roles. In globular proteins, IDRs are usually found as loops and linkers between secondary structure elements. However, not all disordered fragments are loops: some proteins bear an intrinsically disordered extension at their C- or N-terminus, and this flexibility can affect the protein as a whole. In this review, we focus on the disordered N- and C-terminal extensions of globular proteins from photosynthetic organisms. Using the examples of the A2B2-GAPDH and the α Rubisco activase isoform, we show that intrinsically disordered extensions can help regulate their “host” protein in response to changes in light, thereby participating in photosynthesis regulation. As IDPs are famous for their large number of protein partners, we used the examples of the NAC, bZIP, TCP, and GRAS transcription factor families to illustrate the fact that intrinsically disordered extremities can allow a protein to have an increased number of partners, which directly affects its regulation. Finally, for proteins from the cryptochrome light receptor family, we describe how a new role for the photolyase proteins may emerge by the addition of an intrinsically disordered extension, while still allowing the protein to absorb blue light. This review has highlighted the diverse repercussions of the disordered extension on the regulation and function of their host protein and outlined possible future research avenues. PMID:26042223

  8. Continuous wave W- and D-Band EPR spectroscopy offer “sweet-spots” for characterizing conformational changes and dynamics in intrinsically disordered proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Thomas M.; Liu, Zhanglong; Esquiaqui, Jackie M.; Pirman, Natasha L.; Milshteyn, Eugene; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • W- and D-Band line shapes are sensitive to motions in the 0.1–2 ns time regime. • These frequencies effectively report on conformational dynamics of IDPs. • W-band spectra reflecting helical formation in IA{sub 3} is experimentally demonstrated. - Abstract: Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing conformational sampling and dynamics in biological macromolecules. Here we demonstrate that nitroxide spectra collected at frequencies higher than X-band (∼9.5 GHz) have sensitivity to the timescale of motion sampled by highly dynamic intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). The 68 amino acid protein IA{sub 3}, was spin-labeled at two distinct sites and a comparison of X-band, Q-band (35 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz) spectra are shown for this protein as it undergoes the helical transition chemically induced by tri-fluoroethanol. Experimental spectra at W-band showed pronounced line shape dispersion corresponding to a change in correlation time from ∼0.3 ns (unstructured) to ∼0.6 ns (α-helical) as indicated by comparison with simulations. Experimental and simulated spectra at X- and Q-bands showed minimal dispersion over this range, illustrating the utility of SDSL EPR at higher frequencies for characterizing structural transitions and dynamics in IDPs.

  9. Characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi ortholog of the SBDS protein reveals an intrinsically disordered extended C-terminal region showing RNA-interacting activity.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Juliana Ferreira; Castilho, Beatriz A; Sforça, Mauricio L; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Guimarães, Beatriz G; Zanchin, Nilson I T

    2009-04-01

    The human SBDS gene and its yeast ortholog SDO1 encode essential proteins that are involved in ribosome biosynthesis. SDO1 has been implicated in recycling of the ribosomal biogenesis factor Tif6p from pre-66S particles as well as in translation activation of 60S ribosomes. The SBDS protein is highly conserved, containing approximately 250 amino acid residues in animals, fungi and Archaea, while SBDS orthologs of plants and a group of protists contain an extended C-terminal region. In this work, we describe the characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi SBDS ortholog (TcSBDS). TcSBDS co-fractionates with polysomes in sucrose density gradients, which is consistent with a role in ribosome biosynthesis. We show that TcSBDS contains a C-terminal extension of 200 amino acids that displays the features of intrinsically disordered proteins as determined by proteolytic, circular dichroism and NMR analyses. Interestingly, the C-terminal extension is responsible for TcSBDS-RNA interaction activity in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. This finding suggests that Trypanosomatidae and possibly also other organisms containing SBDS with extended C-terminal regions have evolved an additional function for SBDS in ribosome biogenesis.

  10. Interleukin-11: A Multifunctional Cytokine with Intrinsically Disordered Regions.

    PubMed

    Permyakov, Eugene A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Permyakov, Sergei E

    2016-09-01

    Cytokine interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a multifunctional protein with diverse roles in the normal cell signaling and in various pathologies. The structure of IL-11 is characterized by a four-helix bundle motif comprising two pairs of antiparallel α-helices arranged in an up-up-down-down configuration. Evaluation of the intrinsic disorder predisposition of human IL-11 by several computational tools clearly shows that this protein is predicted to have functional disordered regions potentially involved in interaction with natural binding partners. Signaling by IL-11 proceeds via an interaction of the protein with its membrane-specific receptor IL-11Rα and a subsequent interaction of the complex with the transmembrane signal-transducing receptor GP130. Cytoplasmic domain of IL-11Rα is predicted to be very disordered, and noticeable amount of disorder is present even in the large extracellular domain of the protein. GP130 is also predicted to have long disordered region that is located at the C-terminal of the protein and is expected to have several disorder-based binding sites. It shows that intrinsic disorder might play an important role in functioning of this signaling machine. A specific subset of the calcium sensor proteins (calmodulin, S100P, S100B, NCS-1, GCAP-1/2) exhibits metal-dependent binding of IL-11 with dissociation constants in a range of 1-19 μM, and the structural features of their hinge regions likely ensure selectivity and calcium sensitivity of IL-11 binding to the EF-hand proteins studied. IL-11 exhibits multiple effects on hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic systems. It plays a major role in orchestrating complex processes of tumor development and progression. PMID:27334537

  11. Yersinia pestis Caf1 Protein: Effect of Sequence Polymorphism on Intrinsic Disorder Propensity, Serological Cross-Reactivity and Cross-Protectivity of Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Kopylov, Pavel Kh; Platonov, Mikhail E; Ablamunits, Vitaly G; Kombarova, Tat'yana I; Ivanov, Sergey A; Kadnikova, Lidiya A; Somov, Aleksey N; Dentovskaya, Svetlana V; Uversky, Vladimir N; Anisimov, Andrey P

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia pestis Caf1 is a multifunctional protein responsible for antiphagocytic activity and is a key protective antigen. It is generally conserved between globally distributed Y. pestis strains, but Y. pestis subsp. microtus biovar caucasica strains circulating within populations of common voles in Georgia and Armenia were reported to carry a single substitution of alanine to serine. We investigated polymorphism of the Caf1 sequences among other Y. pestis subsp. microtus strains, which have a limited virulence in guinea pigs and in humans. Sequencing of caf1 genes from 119 Y. pestis strains belonging to different biovars within subsp. microtus showed that the Caf1 proteins exist in three isoforms, the global type Caf1NT1 (Ala48 Phe117), type Caf1NT2 (Ser48 Phe117) found in Transcaucasian-highland and Pre-Araks natural plague foci #4-7, and a novel Caf1NT3 type (Ala48 Val117) endemic in Dagestan-highland natural plague focus #39. Both minor types are the progenies of the global isoform. In this report, Caf1 polymorphism was analyzed by comparing predicted intrinsic disorder propensities and potential protein-protein interactivities of the three Caf1 isoforms. The analysis revealed that these properties of Caf1 protein are minimally affected by its polymorphism. All protein isoforms could be equally detected by an immunochromatography test for plague at the lowest protein concentration tested (1.0 ng/mL), which is the detection limit. When compared to the classic Caf1NT1 isoform, the endemic Caf1NT2 or Caf1NT3 had lower immunoreactivity in ELISA and lower indices of self- and cross-protection. Despite a visible reduction in cross-protection between all Caf1 isoforms, our data suggest that polymorphism in the caf1 gene may not allow the carriers of Caf1NT2 or Caf1NT3 variants escaping from the Caf1NT1-mediated immunity to plague in the case of a low-dose flea-borne infection. PMID:27606595

  12. Yersinia pestis Caf1 Protein: Effect of Sequence Polymorphism on Intrinsic Disorder Propensity, Serological Cross-Reactivity and Cross-Protectivity of Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Kopylov, Pavel Kh.; Platonov, Mikhail E.; Ablamunits, Vitaly G.; Kombarova, Tat’yana I.; Ivanov, Sergey A.; Kadnikova, Lidiya A.; Somov, Aleksey N.; Dentovskaya, Svetlana V.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia pestis Caf1 is a multifunctional protein responsible for antiphagocytic activity and is a key protective antigen. It is generally conserved between globally distributed Y. pestis strains, but Y. pestis subsp. microtus biovar caucasica strains circulating within populations of common voles in Georgia and Armenia were reported to carry a single substitution of alanine to serine. We investigated polymorphism of the Caf1 sequences among other Y. pestis subsp. microtus strains, which have a limited virulence in guinea pigs and in humans. Sequencing of caf1 genes from 119 Y. pestis strains belonging to different biovars within subsp. microtus showed that the Caf1 proteins exist in three isoforms, the global type Caf1NT1 (Ala48 Phe117), type Caf1NT2 (Ser48 Phe117) found in Transcaucasian-highland and Pre-Araks natural plague foci #4–7, and a novel Caf1NT3 type (Ala48 Val117) endemic in Dagestan-highland natural plague focus #39. Both minor types are the progenies of the global isoform. In this report, Caf1 polymorphism was analyzed by comparing predicted intrinsic disorder propensities and potential protein-protein interactivities of the three Caf1 isoforms. The analysis revealed that these properties of Caf1 protein are minimally affected by its polymorphism. All protein isoforms could be equally detected by an immunochromatography test for plague at the lowest protein concentration tested (1.0 ng/mL), which is the detection limit. When compared to the classic Caf1NT1 isoform, the endemic Caf1NT2 or Caf1NT3 had lower immunoreactivity in ELISA and lower indices of self- and cross-protection. Despite a visible reduction in cross-protection between all Caf1 isoforms, our data suggest that polymorphism in the caf1 gene may not allow the carriers of Caf1NT2 or Caf1NT3 variants escaping from the Caf1NT1-mediated immunity to plague in the case of a low-dose flea-borne infection. PMID:27606595

  13. Protein intrinsic disorder in Arabidopsis NAC transcription factors: transcriptional activation by ANAC013 and ANAC046 and their interactions with RCD1.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Charlotte; Kryger, Mikael; Stender, Emil G P; Kragelund, Birthe B; Willemoës, Martin; Skriver, Karen

    2015-01-15

    Protein ID (intrinsic disorder) plays a significant, yet relatively unexplored role in transcription factors (TFs). In the present paper, analysis of the transcription regulatory domains (TRDs) of six phylogenetically representative, plant-specific NAC [no apical meristem, ATAF (Arabidopsis transcription activation factor), cup-shaped cotyledon] TFs shows that the domains are present in similar average pre-molten or molten globule-like states, but have different patterns of order/disorder and MoRFs (molecular recognition features). ANAC046 (Arabidopsis NAC 046) was selected for further studies because of its simple MoRF pattern and its ability to interact with RCD1 (radical-induced cell death 1). Experiments in yeast and thermodynamic characterization suggest that its single MoRF region is sufficient for both transcriptional activation and interaction with RCD1. The remainder of the large regulatory domain is unlikely to contribute to the interaction, since the domain and truncations thereof have similar affinities for RCD1, which are also similar for ANAC013-RCD1 interactions. However, different enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding were revealed for ANAC046 and ANAC013, suggestive of differences in binding mechanisms. Although substitution of both hydrophobic and acidic residues of the ANAC046 MoRF region abolished binding, substitution of other residues, even with α-helix-breaking proline, was less disruptive. Together, the biophysical analyses suggest that RCD1-ANAC046 complex formation does not involve folding-upon-binding, but rather fuzziness or an unknown structure in ANAC046. We suggest that the ANAC046 regulatory domain functions as an entropic chain with a terminal hot spot interacting with RCD1. RCD1, a cellular hub, may be able to interact with many different TFs by exploiting their ID-based flexibility, as demonstrated for its interactions with ANAC046 and ANAC013.

  14. Protein intrinsic disorder in Arabidopsis NAC transcription factors: transcriptional activation by ANAC013 and ANAC046 and their interactions with RCD1.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Charlotte; Kryger, Mikael; Stender, Emil G P; Kragelund, Birthe B; Willemoës, Martin; Skriver, Karen

    2015-01-15

    Protein ID (intrinsic disorder) plays a significant, yet relatively unexplored role in transcription factors (TFs). In the present paper, analysis of the transcription regulatory domains (TRDs) of six phylogenetically representative, plant-specific NAC [no apical meristem, ATAF (Arabidopsis transcription activation factor), cup-shaped cotyledon] TFs shows that the domains are present in similar average pre-molten or molten globule-like states, but have different patterns of order/disorder and MoRFs (molecular recognition features). ANAC046 (Arabidopsis NAC 046) was selected for further studies because of its simple MoRF pattern and its ability to interact with RCD1 (radical-induced cell death 1). Experiments in yeast and thermodynamic characterization suggest that its single MoRF region is sufficient for both transcriptional activation and interaction with RCD1. The remainder of the large regulatory domain is unlikely to contribute to the interaction, since the domain and truncations thereof have similar affinities for RCD1, which are also similar for ANAC013-RCD1 interactions. However, different enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding were revealed for ANAC046 and ANAC013, suggestive of differences in binding mechanisms. Although substitution of both hydrophobic and acidic residues of the ANAC046 MoRF region abolished binding, substitution of other residues, even with α-helix-breaking proline, was less disruptive. Together, the biophysical analyses suggest that RCD1-ANAC046 complex formation does not involve folding-upon-binding, but rather fuzziness or an unknown structure in ANAC046. We suggest that the ANAC046 regulatory domain functions as an entropic chain with a terminal hot spot interacting with RCD1. RCD1, a cellular hub, may be able to interact with many different TFs by exploiting their ID-based flexibility, as demonstrated for its interactions with ANAC046 and ANAC013. PMID:25348421

  15. Structure of Yeast Poly(A) Polymerase in Complex with a Peptide from Fip1, an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke,G.; Ezeokonkwo, C.; Balbo, P.; Stafford, W.; Moore, C.; Bohm, A.

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, the mRNA processing enzyme poly(A) polymerase is tethered to the much larger 3'-end processing complex via Fip1, a 36 kDa protein of unknown structure. We report the 2.6 Angstroms crystal structure of yeast poly(A) polymerase in complex with a peptide containing residues 80-105 of Fip1. The Fip1 peptide binds to the outside surface of the C-terminal domain of the polymerase. On the basis of this structure, we designed a mutant of the polymerase (V498Y, C485R) that is lethal to yeast. The mutant is unable to bind Fip1 but retains full polymerase activity. Fip1 is found in all eukaryotes and serves to connect poly(A) polymerase to pre-mRNA processing complexes in yeast, plants, and mammals. However, the Fip1 sequence is highly divergent, and residues on both Pap1 and Fip1 at the observed interaction surface are poorly conserved. Herein we demonstrate using analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, proteolytic studies, and other techniques that, in the absence of Pap1, Fip1 is largely, if not completely, unfolded. We speculate that flexibility may be important for Fip1's function as a molecular scaffold.

  16. Advantages of proteins being disordered

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhirong; Huang, Yongqi

    2014-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed great advances in our understanding of protein structure-function relationships in terms of the ubiquitous existence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). The structural disorder of IDPs/IDRs enables them to play essential functions that are complementary to those of ordered proteins. In addition, IDPs/IDRs are persistent in evolution. Therefore, they are expected to possess some advantages over ordered proteins. In this review, we summarize and survey nine possible advantages of IDPs/IDRs: economizing genome/protein resources, overcoming steric restrictions in binding, achieving high specificity with low affinity, increasing binding rate, facilitating posttranslational modifications, enabling flexible linkers, preventing aggregation, providing resistance to non-native conditions, and allowing compatibility with more available sequences. Some potential advantages of IDPs/IDRs are not well understood and require both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher. The connection with protein design is also briefly discussed. PMID:24532081

  17. NMR contributions to structural dynamics studies of intrinsically disordered proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Konrat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by substantial conformational plasticity. Given their inherent structural flexibility X-ray crystallography is not applicable to study these proteins. In contrast, NMR spectroscopy offers unique opportunities for structural and dynamic studies of IDPs. The past two decades have witnessed significant development of NMR spectroscopy that couples advances in spin physics and chemistry with a broad range of applications. This article will summarize key advances in basic physical-chemistry and NMR methodology, outline their limitations and envision future R&D directions. PMID:24656082

  18. Efficient Atomistic Simulation of Pathways and Calculation of Rate Constants for a Protein-Peptide Binding Process: Application to the MDM2 Protein and an Intrinsically Disordered p53 Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zwier, Matthew C; Pratt, Adam J; Adelman, Joshua L; Kaus, Joseph W; Zuckerman, Daniel M; Chong, Lillian T

    2016-09-01

    The characterization of protein binding processes - with all of the key conformational changes - has been a grand challenge in the field of biophysics. Here, we have used the weighted ensemble path sampling strategy to orchestrate molecular dynamics simulations, yielding atomistic views of protein-peptide binding pathways involving the MDM2 oncoprotein and an intrinsically disordered p53 peptide. A total of 182 independent, continuous binding pathways were generated, yielding a kon that is in good agreement with experiment. These pathways were generated in 15 days using 3500 cores of a supercomputer, substantially faster than would be possible with "brute force" simulations. Many of these pathways involve the anchoring of p53 residue F19 into the MDM2 binding cleft when forming the metastable encounter complex, indicating that F19 may be a kinetically important residue. Our study demonstrates that it is now practical to generate pathways and calculate rate constants for protein binding processes using atomistic simulation on typical computing resources. PMID:27532687

  19. Intrinsic Mean Square Displacement in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vural, Derya; Glyde, Henry R.

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of biological molecules is investigated in neutron scattering experiments, in molecular dynamics simulations, and using analytical theory. Specifically, the mean square displacement (MSD), exp, of hydrogen in proteins is determined from measurements of the incoherent elastic neutron scattering intensity (ENSI). The MSD, exp, is usually obtained from the dependence of the ENSI on the scattering wave vector Q. The MSD increases with increasing temperature reaching large values at room temperature. Large MSD is often associated with and used as an indicator of protein function. The observed MSD, however, depends on the energy resolution of the neutron spectrometer employed. We present a method, a first attempt, to extract the intrinsic MSD of hydrogen in protein from measurements, one that is independent of the instrument resolution. The method consists of a model of the ENSI that contains (1) the intrinsic MSD, (2) the instrument resolution width and (3) a parameter describing the motional processes that contribute to the MSD. Several examples of intrinsic MSDs in proteins obtained from fitting to data in the existing literature will be presented.

  20. Identification of intrinsically disordered regions in PTEN and delineation of its function via a network approach.

    PubMed

    Malaney, Prerna; Uversky, Vladimir N; Davé, Vrushank

    2015-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are proteins that lack stable higher order structures for the entire protein molecule or a significant portion of it. The discovery of IDPs evolved as an antithesis to the conventional structure-function paradigm wherein a higher order structure dictates protein function. Over the last decade, a number of proteins with functionally relevant unstructured regions have been discovered, which includes tumor suppressor PTEN. The protein domains that lack structure provide "hot-spots" for post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein-protein interactions (PPIs), which facilitate their regulation and participation in multiple cellular processes. Consequently, dysregulation in IDPs contribute to aberrant cellular pathophysiology. Herein, we present PTEN and its translational isoform PTEN-L as a hybrid protein possessing ordered domain and intrinsically disordered C-terminal and an N-terminal tails. We review the role of intrinsic disorder in PTEN function and propose a methodology for the use of intrinsic disorder to study PTEN-regulated higher order protein-networks by associating basic principles of network biology to functional pathway analysis at the systems level. PMID:25449897

  1. On the intrinsic disorder status of the major players in programmed cell death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    Earlier computational and bioinformatics analysis of several large protein datasets across 28 species showed that proteins involved in regulation and execution of programmed cell death (PCD) possess substantial amounts of intrinsic disorder. Based on the comprehensive analysis of these datasets by a wide array of modern bioinformatics tools it was concluded that disordered regions of PCD-related proteins are involved in a multitude of biological functions and interactions with various partners, possess numerous posttranslational modification sites, and have specific evolutionary patterns (Peng et al. 2013). This study extends our previous work by providing information on the intrinsic disorder status of some of the major players of the three major PCD pathways: apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis. We also present a detailed description of the disorder status and interactomes of selected proteins that are involved in the p53-mediated apoptotic signaling pathways. PMID:24358900

  2. On the intrinsic disorder status of the major players in programmed cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Alexey V; Xue, Bin; Peng, Zhenling; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    Earlier computational and bioinformatics analysis of several large protein datasets across 28 species showed that proteins involved in regulation and execution of programmed cell death (PCD) possess substantial amounts of intrinsic disorder. Based on the comprehensive analysis of these datasets by a wide array of modern bioinformatics tools it was concluded that disordered regions of PCD-related proteins are involved in a multitude of biological functions and interactions with various partners, possess numerous posttranslational modification sites, and have specific evolutionary patterns (Peng et al. 2013). This study extends our previous work by providing information on the intrinsic disorder status of some of the major players of the three major PCD pathways: apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis. We also present a detailed description of the disorder status and interactomes of selected proteins that are involved in the p53-mediated apoptotic signaling pathways.

  3. Abundance of intrinsic structural disorder in the histone H1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The intrinsically disordered proteins consist of partially structured regions linked to the unstructured stretches, which consequently form the transient and dynamic conformational ensembles. They undergo disorder to order transition upon binding their partners. Intrinsic disorder is attributed to histones H1, perceived as assemblers of chromatin structure and the regulators of DNA and proteins activity. In this work, the comparison of intrinsic disorder abundance in the histone H1 subtypes was performed both by the analysis of their amino acid composition and by the prediction of disordered stretches, as well as by identifying molecular recognition features (MoRFs) and ANCHOR protein binding regions (APBR) that are responsible for recognition and binding. Both human and model organisms-animals, plants, fungi and protists-have H1 histone subtypes with the properties typical of disordered state. They possess a significantly higher content of hydrophilic and charged amino acid residues, arranged in the long regions, covering over half of the whole amino acid residues in chain. Almost complete disorder corresponds to histone H1 terminal domains, including MoRFs and ANCHOR. Those motifs were also identified in a more ordered histone H1 globular domain. Compared to the control (globular and fibrous) proteins, H1 histones demonstrate the increased folding rate and a higher proportion of low-complexity segments. The results of this work indicate that intrinsic disorder is an inherent structural property of histone H1 subtypes and it is essential for establishing a protein conformation which defines functional outcomes affecting on DNA- and/or partner protein-dependent cell processes.

  4. The IntFOLD server: an integrated web resource for protein fold recognition, 3D model quality assessment, intrinsic disorder prediction, domain prediction and ligand binding site prediction.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel B; Buenavista, Maria T; Tetchner, Stuart J; McGuffin, Liam J

    2011-07-01

    The IntFOLD server is a novel independent server that integrates several cutting edge methods for the prediction of structure and function from sequence. Our guiding principles behind the server development were as follows: (i) to provide a simple unified resource that makes our prediction software accessible to all and (ii) to produce integrated output for predictions that can be easily interpreted. The output for predictions is presented as a simple table that summarizes all results graphically via plots and annotated 3D models. The raw machine readable data files for each set of predictions are also provided for developers, which comply with the Critical Assessment of Methods for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) data standards. The server comprises an integrated suite of five novel methods: nFOLD4, for tertiary structure prediction; ModFOLD 3.0, for model quality assessment; DISOclust 2.0, for disorder prediction; DomFOLD 2.0 for domain prediction; and FunFOLD 1.0, for ligand binding site prediction. Predictions from the IntFOLD server were found to be competitive in several categories in the recent CASP9 experiment. The IntFOLD server is available at the following web site: http://www.reading.ac.uk/bioinf/IntFOLD/.

  5. Major intrinsic proteins in biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Claus Hélix

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes define the structural and functional boundaries in living cells and their organelles. The integrity of the cell depends on its ability to separate inside from outside and yet at the same time allow massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting-the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells internal pH and salt concentration. Also known as water channels or aquaporins they are highly efficient membrane pore proteins some of which are capable of transporting water at very high rates up to 10(9) molecules per second. Some MIPs transport other small, uncharged solutes, such as glycerol and other permeants such as carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide and the metalloids antimonite, arsenite, silicic and boric acid depending on the effective restriction mechanism of the protein. The flux properties of MIPs thus lead to the question ifMIPs can be used in separation devices or as sensor devices based on, e.g., the selective permeation of metalloids. In principle a MIP based membrane sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually impermeable to anything but water or the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport

  6. TOP-IDP-Scale: A New Amino Acid Scale Measuring Propensity for Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Campen, Andrew; Williams, Ryan M.; Brown, Celeste J.; Meng, Jingwei; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2009-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins carry out various biological functions while lacking ordered secondary and/or tertiary structure. In order to find general intrinsic properties of amino acid residues that are responsible for the absence of ordered structure in intrinsically disordered proteins we surveyed 517 amino acid scales. Each of these scales was taken as an independent attribute for the subsequent analysis. For a given attribute value X, which is averaged over a consecutive string of amino acids, and for a given data set having both ordered and disordered segments, the conditional probabilities P(so | x) and P(sd | x) for order and disorder, respectively, can be determined for all possible values of X. Plots of the conditional probabilities P(so | x) and P(sd | x) versus X give a pair of curves. The area between these two curves divided by the total area of the graph gives the area ratio value (ARV), which is proportional to the degree of separation of the two probability curves and, therefore, provides a measure of the given attribute’s power to discriminate between order and disorder. As ARV falls between zero and one, larger ARV corresponds to the better discrimination between order and disorder. Starting from the scale with the highest ARV, we applied a simulated annealing procedure to search for alternative scale values and have managed to increase the ARV by more than 10%. The ranking of the amino acids in this new TOP-IDP scale is as follows (from order promoting to disorder promoting): W, F, Y, I, M, L, V, N, C, T, A, G, R, D, H, Q, K, S, E, P. A web-based server has been created to apply the TOP-IDP scale to predict intrinsically disordered proteins (http://www.disprot.org/dev/disindex.php). PMID:18991772

  7. Computational approaches for evaluating the effect of sequence variations and the intrinsically disordered C-terminal region of the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein on the interaction with tyrosine kinase Src.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Paula; Peñaranda, Natalia; Zamora, María Antonia; del Pilar Delgado, María; Bohorquez, Eliana; Castro, Harold; Barrios, Andrés Fernando González; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    The Helicobacter pylori CagA protein was the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified as important in the development of human malignancies such as gastric cancer. It is not clear how it is able to deregulate a set of cell control mechanisms to induce carcinogenesis following translocation into human gastric epithelial cells. It is likely, however, that structural variations in the CagA sequence alter its affinity with the host proteins inducing differences in the pathogenicity of different H. pylori strains. Using the recently elucidated N-terminal 3D structure of H. pylori CagA, information on the full cagA gene sequence, and intrinsically disordered protein structure predictions methods we evaluated the interaction of different CagA variants with the kinase Src. An automated docking followed by molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore CagA interaction modes with Src, one of its cellular partners. The computational approach let us establish that even in the presence of the same number and type of EPIYA motifs, CagA protein can reveal different spatial distributions. Based on the lowest affinity energy and higher number of interactions it was established that the principal forces governing the CagA-Src interaction are electrostatic. Results showed that EPIYA-D models presents higher affinity with some host proteins than EPIYA-C. Thus, we highlight the importance and advantage of the use of computational tools in combining chemical and biological data with bioinformatics for modeling and prediction purposes in some cases where experimental techniques present limitations. PMID:25116152

  8. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses. PMID:25988244

  9. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses.

  10. Human consensus interferons: Bridging the natural and artificial cytokines with intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    El-Baky, Nawal Abd; Uversky, Vladimir N; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2015-12-01

    The consensus interferons are artificially engineered proteins that combine most of the therapeutic features of natural human α-interferons and show high anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. Egyptian patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4 show lower responses to interferon (IFN) therapy than the distributed worldwide patients infected with the other HCV genotypes. Numerous studies have reported that patients with hepatitis C who have not responded to a previous standard IFN-alpha therapy or those who relapsed following treatment cessation may benefit from retreatment with consensus IFN-α (cIFN-α). IFNs-α are shown here to have functionally important disordered regions. Furthermore, a strong correlation is established between the peculiarities of disorder profiles of these proteins and their known structural features. Intrinsic disorder profiles of existing cIFNs-α possess remarkable similarity to the consensus disorder profile calculated as averaged disorder predispositions of all human IFNs-α. If the peculiarities of disorder distribution within the protein sequence are related to protein functionality, then comparison of the disorder profiles of artificial cIFNs (query profiles) with the averaged disorder predisposition profile of human IFNs-α (target profile) can be used in the design of novel cIFNs. The goal here would be to achieve a close similarity between the query and target profiles by manipulating the cIFN sequence.

  11. PEP-19, an Intrinsically Disordered Regulator of Calmodulin Signaling*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kleerekoper, Quinn K.; Putkey, John A.

    2009-01-01

    PEP-19 is a small calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein that greatly increases the rates of association and dissociation of Ca2+ from the C-domain of CaM, an effect that is mediated by an acidic/IQ sequence in PEP-19. We show here using NMR that PEP-19 is an intrinsically disordered protein, but with residual structure localized to its acidic/IQ motif. We also show that the kon and koff rates for binding PEP-19 to apo-CaM are at least 50-fold slower than for binding to Ca2+-CaM. These data indicate that intrinsic disorder confers plasticity that allows PEP-19 to bind to either apo- or Ca2+-CaM via different structural modes, and that complex formation may be facilitated by conformational selection of residual structure in the acidic/IQ sequence. PMID:19106096

  12. The activity and stability of the intrinsically disordered Cip/Kip protein family are regulated by non-receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Otieno, Steve; Lelli, Moreno; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The Cip/Kip family of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors includes p21Cip1, p27Kip1 and p57Kip2. Their kinase inhibitory activities are mediated by a homologous N-terminal kinase-inhibitory domain (KID). The Cdk inhibitory activity and stability of p27 have been shown to be regulated by a two-step phosphorylation mechanism involving a tyrosine residue within the KID and a threonine residue within the flexible C-terminus. We show that these residues are conserved in p21 and p57, suggesting that a similar phosphorylation cascade regulates these Cdk inhibitors. However, the presence of a cyclin binding motif within its C-terminus alters the regulatory interplay between p21 and Cdk2/cyclin A, and its responses to tyrosine phosphorylation and altered p21:Cdk2/cyclin A stoichiometry. We also show that the Cip/Kip proteins can be phosphorylated in vitro by representatives of many non-receptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) sub-families, suggesting that NRTKs may generally regulate the activity and stability of these Cdk inhibitors. Our results further suggest that the Cip/Kip proteins integrate signals from various NRTK pathways and cell cycle regulation. PMID:25463440

  13. Bridge over troubled proline: assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins using (HCA)CON(CAN)H and (HCA)N(CA)CO(N)H experiments concomitantly with HNCO and i(HCA)CO(CA)NH.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Maarit; Piirainen, Henni; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Permi, Perttu

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is by far the most versatile and information rich technique to study intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). While NMR is able to offer residue level information on structure and dynamics, assignment of chemical shift resonances in IDPs is not a straightforward process. Consequently, numerous pulse sequences and assignment protocols have been developed during past several years, targeted especially for the assignment of IDPs, including experiments that employ H(N), H(α) or (13)C detection combined with two to six indirectly detected dimensions. Here we propose two new HN-detection based pulse sequences, (HCA)CON(CAN)H and (HCA)N(CA)CO(N)H, that provide correlations with (1)H(N)(i - 1), (13)C'(i - 1) and (15)N(i), and (1)H(N)(i + 1), (13)C'(i) and (15)N(i) frequencies, respectively. Most importantly, they offer sequential links across the proline bridges and enable filling the single proline gaps during the assignment. We show that the novel experiments can efficiently complement the information available from existing HNCO and intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH pulse sequences and their concomitant usage enabled >95 % assignment of backbone resonances in cytoplasmic tail of adenosine receptor A2A in comparison to 73 % complete assignment using the HNCO/i(HCA)CO(CA)NH data alone. PMID:24346685

  14. Chemical shift assignment of the intrinsically disordered N-terminus and the rubredoxin domain in the folded metal bound and unfolded oxidized state of mycobacterial protein kinase G.

    PubMed

    Wittwer, Matthias; Dames, Sonja A

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein kinase G (PknG) is a 82 kDa multidomain eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinase mediating the survival of pathogenic mycobacteria within host macrophages. The N-terminal sequence preceding the catalytic kinase domain contains an approximately 75 residues long tail, which was predicted to show no regulatory secondary structure (1-75 = NORS) but harbors the major in vivo phosphorylation site (T63), and a rubredoxin-like metal binding motif (74-147 = RD). In the reduced rubredoxin motif, four conserved cysteine residues that are present as two C-X-X-C-G motifs coordinate a metal ion. The cysteines are further involved in sensing the redox environment to regulate PknG catalytic activity. Here, we report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of the highly dynamic unstructured N-terminal region NORS and the RD in the reduced, metal bound, presumably folded and the oxidized, presumably unfolded state. Chemical shifts have been deposited at the BioMagResBank under the BMRB accession numbers 26,028 for the His-PknG1-147 with the RD in reduced, metal bound state, 26,027 for His-PknG1-75, and 26,030 and 26,029 for PknG74-147 either in the reduced, metal bound or oxidized state, respectively. The presented chemical shift assignments pave the route for the structural characterization of the regulation of PknG by redox changes and posttranslational modifications (phosphorylation).

  15. Expression, fermentation and purification of a predicted intrinsically disordered region of the transcription factor, NFAT5.

    PubMed

    DuMond, Jenna F; He, Yi; Burg, Maurice B; Ferraris, Joan D

    2015-11-01

    Hypertonicity stimulates Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5) nuclear localization and transactivating activity. Many transcription factors are known to contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) which become more structured with local environmental changes such as osmolality, temperature and tonicity. The transactivating domain of NFAT5 is predicted to be intrinsically disordered under normal tonicity, and under high NaCl, the activity of this domain is increased. To study the binding of co-regulatory proteins at IDRs a cDNA construct expressing the NFAT5 TAD was created and transformed into Escherichia coli cells. Transformed E. coli cells were mass produced by fermentation and extracted by cell lysis to release the NFAT5 TAD. The NFAT5 TAD was subsequently purified using a His-tag column, cation exchange chromatography as well as hydrophobic interaction chromatography and then characterized by mass spectrometry (MS). PMID:26256058

  16. Defining the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminal Domain of SSB Reveals DNA-Mediated Compaction.

    PubMed

    Green, Matthew; Hatter, Louise; Brookes, Emre; Soultanas, Panos; Scott, David J

    2016-01-29

    The bacterial single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein SSB is a strictly conserved and essential protein involved in diverse functions of DNA metabolism, including replication and repair. SSB comprises a well-characterized tetrameric core of N-terminal oligonucleotide binding OB folds that bind ssDNA and four intrinsically disordered C-terminal domains of unknown structure that interact with partner proteins. The generally accepted, albeit speculative, mechanistic model in the field postulates that binding of ssDNA to the OB core induces the flexible, undefined C-terminal arms to expand outwards encouraging functional interactions with partner proteins. In this structural study, we show that the opposite is true. Combined small-angle scattering with X-rays and neutrons coupled to coarse-grained modeling reveal that the intrinsically disordered C-terminal arms are relatively collapsed around the tetrameric OB core and collapse further upon ssDNA binding. This implies a mechanism of action, in which the disordered C-terminal domain collapse traps the ssDNA and pulls functional partners onto the ssDNA. PMID:26707201

  17. The interplay of intrinsic disorder and macromolecular crowding on α-synuclein fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Nobu C.; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2016-02-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is an intrinsically disordered protein which is considered to be one of the causes of Parkinson's disease. This protein forms amyloid fibrils when in a highly concentrated solution. The fibril formation of α-syn is induced not only by increases in α-syn concentration but also by macromolecular crowding. In order to investigate the coupled effect of the intrinsic disorder of α-syn and macromolecular crowding, we construct a lattice gas model of α-syn in contact with a crowding agent reservoir based on statistical mechanics. The main assumption is that α-syn can be expressed as coarse-grained particles with internal states coupled with effective volume; and disordered states are modeled by larger particles with larger internal entropy than other states. Thanks to the simplicity of the model, we can exactly calculate the number of conformations of crowding agents, and this enables us to prove that the original grand canonical ensemble with a crowding agent reservoir is mathematically equivalent to a canonical ensemble without crowding agents. In this expression, the effect of macromolecular crowding is absorbed in the internal entropy of disordered states; it is clearly shown that the crowding effect reduces the internal entropy. Based on Monte Carlo simulation, we provide scenarios of crowding-induced fibril formation. We also discuss the recent controversy over the existence of helically folded tetramers of α-syn, and suggest that macromolecular crowding is the key to resolving the controversy.

  18. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials. PMID:26777140

  19. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure–high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C–B–C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  20. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-18

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  1. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure–high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C–B–C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials. PMID:26777140

  2. The inverted free energy landscape of an intrinsically disordered peptide by simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Granata, Daniele; Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Habchi, Johnny; Galvagnion, Celine; De Simone, Alfonso; Camilloni, Carlo; Laio, Alessandro; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-10-26

    The free energy landscape theory has been very successful in rationalizing the folding behaviour of globular proteins, as this representation provides intuitive information on the number of states involved in the folding process, their populations and pathways of interconversion. We extend here this formalism to the case of the Aβ40 peptide, a 40-residue intrinsically disordered protein fragment associated with Alzheimer's disease. By using an advanced sampling technique that enables free energy calculations to reach convergence also in the case of highly disordered states of proteins, we provide a precise structural characterization of the free energy landscape of this peptide. We find that such landscape has inverted features with respect to those typical of folded proteins. While the global free energy minimum consists of highly disordered structures, higher free energy regions correspond to a large variety of transiently structured conformations with secondary structure elements arranged in several different manners, and are not separated from each other by sizeable free energy barriers. From this peculiar structure of the free energy landscape we predict that this peptide should become more structured and not only more compact, with increasing temperatures, and we show that this is the case through a series of biophysical measurements.

  3. The inverted free energy landscape of an intrinsically disordered peptide by simulations and experiments

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Daniele; Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Habchi, Johnny; Galvagnion, Celine; De Simone, Alfonso; Camilloni, Carlo; Laio, Alessandro; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The free energy landscape theory has been very successful in rationalizing the folding behaviour of globular proteins, as this representation provides intuitive information on the number of states involved in the folding process, their populations and pathways of interconversion. We extend here this formalism to the case of the Aβ40 peptide, a 40-residue intrinsically disordered protein fragment associated with Alzheimer’s disease. By using an advanced sampling technique that enables free energy calculations to reach convergence also in the case of highly disordered states of proteins, we provide a precise structural characterization of the free energy landscape of this peptide. We find that such landscape has inverted features with respect to those typical of folded proteins. While the global free energy minimum consists of highly disordered structures, higher free energy regions correspond to a large variety of transiently structured conformations with secondary structure elements arranged in several different manners, and are not separated from each other by sizeable free energy barriers. From this peculiar structure of the free energy landscape we predict that this peptide should become more structured and not only more compact, with increasing temperatures, and we show that this is the case through a series of biophysical measurements. PMID:26498066

  4. Intrinsically disordered amphiphilic peptides as potential targets in drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Marian; Accardo, Antonella; Costantini, Susan; Scala, Stefania; Portella, Luigi; Trotta, Annamaria; Ronga, Luisa; Guillon, Jean; Leone, Marilisa; Colonna, Giovanni; Rossi, Filomena; Tesauro, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins/peptides play a crucial role in many physiological and pathological events and may assume a precise conformation upon binding to a specific target. Recently, we have described the conformational and functional properties of two linear ester peptides provided with the following sequences: Y-G-E-C-P-C-K-OAllyl (PepK) and Y-G-E-C-P-C-E-OAllyl (PepE). Both peptides are characterized by the presence of the "CPC" motif together with a few amino acids able to promote disorder. The CPC sequence is a binding motif for the CXCR4 receptor that represents a well-known target for cancer therapies. In this paper, we report on synthetic amphiphilic peptides that consist of lipophilic derivatives of PepE and PepK bearing two stearic alkyl chains and/or an ethoxylic spacer. These peptide amphiphiles form stable supramolecular aggregates; they present conformational features that are typical of intrinsically disordered molecules as shown by CD spectroscopy. Solution fluorescence and DLS studies have been performed to evaluate Critical Micellar Concentrations and the dimension of supramolecular aggregates. Moreover, preliminary in vitro cell-based assays have been conducted to investigate the molecular recognition processes involving the CXCR4 receptor. In the end, the results obtained have been compared with the previous data generated by the corresponding non-amphiphilic peptides (PepE and PepK).

  5. Disordered regions in transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tusnády, Gábor E; Dobson, László; Tompa, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The functions of transmembrane proteins in living cells are widespread; they range from various transport processes to energy production, from cell-cell adhesion to communication. Structurally, they are highly ordered in their membrane-spanning regions, but may contain disordered regions in the cytosolic and extra-cytosolic parts. In this study, we have investigated the disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by a stringent definition of disordered residues on the currently available largest experimental dataset, and show a significant correlation between the spatial distributions of positively charged residues and disordered regions. This finding suggests a new role of disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by providing structural flexibility for stabilizing interactions with negatively charged head groups of the lipid molecules. We also find a preference of structural disorder in the terminal--as opposed to loop--regions in transmembrane proteins, and survey the respective functions involved in recruiting other proteins or mediating allosteric signaling effects. Finally, we critically compare disorder prediction methods on our transmembrane protein set. While there are no major differences between these methods using the usual statistics, such as per residue accuracies, Matthew's correlation coefficients, etc.; substantial differences can be found regarding the spatial distribution of the predicted disordered regions. We conclude that a predictor optimized for transmembrane proteins would be of high value to the field of structural disorder. PMID:26275590

  6. Conformational dissection of a viral intrinsically disordered domain involved in cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Noval, María G; Gallo, Mariana; Perrone, Sebastián; Salvay, Andres G; Chemes, Lucía B; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder is abundant in viral genomes and provides conformational plasticity to its protein products. In order to gain insight into its structure-function relationships, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of structural propensities within the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain from the human papillomavirus type-16 E7 oncoprotein (E7N). Two E7N segments located within the conserved CR1 and CR2 regions present transient α-helix structure. The helix in the CR1 region spans residues L8 to L13 and overlaps with the E2F mimic linear motif. The second helix, located within the highly acidic CR2 region, presents a pH-dependent structural transition. At neutral pH the helix spans residues P17 to N29, which include the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor LxCxE binding motif (residues 21-29), while the acidic CKII-PEST region spanning residues E33 to I38 populates polyproline type II (PII) structure. At pH 5.0, the CR2 helix propagates up to residue I38 at the expense of loss of PII due to charge neutralization of acidic residues. Using truncated forms of HPV-16 E7, we confirmed that pH-induced changes in α-helix content are governed by the intrinsically disordered E7N domain. Interestingly, while at both pH the region encompassing the LxCxE motif adopts α-helical structure, the isolated 21-29 fragment including this stretch is unable to populate an α-helix even at high TFE concentrations. Thus, the E7N domain can populate dynamic but discrete structural ensembles by sampling α-helix-coil-PII-ß-sheet structures. This high plasticity may modulate the exposure of linear binding motifs responsible for its multi-target binding properties, leading to interference with key cell signaling pathways and eventually to cellular transformation by the virus. PMID:24086265

  7. SilE is an intrinsically disordered periplasmic "molecular sponge" involved in bacterial silver resistance.

    PubMed

    Asiani, Karishma R; Williams, Huw; Bird, Louise; Jenner, Matthew; Searle, Mark S; Hobman, Jon L; Scott, David J; Soultanas, Panos

    2016-09-01

    Ag(+) resistance was initially found on the Salmonella enetrica serovar Typhimurium multi-resistance plasmid pMG101 from burns patients in 1975. The putative model of Ag(+) resistance, encoded by the sil operon from pMG101, involves export of Ag(+) via an ATPase (SilP), an effluxer complex (SilCFBA) and a periplasmic chaperon of Ag(+) (SilE). SilE is predicted to be intrinsically disordered. We tested this hypothesis using structural and biophysical studies and show that SilE is an intrinsically disordered protein in its free apo-form but folds to a compact structure upon optimal binding to six Ag(+) ions in its holo-form. Sequence analyses and site-directed mutagenesis established the importance of histidine and methionine containing motifs for Ag(+) -binding, and identified a nucleation core that initiates Ag(+) -mediated folding of SilE. We conclude that SilE is a molecular sponge for absorbing metal ions. PMID:27085056

  8. Chicken cathelicidins as potent intrinsically disordered biocides with antimicrobial activity against infectious pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Haitham A; Elazzazy, Ahmed M; Mahmoud, Maged M; Baeshen, Mohamed Nabih; Al-Maghrabi, Omar A; Alkarim, Saleh; Ahmed, Ekram S; Almehdar, Hussein A; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-12-01

    This study was performed to identify the expression patterns of the cathelicidin genes in a local chicken breed and to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of the cathelicidin peptides against pathogenic bacteria. This analysis revealed that the coding regions of CATH-1, -2, and -3 genes contain 447 bp, 465 bp, and 456 bp, respectively, and encode proteins of 148, 154, 151 amino acids, respectively. The complete amino acid sequences of the cathelicidin peptides are similar to those found in Meleagris gallopavo, Phasianus colchicus, and Coturnix coturnix, and show high sequence identity to their Columba livia and Anas platyrhynchos counterparts. In contrast, these avian peptides shared a very low sequence identity with the mammalian cathelicidins. The analysis further revealed that the cathelicidin genes are expressed in various organ and tissues. We also show that the CATH peptides 1, 2, 3 and their amide-modified structures possess potent antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, with these bacteria being affected to different extents. The antimicrobial activities of the peptides are slightly lower than those of their amide analogs. Computational analysis revealed that pre-pro-cathelicidins are hybrid proteins that contain ordered domains and functional intrinsically disordered regions. Furthermore, high structural and sequence variability of mature cathelicidins is a strong indication of their rather disordered nature. It is likely that intrinsic disorder is needed for the multifarious functionality of these antimicrobial peptides. Our analyses indicated that cathelicidin peptides require further study to better understand their full potentials in the treatment of diseases in both humans and animals. The data obtained for synthetic avian peptides will help elucidating of their potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

  9. Electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry of intact intrinsic membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Whitelegge, J. P.; Gundersen, C. B.; Faull, K. F.

    1998-01-01

    Membrane proteins drive and mediate many essential cellular processes making them a vital section of the proteome. However, the amphipathic nature of these molecules ensures their detailed structural analysis remains challenging. A versatile procedure for effective electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) of intact intrinsic membrane proteins purified using reverse-phase chromatography in aqueous formic acid/isopropanol is presented. The spectra of four examples, bacteriorhodopsin and its apoprotein from Halobacterium and the D1 and D2 reaction-center subunits from spinach thylakoids, achieve mass measurements that are within 0.01% of calculated theoretical values. All of the spectra reveal lesser quantities of other molecular species that can usually be equated with covalently modified subpopulations of these proteins. Our analysis of bovine rhodopsin, the first ESI-MS study of a G-protein coupled receptor, yielded a complex spectrum indicative of extensive molecular heterogeneity. The range of masses measured for the native molecule agrees well with the range calculated based upon variable glycosylation and reveals further heterogeneity arising from other covalent modifications. The technique described represents the most precise way to catalogue membrane proteins and their post-translational modifications. Resolution of the components of protein complexes provides insights into native protein/protein interactions. The apparent retention of structure by bacteriorhodopsin during the analysis raises the potential of obtaining tertiary structure information using more developed ESI-MS experiments. PMID:9655347

  10. Hydrogen exchange of disordered proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, Austin E; Zhou, Larry Z; Pielak, Gary J

    2015-05-01

    A truly disordered protein lacks a stable fold and its backbone amide protons exchange with solvent at rates predicted from studies of unstructured peptides. We have measured the exchange rates of two model disordered proteins, FlgM and α-synuclein, in buffer and in Escherichia coli using the NMR experiment, SOLEXSY. The rates are similar in buffer and cells and are close to the rates predicted from data on small, unstructured peptides. This result indicates that true disorder can persist inside the crowded cellular interior and that weak interactions between proteins and macromolecules in cells do not necessarily affect intrinsic rates of exchange.

  11. Disorder in milk proteins: structure, functional disorder, and biocidal potentials of lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Almehdar, Hussein A; El-Fakharany, Esmail M; Uversky, Vladimir N; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2015-01-01

    This article continues a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. Besides caseins, which are the major proteinaceous constituents of any milk that can be isolated by isoelectric precipitation, milk contains a set of soluble whey proteins, such as β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, serum albumin, immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, glycomacropeptide, and proteose peptone (the last two are soluble casein derivatives). Lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are known to possess prominent biocidal activity, serving as efficient antibiotics and antiviral agents against a wide spectrum of bacteria, fungi, and viruses. LPO is a heme-containing peroxidase expressed as preproprotein. The mature protein has a single catalytic domain, structure of which is known for a protein isolated from several species. Functionally, LPO is a crucial component of the LPO system that includes LPO, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and thiocyanate (SCN(-)), being a well-studied, naturally occurring antimicrobial system in milk that is effective against many microorganisms and some viruses. Although various aspects of LPO structure and function are rather well studied and were subjects of several recent reviews, the abundance and potential functional roles of intrinsically disordered regions in this protein have never being addressed as of yet. The major goal of this article is to fill this gap and to show how intrinsic disorder is encoded in the amino acid sequence of LPO, and how intrinsic disorder is related to functions of this important milk protein.

  12. Long indels are disordered: a study of disorder and indels in homologous eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Light, Sara; Sagit, Rauan; Ekman, Diana; Elofsson, Arne

    2013-05-01

    Proteins evolve through point mutations as well as by insertions and deletions (indels). During the last decade it has become apparent that protein regions that do not fold into three-dimensional structures, i.e. intrinsically disordered regions, are quite common. Here, we have studied the relationship between protein disorder and indels using HMM-HMM pairwise alignments in two sets of orthologous eukaryotic protein pairs. First, we show that disordered residues are much more frequent among indel residues than among aligned residues and, also are more prevalent among indels than in coils. Second, we observed that disordered residues are particularly common in longer indels. Disordered indels of short-to-medium size are prevalent in the non-terminal regions of proteins while the longest indels, ordered and disordered alike, occur toward the termini of the proteins where new structural units are comparatively well tolerated. Finally, while disordered regions often evolve faster than ordered regions and disorder is common in indels, there are some previously recognized protein families where the disordered region is more conserved than the ordered region. We find that these rare proteins are often involved in information processes, such as RNA processing and translation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The emerging dynamic view of proteins: Protein plasticity in allostery, evolution and self-assembly. PMID:23333420

  13. Protein domain definition should allow for conditional disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yegambaram, Kavestri; Bulloch, Esther MM; Kingston, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Proteins are often classified in a binary fashion as either structured or disordered. However this approach has several deficits. Firstly, protein folding is always conditional on the physiochemical environment. A protein which is structured in some circumstances will be disordered in others. Secondly, it hides a fundamental asymmetry in behavior. While all structured proteins can be unfolded through a change in environment, not all disordered proteins have the capacity for folding. Failure to accommodate these complexities confuses the definition of both protein structural domains and intrinsically disordered regions. We illustrate these points with an experimental study of a family of small binding domains, drawn from the RNA polymerase of mumps virus and its closest relatives. Assessed at face value the domains fall on a structural continuum, with folded, partially folded, and near unstructured members. Yet the disorder present in the family is conditional, and these closely related polypeptides can access the same folded state under appropriate conditions. Any heuristic definition of the protein domain emphasizing conformational stability divides this domain family in two, in a way that makes no biological sense. Structural domains would be better defined by their ability to adopt a specific tertiary structure: a structure that may or may not be realized, dependent on the circumstances. This explicitly allows for the conditional nature of protein folding, and more clearly demarcates structural domains from intrinsically disordered regions that may function without folding. PMID:23963781

  14. Intrinsic disorder in graphene on transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankowitz, Matthew; Larentis, Stefano; Kim, Kyounghwam; Xue, Jiamin; McKenzie, Devin; Huang, Shengqiang; Paggen, Marina; Ali, Mazhar; Cava, Robert; Tutuc, Emanuel; Leroy, Brian J.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, semiconducting materials in the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) family have gained great popularity for use in novel graphene-based heterostructure devices such as tunneling transistors, highly efficient flexible photovoltaic devices, and nonvolatile memory cells. TMDs have also been explored as alternatives to hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) as substrates for pristine graphene devices. However, their quality has thus far been significantly worse than comparable hBN devices. We examine graphene on numerous TMD substrates (MoS2, WS2, WSe2, MoTe2) with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and find that point and line defects intrinsic to all TMD crystals (both of natural and synthetic origin) result in scattering of electrons in graphene. Our findings suggest that the quality of graphene on TMD heterostructures is limited by the intrinsic crystalline quality of the TMDs.

  15. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    to its (loose) association with the protein. Note that spin relaxation data are indispensable in determining the dynamic status of the peptide. Such data can be properly modeled only on a basis of bona fide MD simulations, as shown in our study. We anticipate that in future the field will move away from the ensemble view of protein disorder and toward more sophisticated MD models. This will require further optimization of force fields, aimed specifically at disordered systems. Efforts in this direction have been recently initiated by several research groups; the empirical salt-bridge correction proposed in our work falls in the same category. MD models obtained with the help of suitably refined force fields and guided by experimental NMR data will provide a powerful insight into an intricate world of disordered biomolecules. PMID:26910732

  16. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    to its (loose) association with the protein. Note that spin relaxation data are indispensable in determining the dynamic status of the peptide. Such data can be properly modeled only on a basis of bona fide MD simulations, as shown in our study. We anticipate that in future the field will move away from the ensemble view of protein disorder and toward more sophisticated MD models. This will require further optimization of force fields, aimed specifically at disordered systems. Efforts in this direction have been recently initiated by several research groups; the empirical salt-bridge correction proposed in our work falls in the same category. MD models obtained with the help of suitably refined force fields and guided by experimental NMR data will provide a powerful insight into an intricate world of disordered biomolecules.

  17. Structural and Functional Insights into the Cryoprotection of Membranes by the Intrinsically Disordered Dehydrins.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Matthew W; Boddington, Kelly F; Warnica, Josephine M; Atkinson, John; McKenna, Sarah; Madge, Jeffrey; Barker, Christine H; Graether, Steffen P

    2015-11-01

    Dehydration can be due to desiccation caused by a lack of environmental water or to freezing caused by a lack of liquid water. Plants have evolved a large family of proteins called LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins, which include the intrinsically disordered dehydrin (dehydration protein) family, to combat these abiotic stresses. Although transcription and translation studies have shown a correlation between dehydration stress and the presence of dehydrins, the biochemical mechanisms have remained somewhat elusive. We examine here the effect and structure of a small model dehydrin (Vitis riparia K2) on the protection of membranes from freeze-thaw stress. This protein is able to bind to liposomes containing phosphatidic acid and protect the liposomes from fusing after freeze-thaw treatment. The presence of K2 did not measurably affect liposome surface accessibility or lipid mobility but did lower its membrane transition temperature by 3 °C. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate as a membrane model, we examined the NMR structure of K2 in the presence and absence of the micelle. Biochemical and NMR experiments show that the conserved, lysine-rich segments are involved in the binding of the dehydrin to a membrane, whereas the poorly conserved φ segments play no role in binding or protection. PMID:26370084

  18. Intrinsically Disordered Titin PEVK as a Molecular Velcro: Salt-Bridge Dynamics and Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jeffrey; Tsai, Wanxia; Wittebort, Richard; Wang, Kuan

    2009-03-01

    Titin is a giant modular protein (3-4 MDa) found in the muscle sarcomere, where the intrinsically disordered and elastic PEVK segment plays a major role in the passive tension of skeletal and heart tissues. We have proposed that salt-bridges play a central role in the elasticity of PEVK. The 50 kDa engineered PEVK polyprotein shows well-resolved NMR spectra at all concentrations. From long-range NOE's, we observed stable K to E salt-bridges. Simulated annealing with NMR restraints yielded a manifold of structures for an exon 172 trimer. Steered molecular dynamics simulations were done to study how the manifold of salt-bridges evolves during the stretching experiment. Repeated SMD simulations at slow velocity (0.0005 nm/ps) showed force spectra consistent with experimental AFM force spectra of the polyprotein. SMD shows that salt-bridges occur even at high degrees of stretch and that these short range interactions are in integral part of the mechanical properties of PEVK. We propose that the long-range, non-stereospecific nature of electrostatic interactions provide a facile mechanism to tether and untether the flexible chains, which in turn affect elasticity as well as control the accessibility of protein-protein interaction to these nanogel-like proteins.

  19. Iridovirus CARD Protein Inhibits Apoptosis through Intrinsic and Extrinsic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Wen; Wu, Ming-Shan; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Pei-Wen; Shih, Chueh-Ju; Lin, Fu-Pang; Chang, Chi-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Grouper iridovirus (GIV) belongs to the genus Ranavirus of the family Iridoviridae; the genomes of such viruses contain an anti-apoptotic caspase recruitment domain (CARD) gene. The GIV-CARD gene encodes a protein of 91 amino acids with a molecular mass of 10,505 Daltons, and shows high similarity to other viral CARD genes and human ICEBERG. In this study, we used Northern blot to demonstrate that GIV-CARD transcription begins at 4 h post-infection; furthermore, we report that its transcription is completely inhibited by cycloheximide but not by aphidicolin, indicating that GIV-CARD is an early gene. GIV-CARD-EGFP and GIV-CARD-FLAG recombinant proteins were observed to translocate from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, but no obvious nuclear localization sequence was observed within GIV-CARD. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GIV-CARD in GK cells infected with GIV inhibited expression of GIV-CARD and five other viral genes during the early stages of infection, and also reduced GIV infection ability. Immunostaining was performed to show that apoptosis was effectively inhibited in cells expressing GIV-CARD. HeLa cells irradiated with UV or treated with anti-Fas antibody will undergo apoptosis through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, respectively. However, over-expression of recombinant GIV-CARD protein in HeLa cells inhibited apoptosis induced by mitochondrial and death receptor signaling. Finally, we report that expression of GIV-CARD in HeLa cells significantly reduced the activities of caspase-8 and -9 following apoptosis triggered by anti-Fas antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate that GIV-CARD inhibits apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways.

  20. Iridovirus CARD Protein Inhibits Apoptosis through Intrinsic and Extrinsic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Wen; Wu, Ming-Shan; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Pei-Wen; Shih, Chueh-Ju; Lin, Fu-Pang; Chang, Chi-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Grouper iridovirus (GIV) belongs to the genus Ranavirus of the family Iridoviridae; the genomes of such viruses contain an anti-apoptotic caspase recruitment domain (CARD) gene. The GIV-CARD gene encodes a protein of 91 amino acids with a molecular mass of 10,505 Daltons, and shows high similarity to other viral CARD genes and human ICEBERG. In this study, we used Northern blot to demonstrate that GIV-CARD transcription begins at 4 h post-infection; furthermore, we report that its transcription is completely inhibited by cycloheximide but not by aphidicolin, indicating that GIV-CARD is an early gene. GIV-CARD-EGFP and GIV-CARD-FLAG recombinant proteins were observed to translocate from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, but no obvious nuclear localization sequence was observed within GIV-CARD. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GIV-CARD in GK cells infected with GIV inhibited expression of GIV-CARD and five other viral genes during the early stages of infection, and also reduced GIV infection ability. Immunostaining was performed to show that apoptosis was effectively inhibited in cells expressing GIV-CARD. HeLa cells irradiated with UV or treated with anti-Fas antibody will undergo apoptosis through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, respectively. However, over-expression of recombinant GIV-CARD protein in HeLa cells inhibited apoptosis induced by mitochondrial and death receptor signaling. Finally, we report that expression of GIV-CARD in HeLa cells significantly reduced the activities of caspase-8 and -9 following apoptosis triggered by anti-Fas antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate that GIV-CARD inhibits apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. PMID:26047333

  1. The Complete Set of Genes Encoding Major Intrinsic Proteins in Arabidopsis Provides a Framework for a New Nomenclature for Major Intrinsic Proteins in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Urban; Karlsson, Maria; Johansson, Ingela; Gustavsson, Sofia; Sjövall, Sara; Fraysse, Laure; Weig, Alfons R.; Kjellbom, Per

    2001-01-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) facilitate the passive transport of small polar molecules across membranes. MIPs constitute a very old family of proteins and different forms have been found in all kinds of living organisms, including bacteria, fungi, animals, and plants. In the genomic sequence of Arabidopsis, we have identified 35 different MIP-encoding genes. Based on sequence similarity, these 35 proteins are divided into four different subfamilies: plasma membrane intrinsic proteins, tonoplast intrinsic proteins, NOD26-like intrinsic proteins also called NOD26-like MIPs, and the recently discovered small basic intrinsic proteins. In Arabidopsis, there are 13 plasma membrane intrinsic proteins, 10 tonoplast intrinsic proteins, nine NOD26-like intrinsic proteins, and three small basic intrinsic proteins. The gene structure in general is conserved within each subfamily, although there is a tendency to lose introns. Based on phylogenetic comparisons of maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis MIPs (AtMIPs), it is argued that the general intron patterns in the subfamilies were formed before the split of monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Although the gene structure is unique for each subfamily, there is a common pattern in how transmembrane helices are encoded on the exons in three of the subfamilies. The nomenclature for plant MIPs varies widely between different species but also between subfamilies in the same species. Based on the phylogeny of all AtMIPs, a new and more consistent nomenclature is proposed. The complete set of AtMIPs, together with the new nomenclature, will facilitate the isolation, classification, and labeling of plant MIPs from other species. PMID:11500536

  2. Disordered proteins and network disorder in network descriptions of protein structure, dynamics and function: hypotheses and a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Csermely, Peter; Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh; Hazai, Eszter; Hoksza, Zsolt; Kiss, Huba J M; Miozzo, Federico; Veres, Dániel V; Piazza, Francesco; Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    During the last decade, network approaches became a powerful tool to describe protein structure and dynamics. Here we review the links between disordered proteins and the associated networks, and describe the consequences of local, mesoscopic and global network disorder on changes in protein structure and dynamics. We introduce a new classification of protein networks into 'cumulus-type', i.e., those similar to puffy (white) clouds, and 'stratus-type', i.e., those similar to flat, dense (dark) low-lying clouds, and relate these network types to protein disorder dynamics and to differences in energy transmission processes. In the first class, there is limited overlap between the modules, which implies higher rigidity of the individual units; there the conformational changes can be described by an 'energy transfer' mechanism. In the second class, the topology presents a compact structure with significant overlap between the modules; there the conformational changes can be described by 'multi-trajectories'; that is, multiple highly populated pathways. We further propose that disordered protein regions evolved to help other protein segments reach 'rarely visited' but functionally-related states. We also show the role of disorder in 'spatial games' of amino acids; highlight the effects of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) on cellular networks and list some possible studies linking protein disorder and protein structure networks.

  3. Tryptogalinin Is a Tick Kunitz Serine Protease Inhibitor with a Unique Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, James J.; Schwarz, Alexandra; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Calvo, Eric; Pedra, Joao H. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background A salivary proteome-transcriptome project on the hard tick Ixodes scapularis revealed that Kunitz peptides are the most abundant salivary proteins. Ticks use Kunitz peptides (among other salivary proteins) to combat host defense mechanisms and to obtain a blood meal. Most of these Kunitz peptides, however, remain functionally uncharacterized, thus limiting our knowledge about their biochemical interactions. Results We discovered an unusual cysteine motif in a Kunitz peptide. This peptide inhibits several serine proteases with high affinity and was named tryptogalinin due to its high affinity for β-tryptase. Compared with other functionally described peptides from the Acari subclass, we showed that tryptogalinin is phylogenetically related to a Kunitz peptide from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, also reported to have a high affinity for β-tryptase. Using homology-based modeling (and other protein prediction programs) we were able to model and explain the multifaceted function of tryptogalinin. The N-terminus of the modeled tryptogalinin is detached from the rest of the peptide and exhibits intrinsic disorder allowing an increased flexibility for its high affinity with its inhibiting partners (i.e., serine proteases). Conclusions By incorporating experimental and computational methods our data not only describes the function of a Kunitz peptide from Ixodes scapularis, but also allows us to hypothesize about the molecular basis of this function at the atomic level. PMID:23658744

  4. Looking at the carcinogenicity of human insulin analogues via the intrinsic disorder prism

    PubMed Central

    Redwan, Elrashdy M.; Linjawi, Moustafa H.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic insulin, in its native and biosynthetic forms as well as several currently available insulin analogues, continues to be the protein of most interest to researchers. From the time of its discovery to the development of modern insulin analogues, this important therapeutic protein has passed through several stages and product generations. Beside the well-known link between diabetes and cancer risk, the currently used therapeutic insulin analogues raised serious concerns due to their potential roles in cancer initiation and/or progression. It is possible that structural variations in some of the insulin analogues are responsible for the appearance of new oncogenic species with high binding affinity to the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) receptor. The question we are trying to answer in this work is: are there any specific features of the distribution of intrinsic disorder propensity within the amino acid sequences of insulin analogues that may provide an explanation for the carcinogenicity of the altered insulin protein? PMID:26983499

  5. Chemical perturbation of an intrinsically disordered region of TFIID distinguishes two modes of transcription initiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengjian; Boskovic, Zarko; Hussain, Mahmud M; Hu, Wenxin; Inouye, Carla; Kim, Han-Je; Abole, A Katherine; Doud, Mary K; Lewis, Timothy A; Koehler, Angela N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Tjian, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins/regions (IDPs/IDRs) are proteins or peptide segments that fail to form stable 3-dimensional structures in the absence of partner proteins. They are abundant in eukaryotic proteomes and are often associated with human diseases, but their biological functions have been elusive to study. In this study, we report the identification of a tin(IV) oxochloride-derived cluster that binds an evolutionarily conserved IDR within the metazoan TFIID transcription complex. Binding arrests an isomerization of promoter-bound TFIID that is required for the engagement of Pol II during the first (de novo) round of transcription initiation. However, the specific chemical probe does not affect reinitiation, which requires the re-entry of Pol II, thus, mechanistically distinguishing these two modes of transcription initiation. This work also suggests a new avenue for targeting the elusive IDRs by harnessing certain features of metal-based complexes for mechanistic studies, and for the development of novel pharmaceutical interventions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07777.001 PMID:26314865

  6. A Large Intrinsically Disordered Region in SKIP and Its Disorder-Order Transition Induced by PPIL1 Binding Revealed by NMR*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingsheng; Zhang, Shaojie; Zhang, Jiahai; Huang, Xiaojuan; Xu, Chao; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Zhijun; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins or protein regions play an important role in fundamental biological processes. During spliceosome activation, a large structural rearrangement occurs. The Prp19 complex and related factors are involved in the catalytic activation of the spliceosome. Recent mass spectrometric analyses have shown that Ski interaction protein (SKIP) and peptidylprolyl isomerase-like protein 1 (PPIL1) are Prp19-related factors that constitute the spliceosome B, B*, and C complexes. Here, we report that a highly flexible region of SKIP (SKIPN, residues 59–129) is intrinsically disordered. Upon binding to PPIL1, SKIPN undergoes a disorder-order transition. A highly conserved fragment of SKIP (residues 59–79) called the PPIL1-binding fragment (PBF) was sufficient to bind PPIL1. The structure of PBF·PPIL1 complex, solved by NMR, shows that PBF exhibits an ordered structure and interacts with PPIL1 through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Three subfragments in the PBF (residues 59–67, 68–73, and 74–79) show hook-like backbone structure, and interactions between these subfragments are necessary for PBF·PPIL1 complex formation. PPIL1 is a cyclophilin family protein. It is recruited by SKIP into the spliceosome by a region other than the peptidylprolyl isomerase active site. This enables the active site of PPIL1 to remain open in the complex and still function as a peptidylprolyl cis/trans-isomerase or molecular chaperon to facilitate the folding of other proteins in the spliceosomes. The large disordered region in SKIP provides an interaction platform. Its disorder-order transition, induced by PPIL1 binding, may adapt the requirement for a large structural rearrangement occurred in the activation of spliceosome. PMID:20007319

  7. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  8. Kirkwood-Buff Approach Rescues Overcollapse of a Disordered Protein in Canonical Protein Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Davide; Milles, Sigrid; Fuertes, Gustavo; Svergun, Dmitri I; Lemke, Edward A; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-06-25

    Understanding the function of intrinsically disordered proteins is intimately related to our capacity to correctly sample their conformational dynamics. So far, a gap between experimentally and computationally derived ensembles exists, as simulations show overcompacted conformers. Increasing evidence suggests that the solvent plays a crucial role in shaping the ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins and has led to several attempts to modify water parameters and thereby favor protein-water over protein-protein interactions. This study tackles the problem from a different perspective, which is the use of the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions to reproduce the correct conformational ensemble of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). A protein force field recently developed on such a basis was found to be highly effective in reproducing ensembles for a fragment from the FG-rich nucleoporin 153, with dimensions matching experimental values obtained from small-angle X-ray scattering and single molecule FRET experiments. Kirkwood-Buff theory presents a complementary and fundamentally different approach to the recently developed four-site TIP4P-D water model, both of which can rescue the overcollapse observed in IDPs with canonical protein force fields. As such, our study provides a new route for tackling the deficiencies of current protein force fields in describing protein solvation.

  9. Intrinsic disorder mediates the diverse regulatory functions of the Cdk inhibitor p21

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuefeng; Fisher, John C.; Mathew, Rose; Ou, Li; Otieno, Steve; Sublett, Jack; Xiao, Limin; Chen, Jianhan; Roussel, Martine F.; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, well-defined three-dimensional structure was thought to be essential for protein function. However, myriad biological functions are performed by highly dynamic, intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IDPs often fold upon binding their biological targets and frequently exhibit “binding diversity” by targeting multiple ligands. We sought to understand the physical basis of IDP binding diversity and herein report that the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor, p21Cip1, adaptively binds to and inhibits the various Cdk/cyclin complexes that regulate eukaryotic cell division. Based on results from NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical and cellular assays, we show that structural adaptability of a helical sub-domain within p21 termed LH enables two other sub-domains termed D1 and D2 to specifically bind conserved surface features of the cyclin and Cdk subunits, respectively, within otherwise structurally distinct Cdk/cyclin complexes. Adaptive folding upon binding is likely to mediate the diverse biological functions of the thousands of IDPs present in eukaryotes. PMID:21358637

  10. SASSIE: A program to study intrinsically disordered biological molecules and macromolecular ensembles using experimental scattering restraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Joseph E.; Raghunandan, Sindhu; Nanda, Hirsh; Krueger, Susan

    2012-02-01

    A program to construct ensembles of biomolecular structures that are consistent with experimental scattering data are described. Specifically, we generate an ensemble of biomolecular structures by varying sets of backbone dihedral angles that are then filtered using experimentally determined restraints to rapidly determine structures that have scattering profiles that are consistent with scattering data. We discuss an application of these tools to predict a set of structures for the HIV-1 Gag protein, an intrinsically disordered protein, that are consistent with small-angle neutron scattering experimental data. We have assembled these algorithms into a program called SASSIE for structure generation, visualization, and analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins and other macromolecular ensembles using neutron and X-ray scattering restraints. Program summaryProgram title: SASSIE Catalogue identifier: AEKL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 991 624 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 826 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python, C/C++, Fortran Computer: PC/Mac Operating system: 32- and 64-bit Linux (Ubuntu 10.04, Centos 5.6) and Mac OS X (10.6.6) RAM: 1 GB Classification: 3 External routines: Python 2.6.5, numpy 1.4.0, swig 1.3.40, scipy 0.8.0, Gnuplot-py-1.8, Tcl 8.5, Tk 8.5, Mac installation requires aquaterm 1.0 (or X window system) and Xcode 3 development tools. Nature of problem: Open source software to generate structures of disordered biological molecules that subsequently allow for the comparison of computational and experimental results is limiting the use of scattering resources. Solution method: Starting with an all atom model of a protein, for example, users can input

  11. Tyrosinase Degradation Is Prevented when EDEM1 Lacks the Intrinsically Disordered Region

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Marioara B.; Ghenea, Simona; Spiridon, Laurentiu N.; Chiritoiu, Gabriela N.; Petrescu, Andrei-Jose; Petrescu, Stefana-Maria

    2012-01-01

    EDEM1 is a mannosidase-like protein that recruits misfolded glycoproteins from the calnexin/calreticulin folding cycle to downstream endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. Here, we investigate the role of EDEM1 in the processing of tyrosinase, a tumour antigen overexpressed in melanoma cells. First, we analyzed and modeled EDEM1 major domains. The homology model raised on the crystal structures of human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ER class I α1,2-mannosidases reveals that the major mannosidase domain located between aminoacids 121–598 fits with high accuracy. We have further identified an N-terminal region located between aminoacids 40–119, predicted to be intrinsically disordered (ID) and susceptible to adopt multiple conformations, hence facilitating protein-protein interactions. To investigate these two domains we have constructed an EDEM1 deletion mutant lacking the ID region and a triple mutant disrupting the glycan-binding domain and analyzed their association with tyrosinase. Tyrosinase is a glycoprotein partly degraded endogenously by ERAD and the ubiquitin proteasomal system. We found that the degradation of wild type and misfolded tyrosinase was enhanced when EDEM1 was overexpressed. Glycosylated and non-glycosylated mutants co-immunoprecipitated with EDEM1 even in the absence of its intact mannosidase-like domain, but not when the ID region was deleted. In contrast, calnexin and SEL 1L associated with the deletion mutant. Our data suggest that the ID region identified in the N-terminal end of EDEM1 is involved in the binding of glycosylated and non-glycosylated misfolded proteins. Accelerating tyrosinase degradation by EDEM1 overexpression may lead to an efficient antigen presentation and enhanced elimination of melanoma cells. PMID:22905195

  12. Disorder transitions and conformational diversity cooperatively modulate biological function in proteins.

    PubMed

    Zea, Diego Javier; Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Gonzalez, Claudia; Fornasari, María Silvina; Tosatto, Silvio C E; Parisi, Gustavo

    2016-06-01

    Structural differences between conformers sustain protein biological function. Here, we studied in a large dataset of 745 intrinsically disordered proteins, how ordered-disordered transitions modulate structural differences between conformers as derived from crystallographic data. We found that almost 50% of the proteins studied show no transitions and have low conformational diversity while the rest show transitions and a higher conformational diversity. In this last subset, 60% of the proteins become more ordered after ligand binding, while 40% more disordered. As protein conformational diversity is inherently connected with protein function our analysis suggests differences in structure-function relationships related to order-disorder transitions.

  13. Interplay between chaperones and protein disorder promotes the evolution of protein networks.

    PubMed

    Pechmann, Sebastian; Frydman, Judith

    2014-06-01

    Evolution is driven by mutations, which lead to new protein functions but come at a cost to protein stability. Non-conservative substitutions are of interest in this regard because they may most profoundly affect both function and stability. Accordingly, organisms must balance the benefit of accepting advantageous substitutions with the possible cost of deleterious effects on protein folding and stability. We here examine factors that systematically promote non-conservative mutations at the proteome level. Intrinsically disordered regions in proteins play pivotal roles in protein interactions, but many questions regarding their evolution remain unanswered. Similarly, whether and how molecular chaperones, which have been shown to buffer destabilizing mutations in individual proteins, generally provide robustness during proteome evolution remains unclear. To this end, we introduce an evolutionary parameter λ that directly estimates the rate of non-conservative substitutions. Our analysis of λ in Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Homo sapiens sequences reveals how co- and post-translationally acting chaperones differentially promote non-conservative substitutions in their substrates, likely through buffering of their destabilizing effects. We further find that λ serves well to quantify the evolution of intrinsically disordered proteins even though the unstructured, thus generally variable regions in proteins are often flanked by very conserved sequences. Crucially, we show that both intrinsically disordered proteins and highly re-wired proteins in protein interaction networks, which have evolved new interactions and functions, exhibit a higher λ at the expense of enhanced chaperone assistance. Our findings thus highlight an intricate interplay of molecular chaperones and protein disorder in the evolvability of protein networks. Our results illuminate the role of chaperones in enabling protein evolution, and underline the importance of the cellular

  14. Interplay between Chaperones and Protein Disorder Promotes the Evolution of Protein Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pechmann, Sebastian; Frydman, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Evolution is driven by mutations, which lead to new protein functions but come at a cost to protein stability. Non-conservative substitutions are of interest in this regard because they may most profoundly affect both function and stability. Accordingly, organisms must balance the benefit of accepting advantageous substitutions with the possible cost of deleterious effects on protein folding and stability. We here examine factors that systematically promote non-conservative mutations at the proteome level. Intrinsically disordered regions in proteins play pivotal roles in protein interactions, but many questions regarding their evolution remain unanswered. Similarly, whether and how molecular chaperones, which have been shown to buffer destabilizing mutations in individual proteins, generally provide robustness during proteome evolution remains unclear. To this end, we introduce an evolutionary parameter λ that directly estimates the rate of non-conservative substitutions. Our analysis of λ in Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Homo sapiens sequences reveals how co- and post-translationally acting chaperones differentially promote non-conservative substitutions in their substrates, likely through buffering of their destabilizing effects. We further find that λ serves well to quantify the evolution of intrinsically disordered proteins even though the unstructured, thus generally variable regions in proteins are often flanked by very conserved sequences. Crucially, we show that both intrinsically disordered proteins and highly re-wired proteins in protein interaction networks, which have evolved new interactions and functions, exhibit a higher λ at the expense of enhanced chaperone assistance. Our findings thus highlight an intricate interplay of molecular chaperones and protein disorder in the evolvability of protein networks. Our results illuminate the role of chaperones in enabling protein evolution, and underline the importance of the cellular

  15. Interactions of Yeast Dynein with Dynein Light Chain and Dynactin: GENERAL IMPLICATIONS FOR INTRINSICALLY DISORDERED DUPLEX SCAFFOLDS IN MULTIPROTEIN ASSEMBLIES.

    PubMed

    Jie, Jing; Löhr, Frank; Barbar, Elisar

    2015-09-25

    Intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) duplexes composed of two IDP chains cross-linked by bivalent partner proteins form scaffolds for assembly of multiprotein complexes. The N-terminal domain of dynein intermediate chain (N-IC) is one such IDP that forms a bivalent scaffold with multiple dynein light chains including LC8, a hub protein that promotes duplex formation of diverse IDP partners. N-IC also binds a subunit of the dynein regulator, dynactin. Here we characterize interactions of a yeast ortholog of N-IC (N-Pac11) with yeast LC8 (Dyn2) or with the intermediate chain-binding subunit of yeast dynactin (Nip100). Residue level changes in Pac11 structure are monitored by NMR spectroscopy, and binding energetics are monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). N-Pac11 is monomeric and primarily disordered except for a single α-helix (SAH) at the N terminus and a short nascent helix, LH, flanked by the two Dyn2 recognition motifs. Upon binding Dyn2, the only Pac11 residues making direct protein-protein interactions are in and immediately flanking the recognition motifs. Dyn2 binding also orders LH residues of Pac11. Upon binding Nip100, only Pac11 SAH residues make direct protein-protein interactions, but LH residues at a distant sequence position and L1 residues in an adjacent linker are also ordered. The long distance, ligand-dependent ordering of residues reveals new elements of dynamic structure within IDP linker regions.

  16. The fragmented self: imbalance between intrinsic and extrinsic self-networks in psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ebisch, Sjoerd J H; Aleman, André

    2016-08-01

    Self-disturbances are among the core features of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. The basic structure of the self could depend on the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic self-processing. We discuss studies on self-related processing in psychotic disorders that provide converging evidence for disrupted communication between neural networks subserving the so-called intrinsic self and extrinsic self. This disruption might be mainly caused by impaired integrity of key brain hubs. The intrinsic self has been associated with cortical midline structures involved in self-referential processing, autobiographical memory, and emotional evaluation. Additionally, we highlight central aspects of the extrinsic self in its interaction with the environment using sensorimotor networks, including self-experience in sensation and actions. A deficient relationship between these self-aspects because of disrupted between-network interactions offers a framework to explain core clinical features of psychotic disorders. In particular, we show how relative isolation and reduced modularity of networks subserving intrinsic and extrinsic self-processing might trigger the emergence of hallucinations and delusions, and why patients with psychosis typically have difficulties with self-other relationships and do not recognise mental problems. PMID:27374147

  17. Intrinsic characteristics of Min proteins on the cell division of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yoshie; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Norihito; Umeda, Akiko; Kadota, Yoshu; Kira, Mizuki; Okazaki, Ami; Matsumura, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Tetsuro

    2016-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori divides in the human stomach resulting in persistent infections and causing various disorders. Bacterial cell division is precisely coordinated by many molecules, including FtsZ and Min proteins. However, the role of Min proteins in H. pylori division is poorly understood. We investigated the functional characteristics of Min proteins in wild-type HPK5 and five HPK5-derivative mutants using morphological and genetic approaches. All mutants showed a filamentous shape. However, the bacterial cell growth and viability of three single-gene mutants (minC, minD, minE) were similar to that of the wild-type. The coccoid form number was lowest in the minE-disruptant, indicating that MinE contributes to the coccoid form conversion during the stationary phase. Immunofluorescence microscopic observations showed that FtsZ was dispersedly distributed throughout the bacterial cell irrespective of nucleoid position in only minD-disruptants, indicating that MinD is involved in the nucleoid occlusion system. A chase assay demonstrated that MinC loss suppressed FtsZ-degradation, indicating that FtsZ degrades in a MinC-dependent manner. Molecular interactions between FtsZ and Min proteins were confirmed by immunoprecipitation (IP)-western blotting (WB), suggesting the functional cooperation of these molecules during bacterial cell division. This study describes the intrinsic characteristics of Min proteins and provides new insights into H. pylori cell division.

  18. Three reasons protein disorder analysis makes more sense in the light of collagen

    PubMed Central

    Oates, Matt E.; Tompa, Peter; Gough, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have identified that the collagen helix has the potential to be disruptive to analyses of intrinsically disordered proteins. The collagen helix is an extended fibrous structure that is both promiscuous and repetitive. Whilst its sequence is predicted to be disordered, this type of protein structure is not typically considered as intrinsic disorder. Here, we show that collagen‐encoding proteins skew the distribution of exon lengths in genes. We find that previous results, demonstrating that exons encoding disordered regions are more likely to be symmetric, are due to the abundance of the collagen helix. Other related results, showing increased levels of alternative splicing in disorder‐encoding exons, still hold after considering collagen‐containing proteins. Aside from analyses of exons, we find that the set of proteins that contain collagen significantly alters the amino acid composition of regions predicted as disordered. We conclude that research in this area should be conducted in the light of the collagen helix. PMID:26941008

  19. Evolutionarily conserved and conformationally constrained short peptides might serve as DNA recognition elements in intrinsically disordered regions.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Nitish; Choudhary, Preeti; Pandit, Shashi B; Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh

    2014-06-01

    Despite recent advances, it is yet not clear how intrinsically disordered regions in proteins recognize their targets without any defined structures. Short linear motifs had been proposed to mediate molecular recognition by disordered regions; however, the underlying structural prerequisite remains elusive. Moreover, the role of short linear motifs in DNA recognition has not been studied. We report a repertoire of short evolutionarily Conserved Recognition Elements (CoREs) in long intrinsically disordered regions, which have very distinct amino-acid propensities from those of known motifs, and exhibit a strong tendency to retain their three-dimensional conformations compared to adjacent regions. The majority of CoREs directly interact with the DNA in the available 3D structures, which is further supported by literature evidence, analyses of ΔΔG values of DNA-binding energies and threading-based prediction of DNA binding potential. CoREs were enriched in cancer-associated missense mutations, further strengthening their functional nature. Significant enrichment of glycines in CoREs and the preference of glycyl ϕ-Ψ values within the left-handed bridge range in the l-disallowed region of the Ramachandran plot suggest that Gly-to-nonGly mutations within CoREs might alter the backbone conformation and consequently the function, a hypothesis that we reconciled using available mutation data. We conclude that CoREs might serve as bait for DNA recognition by long disordered regions and that certain mutations in these peptides can disrupt their DNA binding potential and consequently the protein function. We further hypothesize that the preferred conformations of CoREs and of glycyl residues therein might play an important role in DNA binding. The highly ordered nature of CoREs hints at a therapeutic strategy to inhibit malicious molecular interactions using small molecules mimicking CoRE conformations.

  20. Balanced Protein–Water Interactions Improve Properties of Disordered Proteins and Non-Specific Protein Association

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some frequently encountered deficiencies in all-atom molecular simulations, such as nonspecific protein–protein interactions being too strong, and unfolded or disordered states being too collapsed, suggest that proteins are insufficiently well solvated in simulations using current state-of-the-art force fields. To address these issues, we make the simplest possible change, by modifying the short-range protein–water pair interactions, and leaving all the water–water and protein–protein parameters unchanged. We find that a modest strengthening of protein–water interactions is sufficient to recover the correct dimensions of intrinsically disordered or unfolded proteins, as determined by direct comparison with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data. The modification also results in more realistic protein-protein affinities, and average solvation free energies of model compounds which are more consistent with experiment. Most importantly, we show that this scaling is small enough not to affect adversely the stability of the folded state, with only a modest effect on the stability of model peptides forming α-helix and β-sheet structures. The proposed adjustment opens the way to more accurate atomistic simulations of proteins, particularly for intrinsically disordered proteins, protein–protein association, and crowded cellular environments. PMID:25400522

  1. Multiscaled exploration of coupled folding and binding of an intrinsically disordered molecular recognition element in measles virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Chu, Xiakun; Longhi, Sonia; Roche, Philippe; Han, Wei; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-10-01

    Numerous relatively short regions within intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) serve as molecular recognition elements (MoREs). They fold into ordered structures upon binding to their partner molecules. Currently, there is still a lack of in-depth understanding of how coupled binding and folding occurs in MoREs. Here, we quantified the unbound ensembles of the α-MoRE within the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein. We developed a multiscaled approach by combining a physics-based and an atomic hybrid model to decipher the mechanism by which the α-MoRE interacts with the X domain of the measles virus phosphoprotein. Our multiscaled approach led to remarkable qualitative and quantitative agreements between the theoretical predictions and experimental results (e.g., chemical shifts). We found that the free α-MoRE rapidly interconverts between multiple discrete partially helical conformations and the unfolded state, in accordance with the experimental observations. We quantified the underlying global folding-binding landscape. This leads to a synergistic mechanism in which the recognition event proceeds via (minor) conformational selection, followed by (major) induced folding. We also provided evidence that the α-MoRE is a compact molten globule-like IDP and behaves as a downhill folder in the induced folding process. We further provided a theoretical explanation for the inherent connections between "downhill folding," "molten globule," and "intrinsic disorder" in IDP-related systems. Particularly, we proposed that binding and unbinding of IDPs proceed in a stepwise way through a "kinetic divide-and-conquer" strategy that confers them high specificity without high affinity. PMID:24043820

  2. Subclassifying disordered proteins by the CH-CDF plot method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Oldfield, Christopher; Meng, Jingwei; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N; Romero, Pedro; Dunker, A Keith

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are associated with a wide range of functions. We suggest that sequence-based subtypes, which we call flavors, may provide the basis for different biological functions. The problem is to find a method that separates IDPs into different flavor / function groups. Here we discuss one approach, the (Charge-Hydropathy) versus (Cumulative Distribution Function) plot or CH-CDF plot, which is based the combined use of the CH and CDF disorder predictors. These two predictors are based on significantly different inputs and methods. This CH-CDF plot partitions all proteins into 4 groups: structured, mixed, disordered, and rare. Studies of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries and homologous show different structural biases for each group classified by the CH-CDF plot. The mixed class has more order-promoting residues and more ordered regions than the disordered class. To test whether this partition accomplishes any functional separation, we performed gene ontology (GO) term analysis on each class. Some functions are indeed found to be related to subtypes of disorder: the disordered class is highly active in mitosis-related processes among others. Meanwhile, the mixed class is highly associated with signaling pathways, where having both ordered and disordered regions could possibly be important.

  3. The large intracellular loop of hZIP4 is an intrinsically disordered zinc binding domain†

    PubMed Central

    Bafaro, Elizabeth M.; Antala, Sagar; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Dzul, Stephen P.; Doyon, Brian; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Dempski, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The human (h) ZIP4 transporter is a plasma membrane protein which functions to increase the cytosolic concentration of zinc. hZIP4 transports zinc into intestinal cells and therefore has a central role in the absorption of dietary zinc. hZIP4 has eight transmembrane domains and encodes a large intracellular loop between transmembrane domains III and IV, M3M4. Previously, it has been postulated that this domain regulates hZIP4 levels in the plasma membrane in a zinc-dependent manner. The objective of this research was to examine the zinc binding properties of the large intracellular loop of hZIP4. Therefore, we have recombineantly expressed and purified M3M4 and showed that this domain binds two zinc ions. Using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, metal binding affinity assays, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrated that the two Zn2+ ions bind sequentially, with the first Zn2+ binding to a CysHis3 site with a nanomolar binding affinity, and the second Zn2+ binding to a His4 site with a weaker affinity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the M3M4 domain is intrinsically disordered, with only a small structural change induced upon Zn2+ coordination. Our data supports a model in which the intracellular M3M4 domain senses high cytosolic Zn2+ concentrations and regulates the plasma membrane levels of the hZIP4 transporter in response to Zn2+ binding. PMID:25882556

  4. Protein disorder in plants: a view from the chloroplast

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The intrinsically unstructured state of some proteins, observed in all living organisms, is essential for basic cellular functions. In this field the available information from plants is limited but it has been reached a point where these proteins can be comprehensively classified on the basis of disorder, function and evolution. Results Our analysis of plant genomes confirms that nuclear-encoded proteins follow the same trend than other multi-cellular eukaryotes; however, chloroplast- and mitochondria- encoded proteins conserve the patterns of Archaea and Bacteria, in agreement with their phylogenetic origin. Based on current knowledge about gene transference from the chloroplast to the nucleus, we report a strong correlation between the rate of disorder of transferred and nuclear-encoded proteins, even for polypeptides that play functional roles back in the chloroplast. We further investigate this trend by reviewing the set of chloroplast ribosomal proteins, one of the most representative transferred gene clusters, finding that the ribosomal large subunit, assembled from a majority of nuclear-encoded proteins, is clearly more unstructured than the small one, which integrates mostly plastid-encoded proteins. Conclusions Our observations suggest that the evolutionary dynamics of the plant nucleus adds disordered segments to genes alike, regardless of their origin, with the notable exception of proteins currently encoded in both genomes, probably due to functional constraints. PMID:22970728

  5. The α-Helical Structure of Prodomains Promotes Translocation of Intrinsically Disordered Neuropeptide Hormones into the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Dirndorfer, Daniela; Seidel, Ralf P.; Nimrod, Guy; Miesbauer, Margit; Ben-Tal, Nir; Engelhard, Martin; Zimmermann, Richard; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Tatzelt, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Different neuropeptide hormones, which are either too small to adopt a stable conformation or are predicted to be intrinsically disordered, are synthesized as larger precursors containing a prodomain in addition to an N-terminal signal peptide. We analyzed the biogenesis of three unstructured neuropeptide hormones and observed that translocation of these precursors into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is critically dependent on the presence of the prodomain. The hormone domains could be deleted from the precursors without interfering with ER import and secretion, whereas constructs lacking the prodomain remained in the cytosol. Domain-swapping experiments revealed that the activity of the prodomains to promote productive ER import resides in their ability to adopt an α-helical structure. Removal of the prodomain from the precursor did not interfere with co-translational targeting of the nascent chain to the Sec61 translocon but with its subsequent productive translocation into the ER lumen. Our study reveals a novel function of prodomains to enable import of small or intrinsically disordered secretory proteins into the ER based on their ability to adopt an α-helical conformation. PMID:23532840

  6. SilE is an intrinsically disordered periplasmic “molecular sponge” involved in bacterial silver resistance

    PubMed Central

    Asiani, Karishma R.; Williams, Huw; Bird, Louise; Jenner, Matthew; Searle, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ag+ resistance was initially found on the Salmonella enetrica serovar Typhimurium multi‐resistance plasmid pMG101 from burns patients in 1975. The putative model of Ag+ resistance, encoded by the sil operon from pMG101, involves export of Ag+ via an ATPase (SilP), an effluxer complex (SilCFBA) and a periplasmic chaperon of Ag+ (SilE). SilE is predicted to be intrinsically disordered. We tested this hypothesis using structural and biophysical studies and show that SilE is an intrinsically disordered protein in its free apo‐form but folds to a compact structure upon optimal binding to six Ag+ ions in its holo‐form. Sequence analyses and site‐directed mutagenesis established the importance of histidine and methionine containing motifs for Ag+‐binding, and identified a nucleation core that initiates Ag+‐mediated folding of SilE. We conclude that SilE is a molecular sponge for absorbing metal ions. PMID:27085056

  7. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Graether, Steffen P.; Boddington, Kelly F.

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  8. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; Boddington, Kelly F

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  9. An Overview of Practical Applications of Protein Disorder Prediction and Drive for Faster, More Accurate Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Gumm, Jordan; Karki, Suman; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Protein disordered regions are segments of a protein chain that do not adopt a stable structure. Thus far, a variety of protein disorder prediction methods have been developed and have been widely used, not only in traditional bioinformatics domains, including protein structure prediction, protein structure determination and function annotation, but also in many other biomedical fields. The relationship between intrinsically-disordered proteins and some human diseases has played a significant role in disorder prediction in disease identification and epidemiological investigations. Disordered proteins can also serve as potential targets for drug discovery with an emphasis on the disordered-to-ordered transition in the disordered binding regions, and this has led to substantial research in drug discovery or design based on protein disordered region prediction. Furthermore, protein disorder prediction has also been applied to healthcare by predicting the disease risk of mutations in patients and studying the mechanistic basis of diseases. As the applications of disorder prediction increase, so too does the need to make quick and accurate predictions. To fill this need, we also present a new approach to predict protein residue disorder using wide sequence windows that is applicable on the genomic scale. PMID:26198229

  10. Neural Systems Approaches to Understanding Major Depressive Disorder: An Intrinsic Functional Organization Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J. Paul; Chen, Michael C.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research detailing the intrinsic functional organization of the brain provides a unique and useful framework to gain a better understanding of the neural bases of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). In this review, we first present a brief history of neuroimaging research that has increased our understanding of the functional macro-architecture of the brain. From this macro-architectural perspective, we examine the extant body of functional neuroimaging research assessing MDD with a specific emphasis on the contributions of default-mode, executive, and salience networks in this debilitating disorder. Next, we describe recent investigations conducted in our laboratory in which we explicitly adopt a neural-systems perspective in examining the relations among these networks in MDD. Finally, we offer directions for future research that we believe will facilitate the development of more detailed and integrative models of neural dysfunction in depression. PMID:23477309

  11. Intrinsic protein flexibility in regulation of cell proliferation: advantages for signaling and opportunities for novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Follis, Ariele Viacava; Galea, Charles A; Kriwacki, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that intrinsically disordered (or unstructured) proteins (IDPs, or IUPs) are found in organisms from all kingdoms of life. In eukaryotes, IDPs are highly abundant and perform a wide range of biological functions, including regulation and signaling. Despite increased interest in understanding the structural biology of IDPs, questions remain regarding the mechanisms through which disordered proteins perform their biological function(s). In other words, what are the relationships between disorder and function for IDPs? Several excellent reviews have recently been published that discuss the structural properties of IDPs.1-3 Here, we discuss two IDP systems which illustrate features of dynamic complexes. In the first section, we discuss two IDPs, p21 and p27, which regulate the mammalian cell division cycle by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). In the second section, we discuss recent results from Follis, Hammoudeh, Metallo and coworkers demonstrating that the IDP Myc can be bound and inhibited by small molecules through formation of dynamic complexes. Previous studies have shown that polypeptide segments of p21 and p27 are partially folded in isolation and fold further upon binding their biological targets. Interestingly, some portions of p27 which bind to and inhibit Cdk2/cyclin A remain flexible in the bound complex. This residual flexibility allows otherwise buried tyrosine residues within p27 to be phosphorylated by nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). Tyrosine phosphorylation relieves kinase inhibition, triggering Cdk2-mediated phosphorylation of a threonine residue within the flexible C-terminus of p27. This, in turn, marks p27 for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, unleashing full Cdk2 activity which drives cell cycle progression. p27, thus, constitutes a conduit for transmission of proliferative signals via posttranslational modifications. Importantly, activation of the p27 signaling conduit by oncogenic NRTKs

  12. The intrinsic disorder related alloy scattering in ZrNiSn half-Heusler thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hanhui; Wang, Heng; Fu, Chenguang; Liu, Yintu; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic structural disorder dramatically affects the thermal and electronic transport in semiconductors. Although normally considered an ordered compound, the half-Heusler ZrNiSn displays many transport characteristics of a disordered alloy. Similar to the (Zr,Hf)NiSn based solid solutions, the unsubstituted ZrNiSn compound also exhibits charge transport dominated by alloy scattering, as demonstrated in this work. The unexpected charge transport, even in ZrNiSn which is normally considered fully ordered, can be explained by the Ni partially filling interstitial sites in this half-Heusler system. The influence of the disordering and defects in crystal structure on the electron transport process has also been quantitatively analyzed in ZrNiSn1-xSbx with carrier concentration nH ranging from 5.0 × 10(19) to 2.3 × 10(21) cm(-3) by changing Sb dopant content. The optimized carrier concentration nH ≈ 3-4 × 10(20) cm(-2) results in ZT ≈ 0.8 at 875K. This work suggests that MNiSn (M = Hf, Zr, Ti) and perhaps most other half-Heusler thermoelectric materials should be considered highly disordered especially when trying to understand the electronic and phonon structure and transport features.

  13. The intrinsic disorder related alloy scattering in ZrNiSn half-Heusler thermoelectric materials

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hanhui; Wang, Heng; Fu, Chenguang; Liu, Yintu; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic structural disorder dramatically affects the thermal and electronic transport in semiconductors. Although normally considered an ordered compound, the half-Heusler ZrNiSn displays many transport characteristics of a disordered alloy. Similar to the (Zr,Hf)NiSn based solid solutions, the unsubstituted ZrNiSn compound also exhibits charge transport dominated by alloy scattering, as demonstrated in this work. The unexpected charge transport, even in ZrNiSn which is normally considered fully ordered, can be explained by the Ni partially filling interstitial sites in this half-Heusler system. The influence of the disordering and defects in crystal structure on the electron transport process has also been quantitatively analyzed in ZrNiSn1-xSbx with carrier concentration nH ranging from 5.0×1019 to 2.3×1021 cm−3 by changing Sb dopant content. The optimized carrier concentration nH ≈ 3–4×1020 cm−2 results in ZT ≈ 0.8 at 875K. This work suggests that MNiSn (M = Hf, Zr, Ti) and perhaps most other half-Heusler thermoelectric materials should be considered highly disordered especially when trying to understand the electronic and phonon structure and transport features. PMID:25363573

  14. Why do proteins aggregate? "Intrinsically insoluble proteins" and "dark mediators" revealed by studies on "insoluble proteins" solubilized in pure water.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianxing

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, I reviewed and proposed a model for our discovery in 2005 that unrefoldable and insoluble proteins could in fact be solubilized in unsalted water. Since then, this discovery has offered us and other groups a powerful tool to characterize insoluble proteins, and we have further addressed several fundamental and disease-relevant issues associated with this discovery. Here I review these results, which are conceptualized into several novel scenarios. 1) Unlike 'misfolded proteins', which still retain the capacity to fold into well-defined structures but are misled to 'off-pathway' aggregation, unrefoldable and insoluble proteins completely lack this ability and will unavoidably aggregate in vivo with ~150 mM ions, thus designated as 'intrinsically insoluble proteins (IIPs)' here. IIPs may largely account for the 'wastefully synthesized' DRiPs identified in human cells. 2) The fact that IIPs including membrane proteins are all soluble in unsalted water, but get aggregated upon being exposed to ions, logically suggests that ions existing in the background play a central role in mediating protein aggregation, thus acting as 'dark mediators'. Our study with 14 salts confirms that IIPs lack the capacity to fold into any well-defined structures. We uncover that salts modulate protein dynamics and anions bind proteins with high selectivity and affinity, which is surprisingly masked by pre-existing ions. Accordingly, I modified my previous model. 3) Insoluble proteins interact with lipids to different degrees. Remarkably, an ALS-causing P56S mutation transforms the β-sandwich MSP domain into a helical integral membrane protein. Consequently, the number of membrane-interacting proteins might be much larger than currently recognized. To attack biological membranes may represent a common mechanism by which aggregated proteins initiate human diseases. 4) Our discovery also implies a solution to the 'chicken-and-egg paradox' for the origin of primitive membranes embedded

  15. Intrinsic Surface-Drying Properties of Bio-adhesive Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Akdogan, Yasar; Wei, Wei; Huang, Kuo-Ying; Kageyama, Yoshiyuki; Danner, Eric W.; Miller, Dusty R.; Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Herbert Waite, J.

    2014-01-01

    Sessile marine mussels must “dry” underwater surfaces before adhering to them. Synthetic adhesives have yet to overcome this fundamental challenge. Previous studies of bio-inspired adhesion have largely been performed under applied compressive forces but these are poor predictors of an adhesive’s ability to spontaneously penetrate surface hydration layers. In a force-free approach to measuring molecular-level interaction via the surface water diffusivity, different mussel foot proteins were found to have differential abilities to evict hydration layers from the surfaces—a necessary step for adsorption and adhesion. It was anticipated that Dopa would mediate dehydration given its efficacy forbio-inspired wet adhesion. Instead, hydrophobic side-chains are found to be a critical component in bringing about protein-surface intimacy. This is the first direct measurement of interfacial water dynamics during force-free adsorptive interactions at solid surfaces, and offers guidance for engineering wet adhesives and coatings. PMID:25168789

  16. Toward an alternative intrinsic probe for spectroscopic characterization of a protein.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Nirmal; Makhal, Abhinandan; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2010-11-25

    The intrinsic fluorescent amino acid tryptophan is the unanimous choice for the spectroscopic investigation of proteins. However, several complicacies in the interpretation of tryptophan fluorescence in a protein are inevitable and an alternative intrinsic protein probe is a longstanding demand. In this contribution, we report an electron-transfer reaction in a human transporter protein (HSA) cavity which causes the tryptophan residue (Trp214) to undergo chemical modification to form one of its metabolites kynurenine (Kyn214). Structural integrity upon modification of the native protein is confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) as well as near and far circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Femtosecond-resolved fluorescence transients of the modified protein describe the dynamics of solvent molecules in the protein cavity in both the native and denatured states. In order to establish general use of the probe, we have studied the dipolar interaction of Kyn214 with a surface-bound ligand (crystal violet, CV) of the protein. By using the sensitivity of FRET, we have determined the distance between Kyn214 (donor) and CV (acceptor). Our study is an attempt to explore an alternative intrinsic fluorescence probe for the spectroscopic investigation of a protein. In order to establish the efficacy of the modification technique we have converted the tryptophan residues of other proteins (bovine serum albumin, chymotrypsin and subtilisin Carlsberg) to kynurenine and confirmed their structural integrity. We have also shown that catalytic activity of the enzymes remains intact upon the modification. PMID:21028859

  17. Intramolecular interactions stabilizing compact conformations of the intrinsically disordered kinase-inhibitor domain of Sic1: a molecular dynamics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Lambrughi, Matteo; Papaleo, Elena; Testa, Lorenzo; Brocca, Stefania; De Gioia, Luca; Grandori, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) are key regulatory proteins of the eukaryotic cell cycle, which modulate cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity. CKIs perform their inhibitory effect by the formation of ternary complexes with a target kinase and its cognate cyclin. These regulators generally belong to the class of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which lack a well-defined and organized three-dimensional (3D) structure in their free state, undergoing folding upon binding to specific partners. Unbound IDPs are not merely random-coil structures, but can present intrinsically folded structural units (IFSUs) and collapsed conformations. These structural features can be relevant to protein function in vivo. The yeast CKI Sic1 is a 284-amino acid IDP that binds to Cdk1 in complex with the Clb5,6 cyclins, preventing phosphorylation of G1 substrates and, therefore, entrance to the S phase. Sic1 degradation, triggered by multiple phosphorylation events, promotes cell-cycle progression. Previous experimental studies pointed out a propensity of Sic1 and its isolated domains to populate both extended and compact conformations. The present contribution provides models for compact conformations of the Sic1 kinase-inhibitory domain (KID) by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent and in the absence of interactors. The results are integrated by spectroscopic and spectrometric data. Helical IFSUs are identified, along with networks of intramolecular interactions. The results identify a group of putative hub residues and networks of electrostatic interactions, which are likely to be involved in the stabilization of the globular states. PMID:23189058

  18. Intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectral features of cottonseed protein fractions and the effects of denaturants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the functional and physicochemical properties of cottonseed protein, we investigated the intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectral features of cottonseed protein isolate (CSPI) and sequentially extracted water (CSPw) and alkali (CSPa) protein fractions, an...

  19. Mapping the intrinsically disordered properties of the flexible loop domain of Bcl-2: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri-Flores, Ian; Correa-Basurto, José; Bello, Martiniano; Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge L; Zamora-López, Beatriz; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2016-04-01

    Most of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein structure has been elucidated; however, the conformation of its flexible loop domain (FLD) has not yet been experimentally predicted. Its high flexibility under physiological conditions is the reason. FLD behaves as an intrinsically disordered region (IDR) and can adopt regular structures in particular conditions associated with the control of Bcl-2's anti-apoptotic functions. In a previous contribution, we analyzed an engineered Bcl-2 construct (Bcl-2-Δ22Σ3) submitted to 25-ns MD and reported a disordered-to-helix transitions in a region of FLD (rFLD, residues 60-77). However, the conformational preferences in solution of rFLD in the nanosecond to microsecond scale were not analyzed. Herein, an average model was obtained for the native Bcl-2 protein by homology modeling and MD simulation techniques. From this, only the atomic coordinates corresponding to the rFLD were simulated for 1 μs by MD at 310 K. In concordance with previous studies, a disordered-to-helix transitions were exhibited, implying that this "interconversion of folding" in the rFLD suggest a possible set of conformations encoded in its sequence. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that most of the conformational fluctuation of Bcl-2 is provided by rFLD. Dihedral PCA (dPCA) offered information about all the conformations of rFLD in the μs of the simulation, characterizing a dPCA-based free energy landscape of rFLD, and a conformational ensemble of fast interconverting conformations as other IDRs. Furthermore, despite the conformational heterogeneity of rFLD, the analysis of the dihedral angles (Φ, Ψ) showed that this region does not randomly explore the conformational space in solution.

  20. Heterochromatin Protein 1 Binding Protein 3 Expression as a Candidate Marker of Intrinsic 5-Fluorouracil Resistance

    PubMed Central

    HADAC, JAMIE N.; MILLER, DEVON D.; GRIMES, IAN C.; CLIPSON, LINDA; NEWTON, MICHAEL A.; SCHELMAN, WILLIAM R.; HALBERG, RICHARD B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite receiving post-operative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy, approximately 50% of patients with stage IIIC colon cancer experience recurrence. Currently, no molecular signature can predict response to 5-FU. Materials and Methods Mouse models of colon cancer have been developed and characterized. Individual tumors in these mice can be longitudinally monitored and assessed to identify differences between those that are responsive and those that are resistant to therapy. Gene expression was analyzed in serial biopsies that were collected before and after treatment with 5-FU. Colon tumors had heterogeneous responses to treatment with 5-FU. Microarray analysis of pretreatment biopsies revealed that Hp1bp3, a gene encoding heterochromatin protein 1 binding protein 3, was differentially expressed between sensitive and resistant tumors. Conclusion Using mouse models of human colorectal cancer, Hp1bp3 was identified as a candidate marker of intrinsic 5-FU resistance and may represent a potential biomarker for patient stratification or a target of clinical importance. PMID:26976970

  1. Comparison of intrinsic dynamics of cytochrome p450 proteins using normal mode analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dorner, Mariah E; McMunn, Ryan D; Bartholow, Thomas G; Calhoon, Brecken E; Conlon, Michelle R; Dulli, Jessica M; Fehling, Samuel C; Fisher, Cody R; Hodgson, Shane W; Keenan, Shawn W; Kruger, Alyssa N; Mabin, Justin W; Mazula, Daniel L; Monte, Christopher A; Olthafer, Augustus; Sexton, Ashley E; Soderholm, Beatrice R; Strom, Alexander M; Hati, Sanchita

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are hemeproteins that catalyze the monooxygenation of a wide-range of structurally diverse substrates of endogenous and exogenous origin. These heme monooxygenases receive electrons from NADH/NADPH via electron transfer proteins. The cytochrome P450 enzymes, which constitute a diverse superfamily of more than 8,700 proteins, share a common tertiary fold but < 25% sequence identity. Based on their electron transfer protein partner, cytochrome P450 proteins are classified into six broad classes. Traditional methods of pro are based on the canonical paradigm that attributes proteins' function to their three-dimensional structure, which is determined by their primary structure that is the amino acid sequence. It is increasingly recognized that protein dynamics play an important role in molecular recognition and catalytic activity. As the mobility of a protein is an intrinsic property that is encrypted in its primary structure, we examined if different classes of cytochrome P450 enzymes display any unique patterns of intrinsic mobility. Normal mode analysis was performed to characterize the intrinsic dynamics of five classes of cytochrome P450 proteins. The present study revealed that cytochrome P450 enzymes share a strong dynamic similarity (root mean squared inner product > 55% and Bhattacharyya coefficient > 80%), despite the low sequence identity (< 25%) and sequence similarity (< 50%) across the cytochrome P450 superfamily. Noticeable differences in Cα atom fluctuations of structural elements responsible for substrate binding were noticed. These differences in residue fluctuations might be crucial for substrate selectivity in these enzymes. PMID:26130403

  2. Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins from Maize Cluster in Two Sequence Subgroups with Differential Aquaporin Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Chaumont, François; Barrieu, François; Jung, Rudolf; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    2000-01-01

    The transport of water through membranes is regulated in part by aquaporins or water channel proteins. These proteins are members of the larger family of major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Plant aquaporins are categorized as either tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) or plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs). Sequence analysis shows that PIPs form several subclasses. We report on the characterization of three maize (Zea mays) PIPs belonging to the PIP1 and PIP2 subfamilies (ZmPIP1a, ZmPIP1b, and ZmPIP2a). The ZmPIP2a clone has normal aquaporin activity in Xenopus laevis oocytes. ZmPIP1a and ZmPIP1b have no activity, and a review of the literature shows that most PIP1 proteins identified in other plants have no or very low activity in oocytes. Arabidopsis PIP1 proteins are the only exception. Control experiments show that this lack of activity of maize PIP1 proteins is not caused by their failure to arrive at the plasma membrane of the oocytes. ZmPIP1b also does not appear to facilitate the transport of any of the small solutes tried (glycerol, choline, ethanol, urea, and amino acids). These results are discussed in relationship to the function and regulation of the PIP family of aquaporins. PMID:10759498

  3. Temperature-dependent solvation modulates the dimensions of disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, René; Hofmann, Hagen; Nettels, Daniel; Borgia, Madeleine B.; Mittal, Jeetain; Best, Robert B.; Schuler, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    For disordered proteins, the dimensions of the chain are an important property that is sensitive to environmental conditions. We have used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to probe the temperature-induced chain collapse of five unfolded or intrinsically disordered proteins. Because this behavior is sensitive to the details of intrachain and chain–solvent interactions, the collapse allows us to probe the physical interactions governing the dimensions of disordered proteins. We find that each of the proteins undergoes a collapse with increasing temperature, with the most hydrophobic one, λ-repressor, undergoing a reexpansion at the highest temperatures. Although such a collapse might be expected due to the temperature dependence of the classical “hydrophobic effect,” remarkably we find that the largest collapse occurs for the most hydrophilic, charged sequences. Using a combination of theory and simulation, we show that this result can be rationalized in terms of the temperature-dependent solvation free energies of the constituent amino acids, with the solvation properties of the most hydrophilic residues playing a large part in determining the collapse. PMID:24706910

  4. Temperature-dependent solvation modulates the dimensions of disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, René; Hofmann, Hagen; Nettels, Daniel; Borgia, Madeleine B; Mittal, Jeetain; Best, Robert B; Schuler, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    For disordered proteins, the dimensions of the chain are an important property that is sensitive to environmental conditions. We have used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to probe the temperature-induced chain collapse of five unfolded or intrinsically disordered proteins. Because this behavior is sensitive to the details of intrachain and chain-solvent interactions, the collapse allows us to probe the physical interactions governing the dimensions of disordered proteins. We find that each of the proteins undergoes a collapse with increasing temperature, with the most hydrophobic one, λ-repressor, undergoing a reexpansion at the highest temperatures. Although such a collapse might be expected due to the temperature dependence of the classical "hydrophobic effect," remarkably we find that the largest collapse occurs for the most hydrophilic, charged sequences. Using a combination of theory and simulation, we show that this result can be rationalized in terms of the temperature-dependent solvation free energies of the constituent amino acids, with the solvation properties of the most hydrophilic residues playing a large part in determining the collapse.

  5. Intrinsic Affective Network Is Impaired in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ho, New-Fei; Chong, Joanna S X; Koh, Hui Li; Koukouna, Eleni; Lee, Tih-Shih; Fung, Daniel; Lim, Choon Guan; Zhou, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in impulsivity and affect dysregulation are key features of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) besides impairing levels of hyperactivity and/or inattention. However, the neural substrates underlying these traits are relatively under-investigated. In this study, we use resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to test the hypothesis of diminished functional integration within the affective/limbic network (which includes the amygdala, hippocampus, subgenual cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens) of children with ADHD, which is associated with their behavioral measures of emotional control deficits. Resting state-fMRI data were obtained from 12 healthy control subjects and 15 children with ADHD, all who had a minimum one-month washout period for medications and supplements. Children with ADHD demonstrated less integrated affective network, evidenced by increased bilateral amygdalar and decreased left orbitofrontal connectivity within the affective network compared to healthy controls. The hyper-connectivity at the left amygdalar within the affective network was associated with increased aggressiveness and conduct problems, as well as decline in functioning in children with ADHD. Similar findings in affective network dysconnectivity were replicated in a subset of children with ADHD three months later. Our findings of divergent changes in amygdala and orbitofrontal intrinsic connectivity support the hypothesis of an impaired functional integration within the affective network in childhood ADHD. Larger prospective studies of the intrinsic affective network in ADHD are required, which may provide further insight on the biological mechanisms of emotional control deficits observed in ADHD. PMID:26406311

  6. Role of antisite disorder on intrinsic Gilbert damping in L 10 FePt films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Ma, L.; He, P.; Zhao, H. B.; Zhou, S. M.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of antisite disorder x on the intrinsic Gilbert damping α0 in well-ordered L 10 FePt films is investigated by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect. The variation of x mainly affects the electron scattering rate 1 /τe , while other leading parameters remain unchanged. The experimentally observed linear dependence of α0 on 1 /τe indicates that spin relaxation is through electron interband transitions, as predicted by the spin-orbit coupling torque correlation model. Measurements at low temperature show that α0 remains unchanged with temperature even for FePt with very high chemical order, indicating that electron-phonon scattering is negligible. Moreover, as x decreases, the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy increases, and the Landau g factor exhibits a negative shift due to an increase in orbital momentum anisotropy. Our results will facilitate the design and exploration of magnetic alloys with large magnetic anisotropy and desirable damping properties.

  7. Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of two cytokine receptors mediate conserved interactions with membranes.

    PubMed

    Haxholm, Gitte W; Nikolajsen, Louise F; Olsen, Johan G; Fredsted, Jacob; Larsen, Flemming H; Goffin, Vincent; Pedersen, Stine F; Brooks, Andrew J; Waters, Michael J; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2015-06-15

    Class 1 cytokine receptors regulate essential biological processes through complex intracellular signalling networks. However, the structural platform for understanding their functions is currently incomplete as structure-function studies of the intracellular domains (ICDs) are critically lacking. The present study provides the first comprehensive structural characterization of any cytokine receptor ICD and demonstrates that the human prolactin (PRL) receptor (PRLR) and growth hormone receptor (GHR) ICDs are intrinsically disordered throughout their entire lengths. We show that they interact specifically with hallmark lipids of the inner plasma membrane leaflet through conserved motifs resembling immuno receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). However, contrary to the observations made for ITAMs, lipid association of the PRLR and GHR ICDs was shown to be unaccompanied by changes in transient secondary structure and independent of tyrosine phosphorylation. The results of the present study provide a new structural platform for studying class 1 cytokine receptors and may implicate the membrane as an active component regulating intracellular signalling.

  8. Structural basis for epitope masking and strain specificity of a conserved epitope in an intrinsically disordered malaria vaccine candidate

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Rodrigo A. V.; MacRaild, Christopher A.; Seow, Jeffrey; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Drinkwater, Nyssa; Rouet, Romain; Anders, Robin F.; Christ, Daniel; McGowan, Sheena; Norton, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2) is an intrinsically disordered, membrane-anchored antigen of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. MSP2 can elicit a protective, albeit strain-specific, antibody response in humans. Antibodies are generated to the conserved N- and C-terminal regions but many of these react poorly with the native antigen on the parasite surface. Here we demonstrate that recognition of a conserved N-terminal epitope by mAb 6D8 is incompatible with the membrane-bound conformation of that region, suggesting a mechanism by which native MSP2 escapes antibody recognition. Furthermore, crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy identify transient, strain-specific interactions between the 6D8 antibody and regions of MSP2 beyond the conserved epitope. These interactions account for the differential affinity of 6D8 for the two allelic families of MSP2, even though 6D8 binds to a fully conserved epitope. These results highlight unappreciated mechanisms that may modulate the specificity and efficacy of immune responses towards disordered antigens. PMID:25965408

  9. Membrane binding mode of intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits depends on lipid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Sigalov, Alexander B.; Hendricks, Gregory M.

    2009-11-13

    Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling subunits including {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} all contain one or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), tyrosine residues of which are phosphorylated upon receptor triggering. Membrane binding-induced helical folding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} ITAMs is thought to control TCR activation. However, the question whether or not lipid binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} is necessarily accompanied by a folding transition of ITAMs remains open. In this study, we investigate whether the membrane binding mechanisms of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depend on the membrane model used. Circular dichroic and fluorescence data indicate that binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} to detergent micelles and unstable vesicles is accompanied by a disorder-to-order transition, whereas upon binding to stable vesicles these proteins remain unfolded. Using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we show that upon protein binding, unstable vesicles fuse and rupture. In contrast, stable vesicles remain intact under these conditions. This suggests different membrane binding modes for {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depending on the bilayer stability: (1) coupled binding and folding, and (2) binding without folding. These findings explain the long-standing puzzle in the literature and highlight the importance of the choice of an appropriate membrane model for protein-lipid interactions studies.

  10. Evolutionary volatile Cysteines and protein disorder in the fast evolving tunicate Oikopleura dioica.

    PubMed

    Berná, Luisa; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is regarded as the most conservative amino acid in nature, something that does not occur in the tunicate Oikopleura dioica, where this amino acid is one of the fastest evolving. In this work we analyze some of the causes of this intriguing absence of conservation. Considering the well-known stabilizing role of Cys, it was first investigated whether the lack of conservation was accompanied by an increase in intrinsic protein disorder. In contrast to expectations, it was found that O. dioica is the chordate that has the lowest levels of intrinsic disorder, while vertebrates (represented by Bos taurus) contain the most disordered proteins. Oikopleura proteins are shorter than their homologs in other Chordates (Ciona and B. taurus proteins are respectively 11% and 18% longer). This process of protein shortening was more intense in intrinsic disordered regions. As a result proteins became not only shorter but also more compact. It is also reported here that the conservation/divergence behavior of Cys depends on whether they are located in ordered or disordered regions. In the four species analyzed, disordered Cys are majorly (> 75%) not conserved at all. Ordered Cys instead, are much more free to diverge in Oikopleura than in the other chordates. We hypothesize that the preferential deletion of disordered regions resulted in a decreased protein disorder and a direct elimination (by deletion) of many ancestral Cys. Besides, the alterations (shortening or complete elimination) of some disordered regions (loops/random coils) probably promoted further Cys evolutionary volatility, because some ancestral Cys (and other amino acids which play a role in stability like Trp) located outside deleted regions became redundant due to the loss of their stabilizing partners. PMID:26228312

  11. Structure/Function Implications in a Dynamic Complex of the Intrinsically Disordered Sic1 with the Cdc4 Subunit of an SCF Ubiquitin Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Mittag, Tanja; Marsh, Joseph; Grishaev, Alexander; Orlicky, Stephen; Lin, Hong; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2010-11-22

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can form highly dynamic complexes with partner proteins. One such dynamic complex involves the intrinsically disordered Sic1 with its partner Cdc4 in regulation of yeast cell cycle progression. Phosphorylation of six N-terminal Sic1 sites leads to equilibrium engagement of each phosphorylation site with the primary binding pocket in Cdc4, the substrate recognition subunit of a ubiquitin ligase. ENSEMBLE calculations using experimental nuclear magnetic resonance and small-angle X-ray scattering data reveal significant transient structure in both phosphorylation states of the isolated ensembles (Sic1 and pSic1) that modulates their electrostatic potential, suggesting a structural basis for the proposed strong contribution of electrostatics to binding. A structural model of the dynamic pSic1-Cdc4 complex demonstrates the spatial arrangements in the ubiquitin ligase complex. These results provide a physical picture of a protein that is predominantly disordered in both its free and bound states, enabling aspects of its structure/function relationship to be elucidated.

  12. Transcriptional repressor domain of MBD1 is intrinsically disordered and interacts with its binding partners in a selective manner.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Umar Farook Shahul; Lim, Jackwee; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A; Yang, Daiwen; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2014-05-09

    Methylation of DNA CpG sites is a major mechanism of epigenetic gene silencing and plays important roles in cell division, development and carcinogenesis. One of its regulators is the 64-residue C-terminal Transcriptional Repressor Domain (the TRD) of MBD1, which recruits several repressor proteins such as MCAF1, HDAC3 and MPG that are essential for the gene silencing. Using NMR spectroscopy, we have characterized the solution structure of the C-terminus of MBD1 (MBD1-c, residues D507 to Q605), which included the TRD (A529 to P592). Surprisingly, the MBD1-c is intrinsically disordered. Despite its lack of a tertiary folding, MBD1-c could still bind to different partner proteins in a selective manner. MPG and MCAF1Δ8 showed binding to both the N-terminal and C-terminal residues of MBD1-c but HDAC3 preferably bound to the C-terminal region. This study reveals how MBD1-c discriminates different binding partners, and thus, expands our understanding of the mechanisms of gene regulation by MBD1.

  13. Calculation of translational friction and intrinsic viscosity. II. Application to globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X Z

    1995-12-01

    The translational friction coefficients and intrinsic viscosities of four proteins (ribonuclease A, lysozyme, myoglobin, and chymotrypsinogen A) are calculated using atomic-level structural details. Inclusion of a 0.9-A-thick hydration shell allows calculated results for both hydrodynamic properties of each protein to reproduce experimental data. The use of detailed protein structures is made possible by relating translational friction and intrinsic viscosity to capacitance and polarizability, which can be calculated easily. The 0.9-A hydration shell corresponds to a hydration level of 0.3-0.4 g water/g protein. Hydration levels within this narrow range are also found by a number of other techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, calorimetry, and computer simulation. The use of detailed protein structures in predicting hydrodynamic properties thus allows hydrodynamic measurement to join the other techniques in leading to a unified picture of protein hydration. In contrast, earlier interpretations of hydrodynamic data based on modeling proteins as ellipsoids gave hydration levels that varied widely from protein to protein and thus challenged the existence of a unified picture of protein hydration. PMID:8599637

  14. Modulation of the multistate folding of designed TPR proteins through intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J J; Javadi, Y; Millership, C; Main, E R G

    2012-03-01

    Tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs) are a class of all alpha-helical repeat proteins that are comprised of 34-aa helix-turn-helix motifs. These stack together to form nonglobular structures that are stabilized by short-range interactions from residues close in primary sequence. Unlike globular proteins, they have few, if any, long-range nonlocal stabilizing interactions. Several studies on designed TPR proteins have shown that this modular structure is reflected in their folding, that is, modular multistate folding is observed as opposed to two-state folding. Here we show that TPR multistate folding can be suppressed to approximate two-state folding through modulation of intrinsic stability or extrinsic environmental variables. This modulation was investigated by comparing the thermodynamic unfolding under differing buffer regimes of two distinct series of consensus-designed TPR proteins, which possess different intrinsic stabilities. A total of nine proteins of differing sizes and differing consensus TPR motifs were each thermally and chemically denatured and their unfolding monitored using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and CD/fluorescence, respectively. Analyses of both the DSC and chemical denaturation data show that reducing the total stability of each protein and repeat units leads to observable two-state unfolding. These data highlight the intimate link between global and intrinsic repeat stability that governs whether folding proceeds by an observably two-state mechanism, or whether partial unfolding yields stable intermediate structures which retain sufficient stability to be populated at equilibrium.

  15. A Novel Plant Major Intrinsic Protein in Physcomitrella patens Most Similar to Bacterial Glycerol Channels1

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, Sofia; Lebrun, Anne-Sophie; Nordén, Kristina; Chaumont, François; Johanson, Urban

    2005-01-01

    A gene encoding a novel fifth type of major intrinsic protein (MIP) in plants has been identified in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Phylogenetic analyses show that this protein, GlpF-like intrinsic protein (GIP1;1), is closely related to a subclass of glycerol transporters in bacteria that in addition to glycerol are highly permeable to water. A likely explanation of the occurrence of this bacterial-like MIP in P. patens is horizontal gene transfer. The expressed P. patens GIP1;1 gene contains five introns and encodes a unique C-loop extension of approximately 110 amino acid residues that has no obvious similarity with any other known protein. Based on alignments and structural comparisons with other MIPs, GIP1;1 is suggested to have retained the permeability for glycerol but not for water. Studies on heterologously expressed GIP1;1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirm the predicted substrate specificity. Interestingly, proteins of one of the plant-specific subgroups of MIPs, the NOD26-like intrinsic proteins, are also facilitating the transport of glycerol and have previously been suggested to have evolved from a horizontally transferred bacterial gene. Further studies on localization and searches for GIP1;1 homologs in other plants will clarify the function and significance of this new plant MIP. PMID:16113222

  16. Crystal Structure of the Carbapenem Intrinsic Resistance Protein CarG

    PubMed Central

    Tichy, E.M.; Luisi, B.F.; Salmond, G.P.C.

    2015-01-01

    In the Gram-negative enterobacterium Erwinia (Pectobacterium) and Serratia sp. ATCC 39006, intrinsic resistance to the carbapenem antibiotic 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid is mediated by the CarF and CarG proteins, by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report a high-resolution crystal structure for the Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 carbapenem resistance protein CarG. This structure of CarG is the first in the carbapenem intrinsic resistance (CIR) family of resistance proteins from carbapenem-producing bacteria. The crystal structure shows the protein to form a homodimer, in agreement with results from analytical gel filtration. The structure of CarG does not show homology with any known antibiotic resistance proteins nor does it belong to any well-characterised protein structural family. However, it is a close structural homologue of the bacterial inhibitor of invertebrate lysozyme, PliI-Ah, with some interesting structural variations, including the absence of the catalytic site responsible for lysozyme inhibition. Both proteins show a unique β-sandwich fold with short terminal α-helices. The core of the protein is formed by stacked anti-parallel sheets that are individually very similar in the two proteins but differ in their packing interface, causing the splaying of the two sheets in CarG. Furthermore, a conserved cation binding site identified in CarG is absent from the homologue. PMID:24583229

  17. Flexibility and Disorder in Gene Regulation: LacI/GalR and Hox Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Bondos, Sarah E.; Swint-Kruse, Liskin; Matthews, Kathleen S.

    2015-01-01

    To modulate transcription, a variety of input signals must be sensed by genetic regulatory proteins. In these proteins, flexibility and disorder are emerging as common themes. Prokaryotic regulators generally have short, flexible segments, whereas eukaryotic regulators have extended regions that lack predicted secondary structure (intrinsic disorder). Two examples illustrate the impact of flexibility and disorder on gene regulation: the prokaryotic LacI/GalR family, with detailed information from studies on LacI, and the eukaryotic family of Hox proteins, with specific insights from investigations of Ultrabithorax (Ubx). The widespread importance of structural disorder in gene regulatory proteins may derive from the need for flexibility in signal response and, particularly in eukaryotes, in protein partner selection. PMID:26342073

  18. Shifted intrinsic connectivity of central executive and salience network in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Anselm; Sorg, Christian; Manoliu, Andrei; Wöller, Andreas; Meng, Chun; Förstl, Hans; Zimmer, Claus; Wohlschläger, Afra M.; Riedl, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by “stable instability” of emotions and behavior and their regulation. This emotional and behavioral instability corresponds with a neurocognitive triple network model of psychopathology, which suggests that aberrant emotional saliency and cognitive control is associated with aberrant interaction across three intrinsic connectivity networks [i.e., the salience network (SN), default mode network (DMN), and central executive network (CEN)]. The objective of the current study was to investigate whether and how such triple network intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) is changed in patients with BPD. We acquired resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data from 14 patients with BPD and 16 healthy controls. High-model order independent component analysis was used to extract spatiotemporal patterns of ongoing, coherent blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal fluctuations from rs-fMRI data. Main outcome measures were iFC within networks (intra-iFC) and between networks (i.e., network time course correlation inter-iFC). Aberrant intra-iFC was found in patients’ DMN, SN, and CEN, consistent with previous findings. While patients’ inter-iFC of the CEN was decreased, inter-iFC of the SN was increased. In particular, a balance index reflecting the relationship of CEN- and SN-inter-iFC across networks was strongly shifted from CEN to SN connectivity in patients. Results provide first preliminary evidence for aberrant triple network iFC in BPD. Our data suggest a shift of inter-network iFC from networks involved in cognitive control to those of emotion-related activity in BPD, potentially reflecting the persistent instability of emotion regulation in patients. PMID:24198777

  19. Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Ruszczynska, Katarzyna; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Paczek, Leszek

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We predicted buffering capacity of yeast proteome from protein abundance data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured total buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that proteins contribute insignificantly to buffering capacity. -- Abstract: Intracellular pH is maintained by a combination of the passive buffering of cytoplasmic dissociable compounds and several active systems. Over the years, a large portion of and possibly most of the cell's intrinsic (i.e., passive non-bicarbonate) buffering effect was attributed to proteins, both in higher organisms and in yeast. This attribution was not surprising, given that the concentration of proteins with multiple protonable/deprotonable groups in the cell exceeds the concentration of free protons by a few orders of magnitude. Using data from both high-throughput experiments and in vitro laboratory experiments, we tested this concept. We assessed the buffering capacity of the yeast proteome using protein abundance data and compared it to our own titration of yeast cytoplasm. We showed that the protein contribution is less than 1% of the total intracellular buffering capacity. As confirmed with NMR measurements, inorganic phosphates play a crucial role in the process. These findings also shed a new light on the role of proteomes in maintaining intracellular pH. The contribution of proteins to the intrinsic buffering capacity is negligible, and proteins might act only as a recipient of signals for changes in pH.

  20. Direct Ubiquitin Independent Recognition and Degradation of a Folded Protein by the Eukaryotic Proteasomes-Origin of Intrinsic Degradation Signals

    PubMed Central

    Singh Gautam, Amit Kumar; Balakrishnan, Satish; Venkatraman, Prasanna

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic 26S proteasomes are structurally organized to recognize, unfold and degrade globular proteins. However, all existing model substrates of the 26S proteasome in addition to ubiquitin or adaptor proteins require unstructured regions in the form of fusion tags for efficient degradation. We report for the first time that purified 26S proteasome can directly recognize and degrade apomyoglobin, a globular protein, in the absence of ubiquitin, extrinsic degradation tags or adaptor proteins. Despite a high affinity interaction, absence of a ligand and presence of only helices/loops that follow the degradation signal, apomyoglobin is degraded slowly by the proteasome. A short floppy F-helix exposed upon ligand removal and in conformational equilibrium with a disordered structure is mandatory for recognition and initiation of degradation. Holomyoglobin, in which the helix is buried, is neither recognized nor degraded. Exposure of the floppy F-helix seems to sensitize the proteasome and primes the substrate for degradation. Using peptide panning and competition experiments we speculate that initial encounters through the floppy helix and additional strong interactions with N-terminal helices anchors apomyoglobin to the proteasome. Stabilizing helical structure in the floppy F-helix slows down degradation. Destabilization of adjacent helices accelerates degradation. Unfolding seems to follow the mechanism of helix unraveling rather than global unfolding. Our findings while confirming the requirement for unstructured regions in degradation offers the following new insights: a) origin and identification of an intrinsic degradation signal in the substrate, b) identification of sequences in the native substrate that are likely to be responsible for direct interactions with the proteasome, and c) identification of critical rate limiting steps like exposure of the intrinsic degron and destabilization of an unfolding intermediate that are presumably catalyzed by the ATPases

  1. Marked variability in the extent of protein disorder within and between viral families.

    PubMed

    Pushker, Ravindra; Mooney, Catherine; Davey, Norman E; Jacqué, Jean-Marc; Shields, Denis C

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions in eukaryotic proteomes contain key signaling and regulatory modules and mediate interactions with many proteins. Many viral proteomes encode disordered proteins and modulate host factors through the use of short linear motifs (SLiMs) embedded within disordered regions. However, the degree of viral protein disorder across different viruses is not well understood, so we set out to establish the constraints acting on viruses, in terms of their use of disordered protein regions. We surveyed predicted disorder across 2,278 available viral genomes in 41 families, and correlated the extent of disorder with genome size and other factors. Protein disorder varies strikingly between viral families (from 2.9% to 23.1% of residues), and also within families. However, this substantial variation did not follow the established trend among their hosts, with increasing disorder seen across eubacterial, archaebacterial, protists, and multicellular eukaryotes. For example, among large mammalian viruses, poxviruses and herpesviruses showed markedly differing disorder (5.6% and 17.9%, respectively). Viral families with smaller genome sizes have more disorder within each of five main viral types (ssDNA, dsDNA, ssRNA+, dsRNA, retroviruses), except for negative single-stranded RNA viruses, where disorder increased with genome size. However, surveying over all viruses, which compares tiny and enormous viruses over a much bigger range of genome sizes, there is no strong association of genome size with protein disorder. We conclude that there is extensive variation in the disorder content of viral proteomes. While a proportion of this may relate to base composition, to extent of gene overlap, and to genome size within viral types, there remain important additional family and virus-specific effects. Differing disorder strategies are likely to impact on how different viruses modulate host factors, and on how rapidly viruses can evolve novel instances of SLi

  2. DeepCNF-D: Predicting Protein Order/Disorder Regions by Weighted Deep Convolutional Neural Fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shunyan; Ma, Jianzhu; Tang, Qingming

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins or protein regions are involved in key biological processes including regulation of transcription, signal transduction, and alternative splicing. Accurately predicting order/disorder regions ab initio from the protein sequence is a prerequisite step for further analysis of functions and mechanisms for these disordered regions. This work presents a learning method, weighted DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields), to improve the accuracy of order/disorder prediction by exploiting the long-range sequential information and the interdependency between adjacent order/disorder labels and by assigning different weights for each label during training and prediction to solve the label imbalance issue. Evaluated by the CASP9 and CASP10 targets, our method obtains 0.855 and 0.898 AUC values, which are higher than the state-of-the-art single ab initio predictors.

  3. Targeting the intrinsically disordered structural ensemble of α-synuclein by small molecules as a potential therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gergely; Gardai, Shyra J; Zago, Wagner; Bertoncini, Carlos W; Cremades, Nunilo; Roy, Susan L; Tambe, Mitali A; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Galvagnion, Celine; Skibinski, Gaia; Finkbeiner, Steven; Bova, Michael; Regnstrom, Karin; Chiou, San-San; Johnston, Jennifer; Callaway, Kari; Anderson, John P; Jobling, Michael F; Buell, Alexander K; Yednock, Ted A; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Vendruscolo, Michele; Christodoulou, John; Dobson, Christopher M; Schenk, Dale; McConlogue, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The misfolding of intrinsically disordered proteins such as α-synuclein, tau and the Aβ peptide has been associated with many highly debilitating neurodegenerative syndromes including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Therapeutic targeting of the monomeric state of such intrinsically disordered proteins by small molecules has, however, been a major challenge because of their heterogeneous conformational properties. We show here that a combination of computational and experimental techniques has led to the identification of a drug-like phenyl-sulfonamide compound (ELN484228), that targets α-synuclein, a key protein in Parkinson's disease. We found that this compound has substantial biological activity in cellular models of α-synuclein-mediated dysfunction, including rescue of α-synuclein-induced disruption of vesicle trafficking and dopaminergic neuronal loss and neurite retraction most likely by reducing the amount of α-synuclein targeted to sites of vesicle mobilization such as the synapse in neurons or the site of bead engulfment in microglial cells. These results indicate that targeting α-synuclein by small molecules represents a promising approach to the development of therapeutic treatments of Parkinson's disease and related conditions. PMID:24551051

  4. Rapid Brownian Motion Primes Ultrafast Reconstruction of Intrinsically Disordered Phe-Gly Repeats Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Moussavi-Baygi, R; Mofrad, M R K

    2016-01-01

    Conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins, such as Phe-Gly repeat domains, alters drastically when they are confined in, and tethered to, nan channels. This has challenged our understanding of how they serve to selectively facilitate translocation of nuclear transport receptor (NTR)-bearing macromolecules. Heterogeneous FG-repeats, tethered to the NPC interior, nonuniformly fill the channel in a diameter-dependent manner and adopt a rapid Brownian motion, thereby forming a porous and highly dynamic polymeric meshwork that percolates in radial and axial directions and features two distinguishable zones: a dense hydrophobic rod-like zone located in the center, and a peripheral low-density shell-like zone. The FG-meshwork is locally disrupted upon interacting with NTR-bearing macromolecules, but immediately reconstructs itself between 0.44 μs and 7.0 μs, depending on cargo size and shape. This confers a perpetually-sealed state to the NPC, and is solely due to rapid Brownian motion of FG-repeats, not FG-repeat hydrophobic bonds. Elongated-shaped macromolecules, both in the presence and absence of NTRs, penetrate more readily into the FG-meshwork compared to their globular counterparts of identical volume and surface chemistry, highlighting the importance of the shape effects in nucleocytoplasmic transport. These results can help our understanding of geometrical effects in, and the design of, intelligent and responsive biopolymer-based materials in nanofiltration and artificial nanopores. PMID:27470900

  5. Rapid Brownian Motion Primes Ultrafast Reconstruction of Intrinsically Disordered Phe-Gly Repeats Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Moussavi-Baygi, R.; Mofrad, M. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins, such as Phe-Gly repeat domains, alters drastically when they are confined in, and tethered to, nan channels. This has challenged our understanding of how they serve to selectively facilitate translocation of nuclear transport receptor (NTR)-bearing macromolecules. Heterogeneous FG-repeats, tethered to the NPC interior, nonuniformly fill the channel in a diameter-dependent manner and adopt a rapid Brownian motion, thereby forming a porous and highly dynamic polymeric meshwork that percolates in radial and axial directions and features two distinguishable zones: a dense hydrophobic rod-like zone located in the center, and a peripheral low-density shell-like zone. The FG-meshwork is locally disrupted upon interacting with NTR-bearing macromolecules, but immediately reconstructs itself between 0.44 μs and 7.0 μs, depending on cargo size and shape. This confers a perpetually-sealed state to the NPC, and is solely due to rapid Brownian motion of FG-repeats, not FG-repeat hydrophobic bonds. Elongated-shaped macromolecules, both in the presence and absence of NTRs, penetrate more readily into the FG-meshwork compared to their globular counterparts of identical volume and surface chemistry, highlighting the importance of the shape effects in nucleocytoplasmic transport. These results can help our understanding of geometrical effects in, and the design of, intelligent and responsive biopolymer-based materials in nanofiltration and artificial nanopores. PMID:27470900

  6. Major intrinsic proteins and arsenic transport in plants: new players and their potential role.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Gerd P; Jahn, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic and highly abundant metalloid that endangers human health through drinking water and the food chain. The most common forms of As in the environment re arsenate [As(V)] and arsenite [As(III)]. As(V) is a nonfunctional phosphate analog that enters the food chain via plant phosphate transporters. Recently, evidence was provided that uptake of As(III)--the second most abundant As species in soils--is mediated by plant nodulin26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), a subfamily of plant major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Specific NIPs are also essential for the uptake of the metalloids boron and silicon and aquaglyceroporins from microbes and mammals were shown to be the major routes of As uptake. Therefore As(III) transport through MIPs is a conserved and ancient feature. In this chapter we summarize the current view on As transport in plants and address the potential physiological significance of As(III) transport through NIPs.

  7. Effects of Linker Length and Transient Secondary Structure Elements in the Intrinsically Disordered Notch RAM Region on Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Kathryn P; Johnson, Scott E; Hatem, Christine L; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2015-11-01

    Formation of the bivalent interaction between the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and the transcription factor CBF-1/RBP-j, Su(H), Lag-1 (CSL) is a key event in Notch signaling because it switches Notch-responsive genes from a repressed state to an activated state. Interaction of the intrinsically disordered RBP-j-associated molecule (RAM) region of NICD with CSL is thought to both disrupt binding of corepressor proteins to CSL and anchor NICD to CSL, promoting interaction of the ankyrin domain of NICD with CSL through an effective concentration mechanism. To quantify the role of disorder in the RAM linker region on the effective concentration enhancement of Notch transcriptional activation, we measured the effects of linker length variation on activation. The resulting activation profile has general features of a worm-like chain model for effective concentration. However, deviations from the model for short sequence deletions suggest that RAM contains sequence-specific structural elements that may be important for activation. Structural characterization of the RAM linker with sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and NMR spectroscopy reveals that the linker is compact and contains three transient helices and two extended and dynamic regions. To test if these secondary structure elements are important for activation, we made sequence substitutions to change the secondary structure propensities of these elements and measured transcriptional activation of the resulting variants. Substitutions to two of these nonrandom elements (helix 2, extended region 1) have effects on activation, but these effects do not depend on the nature of the substituting residues. Thus, the primary sequences of these elements, but not their secondary structures, are influencing signaling.

  8. Dimension conversion and scaling of disordered protein chains.

    PubMed

    Li, Maodong; Sun, Tanlin; Jin, Fan; Yu, Daqi; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-08-16

    To extract protein dimension and energetics information from single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy (smFRET) data, it is essential to establish the relationship between the distributions of the radius of gyration (Rg) and the end-to-end (donor-to-acceptor) distance (Ree). Here, we performed a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation to obtain a conformational ensemble of denatured proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins. For any disordered chain with fixed length, there is an excellent linear correlation between the average values of Rg and Ree under various solvent conditions, but the relationship deviates from the prediction of a Gaussian chain. A modified conversion formula was proposed to analyze smFRET data. The formula reduces the discrepancy between the results obtained from FRET and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The scaling law in a coil-globule transition process was examined where a significant finite-size effect was revealed, i.e., the scaling exponent may exceed the theoretical critical boundary [1/3, 3/5] and the prefactor changes notably during the transition. The Sanchez chain model was also tested and it was shown that the mean-field approximation works well for expanded chains. PMID:27440558

  9. Annotation of Selaginella moellendorffii Major Intrinsic Proteins and the Evolution of the Protein Family in Terrestrial Plants

    PubMed Central

    Anderberg, Hanna I.; Kjellbom, Per; Johanson, Urban

    2012-01-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) also called aquaporins form pores in membranes to facilitate the permeation of water and certain small polar solutes across membranes. MIPs are present in virtually every organism but are uniquely abundant in land plants. To elucidate the evolution and function of MIPs in terrestrial plants, the MIPs encoded in the genome of the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii were identified and analyzed. In total 19 MIPs were found in S. moellendorffii belonging to 6 of the 7 MIP subfamilies previously identified in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Only three of the MIPs were classified as members of the conserved water specific plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily whereas almost half were found to belong to the diverse NOD26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily permeating various solutes. The small number of PIPs in S. moellendorffii is striking compared to all other land plants and no other species has more NIPs than PIPs. Similar to moss, S. moellendorffii only has one type of tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP). Based on ESTs from non-angiosperms we conclude that the specialized groups of TIPs present in higher plants are not found in primitive vascular plants but evolved later in a common ancestor of seed plants. We also note that the silicic acid permeable NIP2 group that has been reported from angiosperms appears at the same time. We suggest that the expansion of the number MIP isoforms in higher plants is primarily associated with an increase in the different types of specialized tissues rather than the emergence of vascular tissue per se and that the loss of subfamilies has been possible due to a functional overlap between some subfamilies. PMID:22639644

  10. Subregional differences in intrinsic amygdala hyperconnectivity and hypoconnectivity in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kleinhans, Natalia M; Reiter, Maya A; Neuhaus, Emily; Pauley, Greg; Martin, Nathalie; Dager, Stephen; Estes, Annette

    2016-07-01

    The amygdala is a complex structure with distinct subregions and dissociable functional networks. The laterobasal subregion of the amygdala is hypothesized to mediate the presentation and severity of autism symptoms, although very little data are available regarding amygdala dysfunction at the subregional level. In this study, we investigated the relationship between abnormal amygdalar intrinsic connectivity, autism symptom severity, and anxiety and depressive symptoms. We collected resting state fMRI data on 31 high functioning adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder and 38 typically developing (TD) controls aged 14-45. Twenty-five participants with ASD and 28 TD participants were included in the final analyses. ASD participants were administered the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Adult participants were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II and the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Functional connectivity analyses were conducted from three amygdalar subregions: centromedial (CM), laterobasal (LB) and superficial (SF). In addition, correlations with the behavioral measures were tested in the adult participants. In general, the ASD group showed significantly decreased connectivity from the LB subregion and increased connectivity from the CM and SF subregions compared to the TD group. We found evidence that social symptoms are primarily associated with under-connectivity from the LB subregion whereas over-connectivity and under-connectivity from the CM, SF and LB subregions are related to co-morbid depression and anxiety in ASD, in brain regions that were distinct from those associated with social dysfunction, and in different patterns than were observed in mildly symptomatic TD participants. Our findings provide new evidence for functional subregional differences in amygdala pathophysiology in ASD. Autism Res 2016, 9: 760-772. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  11. Subregional differences in intrinsic amygdala hyperconnectivity and hypoconnectivity in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kleinhans, Natalia M; Reiter, Maya A; Neuhaus, Emily; Pauley, Greg; Martin, Nathalie; Dager, Stephen; Estes, Annette

    2016-07-01

    The amygdala is a complex structure with distinct subregions and dissociable functional networks. The laterobasal subregion of the amygdala is hypothesized to mediate the presentation and severity of autism symptoms, although very little data are available regarding amygdala dysfunction at the subregional level. In this study, we investigated the relationship between abnormal amygdalar intrinsic connectivity, autism symptom severity, and anxiety and depressive symptoms. We collected resting state fMRI data on 31 high functioning adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder and 38 typically developing (TD) controls aged 14-45. Twenty-five participants with ASD and 28 TD participants were included in the final analyses. ASD participants were administered the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Adult participants were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II and the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Functional connectivity analyses were conducted from three amygdalar subregions: centromedial (CM), laterobasal (LB) and superficial (SF). In addition, correlations with the behavioral measures were tested in the adult participants. In general, the ASD group showed significantly decreased connectivity from the LB subregion and increased connectivity from the CM and SF subregions compared to the TD group. We found evidence that social symptoms are primarily associated with under-connectivity from the LB subregion whereas over-connectivity and under-connectivity from the CM, SF and LB subregions are related to co-morbid depression and anxiety in ASD, in brain regions that were distinct from those associated with social dysfunction, and in different patterns than were observed in mildly symptomatic TD participants. Our findings provide new evidence for functional subregional differences in amygdala pathophysiology in ASD. Autism Res 2016, 9: 760-772. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The SH3 Domain Acts as a Scaffold for the N-Terminal Intrinsically Disordered Regions of c-Src.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Mariano; Arbesú, Miguel; Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Amata, Irene; Roche, Serge; Pons, Miquel

    2015-05-01

    Regulation of c-Src activity by the intrinsically disordered Unique domain has recently been demonstrated. However, its connection with the classical regulatory mechanisms is still missing. Here we show that the Unique domain is part of a long loop closed by the interaction of the SH4 and SH3 domains. The conformational freedom of the Unique domain is further restricted through direct contacts with SH3 that are allosterically modulated by binding of a poly-proline ligand in the presence and in the absence of lipids. Our results highlight the scaffolding role of the SH3 domain for the c-Src N-terminal intrinsically disordered regions and suggest a connection between the regulatory mechanisms involving the SH3 and Unique domains.

  13. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S.; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M.; MacPhee, Cait E.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM‐MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM‐MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM‐MS data of two IDPs; α‐Synuclein (α‐Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C‐II (ApoC‐II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC‐II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α‐Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC‐II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM‐MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  14. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M; MacPhee, Cait E; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-08-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM-MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM-MS data of two IDPs; α-Synuclein (α-Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC-II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α-Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC-II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM-MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  15. MpAsr encodes an intrinsically unstructured protein and enhances osmotic tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin-Ran; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dong-Ru; Liu, Hai-yan; He, Yan-ming; Qi, Kang-biao; Wang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Fa

    2011-07-01

    Abscisic acid-, stress- and ripening (ASR) -induced proteins are plant-specific proteins whose expression is up-regulated under abiotic stresses or during fruit ripening. In this study, we characterized an ASR protein from plantain to explore its physiological roles under osmotic stress. The expression pattern of MpAsr gene shows that MpAsr gene changed little at the mRNA level, while the MpASR protein accumulates under osmotic treatment. Through bioinformatic-based predictions, circular dichroism spectrometry, and proteolysis and heat-stability assays, we determined that the MpASR protein is an intrinsically unstructured protein in solution. We demonstrated that the hydrophilic MpASR protein could protect L: -lactate dehydrogenase (L: -LDH) from cold-induced aggregation. Furthermore, heterologous expression of MpAsr in Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis enhanced the tolerance of transformants to osmotic stress. Transgenic 35S::MpAsr Arabidopsis seeds had a higher germination frequency than wild-type seeds under unfavorable conditions. At the physiological level, 35S::MpAsr Arabidopsis showed increased soluble sugars and decreased cell membrane damage under osmotic stress. Thus, our results suggest that the MpASR protein may act as an osmoprotectant and water-retaining molecule to help cell adjustment to water deficit caused by osmotic stress. PMID:21327389

  16. The Mitochondrial Protein NLRX1 Controls the Balance between Extrinsic and Intrinsic Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Fraser; Tattoli, Ivan; Rahman, Muhammed A.; Robertson, Susan J.; Belcheva, Antoaneta; Liu, Daniel; Streutker, Catherine; Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A.; Martin, Alberto; Philpott, Dana J.; Arnoult, Damien; Girardin, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    NLRX1 is a mitochondrial Nod-like receptor (NLR) protein whose function remains enigmatic. Here, we observed that NLRX1 expression was glucose-regulated and blunted by SV40 transformation. In transformed but not primary murine embryonic fibroblasts, NLRX1 expression mediated resistance to an extrinsic apoptotic signal, whereas conferring susceptibility to intrinsic apoptotic signals, such as glycolysis inhibition, increased cytosolic calcium and endoplasmic reticulum stress. In a murine model of colorectal cancer induced by azoxymethane, NLRX1−/− mice developed fewer tumors than wild type mice. In contrast, in a colitis-associated cancer model combining azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium, NLRX1−/− mice developed a more severe pathology likely due to the increased sensitivity to dextran sulfate sodium colitis. Together, these results identify NLRX1 as a critical mitochondrial protein implicated in the regulation of apoptosis in cancer cells. The unique capacity of NLRX1 to regulate the cellular sensitivity toward intrinsic versus extrinsic apoptotic signals suggests a critical role for this protein in numerous physiological processes and pathological conditions. PMID:24867956

  17. Intrinsic cleavage of receptor-interacting protein kinase-1 by caspase-6.

    PubMed

    van Raam, B J; Ehrnhoefer, D E; Hayden, M R; Salvesen, G S

    2013-01-01

    Necroptosis is a form of programmed cell death that occurs in the absence of caspase activation and depends on the activity of the receptor-interacting protein kinases. Inactivation of these kinases by caspase-mediated cleavage has been shown to be essential for successful embryonic development, survival and activation of certain cell types. The initiator of extrinsic apoptosis, caspase-8, which has a pro-death as well as a pro-life function, has been assigned this role. In the present study we demonstrate that caspase-6, an executioner caspase, performs this role during apoptosis induced through the intrinsic pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that in the absence of caspase activity, intrinsic triggers of apoptosis induce the receptor-interacting-kinase-1-dependent production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We show that ubiquitously expressed caspase-6 has a supporting role in apoptosis by cleaving this kinase, thus preventing production of inflammatory cytokines as well as inhibiting the necroptotic pathway. These findings shed new light on the regulation of necroptosis as well as cell death in an inflammatory environment wherein cells receive both intrinsic and extrinsic death signals.

  18. Structural studies of human Naked2: A biologically active intrinsically unstructured protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Tianhui; Krezel, Andrzej M.; Li Cunxi; Coffey, Robert J. . E-mail: robert.coffey@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-12-01

    Naked1 and 2 are two mammalian orthologs of Naked Cuticle, a canonical Wnt signaling antagonist in Drosophila. Naked2, but not Naked1, interacts with transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF{alpha}) and escorts TGF{alpha}-containing vesicles to the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells. Full-length Naked2 is poorly soluble. Since most functional domains, including the Dishevelled binding region, EF-hand, vesicle recognition, and membrane targeting motifs, reside in the N-terminal half of the protein, we expressed and purified the first 217 residues of human Naked2 and performed a functional analysis of this fragment. Its circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra showed no evidence of secondary and/or tertiary structure. The fragment did not bind calcium or zinc. These results indicate that the N-terminal half of Naked2 behaves as an intrinsically unstructured protein.

  19. Characterising intra- and inter-intrinsic network synchrony in combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Dunkley, Benjamin T; Doesburg, Sam M; Jetly, Rakesh; Sedge, Paul A; Pang, Elizabeth W; Taylor, Margot J

    2015-11-30

    Soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit elevated gamma-band synchrony in left fronto-temporal cortex, and connectivity measures in these regions correlate with comorbidities and PTSD severity, which suggests increased gamma synchrony is related to symptomology. However, little is known about the role of intrinsic, phase-synchronised networks in the disorder. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we characterised spectral connectivity in the default-mode, salience, visual, and attention networks during resting-state in a PTSD population and a trauma-exposed control group. Intrinsic network connectivity was examined in canonical frequency bands. We observed increased inter-network synchronisation in the PTSD group compared with controls in the gamma (30-80 Hz) and high-gamma range (80-150 Hz). Analyses of connectivity and symptomology revealed that PTSD severity was positively associated with beta synchrony in the ventral-attention-to-salience networks, and gamma synchrony within the salience network, but also negatively correlated with beta synchrony within the visual network. These novel results show that frequency-specific, network-level atypicalities may reflect trauma-related alterations of ongoing functional connectivity, and correlations of beta synchrony in attentional-to-salience and visual networks with PTSD severity suggest complicated network interactions mediate symptoms. These results contribute to accumulating evidence that PTSD is a complicated network-based disorder expressed as altered neural interactions.

  20. Structured States of Disordered Proteins from Genomic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Toth-Petroczy, Agnes; Palmedo, Perry; Ingraham, John; Hopf, Thomas A; Berger, Bonnie; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S

    2016-09-22

    Protein flexibility ranges from simple hinge movements to functional disorder. Around half of all human proteins contain apparently disordered regions with little 3D or functional information, and many of these proteins are associated with disease. Building on the evolutionary couplings approach previously successful in predicting 3D states of ordered proteins and RNA, we developed a method to predict the potential for ordered states for all apparently disordered proteins with sufficiently rich evolutionary information. The approach is highly accurate (79%) for residue interactions as tested in more than 60 known disordered regions captured in a bound or specific condition. Assessing the potential for structure of more than 1,000 apparently disordered regions of human proteins reveals a continuum of structural order with at least 50% with clear propensity for three- or two-dimensional states. Co-evolutionary constraints reveal hitherto unseen structures of functional importance in apparently disordered proteins. PMID:27662088

  1. Structured States of Disordered Proteins from Genomic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Toth-Petroczy, Agnes; Palmedo, Perry; Ingraham, John; Hopf, Thomas A; Berger, Bonnie; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S

    2016-09-22

    Protein flexibility ranges from simple hinge movements to functional disorder. Around half of all human proteins contain apparently disordered regions with little 3D or functional information, and many of these proteins are associated with disease. Building on the evolutionary couplings approach previously successful in predicting 3D states of ordered proteins and RNA, we developed a method to predict the potential for ordered states for all apparently disordered proteins with sufficiently rich evolutionary information. The approach is highly accurate (79%) for residue interactions as tested in more than 60 known disordered regions captured in a bound or specific condition. Assessing the potential for structure of more than 1,000 apparently disordered regions of human proteins reveals a continuum of structural order with at least 50% with clear propensity for three- or two-dimensional states. Co-evolutionary constraints reveal hitherto unseen structures of functional importance in apparently disordered proteins.

  2. Influence of the membrane potential on the free energy of an intrinsic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, B

    1997-01-01

    A modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation is developed from statistical mechanical considerations to describe the influence of the transmembrane potential on macromolecular systems. Using a Green's function formalism, the electrostatic free energy of a protein associated with the membrane is expressed as the sum of three terms: a contribution from the energy required to charge the system's capacitance, a contribution corresponding to the interaction of the protein charges with the membrane potential, and a contribution corresponding to a voltage-independent reaction field free energy. The membrane potential, which is due to the polarization interface, is calculated in the absence of the protein charges, whereas the reaction field is calculated in the absence of transmembrane potential. Variations in the capacitive energy associated with typical molecular processes are negligible under physiological conditions. The formulation of the theory is closely related to standard algorithms used to solve the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and only small modifications to current source codes are required for its implementation. The theory is illustrated by examining the voltage-dependent membrane insertion of a simple polyalanine alpha-helix and by computing the electrostatic potential across a 60-A-diameter sphere meant to represent a large intrinsic protein. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9414213

  3. Metalloido-porins: Essentiality of Nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins in metalloid transport.

    PubMed

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Diehn, Till Arvid; Bienert, Gerd Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Metalloids are a group of physiologically important elements ranging from the essential to the highly toxic. Arsenic, antimony, germanium, and tellurium are highly toxic to plants themselves and to consumers of metalloid-contaminated plants. Boron, silicon, and selenium fulfill essential or beneficial functions in plants. However, when present at high concentrations, boron and selenium cause toxicity symptoms that are detrimental to plant fitness and yield. Consequently, all plants require efficient membrane transport systems to control the uptake and extrusion of metalloids into or out of the plant and their distribution within the plant body. Several Nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs) that belong to the aquaporin plant water channel protein family facilitate the diffusion of uncharged metalloid species. Genetic, physiological, and molecular evidence is that NIPs from primitive to higher plants not only transport all environmentally important metalloids, but that these proteins have a major role in the uptake, translocation, and extrusion of metalloids in plants. As most of the metalloid-permeable NIP aquaporins are impermeable or are poorly permeable to water, these NIP channel proteins should be considered as physiologically essential metalloido-porins. PMID:26259189

  4. Metalloido-porins: Essentiality of Nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins in metalloid transport.

    PubMed

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Diehn, Till Arvid; Bienert, Gerd Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Metalloids are a group of physiologically important elements ranging from the essential to the highly toxic. Arsenic, antimony, germanium, and tellurium are highly toxic to plants themselves and to consumers of metalloid-contaminated plants. Boron, silicon, and selenium fulfill essential or beneficial functions in plants. However, when present at high concentrations, boron and selenium cause toxicity symptoms that are detrimental to plant fitness and yield. Consequently, all plants require efficient membrane transport systems to control the uptake and extrusion of metalloids into or out of the plant and their distribution within the plant body. Several Nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs) that belong to the aquaporin plant water channel protein family facilitate the diffusion of uncharged metalloid species. Genetic, physiological, and molecular evidence is that NIPs from primitive to higher plants not only transport all environmentally important metalloids, but that these proteins have a major role in the uptake, translocation, and extrusion of metalloids in plants. As most of the metalloid-permeable NIP aquaporins are impermeable or are poorly permeable to water, these NIP channel proteins should be considered as physiologically essential metalloido-porins.

  5. Genome-wide sequence characterization and expression analysis of major intrinsic proteins in soybean (Glycine max L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da Yong; Ali, Zulfiqar; Wang, Chang Biao; Xu, Ling; Yi, Jin Xin; Xu, Zhao Long; Liu, Xiao Qing; He, Xiao Lan; Huang, Yi Hong; Khan, Iqrar Ahmad; Trethowan, Richard M; Ma, Hong Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Water is essential for all living organisms. Aquaporin proteins are the major facilitator of water transport activity through cell membranes of plants including soybean. These proteins are diverse in plants and belong to a large major intrinsic (MIP) protein family. In higher plants, MIPs are classified into five subfamilies including plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIP), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIP), NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIP), small basic intrinsic proteins (SIP), and the recently discovered X intrinsic proteins (XIP). This paper reports genome wide assembly of soybean MIPs, their functional prediction and expression analysis. Using a bioinformatic homology search, 66 GmMIPs were identified in the soybean genome. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of GmMIPs divided the large and highly similar multi-gene family into 5 subfamilies: GmPIPs, GmTIPs, GmNIPs, GmSIPs and GmXIPs. GmPIPs consisted of 22 genes and GmTIPs 23, which showed high sequence similarity within subfamilies. GmNIPs contained 13 and GmSIPs 6 members which were diverse. In addition, we also identified a two member GmXIP, a distinct 5(th) subfamily. GmMIPs were further classified into twelve subgroups based on substrate selectivity filter analysis. Expression analyses were performed for a selected set of GmMIPs using semi-quantitative reverse transcription (semi-RT-qPCR) and qPCR. Our results suggested that many GmMIPs have high sequence similarity but diverse roles as evidenced by analysis of sequences and their expression. It can be speculated that GmMIPs contains true aquaporins, glyceroporins, aquaglyceroporins and mixed transport facilitators. PMID:23437113

  6. Alanine and proline content modulate global sensitivity to discrete perturbations in disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Perez, Romel B; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew; Whitten, Steven T

    2014-12-01

    Molecular transduction of biological signals is understood primarily in terms of the cooperative structural transitions of protein macromolecules, providing a mechanism through which discrete local structure perturbations affect global macromolecular properties. The recognition that proteins lacking tertiary stability, commonly referred to as intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), mediate key signaling pathways suggests that protein structures without cooperative intramolecular interactions may also have the ability to couple local and global structure changes. Presented here are results from experiments that measured and tested the ability of disordered proteins to couple local changes in structure to global changes in structure. Using the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein as an experimental model, a set of proline (PRO) and alanine (ALA) to glycine (GLY) substitution variants were designed to modulate backbone conformational propensities without introducing non-native intramolecular interactions. The hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) was used to monitor changes in global structure. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the GLY substitutions decreased polyproline II (PP(II)) propensities relative to the wild type, as expected, and fluorescence methods indicated that substitution-induced changes in R(h) were not associated with folding. The experiments showed that changes in local PP(II) structure cause changes in R(h) that are variable and that depend on the intrinsic chain propensities of PRO and ALA residues, demonstrating a mechanism for coupling local and global structure changes. Molecular simulations that model our results were used to extend the analysis to other proteins and illustrate the generality of the observed PRO and alanine effects on the structures of IDPs.

  7. Intrinsic Functional Connectivity of Amygdala-Based Networks in Adolescent Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Amy K.; Fudge, Julie L.; Kelly, Clare; Perry, Justin S. A.; Daniele, Teresa; Carlisi, Christina; Benson, Brenda; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Milham, Michael P.; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) typically begins during adolescence and can persist into adulthood. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disorder remain unclear. Recent evidence from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) studies in adults suggests disruptions in amygdala-based circuitry; the…

  8. Ordered Self-Assembly Mechanism of a Spherical Oncoprotein Oligomer Triggered by Zinc Removal and Stabilized by an Intrinsically Disordered Domain

    PubMed Central

    Smal, Clara; Alonso, Leonardo G.; Wetzler, Diana E.; Heer, Angeles; de Prat Gay, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-assembly is a common theme in proteins of unrelated sequences or functions. The human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein is an extended dimer with an intrinsically disordered domain, that can form large spherical oligomers. These are the major species in the cytosol of HPV transformed and cancerous cells. E7 binds to a large number of targets, some of which lead to cell transformation. Thus, the assembly process not only is of biological relevance, but represents a model system to investigate a widely distributed mechanism. Methodology/Principal Findings Using various techniques, we monitored changes in secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure in a time course manner. By applying a robust kinetic model developed by Zlotnik, we determined the slow formation of a monomeric “Z-nucleus” after zinc removal, followed by an elongation phase consisting of sequential second-order events whereby one monomer is added at a time. This elongation process takes place at a strikingly slow overall average rate of one monomer added every 28 seconds at 20 µM protein concentration, strongly suggesting either a rearrangement of the growing complex after binding of each monomer or the existence of a “conformation editing” mechanism through which the monomer binds and releases until the appropriate conformation is adopted. The oligomerization determinant lies within its small 5 kDa C-terminal globular domain and, remarkably, the E7 N-terminal intrinsically disordered domain stabilizes the oligomer, preventing an insoluble amyloid route. Conclusion We described a controlled ordered mechanism with features in common with soluble amyloid precursors, chaperones, and other spherical oligomers, thus sharing determining factors for symmetry, size and shape. In addition, such a controlled and discrete polymerization reaction provides a valuable tool for nanotechnological applications. Finally, its increased immunogenicity related to its supramolecular structure is the

  9. Metalloids: essential, beneficial or toxic? Major intrinsic proteins sort it out.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Gerd P; Schüssler, Manuela D; Jahn, Thomas P

    2008-01-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) are a family of selective membrane channels comprising water-channelling aquaporins and glycerol-channelling aquaglyceroporins. Recently, several MIPs within all domains of life were shown to facilitate the diffusion of reduced and non-charged species of the metalloids silicon, boron, arsenic and antimony. Metalloids encompass a group of biologically important elements ranging from the essential to the highly toxic. Consequently, all organisms require efficient membrane transport systems to control the exchange of metalloids with the environment. Recent genetic evidence has demonstrated a crucial role for specific MIPs in metalloid homeostasis. We propose that specific MIPs represent an ancient and indispensable transport mechanism for metalloids, which suggests that they could be potential pharmacological targets.

  10. Glycoxidation of histone proteins in autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Mir, Abdul Rouf; Moinuddin

    2015-10-23

    Post translational modifications (PTMs) alter the characteristic properties of proteins by influencing the spatial orientation of amino acid residues leading to a variety of pathological complications. Among the large number of PTMs, much attention has focused on non-enzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins that form advanced glycation end products and generate autoantibodies. Histone proteins are essential components of chromatin structure and have role in its higher order structural formation. They have abundance of lysine and arginine residues and thus are prone to glyoxidation reactions. Glyoxidation causes structural alterations in histones and consequently leads to a variety of modifications in their amino acid sequence and the secondary and tertiary structure producing new antigenic determinants that may result in cause an aggressive autoimmune response. Here we review and evaluate the field of histone glyoxidation and its role in autoimmune disorders. We explore their structural alterations and immunogenicity of histones after glycation and oxidation reactions, and their role in autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. PMID:26234519

  11. [Monitoring the Redox States of Thioredoxin in Protein-Protein Interaction Using Intrinsic Fluorescence Probe].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Guo, Ai-yu; Chang, Guan-xiao; Ran, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Li-jun

    2015-10-01

    The cellular redox states directly affect cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and the redox states changes is particularly important to the regulation of cell survival or death. Thioredoxin is a kind of oxidation regulatory protein which is widely exists in organisms, and the change of redox states is also an important process in redox regulation. In this work, we have used the site-directed mutagenesis of protein, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism etc., to investigate redox states changes between TRX (E. coli) and glutathione peroxidase(GPX3) during their interaction. By observing the fluorescence spectra of TRX and its mutants, we have studied the protein interactions as well as the redox states switching between oxidation state TRX and the reduced state GPX3. The results demonstrate the presence of interactions and electron exchanges occurring between reduced GPX3 and oxidized TRX, which is of significance for revealing the physical and chemical mechanism of TRX in intracellular signal transduction. PMID:26904821

  12. [Monitoring the Redox States of Thioredoxin in Protein-Protein Interaction Using Intrinsic Fluorescence Probe].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Guo, Ai-yu; Chang, Guan-xiao; Ran, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Li-jun

    2015-10-01

    The cellular redox states directly affect cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and the redox states changes is particularly important to the regulation of cell survival or death. Thioredoxin is a kind of oxidation regulatory protein which is widely exists in organisms, and the change of redox states is also an important process in redox regulation. In this work, we have used the site-directed mutagenesis of protein, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism etc., to investigate redox states changes between TRX (E. coli) and glutathione peroxidase(GPX3) during their interaction. By observing the fluorescence spectra of TRX and its mutants, we have studied the protein interactions as well as the redox states switching between oxidation state TRX and the reduced state GPX3. The results demonstrate the presence of interactions and electron exchanges occurring between reduced GPX3 and oxidized TRX, which is of significance for revealing the physical and chemical mechanism of TRX in intracellular signal transduction.

  13. Two-state protein model with water interactions: Influence of temperature on the intrinsic viscosity of myoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakk, Audun

    2001-06-01

    We describe a single-domain protein as a two-state system with water interactions. Around the unfolded apolar parts of the protein we incorporate the hydration effect by introducing hydrogen bonds between the water molecules in order to mimic the ``icelike'' shell structure. Intrinsic viscosity, proportional to the effective hydrodynamic volume, for sperm whale metmyoglobin is assigned from experimental data in the folded and in the denaturated state. By weighing statistically the two states against the degree of folding, we express the total intrinsic viscosity. The temperature dependence of the intrinsic viscosity, for different chemical potentials, is in good correspondence with experimental data [P. L. Privalov et al., J. Mol. Biol. 190, 487 (1986)]. Cold and warm unfolding, common to small globular proteins, is also a result of the model.

  14. Two-state protein model with water interactions: Influence of temperature on the intrinsic viscosity of myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Bakk, Audun

    2001-06-01

    We describe a single-domain protein as a two-state system with water interactions. Around the unfolded apolar parts of the protein we incorporate the hydration effect by introducing hydrogen bonds between the water molecules in order to mimic the {open_quotes}icelike{close_quotes} shell structure. Intrinsic viscosity, proportional to the effective hydrodynamic volume, for sperm whale metmyoglobin is assigned from experimental data in the folded and in the denaturated state. By weighing statistically the two states against the degree of folding, we express the total intrinsic viscosity. The temperature dependence of the intrinsic viscosity, for different chemical potentials, is in good correspondence with experimental data [P. L. Privalov , J. Mol. Biol. >190, 487 (1986)]. Cold and warm unfolding, common to small globular proteins, is also a result of the model.

  15. Expression of calcium-buffering proteins in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Renato; Marques, Maria Julia; Khurana, Tejvir S; Santo Neto, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic laryngeal muscles (ILM) are highly specialized muscles involved in phonation and airway protection, with unique properties that allow them to perform extremely rapid contractions and to escape from damage in muscle dystrophy. Due to that, they may differ from limb muscles in several physiological aspects. Because a better ability to handle intracellular calcium has been suggested to explain ILM unique properties, we hypothesized that the profile of the proteins that regulate calcium levels in ILM is different from that in a limb muscle. Calcium-related proteins were analyzed in the ILM, cricothyroid (CT), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from male Sprague–Dawley rats (8 weeks of age) using quantitative PCR and western blotting. Higher expression of key Ca2+ regulatory proteins was detected in ILM compared to TA, such as the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-reuptake proteins (Sercas 1 and 2), the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, phospholamban, and the Ca2+-binding protein calsequestrin. Parvalbumin, calmodulin and the ATPase, Ca2+-transporting, and plasma membrane 1 were also expressed at higher levels in ILM compared to TA. The store-operated calcium entry channel molecule was decreased in ILM compared to the limb muscle and the voltage-dependent L-type and ryanodine receptor were expressed at similar levels in ILM and TA. These results show that ILM have a calcium regulation system profile suggestive of a better ability to handle calcium changes in comparison to limb muscles, and this may provide a mechanistic insight for their unique pathophysiological properties. PMID:26109185

  16. Sequence- and Temperature-Dependent Properties of Unfolded and Disordered Proteins from Atomistic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zerze, Gül H; Best, Robert B; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-11-19

    We use all-atom molecular simulation with explicit solvent to study the properties of selected intrinsically disordered proteins and unfolded states of foldable proteins, which include chain dimensions and shape, secondary structure propensity, solvent accessible surface area, and contact formation. We find that the qualitative scaling behavior of the chains matches expectations from theory under ambient conditions. In particular, unfolded globular proteins tend to be more collapsed under the same conditions than charged disordered sequences of the same length. However, inclusion of explicit solvent in addition naturally captures temperature-dependent solvation effects, which results in an initial collapse of the chains as temperature is increased, in qualitative agreement with experiment. There is a universal origin to the collapse, revealed in the change of hydration of individual residues as a function of temperature: namely, that the initial collapse is driven by unfavorable solvation free energy of individual residues, which in turn has a strong temperature dependence. We also observe that in unfolded globular proteins, increased temperature also initially favors formation of native-like (rather than non-native-like) structure. Our results help to establish how sequence encodes the degree of intrinsic disorder or order as well as its response to changes in environmental conditions. PMID:26498157

  17. Disorder in Milk Proteins: α -Lactalbumin. Part A. Structural Properties and Conformational Behavior.

    PubMed

    Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Serge E; Breydo, Leonid; Redwan, Elrashdy M; Almehdar, Hussein A; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    This is a first part of the two-part article that continues a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. We introduce here α-lactalbumin, a small (Mr 14 200), simple, acidic (pI 4-5), Ca(2+)-binding protein that might constitute up to 20% of total milk protein. Although function (it is one of the two components of lactose synthase that catalyzes the final step of the lactose biosynthesis in the lactating mammary gland), structure (protein has two domains, a large α -helical domain and a small β -sheet domain connected by a calcium binding loop), and folding mechanisms (α-lactalbumin is well-known as a classic example of the molten globule state) of this model globular protein are relatively well understood, α-lactalbumin continues to surprise researchers and clearly continues to have high discovery potential. The goal of this review is to summarize some recent advances in the field of α-lactalbumin research and to analyze the peculiarities of the "intrinsic disorder code" of this protein. PMID:26956441

  18. Protein disorder--a breakthrough invention of evolution?

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, Avner; Schaefer, Christian; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schmidberger, Markus; Punta, Marco; Rost, Burkhard

    2011-06-01

    As an operational definition, we refer to regions in proteins that do not adopt regular three-dimensional structures in isolation, as disordered regions. An antipode to disorder would be 'well-structured' rather than 'ordered'. Here, we argue for the following three hypotheses. Firstly, it is more useful to picture disorder as a distinct phenomenon in structural biology than as an extreme example of protein flexibility. Secondly, there are many very different flavors of protein disorder, nevertheless, it seems advantageous to portray the universe of all possible proteins in terms of two main types: well-structured, disordered. There might be a third type 'other' but we have so far no positive evidence for this. Thirdly, nature uses protein disorder as a tool to adapt to different environments. Protein disorder is evolutionarily conserved and this maintenance of disorder is highly nontrivial. Increasingly integrating protein disorder into the toolbox of a living cell was a crucial step in the evolution from simple bacteria to complex eukaryotes. We need new advanced computational methods to study this new milestone in the advance of protein biology. PMID:21514145

  19. Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 February 2014 (historical) Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder Replacing a protein that is crucial to ensuring that the skin’s ...

  20. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae

    PubMed Central

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST) and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups. PMID:26307970

  1. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae.

    PubMed

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2015-08-20

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST) and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups.

  2. The Structure of Intrinsically Disordered Peptides Implicated in Amyloid Diseases: Insights from Fully Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun; Shea, Joan-Emma

    Protein aggregation involves the self-assembly of proteins into large β-sheet-rich complexes. This process can be the result of aberrant protein folding and lead to "amyloidosis," a condition characterized by deposits of protein aggregates known as amyloids on various organs of the body [1]. Amyloid-related diseases include, among others, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and type II diabetes [2, 3, 4]. In other instances, however, protein aggregation is not a pathological process, but rather a functional one, with aggregates serving as structural scaffolds in a number of organisms [5].

  3. Deducing the functional characteristics of the human selenoprotein SELK from the structural properties of its intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Polo, Andrea; Colonna, Giovanni; Guariniello, Stefano; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Costantini, Susan

    2016-03-01

    The intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) cannot be described by a single structural representation but, due to their high structural fluctuation, through conformational ensembles. Certainly, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent a useful tool to study their different conformations capturing the conformational distribution. Our group is focusing on the structural characterization of proteins belonging to the seleno-proteome due to their involvement in cancer. They present disordered domains central for their biological function, and, in particular, SELK is a single-pass transmembrane protein that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane (ER) with a C-terminal domain exposed to the cytoplasm that is known to interact with different components of the endoplasmic reticulum associated to the protein degradation (ERAD) pathway. This protein is found to be up-expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and in other cancers. In this work we performed a detailed analysis of the C-terminal domain sequence of SELK and discovered that it is characterized by many prolines, and four negatively and eleven positively charged residues, which are crucial for its biological activity. This region can be considered as a weak polyelectrolyte and, specifically, a polycation, with high disordered propensity and different phosphorylation sites dislocated along the sequence. Then, we modeled its three-dimensional structure by performing MD simulations in water at neutral pH to analyze the structural stability as well as to identify the presence of HUB residues that play a key structural role as evidenced by the residue-residue interaction network analysis. Through this approach, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of SELK (i) presents a poor content of regular secondary structure elements, (ii) is dynamically stabilized by a network of intra-molecular H-bonds and H-bonds with water molecules, (iii) is highly fluctuating and, therefore, can be described only through a

  4. A comparison of intrinsic endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins in maturing seeds and germinated seedlings of castor bean.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D B; Al-Marayati, S; González, E

    1982-01-01

    The intrinsic membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum from endosperm of maturing and germinated seedlings of castor bean (Ricinus communis) were studied. Preparations were simultaneously subjected to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At least 30 separate proteins were distinguished by staining the gels with Coomassie R-250. The characteristic protein profiles obtained from 0.2 m KCl-washed membranes of each endoplasmic reticulum source are highly reproducible. Of these proteins, three to six that were present in maturing seed were found also in germinating seedlings. In general, the majority of membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum of maturing seed were of a higher molecular weight than those from germinated seedlings.

  5. Characterization of Skin Aging-Associated Secreted Proteins (SAASP) Produced by Dermal Fibroblasts Isolated from Intrinsically Aged Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Waldera Lupa, Daniel M; Kalfalah, Faiza; Safferling, Kai; Boukamp, Petra; Poschmann, Gereon; Volpi, Elena; Götz-Rösch, Christine; Bernerd, Francoise; Haag, Laura; Huebenthal, Ulrike; Fritsche, Ellen; Boege, Fritz; Grabe, Niels; Tigges, Julia; Stühler, Kai; Krutmann, Jean

    2015-08-01

    Most molecular hallmarks of cellular senescence have been identified in studies of cells aged in vitro by driving them into replicative or stress-induced senescence. Comparatively, less is known about the characteristic features of cells that have aged in vivo. Here we provide a systematic molecular analysis of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) that were isolated from intrinsically aged human skin of young versus middle aged versus old donors. Intrinsically aged NHDFs in culture exhibited more frequently nuclear foci positive for p53 binding protein 1 and promyelocytic leukemia protein reminiscent of 'DNA segments with chromatin alterations reinforcing senescence (DNA-SCARS)'. Formation of such foci was neither accompanied by increased DNA double strand breaks, nor decreased cell viability, nor telomere shortening. However, it was associated with the development of a secretory phenotype, indicating incipient cell senescence. By quantitative analysis of the entire secretome present in conditioned cell culture supernatant, combined with a multiplex cytokine determination, we identified 998 proteins secreted by intrinsically aged NHDFs in culture. Seventy of these proteins exhibited an age-dependent secretion pattern and were accordingly denoted 'skin aging-associated secreted proteins (SAASP)'. Systematic comparison of SAASP with the classical senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) revealed that matrix degradation as well as proinflammatory processes are common aspects of both conditions. However, secretion of 27 proteins involved in the biological processes of 'metabolism' and 'adherens junction interactions' was unique for NHDFs isolated from intrinsically aged skin. In conclusion, fibroblasts isolated from intrinsically aged skin exhibit some, but not all, molecular hallmarks of cellular senescence. Most importantly, they secrete a unique pattern of proteins that is distinct from the canonical SASP and might reflect specific processes of skin aging

  6. Characterization of Skin Aging-Associated Secreted Proteins (SAASP) Produced by Dermal Fibroblasts Isolated from Intrinsically Aged Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Waldera Lupa, Daniel M; Kalfalah, Faiza; Safferling, Kai; Boukamp, Petra; Poschmann, Gereon; Volpi, Elena; Götz-Rösch, Christine; Bernerd, Francoise; Haag, Laura; Huebenthal, Ulrike; Fritsche, Ellen; Boege, Fritz; Grabe, Niels; Tigges, Julia; Stühler, Kai; Krutmann, Jean

    2015-08-01

    Most molecular hallmarks of cellular senescence have been identified in studies of cells aged in vitro by driving them into replicative or stress-induced senescence. Comparatively, less is known about the characteristic features of cells that have aged in vivo. Here we provide a systematic molecular analysis of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) that were isolated from intrinsically aged human skin of young versus middle aged versus old donors. Intrinsically aged NHDFs in culture exhibited more frequently nuclear foci positive for p53 binding protein 1 and promyelocytic leukemia protein reminiscent of 'DNA segments with chromatin alterations reinforcing senescence (DNA-SCARS)'. Formation of such foci was neither accompanied by increased DNA double strand breaks, nor decreased cell viability, nor telomere shortening. However, it was associated with the development of a secretory phenotype, indicating incipient cell senescence. By quantitative analysis of the entire secretome present in conditioned cell culture supernatant, combined with a multiplex cytokine determination, we identified 998 proteins secreted by intrinsically aged NHDFs in culture. Seventy of these proteins exhibited an age-dependent secretion pattern and were accordingly denoted 'skin aging-associated secreted proteins (SAASP)'. Systematic comparison of SAASP with the classical senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) revealed that matrix degradation as well as proinflammatory processes are common aspects of both conditions. However, secretion of 27 proteins involved in the biological processes of 'metabolism' and 'adherens junction interactions' was unique for NHDFs isolated from intrinsically aged skin. In conclusion, fibroblasts isolated from intrinsically aged skin exhibit some, but not all, molecular hallmarks of cellular senescence. Most importantly, they secrete a unique pattern of proteins that is distinct from the canonical SASP and might reflect specific processes of skin aging.

  7. The Neurite Outgrowth Inhibitory Nogo-A-Δ20 Region Is an Intrinsically Disordered Segment Harbouring Three Stretches with Helical Propensity.

    PubMed

    Zelenay, Viviane; Arzt, Michael E; Bibow, Stefan; Schwab, Martin E; Riek, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery from central neurotrauma, such as spinal cord injury, is limited by myelin-associated inhibitory proteins. The most prominent example, Nogo-A, imposes an inhibitory cue for nerve fibre growth via two independent domains: Nogo-A-Δ20 (residues 544-725 of the rat Nogo-A sequence) and Nogo-66 (residues 1026-1091). Inhibitory signalling from these domains causes a collapse of the neuronal growth cone via individual receptor complexes, centred around sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) for Nogo-A-Δ20 and Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) for Nogo-66. Whereas the helical conformation of Nogo-66 has been studied extensively, only little structural information is available for the Nogo-A-Δ20 region. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess potential residual structural propensities of the intrinsically disordered Nogo-A-Δ20. Using triple resonance experiments, we were able to assign 94% of the non-proline backbone residues. While secondary structure analysis and relaxation measurements highlighted the intrinsically disordered character of Nogo-A-Δ20, three stretches comprising residues 561EAIQESL567, 639EAMNVALKALGT650, and 693SNYSEIAK700 form transient α-helical structures. Interestingly, 561EAIQESL567 is situated directly adjacent to one of the most conserved regions of Nogo-A-Δ20 that contains a binding motif for β1-integrin. Likewise, 639EAMNVALKALGT650 partially overlaps with the epitope recognized by 11C7, a Nogo-A-neutralizing antibody that promotes functional recovery from spinal cord injury. Diffusion measurements by pulse-field gradient NMR spectroscopy suggest concentration- and oxidation state-dependent dimerisation of Nogo-A-Δ20. Surprisingly, NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data could not validate previously shown binding of extracellular loops of S1PR2 to Nogo-A-Δ20. PMID:27611089

  8. The Neurite Outgrowth Inhibitory Nogo-A-Δ20 Region Is an Intrinsically Disordered Segment Harbouring Three Stretches with Helical Propensity

    PubMed Central

    Bibow, Stefan; Schwab, Martin E.; Riek, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery from central neurotrauma, such as spinal cord injury, is limited by myelin-associated inhibitory proteins. The most prominent example, Nogo-A, imposes an inhibitory cue for nerve fibre growth via two independent domains: Nogo-A-Δ20 (residues 544–725 of the rat Nogo-A sequence) and Nogo-66 (residues 1026–1091). Inhibitory signalling from these domains causes a collapse of the neuronal growth cone via individual receptor complexes, centred around sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) for Nogo-A-Δ20 and Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) for Nogo-66. Whereas the helical conformation of Nogo-66 has been studied extensively, only little structural information is available for the Nogo-A-Δ20 region. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess potential residual structural propensities of the intrinsically disordered Nogo-A-Δ20. Using triple resonance experiments, we were able to assign 94% of the non-proline backbone residues. While secondary structure analysis and relaxation measurements highlighted the intrinsically disordered character of Nogo-A-Δ20, three stretches comprising residues 561EAIQESL567, 639EAMNVALKALGT650, and 693SNYSEIAK700 form transient α-helical structures. Interestingly, 561EAIQESL567 is situated directly adjacent to one of the most conserved regions of Nogo-A-Δ20 that contains a binding motif for β1-integrin. Likewise, 639EAMNVALKALGT650 partially overlaps with the epitope recognized by 11C7, a Nogo-A-neutralizing antibody that promotes functional recovery from spinal cord injury. Diffusion measurements by pulse-field gradient NMR spectroscopy suggest concentration- and oxidation state-dependent dimerisation of Nogo-A-Δ20. Surprisingly, NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data could not validate previously shown binding of extracellular loops of S1PR2 to Nogo-A-Δ20. PMID:27611089

  9. Interaction of the intrinsically unstructured phage lambda N Protein with Escherichia coli NusA.

    PubMed

    Prasch, Stefan; Schwarz, Sabine; Eisenmann, Anke; Wöhrl, Birgitta M; Schweimer, Kristian; Rösch, Paul

    2006-04-11

    N protein of the Escherichia coli phage lambda (lambdaN) is involved in antitermination, a transcription regulatory process that is essential for the expression of delayed early genes during phage lytic development. lambdaN is an intrinsically unstructured protein that possesses three distinct binding sites interacting with the carboxy terminus of the E. coli host factor protein NusA, the viral nutBoxB-RNA, and RNA polymerase, respectively. Heteronuclear NMR experiments with lambdaN(1-53) in complex with NusA(339-495) revealed that upon complex formation the lambdaN-binding interface, lambdaN(34-47), adopts a rigid structure. NMR data also indicate the induction of a weak helical structure in the nutboxB RNA-binding region lambdaN(1-22) upon binding to NusA(339-495) even in the absence of RNA. Titration experiments of the lambdaN(1-53)-nutBoxB RNA complex with NusA(339-495) revealed that the ternary complex can be described in terms of two structurally independent binary interactions. Furthermore, chemical-shift perturbation experiments with different NusA constructs and different lambdaN peptides showed that only NusA(353-416) is involved in lambdaN binding. We found that only one molecule of NusA(339-426) binds to one molecule of lambdaN(1-53). We also clarified the role of the lambdaN-binding region and could show that N41-R47 also binds to NusA(339-495). Furthermore, we observe that lambdaN(1-22) adopts a helical fold upon binding to NusA(339-495), in agreement with one of the theoretical models of lambdaN action.

  10. An intrinsically disordered peptide from Ebola virus VP35 controls viral RNA synthesis by modulating nucleoprotein-RNA interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Daisy  W.; Borek, Dominika; Luthra, Priya; Binning, Jennifer  M.; Anantpadma, Manu; Liu, Gai; Harvey, Ian B.; Su, Zhaoming; Endlich-Frazier, Ariel; Pan, Juanli; Shabman, Reed  S.; Chiu, Wah; Davey, Robert  A.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Basler, Christopher  F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya  K.

    2015-04-01

    During viral RNA synthesis, Ebola virus (EBOV) nucleoprotein (NP) alternates between an RNA-template-bound form and a template-free form to provide the viral polymerase access to the RNA template. In addition, newly synthesized NP must be prevented from indiscriminately binding to noncognate RNAs. Here, we investigate the molecular bases for these critical processes. We identify an intrinsically disordered peptide derived from EBOV VP35 (NPBP, residues 20–48) that binds NP with high affinity and specificity, inhibits NP oligomerization, and releases RNA from NP-RNA complexes in vitro. The structure of the NPBP/ΔNPNTD complex, solved to 3.7 Å resolution, reveals how NPBP peptide occludes a large surface area that is important for NP-NP and NP-RNA interactions and for viral RNA synthesis. Together, our results identify a highly conserved viral interface that is important for EBOV replication and can be targeted for therapeutic development.

  11. Conformational Dynamics and Antigenicity in the Disordered Malaria Antigen Merozoite Surface Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Dean; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Nováček, Jiří; Žídek, Lukáš; Sklenář, Vladimír; Richards, Jack S.; Beeson, James G.; Anders, Robin F.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2) of Plasmodium falciparum is an abundant, intrinsically disordered protein that is GPI-anchored to the surface of the invasive blood stage of the malaria parasite. Recombinant MSP2 has been trialled as a component of a malaria vaccine, and is one of several disordered proteins that are candidates for inclusion in vaccines for malaria and other diseases. Nonetheless, little is known about the implications of protein disorder for the development of an effective antibody response. We have therefore undertaken a detailed analysis of the conformational dynamics of the two allelic forms of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27) using NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts and NMR relaxation data indicate that conformational and dynamic properties of the N- and C-terminal conserved regions in the two forms of MSP2 are essentially identical, but significant variation exists between and within the central variable regions. We observe a strong relationship between the conformational dynamics and the antigenicity of MSP2, as assessed with antisera to recombinant MSP2. Regions of increased conformational order in MSP2, including those in the conserved regions, are more strongly antigenic, while the most flexible regions are minimally antigenic. This suggests that modifications that increase conformational order may offer a means to tune the antigenicity of MSP2 and other disordered antigens, with implications for vaccine design. PMID:25742002

  12. Prostate-associated gene 4 (PAGE4), an intrinsically disordered cancer/testis antigen, is a novel therapeutic target for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Prakash; Dunker, A Keith; Weninger, Keith; Orban, John

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-associated gene 4 (PAGE4) is a remarkably prostate-specific Cancer/Testis Antigen that is highly upregulated in the human fetal prostate and its diseased states but not in the adult normal gland. PAGE4 is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that functions as a stress-response protein to suppress reactive oxygen species as well as prevent DNA damage. In addition, PAGE4 is also a transcriptional regulator that potentiates transactivation by the oncogene c-Jun. c-Jun forms the AP-1 complex by heterodimerizing with members of the Fos family and plays an important role in the development and pathology of the prostate gland, underscoring the importance of the PAGE4/c-Jun interaction. HIPK1, also a component of the stress-response pathway, phosphorylates PAGE4 at T51 which is critical for its transcriptional activity. Phosphorylation induces conformational and dynamic switching in the PAGE4 ensemble leading to a new cellular function. Finally, bioinformatics evidence suggests that the PAGE4 mRNA could be alternatively spliced resulting in four potential isoforms of the polypeptide alluding to the possibility of a range of conformational ensembles with latent functions. Considered together, the data suggest that PAGE4 may represent the first molecular link between stress and prostate cancer (PCa). Thus, pharmacologically targeting PAGE4 may be a novel opportunity for treating and managing patients with PCa, especially patients with low-risk disease. PMID:27270343

  13. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to " postdict " the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  14. Intrinsic disorder as a generalizable strategy for the rational design of highly responsive, allosterically cooperative receptors

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Anna J.; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Ricci, Francesco; Plaxco, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Control over the sensitivity with which biomolecular receptors respond to small changes in the concentration of their target ligand is critical for the proper function of many cellular processes. Such control could likewise be of utility in artificial biotechnologies, such as biosensors, genetic logic gates, and “smart” materials, in which highly responsive behavior is of value. In nature, the control of molecular responsiveness is often achieved using “Hill-type” cooperativity, a mechanism in which sequential binding events on a multivalent receptor are coupled such that the first enhances the affinity of the next, producing a steep, higher-order dependence on target concentration. Here, we use an intrinsic-disorder–based mechanism that can be implemented without requiring detailed structural knowledge to rationally introduce this potentially useful property into several normally noncooperative biomolecules. To do so, we fabricate a tandem repeat of the receptor that is destabilized (unfolded) via the introduction of a long, unstructured loop. The first binding event requires the energetically unfavorable closing of this loop, reducing its affinity relative to that of the second binding event, which, in contrast occurs at a preformed site. Using this approach, we have rationally introduced cooperativity into three unrelated DNA aptamers, achieving in the best of these a Hill coefficient experimentally indistinguishable from the theoretically expected maximum. The extent of cooperativity and thus the steepness of the binding transition are, moreover, well modeled as simple functions of the energetic cost of binding-induced folding, speaking to the quantitative nature of this design strategy. PMID:25288724

  15. iHADAMAC: A complementary tool for sequential resonance assignment of globular and highly disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Sophie; Plevin, Michael J.; Willbold, Dieter; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    An experiment, iHADAMAC, is presented that yields information on the amino-acid type of individual residues in a protein by editing the 1H- 15N correlations into seven different 2D spectra, each corresponding to a different class of amino-acid types. Amino-acid type discrimination is realized via a Hadamard encoding scheme based on four different spin manipulations as recently introduced in the context of the sequential HADAMAC experiment. Both sequential and intra-residue HADAMAC experiments yield highly complementary information that greatly facilitate resonance assignment of proteins with high frequency degeneracy, as demonstrated here for a 188-residue intrinsically disordered protein fragment of the hepatitis C virus protein NS5A.

  16. Therapeutic strategies for anchored kinases and phosphatases: exploiting short linear motifs and intrinsic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, Patrick J.; Scott, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation events that occur in response to the second messenger cAMP are controlled spatially and temporally by protein kinase A (PKA) interacting with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Recent advances in understanding the structural basis for this interaction have reinforced the hypothesis that AKAPs create spatially constrained signaling microdomains. This has led to the realization that the PKA/AKAP interface is a potential drug target for modulating a plethora of cell-signaling events. Pharmacological disruption of kinase–AKAP interactions has previously been explored for disease treatment and remains an interesting area of research. However, disrupting or enhancing the association of phosphatases with AKAPs is a therapeutic concept of equal promise, particularly since they oppose the actions of many anchored kinases. Accordingly, numerous AKAPs bind phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), calcineurin (PP2B), and PP2A. These multimodal signaling hubs are equally able to control the addition of phosphate groups onto target substrates, as well as the removal of these phosphate groups. In this review, we describe recent advances in structural analysis of kinase and phosphatase interactions with AKAPs, and suggest future possibilities for targeting these interactions for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26283967

  17. Environmental Pressure May Change the Composition Protein Disorder in Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schlessinger, Avner; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Many prokaryotic organisms have adapted to incredibly extreme habitats. The genomes of such extremophiles differ from their non-extremophile relatives. For example, some proteins in thermophiles sustain high temperatures by being more compact than homologs in non-extremophiles. Conversely, some proteins have increased volumes to compensate for freezing effects in psychrophiles that survive in the cold. Here, we revealed that some differences in organisms surviving in extreme habitats correlate with a simple single feature, namely the fraction of proteins predicted to have long disordered regions. We predicted disorder with different methods for 46 completely sequenced organisms from diverse habitats and found a correlation between protein disorder and the extremity of the environment. More specifically, the overall percentage of proteins with long disordered regions tended to be more similar between organisms of similar habitats than between organisms of similar taxonomy. For example, predictions tended to detect substantially more proteins with long disordered regions in prokaryotic halophiles (survive high salt) than in their taxonomic neighbors. Another peculiar environment is that of high radiation survived, e.g. by Deinococcus radiodurans. The relatively high fraction of disorder predicted in this extremophile might provide a shield against mutations. Although our analysis fails to establish causation, the observed correlation between such a simplistic, coarse-grained, microscopic molecular feature (disorder content) and a macroscopic variable (habitat) remains stunning.

  18. Environmental Pressure May Change the Composition Protein Disorder in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schlessinger, Avner; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Many prokaryotic organisms have adapted to incredibly extreme habitats. The genomes of such extremophiles differ from their non-extremophile relatives. For example, some proteins in thermophiles sustain high temperatures by being more compact than homologs in non-extremophiles. Conversely, some proteins have increased volumes to compensate for freezing effects in psychrophiles that survive in the cold. Here, we revealed that some differences in organisms surviving in extreme habitats correlate with a simple single feature, namely the fraction of proteins predicted to have long disordered regions. We predicted disorder with different methods for 46 completely sequenced organisms from diverse habitats and found a correlation between protein disorder and the extremity of the environment. More specifically, the overall percentage of proteins with long disordered regions tended to be more similar between organisms of similar habitats than between organisms of similar taxonomy. For example, predictions tended to detect substantially more proteins with long disordered regions in prokaryotic halophiles (survive high salt) than in their taxonomic neighbors. Another peculiar environment is that of high radiation survived, e.g. by Deinococcus radiodurans. The relatively high fraction of disorder predicted in this extremophile might provide a shield against mutations. Although our analysis fails to establish causation, the observed correlation between such a simplistic, coarse-grained, microscopic molecular feature (disorder content) and a macroscopic variable (habitat) remains stunning. PMID:26252577

  19. Environmental Pressure May Change the Composition Protein Disorder in Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schlessinger, Avner; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Many prokaryotic organisms have adapted to incredibly extreme habitats. The genomes of such extremophiles differ from their non-extremophile relatives. For example, some proteins in thermophiles sustain high temperatures by being more compact than homologs in non-extremophiles. Conversely, some proteins have increased volumes to compensate for freezing effects in psychrophiles that survive in the cold. Here, we revealed that some differences in organisms surviving in extreme habitats correlate with a simple single feature, namely the fraction of proteins predicted to have long disordered regions. We predicted disorder with different methods for 46 completely sequenced organisms from diverse habitats and found a correlation between protein disorder and the extremity of the environment. More specifically, the overall percentage of proteins with long disordered regions tended to be more similar between organisms of similar habitats than between organisms of similar taxonomy. For example, predictions tended to detect substantially more proteins with long disordered regions in prokaryotic halophiles (survive high salt) than in their taxonomic neighbors. Another peculiar environment is that of high radiation survived, e.g. by Deinococcus radiodurans. The relatively high fraction of disorder predicted in this extremophile might provide a shield against mutations. Although our analysis fails to establish causation, the observed correlation between such a simplistic, coarse-grained, microscopic molecular feature (disorder content) and a macroscopic variable (habitat) remains stunning. PMID:26252577

  20. Enhanced Boron Tolerance in Plants Mediated by Bidirectional Transport Through Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2016-01-01

    High boron (B) concentration is toxic to plants that limit plant productivity. Recent studies have shown the involvement of the members of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family in controlling B transport. Here, we have provided experimental evidences showing the bidirectional transport activity of rice OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6. Boron transport ability of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 were displayed in yeast HD9 mutant strain (∆fps1∆acr3∆ycf1) as a result of increased B sensitivity, influx and accumulation by OsPIP1;3, and rapid efflux activity by OsPIP2;6. RT-PCR analysis showed strong upregulation of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 transcripts in roots by B toxicity. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 exhibited enhanced tolerance to B toxicity. Furthermore, B concentration was significantly increased after 2 and 3 hours of tracer boron ((10)B) treatment. Interestingly, a rapid efflux of (10)B from the roots of the transgenic plants was observed within 1 h of (10)B treatment. Boron tolerance in OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 lines was inhibited by aquaporin inhibitors, silver nitrate and sodium azide. Our data proved that OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 are indeed involved in both influx and efflux of boron transport. Manipulation of these PIPs could be highly useful in improving B tolerance in crops grown in high B containing soils. PMID:26902738

  1. Divergence in function and expression of the NOD26-like intrinsic proteins in plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingpo; Wang, Huasen; Zhang, Zhonghua; Wu, Jiasheng; Feng, Ying; Zhu, Zhujun

    2009-01-01

    Background NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs) that belong to the aquaporin superfamily are plant-specific and exhibit a similar three-dimensional structure. Experimental evidences however revealed that functional divergence should have extensively occurred among NIP genes. It is therefore intriguing to further investigate the evolutionary mechanisms being responsible for the functional diversification of the NIP genes. To better understand this process, a comprehensive analysis including the phylogenetic, positive selection, functional divergence, and transcriptional analysis was carried out. Results The origination of NIPs could be dated back to the primitive land plants, and their diversification would be no younger than the emergence time of the moss P. patens. The rapid proliferation of NIPs in plants may be primarily attributed to the segmental chromosome duplication produced by polyploidy and tandem duplications. The maximum likelihood analysis revealed that NIPs should have experienced strong selective pressure for adaptive evolution after gene duplication and/or speciation, prompting the formation of distinct NIP groups. Functional divergence analysis at the amino acid level has provided strong statistical evidence for shifted evolutionary rate and/or radical change of the physiochemical properties of amino acids after gene duplication, and DIVERGE2 has identified the critical amino acid sites that are thought to be responsible for the divergence for further investigation. The expression of plant NIPs displays a distinct tissue-, cell-type-, and developmental specific pattern, and their responses to various stress treatments are quite different also. The differences in organization of cis-acting regulatory elements in the promoter regions may partially explain their distinction in expression. Conclusion A number of analyses both at the DNA and amino acid sequence levels have provided strong evidences that plant NIPs have suffered a high divergence in

  2. Enhanced Boron Tolerance in Plants Mediated by Bidirectional Transport Through Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mosa, Kareem A.; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C.; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2016-01-01

    High boron (B) concentration is toxic to plants that limit plant productivity. Recent studies have shown the involvement of the members of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family in controlling B transport. Here, we have provided experimental evidences showing the bidirectional transport activity of rice OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6. Boron transport ability of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 were displayed in yeast HD9 mutant strain (∆fps1∆acr3∆ycf1) as a result of increased B sensitivity, influx and accumulation by OsPIP1;3, and rapid efflux activity by OsPIP2;6. RT-PCR analysis showed strong upregulation of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 transcripts in roots by B toxicity. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 exhibited enhanced tolerance to B toxicity. Furthermore, B concentration was significantly increased after 2 and 3 hours of tracer boron (10B) treatment. Interestingly, a rapid efflux of 10B from the roots of the transgenic plants was observed within 1 h of 10B treatment. Boron tolerance in OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 lines was inhibited by aquaporin inhibitors, silver nitrate and sodium azide. Our data proved that OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 are indeed involved in both influx and efflux of boron transport. Manipulation of these PIPs could be highly useful in improving B tolerance in crops grown in high B containing soils. PMID:26902738

  3. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (λEX ∼ 280 nm, λEM ∼ 350 nm), in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the protein’s) local environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET), a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins. PMID:25490136

  4. Effect of Intrinsic Twist on Length of Crystalline and Disordered Regions in Cellulose Microfibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nili, Abdolmadjid; Shklyaev, Oleg; Zhao, Zhen; Zhong, Linghao; Crespi, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biological material in the world. It provides mechanical reinforcement for plant cell wall, and could potentially serve as renewable energy source for biofuel. Native cellulose forms a non-centrosymmetric chiral crystal due to lack of roto-inversion symmetry of constituent glucose chains. Chirality of cellulose crystal could result in an overall twist. Competition between unwinding torsional/extensional and twisting energy terms leads to twist induced frustration along fibril's axis. The accumulated frustration could be the origin of periodic disordered regions observed in cellulose microfibrils. These regions could play significant role in properties of cellulose bundles and ribbons as well as biological implications on plant cell walls. We propose a mechanical model based on Frenkel-Kontorova mechanism to investigate effects of radius dependent twist on crystalline size in cellulose microfibrils. Parameters of the model are adjusted according to all-atom molecular simulations. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as part of The Center for LignoCellulose Structure and Formation, an Energy Frontier Research Center

  5. Correlation of chemical shifts predicted by molecular dynamics simulations for partially disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Jerome M.; Erylimaz, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in being able to accurately predict NMR chemical shifts from structural data. Recent studies have focused on using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data as input for improved prediction. Here we examine the accuracy of chemical shift prediction for intein systems, which have regions of intrinsic disorder. We find that using MD simulation data as input for chemical shift prediction does not consistently improve prediction accuracy over use of a static X-ray crystal structure. This appears to result from the complex conformational ensemble of the disordered protein segments. We show that using accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations improves chemical shift prediction, suggesting that methods which better sample the conformational ensemble like aMD are more appropriate tools for use in chemical shift prediction for proteins with disordered regions. Moreover, our study suggests that data accurately reflecting protein dynamics must be used as input for chemical shift prediction in order to correctly predict chemical shifts in systems with disorder. PMID:25416617

  6. DFLpred: High-throughput prediction of disordered flexible linker regions in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Disordered flexible linkers (DFLs) are disordered regions that serve as flexible linkers/spacers in multi-domain proteins or between structured constituents in domains. They are different from flexible linkers/residues because they are disordered and longer. Availability of experimentally annotated DFLs provides an opportunity to build high-throughput computational predictors of these regions from protein sequences. To date, there are no computational methods that directly predict DFLs and they can be found only indirectly by filtering predicted flexible residues with predictions of disorder. Results: We conceptualized, developed and empirically assessed a first-of-its-kind sequence-based predictor of DFLs, DFLpred. This method outputs propensity to form DFLs for each residue in the input sequence. DFLpred uses a small set of empirically selected features that quantify propensities to form certain secondary structures, disordered regions and structured regions, which are processed by a fast linear model. Our high-throughput predictor can be used on the whole-proteome scale; it needs <1 h to predict entire proteome on a single CPU. When assessed on an independent test dataset with low sequence-identity proteins, it secures area under the receiver operating characteristic curve equal 0.715 and outperforms existing alternatives that include methods for the prediction of flexible linkers, flexible residues, intrinsically disordered residues and various combinations of these methods. Prediction on the complete human proteome reveals that about 10% of proteins have a large content of over 30% DFL residues. We also estimate that about 6000 DFL regions are long with ≥30 consecutive residues. Availability and implementation: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/DFLpred/. Contact: lkurgan@vcu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307636

  7. Membrane-Mediated Regulation of the Intrinsically Disordered CD3ϵ Cytoplasmic Tail of the TCR

    PubMed Central

    López, Cesar A.; Sethi, Anurag; Goldstein, Byron; Wilson, Bridget S.; Gnanakaran, S.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of T-cell-mediated immune responses depends on the phosphorylation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) on T-cell receptors. Although many details of the signaling cascades are well understood, the initial mechanism and regulation of ITAM phosphorylation remains unknown. We used molecular dynamics simulations to study the influence of different compositions of lipid bilayers on the membrane association of the CD3ϵ cytoplasmic tails of the T-cell receptors. Our results show that binding of CD3ϵ to membranes is modulated by both the presence of negatively charged lipids and the lipid order of the membrane. Free-energy calculations reveal that the protein-membrane interaction is favored by the presence of nearby basic residues and the ITAM tyrosines. Phosphorylation minimizes membrane association, rendering the ITAM motif more accessible to binding partners. In systems mimicking biological membranes, the CD3ϵ chain localization is modulated by different facilitator lipids (e.g., gangliosides or phosphoinositols), revealing a plausible regulatory effect on activation through the regulation of lipid composition in cell membranes. PMID:25992726

  8. The intrinsically disordered distal face of nucleoplasmin recognizes distinct oligomerization states of histones.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Isbaal; Fernández-Rivero, Noelia; Arranz, Rocío; Aloria, Kerman; Finn, Ron; Arizmendi, Jesús M; Ausió, Juan; Valpuesta, José María; Muga, Arturo; Prado, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    The role of Nucleoplasmin (NP) as a H2A-H2B histone chaperone has been extensively characterized. To understand its putative interaction with other histone ligands, we have characterized its ability to bind H3-H4 and histone octamers. We find that the chaperone forms distinct complexes with histones, which differ in the number of molecules that build the assembly and in their spatial distribution. When complexed with H3-H4 tetramers or histone octamers, two NP pentamers form an ellipsoidal particle with the histones located at the center of the assembly, in stark contrast with the NP/H2A-H2B complex that contains up to five histone dimers bound to one chaperone pentamer. This particular assembly relies on the ability of H3-H4 to form tetramers either in solution or as part of the octamer, and it is not observed when a variant of H3 (H3C110E), unable to form stable tetramers, is used instead of the wild-type protein. Our data also suggest that the distal face of the chaperone is involved in the interaction with distinct types of histones, as supported by electron microscopy analysis of the different NP/histone complexes. The use of the same structural region to accommodate all type of histones could favor histone exchange and nucleosome dynamics.

  9. Laboratory tests for disorders of complement and complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Shih, Angela R; Murali, Mandakolathur R

    2015-12-01

    The complement pathway is a cascade of proteases that is involved in immune surveillance and innate immunity, as well as adaptive immunity. Dysfunction of the complement cascade may be mediated by aberrations in the pathways of activation, complement regulatory proteins, or complement deficiencies, and has been linked to a number of hematologic disorders, including paroxysmal noctural hemoglobinuria (PNH), hereditary angioedema (HAE), and atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS). Here, current laboratory tests for disorders of the complement pathway are reviewed, and their utility and limitations in hematologic disorders and systemic diseases are discussed. Current therapeutic advances targeting the complement pathway in treatment of complement-mediated hematologic disorders are also reviewed.

  10. A new strategy for sequential assignment of intrinsically unstructured proteins based on 15N single isotope labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Gerard, Melanie; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy

    2013-11-01

    We describe a new efficient strategy for the sequential assignment of amide resonances of a conventional 15N-1H HSQC spectrum of intrinsically unfolded proteins, based on composite NOESY-TOCSY and TOCSY-NOESY mixing times. These composite mixing times lead to a Hα-proton mediated unidirectional transfer of amide to amide proton. We have implemented the composite mixing times in an HSQC-NOESY-HSQC manner to obtain directional connectivity between amides of neighbouring residues. We experimentally determine the optimal mixing times for both transfer schemes, and demonstrate its use in the assignment for both a fragment of the neuronal tau protein and for α-synuclein.

  11. The effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy on intrinsic functional brain networks in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Qingjiu; Wang, Jinhui; Wu, Zhaomin; Wang, Peng; Sun, Li; Cai, Taisheng; Wang, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious psychological treatment for adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the neural processes underlying the benefits of CBT are not well understood. This study aims to unravel psychosocial mechanisms for treatment ADHD by exploring the effects of CBT on functional brain networks. Ten adults with ADHD were enrolled and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired before and after a 12-session CBT. Twelve age- and gender-matched healthy controls were also scanned. We constructed whole-brain functional connectivity networks using graph-theory approaches and further computed the changes of regional functional connectivity strength (rFCS) between pre- and post-CBT in ADHD for measuring the effects of CBT. The results showed that rFCS was increased in the fronto-parietal network and cerebellum, the brain regions that were most often affected by medication, in adults with ADHD following CBT. Furthermore, the enhanced functional coupling between bilateral superior parietal gyrus was positively correlated with the improvement of ADHD symptoms following CBT. Together, these findings provide evidence that CBT can selectively modulate the intrinsic network connectivity in the fronto-parietal network and cerebellum and suggest that the CBT may share common brain mechanism with the pharmacology in adults with ADHD.

  12. An intrinsically disordered peptide from Ebola virus VP35 controls viral RNA synthesis by modulating nucleoprotein-RNA interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Leung, Daisy  W.; Borek, Dominika; Luthra, Priya; Binning, Jennifer  M.; Anantpadma, Manu; Liu, Gai; Harvey, Ian B.; Su, Zhaoming; Endlich-Frazier, Ariel; Pan, Juanli; et al

    2015-04-01

    During viral RNA synthesis, Ebola virus (EBOV) nucleoprotein (NP) alternates between an RNA-template-bound form and a template-free form to provide the viral polymerase access to the RNA template. In addition, newly synthesized NP must be prevented from indiscriminately binding to noncognate RNAs. Here, we investigate the molecular bases for these critical processes. We identify an intrinsically disordered peptide derived from EBOV VP35 (NPBP, residues 20–48) that binds NP with high affinity and specificity, inhibits NP oligomerization, and releases RNA from NP-RNA complexes in vitro. The structure of the NPBP/ΔNPNTD complex, solved to 3.7 Å resolution, reveals how NPBP peptide occludesmore » a large surface area that is important for NP-NP and NP-RNA interactions and for viral RNA synthesis. Together, our results identify a highly conserved viral interface that is important for EBOV replication and can be targeted for therapeutic development.« less

  13. Gecko proteins induce the apoptosis of bladder cancer 5637 cells by inhibiting Akt and activating the intrinsic caspase cascade

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geun-Young; Park, Soon Yong; Jo, Ara; Kim, Mira; Leem, Sun-Hee; Jun, Woo-Jin; Shim, Sang In; Lee, Sang Chul; Chung, Jin Woong

    2015-01-01

    Gecko proteins have long been used as anti-tumor agents in oriental medicine, without any scientific background. Although anti-tumor effects of Gecko proteins on several cancers were recently reported, their effect on bladder cancer has not been investigated. Thus, we explored the anti-tumor effect of Gecko proteins and its cellular mechanisms in human bladder cancer 5637 cells. Gecko proteins significantly reduced the viability of 5637 cells without any cytotoxic effect on normal cells. These proteins increased the Annexin-V staining and the amount of condensed chromatin, demonstrating that the Gecko proteinsinduced cell death was caused by apoptosis. Gecko proteins suppressed Akt activation, and the overexpression of constitutively active form of myristoylated Akt prevented Gecko proteins-induced death of 5637 cells. Furthermore, Gecko proteins activated caspase 9 and caspase 3/7. Taken together, our data demonstrated that Gecko proteins suppressed the Akt pathway and activated the intrinsic caspase pathway, leading to the apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 531-536] PMID:26246284

  14. Gecko proteins induce the apoptosis of bladder cancer 5637 cells by inhibiting Akt and activating the intrinsic caspase cascade.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geun-Young; Park, Soon Yong; Jo, Ara; Kim, Mira; Leem, Sun-Hee; Jun, Woo-Jin; Shim, Sang In; Lee, Sang Chul; Chung, Jin Woong

    2015-09-01

    Gecko proteins have long been used as anti-tumor agents in oriental medicine, without any scientific background. Although anti-tumor effects of Gecko proteins on several cancers were recently reported, their effect on bladder cancer has not been investigated. Thus, we explored the anti-tumor effect of Gecko proteins and its cellular mechanisms in human bladder cancer 5637 cells. Gecko proteins significantly reduced the viability of 5637 cells without any cytotoxic effect on normal cells. These proteins increased the Annexin-V staining and the amount of condensed chromatin, demonstrating that the Gecko proteinsinduced cell death was caused by apoptosis. Gecko proteins suppressed Akt activation, and the overexpression of constitutively active form of myristoylated Akt prevented Gecko proteins-induced death of 5637 cells. Furthermore, Gecko proteins activated caspase 9 and caspase 3/7. Taken together, our data demonstrated that Gecko proteins suppressed the Akt pathway and activated the intrinsic caspase pathway, leading to the apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 531-536].

  15. Assessing Energetic Contributions to Binding from a Disordered Region in a Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    S Cho; C Swaminathan; D Bonsor; M Kerzic; R Guan; J Yang; C Kieke; P Anderson; D Kranz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Many functional proteins are at least partially disordered prior to binding. Although the structural transitions upon binding of disordered protein regions can influence the affinity and specificity of protein complexes, their precise energetic contributions to binding are unknown. Here, we use a model protein-protein interaction system in which a locally disordered region has been modified by directed evolution to quantitatively assess the thermodynamic and structural contributions to binding of disorder-to-order transitions. Through X-ray structure determination of the protein binding partners before and after complex formation and isothermal titration calorimetry of the interactions, we observe a correlation between protein ordering and binding affinity for complexes along this affinity maturation pathway. Additionally, we show that discrepancies between observed and calculated heat capacities based on buried surface area changes in the protein complexes can be explained largely by heat capacity changes that would result solely from folding the locally disordered region. Previously developed algorithms for predicting binding energies of protein-protein interactions, however, are unable to correctly model the energetic contributions of the structural transitions in our model system. While this highlights the shortcomings of current computational methods in modeling conformational flexibility, it suggests that the experimental methods used here could provide training sets of molecular interactions for improving these algorithms and further rationalizing molecular recognition in protein-protein interactions.

  16. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  17. Identification and functional characterization of silicon transporters in soybean using comparative genomics of major intrinsic proteins in Arabidopsis and rice.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Rupesh K; Vivancos, Julien; Guérin, Valérie; Sonah, Humira; Labbé, Caroline; Belzile, François; Bélanger, Richard R

    2013-11-01

    Silicon (Si) confers several benefits to many plant species when absorbed as silicic acid through nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs). The NIPs belong to major intrinsic protein (MIP) family, members of which form channels with high selectivity to control transport of water and different solutes. Here, comparative genomic analysis of the MIPs was performed to investigate the presence of Si transporter MIPs in soybean. Thorough analysis of phylogeny, gene organization, transcriptome profiling and protein modeling was performed to characterize MIPs in rice, Arabidopsis and soybean. Based on several attributes, two putative Si transporter genes, GmNIP2-1 and GmNIP2-2, were identified, characterized and cloned from soybean. Expression of both genes was detected in shoot and root tissues, and decreased as Si increased. The protein encoded by GmNIP2-2 showed functionality for Si transport when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, thus confirming the genetic capability of soybean to absorb the element. Comparative analysis of MIPs in plants provides opportunities to decipher gene evolution, functionality and selectivity of nutrient uptake mechanisms. Exploitation of this strategy has helped to uncover unique features of MIPs in soybean. The identification and functional characterization of Si transporters can be exploited to optimize the benefits that plants can derive from Si absorption. PMID:23771580

  18. Anatomy of protein disorder, flexibility and disease-related mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui-Chun; Chung, Sun Sook; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca

    2015-01-01

    Integration of protein structural information with human genetic variation and pathogenic mutations is essential to understand molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of polymorphisms on protein interactions and cellular processes. We investigate occurrences of non-synonymous SNPs in ordered and disordered protein regions by systematic mapping of common variants and disease-related SNPs onto these regions. We show that common variants accumulate in disordered regions; conversely pathogenic variants are significantly depleted in disordered regions. These different occurrences of pathogenic and common SNPs can be attributed to a negative selection on random mutations in structurally highly constrained regions. New approaches in the study of quantitative effects of pathogenic-related mutations should effectively account for all the possible contexts and relative functional constraints in which the sequence variation occurs. PMID:26322316

  19. Aberrant Intrinsic Connectivity of Hippocampus and Amygdala Overlap in the Fronto-Insular and Dorsomedial-Prefrontal Cortex in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasian, Masoud; Knight, David C.; Manoliu, Andrei; Schwerthöffer, Dirk; Scherr, Martin; Meng, Chun; Shao, Junming; Peters, Henning; Doll, Anselm; Khazaie, Habibolah; Drzezga, Alexander; Bäuml, Josef; Zimmer, Claus; Förstl, Hans; Wohlschläger, Afra M.; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) have consistently observed functional and structural changes of the hippocampus (HP) and amygdale (AY). Thus, these brain regions appear to be critical elements of the pathophysiology of MDD. The HP and AY directly interact and show broad and overlapping intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) to other brain regions. Therefore, we hypothesized the HP and AY would show a corresponding pattern of aberrant intrinsic connectivity in MDD. Resting-state functional MRI was acquired from 21 patients with MDD and 20 healthy controls. ß-Maps of region-of-interest-based FC for bilateral body of the HP and basolateral AY were used as surrogates for iFC of the HP and AY. Analysis of variance was used to compare ß-maps between MDD and healthy control groups, and included covariates for age and gender as well as gray matter volume of the HP and AY. The HP and AY of MDD patient’s showed an overlapping pattern of reduced FC to the dorsomedial-prefrontal cortex and fronto-insular operculum. Both of these regions are known to regulate the interactions among intrinsic networks (i.e., default mode, central executive, and salience networks) that are disrupted in MDD. These results provide the first evidence of overlapping aberrant HP and AY intrinsic connectivity in MDD. Our findings suggest that aberrant HP and AY connectivity may interact with dysfunctional intrinsic network activity in MDD. PMID:24101900

  20. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker’s yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to “ postdict ” the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  1. Distribution of Pico- and Nanosecond Motions in Disordered Proteins from Nuclear Spin Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid N; Charlier, Cyril; Augustyniak, Rafal; Salvi, Nicola; Déjean, Victoire; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Lequin, Olivier; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2015-09-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are ubiquitous in the eukaryotic proteome. The description and understanding of their conformational properties require the development of new experimental, computational, and theoretical approaches. Here, we use nuclear spin relaxation to investigate the distribution of timescales of motions in an IDR from picoseconds to nanoseconds. Nitrogen-15 relaxation rates have been measured at five magnetic fields, ranging from 9.4 to 23.5 T (400-1000 MHz for protons). This exceptional wealth of data allowed us to map the spectral density function for the motions of backbone NH pairs in the partially disordered transcription factor Engrailed at 11 different frequencies. We introduce an approach called interpretation of motions by a projection onto an array of correlation times (IMPACT), which focuses on an array of six correlation times with intervals that are equidistant on a logarithmic scale between 21 ps and 21 ns. The distribution of motions in Engrailed varies smoothly along the protein sequence and is multimodal for most residues, with a prevalence of motions around 1 ns in the IDR. We show that IMPACT often provides better quantitative agreement with experimental data than conventional model-free or extended model-free analyses with two or three correlation times. We introduce a graphical representation that offers a convenient platform for a qualitative discussion of dynamics. Even when relaxation data are only acquired at three magnetic fields that are readily accessible, the IMPACT analysis gives a satisfactory characterization of spectral density functions, thus opening the way to a broad use of this approach. PMID:26331256

  2. Distribution of Pico- and Nanosecond Motions in Disordered Proteins from Nuclear Spin Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid N.; Charlier, Cyril; Augustyniak, Rafal; Salvi, Nicola; Déjean, Victoire; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Lequin, Olivier; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are ubiquitous in the eukaryotic proteome. The description and understanding of their conformational properties require the development of new experimental, computational, and theoretical approaches. Here, we use nuclear spin relaxation to investigate the distribution of timescales of motions in an IDR from picoseconds to nanoseconds. Nitrogen-15 relaxation rates have been measured at five magnetic fields, ranging from 9.4 to 23.5 T (400–1000 MHz for protons). This exceptional wealth of data allowed us to map the spectral density function for the motions of backbone NH pairs in the partially disordered transcription factor Engrailed at 11 different frequencies. We introduce an approach called interpretation of motions by a projection onto an array of correlation times (IMPACT), which focuses on an array of six correlation times with intervals that are equidistant on a logarithmic scale between 21 ps and 21 ns. The distribution of motions in Engrailed varies smoothly along the protein sequence and is multimodal for most residues, with a prevalence of motions around 1 ns in the IDR. We show that IMPACT often provides better quantitative agreement with experimental data than conventional model-free or extended model-free analyses with two or three correlation times. We introduce a graphical representation that offers a convenient platform for a qualitative discussion of dynamics. Even when relaxation data are only acquired at three magnetic fields that are readily accessible, the IMPACT analysis gives a satisfactory characterization of spectral density functions, thus opening the way to a broad use of this approach. PMID:26331256

  3. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Intrinsic Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders: Advanced Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (ASWPD), Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (DSWPD), Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (N24SWD), and Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (ISWRD). An Update for 2015

    PubMed Central

    Auger, R. Robert; Burgess, Helen J.; Emens, Jonathan S.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Sharkey, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analyses (where appropriate) were performed and the GRADE approach was used to update the previous American Academy of Sleep Medicine Practice Parameters on the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. Available data allowed for positive endorsement (at a second-tier degree of confidence) of strategically timed melatonin (for the treatment of DSWPD, blind adults with N24SWD, and children/ adolescents with ISWRD and comorbid neurological disorders), and light therapy with or without accompanying behavioral interventions (adults with ASWPD, children/adolescents with DSWPD, and elderly with dementia). Recommendations against the use of melatonin and discrete sleep-promoting medications are provided for demented elderly patients, at a second- and first-tier degree of confidence, respectively. No recommendations were provided for remaining treatments/ populations, due to either insufficient or absent data. Areas where further research is needed are discussed. Citation: Auger RR, Burgess HJ, Emens JS, Deriy LV, Thomas SM, Sharkey KM. Clinical practice guideline for the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders: advanced sleep-wake phase disorder (ASWPD), delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD), non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder (N24SWD), and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder (ISWRD). An update for 2015. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1199–1236. PMID:26414986

  4. The bacterial tubulin FtsZ requires its intrinsically disordered linker to direct robust cell wall construction

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Kousik; Miguel, Amanda; Desmarais, Samantha M.; Meier, Elizabeth L.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Goley, Erin D.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial GTPase FtsZ forms a cytokinetic ring at midcell, recruits the division machinery, and orchestrates membrane and peptidoglycan cell wall invagination. However, the mechanism for FtsZ regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism is unknown. The FtsZ GTPase domain is separated from its membrane-anchoring C-terminal conserved (CTC) peptide by a disordered C-terminal linker (CTL). Here, we investigate CTL function in Caulobacter crescentus. Strikingly, production of FtsZ lacking the CTL (ΔCTL) is lethal: cells become filamentous, form envelope bulges, and lyse, resembling treatment with β-lactam antibiotics. This phenotype is produced by FtsZ polymers bearing the CTC and a CTL shorter than 14 residues. Peptidoglycan synthesis still occurs downstream of ΔCTL, however cells expressing ΔCTL exhibit reduced peptidoglycan crosslinking and longer glycan strands than wildtype. Importantly, midcell proteins are still recruited to sites of ΔCTL assembly. We propose that FtsZ regulates peptidoglycan metabolism through a CTL-dependent mechanism that extends beyond simple protein recruitment. PMID:26099469

  5. Disorder in Milk Proteins: α-Lactalbumin. Part B. A Multifunctional Whey Protein Acting as an Oligomeric Molten Globular "Oil Container" in the Anti-Tumorigenic Drugs, Liprotides.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N; Permyakov, Serge E; Breydo, Leonid; Redwan, Elrashdy M; Almehdar, Hussein A; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2016-07-15

    This is a second part of the three-part article from a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. We continue to describe α-lactalbumin, a small globular Ca2+-binding protein, which besides being one of the two components of lactose synthase that catalyzes the final step of the lactose biosynthesis in the lactating mammary gland, possesses a multitude of other functions. In fact, recent studies indicated that some partially folded forms of this protein possess noticeable bactericidal activity and other forms might be related to induction of the apoptosis of tumor cells. In its anti-tumorigenic function, oligomeric α-lactalbumin serves as a founding member of a new family of anticancer drugs termed liprotides (for lipids and partially denatured proteins), where an oligomeric molten globular protein acts as an "oil container" or cargo for the delivery of oleic acid to the cell membranes.

  6. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-06-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity.

  7. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-01-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity. Images PMID:6286971

  8. DPROT: prediction of disordered proteins using evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Deepti; Garg, Aarti; Raghava, G P S

    2008-10-01

    The association of structurally disordered proteins with a number of diseases has engendered enormous interest and therefore demands a prediction method that would facilitate their expeditious study at molecular level. The present study describes the development of a computational method for predicting disordered proteins using sequence and profile compositions as input features for the training of SVM models. First, we developed the amino acid and dipeptide compositions based SVM modules which yielded sensitivities of 75.6 and 73.2% along with Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC) values of 0.75 and 0.60, respectively. In addition, the use of predicted secondary structure content (coil, sheet and helices) in the form of composition values attained a sensitivity of 76.8% and MCC value of 0.77. Finally, the training of SVM models using evolutionary information hidden in the multiple sequence alignment profile improved the prediction performance by achieving a sensitivity value of 78% and MCC of 0.78. Furthermore, when evaluated on an independent dataset of partially disordered proteins, the same SVM module provided a correct prediction rate of 86.6%. Based on the above study, a web server ("DPROT") was developed for the prediction of disordered proteins, which is available at http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/dprot/.

  9. Understanding Protein Non-Folding

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the family of intrinsically disordered proteins, members of which fail to form rigid 3-D structures under physiological conditions, either along their entire lengths or only in localized regions. Instead, these intriguing proteins/regions exist as dynamic ensembles within which atom positions and backbone Ramachandran angles exhibit extreme temporal fluctuations without specific equilibrium values. Many of these intrinsically disordered proteins are known to carry out important biological functions which, in fact, depend on the absence of specific 3-D structure. The existence of such proteins does not fit the prevailing structure-function paradigm, which states that unique 3-D structure is a prerequisite to function. Thus, the protein structure-function paradigm has to be expanded to include intrinsically disordered proteins and alternative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and function. This shift in the paradigm represents a major breakthrough for biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, as it opens new levels of understanding with regard to the complex life of proteins. This review will try to answer the following questions: How were intrinsically disordered proteins discovered? Why don't these proteins fold? What is so special about intrinsic disorder? What are the functional advantages of disordered proteins/regions? What is the functional repertoire of these proteins? What are the relationships between intrinsically disordered proteins and human diseases? PMID:20117254

  10. Pathogenic protein seeding in Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Jucker, Mathias; Walker, Lary C

    2011-10-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins is a seminal occurrence in a remarkable variety of neurodegenerative disorders. In Alzheimer disease (the most prevalent cerebral proteopathy), the two principal aggregating proteins are β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau. The abnormal assemblies formed by conformational variants of these proteins range in size from small oligomers to the characteristic lesions that are visible by optical microscopy, such as senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Pathologic similarities with prion disease suggest that the formation and spread of these proteinaceous lesions might involve a common molecular mechanism-corruptive protein templating. Experimentally, cerebral β-amyloidosis can be exogenously induced by exposure to dilute brain extracts containing aggregated Aβ seeds. The amyloid-inducing agent probably is Aβ itself, in a conformation generated most effectively in the living brain. Once initiated, Aβ lesions proliferate within and among brain regions. The induction process is governed by the structural and biochemical nature of the Aβ seed, as well as the attributes of the host, reminiscent of pathogenically variant prion strains. The concept of prionlike induction and spreading of pathogenic proteins recently has been expanded to include aggregates of tau, α-synuclein, huntingtin, superoxide dismutase-1, and TDP-43, which characterize such human neurodegenerative disorders as frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Parkinson/Lewy body disease, Huntington disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Our recent finding that the most effective Aβ seeds are small and soluble intensifies the search in bodily fluids for misfolded protein seeds that are upstream in the proteopathic cascade, and thus could serve as predictive diagnostics and the targets of early, mechanism-based interventions. Establishing the clinical implications of corruptive protein templating will require further mechanistic and epidemiologic investigations

  11. Honing the in silico toolkit for detecting protein disorder.

    PubMed

    Esnouf, Robert M; Hamer, R; Sussman, J L; Silman, I; Trudgian, D; Yang, Z-R; Prilusky, Jaime

    2006-10-01

    Not all proteins form well defined three-dimensional structures in their native states. Some amino-acid sequences appear to strongly favour the disordered state, whereas some can apparently transition between disordered and ordered states under the influence of changes in the biological environment, thereby playing an important role in processes such as signalling. Although important biologically, for the structural biologist disordered regions of proteins can be disastrous even preventing successful structure determination. The accurate prediction of disorder is therefore important, not least for directing the design of expression constructs so as to maximize the chances of successful structure determination. Such design criteria have become integral to the construct-design strategies of laboratories within the Structural Proteomics In Europe (SPINE) consortium. This paper assesses the current state of the art in disorder prediction in terms of prediction reliability and considers how best to use these methods to guide construct design. Finally, it presents a brief discussion as to how methods of prediction might be improved in the future.

  12. Arsenite induces apoptosis in human mesenchymal stem cells by altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by activating intrinsic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Santosh; Shi Yongli; Wang Feng; Wang He

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Environmental exposure to arsenic is an important public health issue. The effects of arsenic on different tissues and organs have been intensively studied. However, the effects of arsenic on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have not been reported. This study is designed to investigate the cell death process caused by arsenite and its related underlying mechanisms on MSCs. The rationale is that absorbed arsenic in the blood circulation can reach to the bone marrow and may affect the cell survival of MSCs. Methods: MSCs of passage 1 were purchased from Tulane University, grown till 70% confluency level and plated according to the experimental requirements followed by treatment with arsenite at various concentrations and time points. Arsenite (iAs{sup III}) induced cytotoxic effects were confirmed by cell viability and cell cycle analysis. For the presence of canonic apoptosis markers; DNA damage, exposure of intramembrane phosphotidylserine, protein and m-RNA expression levels were analyzed. Results: iAs{sup III} induced growth inhibition, G2-M arrest and apoptotic cell death in MSCs, the apoptosis induced by iAs{sup III} in the cultured MSCs was, via altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by involving intrinsic pathway. Conclusion: iAs{sup III} can induce apoptosis in bone marrow-derived MSCs via Bcl-2 family proteins, regulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Due to the multipotency of MSC, acting as progenitor cells for a variety of connective tissues including bone, adipose, cartilage and muscle, these effects of arsenic may be important in assessing the health risk of the arsenic compounds and understanding the mechanisms of arsenic-induced harmful effects.

  13. Structural disorder in proteins of the rhabdoviridae replication complex.

    PubMed

    Leyrat, Cédric; Gérard, Francine C A; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Ivanov, Ivan; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Jamin, Marc

    2010-08-01

    Rhabdoviridae are single stranded negative sense RNA viruses. The viral RNA condensed by the nucleoprotein (N), the phosphoprotein (P) and the large subunit (L) of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase are the viral components of the transcription/replication machineries. Both P and N contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) that play different roles in the virus life cycle. Here, we describe the modular organization of P based on recent structural, biophysical and bioinformatics data. We show how flexible loops in N participate in the attachment of P to the N-RNA template by an induced-fit mechanism. Finally, we discuss the roles of IDRs in the mechanism of replication/transcription, and propose a new model for the interaction of the L subunit with its N-RNA template.

  14. Multiple oxygen entry pathways in globin proteins revealed by intrinsic pathway identification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Masayoshi; Kurisaki, Ikuo; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2015-12-01

    Each subunit of human hemoglobin (HbA) stores an oxygen molecule (O2) in the binding site (BS) cavity near the heme group. The BS is buried in the interior of the subunit so that there is a debate over the O2 entry pathways from solvent to the BS; histidine gate or multiple pathways. To elucidate the O2 entry pathways, we executed ensemble molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of T-state tetramer HbA in high concentration O2 solvent to simulate spontaneous O2 entry from solvent into the BS. By analyzing 128 independent 8 ns MD trajectories by intrinsic pathway identification by clustering (IPIC) method, we found 141 and 425 O2 entry events into the BS of the α and β subunits, respectively. In both subunits, we found that multiple O2 entry pathways through inside cavities play a significant role for O2 entry process of HbA. The rate constants of O2 entry estimated from the MD trajectories correspond to the experimentally observed values. In addition, by analyzing monomer myoglobin, we verified that the high O2 concentration condition can reproduce the ratios of each multiple pathway in the one-tenth lower O2 concentration condition. These indicate the validity of the multiple pathways obtained in our MD simulations.

  15. ALS-Causing Mutations Significantly Perturb the Self-Assembly and Interaction with Nucleic Acid of the Intrinsically Disordered Prion-Like Domain of TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Liangzhong; Wei, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yimei; Song, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    TAR-DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) C-terminus encodes a prion-like domain widely presented in RNA-binding proteins, which functions to form dynamic oligomers and also, amazingly, hosts most amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-causing mutations. Here, as facilitated by our previous discovery, by circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have successfully determined conformations, dynamics, and self-associations of the full-length prion-like domains of the wild type and three ALS-causing mutants (A315E, Q331K, and M337V) in both aqueous solutions and membrane environments. The study decodes the following: (1) The TDP-43 prion-like domain is intrinsically disordered only with some nascent secondary structures in aqueous solutions, but owns the capacity to assemble into dynamic oligomers rich in β-sheet structures. By contrast, despite having highly similar conformations, three mutants gained the ability to form amyloid oligomers. The wild type and three mutants all formed amyloid fibrils after incubation as imaged by electron microscopy. (2) The interaction with nucleic acid enhances the self-assembly for the wild type but triggers quick aggregation for three mutants. (3) A membrane-interacting subdomain has been identified over residues Met311-Gln343 indispensable for TDP-43 neurotoxicity, which transforms into a well-folded Ω-loop-helix structure in membrane environments. Furthermore, despite having very similar membrane-embedded conformations, three mutants will undergo further self-association in the membrane environment. Our study implies that the TDP-43 prion-like domain appears to have an energy landscape, which allows the assembly of the wild-type sequence into dynamic oligomers only under very limited condition sets, and ALS-causing point mutations are sufficient to remodel it to more favor the amyloid formation or irreversible aggregation, thus supporting the emerging view that the pathologic aggregation

  16. Age-related changes in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles: analysis of muscle fibers, muscle fiber proteins, and subneural apparatuses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Taguchi, Aki; Motoyoshi, Kazumi; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Desaki, Junzo

    2013-03-01

    We compared age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of aged and young adult rats by determining the number and diameter of muscle fibers, contractile muscle protein (myosin heavy chain isoforms, MHC) composition, and the morphology of the subneural apparatuses. In aged rats, both the numbers and the diameters of muscle fibers decreased in the cricothyroid (CT) muscle. The number of fibers, but not diameter, decreased in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. In the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle, neither the number nor the diameter of fibers changed significantly. Aging was associated with a decrease in type IIB and an increase in type IIA MHC isoform levels in CT muscle, but no such changes were observed in the TA or PCA muscles. Morphological examination of primary synaptic clefts of the subneural apparatus revealed that aging resulted in decreased labyrinthine and increased depression types in only the CT muscle. In the aged group, morphologically immature subneural apparatuses were found infrequently in the CT muscle, indicating continued tissue remodeling. We suggest, therefore, that age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles primarily involve the CT muscle, whereas the structures of the TA and PCA muscles may better resist aging processes and therefore are less vulnerable to functional impairment. This may reflect differences in their roles; the CT muscle controls the tone of the vocal folds, while the TA and PCA muscles play an essential role in vital activities such as respiration and swallowing.

  17. Probing Structural Transitions in the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminal Domain of the Measles Virus Nucleoprotein by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Cyanylated Cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Bischak, Connor G.; Longhi, Sonia; Snead, David M.; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Terrer, Elodie; Londergan, Casey H.

    2010-01-01

    Four single-cysteine variants of the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (NTAIL) were cyanylated at cysteine and their infrared spectra in the C≡N stretching region were recorded both in the absence and in the presence of one of the physiological partners of NTAIL, namely the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein. Consistent with previous studies showing that XD triggers a disorder-to-order transition within NTAIL, the C≡N stretching bands of the infrared probe were found to be significantly affected by XD, with this effect being position-dependent. When the cyanylated cysteine side chain is solvent-exposed throughout the structural transition, its changing linewidth reflects a local gain of structure. When the probe becomes partially buried due to binding, its frequency reports on the mean hydrophobicity of the microenvironment surrounding the labeled side chain of the bound form. The probe moiety is small compared to other common covalently attached spectroscopic probes, thereby minimizing possible steric hindrance/perturbation at the binding interface. These results show for the first time to our knowledge the suitability of site-specific cysteine mutagenesis followed by cyanylation and infrared spectroscopy to document structural transitions occurring within intrinsically disordered regions, with regions involved in binding and folding being identifiable at the residue level. PMID:20816082

  18. Effects of protein molecular weight on the intrinsic material properties and release kinetics of wet spun polymeric microfiber delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Lavin, Danya M; Zhang, Linda; Furtado, Stacia; Hopkins, Richard A; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Wet spun microfibers have great potential for the design of multifunctional controlled release scaffolds. Understanding aspects of drug delivery and mechanical strength, specific to protein molecular weight, may aid in the optimization and development of wet spun fiber platforms. This study investigated the intrinsic material properties and release kinetics of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) wet spun microfibers encapsulating proteins with varying molecular weights. A cryogenic emulsion technique developed in our laboratory was used to encapsulate insulin (5.8 kDa), lysozyme (14.3 kDa) and bovine serum albumin (BSA, 66.0 kDa) within wet spun microfibers (~100 μm). Protein loading was found to significantly influence mechanical strength and drug release kinetics of PLGA and PLLA microfibers in a molecular-weight-dependent manner. BSA encapsulation resulted in the most significant decrease in strength and ductility for both PLGA and PLLA microfibers. Interestingly, BSA-loaded PLGA microfibers had a twofold increase (8±2 MPa to 16±1 MPa) in tensile strength and a fourfold increase (3±1% to 12±6%) in elongation until failure in comparison to PLLA microfibers. PLGA and PLLA microfibers exhibited prolonged protein release up to 63 days in vitro. Further analysis with the Korsmeyer-Peppas kinetic model determined that the mechanism of protein release was dependent on Fickian diffusion. These results emphasize the critical role protein molecular weight has on the properties of wet spun filaments, highlighting the importance of designing small molecular analogues to replace growth factors with large molecular weights.

  19. Cell Intrinsic and Extrinsic Activators of the Unfolded Protein Response in Cancer: Mechanisms and Targets for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tameire, Feven; Verginadis, Ioannis I.; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    A variety of cell intrinsic or extrinsic stresses evoke perturbations in the folding environment of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), collectively known as ER stress. Adaptation to stress and reestablishment of ER homeostasis is achieved by activation of an integrated signal transduction pathway called the unfolded protein response (UPR). Both ER stress and UPR activation have been implicated in a variety of human cancers. Although at early stages, or physiological conditions of ER stress, the UPR generally promotes survival, when the stress becomes more stringent or prolonged, its role can switch to a pro-cell death one. Here, we discuss historical and recent evidence supporting an involvement of the UPR in malignancy, describe the main mechanisms by which how tumor cells overcome ER stress to promote their survival, tumor progression and metastasis and discuss the current state of efforts to develop therapeutic approaches of targeting the UPR. PMID:25920797

  20. Intrinsically disordered proteins and prostate cancer: pouring new wine in an old bottle

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    An inconvenient truth in urology is that despite decades of intense research, prostate cancer (PCa) has remained one of the most prevalent cancers and leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men, particularly in the industrialized world.1 It is rather sobering to acknowledge that even with early diagnosis and treatment, the incidence and death due to the disease are almost paradoxically projected to increase in the coming decades.2 PMID:27427556

  1. Members of rice plasma membrane intrinsic proteins subfamily are involved in arsenite permeability and tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Mcdermott, Joseph; Liu, Zijuan; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2012-12-01

    Rice accumulates high level of arsenic (As) in its edible parts and thus plays an important role in the transfer of As into the food chain. However, the mechanisms of As uptake and its detoxification in rice are not well understood. Recently, members of the Nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily of plant aquaporins were shown to transport arsenite in rice and Arabidopsis. Here we report that members of the rice plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are also involved in As tolerance and transport. Based on the homology search with the mammalian AQP9 and yeast Fps1 arsenite transporters, we identified and cloned five rice PIP gene subfamily members. qRT-PCR analysis of PIPs in rice root and shoot tissues revealed a significant down regulation of transcripts encoding OsPIP1;2, OsPIP1;3, OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in response to arsenite treatment. Heterologous expression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increased the uptake of arsenite. Overexpression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Arabidopsis yielded enhanced arsenite tolerance and higher biomass accumulation. Further, these transgenic plants showed no significant accumulation of As in shoot and root tissues in long term uptake assays. Whereas, short duration exposure to arsenite caused both active influx and efflux of As in the roots. The data suggests a bidirectional arsenite permeability of rice PIPs in plants. These rice PIPs genes will be highly useful for engineering important food and biofuel crops for enhanced crop productivity on contaminated soils without increasing the accumulation of toxic As in the biomass or edible tissues. PMID:22350764

  2. Members of rice plasma membrane intrinsic proteins subfamily are involved in arsenite permeability and tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Mcdermott, Joseph; Liu, Zijuan; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2012-12-01

    Rice accumulates high level of arsenic (As) in its edible parts and thus plays an important role in the transfer of As into the food chain. However, the mechanisms of As uptake and its detoxification in rice are not well understood. Recently, members of the Nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily of plant aquaporins were shown to transport arsenite in rice and Arabidopsis. Here we report that members of the rice plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are also involved in As tolerance and transport. Based on the homology search with the mammalian AQP9 and yeast Fps1 arsenite transporters, we identified and cloned five rice PIP gene subfamily members. qRT-PCR analysis of PIPs in rice root and shoot tissues revealed a significant down regulation of transcripts encoding OsPIP1;2, OsPIP1;3, OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in response to arsenite treatment. Heterologous expression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increased the uptake of arsenite. Overexpression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Arabidopsis yielded enhanced arsenite tolerance and higher biomass accumulation. Further, these transgenic plants showed no significant accumulation of As in shoot and root tissues in long term uptake assays. Whereas, short duration exposure to arsenite caused both active influx and efflux of As in the roots. The data suggests a bidirectional arsenite permeability of rice PIPs in plants. These rice PIPs genes will be highly useful for engineering important food and biofuel crops for enhanced crop productivity on contaminated soils without increasing the accumulation of toxic As in the biomass or edible tissues.

  3. RNAi-mediated downregulation of poplar plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) changes plasma membrane proteome composition and affects leaf physiology.

    PubMed

    Bi, Zhen; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Uehlein, Norbert; Zimmer, Ina; Mühlhans, Stefanie; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Palme, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Block, Katja

    2015-10-14

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are one subfamily of aquaporins that mediate the transmembrane transport of water. To reveal their function in poplar, we generated transgenic poplar plants in which the translation of PIP genes was downregulated by RNA interference investigated these plants with a comprehensive leaf plasma membrane proteome and physiome analysis. First, inhibition of PIP synthesis strongly altered the leaf plasma membrane protein composition. Strikingly, several signaling components and transporters involved in the regulation of stomatal movement were differentially regulated in transgenic poplars. Furthermore, hormonal crosstalk related to abscisic acid, auxin and brassinosteroids was altered, in addition to cell wall biosynthesis/cutinization, the organization of cellular structures and membrane trafficking. A physiological analysis confirmed the proteomic results. The leaves had wider opened stomata and higher net CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates as well as greater mesophyll conductance for CO2 (gm) and leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). Based on these results, we conclude that PIP proteins not only play essential roles in whole leaf water and CO2 flux but have important roles in the regulation of stomatal movement. PMID:26248320

  4. A Novel Soybean Intrinsic Protein Gene, GmTIP2;3, Involved in Responding to Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dayong; Tong, Jinfeng; He, Xiaolan; Xu, Zhaolong; Xu, Ling; Wei, Peipei; Huang, Yihong; Brestic, Marian; Ma, Hongxiang; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Water is essential for plant growth and development. Water deficiency leads to loss of yield and decreased crop quality. To understand water transport mechanisms in plants, we cloned and characterized a novel tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) gene from soybean with the highest similarity to TIP2-type from other plants, and thus designated GmTIP2;3. The protein sequence contains two conserved NPA motifs and six transmembrane domains. The expression analysis indicated that this gene was constitutively expressed in all detected tissues, with higher levels in the root, stem and pod, and the accumulation of GmTIP2;3 transcript showed a significant response to osmotic stresses, including 20% PEG6000 (polyethylene glycol) and 100 μM ABA (abscisic acid) treatments. The promoter-GUS (glucuronidase) activity analysis suggested that GmTIP2;3 was also expressed in the root, stem, and leaf, and preferentially expressed in the stele of root and stem, and the core promoter region was 1000 bp in length, located upstream of the ATG start codon. The GUS tissue and induced expression observations were consistent with the findings in soybean. In addition, subcellular localization showed that GmTIP2;3 was a plasma membrane-localized protein. Yeast heterologous expression revealed that GmTIP2;3 could improve tolerance to osmotic stress in yeast cells. Integrating these results, GmTIP2;3 might play an important role in response to osmotic stress in plants. PMID:26779248

  5. A Novel Soybean Intrinsic Protein Gene, GmTIP2;3, Involved in Responding to Osmotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayong; Tong, Jinfeng; He, Xiaolan; Xu, Zhaolong; Xu, Ling; Wei, Peipei; Huang, Yihong; Brestic, Marian; Ma, Hongxiang; Shao, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Water is essential for plant growth and development. Water deficiency leads to loss of yield and decreased crop quality. To understand water transport mechanisms in plants, we cloned and characterized a novel tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) gene from soybean with the highest similarity to TIP2-type from other plants, and thus designated GmTIP2;3. The protein sequence contains two conserved NPA motifs and six transmembrane domains. The expression analysis indicated that this gene was constitutively expressed in all detected tissues, with higher levels in the root, stem and pod, and the accumulation of GmTIP2;3 transcript showed a significant response to osmotic stresses, including 20% PEG6000 (polyethylene glycol) and 100 μM ABA (abscisic acid) treatments. The promoter-GUS (glucuronidase) activity analysis suggested that GmTIP2;3 was also expressed in the root, stem, and leaf, and preferentially expressed in the stele of root and stem, and the core promoter region was 1000 bp in length, located upstream of the ATG start codon. The GUS tissue and induced expression observations were consistent with the findings in soybean. In addition, subcellular localization showed that GmTIP2;3 was a plasma membrane-localized protein. Yeast heterologous expression revealed that GmTIP2;3 could improve tolerance to osmotic stress in yeast cells. Integrating these results, GmTIP2;3 might play an important role in response to osmotic stress in plants. PMID:26779248

  6. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2009-09-01

    An analysis of the rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is presented. In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallographic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate.

  7. Intrinsic relative activities of κ opioid agonists in activating Gα proteins and internalizing receptor: Differences between human and mouse receptors.

    PubMed

    DiMattio, Kelly M; Ehlert, Frederick J; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-08-15

    Several investigators recently identified biased κ opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi-G) and receptor internalization (RAi-I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi-G - logRAi-I, RAi-G/RAi-I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1-17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed.

  8. Intrinsic Relative Activities of Opioid Agonists in Activating Gα proteins and Internalizing Receptor: Differences between Human and Mouse Receptors

    PubMed Central

    DiMattio, Kelly M.; Ehlert, Frederick J.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators recently identified biased opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi−G) and receptor internalization (RAi−I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi−G − Log RAi−I, RAi−G/RAi−I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1–17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed. PMID:26057692

  9. First-principles evaluation of intrinsic, side-jump, and skew-scattering parts of anomalous Hall conductivities in disordered alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, K.; Sakuma, A.; Kota, Y.

    2016-09-01

    We develop a first-principles procedure for the individual evaluation of the intrinsic, side-jump, and skew-scattering contributions to the anomalous Hall conductivity σx y. This method is based on the different microscopic conductive processes of each origin of σx y in the Kubo-Bastin formula. We also present an approach for implementing this scheme in the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method with the coherent potential approximation (CPA). The validity of this calculation method is demonstrated for disordered FePt and FePd alloys. We find that the estimated value of each origin of σx y exhibits reasonable dependencies on the electron scattering in these disordered alloys.

  10. Myosin-binding protein C corrects an intrinsic inhomogeneity in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling

    PubMed Central

    Previs, Michael J.; Prosser, Benjamin L.; Mun, Ji Young; Previs, Samantha Beck; Gulick, James; Lee, Kyounghwan; Robbins, Jeffrey; Craig, Roger; Lederer, W. J.; Warshaw, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The beating heart exhibits remarkable contractile fidelity over a lifetime, which reflects the tight coupling of electrical, chemical, and mechanical elements within the sarcomere, the elementary contractile unit. On a beat-to-beat basis, calcium is released from the ends of the sarcomere and must diffuse toward the sarcomere center to fully activate the myosin- and actin-based contractile proteins. The resultant spatial and temporal gradient in free calcium across the sarcomere should lead to nonuniform and inefficient activation of contraction. We show that myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C), through its positioning on the myosin thick filaments, corrects this nonuniformity in calcium activation by exquisitely sensitizing the contractile apparatus to calcium in a manner that precisely counterbalances the calcium gradient. Thus, the presence and correct localization of MyBP-C within the sarcomere is critically important for normal cardiac function, and any disturbance of MyBP-C localization or function will contribute to the consequent cardiac pathologies. PMID:25839057

  11. Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) in plants: a complex gene family with major impacts on plant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Kerrie L; Bhave, Mrinal

    2007-10-01

    The ubiquitous cell membrane proteins called aquaporins are now firmly established as channel proteins that control the specific transport of water molecules across cell membranes in all living organisms. The aquaporins are thus likely to be of fundamental significance to all facets of plant growth and development affected by plant-water relations. A majority of plant aquaporins have been found to share essential structural features with the human aquaporin and exhibit water-transporting ability in various functional assays, and some have been shown experimentally to be of critical importance to plant survival. Furthermore, substantial evidence is now available from a number of plant species that shows differential gene expression of aquaporins in response to abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, or cold and clearly establishes the aquaporins as major players in the response of plants to conditions that affect water availability. This review summarizes the function and regulation of these genes to develop a greater understanding of the response of plants to water insufficiency, and particularly, to identify tolerant genotypes of major crop species including wheat and rice and plants that are important in agroforestry.

  12. Intrinsic versus imposed curvature in cyclical oligomers: the portal protein of bacteriophage SPP1.

    PubMed Central

    van Heel, M; Orlova, E V; Dube, P; Tavares, P

    1996-01-01

    Large cyclical oligomers may be formed by (curvi-) linear polymerization of monomers until the n(th) monomer locks in with the first member of the chain. The subunits in incomplete structures exhibit a natural curvature with respect to each other which can be perturbed when the oligomer closes cyclically. Using cryo-electron microscopy and multivariate statistical image processing we report herein a direct structural observation of this effect. A sub-population (approximately 15%) of incomplete oligomers was found within a sample of SPP1 bacteriophage portal proteins embedded in vitreous ice. Whereas the curvature between adjacent subunits of the closed circular 13-fold symmetric oligomer is 27.7 degrees, in these incomplete oligomers the angle is only 25.8 degrees, a value which almost allows for a 14-subunit cyclical arrangement. A simple model for the association of large cyclical oligomers is suggested by our data. Images PMID:8890151

  13. Targeting protein kinases in central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chico, Laura K.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Watterson, D. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases are a growing drug target class in disorders in peripheral tissues, but the development of kinase-targeted therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases remains a challenge, largely owing to issues associated specifically with CNS drug discovery. However, several candidate therapeutics that target CNS protein kinases are now in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. We review candidate compounds and discuss selected CNS protein kinases that are emerging as important therapeutic targets. In addition, we analyse trends in small-molecule properties that correlate with key challenges in CNS drug discovery, such as blood–brain barrier penetrance and cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism, and discuss the potential of future approaches that will integrate molecular-fragment expansion with pharmacoinformatics to address these challenges. PMID:19876042

  14. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site.

  15. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. PMID:27002154

  16. A Group 6 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Common Bean Is a Disordered Protein with Extended Helical Structure and Oligomer-forming Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y.; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O.; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M.; Reyes, José L.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  17. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  18. A novel mutation in the major intrinsic protein (MIP) associated with autosomal dominant congenital cataracts in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Jiang, Jin; Zhu, Yanan; Li, Jinyu; Jin, Chongfei; Shentu, Xingchao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To detect the underlying genetic defect in a Chinese family affected with bilateral congenital cataracts. Methods A detailed family history and clinical data were recorded. Mutation screening was performed in the nuclear cataract-related gene by bidirectional sequencing of the amplified products. The mutation was verified by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). Results Two cataract phenotypes were observed within this family: one eye exhibited Y-suture and nuclear pulverulent opacification of the lens, while the others exhibited complete opacification in the fetal nuclear region. Sequencing of the candidate genes detected a heterozygous c.319G>A change in the coding region of the major intrinsic protein (MIP), resulting in the substitution of a highly conserved Valine by Isoleucine (p.V107I).The mutation was confirmed by DHPLC. Conclusions This study has identified a novel MIP mutation, p.V107I in a Chinese family with congenital cataracts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cataracts caused by a mutation in the second extracellular loop domain of MIP. PMID:20361015

  19. Synaptic proteins and receptors defects in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianling; Yu, Shunying; Fu, Yingmei; Li, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have found that hundreds of genetic variants, including common and rare variants, rare and de novo mutations, and common polymorphisms contribute to the occurrence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The mutations in a number of genes such as neurexin, neuroligin, postsynaptic density protein 95, SH3, and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (SHANK3), synapsin, gephyrin, cadherin, and protocadherin, thousand-and-one-amino acid 2 kinase, and contactin, have been shown to play important roles in the development and function of synapses. In addition, synaptic receptors, such as gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors and glutamate receptors, have also been associated with ASDs. This review will primarily focus on the defects of synaptic proteins and receptors associated with ASDs and their roles in the pathogenesis of ASDs via synaptic pathways. PMID:25309321

  20. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations (13C–13C, 15N–13C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 13C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited “hand-picked” data sets, we show that ~94 % of the 13C NMR data and almost all 15N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6 % of the 13C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. −2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided command

  1. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  2. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  3. Ribosomal protein gene mapping and human chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmochi, N.; Goodman, N.; Page, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    In Drosophila, the Minute phenotype (reduced body size, diminished viability and fertility, and short, thin bristles) results from heterozygous deficiencies (deletions) at any one of 50 loci scattered about the genome. A handful of these Minute loci have been molecularly characterized, and all have been found to encode ribosomal proteins. Thus, the Minute phenotype appears to result from reduced protein synthetic capacity in flies with one rather than two copies of a given ribosomal protein (rp) gene. We are pursuing the possibility that similar reductions in protein synthetic capacity--again resulting from rp gene deficiencies--might underlie phenotypes associated with certain chromosomal disorders in humans. We and our colleagues have reported findings consistent with a role for RPS4 deficiency in the etiology of certain features of Turner syndrome, a complex human disorder classically associated with an XO karyotype. We are intrigued by the possibility that deficiencies of other human rp genes might cause phenotypic abnormalities similar to those seen in Turner syndrome--just as deficiencies of any of a number of Drosophila rp genes cause the Minute phenotype. We must first learn the chromosomal map position of each of the estimated 83 human rp genes. The task of mapping the functional (intron-containing) rp genes is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes elsewhere in the genome. To date, we have assigned (or confirmed the previous assignment of) 38 rp genes to individual human chromosomes by PCR analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids containing subsets of human chromosomes, with all but four chromosomes carrying at least one rp gene. We have also identified more than 100 large-insert human YAC (yeast artificial chromosome) clones that contain individual rp genes. Such screening of YAC libraries will result in precise positioning of the rp genes on the emerging physical map of the human genome.

  4. Dataset for the NMR structure of the intrinsically disordered acidic region of XPC bound to the PH domain of TFIIH p62

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Masahiko; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The global genome nucleotide excision repair factor XPC firstly detects DNA lesions and then recruits a ten-subunit complex TFIIH through binding to the subunit p62 to unwind the damaged DNA for excision repair. This data article contains detailed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) restraints (nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE)-derived distance restraints, dihedral angle restraints, and hydrogen bond restraints) used for the structure determination of the complex formed between the intrinsically disordered acidic region of XPC and the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of TFIIH p62, related to the recent work entitled “Structural insight into the mechanism of TFIIH recognition by the acidic string of the nucleotide excision repair factor XPC.” [1]. PMID:26909369

  5. Intrinsic Motivation as a Mediator of Relationships Between Symptoms and Functioning Among Individuals With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders in a Diverse Urban Community

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Ann-Marie; Lee, Karen K.; Dinh, Tam Q.; Barrio, Concepción; Brekke, John S.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated intrinsic motivation as a mediator of the relationship between clinical symptoms and functioning. The mediation model was tested with a sample of 166 adults with schizophrenia spectrum disorders attending psychosocial rehabilitation programs in a diverse urban community. Ethnic minority status was examined as a moderator of the mediation model. Motivation was measured using items reflecting intrapsychic drive. Symptoms were assessed with the expanded Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and functioning with the Role Functioning Scale. Motivation was a significant mediator of the relationship between functioning and all symptom scores; fully mediating the relationship between functioning and negative, disorganized, and global symptoms, and partially mediating the relationship between positive symptoms and functioning. Motivation scores between ethnic minority and nonminority individuals differed significantly (p < 0.05), but no moderation effect was indicated. The strong mediation effect schizophrenia of motivation on the symptoms-functioning relationship supports future work to translate findings into effective recovery-oriented services. PMID:20061866

  6. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Intrinsic Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders: Advanced Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (ASWPD), Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (DSWPD), Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (N24SWD), and Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (ISWRD). An Update for 2015: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Auger, R Robert; Burgess, Helen J; Emens, Jonathan S; Deriy, Ludmila V; Thomas, Sherene M; Sharkey, Katherine M

    2015-10-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analyses (where appropriate) were performed and the GRADE approach was used to update the previous American Academy of Sleep Medicine Practice Parameters on the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. Available data allowed for positive endorsement (at a second-tier degree of confidence) of strategically timed melatonin (for the treatment of DSWPD, blind adults with N24SWD, and children/ adolescents with ISWRD and comorbid neurological disorders), and light therapy with or without accompanying behavioral interventions (adults with ASWPD, children/adolescents with DSWPD, and elderly with dementia). Recommendations against the use of melatonin and discrete sleep-promoting medications are provided for demented elderly patients, at a second- and first-tier degree of confidence, respectively. No recommendations were provided for remaining treatments/ populations, due to either insufficient or absent data. Areas where further research is needed are discussed.

  7. A novel donor splice-site mutation of major intrinsic protein gene associated with congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lu; Liu, Wenqiang; Feng, Wenguo; Wang, Xing; Dang, Hui; Gao, Luna; Yao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the disease-causing gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. Methods Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on all members of a Chinese family with congenital cataract. Nine genes associated with congenital cataract were screened using direct DNA sequencing. Mutations were confirmed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The mutated major intrinsic protein (MIP) minigene, which carries the disease-causing splice-site mutation, and the wild-type (WT) MIP minigene were constructed using the pcDNA3.1 expression vector. Wild-type and mutant MIP minigene constructs were transiently transfected into HeLa cells. After 48 h of incubation at 37 °C, total RNA isolation and reverse transcription (RT)–PCR analysis were performed, and PCR products were separated and confirmed with sequencing. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel splice-site mutation in intron 3 (c.606+1 G>A) of the MIP gene. To investigate the manner in which the splice donor mutation could affect mRNA splicing, WT and mutant MIP minigenes were inserted in the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. Constructs were transfected into HeLa cells. RT–PCR analysis showed that the donor splice site mutation led to deletion of exon 3 in the mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. Conclusions The present study identified a novel donor splice-site mutation (c.606+1G>A) in the MIP gene in a Chinese family with congenital cataract. In vitro RT–PCR analysis showed that this splice-site mutation resulted in the deletion of exon 3 from mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. This is the first report to show that donor splice-site mutation in MIP gene can cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. PMID:24319327

  8. Dynamics of the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the nipah virus nucleoprotein and interaction with the x domain of the phosphoprotein as unveiled by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baronti, Lorenzo; Erales, Jenny; Habchi, Johnny; Felli, Isabella C; Pierattelli, Roberta; Longhi, Sonia

    2015-01-19

    We provide an atomic-resolution description based on NMR spectroscopy, of the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the Nipah virus nucleoprotein (NTAIL ), both in its isolated state and within the nucleocapsid (NC). Within the NC the second half of NTAIL retains conformational behavior similar to that of isolated NTAIL , whereas the first half of NTAIL becomes much more rigid. In spite of the mostly disordered nature of NTAIL , chemical shifts and relaxation measurements show a significant degree of α-helical sampling in the molecular recognition element (MoRE) involved in binding to the X domain (XD) of the phosphoprotein, with this preconfiguration being more pronounced than in the NTAIL domain from the cognate Hendra virus. Outside the MoRE, an additional region exhibiting reduced flexibility was identified within NTAIL and found to be involved in binding to the XD. (1) H- and (13) C-detected titration NMR experiments support a highly dynamic binding of NTAIL at the surface of the XD.

  9. An Updated Test of AMBER Force Fields and Implicit Solvent Models in Predicting the Secondary Structure of Helical, β-Hairpin, and Intrinsically Disordered Peptides.

    PubMed

    Maffucci, Irene; Contini, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations were performed to test the ability of six AMBER force fields and three implicit solvent models of predicting the native conformation of two helical peptides, three β-hairpins, and three intrinsically disordered peptides. Although a combination of the force field and implicit solvation models able to accurately predict the native structure of all the considered peptides was not identified, we found that the GB-Neck2 model seems to well compensate for some of the conformational biases showed by ff96 and ff99SB/ildn/ildn-φ. Indeed, the force fields of the ff99SB series coupled with GB-Neck2 reasonably discriminated helices from disordered peptides, while a good prediction of β-hairpin conformations was only achieved by performing two independent simulations: one with the ff96/GB-Neck2 combination and the other with GB-Neck2 coupled with any of the ff99SB/ildn/ildn-φ force fields.

  10. Synergy of aromatic residues and phosphoserines within the intrinsically disordered DNA-binding inhibitory elements of the Ets-1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Geneviève; Meeker, Charles A; Bhachech, Niraja; Currie, Simon L; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2014-07-29

    The E26 transformation-specific (Ets-1) transcription factor is autoinhibited by a conformationally disordered serine-rich region (SRR) that transiently interacts with its DNA-binding ETS domain. In response to calcium signaling, autoinhibition is reinforced by calmodulin-dependent kinase II phosphorylation of serines within the SRR. Using mutagenesis and quantitative DNA-binding measurements, we demonstrate that phosphorylation-enhanced autoinhibition requires the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine (ϕ) residues adjacent to the SRR phosphoacceptor serines. The introduction of additional phosphorylated Ser-ϕ-Asp, but not Ser-Ala-Asp, repeats within the SRR dramatically reinforces autoinhibition. NMR spectroscopic studies of phosphorylated and mutated SRR variants, both within their native context and as separate trans-acting peptides, confirmed that the aromatic residues and phosphoserines contribute to the formation of a dynamic complex with the ETS domain. Complementary NMR studies also identified the SRR-interacting surface of the ETS domain, which encompasses its positively charged DNA-recognition interface and an adjacent region of neutral polar and nonpolar residues. Collectively, these studies highlight the role of aromatic residues and their synergy with phosphoserines in an intrinsically disordered regulatory sequence that integrates cellular signaling and gene expression.

  11. DBC1/CCAR2 and CCAR1 Are Largely Disordered Proteins that Have Evolved from One Common Ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jia; Westerheide, Sandy D.; Xue, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1, CCAR2, KIAA1967) is a large, predominantly nuclear, multidomain protein that modulates gene expression by inhibiting several epigenetic modifiers, including the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3, and the methyltransferase SUV39H1. DBC1 shares many highly conserved protein domains with its paralog cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1, CARP-1). In this study, we examined the full-length sequential and structural properties of DBC1 and CCAR1 from multiple species and correlated these properties with evolution. Our data shows that the conserved domains shared between DBC1 and CCAR1 have similar domain structures, as well as similar patterns of predicted disorder in less-conserved intrinsically disordered regions. Our analysis indicates similarities between DBC1, CCAR1, and the nematode protein lateral signaling target 3 (LST-3), suggesting that DBC1 and CCAR1 may have evolved from LST-3. Our data also suggests that DBC1 emerged later in evolution than CCAR1. DBC1 contains regions that show less conservation across species as compared to the same regions in CCAR1, suggesting a continuously evolving scenario for DBC1. Overall, this study provides insight into the structure and evolution of DBC1 and CCAR1, which may impact future studies on the biological functions of these proteins. PMID:25610865

  12. Abscisic acid prevents the coalescence of protein storage vacuoles by upregulating expression of a tonoplast intrinsic protein gene in barley aleurone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-eun; Yim, Hui-kyung; Lim, Mi-na; Yoon, In sun; Kim, Jeong hoe; Hwang, Yong-sic

    2015-01-01

    Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) are integral membrane proteins that are known to function in plants as aquaporins. Here, we propose another role for TIPs during the fusion of protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) in aleurone cells, a process that is promoted by gibberellic acid (GA) and prevented by abscisic acid (ABA). Studies of the expression of barley (Hordeum vulgare) TIP genes (HvTIP) showed that GA specifically decreased the abundance of HvTIP1;2 and HvTIP3;1 transcripts, while ABA strongly increased expression of HvTIP3;1. Increased or decreased expression of HvTIP3;1 interfered with the hormonal effects on vacuolation in aleurone protoplasts. HvTIP3;1 gain-of-function experiments delayed GA-induced vacuolation, whereas HvTIP3;1 loss-of-function experiments promoted vacuolation in ABA-treated aleurone cells. These results indicate that TIP plays a key role in preventing the coalescence of small PSVs in aleurone cells. Hormonal regulation of the HvTIP3;1 promoter is similar to the regulation of the endogenous gene, indicating that induction of the transcription of HvTIP3;1 by ABA is a critical factor in the prevention of PSV coalescence in response to ABA. Promoter analysis using deletions and site-directed mutagenesis of sequences identified three cis-acting elements that are responsible for ABA responsiveness in the HvTIP3;1 promoter. Promoter analysis also showed that ABA responsiveness of the HvTIP3;1 promoter is likely to occur via a unique regulatory system distinct from that involving the ABA-response promoter complexes. PMID:25477530

  13. Abscisic acid prevents the coalescence of protein storage vacuoles by upregulating expression of a tonoplast intrinsic protein gene in barley aleurone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-eun; Yim, Hui-kyung; Lim, Mi-na; Yoon, In sun; Kim, Jeong hoe; Hwang, Yong-sic

    2015-03-01

    Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) are integral membrane proteins that are known to function in plants as aquaporins. Here, we propose another role for TIPs during the fusion of protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) in aleurone cells, a process that is promoted by gibberellic acid (GA) and prevented by abscisic acid (ABA). Studies of the expression of barley (Hordeum vulgare) TIP genes (HvTIP) showed that GA specifically decreased the abundance of HvTIP1;2 and HvTIP3;1 transcripts, while ABA strongly increased expression of HvTIP3;1. Increased or decreased expression of HvTIP3;1 interfered with the hormonal effects on vacuolation in aleurone protoplasts. HvTIP3;1 gain-of-function experiments delayed GA-induced vacuolation, whereas HvTIP3;1 loss-of-function experiments promoted vacuolation in ABA-treated aleurone cells. These results indicate that TIP plays a key role in preventing the coalescence of small PSVs in aleurone cells. Hormonal regulation of the HvTIP3;1 promoter is similar to the regulation of the endogenous gene, indicating that induction of the transcription of HvTIP3;1 by ABA is a critical factor in the prevention of PSV coalescence in response to ABA. Promoter analysis using deletions and site-directed mutagenesis of sequences identified three cis-acting elements that are responsible for ABA responsiveness in the HvTIP3;1 promoter. Promoter analysis also showed that ABA responsiveness of the HvTIP3;1 promoter is likely to occur via a unique regulatory system distinct from that involving the ABA-response promoter complexes.

  14. Identification and expression analysis of a full-length cDNA encoding a Kandelia candel tonoplast intrinsic protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Fang, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Qi-Fen; Li, Guan-Yi; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2003-03-01

    Soil salinity is an important issue, as most crop plants are low in salt tolerance. Salt tolerance, a complex, multifactorial, and multigenic process, has been known to be a quantitative trait. The identification of the salt stress responsive genes or salt tolerance genes is essential for the breeding programs. Most recent efforts have been focused on the products of structural genes (transport proteins, ion channels, enzymes of solute synthesis) while little attention were paid to the regulatory aspects of these proteins. Since the first aquaporin gene from plants was cloned and functionally expressed in 1993, there has been a growing interest in the molecular biology of MIPs (membrane intrinsic proteins) and their bearing on the biophysics of water flow across plant membranes. In the last decades, studies on Mangroves, a special kind of wood plants, grow in high-salt and flooding conditions have been concentrated almost exclusively on their physiological and ecological characteristics. Kandelia candel, one of the dominant species of mangroves along the Chinese coast, lacks salt glands or salt hairs used for removal of excess salt in other mangroves. This makes K. candel a perfect model to study the molecular mechanism of salt tolerance in mangrove plants. Using cDNA RDA, a cDNA-specific modification of genomic representational difference analysis, a series of salt responsive genes of Kandelia candel were cloned. Among these gene fragments, a 183 bp fragment (termed as SRGKC1) encoding a tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) in Kandelia candel (KCTIP1) was identified. Based on the sequence of SRGKC1, two gene specific primers were designed, and the 3' and 5' end of the KCTIP1 gene were obtained using the SMART RACE cDNA Amplification Kit. RACE products were purified from low-melting agarose, and sequenced directly with GSPs as the sequencing primers. A 500-bp fragment corresponding to the 3'end of this gene was obtained using the GSP1 primer, and a 690 bp fragment

  15. Identification and expression analysis of a full-length cDNA encoding a Kandelia candel tonoplast intrinsic protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Fang, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Qi-Fen; Li, Guan-Yi; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2003-03-01

    Soil salinity is an important issue, as most crop plants are low in salt tolerance. Salt tolerance, a complex, multifactorial, and multigenic process, has been known to be a quantitative trait. The identification of the salt stress responsive genes or salt tolerance genes is essential for the breeding programs. Most recent efforts have been focused on the products of structural genes (transport proteins, ion channels, enzymes of solute synthesis) while little attention were paid to the regulatory aspects of these proteins. Since the first aquaporin gene from plants was cloned and functionally expressed in 1993, there has been a growing interest in the molecular biology of MIPs (membrane intrinsic proteins) and their bearing on the biophysics of water flow across plant membranes. In the last decades, studies on Mangroves, a special kind of wood plants, grow in high-salt and flooding conditions have been concentrated almost exclusively on their physiological and ecological characteristics. Kandelia candel, one of the dominant species of mangroves along the Chinese coast, lacks salt glands or salt hairs used for removal of excess salt in other mangroves. This makes K. candel a perfect model to study the molecular mechanism of salt tolerance in mangrove plants. Using cDNA RDA, a cDNA-specific modification of genomic representational difference analysis, a series of salt responsive genes of Kandelia candel were cloned. Among these gene fragments, a 183 bp fragment (termed as SRGKC1) encoding a tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) in Kandelia candel (KCTIP1) was identified. Based on the sequence of SRGKC1, two gene specific primers were designed, and the 3' and 5' end of the KCTIP1 gene were obtained using the SMART RACE cDNA Amplification Kit. RACE products were purified from low-melting agarose, and sequenced directly with GSPs as the sequencing primers. A 500-bp fragment corresponding to the 3'end of this gene was obtained using the GSP1 primer, and a 690 bp fragment

  16. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    PubMed Central

    Pletnev, Sergei; Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallo­graphic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate. PMID:19690368

  17. Globular-disorder transition in proteins: a compromise between hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions?

    PubMed

    Baruah, Anupaul; Biswas, Parbati

    2016-08-17

    The charge-hydrophobicity correlation of globular and disordered proteins is explored using a generalized self-consistent field theoretical method combined with Monte Carlo simulations. Globular and disordered protein sequences with varied mean net charge and mean hydrophobicity are designed by theory, while Metropolis Monte Carlo generates a suitable ensemble of conformations. Results imply a transition of the dominant interactions between globular and disordered proteins across the charge-hydrophobicity boundary. It is observed that the charge-hydrophobicity boundary actually represents a trade-off between the repulsive and attractive interactions in a protein sequence. The attractive interactions predominate on the globular side of the boundary, while the repulsive interactions prevail on the disordered side. For globular proteins, core forming hydrophobic interactions are dominant leading to a minimally frustrated native conformation. For disordered proteins, the repulsive electrostatic interactions prevail yielding a minimally frustrated region comprising of an expanded, dynamic conformational ensemble. Thus, protein disorder, like protein folding, satisfies the principle of minimal frustration. All results are compared to real globular and disordered proteins. Thus this algorithm may be useful to probe the conformational characteristics of disordered proteins. PMID:27498593

  18. The Intrinsically Disordered Domain of the Antitoxin Phd Chaperones the Toxin Doc against Irreversible Inactivation and Misfolding*

    PubMed Central

    De Gieter, Steven; Konijnenberg, Albert; Talavera, Ariel; Butterer, Annika; Haesaerts, Sarah; De Greve, Henri; Sobott, Frank; Loris, Remy; Garcia-Pino, Abel

    2014-01-01

    The toxin Doc from the phd/doc toxin-antitoxin module targets the cellular translation machinery and is inhibited by its antitoxin partner Phd. Here we show that Phd also functions as a chaperone, keeping Doc in an active, correctly folded conformation. In the absence of Phd, Doc exists in a relatively expanded state that is prone to dimerization through domain swapping with its active site loop acting as hinge region. The domain-swapped dimer is not capable of arresting protein synthesis in vitro, whereas the Doc monomer is. Upon binding to Phd, Doc becomes more compact and is secured in its monomeric state with a neutralized active site. PMID:25326388

  19. Optical Detection of Disordered Water Within a Protein Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Goldbeck, Robert A.; Pillsbury, Marlisa L.; Jensen, Russell A.; Mendoza, Juan L.; Nguyen, Rosa L.; Olson, John S.; Soman, Jayashree; Kliger, David S.; Esquerra, Raymond M.

    2009-01-01

    Internal water molecules are important to protein structure and function, but positional disorder and low occupancies can obscure their detection by x-ray crystallography. Here we show that water can be detected within the distal cavities of myoglobin mutants by subtle changes in the absorbance spectrum of pentacoordinate heme, even when the presence of solvent is not readily observed in the corresponding crystal structures. A well defined, non-coordinated water molecule hydrogen bonded to the distal histidine (His64) is seen within the distal heme pocket in the crystal structure of wild type (wt) deoxymyoglobin. Displacement of this water decreases the rate of ligand entry into wt Mb, and we have shown previously that the entry of this water is readily detected optically after laser photolysis of MbCO complexes. However, for L29F and V68L Mb no discrete positions for solvent molecules are seen in the electron density maps of the crystal structures even though His64 is still present and slow rates of ligand binding indicative of internal water are observed. In contrast, time-resolved perturbations of the visible absorption bands of L29F and V68L deoxyMb generated after laser photolysis detect the entry and significant occupancy of water within the distal pockets of these variants. Thus, the spectral perturbation of pentacoordinate heme offers a potentially robust system for measuring non-specific hydration of the active sites of heme proteins. PMID:19655795

  20. Recognition of the disordered p53 transactivation domain by the transcriptional adapter zinc finger domains of CREB-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Krois, Alexander S; Ferreon, Josephine C; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2016-03-29

    An important component of the activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor is its interaction with the transcriptional coactivators cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300, which activate transcription of p53-regulated stress response genes and stabilize p53 against ubiquitin-mediated degradation. The highest affinity interactions are between the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains of CBP/p300. The NMR spectra of simple binary complexes of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains with the p53TAD suffer from exchange broadening, but innovations in construct design and isotopic labeling have enabled us to obtain high-resolution structures using fusion proteins, uniformly labeled in the case of the TAZ2-p53TAD fusion and segmentally labeled through transintein splicing for the TAZ1-p53TAD fusion. The p53TAD is bipartite, with two interaction motifs, termed AD1 and AD2, which fold to form short amphipathic helices upon binding to TAZ1 and TAZ2 whereas intervening regions of the p53TAD remain flexible. Both the AD1 and AD2 motifs bind to hydrophobic surfaces of the TAZ domains, with AD2 making more extensive hydrophobic contacts consistent with its greater contribution to the binding affinity. Binding of AD1 and AD2 is synergistic, and structural studies performed with isolated motifs can be misleading. The present structures of the full-length p53TAD complexes demonstrate the versatility of the interactions available to an intrinsically disordered domain containing bipartite interaction motifs and provide valuable insights into the structural basis of the affinity changes that occur upon stress-related posttranslational modification. PMID:26976603