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Sample records for intrinsically disordered protein

  1. Intrinsically disordered proteins and intrinsically disordered protein regions.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Christopher J; Dunker, A Keith

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and IDP regions fail to form a stable structure, yet they exhibit biological activities. Their mobile flexibility and structural instability are encoded by their amino acid sequences. They recognize proteins, nucleic acids, and other types of partners; they accelerate interactions and chemical reactions between bound partners; and they help accommodate posttranslational modifications, alternative splicing, protein fusions, and insertions or deletions. Overall, IDP-associated biological activities complement those of structured proteins. Recently, there has been an explosion of studies on IDP regions and their functions, yet the discovery and investigation of these proteins have a long, mostly ignored history. Along with recent discoveries, we present several early examples and the mechanisms by which IDPs contribute to function, which we hope will encourage comprehensive discussion of IDPs and IDP regions in biochemistry textbooks. Finally, we propose future directions for IDP research.

  2. CECAM workshop on Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rösner, Heike; Papaleo, Elena; Haxholm, Gitte W; Best, Robert B; Kragelund, Birthe B; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing need to integrate different areas of science in the study of intrinsically disordered proteins we arranged a meeting entitled “Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Connecting Computation, Physics and Biology” in Zürich in September 2013. The aim of the meeting was to bring together scientists from a range of disciplines to provide a snapshot of the field, as well as to promote future interdisciplinary studies that link the fundamental physical and chemical properties of intrinsically disordered proteins with their biological function. A range of important topics were covered at the meeting including studies linking structural studies of intrinsically disordered proteins with their function, the effect of post-translational modifications, studies of folding-upon-binding, as well as presentation of a number of systems in which intrinsically disordered proteins play a central role in important biological processes. A recurring theme was how computation, including various forms of molecular simulations, can be integrated with experimental and theoretical studies to help understand the complex properties of intrinsically disordered proteins. With this Meeting Report we hope to give a brief overview of the inspiration obtained from presentations, discussions and conversation held at the workshop and point out possible future directions within the field of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  3. CECAM workshop on intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rösner, Heike; Papaleo, Elena; Haxholm, Gitte W; Best, Robert B; Kragelund, Birthe B; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing need to integrate different areas of science in the study of intrinsically disordered proteins we arranged a meeting entitled “Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Connecting Computation, Physics and Biology” in Zürich in September 2013. The aim of the meeting was to bring together scientists from a range of disciplines to provide a snapshot of the field, as well as to promote future interdisciplinary studies that link the fundamental physical and chemical properties of intrinsically disordered proteins with their biological function. A range of important topics were covered at the meeting including studies linking structural studies of intrinsically disordered proteins with their function, the effect of post-translational modifications, studies of folding-upon-binding, as well as presentation of a number of systems in which intrinsically disordered proteins play a central role in important biological processes. A recurring theme was how computation, including various forms of molecular simulations, can be integrated with experimental and theoretical studies to help understand the complex properties of intrinsically disordered proteins. With this Meeting Report we hope to give a brief overview of the inspiration obtained from presentations, discussions and conversations held at the workshop and point out possible future directions within the field of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  4. Structure and intrinsic disorder in protein autoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Travis; Nassar, Roy; Cumberworth, Alexander; Wong, Eric T C; Woollard, Geoffrey; Gsponer, Jörg

    2013-03-05

    Autoinhibition plays a significant role in the regulation of many proteins. By analyzing autoinhibited proteins, we demonstrate that these proteins are enriched in intrinsic disorder because of the properties of their inhibitory modules (IMs). A comparison of autoinhibited proteins with structured and intrinsically disordered IMs revealed that in the latter group (1) multiple phosphorylation sites are highly abundant; (2) splice variants occur in greater number than in their structured cousins; and (3) activation is often associated with changes in secondary structure in the IM. Analyses of families of autoinhibited proteins revealed that the levels of disorder in IMs can vary significantly throughout homologous proteins, whereas residues located at the interfaces between the IMs and inhibited domains are conserved. Our findings suggest that intrinsically disordered IMs provide advantages over structured ones that are likely to be exploited in the fine-tuning of the equilibrium between active and inactive states of autoinhibited proteins.

  5. Frustration-induced protein intrinsic disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-03-01

    Spontaneous folding into a specific native structure is the most important property of protein to perform their biological functions within organisms. Spontaneous folding is understood on the basis of an energy landscape picture based on the minimum frustration principle. Therefore, frustration seemingly only leads to protein functional disorder. However, frustration has recently been suggested to have a function in allosteric regulation. Functional frustration has the possibility to be a key to our deeper understanding of protein function. To explore another functional frustration, we theoretically examined structural frustration, which is designed to induce intrinsic disorder of a protein and its function through the coupled folding and binding. We extended the Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton model to take into account a frustration effect. With the model, we analyzed the binding part of neuron-restrictive silencer factor and showed that designed structural frustration in it induces intrinsic disorder. Furthermore, we showed that the folding and the binding are cooperative in interacting with a target protein. The cooperativity enables an intrinsically disordered protein to exhibit a sharp switch-like folding response to binding chemical potential change. Through this switch-like response, the structural frustration may contribute to the regulation function of interprotein interaction of the intrinsically disordered protein.

  6. Unreported intrinsic disorder in proteins: Disorder emergency room

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    This article continues an “Unreported Intrinsic Disorder in Proteins” series, the goal of which is to expose some interesting cases of missed (or overlooked, or ignored) disorder in proteins. The need for this series is justified by the observation that despite the fact that protein intrinsic disorder is widely accepted by the scientific community, there are still numerous instances when appreciation of this phenomenon is absent. This results in the avalanche of research papers which are talking about intrinsically disordered proteins (or hybrid proteins with ordered and disordered regions) not recognizing that they are talking about such proteins. Articles in the “Unreported Intrinsic Disorder in Proteins” series provide a fast fix for some of the recent noticeable disorder overlooks.

  7. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-07-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  8. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures. PMID:26204806

  9. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Busch, David J; Houser, Justin R; Hayden, Carl C; Sherman, Michael B; Lafer, Eileen M; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2015-07-24

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  10. Intrinsically disordered proteins and multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Dunker, A Keith; Bondos, Sarah E; Huang, Fei; Oldfield, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and IDP regions lack stable tertiary structure yet carry out numerous biological functions, especially those associated with signaling, transcription regulation, DNA condensation, cell division, and cellular differentiation. Both post-translational modifications (PTMs) and alternative splicing (AS) expand the functional repertoire of IDPs. Here we propose that an "IDP-based developmental toolkit," which is comprised of IDP regions, PTMs, especially multiple PTMs, within these IDP regions, and AS events within segments of pre-mRNA that code for these same IDP regions, allows functional diversification and environmental responsiveness for molecules that direct the development of complex metazoans.

  11. Stimuli-sensitive intrinsically disordered protein brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Nithya; Bhagawati, Maniraj; Ananthanarayanan, Badriprasad; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Grafting polymers onto surfaces at high density to yield polymer brush coatings is a widely employed strategy to reduce biofouling and interfacial friction. These brushes almost universally feature synthetic polymers, which are often heterogeneous and do not readily allow incorporation of chemical functionalities at precise sites along the constituent chains. To complement these synthetic systems, we introduce a biomimetic, recombinant intrinsically disordered protein that can assemble into an environment-sensitive brush. This macromolecule adopts an extended conformation and can be grafted to solid supports to form oriented protein brushes that swell and collapse dramatically with changes in solution pH and ionic strength. We illustrate the value of sequence specificity by using proteases with mutually orthogonal recognition sites to modulate brush height in situ to predictable values. This study demonstrates that stimuli-responsive brushes can be fabricated from proteins and introduces them as a new class of smart biomaterial building blocks.

  12. Genome-Wide Prediction of Intrinsic Disorder; Sequence Alignment of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midic, Uros

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) is defined as a lack of stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are highly abundant in nature. IDPs possess a number of crucial biological functions, being involved in regulation, recognition, signaling and control, e.g. their functional…

  13. Disorder in milk proteins: caseins, intrinsically disordered colloids.

    PubMed

    Redwan, Elrashdy M; Xue, Bin; Almehdar, Hussein A; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    This article opens a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. The focus of this introductory article on caseins is symbolic, since caseins were among the first recognized functional unfolded proteins and since they are definitely the most disordered, the most abundant, and the most studied of all milk proteins. In eutherian milks, the casein family includes at least three and usually four major members (αs1-, αs2-, β-, and κ-caseins) that are unrelated in sequence. However, in some species, two different αS2-casein genes are active, and therefore the total number of caseins can be as high as five. These proteins have found a number of uses in food industry. The functional repertoire of caseins ranges from nutritional function to involvement in the improving and/or maintaining cardiovascular health, to crucial contribution to the milk capacity to transport calcium phosphate, to serve as molecular chaperones, and to protect the mother's mammary gland against amyloidoses and ectopic calcification. An intricate feature of caseins is their ability to assemble to colloidal protein particles, casein micelles, serving to sequester and transport amorphous calcium phosphate. These and many other functions of caseins are obviously dependent on their intrinsically disordered nature and are controlled by various posttranslational modifications. Since various aspects of casein structure and function are rather well studied and since several recent reviews emphasized the functional roles of caseins' intrinsic disorder, the major goal of this article is to show how intrinsic disorder is encoded in the amino acid sequences of these proteins.

  14. Functional Anthology of Intrinsic Disorder. III. Ligands, Postranslational Modifications and Diseases Associated with Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongbo; Vucetic, Slobodan; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Dunker, A. Keith; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the understanding of the relationships between function, amino acid sequence and protein structure continues to represent one of the major challenges of the modern protein science. As much as 50% of eukaryotic proteins are likely to contain functionally important long disordered regions. Many proteins are wholly disordered but still possess numerous biologically important functions. However, the number of experimentally confirmed disordered proteins with known biological functions is substantially smaller than their actual number in nature. Therefore, there is a crucial need for novel bioinformatics approaches that allow projection of the current knowledge from a few experimentally verified examples to much larger groups of known and potential proteins. The elaboration of a bioinformatics tool for the analysis of functional diversity of intrinsically disordered proteins and application of this data mining tool to >200,000 proteins from Swiss-Prot database, each annotated with at least one of the 875 functional keywords was described in the first paper of this series (Xie H., Vucetic S., Iakoucheva L.M., Oldfield C.J., Dunker A.K., Obradovic Z., Uversky V.N. (2006) Functional anthology of intrinsic disorder. I. Biological processes and functions of proteins with long disordered regions. J. Proteome Res.). Using this tool, we have found that out of the 711 Swiss-Prot functional keywords associated with at least 20 proteins, 262 were strongly positively correlated with long intrinsically disordered regions, and 302 were strongly negatively correlated. Illustrative examples of functional disorder or order were found for the vast majority of keywords showing strongest positive or negative correlation with intrinsic disorder, respectively. Some 80 Swiss-Prot keywords associated with disorder- and order-driven biological processes and protein functions were described in the first paper (Xie H., Vucetic S., Iakoucheva L.M., Oldfield C.J., Dunker A.K., Obradovic

  15. Can proteins be intrinsically disordered inside a membrane?

    PubMed Central

    Kjaergaard, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disorder has evolved in many soluble proteins because it confers a unique set of functional advantages. In contrast, the functions of membrane proteins are largely understood in terms of well-defined structures. This raises the question: Why would the evolutionary pressures that select for disorder leave membrane proteins untouched. In this hypothesis piece, I argue that intrinsic disorder may exist in membrane embedded proteins, but that it will take a different form due to the different environment. Disordered membrane proteins are thus likely to have fully formed secondary structure, but little tertiary structure. Furthermore, the sequence signature for disorder in membrane proteins is likely to be reversed; so disordered proteins are more hydrophobic than their folded counterparts. At present it is impossible to tell how common this type of disordered membrane protein is.

  16. New force field on modeling intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ye, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2014-09-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins or intrinsically disordered protein regions comprise a large portion of eukaryotic proteomes (between 35% and 51%). These intrinsically disordered proteins were found to link with cancer and various other diseases. However, widely used additive force field parameter sets are insufficient in quantifying the structural properties of intrinsically disordered proteins. Therefore, we explored to a systematic correction of a base additive force field parameter set (chosen as Amber ff99SBildn) to correct the biases that was first demonstrated in simulations with the base parameter set. Specifically, the φ/ψ distributions of disorder-promoting residues were systematically corrected with the CMAP method. Our simulations show that the CMAP corrected Amber parameter set, termed ff99IDPs, improves the φ/ψ distributions of the disorder-promoting residues with respect to the benchmark data of intrinsically disordered protein structures, with root mean-squared percentage deviation less than 0.15% between the simulation and the benchmark. Our further validation shows that the chemical shifts from the ff99IDPs simulations are in quantitative agreement with those from reported NMR measurements for two tested IDPs, MeV NTAIL , and p53. The predicted residue dipolar couplings also show high correlation with experimental data. Interestingly, our simulations show that ff99IDPs can still be used to model the ordered state when the intrinsically disordered proteins are in complex, in contrast to ff99SBildn that can be applied well only to the ordered complex structures. These findings confirm that the newly proposed Amber ff99IDPs parameter set provides a reasonable tool in further studies of intrinsically disordered protein structures. In addition, our study also shows the importance of considering intrinsically disordered protein structures in general-purposed force field developments for both additive and non-additive models.

  17. Analysis of Structured and Intrinsically Disordered Regions of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bin; Li, Liwei; Meroueh, Samy O.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins display two major types of transmembrane structures, helical bundles and beta barrels. The main functional roles of transmembrane proteins are the transport of small molecules and cell signaling, and sometimes these two roles are coupled. For cytosolic, water-soluble proteins, signaling and regulatory functions are often carried out by intrinsically disordered regions. Our long range goal is to determine whether integral membrane proteins likewise often use disordered regions for signaling and regulation. Here we carried out a systematic bioinformatics investigation of intrinsically disordered regions obtained from integral membrane proteins for which crystal structures have been determined, and for which the intrinsic disorder was identified as missing electron density. We found 120 disorder-containing integral membrane proteins having a total of 33,675 residues, with 3209 of the residues distributed among 240 different disordered regions. These disordered regions were compared with those obtained from water-soluble proteins with regard to their amino acid compositional biases, and with regard to accuracies of various disorder predictors. The results of these analyses show that the disordered regions from helical bundle integral membrane proteins, those from beta barrel integral membrane proteins, and those from water soluble proteins all exhibit statistically distinct amino acid compositional biases. Despite these differences in composition, current algorithms make reasonably accurate predictions of disorder for these membrane proteins. Although the small size of the current data sets are limiting, these results suggest that developing new predictors that make use of data from disordered regions in helical bundles and beta barrels, especially as these datasets increase in size, will likely lead to significantly more accurate disorder predictions for these two classes of integral membrane proteins. PMID:19585006

  18. Electronegativity and intrinsic disorder of preeclampsia-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Uversky, Vladimir N; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego Mendoza, José Lino; Calva, Juan J

    2017-01-01

    Preeclampsia, hemorrhage, and infection are the leading causes of maternal death in underdeveloped countries. Since several proteins associated with preeclampsia are known, we conducted a computational study which evaluated the commonness and potential functionality of intrinsic disorder of these proteins and also made an attempt to characterize their origin. The origin of the preeclampsia-related proteins was assessed with a supervised technique, a Polarity Index Method (PIM), which evaluates the electronegativity of proteins based solely on their sequence. The commonness of intrinsic disorder was evaluated using several disorder predictors from the PONDR family, the charge-hydropathy plot (CH-plot) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) analyses, and using the MobiDB web-based tool, whereas potential functionality of intrinsic disorder was studied with the D2P2 resource and ANCHOR predictor of disorder-based binding sites, and the STRING tool was used to build the interactivity networks of the preeclampsia-related proteins. Peculiarities of the PIM-derived polar profile of the group of preeclampsia-related proteins were then compared with profiles of a group of lipoproteins, antimicrobial peptides, angiogenesis-related proteins, and the intrinsically disordered proteins. Our results showed a high graphical correlation between preeclampsia proteins, lipoproteins, and the angiogenesis proteins. We also showed that many preeclampsia-related proteins contain numerous functional disordered regions. Therefore, these bioinformatics results led us to assume that the preeclampsia proteins are highly associated with the lipoproteins group, and that some preeclampsia-related proteins contain significant amounts of functional disorders.

  19. Molecular Recognition by Templated Folding of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toto, Angelo; Camilloni, Carlo; Giri, Rajanish; Brunori, Maurizio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Gianni, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins often become structured upon interacting with their partners. The mechanism of this ‘folding upon binding’ process, however, has not been fully characterised yet. Here we present a study of the folding of the intrinsically disordered transactivation domain of c-Myb (c-Myb) upon binding its partner KIX. By determining the structure of the folding transition state for the binding of wild-type and three mutational variants of KIX, we found a remarkable plasticity of the folding pathway of c-Myb. To explain this phenomenon, we show that the folding of c-Myb is templated by the structure of KIX. This adaptive folding behaviour, which occurs by heterogeneous nucleation, differs from the robust homogeneous nucleation typically observed for globular proteins. We suggest that this templated folding mechanism may enable intrinsically disordered proteins to achieve specific and reliable binding with multiple partners while avoiding aberrant interactions.

  20. Molecular Recognition by Templated Folding of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    PubMed Central

    Toto, Angelo; Camilloni, Carlo; Giri, Rajanish; Brunori, Maurizio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Gianni, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins often become structured upon interacting with their partners. The mechanism of this ‘folding upon binding’ process, however, has not been fully characterised yet. Here we present a study of the folding of the intrinsically disordered transactivation domain of c-Myb (c-Myb) upon binding its partner KIX. By determining the structure of the folding transition state for the binding of wild-type and three mutational variants of KIX, we found a remarkable plasticity of the folding pathway of c-Myb. To explain this phenomenon, we show that the folding of c-Myb is templated by the structure of KIX. This adaptive folding behaviour, which occurs by heterogeneous nucleation, differs from the robust homogeneous nucleation typically observed for globular proteins. We suggest that this templated folding mechanism may enable intrinsically disordered proteins to achieve specific and reliable binding with multiple partners while avoiding aberrant interactions. PMID:26912067

  1. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Drive Emergence and Inheritance of Biological Traits.

    PubMed

    Chakrabortee, Sohini; Byers, James S; Jones, Sandra; Garcia, David M; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Chang, Amelia; She, Richard; Lee, Laura; Fremin, Brayon; Lindquist, Susan; Jarosz, Daniel F

    2016-10-06

    Prions are a paradigm-shifting mechanism of inheritance in which phenotypes are encoded by self-templating protein conformations rather than nucleic acids. Here, we examine the breadth of protein-based inheritance across the yeast proteome by assessing the ability of nearly every open reading frame (ORF; ∼5,300 ORFs) to induce heritable traits. Transient overexpression of nearly 50 proteins created traits that remained heritable long after their expression returned to normal. These traits were beneficial, had prion-like patterns of inheritance, were common in wild yeasts, and could be transmitted to naive cells with protein alone. Most inducing proteins were not known prions and did not form amyloid. Instead, they are highly enriched in nucleic acid binding proteins with large intrinsically disordered domains that have been widely conserved across evolution. Thus, our data establish a common type of protein-based inheritance through which intrinsically disordered proteins can drive the emergence of new traits and adaptive opportunities.

  2. Mutual effects of disorder and order in fusion proteins between intrinsically disordered domains and fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Marina; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are being paid an increasing amount of interest due to the understanding of the crucial role that flexible regions play in molecular recognition and in signaling. Accordingly, reports focusing on the structural and functional characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins or regions are growing exponentially. Relatively few studies have however been reported on the mutual effects of ordered and disordered moieties in artificial fusion proteins. In this review, we focus on the few available experimental data based on the use of chimeras in which fluorescent proteins were fused to disordered domains of different lengths, compactness and propensity to form secondary structures. The impact of the artificial fusion on the conformational and functional properties of the resulting proteins is discussed.

  3. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M.; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the “fly-casting” hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context. PMID:27668217

  4. Folding propensity of intrinsically disordered proteins by osmotic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Mansouri, Amanda L.; Grese, Laura N.; Rowe, Erica L.; Pino, James C.; Chennubhotla, S. Chakra; Ramanathan, Arvind; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Berthelier, Valerie; Stanley, Christopher B.

    2016-10-11

    Proteins imparted with intrinsic disorder conduct a range of essential cellular functions. To better understand the folding and hydration properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), we used osmotic stress to induce conformational changes in nuclear co-activator binding domain (NCBD) and activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptor (ACTR). Osmotic stress was applied by the addition of small and polymeric osmolytes, where we discovered that water contributions to NCBD folding always exceeded those for ACTR. Both NCBD and ACTR were found to gain a-helical structure with increasing osmotic stress, consistent with their folding upon NCBD/ACTR complex formation. Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we further characterized NCBD structural changes with the osmolyte ethylene glycol. Here a large reduction in overall size initially occurred before substantial secondary structural change. In conclusion, by focusing on folding propensity, and linked hydration changes, we uncover new insights that may be important for how IDP folding contributes to binding.

  5. Computational approaches for inferring the functions of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Mihaly; Vranken, Wim; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are ubiquitously involved in cellular processes and often implicated in human pathological conditions. The critical biological roles of these proteins, despite not adopting a well-defined fold, encouraged structural biologists to revisit their views on the protein structure-function paradigm. Unfortunately, investigating the characteristics and describing the structural behavior of IDPs is far from trivial, and inferring the function(s) of a disordered protein region remains a major challenge. Computational methods have proven particularly relevant for studying IDPs: on the sequence level their dependence on distinct characteristics determined by the local amino acid context makes sequence-based prediction algorithms viable and reliable tools for large scale analyses, while on the structure level the in silico integration of fundamentally different experimental data types is essential to describe the behavior of a flexible protein chain. Here, we offer an overview of the latest developments and computational techniques that aim to uncover how protein function is connected to intrinsic disorder. PMID:26301226

  6. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  7. Elastin-like Polypeptides as Models of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Stefan; Dzuricky, Michael; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are a class of stimuli-responsive biopolymers inspired by the intrinsically disordered domains of tropoelastin that are composed of repeats of the VPGXG pentapeptide motif, where X is a “guest residue”. They undergo a reversible, thermally triggered lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase transition, which has been utilized for a variety of applications including protein purification, affinity capture, immunoassays, and drug delivery. ELPs have been extensively studied as protein polymers and as biomaterials, but their relationship to other disordered proteins has heretofore not been established. The biophysical properties of ELPs that lend them their unique material behavior are similar to the properties of many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP). Their low sequence complexity, phase behavior, and elastic properties make them an interesting “minimal” artificial IDP, and the study of ELPs can hence provide insights into the behavior of other more complex IDPs. Motivated by this emerging realization of the similarities between ELPs and IDPs, this review discusses the biophysical properties of ELPs, their biomedical utility, and their relationship to other disordered polypeptide sequences. PMID:26325592

  8. Tardigrades Use Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Survive Desiccation.

    PubMed

    Boothby, Thomas C; Tapia, Hugo; Brozena, Alexandra H; Piszkiewicz, Samantha; Smith, Austin E; Giovannini, Ilaria; Rebecchi, Lorena; Pielak, Gary J; Koshland, Doug; Goldstein, Bob

    2017-03-16

    Tardigrades are microscopic animals that survive a remarkable array of stresses, including desiccation. How tardigrades survive desiccation has remained a mystery for more than 250 years. Trehalose, a disaccharide essential for several organisms to survive drying, is detected at low levels or not at all in some tardigrade species, indicating that tardigrades possess potentially novel mechanisms for surviving desiccation. Here we show that tardigrade-specific intrinsically disordered proteins (TDPs) are essential for desiccation tolerance. TDP genes are constitutively expressed at high levels or induced during desiccation in multiple tardigrade species. TDPs are required for tardigrade desiccation tolerance, and these genes are sufficient to increase desiccation tolerance when expressed in heterologous systems. TDPs form non-crystalline amorphous solids (vitrify) upon desiccation, and this vitrified state mirrors their protective capabilities. Our study identifies TDPs as functional mediators of tardigrade desiccation tolerance, expanding our knowledge of the roles and diversity of disordered proteins involved in stress tolerance.

  9. Intrinsic α helix propensities compact hydrodynamic radii in intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    English, Lance R; Tilton, Erin C; Ricard, Benjamin J; Whitten, Steven T

    2017-02-01

    Proteins that lack tertiary stability under normal conditions, known as intrinsically disordered, exhibit a wide range of biological activities. Molecular descriptions for the biology of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) consequently rely on disordered structural models, which in turn require experiments that assess the origins to structural features observed. For example, while hydrodynamic size is mostly insensitive to sequence composition in chemically denatured proteins, IDPs show strong sequence-specific effects in the hydrodynamic radius (Rh ) when measured under normal conditions. To investigate sequence-modulation of IDP Rh , disordered ensembles generated by a hard sphere collision model modified with a structure-based parameterization of the solution energetics were used to parse the contributions of net charge, main chain dihedral angle bias, and excluded volume on hydrodynamic size. Ensembles for polypeptides 10-35 residues in length were then used to establish power-law scaling relationships for comparison to experimental Rh from 26 IDPs. Results showed the expected outcomes of increased hydrodynamic size from increases in excluded volume and net charge, and compaction from chain-solvent interactions. Chain bias representing intrinsic preferences for α helix and polyproline II (PPII ), however, modulated Rh with intricate dependence on the simulated propensities. PPII propensities at levels expected in IDPs correlated with heightened Rh sensitivity to even weak α helix propensities, indicating bias for common (φ, ψ) are important determinants of hydrodynamic size. Moreover, data show that IDP Rh can be predicted from sequence with good accuracy from a small set of physicochemical properties, namely intrinsic conformational propensities and net charge. Proteins 2017; 85:296-311. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Folding propensity of intrinsically disordered proteins by osmotic stress

    DOE PAGES

    Mansouri, Amanda L.; Grese, Laura N.; Rowe, Erica L.; ...

    2016-10-11

    Proteins imparted with intrinsic disorder conduct a range of essential cellular functions. To better understand the folding and hydration properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), we used osmotic stress to induce conformational changes in nuclear co-activator binding domain (NCBD) and activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptor (ACTR). Osmotic stress was applied by the addition of small and polymeric osmolytes, where we discovered that water contributions to NCBD folding always exceeded those for ACTR. Both NCBD and ACTR were found to gain a-helical structure with increasing osmotic stress, consistent with their folding upon NCBD/ACTR complex formation. Using small-angle neutron scatteringmore » (SANS), we further characterized NCBD structural changes with the osmolyte ethylene glycol. Here a large reduction in overall size initially occurred before substantial secondary structural change. In conclusion, by focusing on folding propensity, and linked hydration changes, we uncover new insights that may be important for how IDP folding contributes to binding.« less

  11. Folding propensity of intrinsically disordered proteins by osmotic stress†

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Amanda L.; Grese, Laura N.; Rowe, Erica L.; Pino, James C.; Chennubhotla, S. Chakra; Ramanathan, Arvind; O’Neill, Hugh M.; Berthelier, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Proteins imparted with intrinsic disorder conduct a range of essential cellular functions. To better understand the folding and hydration properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), we used osmotic stress to induce conformational changes in nuclear co-activator binding domain (NCBD) and activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptor (ACTR) separate from their mutual binding. Osmotic stress was applied by the addition of small and polymeric osmolytes, where we discovered that water contributions to NCBD folding always exceeded those for ACTR. Both NCBD and ACTR were found to gain α-helical structure with increasing osmotic stress, consistent with their folding upon NCBD/ACTR complex formation. Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we further characterized NCBD structural changes with the osmolyte ethylene glycol. Here a large reduction in overall size initially occurred before substantial secondary structural change. By focusing on folding propensity, and linked hydration changes, we uncover new insights that may be important for how IDP folding contributes to binding. PMID:27752679

  12. Molecular signaling involving intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Anna; Manna, Sara La; Novellino, Ettore; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Marasco, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on cellular protein interaction networks (PINs) reveal that proteins that constitute hubs in a PIN are notably enriched in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) compared to proteins that constitute edges, highlighting the role of IDPs in signaling pathways. Most IDPs rapidly undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their biological targets to perform their function. Conformational dynamics enables IDPs to be versatile and to interact with a broad range of interactors under normal physiological conditions where their expression is tightly modulated. IDPs are involved in many cellular processes such as cellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, and splicing; thus, their high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases including cancer. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in men worldwide. Therefore, identifying molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic signaling pathways that are involved in prostate carcinogenesis is crucial. In this review, we focus on the aspects of cellular pathways leading to PCa in which IDPs exert a primary role. PMID:27212129

  13. Understanding Viral Transmission Behavior via Protein Intrinsic Disorder Prediction: Coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A. Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2012-01-01

    Besides being a common threat to farm animals and poultry, coronavirus (CoV) was responsible for the human severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2002–4. However, many aspects of CoV behavior, including modes of its transmission, are yet to be fully understood. We show that the amount and the peculiarities of distribution of the protein intrinsic disorder in the viral shell can be used for the efficient analysis of the behavior and transmission modes of CoV. The proposed model allows categorization of the various CoVs by the peculiarities of disorder distribution in their membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N). This categorization enables quick identification of viruses with similar behaviors in transmission, regardless of genetic proximity. Based on this analysis, an empirical model for predicting the viral transmission behavior is developed. This model is able to explain some behavioral aspects of important coronaviruses that previously were not fully understood. The new predictor can be a useful tool for better epidemiological, clinical, and structural understanding of behavior of both newly emerging viruses and viruses that have been known for a long time. A potentially new vaccine strategy could involve searches for viral strains that are characterized by the evolutionary misfit between the peculiarities of the disorder distribution in their shells and their behavior. PMID:23097708

  14. Dihedral angle entropy measures for intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Cukier, Robert I

    2015-03-05

    Protein stability is based on a delicate balance between energetic and entropic factors. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) interacting with a folded partner protein in the act of binding can order the IDP to form the correct functional interface by decrease in the overall free energy. In this work, we evaluate the part of the entropic cost of ordering an IDP arising from their dihedral states. The IDP studied is a leucine zipper dimer that we simulate with molecular dynamics and find that it does show disorder in six phi and psi dihedral angles of the N terminal sequence of one monomer. Essential to ascertain is the degree of disorder in the IDP, and we do so by considering the entire, discretized probability distribution function of N dihedrals with M conformers per dihedral. A compositional clustering method is introduced, whereby the NS = N(M) states are formed from the Cartesian product of each dihedral's conformational space. Clustering is carried out with a version of a k-means algorithm that accounts for the circular nature of dihedral angles. For the 12 dihedrals each found to have three conformers, among the resulting 531441 states, their populations show that the first 100 (500) most populated states account for ∼65% (∼90%) of the entire population, indicating that there are strong dependencies among the dihedrals' conformations. These state populations are used to evaluate a Kullback-Leibler divergence entropy measure and obtain the dihedral configurational entropy S. At 300 K, TS ∼ 3 kcal/mol, showing that IDP entropy, while roughly half that would be expected from independently distributed dihedrals, can be a decisive contributor to the free energy of this IDP binding and ordering.

  15. Phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer: role of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Steven M; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Levine, Herbert; Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    A striking characteristic of cancer cells is their remarkable phenotypic plasticity, which is the ability to switch states or phenotypes in response to environmental fluctuations. Phenotypic changes such as a partial or complete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) that play important roles in their survival and proliferation, and development of resistance to therapeutic treatments, are widely believed to arise due to somatic mutations in the genome. However, there is a growing concern that such a deterministic view is not entirely consistent with multiple lines of evidence, which indicate that stochasticity may also play an important role in driving phenotypic plasticity. Here, we discuss how stochasticity in protein interaction networks (PINs) may play a key role in determining phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer (PCa). Specifically, we point out that the key players driving transitions among different phenotypes (epithelial, mesenchymal, and hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal), including ZEB1, SNAI1, OVOL1, and OVOL2, are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and discuss how plasticity at the molecular level may contribute to stochasticity in phenotypic switching by rewiring PINs. We conclude by suggesting that targeting IDPs implicated in EMT in PCa may be a new strategy to gain additional insights and develop novel treatments for this disease, which is the most common form of cancer in adult men. PMID:27427552

  16. Experimental Inferential Structure Determination of Ensembles for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Brookes, David H; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-04-06

    We develop a Bayesian approach to determine the most probable structural ensemble model from candidate structures for intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that takes full advantage of NMR chemical shifts and J-coupling data, their known errors and variances, and the quality of the theoretical back-calculation from structure to experimental observables. Our approach differs from previous formulations in the optimization of experimental and back-calculation nuisance parameters that are treated as random variables with known distributions, as opposed to structural or ensemble weight optimization or use of a reference ensemble. The resulting experimental inferential structure determination (EISD) method is size extensive with O(N) scaling, with N = number of structures, that allows for the rapid ranking of large ensemble data comprising tens of thousands of conformations. We apply the EISD approach on singular folded proteins and a corresponding set of ∼25 000 misfolded states to illustrate the problems that can arise using Boltzmann weighted priors. We then apply the EISD method to rank IDP ensembles most consistent with the NMR data and show that the primary error for ranking or creating good IDP ensembles resides in the poor back-calculation from structure to simulated experimental observable. We show that a reduction by a factor of 3 in the uncertainty of the back-calculation error can improve the discrimination among qualitatively different IDP ensembles for the amyloid-beta peptide.

  17. Phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer: role of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Steven M; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Levine, Herbert; Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    A striking characteristic of cancer cells is their remarkable phenotypic plasticity, which is the ability to switch states or phenotypes in response to environmental fluctuations. Phenotypic changes such as a partial or complete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) that play important roles in their survival and proliferation, and development of resistance to therapeutic treatments, are widely believed to arise due to somatic mutations in the genome. However, there is a growing concern that such a deterministic view is not entirely consistent with multiple lines of evidence, which indicate that stochasticity may also play an important role in driving phenotypic plasticity. Here, we discuss how stochasticity in protein interaction networks (PINs) may play a key role in determining phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer (PCa). Specifically, we point out that the key players driving transitions among different phenotypes (epithelial, mesenchymal, and hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal), including ZEB1, SNAI1, OVOL1, and OVOL2, are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and discuss how plasticity at the molecular level may contribute to stochasticity in phenotypic switching by rewiring PINs. We conclude by suggesting that targeting IDPs implicated in EMT in PCa may be a new strategy to gain additional insights and develop novel treatments for this disease, which is the most common form of cancer in adult men.

  18. Fuzzy regions in an intrinsically disordered protein impair protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Gruet, Antoine; Dosnon, Marion; Blocquel, David; Brunel, Joanna; Gerlier, Denis; Das, Rahul K; Bonetti, Daniela; Gianni, Stefano; Fuxreiter, Monika; Longhi, Sonia; Bignon, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Despite the partial disorder-to-order transition that intrinsically disordered proteins often undergo upon binding to their partners, a considerable amount of residual disorder may be retained in the bound form, resulting in a fuzzy complex. Fuzzy regions flanking molecular recognition elements may enable partner fishing through non-specific, transient contacts, thereby facilitating binding, but may also disfavor binding through various mechanisms. So far, few computational or experimental studies have addressed the effect of fuzzy appendages on partner recognition by intrinsically disordered proteins. In order to shed light onto this issue, we used the interaction between the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus (MeV) nucleoprotein (NTAIL ) and the X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein as model system. After binding to XD, the N-terminal region of NTAIL remains conspicuously disordered, with α-helical folding taking place only within a short molecular recognition element. To study the effect of the N-terminal fuzzy region on NTAIL /XD binding, we generated N-terminal truncation variants of NTAIL , and assessed their binding abilities towards XD. The results revealed that binding increases with shortening of the N-terminal fuzzy region, with this also being observed with hsp70 (another MeV NTAIL binding partner), and for the homologous NTAIL /XD pairs from the Nipah and Hendra viruses. Finally, similar results were obtained when the MeV NTAIL fuzzy region was replaced with a highly dissimilar artificial disordered sequence, supporting a sequence-independent inhibitory effect of the fuzzy region.

  19. Structural flexibility of intrinsically disordered proteins induces stepwise target recognition.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Nobu C; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-12-14

    An intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) lacks a stable three-dimensional structure, while it folds into a specific structure when it binds to a target molecule. In some IDP-target complexes, not all target binding surfaces are exposed on the outside, and intermediate states are observed in their binding processes. We consider that stepwise target recognition via intermediate states is a characteristic of IDP binding to targets with "hidden" binding sites. To investigate IDP binding to hidden target binding sites, we constructed an IDP lattice model based on the HP model. In our model, the IDP is modeled as a chain and the target is modeled as a highly coarse-grained object. We introduced motion and internal interactions to the target to hide its binding sites. In the case of unhidden binding sites, a two-state transition between the free states and a bound state is observed, and we consider that this represents coupled folding and binding. Introducing hidden binding sites, we found an intermediate bound state in which the IDP forms various structures to temporarily stabilize the complex. The intermediate state provides a scaffold for the IDP to access the hidden binding site. We call this process multiform binding. We conclude that structural flexibility of IDPs enables them to access hidden binding sites and this is a functional advantage of IDPs.

  20. Structural flexibility of intrinsically disordered proteins induces stepwise target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Nobu C.; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-12-01

    An intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) lacks a stable three-dimensional structure, while it folds into a specific structure when it binds to a target molecule. In some IDP-target complexes, not all target binding surfaces are exposed on the outside, and intermediate states are observed in their binding processes. We consider that stepwise target recognition via intermediate states is a characteristic of IDP binding to targets with "hidden" binding sites. To investigate IDP binding to hidden target binding sites, we constructed an IDP lattice model based on the HP model. In our model, the IDP is modeled as a chain and the target is modeled as a highly coarse-grained object. We introduced motion and internal interactions to the target to hide its binding sites. In the case of unhidden binding sites, a two-state transition between the free states and a bound state is observed, and we consider that this represents coupled folding and binding. Introducing hidden binding sites, we found an intermediate bound state in which the IDP forms various structures to temporarily stabilize the complex. The intermediate state provides a scaffold for the IDP to access the hidden binding site. We call this process multiform binding. We conclude that structural flexibility of IDPs enables them to access hidden binding sites and this is a functional advantage of IDPs.

  1. Dancing Protein Clouds: The Strange Biology and Chaotic Physics of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-03-25

    Biologically active but floppy proteins represent a new reality of modern protein science. These intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and hybrid proteins containing ordered and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) constitute a noticeable part of any given proteome. Functionally, they complement ordered proteins, and their conformational flexibility and structural plasticity allow them to perform impossible tricks and be engaged in biological activities that are inaccessible to well folded proteins with their unique structures. The major goals of this minireview are to show that, despite their simplified amino acid sequences, IDPs/IDPRs are complex entities often resembling chaotic systems, are structurally and functionally heterogeneous, and can be considered an important part of the structure-function continuum. Furthermore, IDPs/IDPRs are everywhere, and are ubiquitously engaged in various interactions characterized by a wide spectrum of binding scenarios and an even wider spectrum of structural and functional outputs.

  2. Dancing Protein Clouds: The Strange Biology and Chaotic Physics of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biologically active but floppy proteins represent a new reality of modern protein science. These intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and hybrid proteins containing ordered and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) constitute a noticeable part of any given proteome. Functionally, they complement ordered proteins, and their conformational flexibility and structural plasticity allow them to perform impossible tricks and be engaged in biological activities that are inaccessible to well folded proteins with their unique structures. The major goals of this minireview are to show that, despite their simplified amino acid sequences, IDPs/IDPRs are complex entities often resembling chaotic systems, are structurally and functionally heterogeneous, and can be considered an important part of the structure-function continuum. Furthermore, IDPs/IDPRs are everywhere, and are ubiquitously engaged in various interactions characterized by a wide spectrum of binding scenarios and an even wider spectrum of structural and functional outputs. PMID:26851286

  3. MetaDisorder: a meta-server for the prediction of intrinsic disorder in proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs) lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. Some of them may assume a locally stable structure under specific conditions, e.g. upon interaction with another molecule, while others function in a permanently unstructured state. The discovery of IUPs challenged the traditional protein structure paradigm, which stated that a specific well-defined structure defines the function of the protein. As of December 2011, approximately 60 methods for computational prediction of protein disorder from sequence have been made publicly available. They are based on different approaches, such as utilizing evolutionary information, energy functions, and various statistical and machine learning methods. Results Given the diversity of existing intrinsic disorder prediction methods, we decided to test whether it is possible to combine them into a more accurate meta-prediction method. We developed a method based on arbitrarily chosen 13 disorder predictors, in which the final consensus was weighted by the accuracy of the methods. We have also developed a disorder predictor GSmetaDisorder3D that used no third-party disorder predictors, but alignments to known protein structures, reported by the protein fold-recognition methods, to infer the potentially structured and unstructured regions. Following the success of our disorder predictors in the CASP8 benchmark, we combined them into a meta-meta predictor called GSmetaDisorderMD, which was the top scoring method in the subsequent CASP9 benchmark. Conclusions A series of disorder predictors described in this article is available as a MetaDisorder web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/metadisorder/. Results are presented both in an easily interpretable, interactive mode and in a simple text format suitable for machine processing. PMID:22624656

  4. Roles of intrinsic disorder in protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Dyson, H Jane

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids typify the role of disordered segments, linkers, tails and other entities in the function of complexes that must form with high affinity and specificity but which must be capable of dissociating when no longer needed. While much of the emphasis in the literature has been on the interactions of disordered proteins with other proteins, disorder is also frequently observed in nucleic acids (particularly RNA) and in the proteins that interact with them. The interactions of disordered proteins with DNA most often manifest as molding of the protein onto the B-form DNA structure, although some well-known instances involve remodeling of the DNA structure that seems to require that the interacting proteins be disordered to various extents in the free state. By contrast, induced fit in RNA-protein interactions has been recognized for many years-the existence and prevalence of this phenomenon provides the clearest possible evidence that RNA and its interactions with proteins must be considered as highly dynamic, and the dynamic nature of RNA and its multiplicity of folded and unfolded states is an integral part of its nature and function.

  5. Content of intrinsic disorder influences the outcome of cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tokmakov, Alexander A; Kurotani, Atsushi; Ikeda, Mariko; Terazawa, Yumiko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Stefanov, Vasily; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-09-11

    Cell-free protein synthesis is used to produce proteins with various structural traits. Recent bioinformatics analyses indicate that more than half of eukaryotic proteins possess long intrinsically disordered regions. However, no systematic study concerning the connection between intrinsic disorder and expression success of cell-free protein synthesis has been presented until now. To address this issue, we examined correlations of the experimentally observed cell-free protein expression yields with the contents of intrinsic disorder bioinformatically predicted in the expressed sequences. This analysis revealed strong relationships between intrinsic disorder and protein amenability to heterologous cell-free expression. On the one hand, elevated disorder content was associated with the increased ratio of soluble expression. On the other hand, overall propensity for detectable protein expression decreased with disorder content. We further demonstrated that these tendencies are rooted in some distinct features of intrinsically disordered regions, such as low hydrophobicity, elevated surface accessibility and high abundance of sequence motifs for proteolytic degradation, including sites of ubiquitination and PEST sequences. Our findings suggest that identification of intrinsically disordered regions in the expressed amino acid sequences can be of practical use for predicting expression success and optimizing cell-free protein synthesis.

  6. Proteins without unique 3D structures: biotechnological applications of intrinsically unstable/disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are functional proteins or regions that do not have unique 3D structures under functional conditions. Therefore, from the viewpoint of their lack of stable 3D structure, IDPs/IDPRs are inherently unstable. As much as structure and function of normal ordered globular proteins are determined by their amino acid sequences, the lack of unique 3D structure in IDPs/IDPRs and their disorder-based functionality are also encoded in the amino acid sequences. Because of their specific sequence features and distinctive conformational behavior, these intrinsically unstable proteins or regions have several applications in biotechnology. This review introduces some of the most characteristic features of IDPs/IDPRs (such as peculiarities of amino acid sequences of these proteins and regions, their major structural features, and peculiar responses to changes in their environment) and describes how these features can be used in the biotechnology, for example for the proteome-wide analysis of the abundance of extended IDPs, for recombinant protein isolation and purification, as polypeptide nanoparticles for drug delivery, as solubilization tools, and as thermally sensitive carriers of active peptides and proteins.

  7. Autophagy-related intrinsically disordered proteins in intra-nuclear compartments.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Meng, Fanchi; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-16

    Recent analyses indicated that autophagy can be regulated via some nuclear transcriptional networks and many important players in the autophagy and other forms of programmed cell death are known to be intrinsically disordered. To this end, we analyzed similarities and differences in the intrinsic disorder distribution of nuclear and non-nuclear proteins related to autophagy. We also looked at the peculiarities of the distribution of the intrinsically disordered autophagy-related proteins in various intra-nuclear organelles, such as the nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinucleolar compartment. This analysis revealed that the autophagy-related proteins constitute about 2.5% of the non-nuclear proteins and 3.3% of the nuclear proteins, which corresponds to a substantial enrichment by about 32% in the nucleus. Curiously, although, in general, the autophagy-related proteins share similar characteristics of disorder with a generic set of all non-nuclear proteins, chromatin and nuclear speckles are enriched in the intrinsically disordered autophagy proteins (29 and 37% of these proteins are disordered, respectively) and have high disorder content at 0.24 and 0.27, respectively. Therefore, our data suggest that some of the nuclear disordered proteins may play important roles in autophagy.

  8. An Unusual Intrinsically Disordered Protein from the Model Legume Lotus japonicus Stabilizes Proteins in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Haaning, Svend; Radutoiu, Simona; Hoffmann, Søren V.; Dittmer, Jens; Giehm, Lise; Otzen, Daniel E.; Stougaard, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic structural disorder is a prevalent feature of proteins with chaperone activity. Using a complementary set of techniques, we have structurally characterized LjIDP1 (intrinsically disordered protein 1) from the model legume Lotus japonicus, and our results provide the first structural characterization of a member of the Lea5 protein family (PF03242). Contrary to in silico predictions, we show that LjIDP1 is intrinsically disordered and probably exists as an ensemble of conformations with limited residual β-sheet, turn/loop, and polyproline II secondary structure. Furthermore, we show that LjIDP1 has an inherent propensity to undergo a large conformational shift, adopting a largely α-helical structure when it is dehydrated and in the presence of different detergents and alcohols. This is consistent with an overrepresentation of order-promoting residues in LjIDP1 compared with the average of intrinsically disordered proteins. In line with functioning as a chaperone, we show that LjIDP1 effectively prevents inactivation of two model enzymes under conditions that promote protein misfolding and aggregation. The LjIdp1 gene is expressed in all L. japonicus tissues tested. A higher expression level was found in the root tip proximal zone, in roots inoculated with compatible endosymbiotic M. loti, and in functional nitrogen-fixing root nodules. We suggest that the ability of LjIDP1 to prevent protein misfolding and aggregation may play a significant role in tissues, such as symbiotic root nodules, which are characterized by high metabolic activity. PMID:18779323

  9. Consequences of inducing intrinsic disorder in a high-affinity protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Grigorios; Sharma, Amit; Lancaster, Lorna E; Bowen, Rebecca; Kaminska, Renata; Leech, Andrew P; Walker, Daniel; Redfield, Christina; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-04-29

    The kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of intrinsic disorder in protein-protein recognition are controversial. We address this by inducing one partner of the high-affinity colicin E3 rRNase domain-Im3 complex (K(d) ≈ 10(-12) M) to become an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). Through a variety of biophysical measurements, we show that a single alanine mutation at Tyr507 within the hydrophobic core of the isolated colicin E3 rRNase domain causes the enzyme to become an IDP (E3 rRNase(IDP)). E3 rRNase(IDP) binds stoichiometrically to Im3 and forms a structure that is essentially identical to the wild-type complex. However, binding of E3 rRNase(IDP) to Im3 is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than that of the folded rRNase, with thermodynamic parameters reflecting the disorder-to-order transition on forming the complex. Critically, pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the E3 rRNase(IDP)-Im3 complex demonstrates that the decrease in affinity is mostly accounted for by a drop in the electrostatically steered association rate. Our study shows that, notwithstanding the advantages intrinsic disorder brings to biological systems, this can come at severe kinetic and thermodynamic cost.

  10. ff14IDPs force field improving the conformation sampling of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong; Wang, Wei; Ye, Wei; Ji, Dingjue; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are proteins which lack of specific tertiary structure and unable to fold spontaneously without the partner binding. These intrinsically disordered proteins are found to associate with various diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. However, current widely used force fields, such as ff99SB, ff14SB, OPLS/AA, and Charmm27, are insufficient in sampling the conformational characters of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this study, the CMAP method was used to correct the φ/ψ distributions of disorder-promoting amino acids. The simulation results show that the force filed parameters (ff14IDPs) can improve the φ/ψ distributions of the disorder-promoting amino acids, with RMSD less than 0.10% relative to the benchmark data of intrinsically disordered proteins. Further test suggests that the calculated secondary chemical shifts under ff14IDPs are in quantitative agreement with the data of NMR experiment for five tested systems. In addition, the simulation results show that ff14IDPs can still be used to model structural proteins, such as tested lysozyme and ubiquitin, with better performance in coil regions than the original general Amber force field ff14SB. These findings confirm that the newly developed Amber ff14IDPs is a robust model for improving the conformation sampling of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  11. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-12-25

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions.

  12. Differential dehydration effects on globular proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins during film formation.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Juliana Sakamoto; Miles, Andew J; Araujo, Ana Paula Ulian; Wallace, B A

    2017-04-01

    Globular proteins composed of different secondary structures and fold types were examined by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to determine the effects of dehydration on their secondary structures. They exhibited only minor changes upon removal of bulk water during film formation, contrary to previously reported studies of proteins dehydrated by lyophilization (where substantial loss of helical structure and gain in sheet structure was detected). This near lack of conformational change observed for globular proteins contrasts with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) dried in the same manner: the IDPs, which have almost completely unordered structures in solution, exhibited increased amounts of regular (mostly helical) secondary structures when dehydrated, suggesting formation of new intra-protein hydrogen bonds replacing solvent-protein hydrogen bonds, in a process which may mimic interactions that occur when IDPs bind to partner molecules. This study has thus shown that the secondary structures of globular and intrinsically disordered proteins behave very differently upon dehydration, and that films are a potentially useful format for examining dehydrated soluble proteins and assessing IDPs structures.

  13. Differential dehydration effects on globular proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins during film formation

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Juliana Sakamoto; Miles, Andew J.; Araujo, Ana Paula Ulian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Globular proteins composed of different secondary structures and fold types were examined by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to determine the effects of dehydration on their secondary structures. They exhibited only minor changes upon removal of bulk water during film formation, contrary to previously reported studies of proteins dehydrated by lyophilization (where substantial loss of helical structure and gain in sheet structure was detected). This near lack of conformational change observed for globular proteins contrasts with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) dried in the same manner: the IDPs, which have almost completely unordered structures in solution, exhibited increased amounts of regular (mostly helical) secondary structures when dehydrated, suggesting formation of new intra‐protein hydrogen bonds replacing solvent‐protein hydrogen bonds, in a process which may mimic interactions that occur when IDPs bind to partner molecules. This study has thus shown that the secondary structures of globular and intrinsically disordered proteins behave very differently upon dehydration, and that films are a potentially useful format for examining dehydrated soluble proteins and assessing IDPs structures. PMID:28097742

  14. Protein intrinsic disorder within the Potyvirus genus: from proteome-wide analysis to functional annotation.

    PubMed

    Charon, Justine; Theil, Sébastien; Nicaise, Valérie; Michon, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    Within proteins, intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are devoid of stable secondary and tertiary structures under physiological conditions and rather exist as dynamic ensembles of inter-converting conformers. Although ubiquitous in all domains of life, the intrinsic disorder content is highly variable in viral genomes. Over the years, functional annotations of disordered regions at the scale of the whole proteome have been conducted for several animal viruses. But to date, similar studies applied to plant viruses are still missing. Based on disorder prediction tools combined with annotation programs and evolutionary studies, we analyzed the intrinsic disorder content in Potyvirus, using a 10-species dataset representative of this genus diversity. In this paper, we revealed that: (i) the Potyvirus proteome displays high disorder content, (ii) disorder is conserved during Potyvirus evolution, suggesting a functional advantage of IDRs, (iii) IDRs evolve faster than ordered regions, and (iv) IDRs may be associated with major biological functions required for the Potyvirus cycle. Notably, the proteins P1, Coat protein (CP) and Viral genome-linked protein (VPg) display a high content of conserved disorder, enriched in specific motifs mimicking eukaryotic functional modules and suggesting strategies of host machinery hijacking. In these three proteins, IDRs are particularly conserved despite their high amino acid polymorphism, indicating a link to adaptive processes. Through this comprehensive study, we further investigate the biological relevance of intrinsic disorder in Potyvirus biology and we propose a functional annotation of potyviral proteome IDRs.

  15. Orderly order in protein intrinsic disorder distribution: disorder in 3500 proteomes from viruses and the three domains of life.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and intrinsically disordered protein regions are highly abundant in nature. However, the quantitative and qualitative measures of protein intrinsic disorder in species with known genomes are still not available. Furthermore, although the correlation between high fraction of disordered residues and advanced species has been reported, the details of this correlation and the connection between the disorder content and proteome complexity have not been reported as of yet. To fill this gap, we analysed entire proteomes of 3484 species from three domains of life (archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes) and from viruses. Our analysis revealed that the evolution process is characterized by distinctive patterns of changes in the protein intrinsic disorder content. We are showing here that viruses are characterized by the widest spread of the proteome disorder content (the percentage of disordered residues ranges from 7.3% in human coronavirus NL63 to 77.3% in Avian carcinoma virus). For several organisms, a clear correlation is seen between their disorder contents and habitats. In multicellular eukaryotes, there is a weak correlation between the complexity of an organism (evaluated as a number of different cell types) and its overall disorder content. For both the prokaryotes and eukaryotes, the disorder content is generally independent of the proteome size. However, disorder shows a sharp increase associated with the transition from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells. This suggests that the increased disorder content in eukaryotic proteomes might be used by nature to deal with the increased cell complexity due to the appearance of the various cellular compartments.

  16. Intrinsic Disorder in Male Sex Determination: Disorderedness of Proteins from the Sry Transcriptional Network.

    PubMed

    Merone, Jean; Nwogu, Onyekahi; Redington, Jennifer M; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-10-28

    Sex differentiation is a complex process where sexually indifferent embryo progressively acquires male or female characteristics via tightly controlled, perfectly timed, and sophisticatedly intertwined chain of events. This process is controlled and regulated by a set of specific proteins, with one of the first steps in sex differentiation being the activation of the Y-chromosomal Sry gene (sex-determining region Y) in males that acts as a switch from undifferentiated gonad somatic cells to testis development. There are several key players in this process, which constitute the Sry transcriptional network, and collective action of which governs testis determination. Although it is accepted now that many proteins engaged in signal transduction as well as regulation and control of various biological processes are intrinsically disordered (i.e., do not have unique structure and remain unstructured, or incompletely structured, under physiological conditions), the roles and profusion of intrinsic disorder in proteins involved in the male sex determination have not been accessed as of yet. The goal of this study is to cover this gap by analyzing some key players of the Sry transcriptional network. To this end, we employed a broad set of computational tools for intrinsic disorder analysis and conducted intensive literature search in order to gain information on the structural peculiarities of the Sry network-related proteins, their intrinsic disorder predispositions, and the roles of intrinsic disorder in their functions.

  17. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J.; Weik, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity. PMID:25774711

  18. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J; Weik, Martin

    2015-03-16

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  19. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J.; Weik, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  20. Functional Advantages of Conserved Intrinsic Disorder in RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Mihaly; Zsolyomi, Fruzsina; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Proteins form large macromolecular assemblies with RNA that govern essential molecular processes. RNA-binding proteins have often been associated with conformational flexibility, yet the extent and functional implications of their intrinsic disorder have never been fully assessed. Here, through large-scale analysis of comprehensive protein sequence and structure datasets we demonstrate the prevalence of intrinsic structural disorder in RNA-binding proteins and domains. We addressed their functionality through a quantitative description of the evolutionary conservation of disordered segments involved in binding, and investigated the structural implications of flexibility in terms of conformational stability and interface formation. We conclude that the functional role of intrinsically disordered protein segments in RNA-binding is two-fold: first, these regions establish extended, conserved electrostatic interfaces with RNAs via induced fit. Second, conformational flexibility enables them to target different RNA partners, providing multi-functionality, while also ensuring specificity. These findings emphasize the functional importance of intrinsically disordered regions in RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26439842

  1. Intrinsically disordered tau protein in Alzheimer's tangles: a coincidence or a rule?

    PubMed

    Skrabana, R; Skrabanova, M; Csokova, N; Sevcik, J; Novak, M

    2006-01-01

    Tau protein, the major constituent of neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies, is classified as intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). IDPs in contrast to globular proteins contain high proportion of polar and charged amino acids in their sequence, which results in the absence of a well-defined three-dimensional structure of the free protein. Structural flexibility of IDPs is required to perform their important role in many cellular processes. In the course of tauopathies, highly soluble disordered tau protein acquires rigid fold and forms highly insoluble filaments. Beneficial intrinsic disorder transforms into a fatal order: is it a coincidence, or is there an underlying reason for preferential IDPs assembly? In this review we present the structural characteristics of tau protein filamentous lesions in AD and discuss the tendency of IDPs to assembly and to form amyloid deposits (Ref: 65).

  2. Intrinsically disordered protein from a pathogenic mesophile Mycobacterium tuberculosis adopts structured conformation at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niti; Shukla, Swati; Kumar, Sanjiv; Suryawanshi, Anju; Chaudhry, Uma; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Maiti, Souvik

    2008-05-15

    Compared to eukaryotes, the occurrence of "intrinsically disordered" or "natively unfolded" proteins in prokaryotes has not been explored extensively. Here, we report the occurrence of an intrinsically disordered protein from the mesophilic human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The Histidine-tagged recombinant Rv3221c biotin-binding protein is intrinsically disordered at ambient and physiological growth temperatures as revealed by circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies. However, an increase in temperature induces a transition from disordered to structured state with a folding temperature of approximately 53 degrees C. Addition of a structure inducing solvent trifluoroethanol (TFE) causes the protein to fold at lower temperatures suggesting that TFE fosters hydrophobic interactions, which drives protein folding. Differential Scanning Calorimetry studies revealed that folding is endothermic and the transition from a disordered to structured state is continuous (higher-order), implying existence of intermediates during folding process. Secondary structure analysis revealed that the protein has propensity to form beta-sheets. This is in conformity with FTIR spectrum that showed an absorption peak at wave number of 1636 cm(-1), indicative of disordered beta-sheet conformation in the native state. These data suggest that although Rv3221c may be disordered under ambient or optimal growth temperature conditions, it has the potential to fold into ordered structure at high temperature driven by increased hydrophobic interactions. In contrast to the generally known behavior of other intrinsically disordered proteins folding at high temperature, Rv3221c does not appear to oligomerize or aggregate as revealed through numerous experiments including Congo red binding, Thioflavin T-binding, turbidity measurements, and examining molar ellipticity as a function of protein concentration. The amino acid composition of Rv3221c reveals that

  3. Toward a quantitative theory of intrinsically disordered proteins and their function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jintao; Faeder, James R; Camacho, Carlos J

    2009-11-24

    A large number of proteins are sufficiently unstable that their full 3D structure cannot be resolved. The origins of this intrinsic disorder are not well understood, but its ubiquitous presence undercuts the principle that a protein's structure determines its function. Here we present a quantitative theory that makes predictions regarding the role of intrinsic disorder in protein structure and function. In particular, we discuss the implications of analytical solutions of a series of fundamental thermodynamic models of protein interactions in which disordered proteins are characterized by positive folding free energies. We validate our predictions by assigning protein function by using the gene ontology classification--in which "protein binding", "catalytic activity", and "transcription regulator activity" are the three largest functional categories--and by performing genome-wide surveys of both the amount of disorder in these functional classes and binding affinities for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. Specifically, without assuming any a priori structure-function relationship, the theory predicts that both catalytic and low-affinity binding (K(d) greater, >or= 0(-7) M) proteins prefer ordered structures, whereas only high-affinity binding proteins (found mostly in eukaryotes) can tolerate disorder. Relevant to both transcription and signal transduction, the theory also explains how increasing disorder can tune the binding affinity to maximize the specificity of promiscuous interactions. Collectively, these studies provide insight into how natural selection acts on folding stability to optimize protein function.

  4. An assignment of intrinsically disordered regions of proteins based on NMR structures.

    PubMed

    Ota, Motonori; Koike, Ryotaro; Amemiya, Takayuki; Tenno, Takeshi; Romero, Pedro R; Hiroaki, Hidekazu; Dunker, A Keith; Fukuchi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not adopt stable three-dimensional structures in physiological conditions, yet these proteins play crucial roles in biological phenomena. In most cases, intrinsic disorder manifests itself in segments or domains of an IDP, called intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), but fully disordered IDPs also exist. Although IDRs can be detected as missing residues in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography, no protocol has been developed to identify IDRs from structures obtained by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). Here, we propose a computational method to assign IDRs based on NMR structures. We compared missing residues of X-ray structures with residue-wise deviations of NMR structures for identical proteins, and derived a threshold deviation that gives the best correlation of ordered and disordered regions of both structures. The obtained threshold of 3.2Å was applied to proteins whose structures were only determined by NMR, and the resulting IDRs were analyzed and compared to those of X-ray structures with no NMR counterpart in terms of sequence length, IDR fraction, protein function, cellular location, and amino acid composition, all of which suggest distinct characteristics. The structural knowledge of IDPs is still inadequate compared with that of structured proteins. Our method can collect and utilize IDRs from structures determined by NMR, potentially enhancing the understanding of IDPs.

  5. The Lifestyle Switch Protein Bd0108 of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus Is an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    PubMed Central

    Prehna, Gerd; Ramirez, Benjamin E.; Lovering, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a δ-proteobacterium that preys upon Salmonella spp., E. coli, and other Gram-negative bacteria. Bdellovibrio can grow axenically (host-independent, HI, rare and mutation-driven) or subsist via a predatory lifecycle (host-dependent, HD, the usual case). Upon contact with prey, B. bacteriovorus enters the host periplasm from where it slowly drains the host cytosol of nutrients for its own replication. At the core of this mechanism is a retractile pilus, whose architecture is regulated by the protein Bd0108 and its interaction with the neighboring gene product Bd0109. Deletion of bd0108 results in negligible pilus formation, whereas an internal deletion (the one that instigates host-independence) causes mis-regulation of pilus length. These mutations, along with a suite of naturally occurring bd0108 mutant strains, act to control the entry to HI growth. To further study the molecular mechanism of predatory regulation, we focused on the apparent lifecycle switch protein Bd0108. Here we characterize the solution structure and dynamics of Bd0108 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy complemented with additional biophysical methods. We then explore the interaction between Bd0108 and Bd0109 in detail utilizing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and NMR spectroscopy. Together our results demonstrate that Bd0108 is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) and that the interaction with Bd0109 is of low affinity. Furthermore, we observe that Bd0108 retains an IDP nature while binding Bd0109. From our data we conclude that Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus utilizes an intrinsically disordered protein to regulate its pilus and control predation signaling. PMID:25514156

  6. Intrinsic disorder modulates protein self-assembly and aggregation.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Alfonso; Kitchen, Craig; Kwan, Ann H; Sunde, Margaret; Dobson, Christopher M; Frenkel, Daan

    2012-05-01

    Protein molecules have evolved to adopt distinctive and well-defined functional and soluble states under physiological conditions. In some circumstances, however, proteins can self-assemble into fibrillar aggregates designated as amyloid fibrils. In vivo these processes are normally associated with severe pathological conditions but can sometimes have functional relevance. One such example is the hydrophobins, whose aggregation at air-water interfaces serves to create robust protein coats that help fungal spores to resist wetting and thus facilitate their dispersal in the air. We have performed multiscale simulations to address the molecular determinants governing the formation of functional amyloids by the class I fungal hydrophobin EAS. Extensive samplings of full-atom replica-exchange molecular dynamics and coarse-grained simulations have allowed us to identify factors that distinguish aggregation-prone from highly soluble states of EAS. As a result of unfavourable entropic terms, highly dynamical regions are shown to exert a crucial influence on the propensity of the protein to aggregate under different conditions. More generally, our findings suggest a key role that specific flexible structural elements can play to ensure the existence of soluble and functional states of proteins under physiological conditions.

  7. HSF transcription factor family, heat shock response, and protein intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Westerheide, Sandy D; Raynes, Rachel; Powell, Chase; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2012-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are highly abundant in all kingdoms of life, and several protein functional classes, such as transcription factors, transcriptional regulators, hub and scaffold proteins, signaling proteins, and chaperones are especially enriched in intrinsic disorder. One of the unique cellular reactions to protein damaging stress is the so-called heat shock response that results in the upregulation of heat shock proteins including molecular chaperones. This molecular protective mechanism is conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes and allows an organism to respond to various proteotoxic stressors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, exposure to heavy metals, and drugs. The heat shock response- related proteins can be expressed during normal conditions (e.g., during the cell growth and development) or can be induced by various pathological conditions, such as infection, inflammation, and protein conformation diseases. The initiation of the heat shock response is manifested by the activation of the heat shock transcription factors HSF 1, part of a family of related HSF transcription factors. This review analyzes the abundance and functional roles of intrinsic disorder in various heat shock transcription factors and clearly shows that the heat shock response requires HSF flexibility to be more efficient.

  8. Structural Diversity in Free and Bound States of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.A.; Allaire, M.; Dancheck, B.; Ragusa, M.J.; Forman-Kay, J.D.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2010-09-08

    Complete folding is not a prerequisite for protein function, as disordered and partially folded states of proteins frequently perform essential biological functions. In order to understand their functions at the molecular level, we utilized diverse experimental measurements to calculate ensemble models of three nonhomologous, intrinsically disordered proteins: I-2, spinophilin, and DARPP-32, which bind to and regulate protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). The models demonstrate that these proteins have dissimilar propensities for secondary and tertiary structure in their unbound forms. Direct comparison of these ensemble models with recently determined PP1 complex structures suggests a significant role for transient, preformed structure in the interactions of these proteins with PP1. Finally, we generated an ensemble model of partially disordered I-2 bound to PP1 that provides insight into the relationship between flexibility and biological function in this dynamic complex.

  9. Structural diversity in free and bound states of intrinsically disordered protein phosphatase 1 regulators

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Joseph A.; Dancheck, Barbara; Ragusa, Michael J.; Allaire, Marc; Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Complete folding is not a prerequisite for protein function, as disordered and partially folded states of proteins frequently perform essential biological functions. In order to understand their functions at the molecular level, we utilized diverse experimental measurements to calculate ensemble models of three non-homologous, intrinsically disordered proteins: I-2, spinophilin and DARPP-32, which bind to and regulate protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). The models demonstrate that these proteins have dissimilar propensities for secondary and tertiary structure in their unbound forms. Direct comparison of these ensemble models with recently determined PP1 complex structures suggests a significant role for transient, pre-formed structure in the interactions of these proteins with PP1. Finally, we generated an ensemble model of partially disordered I-2 bound to PP1 that provides insight into the relationship between flexibility and biological function in this dynamic complex. PMID:20826336

  10. The contribution of intrinsically disordered regions to protein function, cellular complexity, and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    In the 1960s, Christian Anfinsen postulated that the unique three-dimensional structure of a protein is determined by its amino acid sequence. This work laid the foundation for the sequence–structure–function paradigm, which states that the sequence of a protein determines its structure, and structure determines function. However, a class of polypeptide segments called intrinsically disordered regions does not conform to this postulate. In this review, I will first describe established and emerging ideas about how disordered regions contribute to protein function. I will then discuss molecular principles by which regulatory mechanisms, such as alternative splicing and asymmetric localization of transcripts that encode disordered regions, can increase the functional versatility of proteins. Finally, I will discuss how disordered regions contribute to human disease and the emergence of cellular complexity during organismal evolution. PMID:27911701

  11. Thermally induced structural changes of intrinsically disordered small heat shock protein Hsp22.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Alexey S; Markov, Denis I; Gusev, Nikolai B; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2009-12-01

    We applied different methods (differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and intrinsic fluorescence) to investigate the thermal-induced changes in the structure of small heat shock protein Hsp22. It has been shown that this protein undergoes thermal-induced unfolding that occurs within a very broad temperature range (from 27 degrees C to 80 degrees C and above), and this is accompanied by complete disappearance of alpha-helices, significant decrease in beta-sheets content, and by pronounced changes in the intrinsic fluorescence. The results confirm predictions that Hsp22 belongs to the family of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) with certain parts of its molecule (presumably, in the alpha-crystallin domain) retaining folded structure and undergoing reversible thermal unfolding. The results are also discussed in terms of downhill folding scenario.

  12. Ligand clouds around protein clouds: a scenario of ligand binding with intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fan; Yu, Chen; Lai, Luhua; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) were found to be widely associated with human diseases and may serve as potential drug design targets. However, drug design targeting IDPs is still in the very early stages. Progress in drug design is usually achieved using experimental screening; however, the structural disorder of IDPs makes it difficult to characterize their interaction with ligands using experiments alone. To better understand the structure of IDPs and their interactions with small molecule ligands, we performed extensive simulations on the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide and its binding to a reported small molecule inhibitor, ligand 10074-A4. We found that the conformational space of the apo c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide was rather dispersed and that the conformations of the peptide were stabilized mainly by charge interactions and hydrogen bonds. Under the binding of the ligand, c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ remained disordered. The ligand was found to bind to c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ at different sites along the chain and behaved like a 'ligand cloud'. In contrast to ligand binding to more rigid target proteins that usually results in a dominant bound structure, ligand binding to IDPs may better be described as ligand clouds around protein clouds. Nevertheless, the binding of the ligand and a non-ligand to the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ target could be clearly distinguished. The present study provides insights that will help improve rational drug design that targets IDPs.

  13. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease.

  14. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  15. Intrinsic Disorder in Transmembrane Proteins: Roles in Signaling and Topology Prediction.

    PubMed

    Bürgi, Jérôme; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are peculiar stretches of amino acids that lack stable conformations in solution. Intrinsic Disorder containing Proteins (IDP) are defined by the presence of at least one large IDR and have been linked to multiple cellular processes including cell signaling, DNA binding and cancer. Here we used computational analyses and publicly available databases to deepen insight into the prevalence and function of IDRs specifically in transmembrane proteins, which are somewhat neglected in most studies. We found that 50% of transmembrane proteins have at least one IDR of 30 amino acids or more. Interestingly, these domains preferentially localize to the cytoplasmic side especially of multi-pass transmembrane proteins, suggesting that disorder prediction could increase the confidence of topology prediction algorithms. This was supported by the successful prediction of the topology of the uncharacterized multi-pass transmembrane protein TMEM117, as confirmed experimentally. Pathway analysis indicated that IDPs are enriched in cell projection and axons and appear to play an important role in cell adhesion, signaling and ion binding. In addition, we found that IDP are enriched in phosphorylation sites, a crucial post translational modification in signal transduction, when compared to fully ordered proteins and to be implicated in more protein-protein interaction events. Accordingly, IDPs were highly enriched in short protein binding regions called Molecular Recognition Features (MoRFs). Altogether our analyses strongly support the notion that the transmembrane IDPs act as hubs in cellular signal events.

  16. Deciphering the cause of evolutionary variance within intrinsically disordered regions in human proteins.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sanghita; Chakraborty, Sandip; De, Rajat K

    2017-02-01

    Why the intrinsically disordered regions evolve within human proteome has became an interesting question for a decade. Till date, it remains an unsolved yet an intriguing issue to investigate why some of the disordered regions evolve rapidly while the rest are highly conserved across mammalian species. Identifying the key biological factors, responsible for the variation in the conservation rate of different disordered regions within the human proteome, may revisit the above issue. We emphasized that among the other biological features (multifunctionality, gene essentiality, protein connectivity, number of unique domains, gene expression level and expression breadth) considered in our study, the number of unique protein domains acts as a strong determinant that negatively influences the conservation of disordered regions. In this context, we justified that proteins having a fewer types of domains preferably need to conserve their disordered regions to enhance their structural flexibility which in turn will facilitate their molecular interactions. In contrast, the selection pressure acting on the stretches of disordered regions is not so strong in the case of multi-domains proteins. Therefore, we reasoned that the presence of conserved disordered stretches may compensate the functions of multiple domains within a single domain protein. Interestingly, we noticed that the influence of the unique domain number and expression level acts differently on the evolution of disordered regions from that of well-structured ones.

  17. Intermolecular Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement (PRE) Studies of Transient Complexes in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Janowska, Maria K; Baum, Jean

    2016-01-01

    NMR interchain paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) techniques are a very powerful approach for detecting transient interchain interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins. These experiments, requiring a mixed sample containing a 1:1 ratio of isotope-labeled (15)N protein and natural abundance (14)N protein with a paramagnetic spin label, provide data that is limited to interchain interactions only. Application of these experiments to weakly associated transient species such as those that are present in the very early stages of self-assembly processes will aid our understanding of protein aggregation or fibril formation processes.

  18. Single-Molecule FRET Spectroscopy and the Polymer Physics of Unfolded and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Benjamin; Soranno, Andrea; Hofmann, Hagen; Nettels, Daniel

    2016-07-05

    The properties of unfolded proteins have long been of interest because of their importance to the protein folding process. Recently, the surprising prevalence of unstructured regions or entirely disordered proteins under physiological conditions has led to the realization that such intrinsically disordered proteins can be functional even in the absence of a folded structure. However, owing to their broad conformational distributions, many of the properties of unstructured proteins are difficult to describe with the established concepts of structural biology. We have thus seen a reemergence of polymer physics as a versatile framework for understanding their structure and dynamics. An important driving force for these developments has been single-molecule spectroscopy, as it allows structural heterogeneity, intramolecular distance distributions, and dynamics to be quantified over a wide range of timescales and solution conditions. Polymer concepts provide an important basis for relating the physical properties of unstructured proteins to folding and function.

  19. Intrinsic Disorder of the C-Terminal Domain of Drosophila Methoprene-Tolerant Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kolonko, Marta; Ożga, Katarzyna; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Taube, Michał; Kozak, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej; Greb-Markiewicz, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Methoprene tolerant protein (Met) has recently been confirmed as the long-sought juvenile hormone (JH) receptor. This protein plays a significant role in the cross-talk of the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and JH signalling pathways, which are important for control of insect development and maturation. Met belongs to the basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH-PAS) family of transcription factors. In these proteins, bHLH domains are typically responsible for DNA binding and dimerization, whereas the PAS domains are crucial for the choice of dimerization partner and the specificity of target gene activation. The C-terminal region is usually responsible for the regulation of protein complex activity. The sequence of the Met C-terminal region (MetC) is not homologous to any sequence deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and has not been structurally characterized to date. In this study, we show that the MetC exhibits properties typical for an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). The final averaged structure obtained with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments indicates that intrinsically disordered MetC exists in an extended conformation. This extended shape and the long unfolded regions characterise proteins with high flexibility and dynamics. Therefore, we suggest that the multiplicity of conformations adopted by the disordered MetC is crucial for its activity as a biological switch modulating the cross-talk of different signalling pathways in insects. PMID:27657508

  20. Targeting intrinsically disordered proteins in neurodegenerative and protein dysfunction diseases: another illustration of the D(2) concept.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2010-08-01

    Many biologically active proteins, which are usually called intrinsically disordered or natively unfolded proteins, lack stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. Their functions complement the functional repertoire of ordered proteins, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) often being involved in regulation, signaling and control. Their amino acid sequences and compositions are very different from those of ordered proteins, making reliable identification of IDPs possible at the proteome level. IDPs are highly abundant in various human diseases, including neurodegeneration and other protein dysfunction maladies and, therefore, represent attractive novel drug targets. Some of the aspects of IDPs, as well as their roles in neurodegeneration and protein dysfunction diseases, are discussed in this article, together with the peculiarities of IDPs as potential drug targets.

  1. Hydrodynamic Radii of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Determined from Experimental Polyproline II Propensities.

    PubMed

    Tomasso, Maria E; Tarver, Micheal J; Devarajan, Deepa; Whitten, Steven T

    2016-01-01

    The properties of disordered proteins are thought to depend on intrinsic conformational propensities for polyproline II (PPII) structure. While intrinsic PPII propensities have been measured for the common biological amino acids in short peptides, the ability of these experimentally determined propensities to quantitatively reproduce structural behavior in intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) has not been established. Presented here are results from molecular simulations of disordered proteins showing that the hydrodynamic radius (Rh) can be predicted from experimental PPII propensities with good agreement, even when charge-based considerations are omitted. The simulations demonstrate that Rh and chain propensity for PPII structure are linked via a simple power-law scaling relationship, which was tested using the experimental Rh of 22 IDPs covering a wide range of peptide lengths, net charge, and sequence composition. Charge effects on Rh were found to be generally weak when compared to PPII effects on Rh. Results from this study indicate that the hydrodynamic dimensions of IDPs are evidence of considerable sequence-dependent backbone propensities for PPII structure that qualitatively, if not quantitatively, match conformational propensities measured in peptides.

  2. From sequence and forces to structure, function, and evolution of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Forman-Kay, Julie D; Mittag, Tanja

    2013-09-03

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which lack persistent structure, are a challenge to structural biology due to the inapplicability of standard methods for characterization of folded proteins as well as their deviation from the dominant structure/function paradigm. Their widespread presence and involvement in biological function, however, has spurred the growing acceptance of the importance of IDPs and the development of new tools for studying their structure, dynamics, and function. The interplay of folded and disordered domains or regions for function and the existence of a continuum of protein states with respect to conformational energetics, motional timescales, and compactness are shaping a unified understanding of structure-dynamics-disorder/function relationships. In the 20(th) anniversary of Structure, we provide a historical perspective on the investigation of IDPs and summarize the sequence features and physical forces that underlie their unique structural, functional, and evolutionary properties.

  3. From Sequence and Forces to Structure, Function and Evolution of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Mittag, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which lack persistent structure, are a challenge to structural biology due to the inapplicability of standard methods for characterization of folded proteins as well as their deviation from the dominant structure/function paradigm. Their widespread presence and involvement in biological function, however, has spurred the growing acceptance of the importance of IDPs and the development of new tools for studying their structure, dynamics and function. The interplay of folded and disordered domains or regions for function and the existence of a continuum of protein states with respect to conformational energetics, motional timescales and compactness is shaping a unified understanding of structure-dynamics-disorder/function relationships. On the 20th anniversary of this journal, Structure, we provide a historical perspective on the investigation of IDPs and summarize the sequence features and physical forces that underlie their unique structural, functional and evolutionary properties. PMID:24010708

  4. Osmolyte-induced folding of an intrinsically disordered protein: folding mechanism in the absence of ligand.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chu; Oas, Terrence G

    2010-06-29

    Understanding the interconversion between thermodynamically distinguishable states present in a protein folding pathway provides not only the kinetics and energetics of protein folding but also insights into the functional roles of these states in biological systems. The protein component of the bacterial RNase P holoenzyme from Bacillus subtilis (P protein) was previously shown to be unfolded in the absence of its cognate RNA or other anionic ligands. P protein was used in this study as a model system to explore general features of intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) folding mechanisms. The use of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), an osmolyte that stabilizes the unliganded folded form of the protein, enabled us to study the folding process of P protein in the absence of ligand. Transient stopped-flow kinetic traces at various final TMAO concentrations exhibited multiphasic kinetics. Equilibrium "cotitration" experiments were performed using both TMAO and urea during the titration to produce a urea-TMAO titration surface of P protein. Both kinetic and equilibrium studies show evidence of a previously undetected intermediate state in the P protein folding process. The intermediate state is significantly populated, and the folding rate constants are relatively slow compared to those of intrinsically folded proteins similar in size and topology. The experiments and analysis described serve as a useful example for mechanistic folding studies of other IDPs.

  5. Study conformational dynamics of intrinsically disordered protein by PET-FCS (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlein, Joerg; Zhou, Man; Van, Qui; Gregor, Ingo

    2016-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) form a large and functionally important class of proteins that lack an ordered three-dimensional structure. IDPs play an important role in cell signaling, transcription, or chromatin remodeling. The discovery of IDPs has challenged the traditional paradigm of protein structure which states that protein function depends on a well-defined three-dimensional structure. Due to their high conformational flexibility and the lack of ordered secondary structure, it is challenging to study the flexible structure, dynamics and energetics of these proteins with conventional methods. In our work, we employ photoinduced electron transfer (PET) combined with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for studying the conformational dynamics of one specific class of IDPs: phenylalanine-glycine rich protein domains (FG repeats) which are dominant building blocks within the pore of nuclear pore complexes. Nuclear pore complexes are large protein assemblies that cross the nuclear envelope and form selective barrier, which regulate bidirectional exchange between nucleus and cytoplasm.

  6. Intrinsically Disordered Energy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such ‘intrinsically disordered’ landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an -helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium.

  7. Intrinsically Disordered Energy Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such ‘intrinsically disordered’ landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an -helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium. PMID:25999294

  8. Unreported intrinsic disorder in proteins: Building connections to the literature on IDPs

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    This review opens a new series entitled “Unreported intrinsic disorder in proteins.” The goal of this series is to bring attention of researchers to an interesting phenomenon of missed (or overlooked, or ignored, or unreported) disorder. This series serves as a companion to “Digested Disorder” which provides a quarterly review of papers on intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) found by standard literature searches. The need for this alternative series results from the observation that there are numerous publications that describe IDPs (or hybrid proteins with ordered and disordered regions) yet fail to recognize many of the key discoveries and publications in the IDP field. By ignoring the body of work on IDPs, such publications often fail to relate their findings to prior discoveries or fail to explore the obvious implications of their work. Thus, the goal of this series is not only to review these very interesting and important papers, but also to point out how each paper relates to the IDP field and show how common tools in the IDP field can readily take the findings in new directions or provide a broader context for the reported findings. PMID:28232880

  9. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level. PMID:26390327

  10. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level.

  11. Structural transitions in the intrinsically disordered Parkinson's protein alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliezer, David

    2013-03-01

    The protein alpha-synuclein is genetically and histopathologically associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Although considered to belong to the category of intrinsically disordered proteins for well over a decade, recent reports have suggested that synuclein may actually exist predominantly in a native, well-structured, tetrameric form. Experiments using in-cell NMR, which bypass potential structural perturbations caused by purification protocols, conclusively demonstrate that recombinant synuclein is in fact highly disordered and monomeric. In the presence of membranes, however, the protein undergoes a coil-to-helix transition to adopt several highly helical conformations, which are proposed to mediate both its normal function and its membrane-induced aggregation into amyloid fibrils. Supported by NIH grant R37AG019391

  12. p53 Proteoforms and Intrinsic Disorder: An Illustration of the Protein Structure-Function Continuum Concept.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-11-10

    Although it is one of the most studied proteins, p53 continues to be an enigma. This protein has numerous biological functions, possesses intrinsically disordered regions crucial for its functionality, can form both homo-tetramers and isoform-based hetero-tetramers, and is able to interact with many binding partners. It contains numerous posttranslational modifications, has several isoforms generated by alternative splicing, alternative promoter usage or alternative initiation of translation, and is commonly mutated in different cancers. Therefore, p53 serves as an important illustration of the protein structure-function continuum concept, where the generation of multiple proteoforms by various mechanisms defines the ability of this protein to have a multitude of structurally and functionally different states. Considering p53 in the light of a proteoform-based structure-function continuum represents a non-canonical and conceptually new contemplation of structure, regulation, and functionality of this important protein.

  13. p53 Proteoforms and Intrinsic Disorder: An Illustration of the Protein Structure–Function Continuum Concept

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is one of the most studied proteins, p53 continues to be an enigma. This protein has numerous biological functions, possesses intrinsically disordered regions crucial for its functionality, can form both homo-tetramers and isoform-based hetero-tetramers, and is able to interact with many binding partners. It contains numerous posttranslational modifications, has several isoforms generated by alternative splicing, alternative promoter usage or alternative initiation of translation, and is commonly mutated in different cancers. Therefore, p53 serves as an important illustration of the protein structure–function continuum concept, where the generation of multiple proteoforms by various mechanisms defines the ability of this protein to have a multitude of structurally and functionally different states. Considering p53 in the light of a proteoform-based structure–function continuum represents a non-canonical and conceptually new contemplation of structure, regulation, and functionality of this important protein. PMID:27834926

  14. Rational design of antibodies targeting specific epitopes within intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Sormanni, Pietro; Aprile, Francesco A; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-08-11

    Antibodies are powerful tools in life sciences research, as well as in diagnostic and therapeutic applications, because of their ability to bind given molecules with high affinity and specificity. Using current methods, however, it is laborious and sometimes difficult to generate antibodies to target specific epitopes within a protein, in particular if these epitopes are not effective antigens. Here we present a method to rationally design antibodies to enable them to bind virtually any chosen disordered epitope in a protein. The procedure consists in the sequence-based design of one or more complementary peptides targeting a selected disordered epitope and the subsequent grafting of such peptides on an antibody scaffold. We illustrate the method by designing six single-domain antibodies to bind different epitopes within three disease-related intrinsically disordered proteins and peptides (α-synuclein, Aβ42, and IAPP). Our results show that all these designed antibodies bind their targets with good affinity and specificity. As an example of an application, we show that one of these antibodies inhibits the aggregation of α-synuclein at substoichiometric concentrations and that binding occurs at the selected epitope. Taken together, these results indicate that the design strategy that we propose makes it possible to obtain antibodies targeting given epitopes in disordered proteins or protein regions.

  15. Primary structure and solution conditions determine conformational ensemble properties of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hsuan-Han Alberto

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a class of proteins that do not exhibit well-defined three-dimensional structures. The absence of structure is intrinsic to their amino acid sequences, which are characterized by low hydrophobicity and high net charge per residue compared to folded proteins. Contradicting the classic structure-function paradigm, IDPs are capable of interacting with high specificity and affinity, often acquiring order in complex with protein and nucleic acid binding partners. This phenomenon is evident during cellular activities involving IDPs, which include transcriptional and translational regulation, cell cycle control, signal transduction, molecular assembly, and molecular recognition. Although approximately 30% of eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, the nature of IDP conformational ensembles remains unclear. In this dissertation, we describe relationships connecting characteristics of IDP conformational ensembles to their primary structures and solution conditions. Using molecular simulations and fluorescence experiments on a set of base-rich IDPs, we find that net charge per residue segregates conformational ensembles along a globule-to-coil transition. Speculatively generalizing this result, we propose a phase diagram that predicts an IDP's average size and shape based on sequence composition and use it to generate hypotheses for a broad set of intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Simulations reveal that acid-rich IDRs, unlike their oppositely charged base-rich counterparts, exhibit disordered globular ensembles despite intra-chain repulsive electrostatic interactions. This apparent asymmetry is sensitive to simulation parameters for representing alkali and halide salt ions, suggesting that solution conditions modulate IDP conformational ensembles. We refine the ion parameters using a calibration procedure that relies exclusively on crystal lattice properties. Simulations with these parameters recover swollen

  16. An Overview of Predictors for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins over 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzong; Feng, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Jing; Liu, Wen; Rong, Li; Bao, Jinku

    2015-09-29

    The sequence-structure-function paradigm of proteins has been changed by the occurrence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Benefiting from the structural disorder, IDPs are of particular importance in biological processes like regulation and signaling. IDPs are associated with human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, amyloidoses, and several other maladies. IDPs attract a high level of interest and a substantial effort has been made to develop experimental and computational methods. So far, more than 70 prediction tools have been developed since 1997, within which 17 predictors were created in the last five years. Here, we presented an overview of IDPs predictors developed during 2010-2014. We analyzed the algorithms used for IDPs prediction by these tools and we also discussed the basic concept of various prediction methods for IDPs. The comparison of prediction performance among these tools is discussed as well.

  17. An Overview of Predictors for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins over 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianzong; Feng, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Jing; Liu, Wen; Rong, Li; Bao, Jinku

    2015-01-01

    The sequence-structure-function paradigm of proteins has been changed by the occurrence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Benefiting from the structural disorder, IDPs are of particular importance in biological processes like regulation and signaling. IDPs are associated with human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, amyloidoses, and several other maladies. IDPs attract a high level of interest and a substantial effort has been made to develop experimental and computational methods. So far, more than 70 prediction tools have been developed since 1997, within which 17 predictors were created in the last five years. Here, we presented an overview of IDPs predictors developed during 2010–2014. We analyzed the algorithms used for IDPs prediction by these tools and we also discussed the basic concept of various prediction methods for IDPs. The comparison of prediction performance among these tools is discussed as well. PMID:26426014

  18. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed `clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Powder Model of the Intrinsically Disordered Protein Tau.

    PubMed

    Fichou, Yann; Heyden, Matthias; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Weik, Martin; Tobias, Douglas J

    2015-10-01

    The tau protein, whose aggregates are involved in Alzheimer's disease, is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that regulates microtubule activity in neurons. An IDP lacks a single, well-defined structure and, rather, constantly exchanges among multiple conformations. In order to study IDP dynamics, the combination of experimental techniques, such as neutron scattering, and computational techniques, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is a powerful approach. Amorphous hydrated powder samples have been very useful for studying protein internal dynamics experimentally, e.g., using neutron scattering. Thus, there is demand for realistic in silico models of hydrated protein powders. Here we present an MD simulation analysis of a powder hydrated at 0.4 g water/g protein of the IDP tau in the temperature range 20-300 K. By comparing with neutron scattering data, we identify the protein-water interface as the predominant feature determining IDP dynamics. The so-called protein dynamical transition is shown to be attenuated, but not suppressed, in the parts of the protein that are not exposed to the solvent. In addition, we find similarities in the mean-squared displacements of the core of a globular protein and "dry" clusters formed by the IDP in hydrated powders. Thus, the ps to ns dynamics of proteins in hydrated powders originate mainly from those residues in contact with solvent. We propose that by measuring the dynamics of protein assemblies, such as aggregates, one might assess qualitatively their state of hydration.

  20. A decade and a half of protein intrinsic disorder: Biology still waits for physics

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    The abundant existence of proteins and regions that possess specific functions without being uniquely folded into unique 3D structures has become accepted by a significant number of protein scientists. Sequences of these intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and IDP regions (IDPRs) are characterized by a number of specific features, such as low overall hydrophobicity and high net charge which makes these proteins predictable. IDPs/IDPRs possess large hydrodynamic volumes, low contents of ordered secondary structure, and are characterized by high structural heterogeneity. They are very flexible, but some may undergo disorder to order transitions in the presence of natural ligands. The degree of these structural rearrangements varies over a very wide range. IDPs/IDPRs are tightly controlled under the normal conditions and have numerous specific functions that complement functions of ordered proteins and domains. When lacking proper control, they have multiple roles in pathogenesis of various human diseases. Gaining structural and functional information about these proteins is a challenge, since they do not typically “freeze” while their “pictures are taken.” However, despite or perhaps because of the experimental challenges, these fuzzy objects with fuzzy structures and fuzzy functions are among the most interesting targets for modern protein research. This review briefly summarizes some of the recent advances in this exciting field and considers some of the basic lessons learned from the analysis of physics, chemistry, and biology of IDPs. PMID:23553817

  1. SS-Stabilizing Proteins Rationally: Intrinsic Disorder-Based Design of Stabilizing Disulphide Bridges in GFP.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bogdan S; Povarnitsyna, Tatiana V; Glukhov, Anatoly S; Melnik, Tatyana N; Uversky, Vladimir N; Sarma, Ramaswamy H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The most attractive and methodologically convenient way to enhance protein stability is via the introduction of disulphide bond(s). However, the effect of the artificially introduced SS-bond on protein stability is often quite unpredictable. This raises the question of how to choose the protein sites in an intelligent manner, so that the 'fastening' of these sites by the SS-bond(s) would provide maximal protein stability. We hypothesize that the successful design of a stabilizing SS-bond requires finding highly mobile protein regions. Using GFP as an illustrative example, we demonstrate that the knowledge of the peculiarities of the intramolecular hydrophobic interactions, combined with the understanding of the local intrinsic disorder propensities (that can be evaluated by various disorder predictors, e.g., PONDRFIT), is sufficient to find the candidate sites for the introduction of stabilizing SS-bridge(s). In fact, our analysis revealed that the insertion of the engineered SS-bridge between two highly flexible regions of GFP noticeably increased the conformational stability of this protein toward the thermal and chemical unfolding. Therefore, our study represents a novel approach for the rational design of stabilizing disulphide bridges in proteins.

  2. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, J. Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G.; Sánchez, Ignacio E.

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage “Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis”. PMID:26674530

  3. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, J Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G; Sánchez, Ignacio E

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage "Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis".

  4. In-cell NMR of intrinsically disordered proteins in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yutaka; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Smith, Brian O

    2012-01-01

    In-cell NMR, i.e., the acquisition of heteronuclear multidimensional NMR of biomacromolecules inside living cells, is, to our knowledge, the only method for investigating the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of proteins at atomic detail in the intracellular environment. Since the inception of the method, intrinsically disordered proteins have been regarded as particular targets for in-cell NMR, due to their expected sensitivity to the molecular crowding in the intracellular environment. While both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells can be used as host cells for in-cell NMR, prokaryotic in-cell NMR, particularly employing commonly used protein overexpression systems in Escherichia coli cells, is the most accessible approach. In this chapter we describe general procedures for obtaining in-cell NMR spectra in E. coli cells.

  5. Novel methods based on 13C detection to study intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felli, Isabella C.; Pierattelli, Roberta

    2014-04-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by highly flexible solvent exposed backbones and can sample many different conformations. These properties confer them functional advantages, complementary to those of folded proteins, which need to be characterized to expand our view of how protein structural and dynamic features affect function beyond the static picture of a single well defined 3D structure that has influenced so much our way of thinking. NMR spectroscopy provides a unique tool for the atomic resolution characterization of highly flexible macromolecules in general and of IDPs in particular. The peculiar properties of IDPs however have profound effects on spectroscopic parameters. It is thus worth thinking about these aspects to make the best use of the great potential of NMR spectroscopy to contribute to this fascinating field of research. In particular, after many years of dealing with exclusively heteronuclear NMR experiments based on 13C direct detection, we would like here to address their relevance when studying IDPs.

  6. Smoothing molecular interactions: the "kinetic buffer" effect of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Zhirong

    2010-12-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) widely participate in molecular recognition and signaling processes in cells by interacting with other molecules. Compared with ordered proteins, IDPs usually possess stronger intermolecular interactions in binding. As a result, the interface structure of IDPs in complexes is distinct from that of ordered-protein complexes, and this difference may have essential effect on the response to various perturbations in a cell. In this study, we examined the perturbations of intermolecular interactions and temperature on the coupled folding and binding processes of pKID to KIX domains by performing molecular dynamics simulations. By comparing a series of virtual pKID systems with various degree of disorder, we found that the complex stability and the binding kinetics of the disordered systems were less sensitive to the perturbations than the ordered systems. The origin of the lower response sensitivity of IDPs was attributed to their higher flexibility in the complex interface, which was further supported by an analysis on protein complex structures. On the basis of our simulations and results from the literature, we speculate IDPs may not only interact with their biological partners with high specificity and low affinity but also may be resistant to the perturbations in the environment and transmit signals fast and smooth. We proposed to name it the "kinetic buffer" effect.

  7. Large-scale analysis of intrinsic disorder flavors and associated functions in the protein sequence universe.

    PubMed

    Necci, Marco; Piovesan, Damiano; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-12-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) in proteins has been extensively described for the last decade; a large-scale classification of ID in proteins is mostly missing. Here, we provide an extensive analysis of ID in the protein universe on the UniProt database derived from sequence-based predictions in MobiDB. Almost half the sequences contain an ID region of at least five residues. About 9% of proteins have a long ID region of over 20 residues which are more abundant in Eukaryotic organisms and most frequently cover less than 20% of the sequence. A small subset of about 67,000 (out of over 80 million) proteins is fully disordered and mostly found in Viruses. Most proteins have only one ID, with short ID evenly distributed along the sequence and long ID overrepresented in the center. The charged residue composition of Das and Pappu was used to classify ID proteins by structural propensities and corresponding functional enrichment. Swollen Coils seem to be used mainly as structural components and in biosynthesis in both Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes. In Bacteria, they are confined in the nucleoid and in Viruses provide DNA binding function. Coils & Hairpins seem to be specialized in ribosome binding and methylation activities. Globules & Tadpoles bind antigens in Eukaryotes but are involved in killing other organisms and cytolysis in Bacteria. The Undefined class is used by Bacteria to bind toxic substances and mediate transport and movement between and within organisms in Viruses. Fully disordered proteins behave similarly, but are enriched for glycine residues and extracellular structures.

  8. Identification of a Drug Targeting an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Involved in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Neira, José L.; Bintz, Jennifer; Arruebo, María; Rizzuti, Bruno; Bonacci, Thomas; Vega, Sonia; Lanas, Angel; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Iovanna, Juan L.; Abián, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are prevalent in eukaryotes, performing signaling and regulatory functions. Often associated with human diseases, they constitute drug-development targets. NUPR1 is a multifunctional IDP, over-expressed and involved in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) development. By screening 1120 FDA-approved compounds, fifteen candidates were selected, and their interactions with NUPR1 were characterized by experimental and simulation techniques. The protein remained disordered upon binding to all fifteen candidates. These compounds were tested in PDAC-derived cell-based assays, and all induced cell-growth arrest and senescence, reduced cell migration, and decreased chemoresistance, mimicking NUPR1-deficiency. The most effective compound completely arrested tumor development in vivo on xenografted PDAC-derived cells in mice. Besides reporting the discovery of a compound targeting an intact IDP and specifically active against PDAC, our study proves the possibility to target the ‘fuzzy’ interface of a protein that remains disordered upon binding to its natural biological partners or to selected drugs. PMID:28054562

  9. Identification of a Drug Targeting an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Involved in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neira, José L; Bintz, Jennifer; Arruebo, María; Rizzuti, Bruno; Bonacci, Thomas; Vega, Sonia; Lanas, Angel; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Iovanna, Juan L; Abián, Olga

    2017-01-05

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are prevalent in eukaryotes, performing signaling and regulatory functions. Often associated with human diseases, they constitute drug-development targets. NUPR1 is a multifunctional IDP, over-expressed and involved in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) development. By screening 1120 FDA-approved compounds, fifteen candidates were selected, and their interactions with NUPR1 were characterized by experimental and simulation techniques. The protein remained disordered upon binding to all fifteen candidates. These compounds were tested in PDAC-derived cell-based assays, and all induced cell-growth arrest and senescence, reduced cell migration, and decreased chemoresistance, mimicking NUPR1-deficiency. The most effective compound completely arrested tumor development in vivo on xenografted PDAC-derived cells in mice. Besides reporting the discovery of a compound targeting an intact IDP and specifically active against PDAC, our study proves the possibility to target the 'fuzzy' interface of a protein that remains disordered upon binding to its natural biological partners or to selected drugs.

  10. Identification of a Drug Targeting an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Involved in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neira, José L.; Bintz, Jennifer; Arruebo, María; Rizzuti, Bruno; Bonacci, Thomas; Vega, Sonia; Lanas, Angel; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Iovanna, Juan L.; Abián, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are prevalent in eukaryotes, performing signaling and regulatory functions. Often associated with human diseases, they constitute drug-development targets. NUPR1 is a multifunctional IDP, over-expressed and involved in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) development. By screening 1120 FDA-approved compounds, fifteen candidates were selected, and their interactions with NUPR1 were characterized by experimental and simulation techniques. The protein remained disordered upon binding to all fifteen candidates. These compounds were tested in PDAC-derived cell-based assays, and all induced cell-growth arrest and senescence, reduced cell migration, and decreased chemoresistance, mimicking NUPR1-deficiency. The most effective compound completely arrested tumor development in vivo on xenografted PDAC-derived cells in mice. Besides reporting the discovery of a compound targeting an intact IDP and specifically active against PDAC, our study proves the possibility to target the ‘fuzzy’ interface of a protein that remains disordered upon binding to its natural biological partners or to selected drugs.

  11. How Random are Intrinsically Disordered Proteins? A Small Angle Scattering Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Durand, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    While the crucial role of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) in the cell cycle is now recognized, deciphering their molecular mode of action at the structural level still remains highly challenging and requires a combination of many biophysical approaches. Among them, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has been extremely successful in the last decade and has become an indispensable technique for addressing many of the fundamental questions regarding the activities of IDPs. After introducing some experimental issues specific to IDPs and in relation to the latest technical developments, this article presents the interest of the theory of polymer physics to evaluate the flexibility of fully disordered proteins. The different strategies to obtain 3-dimensional models of IDPs, free in solution and associated in a complex, are then reviewed. Indeed, recent computational advances have made it possible to readily extract maximum information from the scattering curve with a special emphasis on highly flexible systems, such as multidomain proteins and IDPs. Furthermore, integrated computational approaches now enable the generation of ensembles of conformers to translate the unique flexible characteristics of IDPs by taking into consideration the constraints of more and more various complementary experiment. In particular, a combination of SAXS with high-resolution techniques, such as x-ray crystallography and NMR, allows us to provide reliable models and to gain unique structural insights about the protein over multiple structural scales. The latest neutron scattering experiments also promise new advances in the study of the conformational changes of macromolecules involving more complex systems. PMID:22044150

  12. Dissecting partner recognition by an intrinsically disordered protein using descriptive random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gruet, Antoine; Dosnon, Marion; Vassena, Andrea; Lombard, Vincent; Gerlier, Denis; Bignon, Christophe; Longhi, Sonia

    2013-09-23

    In view of getting insights into the molecular determinants of the binding efficiency of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), we used random mutagenesis. As a proof of concept, we chose the interaction between the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (NTAIL) and the X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein and assessed how amino acid substitutions introduced at random within NTAIL affect partner recognition. In contrast with directed evolution approaches, we did not apply any selection and used the gene library approach not for production purposes but for achieving a better understanding of the NTAIL/XD interaction. For that reason, and to differentiate our approach from similar approaches that make use of systematic (i.e., targeted) mutagenesis, we propose to call it "descriptive random mutagenesis" (DRM). NTAIL variants generated by error-prone PCR were picked at random in the absence of selection pressure and were characterized in terms of sequence and binding abilities toward XD. DRM not only identified determinants of NTAIL/XD interaction that were in good agreement with previous work but also provided new insights. In particular, we discovered that the primary interaction site is poorly evolvable in terms of binding abilities toward XD. We also identified a critical NTAIL residue whose role in stabilizing the NTAIL/XD complex had previously escaped detection, and we identified NTAIL regulatory sites that dampen the interaction while being located outside the primary interaction site. Results show that DRM is a valuable approach to study binding abilities of IDPs.

  13. NS3 Protease from Hepatitis C Virus: Biophysical Studies on an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Domain

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Sonia; Neira, Jose L.; Marcuello, Carlos; Lostao, Anabel; Abian, Olga; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is responsible for processing the non-structural region of the viral precursor polyprotein in infected hepatic cells. NS3 protease activity, located at the N-terminal domain, is a zinc-dependent serine protease. A zinc ion, required for the hydrolytic activity, has been considered as a structural metal ion essential for the structural integrity of the protein. In addition, NS3 interacts with another cofactor, NS4A, an accessory viral protein that induces a conformational change enhancing the hydrolytic activity. Biophysical studies on the isolated protease domain, whose behavior is similar to that of the full-length protein (e.g., catalytic activity, allosteric mechanism and susceptibility to inhibitors), suggest that a considerable global conformational change in the protein is coupled to zinc binding. Zinc binding to NS3 protease can be considered as a folding event, an extreme case of induced-fit binding. Therefore, NS3 protease is an intrinsically (partially) disordered protein with a complex conformational landscape due to its inherent plasticity and to the interaction with its different effectors. Here we summarize the results from a detailed biophysical characterization of this enzyme and present new experimental data. PMID:23803659

  14. Intrinsically disordered mollusk shell prismatic protein that modulates calcium carbonate crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Ndao, Moise; Keene, Ellen; Amos, Fairland F; Rewari, Gita; Ponce, Christopher B; Estroff, Lara; Evans, John Spencer

    2010-10-11

    The formation of calcite prism architecture in the prismatic layer of the mollusk shell involves the participation of a number of different proteins. One protein family, Asprich, has been identified as a participant in amorphous calcium carbonate stabilization and calcite architecture in the prismatic layer of the mollusk, Atrina rigida . However, the functional role(s) of this protein family are not fully understood due to the fact that insufficient quantities of these proteins are available for experimentation. To overcome this problem, we employed stepwise solid-phase synthesis to recreate one of the 10 members of the Asprich family, the 61 AA single chain protein, Asprich "3". We find that the Asprich "3" protein inhibits the formation of rhombohedral calcite crystals and induces the formation of round calcium carbonate deposits in vitro that contain calcite and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). This mineralization behavior does not occur under control conditions, and the formation of ACC and calcite is similar to that reported for the recombinant form of the Asprich "g" protein. Circular dichroism studies reveal that Asprich "3" is an intrinsically disordered protein, predominantly random coil (66%), with 20-30% β-strand content, a small percentage of β-turn, and little if any α-helical content. This protein is not extrinsically stabilized by Ca(II) ions but can be stabilized by 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol to form a structure consisting of turn-like and random coil characteristics. This finding suggests that Asprich "3" may require other extrinsic interactions (i.e., with mineral or ionic clusters or other macromolecules) to achieve folding. In conclusion, Asprich "3" possesses in vitro functional and structural qualities that are similar to other reported for other Asprich protein sequences.

  15. Exploring intrinsically disordered proteins using site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Nolwenn; Martinho, Marlène; Mileo, Elisabetta; Etienne, Emilien; Gerbaud, Guillaume; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Belle, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are highly variable biological systems, not only in their structures but also in their dynamics. The most extreme example of dynamics is encountered within the family of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs), which are proteins lacking a well-defined 3D structure under physiological conditions. Among the biophysical techniques well-suited to study such highly flexible proteins, Site-Directed Spin Labeling combined with EPR spectroscopy (SDSL-EPR) is one of the most powerful, being able to reveal, at the residue level, structural transitions such as folding events. SDSL-EPR is based on selective grafting of a paramagnetic label on the protein under study and is limited neither by the size nor by the complexity of the system. The objective of this mini-review is to describe the basic strategy of SDSL-EPR and to illustrate how it can be successfully applied to characterize the structural behavior of IDPs. Recent developments aimed at enlarging the panoply of SDSL-EPR approaches are presented in particular newly synthesized spin labels that allow the limitations of the classical ones to be overcome. The potentialities of these new spin labels will be demonstrated on different examples of IDPs. PMID:26042221

  16. Deducing conformational variability of intrinsically disordered proteins from infrared spectroscopy with Bayesian statistics

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Anurag; Anunciado, Divina; Tian, Jianhui; Vu, Dung M.; Gnanakaran, S.

    2013-01-01

    As it remains practically impossible to generate ergodic ensembles for large intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, it becomes critical to compare spectroscopic characteristics of the theoretically generated ensembles to corresponding measurements. We develop a Bayesian framework to infer the ensemble properties of an IDP using a combination of conformations generated by MD simulations and its measured infrared spectrum. We performed 100 different MD simulations totaling more than 10 µs to characterize the conformational ensemble of αsynuclein, a prototypical IDP, in water. These conformations are clustered based on solvent accessibility and helical content. We compute the amide-I band for these clusters and predict the thermodynamic weights of each cluster given the measured amide-I band. Bayesian analysis produces a reproducible and non-redundant set of thermodynamic weights for each cluster, which can then be used to calculate the ensemble properties. In a rigorous validation, these weights reproduce measured chemical shifts. PMID:24187427

  17. Ordered water within the collapsed globules of an amyloidogenic intrinsically disordered protein.

    PubMed

    Arya, Shruti; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2014-08-07

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) confront the traditional sequence-structure-function paradigm and are associated with important functions and amyloid disorders. Water molecules residing in the vicinity of the polypeptide chain play potentially important roles in directing the course of binding-induced folding and amyloid aggregation of IDP. Here we characterized the nature of water molecules entrapped within the collapsed globules of an amyloidogenic IDP, namely, κ-casein. These globules can undergo further compaction in the presence of an anionic detergent that is capable of diminishing the intrachain repulsion from the positively charged glutamine/asparagine-rich amyloidogenic N-terminal domain comprising 100 residues. Using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, we estimated the longer component of the solvation time to be ∼1.4 ns, which is 3 orders of magnitude slower than that in bulk water and more than an order of magnitude slower than the "biological water" present at the protein surface. Profoundly restrained water within the collapsed IDP globules resembles the ordered water cluster found under nanoconfinement. We suggest that the association of these globules would result in the release of ordered water molecules into the bulk milieu causing an entropic gain that would eventually drive the formation of the key (obligatory) oligomeric intermediates on the pathway to amyloids via nucleation-dependent polymerization.

  18. Phosphorylation Regulates the Bound Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: The p53-TAZ2 Case.

    PubMed

    Ithuralde, Raúl Esteban; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Disordered regions and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in critical cellular processes and may acquire a stable three-dimensional structure only upon binding to their partners. IDPs may follow a folding-after-binding process, known as induced folding, or a folding-before-binding process, known as conformational selection. The transcription factor p53 is involved in the regulation of cellular events that arise upon stress or DNA damage. The p53 domain structure is composed of an N-terminal transactivation domain (p53TAD), a DNA Binding Domain and a tetramerization domain. The activity of TAD is tightly regulated by interactions with cofactors, inhibitors and phosphorylation. To initiate transcription, p53TAD binds to the TAZ2 domain of CBP, a co-transcription factor, and undergoes a folding and binding process, as revealed by the recent NMR structure of the complex. The activity of p53 is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites on the TAD domain and recent studies have shown that modifications at three residues affect the binding towards TAZ2. However, we still do not know how these phosphorylations affect the structure of the bound state and, therefore, how they regulate the p53 function. In this work, we have used computational simulations to understand how phosphorylation affects the structure of the p53TAD:TAZ2 complex and regulates the recognition mechanism. Phosphorylation has been proposed to enhance binding by direct interaction with the folded protein or by changing the unbound conformation of IDPs, for example by pre-folding the protein favoring the recognition mechanism. Here, we show an interesting turn in the p53 case: phosphorylation mainly affects the bound structure of p53TAD, highlighting the complexity of IDP protein-protein interactions. Our results are in agreement with previous experimental studies, allowing a clear picture of how p53 is regulated by phosphorylation and giving new insights into how post

  19. On the importance of polar interactions for complexes containing intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eric T C; Na, Dokyun; Gsponer, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing recognition for the importance of proteins with large intrinsically disordered (ID) segments in cell signaling and regulation. ID segments in these proteins often harbor regions that mediate molecular recognition. Coupled folding and binding of the recognition regions has been proposed to confer high specificity to interactions involving ID segments. However, researchers recently questioned the origin of the interaction specificity of ID proteins because of the overrepresentation of hydrophobic residues in their interaction interfaces. Here, we focused on the role of polar and charged residues in interactions mediated by ID segments. Making use of the extended nature of most ID segments when in complex with globular proteins, we first identified large numbers of complexes between globular proteins and ID segments by using radius-of-gyration-based selection criteria. Consistent with previous studies, we found the interfaces of these complexes to be enriched in hydrophobic residues, and that these residues contribute significantly to the stability of the interaction interface. However, our analyses also show that polar interactions play a larger role in these complexes than in structured protein complexes. Computational alanine scanning and salt-bridge analysis indicate that interfaces in ID complexes are highly complementary with respect to electrostatics, more so than interfaces of globular proteins. Follow-up calculations of the electrostatic contributions to the free energy of binding uncovered significantly stronger Coulombic interactions in complexes harbouring ID segments than in structured protein complexes. However, they are counter-balanced by even higher polar-desolvation penalties. We propose that polar interactions are a key contributing factor to the observed high specificity of ID segment-mediated interactions.

  20. Advantages of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to study intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Patricia S; DeMarco, Ricardo; Lopes, Jose L S

    2017-03-03

    The unordered secondary structural content of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) is susceptible to conformational changes induced by many different external factors, such as the presence of organic solvents, removal of water, changes in temperature, binding to partner molecules, and interaction with lipids and/or other ligands. In order to characterize the high-flexibility nature of an IDP, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a particularly useful method due to its capability of monitoring both subtle and remarkable changes in different environments, relative ease in obtaining measurements, the small amount of sample required, and the capability for sample recovery (sample not damaged) and others. Using synchrotron radiation as the light source for CD spectroscopy represents the state-of-the-art version of this technique with feasibility of accessing the lower wavelength UV region, and therefore presenting a series of advantages over conventional circular dichroism (cCD) to monitor a protein conformational behavior, check protein stability, detect ligand binding, and many others. In this paper, we have performed a comparative study using cCD and SRCD methods for investigating the secondary structure and the conformational behavior of natively unfolded proteins: MEG-14 and soybean trypsin inhibitor. We show that the SRCD technique greatly improves the analysis and accuracy of the studies on the conformations of IDPs.

  1. Time window expansion for HDX analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Devrishi; Devarakonda, Srikripa; Chalmers, Michael J; Pascal, Bruce D; Spiegelman, Bruce M; Griffin, Patrick R

    2013-01-01

    Application of typical HDX methods to examine intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP), proteins that are natively unstructured and highly dynamic at physiological pH, is limited due to the rapid exchange of unprotected amide hydrogens with solvent. The exchange rates of these fast exchanging amides are usually faster than the shortest time scale (10s) employed in typical automated HDX-MS experiments. Considering the functional importance of IDPs and their association with many diseases, it is valuable to develop methods that allow the study of solution dynamics of these proteins as well as the ability to probe the interaction of IDPs with their wide range of binding partners. Here, we report the application of time window expansion to the millisecond range by altering the on-exchange pH of the HDX experiment to study a well characterized IDP; the activation domain of the nuclear receptor coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α). This method enabled mapping the regions of PGC-1α that are stabilized upon binding the ligand binding domain (LBD) of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). We further demonstrate the method’s applicability to other binding partners of the IDP PGC-1α and pave the way for characterizing many other biologically important ID proteins. PMID:23884631

  2. Time Window Expansion for HDX Analysis of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Devrishi; Devarakonda, Srikripa; Chalmers, Michael J.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2013-10-01

    Application of typical HDX methods to examine intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP), proteins that are natively unstructured and highly dynamic at physiological pH, is limited because of the rapid exchange of unprotected amide hydrogens with solvent. The exchange rates of these fast exchanging amides are usually faster than the shortest time scale (10 s) employed in typical automated HDX-MS experiments. Considering the functional importance of IDPs and their association with many diseases, it is valuable to develop methods that allow the study of solution dynamics of these proteins as well as the ability to probe the interaction of IDPs with their wide range of binding partners. Here, we report the application of time window expansion to the millisecond range by altering the on-exchange pH of the HDX experiment to study a well-characterized IDP; the activation domain of the nuclear receptor coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α). This method enabled mapping the regions of PGC-1α that are stabilized upon binding the ligand binding domain (LBD) of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). We further demonstrate the method's applicability to other binding partners of the IDP PGC-1α and pave the way for characterizing many other biologically important ID proteins.

  3. Electrostatically accelerated encounter and folding for facile recognition of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Debabani; Zhang, Weihong; Chen, Jianhan

    2013-01-01

    Achieving facile specific recognition is essential for intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that are involved in cellular signaling and regulation. Consideration of the physical time scales of protein folding and diffusion-limited protein-protein encounter has suggested that the frequent requirement of protein folding for specific IDP recognition could lead to kinetic bottlenecks. How IDPs overcome such potential kinetic bottlenecks to viably function in signaling and regulation in general is poorly understood. Our recent computational and experimental study of cell-cycle regulator p27 (Ganguly et al., J. Mol. Biol. (2012)) demonstrated that long-range electrostatic forces exerted on enriched charges of IDPs could accelerate protein-protein encounter via "electrostatic steering" and at the same time promote "folding-competent" encounter topologies to enhance the efficiency of IDP folding upon encounter. Here, we further investigated the coupled binding and folding mechanisms and the roles of electrostatic forces in the formation of three IDP complexes with more complex folded topologies. The surface electrostatic potentials of these complexes lack prominent features like those observed for the p27/Cdk2/cyclin A complex to directly suggest the ability of electrostatic forces to facilitate folding upon encounter. Nonetheless, similar electrostatically accelerated encounter and folding mechanisms were consistently predicted for all three complexes using topology-based coarse-grained simulations. Together with our previous analysis of charge distributions in known IDP complexes, our results support a prevalent role of electrostatic interactions in promoting efficient coupled binding and folding for facile specific recognition. These results also suggest that there is likely a co-evolution of IDP folded topology, charge characteristics, and coupled binding and folding mechanisms, driven at least partially by the need to achieve fast association kinetics for cellular

  4. The intrinsically disordered Sem1 protein functions as a molecular tether during proteasome lid biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tomko, Robert J; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2014-02-06

    The intrinsically disordered yeast protein Sem1 (DSS1 in mammals) participates in multiple protein complexes, including the proteasome, but its role(s) within these complexes is uncertain. We report that Sem1 enforces the ordered incorporation of subunits Rpn3 and Rpn7 into the assembling proteasome lid. Sem1 uses conserved acidic segments separated by a flexible linker to grasp Rpn3 and Rpn7. The same segments are used for protein binding in other complexes, but in the proteasome lid they are uniquely deployed for recognizing separate polypeptides. We engineered TEV protease-cleavage sites into Sem1 to show that the tethering function of Sem1 is important for the biogenesis and integrity of the Rpn3-Sem1-Rpn7 ternary complex but becomes dispensable once the ternary complex incorporates into larger lid precursors. Thus, although Sem1 is a stoichiometric component of the mature proteasome, it has a distinct, chaperone-like function specific to early stages of proteasome assembly.

  5. Intrinsic disorder within an AKAP-protein kinase A complex guides local substrate phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Smith, F Donelson; Reichow, Steve L; Esseltine, Jessica L; Shi, Dan; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-11-05

    Anchoring proteins sequester kinases with their substrates to locally disseminate intracellular signals and avert indiscriminate transmission of these responses throughout the cell. Mechanistic understanding of this process is hampered by limited structural information on these macromolecular complexes. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) spatially constrain phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA). Electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstructions of type-II PKA-AKAP18γ complexes reveal hetero-pentameric assemblies that adopt a range of flexible tripartite configurations. Intrinsically disordered regions within each PKA regulatory subunit impart the molecular plasticity that affords an ∼16 nanometer radius of motion to the associated catalytic subunits. Manipulating flexibility within the PKA holoenzyme augmented basal and cAMP responsive phosphorylation of AKAP-associated substrates. Cell-based analyses suggest that the catalytic subunit remains within type-II PKA-AKAP18γ complexes upon cAMP elevation. We propose that the dynamic movement of kinase sub-structures, in concert with the static AKAP-regulatory subunit interface, generates a solid-state signaling microenvironment for substrate phosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01319.001.

  6. Simple biophysics underpins collective conformations of the intrinsically disordered proteins of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Vovk, Andrei; Gu, Chad; Opferman, Michael G; Kapinos, Larisa E; Lim, Roderick YH; Coalson, Rob D; Jasnow, David; Zilman, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs) are key cellular transporter that control nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotic cells, but its transport mechanism is still not understood. The centerpiece of NPC transport is the assembly of intrinsically disordered polypeptides, known as FG nucleoporins, lining its passageway. Their conformations and collective dynamics during transport are difficult to assess in vivo. In vitro investigations provide partially conflicting results, lending support to different models of transport, which invoke various conformational transitions of the FG nucleoporins induced by the cargo-carrying transport proteins. We show that the spatial organization of FG nucleoporin assemblies with the transport proteins can be understood within a first principles biophysical model with a minimal number of key physical variables, such as the average protein interaction strengths and spatial densities. These results address some of the outstanding controversies and suggest how molecularly divergent NPCs in different species can perform essentially the same function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10785.001 PMID:27198189

  7. Prediction of intrinsically disordered regions in proteins using signal processing methods: application to heat-shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Heat-shock protein (HSP)-based immunotherapy is believed to be a promising area of development for cancer treatment as such therapy is characterized by a unique approach to every tumour. It was shown that by inhibition of HSPs it is possible to induce apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Interestingly, there are a great number of disordered regions in proteins associated with cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, signalling, and diabetes. HSPs and some specific enzymes were shown to have these disordered regions in their primary structures. The experimental studies of HSPs confirmed that their intrinsically disordered (ID) regions are of functional importance. These ID regions play crucial roles in regulating the specificity of interactions between dimer complexes and their interacting partners. Because HSPs are overexpressed in cancer, predicting the locations of ID regions and binding sites in these proteins will be important for developing novel cancer therapeutics. In our previous studies, signal processing methods have been successfully used for protein structure-function analysis (i.e. for determining functionally important amino acids and the locations of protein active sites). In this paper, we present and discuss a novel approach for predicting the locations of ID regions in the selected cancer-related HSPs.

  8. Free-energy landscape of intrinsically disordered proteins investigated by all-atom multicanonical molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Higo, Junichi; Umezawa, Koji

    2014-01-01

    We introduce computational studies on intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Especially, we present our multicanonical molecular dynamics (McMD) simulations of two IDP-partner systems: NRSF-mSin3 and pKID-KIX. McMD is one of enhanced conformational sampling methods useful for conformational sampling of biomolecular systems. IDP adopts a specific tertiary structure upon binding to its partner molecule, although it is unstructured in the unbound state (i.e. the free state). This IDP-specific property is called "coupled folding and binding". The McMD simulation treats the biomolecules with an all-atom model immersed in an explicit solvent. In the initial configuration of simulation, IDP and its partner molecules are set to be distant from each other, and the IDP conformation is disordered. The computationally obtained free-energy landscape for coupled folding and binding has shown that native- and non-native-complex clusters distribute complicatedly in the conformational space. The all-atom simulation suggests that both of induced-folding and population-selection are coupled complicatedly in the coupled folding and binding. Further analyses have exemplified that the conformational fluctuations (dynamical flexibility) in the bound and unbound states are essentially important to characterize IDP functioning.

  9. Actinidia DRM1--an intrinsically disordered protein whose mRNA expression is inversely correlated with spring budbreak in kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Wood, Marion; Rae, Georgina M; Wu, Rong-Mei; Walton, Eric F; Xue, Bin; Hellens, Roger P; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a relatively recently defined class of proteins which, under native conditions, lack a unique tertiary structure whilst maintaining essential biological functions. Functional classification of IDPs have implicated such proteins as being involved in various physiological processes including transcription and translation regulation, signal transduction and protein modification. Actinidia DRM1 (Ade DORMANCY ASSOCIATED GENE 1), represents a robust dormancy marker whose mRNA transcript expression exhibits a strong inverse correlation with the onset of growth following periods of physiological dormancy. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that DRM1 is plant specific and highly conserved at both the nucleotide and protein levels. It is predicted to be an intrinsically disordered protein with two distinct highly conserved domains. Several Actinidia DRM1 homologues, which align into two distinct Actinidia-specific families, Type I and Type II, have been identified. No candidates for the Arabidopsis DRM1-Homologue (AtDRM2) an additional family member, has been identified in Actinidia.

  10. Probing the Action of Chemical Denaturant on an Intrinsically Disordered Protein by Simulation and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenwei; Borgia, Alessandro; Buholzer, Karin; Grishaev, Alexander; Schuler, Benjamin; Best, Robert B

    2016-09-14

    Chemical denaturants are the most commonly used agents for unfolding proteins and are thought to act by better solvating the unfolded state. Improved solvation is expected to lead to an expansion of unfolded chains with increasing denaturant concentration, providing a sensitive probe of the denaturant action. However, experiments have so far yielded qualitatively different results concerning the effects of chemical denaturation. Studies using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and other methods found an increase in radius of gyration with denaturant concentration, but most small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies found no change. This discrepancy therefore challenges our understanding of denaturation mechanism and more generally the accuracy of these experiments as applied to unfolded or disordered proteins. Here, we use all-atom molecular simulations to investigate the effect of urea and guanidinium chloride on the structure of the intrinsically disordered protein ACTR, which can be studied by experiment over a wide range of denaturant concentration. Using unbiased molecular simulations with a carefully calibrated denaturant model, we find that the protein chain indeed swells with increasing denaturant concentration. This is due to the favorable association of urea or guanidinium chloride with the backbone of all residues and with the side-chains of almost all residues, with denaturant-water transfer free energies inferred from this association in reasonable accord with experimental estimates. Interactions of the denaturants with the backbone are dominated by hydrogen bonding, while interactions with side-chains include other contributions. By computing FRET efficiencies and SAXS intensities at each denaturant concentration, we show that the simulation trajectories are in accord with both experiments on this protein, demonstrating that there is no fundamental inconsistency between the two types of experiment. Agreement with experiment also supports the

  11. Thermal stability and folding kinetics analysis of intrinsically disordered protein, securin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Ho, Li-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Lacking a stable tertiary structure, intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) possess particular functions in cell regulation, signaling, and controlling pathways. The study of their unique structure features, thermal stabilities, and folding kinetics is intriguing. In this study, an identified IDP, securin, was used as a model protein. By using a quasi-static five-step (on-path) folding process, the function of securin was restored and analyzed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Fluorescence spectroscopy and particle size analysis indicated that securin possessed a compact hydrophobic core and particle size. The glass transition of securin was characterized using differential scanning microcalorimetry. Furthermore, the folding/unfolding rates (kobs) of securin were undetectable, implying that the folding/unfolding rate is very fast and that the conformation of securin is sensitive to solvent environment change. Therefore, securin may fold properly under specific physiological conditions. In summary, the thermal glass transition behavior and undetectable kobs of folding/unfolding reactions may be two of the indices of IDP. This study was supported in part by grants NSC 97-2112-M-009-009-YM3 and NSC 100-2112-M-009-004-MY3, Taiwan, R.O.C.

  12. DisoMCS: Accurately Predicting Protein Intrinsically Disordered Regions Using a Multi-Class Conservative Score Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiheng; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Tonghua; Cong, Peisheng

    2015-01-01

    The precise prediction of protein intrinsically disordered regions, which play a crucial role in biological procedures, is a necessary prerequisite to further the understanding of the principles and mechanisms of protein function. Here, we propose a novel predictor, DisoMCS, which is a more accurate predictor of protein intrinsically disordered regions. The DisoMCS bases on an original multi-class conservative score (MCS) obtained by sequence-order/disorder alignment. Initially, near-disorder regions are defined on fragments located at both the terminus of an ordered region connecting a disordered region. Then the multi-class conservative score is generated by sequence alignment against a known structure database and represented as order, near-disorder and disorder conservative scores. The MCS of each amino acid has three elements: order, near-disorder and disorder profiles. Finally, the MCS is exploited as features to identify disordered regions in sequences. DisoMCS utilizes a non-redundant data set as the training set, MCS and predicted secondary structure as features, and a conditional random field as the classification algorithm. In predicted near-disorder regions a residue is determined as an order or a disorder according to the optimized decision threshold. DisoMCS was evaluated by cross-validation, large-scale prediction, independent tests and CASP (Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction) tests. All results confirmed that DisoMCS was very competitive in terms of accuracy of prediction when compared with well-established publicly available disordered region predictors. It also indicated our approach was more accurate when a query has higher homologous with the knowledge database. Availability The DisoMCS is available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/disorder/. PMID:26090958

  13. Polymorphism Analysis Reveals Reduced Negative Selection and Elevated Rate of Insertions and Deletions in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahsin; Douglas, Gavin M; Patel, Priyenbhai; Nguyen Ba, Alex N; Moses, Alan M

    2015-06-04

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions are abundant in eukaryotic proteins and lack stable tertiary structures and enzymatic functions. Previous studies of disordered region evolution based on interspecific alignments have revealed an increased propensity for indels and rapid rates of amino acid substitution. How disordered regions are maintained at high abundance in the proteome and across taxa, despite apparently weak evolutionary constraints, remains unclear. Here, we use single nucleotide and indel polymorphism data in yeast and human populations to survey the population variation within disordered regions. First, we show that single nucleotide polymorphisms in disordered regions are under weaker negative selection compared with more structured protein regions and have a higher proportion of neutral non-synonymous sites. We also confirm previous findings that nonframeshifting indels are much more abundant in disordered regions relative to structured regions. We find that the rate of nonframeshifting indel polymorphism in intrinsically disordered regions resembles that of noncoding DNA and pseudogenes, and that large indels segregate in disordered regions in the human population. Our survey of polymorphism confirms patterns of evolution in disordered regions inferred based on longer evolutionary comparisons.

  14. Polymorphism Analysis Reveals Reduced Negative Selection and Elevated Rate of Insertions and Deletions in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tahsin; Douglas, Gavin M.; Patel, Priyenbhai; Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Moses, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions are abundant in eukaryotic proteins and lack stable tertiary structures and enzymatic functions. Previous studies of disordered region evolution based on interspecific alignments have revealed an increased propensity for indels and rapid rates of amino acid substitution. How disordered regions are maintained at high abundance in the proteome and across taxa, despite apparently weak evolutionary constraints, remains unclear. Here, we use single nucleotide and indel polymorphism data in yeast and human populations to survey the population variation within disordered regions. First, we show that single nucleotide polymorphisms in disordered regions are under weaker negative selection compared with more structured protein regions and have a higher proportion of neutral non-synonymous sites. We also confirm previous findings that nonframeshifting indels are much more abundant in disordered regions relative to structured regions. We find that the rate of nonframeshifting indel polymorphism in intrinsically disordered regions resembles that of noncoding DNA and pseudogenes, and that large indels segregate in disordered regions in the human population. Our survey of polymorphism confirms patterns of evolution in disordered regions inferred based on longer evolutionary comparisons. PMID:26047845

  15. Phosphorylation Regulates the Bound Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: The p53-TAZ2 Case

    PubMed Central

    Ithuralde, Raúl Esteban; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Disordered regions and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in critical cellular processes and may acquire a stable three-dimensional structure only upon binding to their partners. IDPs may follow a folding-after-binding process, known as induced folding, or a folding-before-binding process, known as conformational selection. The transcription factor p53 is involved in the regulation of cellular events that arise upon stress or DNA damage. The p53 domain structure is composed of an N-terminal transactivation domain (p53TAD), a DNA Binding Domain and a tetramerization domain. The activity of TAD is tightly regulated by interactions with cofactors, inhibitors and phosphorylation. To initiate transcription, p53TAD binds to the TAZ2 domain of CBP, a co-transcription factor, and undergoes a folding and binding process, as revealed by the recent NMR structure of the complex. The activity of p53 is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites on the TAD domain and recent studies have shown that modifications at three residues affect the binding towards TAZ2. However, we still do not know how these phosphorylations affect the structure of the bound state and, therefore, how they regulate the p53 function. In this work, we have used computational simulations to understand how phosphorylation affects the structure of the p53TAD:TAZ2 complex and regulates the recognition mechanism. Phosphorylation has been proposed to enhance binding by direct interaction with the folded protein or by changing the unbound conformation of IDPs, for example by pre-folding the protein favoring the recognition mechanism. Here, we show an interesting turn in the p53 case: phosphorylation mainly affects the bound structure of p53TAD, highlighting the complexity of IDP protein-protein interactions. Our results are in agreement with previous experimental studies, allowing a clear picture of how p53 is regulated by phosphorylation and giving new insights into how post

  16. Structural Ensembles of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Depend Strongly on Force Field: A Comparison to Experiment.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Sarah; Gapsys, Vytautas; Gajda, Michal J; Zweckstetter, Markus; de Groot, Bert L; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-11-10

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are notoriously challenging to study both experimentally and computationally. The structure of IDPs cannot be described by a single conformation but must instead be described as an ensemble of interconverting conformations. Atomistic simulations are increasingly used to obtain such IDP conformational ensembles. Here, we have compared the IDP ensembles generated by eight all-atom empirical force fields against primary small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and NMR data. Ensembles obtained with different force fields exhibit marked differences in chain dimensions, hydrogen bonding, and secondary structure content. These differences are unexpectedly large: changing the force field is found to have a stronger effect on secondary structure content than changing the entire peptide sequence. The CHARMM 22* ensemble performs best in this force field comparison: it has the lowest error in chemical shifts and J-couplings and agrees well with the SAXS data. A high population of left-handed α-helix is present in the CHARMM 36 ensemble, which is inconsistent with measured scalar couplings. To eliminate inadequate sampling as a reason for differences between force fields, extensive simulations were carried out (0.964 ms in total); the remaining small sampling uncertainty is shown to be much smaller than the observed differences. Our findings highlight how IDPs, with their rugged energy landscapes, are highly sensitive test systems that are capable of revealing force field deficiencies and, therefore, contributing to force field development.

  17. An Intrinsically Disordered Motif Mediates Diverse Actions of Monomeric C-reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yun; Wang, Jing; Meng, Fan; Jia, Zhe-Kun; Su, Yang; Bai, Qi-Feng; Lv, Ling-Ling; Ma, Fu-Rong; Potempa, Lawrence A; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Most proinflammatory actions of C-reactive protein (CRP) are only expressed following dissociation of its native pentameric assembly into monomeric form (mCRP). However, little is known about what underlies the greatly enhanced activities of mCRP. Here we show that a single sequence motif, i.e. cholesterol binding sequence (CBS; a.a. 35-47), is responsible for mediating the interactions of mCRP with diverse ligands. The binding of mCRP to lipoprotein component ApoB, to complement component C1q, to extracellular matrix components fibronectin and collagen, to blood coagulation component fibrinogen, and to membrane lipid component cholesterol, are all found to be markedly inhibited by the synthetic CBS peptide but not by other CRP sequences tested. Likewise, mutating CBS in mCRP also greatly impairs these interactions. Functional experiments further reveal that CBS peptide significantly reduces the effects of mCRP on activation of endothelial cells in vitro and on acute induction of IL-6 in mice. The potency and specificity of CBS are critically determined by the N-terminal residues Cys-36, Leu-37, and His-38; while the versatility of CBS appears to originate from its intrinsically disordered conformation polymorphism. Together, these data unexpectedly identify CBS as the major recognition site of mCRP and suggest that this motif may be exploited to tune the proinflammatory actions of mCRP.

  18. Multiple interactions of the intrinsically disordered region between the helicase and nuclease domains of the archaeal Hef protein.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Sonoko; Yamagami, Takeshi; Kitamura, Makoto; Kodera, Noriyuki; Mori, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Shyogo; Ando, Toshio; Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Hiroaki, Hidekazu; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2014-08-01

    Hef is an archaeal protein that probably functions mainly in stalled replication fork repair. The presence of an unstructured region was predicted between the two distinct domains of the Hef protein. We analyzed the interdomain region of Thermococcus kodakarensis Hef and demonstrated its disordered structure by CD, NMR, and high speed atomic force microscopy (AFM). To investigate the functions of this intrinsically disordered region (IDR), we screened for proteins interacting with the IDR of Hef by a yeast two-hybrid method, and 10 candidate proteins were obtained. We found that PCNA1 and a RecJ-like protein specifically bind to the IDR in vitro. These results suggested that the Hef protein interacts with several different proteins that work together in the pathways downstream from stalled replication fork repair by converting the IDR structure depending on the partner protein.

  19. The Tooth Enamel Protein, Porcine Amelogenin, Is an Intrinsically Disordered Protein with an Extended Molecular Configuration in the Monomeric Form†

    PubMed Central

    Delak, Katya; Harcup, Craig; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sun, Zhi; Fan, Yuwwei; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Evans, John Spencer

    2009-01-01

    Amelogenins make up a class of proteins associated with the formation of mineralized enamel in vertebrates, possess highly conserved N- and C-terminal sequence regions, and represent an interesting model protein system for understanding biomineralization and protein assembly. Using bioinformatics, we report here the identification of molecular traits that classify 12 amelogenin proteins as members of the intrinsically disordered or unstructured protein family (IDPs), a group of proteins that normally exist as unfolded species but are capable of transformation to a folded state as part of their overall function. Using biophysical techniques (CD and NMR), we follow up on our bioinformatics studies and confirm that one of the amelogenins, recombinant porcine rP172, exists in an extended, unfolded state in the monomeric form. This protein exhibits evidence of conformational exchange between two states, and this exchange may be mediated by Pro residues in the sequence. Although the protein is globally unfolded, we detect the presence of local residual secondary structure [α-helix, extended β-strand, turn/loop, and polyproline type II (PPII)] that may serve several functional roles within the enamel matrix. The extended, labile conformation of rP172 amelogenin is compatible with the known functions of amelogenin in enamel biomineralization, i.e., self-assembly, associations with other enamel matrix proteins and with calcium phosphate biominerals, and interaction with cell receptors. It is likely that the labile structure of this protein facilitates interactions of amelogenin with other macromolecules or with minerals for achievement of internal protein stabilization. PMID:19236004

  20. A Set of Efficient nD NMR Protocols for Resonance Assignments of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Bellstedt, Peter; Häfner, Sabine; Herbst, Christian; Bordusa, Frank; Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2016-07-04

    The RF pulse scheme RN[N-CA HEHAHA]NH, which provides a convenient approach to the acquisition of different multidimensional chemical shift correlation NMR spectra leading to backbone resonance assignments, including those of the proline residues of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), is experimentally demonstrated. Depending on the type of correlation data required, the method involves the generation of in-phase ((15) N)(x) magnetisation via different magnetisation transfer pathways such as H→N→CO→N, HA→CA→CO→N, H→N→CA→N and H→CA→N, the subsequent application of (15) N-(13) C(α) heteronuclear Hartmann-Hahn mixing over a period of ≈100 ms, chemical-shift labelling of relevant nuclei before and after the heteronuclear mixing step and amide proton detection in the acquisition dimension. It makes use of the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of (1) JCαN and (2) JCαN couplings to achieve efficient correlation of the backbone resonances of each amino acid residue "i" with the backbone amide resonances of residues "i-1" and "i+1". It can be implemented in a straightforward way through simple modifications of the RF pulse schemes commonly employed in protein NMR studies. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated using a uniformly ((15) N,(13) C) labelled sample of α-synuclein. The different possibilities for obtaining the amino-acid-type information, simultaneously with the connectivity data between the backbone resonances of sequentially neighbouring residues, have also been outlined.

  1. Thermal compaction of the intrinsically disordered protein tau: entropic, structural, and hydrophobic factors.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Anna; Ciasca, Gabriele; Grottesi, Alessandro; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2017-03-28

    Globular denatured proteins have structural properties similar to those of random coils. Experiments on denatured proteins have shown that when the temperature is increased thermal compaction may take place, resulting in a reduction of their radius of gyration Rg to range between 5% and 35% of its initial value. This phenomenon has been attributed to various causes, namely entropic, hydrophobic, and structural factors. The intrinsically disordered protein tau, which helps in nucleating and stabilizing microtubules in the axons of the neurons, also undergoes a relevant compaction process: when its temperature is increased from 293 K to 333 K its gyration radius decreases by 18%. We have performed an atomistic simulation of this molecule, at the lowest and highest temperatures of the mentioned interval, using both standard molecular dynamics and metadynamics, in parallel with small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. Using the fit of the experimental data and a genetic algorithm to select the most probable configurations among those produced in both atomistic simulations (standard MD and metadynamics), we were able to compute relevant changes, related to the temperature increase, in the average angles between residues, in the transient secondary structures, in the solvent accessible surface area, and in the number of intramolecular H-bonds. The analysis of the data showed how to decompose the compaction phenomenon into three contributions. An estimate of the entropic contribution to the compaction was obtained using the changes in the mean values of the angles between contiguous residues. The computation of the solvent accessible surface at the two temperatures allowed an estimation of the second factor contributing to the compaction, namely the increase in the hydrophobic interaction. We also measured the change in the average number of residues temporarily being in α-helices, 3-helices, PP II helices, β-sheets and β-turns. Those changes in the secondary

  2. Large-scale Analysis of Thermo-stable, Mammalian Proteins Provides Insights into the Intrinsically Disordered Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Charles A.; High, Anthony; Obenauer, John C.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Park, Cheon-Gil; Punta, Marco; Schlessinger, Avner; Ma, Jing; Rost, Burkhard; Slaughter, Clive A.; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are predicted to be highly abundant and play broad biological roles in eukaryotic cells. In particular, by virtue of their structural malleability and propensity to interact with multiple binding partners, disordered proteins are thought to be specialized for roles in signaling and regulation. However, these concepts are based on in silico analyses of translated whole genome sequences, not on large-scale analyses of proteins expressed in living cells. Therefore, whether these concepts broadly apply to expressed proteins is currently unknown. Previous studies have shown that heat-treatment of cell extracts lead to partial enrichment of soluble, disordered proteins. Based on this observation, we sought to address the current dearth of knowledge about expressed, disordered proteins by performing a large-scale proteomics study of thermo-stable proteins isolated from mouse fibroblast cells. Using novel multidimensional chromatography methods and mass spectrometry, we identified a total of 1,320 thermo-stable proteins from these cells. Further, we used a variety of bioinformatics methods to analyze the structural and biological properties of these proteins. Interestingly, more than 900 of these expressed proteins were predicted to be substantially disordered. These were divided into two categories, with 514 predicted to be predominantly disordered and 395 predicted to exhibit both disordered and ordered/folded features. In addition, 411 of the thermo-stable proteins were predicted to be folded. Despite the use of heat treatment (60 min. at 98 °C) to partially enrich for disordered proteins, which might have been expected to select for small proteins, the sequences of these proteins exhibited a wide range of lengths (622 ± 555 residues (average length ± standard deviation) for disordered proteins and 569 ± 598 residues for folded proteins). Computational structural analyses revealed several unexpected features of the thermo

  3. Intrinsically disordered segments and the evolution of protein half-life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, M.

    2013-03-01

    Precise turnover of proteins is essential for cellular homeostasis and is primarily mediated by the proteasome. Thus, a fundamental question is: What features make a protein an efficient substrate for degradation? Here I will present results that proteins with a long terminal disordered segment or internal disordered segments have a significantly shorter half-life in yeast. This relationship appears to be evolutionarily conserved in mouse and human. Furthermore, upon gene duplication, divergence in the length of terminal disorder or variation in the number of internal disordered segments results in significant alteration of the half-life of yeast paralogs. Many proteins that exhibit such changes participate in signaling, where altered protein half-life will likely influence their activity. We suggest that variation in the length and number of disordered segments could serve as a remarkably simple means to evolve protein half-life and may serve as an underappreciated source of genetic variation with important phenotypic consequences. MMB acknowledges the Medical Research Council for funding his research program.

  4. Temperature effects on the hydrodynamic radius of the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Langridge, Timothy D; Tarver, Micheal J; Whitten, Steven T

    2014-04-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are often characterized in terms of the hydrodynamic radius, Rh . The Rh of IDPs are known to depend on fractional proline content and net charge, where increased numbers of proline residues and increased net charge cause larger Rh . Though sequence and charge effects on the Rh of IDPs have been studied, the temperature sensitivity has been noted only briefly. Reported here are Rh measurements in the temperature range of 5-75°C for the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein, p53(1-93). Of note, the Rh of this protein fragment was highly sensitive to temperature, decreasing from 35 Å at 5°C to 26 Å at 75°C. Computer generated simulations of conformationally dynamic and disordered polypeptide chains were performed to provide a hypothesis for the heat-induced compaction of p53(1-93) structure, which was opposite to the heat-induced increase in Rh observed for a model folded protein. The simulations demonstrated that heat caused Rh to trend toward statistical coil values for both proteins, indicating that the effects of heat on p53(1-93) structure could be interpreted as thermal denaturation. The simulation data also predicted that proline content contributed minimally to the native Rh of p53(1-93), which was confirmed by measuring Rh for a substitution variant that had all 22 proline residues changed for glycine.

  5. Actinidia DRM1 - An Intrinsically Disordered Protein Whose mRNA Expression Is Inversely Correlated with Spring Budbreak in Kiwifruit

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Marion; Rae, Georgina M.; Wu, Rong-Mei; Walton, Eric F.; Xue, Bin; Hellens, Roger P.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a relatively recently defined class of proteins which, under native conditions, lack a unique tertiary structure whilst maintaining essential biological functions. Functional classification of IDPs have implicated such proteins as being involved in various physiological processes including transcription and translation regulation, signal transduction and protein modification. Actinidia DRM1 (Ade DORMANCY ASSOCIATED GENE 1), represents a robust dormancy marker whose mRNA transcript expression exhibits a strong inverse correlation with the onset of growth following periods of physiological dormancy. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that DRM1 is plant specific and highly conserved at both the nucleotide and protein levels. It is predicted to be an intrinsically disordered protein with two distinct highly conserved domains. Several Actinidia DRM1 homologues, which align into two distinct Actinidia-specific families, Type I and Type II, have been identified. No candidates for the Arabidopsis DRM1-Homologue (AtDRM2) an additional family member, has been identified in Actinidia. PMID:23516402

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: On the Accuracy of the TIP4P-D Water Model and the Representativeness of Protein Disorder Models.

    PubMed

    Henriques, João; Skepö, Marie

    2016-07-12

    Here, we first present a follow-up to a previous work by our group on the problematic of molecular dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) [ Henriques et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2015 , 11 , 3420 - 3431 ], using the recently developed TIP4P-D water model. When used in conjunction with the standard AMBER ff99SB-ILDN force field and applied to the simulation of Histatin 5, our IDP model, we obtain results which are in excellent agreement with the best performing IDP-suitable force field from the earlier study and with experiment. We then assess the representativeness of the IDP models used in these and similar studies, finding that most are too short in comparison to the average IDP and contain a bias toward hydrophilic amino acid residues. Moreover, several key order- and disorder-promoting residues are also found to be misrepresented. It seems appropriate for future studies to address these issues.

  7. Intrinsically disordered and pliable Starmaker-like protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes) controls the formation of calcium carbonate crystals.

    PubMed

    Różycka, Mirosława; Wojtas, Magdalena; Jakób, Michał; Stigloher, Christian; Grzeszkowiak, Mikołaj; Mazur, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Fish otoliths, biominerals composed of calcium carbonate with a small amount of organic matrix, are involved in the functioning of the inner ear. Starmaker (Stm) from zebrafish (Danio rerio) was the first protein found to be capable of controlling the formation of otoliths. Recently, a gene was identified encoding the Starmaker-like (Stm-l) protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes), a putative homologue of Stm and human dentine sialophosphoprotein. Although there is no sequence similarity between Stm-l and Stm, Stm-l was suggested to be involved in the biomineralization of otoliths, as had been observed for Stm even before. The molecular properties and functioning of Stm-l as a putative regulatory protein in otolith formation have not been characterized yet. A comprehensive biochemical and biophysical analysis of recombinant Stm-l, along with in silico examinations, indicated that Stm-l exhibits properties of a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein. Stm-l possesses an elongated and pliable structure that is able to adopt a more ordered and rigid conformation under the influence of different factors. An in vitro assay of the biomineralization activity of Stm-l indicated that Stm-l affected the size, shape and number of calcium carbonate crystals. The functional significance of intrinsically disordered properties of Stm-l and the possible role of this protein in controlling the formation of calcium carbonate crystals is discussed.

  8. Intrinsically Disordered and Pliable Starmaker-Like Protein from Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Controls the Formation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Różycka, Mirosława; Wojtas, Magdalena; Jakób, Michał; Stigloher, Christian; Grzeszkowiak, Mikołaj; Mazur, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Fish otoliths, biominerals composed of calcium carbonate with a small amount of organic matrix, are involved in the functioning of the inner ear. Starmaker (Stm) from zebrafish (Danio rerio) was the first protein found to be capable of controlling the formation of otoliths. Recently, a gene was identified encoding the Starmaker-like (Stm-l) protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes), a putative homologue of Stm and human dentine sialophosphoprotein. Although there is no sequence similarity between Stm-l and Stm, Stm-l was suggested to be involved in the biomineralization of otoliths, as had been observed for Stm even before. The molecular properties and functioning of Stm-l as a putative regulatory protein in otolith formation have not been characterized yet. A comprehensive biochemical and biophysical analysis of recombinant Stm-l, along with in silico examinations, indicated that Stm-l exhibits properties of a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein. Stm-l possesses an elongated and pliable structure that is able to adopt a more ordered and rigid conformation under the influence of different factors. An in vitro assay of the biomineralization activity of Stm-l indicated that Stm-l affected the size, shape and number of calcium carbonate crystals. The functional significance of intrinsically disordered properties of Stm-l and the possible role of this protein in controlling the formation of calcium carbonate crystals is discussed. PMID:25490041

  9. Monitoring structural changes in intrinsically disordered proteins using QCM-D: application to the bacterial cell division protein ZipA.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Tsortos, Achilleas; Vélez, Marisela; Gizeli, Electra

    2016-05-05

    The sensitivity of QCM-D to molecular hydrodynamic properties is applied in this work to study conformational changes of the intrinsically disordered protein ZipA. Acoustic measurements can clearly follow ZipA's unstructured domain expansion and contraction with salt content and be correlated with changes in the hydrodynamic radius of 1.8 nm or less.

  10. Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase from Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.: an Intrinsically Disordered Protein.

    PubMed

    Montero-Morán, Gabriela M; Sampedro, José G; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Cervantes-González, Miguel A; Huerta-Ocampo, José Á; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P

    2015-08-01

    A novel Cu/ZnSOD from Amaranthus hypochondriacus was cloned, expressed, and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed an open reading frame (ORF) of 456 bp, which was predicted to encode a 15.6-kDa molecular weight protein with a pI of 5.4. Structural analysis showed highly conserved amino acid residues involved in Cu/Zn binding. Recombinant amaranth superoxide dismutase (rAhSOD) displayed more than 50 % of catalytic activity after incubation at 100 °C for 30 min. In silico analysis of Amaranthus hypochondriacus SOD (AhSOD) amino acid sequence for globularity and disorder suggested that this protein is mainly disordered; this was confirmed by circular dichroism, which showed the lack of secondary structure. Intrinsic fluorescence studies showed that rAhSOD undergoes conformational changes in two steps by the presence of Cu/Zn, which indicates the presence of two binding sites displaying different affinities for metals ions. Our results show that AhSOD could be classified as an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that is folded when metals are bound and with high thermal stability.

  11. Discriminating binding mechanisms of an intrinsically disordered protein via a multi-state coarse-grained model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Michael; Best, Robert B.

    2014-05-01

    Many proteins undergo a conformational transition upon binding to their cognate binding partner, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) providing an extreme example in which a folding transition occurs. However, it is often not clear whether this occurs via an "induced fit" or "conformational selection" mechanism, or via some intermediate scenario. In the first case, transient encounters with the binding partner favour transitions to the bound structure before the two proteins dissociate, while in the second the bound structure must be selected from a subset of unbound structures which are in the correct state for binding, because transient encounters of the incorrect conformation with the binding partner are most likely to result in dissociation. A particularly interesting situation involves those intrinsically disordered proteins which can bind to different binding partners in different conformations. We have devised a multi-state coarse-grained simulation model which is able to capture the binding of IDPs in alternate conformations, and by applying it to the binding of nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) to either ACTR or IRF-3 we are able to determine the binding mechanism. By all measures, the binding of NCBD to either binding partner appears to occur via an induced fit mechanism. Nonetheless, we also show how a scenario closer to conformational selection could arise by choosing an alternative non-binding structure for NCBD.

  12. Discriminating binding mechanisms of an intrinsically disordered protein via a multi-state coarse-grained model

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Michael; Best, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins undergo a conformational transition upon binding to their cognate binding partner, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) providing an extreme example in which a folding transition occurs. However, it is often not clear whether this occurs via an “induced fit” or “conformational selection” mechanism, or via some intermediate scenario. In the first case, transient encounters with the binding partner favour transitions to the bound structure before the two proteins dissociate, while in the second the bound structure must be selected from a subset of unbound structures which are in the correct state for binding, because transient encounters of the incorrect conformation with the binding partner are most likely to result in dissociation. A particularly interesting situation involves those intrinsically disordered proteins which can bind to different binding partners in different conformations. We have devised a multi-state coarse-grained simulation model which is able to capture the binding of IDPs in alternate conformations, and by applying it to the binding of nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) to either ACTR or IRF-3 we are able to determine the binding mechanism. By all measures, the binding of NCBD to either binding partner appears to occur via an induced fit mechanism. Nonetheless, we also show how a scenario closer to conformational selection could arise by choosing an alternative non-binding structure for NCBD. PMID:24811666

  13. Discriminating binding mechanisms of an intrinsically disordered protein via a multi-state coarse-grained model

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, Michael; Best, Robert B.

    2014-05-07

    Many proteins undergo a conformational transition upon binding to their cognate binding partner, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) providing an extreme example in which a folding transition occurs. However, it is often not clear whether this occurs via an “induced fit” or “conformational selection” mechanism, or via some intermediate scenario. In the first case, transient encounters with the binding partner favour transitions to the bound structure before the two proteins dissociate, while in the second the bound structure must be selected from a subset of unbound structures which are in the correct state for binding, because transient encounters of the incorrect conformation with the binding partner are most likely to result in dissociation. A particularly interesting situation involves those intrinsically disordered proteins which can bind to different binding partners in different conformations. We have devised a multi-state coarse-grained simulation model which is able to capture the binding of IDPs in alternate conformations, and by applying it to the binding of nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) to either ACTR or IRF-3 we are able to determine the binding mechanism. By all measures, the binding of NCBD to either binding partner appears to occur via an induced fit mechanism. Nonetheless, we also show how a scenario closer to conformational selection could arise by choosing an alternative non-binding structure for NCBD.

  14. A practical guide to small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of flexible and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Kikhney, Alexey G; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2015-09-14

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a biophysical method to study the overall shape and structural transitions of biological macromolecules in solution. SAXS provides low resolution information on the shape, conformation and assembly state of proteins, nucleic acids and various macromolecular complexes. The technique also offers powerful means for the quantitative analysis of flexible systems, including intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Here, the basic principles of SAXS are presented, and profits and pitfalls of the characterization of multidomain flexible proteins and IDPs using SAXS are discussed from the practical point of view. Examples of the synergistic use of SAXS with high resolution methods like X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as other experimental and in silico techniques to characterize completely, or partially unstructured proteins, are presented.

  15. Small angle neutron scattering for the structural study of intrinsically disordered proteins in solution: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) allows studying bio-macromolecular structures and interactions in solution. It is particularly well-suited to study structural properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) over a wide range of length-scales ranging from global aspects (radii of gyration and molecular weight) down to short-distance properties (e.g., cross-sectional analysis). In this book chapter, we provide a practical guide on how to carry out SANS experiments on IDPs and discuss the complementary aspects and strengths of SANS with respect to small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS).

  16. Intrinsic Disorder in Pathogen Effectors: Protein Flexibility as an Evolutionary Hallmark in a Molecular Arms Race[W

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Macarena; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Ott, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Effector proteins represent a refined mechanism of bacterial pathogens to overcome plants’ innate immune systems. These modular proteins often manipulate host physiology by directly interfering with immune signaling of plant cells. Even if host cells have developed efficient strategies to perceive the presence of pathogenic microbes and to recognize intracellular effector activity, it remains an open question why only few effectors are recognized directly by plant resistance proteins. Based on in-silico genome-wide surveys and a reevaluation of published structural data, we estimated that bacterial effectors of phytopathogens are highly enriched in long-disordered regions (>50 residues). These structurally flexible segments have no secondary structure under physiological conditions but can fold in a stimulus-dependent manner (e.g., during protein–protein interactions). The high abundance of intrinsic disorder in effectors strongly suggests positive evolutionary selection of this structural feature and highlights the dynamic nature of these proteins. We postulate that such structural flexibility may be essential for (1) effector translocation, (2) evasion of the innate immune system, and (3) host function mimicry. The study of these dynamical regions will greatly complement current structural approaches to understand the molecular mechanisms of these proteins and may help in the prediction of new effectors. PMID:24038649

  17. Role of Intrinsic Protein Disorder in the Function and Interactions of the Transcriptional Coactivators CREB-binding Protein (CBP) and p300.

    PubMed

    Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2016-03-25

    The transcriptional coactivators CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 undergo a particularly rich set of interactions with disordered and partly ordered partners, as a part of their ubiquitous role in facilitating transcription of genes. CBP and p300 contain a number of small structured domains that provide scaffolds for the interaction of disordered transactivation domains from a wide variety of partners, including p53, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), NF-κB, and STAT proteins, and are the targets for the interactions of disordered viral proteins that compete with cellular factors to disrupt signaling and subvert the cell cycle. The functional diversity of the CBP/p300 interactome provides an excellent example of the power of intrinsic disorder to facilitate the complexity of living systems.

  18. Role of Intrinsic Protein Disorder in the Function and Interactions of the Transcriptional Coactivators CREB-binding Protein (CBP) and p300*

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivators CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 undergo a particularly rich set of interactions with disordered and partly ordered partners, as a part of their ubiquitous role in facilitating transcription of genes. CBP and p300 contain a number of small structured domains that provide scaffolds for the interaction of disordered transactivation domains from a wide variety of partners, including p53, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), NF-κB, and STAT proteins, and are the targets for the interactions of disordered viral proteins that compete with cellular factors to disrupt signaling and subvert the cell cycle. The functional diversity of the CBP/p300 interactome provides an excellent example of the power of intrinsic disorder to facilitate the complexity of living systems. PMID:26851278

  19. The intrinsically disordered C-RING biomineralization protein, AP7, creates protein phases that introduce nanopatterning and nanoporosities into mineral crystals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eric P; Russ, Jennie A; Verch, Andreas; Kröger, Roland; Estroff, Lara A; Evans, John Spencer

    2014-07-15

    We report an interesting process whereby the formation of nanoparticle assemblies on and nanoporosities within calcite crystals is directed by an intrinsically disordered C-RING mollusk shell nacre protein, AP7. Under mineralization conditions, AP7 forms protein phases that direct the nucleation of ordered calcite nanoparticles via a repetitive protein phase deposition process onto calcite crystals. These organized nanoparticles are separated by gaps or spaces that become incorporated into the forming bulk crystal as nanoporosities. This is an unusual example of organized nanoparticle biosynthesis and mineral modification directed by a C-RING protein phase.

  20. The Intrinsically Disordered C-RING Biomineralization Protein, AP7, Creates Protein Phases That Introduce Nanopatterning and Nanoporosities into Mineral Crystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report an interesting process whereby the formation of nanoparticle assemblies on and nanoporosities within calcite crystals is directed by an intrinsically disordered C-RING mollusk shell nacre protein, AP7. Under mineralization conditions, AP7 forms protein phases that direct the nucleation of ordered calcite nanoparticles via a repetitive protein phase deposition process onto calcite crystals. These organized nanoparticles are separated by gaps or spaces that become incorporated into the forming bulk crystal as nanoporosities. This is an unusual example of organized nanoparticle biosynthesis and mineral modification directed by a C-RING protein phase. PMID:24977921

  1. Intrinsic disorder of the bacterial cell division protein ZipA: coil-to-brush conformational transition.

    PubMed

    López-Montero, Iván; López-Navajas, Pilar; Mingorance, Jesús; Rivas, Germán; Vélez, Marisela; Vicente, Miguel; Monroy, Francisco

    2013-08-01

    The full-length ZipA protein from Escherichia coli, one of the essential elements of the cell division machinery, was studied in a surface model built as adsorbed monolayers. The interplay between lateral packing and molecular conformation was probed using a combined methodology based on the scaling analysis of the surface pressure isotherms and ellipsometry measurements of the monolayer thickness. The observed behavior is compatible with the one expected for an intrinsically disordered and highly flexible protein that is preferentially structured in a random coil conformation. At low grafting densities, ZipA coils organize in a mushroom-like regime, whereas a coil-to-brush transition occurs on increasing lateral packing. The structural results suggest a functional scenario in which ZipA acts as a flexible tether anchoring bacterial proto-ring elements to the membrane during the earlier stages of division.

  2. Minimal effects of macromolecular crowding on an intrinsically disordered protein: a small-angle neutron scattering study.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, David P; Argyle, Brian

    2014-02-18

    Small-angle neutron scattering was used to study the effects of macromolecular crowding by two globular proteins, i.e., bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and equine metmyoglobin, on the conformational ensemble of an intrinsically disordered protein, the N protein of bacteriophage λ. The λ N protein was uniformly labeled with (2)H, and the concentrations of D2O in the samples were adjusted to match the neutron scattering contrast of the unlabeled crowding proteins, thereby masking their contribution to the scattering profiles. Scattering from the deuterated λ N was recorded for samples containing up to 0.12 g/mL bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor or 0.2 g/mL metmyoglobin. The radius of gyration of the uncrowded protein was estimated to be 30 Å and was found to be remarkably insensitive to the presence of crowders, varying by <2 Å for the highest crowder concentrations. The scattering profiles were also used to estimate the fractal dimension of λ N, which was found to be ∼1.8 in the absence or presence of crowders, indicative of a well-solvated and expanded random coil under all of the conditions examined. These results are contrary to the predictions of theoretical treatments and previous experimental studies demonstrating compaction of unfolded proteins by crowding with polymers such as dextran and Ficoll. A computational simulation suggests that some previous treatments may have overestimated the effective volumes of disordered proteins and the variation of these volumes within an ensemble. The apparent insensitivity of λ N to crowding may also be due in part to weak attractive interactions with the crowding proteins, which may compensate for the effects of steric exclusion.

  3. Solvent effects in the helix-coil transition model can explain the unusual biophysics of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badasyan, Artem; Mamasakhlisov, Yevgeni Sh.; Podgornik, Rudolf; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2015-07-01

    We analyze a model statistical description of the polypeptide chain helix-coil transition, where we take into account the specificity of its primary sequence, as quantified by the phase space volume ratio of the number of all accessible states to the number corresponding to a helical conformation. The resulting transition phase diagram is then juxtaposed with the unusual behavior of the secondary structures in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) and a number of similarities are observed, even if the protein folding is a more complex transition than the helix-coil transition. In fact, the deficit in bulky and hydrophobic amino acids observed in IDPs, translated into larger values of phase space volume, allows us to locate the region in parameter space of the helix-coil transition that would correspond to the secondary structure transformations that are intrinsic to conformational transitions in IDPs and that is characterized by a modified phase diagram when compared to globular proteins. Here, we argue how the nature of this modified phase diagram, obtained from a model of the helix-coil transition in a solvent, would illuminate the turned-out response of IDPs to the changes in the environment conditions that follow straightforwardly from the re-entrant (cold denaturation) branch in their folding phase diagram.

  4. Are Charge-State Distributions a Reliable Tool Describing Molecular Ensembles of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins by Native MS?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalello, Antonino; Santambrogio, Carlo; Grandori, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a central tool of structural proteomics, but its applicability to the peculiar class of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is still object of debate. IDPs lack an ordered tridimensional structure and are characterized by high conformational plasticity. Since they represent valuable targets for cancer and neurodegeneration research, there is an urgent need of methodological advances for description of the conformational ensembles populated by these proteins in solution. However, structural rearrangements during electrospray-ionization (ESI) or after the transfer to the gas phase could affect data obtained by native ESI-MS. In particular, charge-state distributions (CSDs) are affected by protein conformation inside ESI droplets, while ion mobility (IM) reflects protein conformation in the gas phase. This review focuses on the available evidence relating IDP solution ensembles with CSDs, trying to summarize cases of apparent consistency or discrepancy. The protein-specificity of ionization patterns and their responses to ligands and buffer conditions suggests that CSDs are imprinted to protein structural features also in the case of IDPs. Nevertheless, it seems that these proteins are more easily affected by electrospray conditions, leading in some cases to rearrangements of the conformational ensembles.

  5. Combining a PagP fusion protein system with nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage to produce intrinsically disordered proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Somaya; Pan, Jonathan S; Liu, Philip B; Hwang, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions that are highly solvent-exposed and susceptible to post-translational modifications. Studying these protein segments is critical to understanding their physiologic regulation, but proteolytic degradation can make them difficult to express and purify. We have designed a new protein expression vector that fuses the target protein to the N-terminus of the integral membrane protein, PagP. The two proteins are connected by a short linker containing the sequence SRHW, previously shown to be optimal for nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage. The methodology is demonstrated for an intrinsically disordered segment of cardiac troponin I. cTnI[135-209]-SRHW-PagP-His6 fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, accumulating in insoluble inclusion bodies. The protein was solubilized, purified using nickel affinity chromatography, and then cleaved with 0.5mM NiSO4 at pH 9.0 and 45 °C, all in 6M guanidine-HCl. Nickel ion-catalyzed peptide bond hydrolysis is an effective chemical cleavage technique under denaturing conditions that preclude the use of proteases. Moreover, nickel-catalyzed cleavage is more specific than the most commonly used agent, cyanogen bromide, which cleaves C-terminal to methionine residues. We were able to produce 15 mg of purified cTnI[135-209] from 1L of M9 minimal media using this protocol. The methodology is more generally applicable to the production of intrinsically disordered protein segments.

  6. The Effect of Intrinsic Disorder and Self-association on the Translational Diffusion of Proteins: the Case of α-Casein.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Daria L; Skirda, Vladimir Dmitrievich; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2017-03-27

    Translational diffusion is the major mode of macromolecular transport in leaving organisms and therefore it is vital to many biological and biotechnological processes. Although translational diffusion of proteins has received considerable theoretical and experimental scrutiny, much of that attention has been directed towards the description of globular proteins. The translational diffusion of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), however, is much less studied. Here, we use a pulsed-gradient nuclear magnetic resonance technique (PFG NMR) to investigate the translational diffusion of a disordered protein in a wide range of concentrations using α-casein that belongs to the class of natively disordered proteins as an example.

  7. Structural analysis of the complex between calmodulin and full-length myelin basic protein, an intrinsically disordered molecule.

    PubMed

    Majava, Viivi; Wang, Chaozhan; Myllykoski, Matti; Kangas, Salla M; Kang, Sung Ung; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Baumgärtel, Peter; Heape, Anthony M; Lubec, Gert; Kursula, Petri

    2010-06-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is present between the cytoplasmic leaflets of the compact myelin membrane in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, and characterized to be intrinsically disordered in solution. One of the best-characterized protein ligands for MBP is calmodulin (CaM), a highly acidic calcium sensor. We pulled down MBP from human brain white matter as the major calcium-dependent CaM-binding protein. We then used full-length brain MBP, and a peptide from rodent MBP, to structurally characterize the MBP-CaM complex in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering, NMR spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, and size exclusion chromatography. We determined 3D structures for the full-length protein-protein complex at different stoichiometries and detect ligand-induced folding of MBP. We also obtained thermodynamic data for the two CaM-binding sites of MBP, indicating that CaM does not collapse upon binding to MBP, and show that CaM and MBP colocalize in myelin sheaths. In addition, we analyzed the post-translational modifications of rat brain MBP, identifying a novel MBP modification, glucosylation. Our results provide a detailed picture of the MBP-CaM interaction, including a 3D model of the complex between full-length proteins.

  8. Coil-to-helix transitions in intrinsically disordered methyl CpG binding protein 2 and its isolated domains

    PubMed Central

    Hite, Kristopher C; Kalashnikova, Anna A; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2012-01-01

    Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a canonical intrinsically disordered protein (IDP), that is, it lacks stable secondary structure throughout its entire polypeptide chain. Because IDPs often have the propensity to become locally ordered, we tested whether full-length MeCP2 and its constituent domains would gain secondary structure in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE), a cosolvent that stabilizes intramolecular hydrogen bonding in proteins. The α-helix, β-strand/turn, and unstructured content were determined as a function of TFE concentration by deconvolution of circular dichroism data. Results indicate that approximately two-thirds of the unstructured residues present in full-length MeCP2 were converted to α-helix in 70% TFE without a change in β-strand/turn. Thus, much of the MeCP2 polypeptide chain undergoes coil-to-helix transitions under conditions that favor intrachain hydrogen bond formation. The unstructured residues of the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains were partially converted to α-helix in 70% TFE. In contrast, the central transcription regulation domain (TRD) became almost completely α-helical in 70% TFE. Unlike the NTD, CTD, and TRD, the unstructured content of the methyl DNA binding domain and the intervening domain did not change with increasing TFE concentration. These results indicate that the coil-to-helix transitions that occur in full-length MeCP2 are localized to the NTD, CTD, and TRD, with the TRD showing the greatest tendency for helix formation. The potential relationships between intrinsic disorder, coil-to-helix transitions, and MeCP2 structure and function are discussed. PMID:22294343

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Fluctuating Conformational Dynamics of the Intrinsically Disordered Proteins α-Synuclein and τ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.; Schreck, Carl; Nath, Abhinav; Rhoades, Elizabeth; O'Hern, Corey

    2013-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not possess well-defined three-dimensional structures in solution under physiological conditions. We develop united-atom and coarse-grained Langevin dynamics simulations for the IDPs α-synuclein and τ that include geometric,attractive hydrophobic, and screened electrostatic interactions and are calibrated to the inter-residue separations measured in recent smFRET experiments. We find that these IDPs have conformational statistics that are intermediate between random walk and collapsed globule behavior and demonstrate close resemblance to the known experimental data, with both electrostatics and hydrophobicity strongly influencing the dynamics. We investigate the propensity of α-synuclein to aggregate and form oligomers, and present preliminary results for the aggregation of τ and interactions between these IDPs and small molecules such as heparin and spermine which are known to induce aggregation.

  10. A Fragment-Based Method of Creating Small-Molecule Libraries to Target the Aggregation of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Priyanka; Chia, Sean; Habchi, Johnny; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-03-14

    The aggregation process of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) has been associated with a wide range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Currently, however, no drug in clinical use targets IDP aggregation. To facilitate drug discovery programs in this important and challenging area, we describe a fragment-based approach of generating small-molecule libraries that target specific IDPs. The method is based on the use of molecular fragments extracted from compounds reported in the literature to inhibit of the aggregation of IDPs. These fragments are used to screen existing large generic libraries of small molecules to form smaller libraries specific for given IDPs. We illustrate this approach by describing three distinct small-molecule libraries to target, Aβ, tau, and α-synuclein, which are three IDPs implicated in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The strategy described here offers novel opportunities for the identification of effective molecular scaffolds for drug discovery for neurodegenerative disorders and to provide insights into the mechanism of small-molecule binding to IDPs.

  11. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-01-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution. PMID:26042819

  12. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin.

    PubMed

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P; Elvin, Christopher M; Hill, Anita J; Choudhury, Namita R; Dutta, Naba K

    2015-06-04

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution.

  13. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-06-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution.

  14. Spatial patterning of P granules by RNA-induced phase separation of the intrinsically-disordered protein MEG-3

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jarrett; Calidas, Deepika; Schmidt, Helen; Lu, Tu; Rasoloson, Dominique; Seydoux, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    RNA granules are non-membrane bound cellular compartments that contain RNA and RNA binding proteins. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the spatial distribution of RNA granules in cells are poorly understood. During polarization of the C. elegans zygote, germline RNA granules, called P granules, assemble preferentially in the posterior cytoplasm. We present evidence that P granule asymmetry depends on RNA-induced phase separation of the granule scaffold MEG-3. MEG-3 is an intrinsically disordered protein that binds and phase separates with RNA in vitro. In vivo, MEG-3 forms a posterior-rich concentration gradient that is anti-correlated with a gradient in the RNA-binding protein MEX-5. MEX-5 is necessary and sufficient to suppress MEG-3 granule formation in vivo, and suppresses RNA-induced MEG-3 phase separation in vitro. Our findings suggest that MEX-5 interferes with MEG-3’s access to RNA, thus locally suppressing MEG-3 phase separation to drive P granule asymmetry. Regulated access to RNA, combined with RNA-induced phase separation of key scaffolding proteins, may be a general mechanism for controlling the formation of RNA granules in space and time. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21337.001 PMID:27914198

  15. Intrinsically disordered inhibitor of glutamine synthetase is a functional protein with random-coil-like pKa values.

    PubMed

    Cozza, Concetta; Neira, José L; Florencio, Francisco J; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel; Rizzuti, Bruno

    2017-03-15

    The sequential action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) in cyanobacteria allows the incorporation of ammonium into carbon skeletons. In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the activity of GS is modulated by the interaction with proteins, which include a 65-residue-long intrinsically disordered protein (IDP), the inactivating factor IF7. This interaction is regulated by the presence of charged residues in both IF7 and GS. To understand how charged amino acids can affect the binding of an IDP with its target and to provide clues on electrostatic interactions in disordered states of proteins, we measured the pKa values of all IF7 acidic groups (Glu32, Glu36, Glu38, Asp40, Asp58, and Ser65, the backbone C-terminus) at 100 mM NaCl concentration, by using NMR spectroscopy. We also obtained solution structures of IF7 through molecular dynamics simulation, validated them on the basis of previous experiments, and used them to obtain theoretical estimates of the pKa values. Titration values for the two Asp and three Glu residues of IF7 were similar to those reported for random-coil models, suggesting the lack of electrostatic interactions around these residues. Furthermore, our results suggest the presence of helical structure at the N-terminus of the protein and of conformational changes at acidic pH values. The overall experimental and in silico findings suggest that local interactions and conformational equilibria do not play a role in determining the electrostatic features of the acidic residues of IF7.

  16. Rethinking gene regulatory networks in light of alternative splicing, intrinsically disordered protein domains, and post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J.; Bondos, Sarah E.; Dunker, A. Keith; Newman, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Models for genetic regulation and cell fate specification characteristically assume that gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are essentially deterministic and exhibit multiple stable states specifying alternative, but pre-figured cell fates. Mounting evidence shows, however, that most eukaryotic precursor RNAs undergo alternative splicing (AS) and that the majority of transcription factors contain intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) domains whose functionalities are context dependent as well as subject to post-translational modification (PTM). Consequently, many transcription factors do not have fixed cis-acting regulatory targets, and developmental determination by GRNs alone is untenable. Modeling these phenomena requires a multi-scale approach to explain how GRNs operationally interact with the intra- and intercellular environments. Evidence shows that AS, IDP, and PTM complicate gene expression and act synergistically to facilitate and promote time- and cell-specific protein modifications involved in cell signaling and cell fate specification and thereby disrupt a strict deterministic GRN-phenotype mapping. The combined effects of AS, IDP, and PTM give proteomes physiological plasticity, adaptive responsiveness, and developmental versatility without inefficiently expanding genome size. They also help us understand how protein functionalities can undergo major evolutionary changes by buffering mutational consequences. PMID:25767796

  17. Origin of a folded repeat protein from an intrinsically disordered ancestor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbo; Sepulveda, Edgardo; Hartmann, Marcus D; Kogenaru, Manjunatha; Ursinus, Astrid; Sulz, Eva; Albrecht, Reinhard; Coles, Murray; Martin, Jörg; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-09-13

    Repetitive proteins are thought to have arisen through the amplification of subdomain-sized peptides. Many of these originated in a non-repetitive context as cofactors of RNA-based replication and catalysis, and required the RNA to assume their active conformation. In search of the origins of one of the most widespread repeat protein families, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR), we identified several potential homologs of its repeated helical hairpin in non-repetitive proteins, including the putatively ancient ribosomal protein S20 (RPS20), which only becomes structured in the context of the ribosome. We evaluated the ability of the RPS20 hairpin to form a TPR fold by amplification and obtained structures identical to natural TPRs for variants with 2-5 point mutations per repeat. The mutations were neutral in the parent organism, suggesting that they could have been sampled in the course of evolution. TPRs could thus have plausibly arisen by amplification from an ancestral helical hairpin.

  18. An optimized Npro-based method for the expression and purification of intrinsically disordered proteins for an NMR study

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Natsuko; Matsuo, Naoki; Tenno, Takeshi; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Ota, Motonori; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are an emerging concept. IDPs have high flexibility in their polypeptide chains, lacking a stable 3-dimensional structure. Because of the difficulty in performing X-ray crystallography for IDPs, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the first choice for atomic-level investigation of their nature. Given that isotopically labeled IDP samples are necessary for NMR study, a robust and cost-effective protocol for bacterial expression and purification of IDP is also needed. We employed the Npro (EDDIE)-autoprotease fusion protein system. Although IDPs are believed to be readily degraded by endogenous proteases when expressed in Escherichia coli, Npro-fused IDPs showed excellent resistance to degradation. Seven IDPs of uncharacterized function sampled from the human genome as well as 3 constructs from IDP regions derived from human FancM and Thermococcus kodakarensis Hef were prepared. We improved the protocol of refolding of Npro (EDDIE) to use dialysis, which is convenient for subsequent purification using reversed-phase (RP) HPLC. The method is robust and widely applicable to any IDP sample, promoting the acquisition of experimental data for IDPs in a high-throughput manner.

  19. Tunable Membrane Binding of the Intrinsically Disordered Dehydrin Lti30, a Cold-Induced Plant Stress Protein[W

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Sylvia K.; Kutzer, Michael; Procek, Jan; Gröbner, Gerhard; Harryson, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrins are intrinsically disordered plant proteins whose expression is upregulated under conditions of desiccation and cold stress. Their molecular function in ensuring plant survival is not yet known, but several studies suggest their involvement in membrane stabilization. The dehydrins are characterized by a broad repertoire of conserved and repetitive sequences, out of which the archetypical K-segment has been implicated in membrane binding. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of these K-segments, we examined the interaction between lipid membranes and a dehydrin with a basic functional sequence composition: Lti30, comprising only K-segments. Our results show that Lti30 interacts electrostatically with vesicles of both zwitterionic (phosphatidyl choline) and negatively charged phospholipids (phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl serine, and phosphatidic acid) with a stronger binding to membranes with high negative surface potential. The membrane interaction lowers the temperature of the main lipid phase transition, consistent with Lti30’s proposed role in cold tolerance. Moreover, the membrane binding promotes the assembly of lipid vesicles into large and easily distinguishable aggregates. Using these aggregates as binding markers, we identify three factors that regulate the lipid interaction of Lti30 in vitro: (1) a pH dependent His on/off switch, (2) phosphorylation by protein kinase C, and (3) reversal of membrane binding by proteolytic digest. PMID:21665998

  20. An optimized N(pro)-based method for the expression and purification of intrinsically disordered proteins for an NMR study.

    PubMed

    Goda, Natsuko; Matsuo, Naoki; Tenno, Takeshi; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Ota, Motonori; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are an emerging concept. IDPs have high flexibility in their polypeptide chains, lacking a stable 3-dimensional structure. Because of the difficulty in performing X-ray crystallography for IDPs, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the first choice for atomic-level investigation of their nature. Given that isotopically labeled IDP samples are necessary for NMR study, a robust and cost-effective protocol for bacterial expression and purification of IDP is also needed. We employed the N(pro) (EDDIE)-autoprotease fusion protein system. Although IDPs are believed to be readily degraded by endogenous proteases when expressed in Escherichia coli, N(pro)-fused IDPs showed excellent resistance to degradation. Seven IDPs of uncharacterized function sampled from the human genome as well as 3 constructs from IDP regions derived from human FancM and Thermococcus kodakarensis Hef were prepared. We improved the protocol of refolding of N(pro) (EDDIE) to use dialysis, which is convenient for subsequent purification using reversed-phase (RP) HPLC. The method is robust and widely applicable to any IDP sample, promoting the acquisition of experimental data for IDPs in a high-throughput manner.

  1. BIM(EL), an intrinsically disordered protein, is degraded by 20S proteasomes in the absence of poly-ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Ceri M; Tsvetkov, Peter; Johnson, Mark; Joyce, Claire L; Lamb, Christopher A; Bryant, Nia J; Komander, David; Shaul, Yosef; Cook, Simon J

    2011-03-15

    BIM-extra long (BIM(EL)), a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein and part of the BCL-2 family, is degraded by the proteasome following activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway. Although studies have demonstrated poly-ubiquitylation of BIM(EL) in cells, the nature of the ubiquitin chain linkage has not been defined. Using ubiquitin-binding domains (UBDs) specific for defined ubiquitin chain linkages, we show that BIM(EL) undergoes K48-linked poly-ubiquitylation at either of two lysine residues. Surprisingly, BIM(EL)ΔKK, which lacks both lysine residues, was not poly-ubiquitylated but still underwent ERK1/2-driven, proteasome-dependent turnover. BIM has been proposed to be an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) and some IDPs can be degraded by uncapped 20S proteasomes in the absence of poly-ubiquitylation. We show that BIM(EL) is degraded by isolated 20S proteasomes but that this is prevented when BIM(EL) is bound to its pro-survival target protein MCL-1. Furthermore, knockdown of the proteasome cap component Rpn2 does not prevent BIM(EL) turnover in cells, and inhibition of the E3 ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP, which catalyses poly-Ub of BIM(EL), causes Cdc25A accumulation but does not inhibit BIM(EL) turnover. These results provide new insights into the regulation of BIM(EL) by defining a novel ubiquitin-independent pathway for the proteasome-dependent destruction of this highly toxic protein.

  2. Origin of a folded repeat protein from an intrinsically disordered ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongbo; Sepulveda, Edgardo; Hartmann, Marcus D; Kogenaru, Manjunatha; Ursinus, Astrid; Sulz, Eva; Albrecht, Reinhard; Coles, Murray; Martin, Jörg; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive proteins are thought to have arisen through the amplification of subdomain-sized peptides. Many of these originated in a non-repetitive context as cofactors of RNA-based replication and catalysis, and required the RNA to assume their active conformation. In search of the origins of one of the most widespread repeat protein families, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR), we identified several potential homologs of its repeated helical hairpin in non-repetitive proteins, including the putatively ancient ribosomal protein S20 (RPS20), which only becomes structured in the context of the ribosome. We evaluated the ability of the RPS20 hairpin to form a TPR fold by amplification and obtained structures identical to natural TPRs for variants with 2–5 point mutations per repeat. The mutations were neutral in the parent organism, suggesting that they could have been sampled in the course of evolution. TPRs could thus have plausibly arisen by amplification from an ancestral helical hairpin. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16761.001 PMID:27623012

  3. Intrinsic disorder in the C-terminal domain of the Shaker voltage-activated K+ channel modulates its interaction with scaffold proteins

    PubMed Central

    Magidovich, Elhanan; Orr, Irit; Fass, Deborah; Abdu, Uri; Yifrach, Ofer

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of membrane-embedded voltage-activated potassium channels (Kv) with intracellular scaffold proteins, such as the postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) protein, is mediated by the channel C-terminal segment. This interaction underlies Kv channel clustering at unique membrane sites and is important for the proper assembly and functioning of the synapse. In the current study, we address the molecular mechanism underlying Kv/PSD-95 interaction. We provide experimental evidence, based on hydrodynamic and spectroscopic analyses, indicating that the isolated C-terminal segment of the archetypical Shaker Kv channel (ShB-C) is a random coil, suggesting that ShB-C belongs to the recently defined class of intrinsically disordered proteins. We show that isolated ShB-C is still able to bind its scaffold protein partner and support protein clustering in vivo, indicating that unfoldedness is compatible with ShB-C activity. Pulldown experiments involving C-terminal chains differing in flexibility or length further demonstrate that intrinsic disorder in the C-terminal segment of the Shaker channel modulates its interaction with the PSD-95 protein. Our results thus suggest that the C-terminal domain of the Shaker Kv channel behaves as an entropic chain and support a “fishing rod” molecular mechanism for Kv channel binding to scaffold proteins. The importance of intrinsically disordered protein segments to the complex processes of synapse assembly, maintenance, and function is discussed. PMID:17666528

  4. A J-modulated protonless NMR experiment characterizes the conformational ensemble of the intrinsically disordered protein WIP.

    PubMed

    Rozentur-Shkop, Eva; Goobes, Gil; Chill, Jordan H

    2016-12-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are multi-conformational polypeptides that lack a single stable three-dimensional structure. It has become increasingly clear that the versatile IDPs play key roles in a multitude of biological processes, and, given their flexible nature, NMR is a leading method to investigate IDP behavior on the molecular level. Here we present an IDP-tailored J-modulated experiment designed to monitor changes in the conformational ensemble characteristic of IDPs by accurately measuring backbone one- and two-bond J((15)N,(13)Cα) couplings. This concept was realized using a unidirectional (H)NCO (13)C-detected experiment suitable for poor spectral dispersion and optimized for maximum coverage of amino acid types. To demonstrate the utility of this approach we applied it to the disordered actin-binding N-terminal domain of WASp interacting protein (WIP), a ubiquitous key modulator of cytoskeletal changes in a range of biological systems. One- and two-bond J((15)N,(13)Cα) couplings were acquired for WIP residues 2-65 at various temperatures, and in denaturing and crowding environments. Under native conditions fitted J-couplings identified in the WIP conformational ensemble a propensity for extended conformation at residues 16-23 and 45-60, and a helical tendency at residues 28-42. These findings are consistent with a previous study of the based upon chemical shift and RDC data and confirm that the WIP(2-65) conformational ensemble is biased towards the structure assumed by this fragment in its actin-bound form. The effects of environmental changes upon this ensemble were readily apparent in the J-coupling data, which reflected a significant decrease in structural propensity at higher temperatures, in the presence of 8 M urea, and under the influence of a bacterial cell lysate. The latter suggests that crowding can cause protein unfolding through protein-protein interactions that stabilize the unfolded state. We conclude that J-couplings are

  5. The neglected functions of intrinsically disordered proteins and the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Jaeken, Laurent

    2017-03-15

    The example of gelatine shows that extended proteins behave quite differently than globular ones: with water they form a gel. Historically the colloid view of protoplasm was discredited in favour of membrane-(pump)-theory (MPT), but unjustified. In his association-induction hypothesis Ling demonstrates that MPT is full of contradictions and that the colloid view has to be re-considered. In that case IDP's play a crucial role in this. What Ling calls the 'living state' consists of the unitary protoplasmic structure from which it was experimentally demonstrated that it can survive and keep Na(+) and K(+) concentrations without a delineating membrane. It consists of unfolded polypeptide chains whereby the repetitive backbone peptide groups orient and polarise many layers of water, in which Na(+) and other solutes have reduced solubility and whereby the polypeptide β- and ϒ-carboxyl-groups adsorb K(+). This 'associated' state is the resting state: a coherent high-energy low-entropy meta-stable state. It can be kept by adsorbed ATP (NTP) eventually for years without consumption of ATP as demonstrated by Clegg on Artemia embryo's. Stimuli can transform this state into a lower-energy higher-entropy action state with dissociation of ADP and Pi and newly synthesised ATP can reinstall it. Rest-to-action and action-to-rest were shown to be real phase-shifts. Ling's theory is a complete quantitative theory with corroborated equations for solute distribution, transport, cell potentials and osmotic behaviour and describing the cell's energy cycle. IDP's are involved in all this. The new view on IDP's leads to new insights on the origin of life.

  6. Impact of hydrostatic pressure on an intrinsically disordered protein: a high-pressure NMR study of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Roche, Julien; Ying, Jinfa; Maltsev, Alexander S; Bax, Ad

    2013-09-23

    The impact of pressure on the backbone (15) N, (1) H and (13) C chemical shifts in N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein has been evaluated over a pressure range 1-2500 bar. Even while the chemical shifts fall very close to random coil values, as expected for an intrinsically disordered protein, substantial deviations in the pressure dependence of the chemical shifts are seen relative to those in short model peptides. In particular, the nonlinear pressure response of the (1) H(N) chemical shifts, which commonly is associated with the presence of low-lying "excited states", is much larger in α-synuclein than in model peptides. The linear pressure response of (1) H(N) chemical shift, commonly linked to H-bond length change, correlates well with those in short model peptides, and is found to be anticorrelated with its temperature dependence. The pressure dependence of (13) C chemical shifts shows remarkably large variations, even when accounting for residue type, and do not point to a clear shift in population between different regions of the Ramachandran map. However, a nearly universal decrease in (3) JHN-Hα by 0.22 ± 0.05 Hz suggests a slight increase in population of the polyproline II region at 2500 bar. The first six residues of N-terminally acetylated synuclein show a transient of approximately 15% population of α-helix, which slightly diminishes at 2500 bar. The backbone dynamics of the protein is not visibly affected beyond the effect of slight increase in water viscosity at 2500 bar.

  7. Intrinsically Disordered Side of the Zika Virus Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Rajanish; Kumar, Deepak; Sharma, Nitin; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few decades, concepts of protein intrinsic disorder have been implicated in different biological processes. Recent studies have suggested that intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) provide structural plasticity and functional diversity to viral proteins that are involved in rapid replication and immune evasion in host cells. In case of Zika virus, the roles of protein intrinsic disorder in mechanisms of pathogenesis are not completely understood. In this study, we have analyzed the prevalence of intrinsic disorder in Zika virus proteome (strain MR 766). Our analyses revealed that Zika virus polyprotein is enriched with intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) and this finding is consistent with previous reports on the involvement of IDPs in shell formation and virulence of the Flaviviridae family. We found abundant IDPRs in Capsid, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins that are involved in mature particle formation and replication. In our view, the intrinsic disorder-focused analysis of ZIKV proteins could be important for the development of disorder-based drugs. PMID:27867910

  8. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut.

  9. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    PubMed Central

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut. PMID:27112540

  10. The intrinsic disorder alphabet. III. Dual personality of serine

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are natural polypeptides consisting of 20 major amino acid residues, content and order of which in a given amino acid sequence defines the ability of a related protein to fold into unique functional state or to stay intrinsically disordered. Amino acid sequences code for both foldable (ordered) proteins/domains and for intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and IDP regions (IDPRs), but these sequence codes are dramatically different. This difference starts with a very general property of the corresponding amino acid sequences, namely, their compositions. IDPs/IDPRs are enriched in specific disorder-promoting residues, whereas amino acid sequences of ordered proteins/domains typically contain more order-promoting residues. Therefore, the relative abundances of various amino acids in ordered and disordered proteins can be used to scale amino acids according to their disorder promoting potentials. This review continues a series of publications on the roles of different amino acids in defining the phenomenon of protein intrinsic disorder and represents serine, which is the third most disorder-promoting residue. Similar to previous publications, this review represents some physico-chemical properties of serine and the roles of this residue in structures and functions of ordered proteins, describes major posttranslational modifications tailored to serine, and finally gives an overview of roles of serine in structure and functions of intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:28232888

  11. A PagP fusion protein system for the expression of intrinsically disordered proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Peter M; Pan, Jonathan S; Sykes, Brian D

    2012-09-01

    PagP, a beta-barrel membrane protein found in Gram-negative bacteria, expresses robustly in inclusion bodies when its signal sequence is removed. We have developed a new fusion protein expression system based on PagP and demonstrated its utility in the expression of the unstructured N-terminal region of human cardiac troponin I (residues 1-71). A yield of 100mg fusion protein per liter M9 minimal media was obtained. The troponin I fragment was removed from PagP using cyanogen bromide cleavage at methionine residues followed by nickel affinity chromatography. We further demonstrate that optimal cleavage requires complete reduction of methionine residues prior to cyanogen bromide treatment, and this is effectively accomplished using potassium iodide under acidic conditions. The PagP-based fusion protein system is more effective at targeting proteins into inclusion bodies than a commercially available system that uses ketosteroid isomerase; it thus represents an important advance for producing large quantities of unfolded peptides or proteins in Escherichia coli.

  12. Paradoxes and wonders of intrinsic disorder: Complexity of simplicity

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT At first glance it may seem that intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and IDP regions (IDPRs) are simpler than ordered proteins and domains on multiple levels. However, such multilevel simplicity equips these proteins with the ability to have very complex behavior.

  13. Biophysical characterization of the structural change of Nopp140, an intrinsically disordered protein, in the interaction with CK2α

    PubMed Central

    Na, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Kim, Yuyoung; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Song, Seung Soo; Cha, Sun-Shin; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yu, Yeon Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Nucleolar phosphoprotein 140 (Nopp140) is a nucleolar protein, more than 80% of which is disordered. Previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Nopp140 (residues 568–596) interacts with protein kinase CK2α, and inhibits the catalytic activity of CK2. Although the region of Nopp140 responsible for the interaction with CK2α was identified, the structural features and the effect of this interaction on the structure of Nopp140 have not been defined due to the difficulty of structural characterization of disordered protein. In this study, the disordered feature of Nopp140 and the effect of CK2α on the structure of Nopp140 were examined using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The interaction with CK2α was increased conformational rigidity of the CK2α-interacting region of Nopp140 (Nopp140C), suggesting that the disordered and flexible conformation of Nopp140C became more rigid conformation as it binds to CK2α. In addition, site specific spin labeling and EPR analysis confirmed that the residues 574–589 of Nopp140 are critical for binding to CK2α. Similar technical approaches can be applied to analyze the conformational changes in other IDPs during their interactions with binding partners. PMID:27297113

  14. Molecular Basis for Structural Heterogeneity of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Bound to a Partner by Combined ESI-IM-MS and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urzo, Annalisa; Konijnenberg, Albert; Rossetti, Giulia; Habchi, Johnny; Li, Jinyu; Carloni, Paolo; Sobott, Frank; Longhi, Sonia; Grandori, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) form biologically active complexes that can retain a high degree of conformational disorder, escaping structural characterization by conventional approaches. An example is offered by the complex between the intrinsically disordered NTAIL domain and the phosphoprotein X domain (PXD) from measles virus (MeV). Here, distinct conformers of the complex are detected by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and ion mobility (IM) techniques yielding estimates for the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) in solution and the average collision cross-section (CCS) in the gas phase. Computational modeling of the complex in solution, based on experimental constraints, provides atomic-resolution structural models featuring different levels of compactness. The resulting models indicate high structural heterogeneity. The intermolecular interactions are predominantly hydrophobic, not only in the ordered core of the complex, but also in the dynamic, disordered regions. Electrostatic interactions become involved in the more compact states. This system represents an illustrative example of a hydrophobic complex that could be directly detected in the gas phase by native mass spectrometry. This work represents the first attempt to modeling the entire NTAIL domain bound to PXD at atomic resolution.

  15. Intrinsic Localized Modes in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Delarue, Patrice; Senet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Protein dynamics is essential for proteins to function. Here we predicted the existence of rare, large nonlinear excitations, termed intrinsic localized modes (ILMs), of the main chain of proteins based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of two fast-folder proteins and of a rigid α/β protein at 300 K and at 380 K in solution. These nonlinear excitations arise from the anharmonicity of the protein dynamics. The ILMs were detected by computing the Shannon entropy of the protein main-chain fluctuations. In the non-native state (significantly explored at 380 K), the probability of their excitation was increased by a factor between 9 and 28 for the fast-folder proteins and by a factor 2 for the rigid protein. This enhancement in the non-native state was due to glycine, as demonstrated by simulations in which glycine was mutated to alanine. These ILMs might play a functional role in the flexible regions of proteins and in proteins in a non-native state (i.e. misfolded or unfolded states). PMID:26658321

  16. The case for intrinsically disordered proteins playing contributory roles in molecular recognition without a stable 3D structure

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2013-01-01

    The classical ‘lock-and-key’ and ‘induced-fit’ mechanisms for binding both originated in attempts to explain features of enzyme catalysis. For both of these mechanisms and for their recent refinements, enzyme catalysis requires exquisite spatial and electronic complementarity between the substrate and the catalyst. Thus, binding models derived from models originally based on catalysis will be highly biased towards mechanisms that utilize structural complementarity. If mere binding without catalysis is the endpoint, then the structural requirements for the interaction become much more relaxed. Recent observations on specific examples suggest that this relaxation can reach an extreme lack of specific 3D structure, leading to molecular recognition with biological consequences that depend not only upon structural and electrostatic complementarity between the binding partners but also upon kinetic, entropic, and generalized electrostatic effects. In addition to this discussion of binding without fixed structure, examples in which unstructured regions carry out important biological functions not involving molecular recognition will also be discussed. Finally, we discuss whether ‘intrinsically disordered protein’ (IDP) represents a useful new concept. PMID:23361308

  17. Role of Prion Disease-Linked Mutations in the Intrinsically Disordered N-Terminal Domain of the Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaojing; Casiraghi, Nicola; Rossetti, Giulia; Mohanty, Sandipan; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe; Carloni, Paolo

    2013-11-12

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in mammals and other animal species. In humans, about 15% of these maladies are caused by pathogenic mutations (PMs) in the gene encoding for the prion protein (PrP(C)). Seven PMs are located in the naturally unfolded PrP(C) N-terminal domain, which constitutes about half of the protein. Intriguingly and in sharp contrast to other PMs clustered in the folded domain, N-terminal PMs barely affect the conversion to the pathogenic (scrapie, or PrP(Sc)) isoform of PrP(C). Here, we hypothesize that the neurotoxicity of these PMs arises from changes in structural determinants of the N-terminal domain, affecting the protein binding with its cellular partners and/or the cotranslational translocation during the PrP(C) biosynthesis. We test this idea by predicting the conformational ensemble of the wild-type (WT) and mutated mouse PrP(C) N-terminal domain, whose sequence is almost identical to that of the human one and for which the largest number of in vivo data is available. The conformational properties of the WT are consistent with those inferred experimentally. Importantly, the PMs turn out to affect in a subtle manner the intramolecular contacts in the putative N-terminal domain binding sites for Cu(2+) ions, sulphated glycosaminoglycans, and other known PrP(C) cellular partners. The PMs also alter the local structural features of the transmembrane domain and adjacent stop transfer effector, which act together to regulate the protein topology. These results corroborate the hypothesis that N-terminal PMs affect the PrP(C) binding to functional interactors and/or the translocation.

  18. A maximum entropy approach to the study of residue-specific backbone angle distributions in α-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein

    PubMed Central

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Hummer, Gerhard; Bax, Ad

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein of 140 residues that switches to an α-helical conformation upon binding phospholipid membranes. We characterize its residue-specific backbone structure in free solution with a novel maximum entropy procedure that integrates an extensive set of NMR data. These data include intraresidue and sequential HN–Hα and HN–HN NOEs, values for 3JHNHα, 1JHαCα, 2JCαN, and 1JCαN, as well as chemical shifts of 15N, 13Cα, and 13C′ nuclei, which are sensitive to backbone torsion angles. Distributions of these torsion angles were identified that yield best agreement to the experimental data, while using an entropy term to minimize the deviation from statistical distributions seen in a large protein coil library. Results indicate that although at the individual residue level considerable deviations from the coil library distribution are seen, on average the fitted distributions agree fairly well with this library, yielding a moderate population (20–30%) of the PPII region and a somewhat higher population of the potentially aggregation-prone β region (20–40%) than seen in the database. A generally lower population of the αR region (10–20%) is found. Analysis of 1H–1H NOE data required consideration of the considerable backbone diffusion anisotropy of a disordered protein. PMID:24976112

  19. Using chemical shifts to generate structural ensembles for intrinsically disordered proteins with converged distributions of secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Ytreberg, F Marty; Borcherds, Wade; Wu, Hongwei; Daughdrill, Gary W

    2015-01-01

    A short segment of the disordered p53 transactivation domain (p53TAD) forms an amphipathic helix when bound to the E3 ubiquitin ligase, MDM2. In the unbound p53TAD, this short segment has transient helical secondary structure. Using a method that combines broad sampling of conformational space with re-weighting, it is shown that it is possible to generate multiple, independent structural ensembles that have highly similar secondary structure distributions for both p53TAD and a P27A mutant. Fractional amounts of transient helical secondary structure were found at the MDM2 binding site that are very similar to estimates based directly on experimental observations. Structures were identified in these ensembles containing segments that are highly similar to short p53 peptides bound to MDM2, even though the ensembles were re-weighted using unbound experimental data. Ensembles were generated using chemical shift data (alpha carbon only, or in combination with other chemical shifts) and cross-validated by predicting residual dipolar couplings. We think this ensemble generator could be used to predict the bound state structure of protein interaction sites in IDPs if there are detectable amounts of matching transient secondary structure in the unbound state.

  20. Novel circular single-stranded DNA viruses identified in marine invertebrates reveal high sequence diversity and consistent predicted intrinsic disorder patterns within putative structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Karyna; Schenck, Ryan O; Harbeitner, Rachel C; Lawler, Stephanie N; Breitbart, Mya

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics has recently revealed the ubiquitous and diverse nature of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses that encode a conserved replication initiator protein (Rep) in the marine environment. Although eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses were originally thought to only infect plants and vertebrates, recent studies have identified these viruses in a number of invertebrates. To further explore CRESS-DNA viruses in the marine environment, this study surveyed CRESS-DNA viruses in various marine invertebrate species. A total of 27 novel CRESS-DNA genomes, with Reps that share less than 60.1% identity with previously reported viruses, were recovered from 21 invertebrate species, mainly crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep revealed a novel clade of CRESS-DNA viruses that included approximately one third of the marine invertebrate associated viruses identified here and whose members may represent a novel family. Investigation of putative capsid proteins (Cap) encoded within the eukaryotic CRESS-DNA viral genomes from this study and those in GenBank demonstrated conserved patterns of predicted intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), which can be used to complement similarity-based searches to identify divergent structural proteins within novel genomes. Overall, this study expands our knowledge of CRESS-DNA viruses associated with invertebrates and explores a new tool to evaluate divergent structural proteins encoded by these viruses.

  1. Novel circular single-stranded DNA viruses identified in marine invertebrates reveal high sequence diversity and consistent predicted intrinsic disorder patterns within putative structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Karyna; Schenck, Ryan O.; Harbeitner, Rachel C.; Lawler, Stephanie N.; Breitbart, Mya

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics has recently revealed the ubiquitous and diverse nature of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses that encode a conserved replication initiator protein (Rep) in the marine environment. Although eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses were originally thought to only infect plants and vertebrates, recent studies have identified these viruses in a number of invertebrates. To further explore CRESS-DNA viruses in the marine environment, this study surveyed CRESS-DNA viruses in various marine invertebrate species. A total of 27 novel CRESS-DNA genomes, with Reps that share less than 60.1% identity with previously reported viruses, were recovered from 21 invertebrate species, mainly crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep revealed a novel clade of CRESS-DNA viruses that included approximately one third of the marine invertebrate associated viruses identified here and whose members may represent a novel family. Investigation of putative capsid proteins (Cap) encoded within the eukaryotic CRESS-DNA viral genomes from this study and those in GenBank demonstrated conserved patterns of predicted intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), which can be used to complement similarity-based searches to identify divergent structural proteins within novel genomes. Overall, this study expands our knowledge of CRESS-DNA viruses associated with invertebrates and explores a new tool to evaluate divergent structural proteins encoded by these viruses. PMID:26217327

  2. Fairy “tails”: flexibility and function of intrinsically disordered extensions in the photosynthetic world

    PubMed Central

    Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Avilan, Luisana; Kojadinovic, Mila; Gontero, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs), or protein fragments also called Intrinsically Disordered Regions (IDRs), display high flexibility as the result of their amino acid composition. They can adopt multiple roles. In globular proteins, IDRs are usually found as loops and linkers between secondary structure elements. However, not all disordered fragments are loops: some proteins bear an intrinsically disordered extension at their C- or N-terminus, and this flexibility can affect the protein as a whole. In this review, we focus on the disordered N- and C-terminal extensions of globular proteins from photosynthetic organisms. Using the examples of the A2B2-GAPDH and the α Rubisco activase isoform, we show that intrinsically disordered extensions can help regulate their “host” protein in response to changes in light, thereby participating in photosynthesis regulation. As IDPs are famous for their large number of protein partners, we used the examples of the NAC, bZIP, TCP, and GRAS transcription factor families to illustrate the fact that intrinsically disordered extremities can allow a protein to have an increased number of partners, which directly affects its regulation. Finally, for proteins from the cryptochrome light receptor family, we describe how a new role for the photolyase proteins may emerge by the addition of an intrinsically disordered extension, while still allowing the protein to absorb blue light. This review has highlighted the diverse repercussions of the disordered extension on the regulation and function of their host protein and outlined possible future research avenues. PMID:26042223

  3. Quarterly intrinsic disorder digest (January-February-March, 2014)

    PubMed Central

    DeForte, Shelly; Reddy, Krishna D.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This is the 5th issue of the Digested Disorder series that represents a reader's digest of the scientific literature on intrinsically disordered proteins. We continue to use only 2 criteria for inclusion of a paper to this digest: The publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and the topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrinsic disorder). The current digest issue covers papers published during the first quarter of 2014; i.e., during the period of January, February, and March of 2014. Similar to previous issues, the papers are grouped hierarchically by topics they cover, and for each of the included papers a short description is given on its major findings. PMID:28232896

  4. Mechanism of the Interaction between the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminus of the Pro-Apoptotic ARTS Protein and the Bir3 Domain of XIAP

    PubMed Central

    Reingewertz, Tali H.; Shalev, Deborah E.; Sukenik, Shahar; Blatt, Ofrah; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Lebendiker, Mario; Larisch, Sarit; Friedler, Assaf

    2011-01-01

    ARTS (Sept4_i2) is a mitochondrial pro-apoptotic protein that functions as a tumor suppressor. Its expression is significantly reduced in leukemia and lymphoma patients. ARTS binds and inhibits XIAP (X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis protein) by interacting with its Bir3 domain. ARTS promotes degradation of XIAP through the proteasome pathway. By doing so, ARTS removes XIAP inhibition of caspases and enables apoptosis to proceed. ARTS contains 27 unique residues in its C-terminal domain (CTD, residues 248–274) which are important for XIAP binding. Here we characterized the molecular details of this interaction. Biophysical and computational methods were used to show that the ARTS CTD is intrinsically disordered under physiological conditions. Direct binding of ARTS CTD to Bir3 was demonstrated using NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. The Bir3 interacting region in ARTS CTD was mapped to ARTS residues 266–274, which are the nine C-terminal residues in the protein. Alanine scan of ARTS 266–274 showed the importance of several residues for Bir3 binding, with His268 and Cys273 contributing the most. Adding a reducing agent prevented binding to Bir3. A dimer of ARTS 266–274 formed by oxidation of the Cys residues into a disulfide bond bound with similar affinity and was probably required for the interaction with Bir3. The detailed analysis of the ARTS – Bir3 interaction provides the basis for setting it as a target for anti cancer drug design: It will enable the development of compounds that mimic ARTS CTD, remove IAPs inhibition of caspases, and thereby induce apoptosis. PMID:21949740

  5. Yersinia pestis Caf1 Protein: Effect of Sequence Polymorphism on Intrinsic Disorder Propensity, Serological Cross-Reactivity and Cross-Protectivity of Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Kopylov, Pavel Kh.; Platonov, Mikhail E.; Ablamunits, Vitaly G.; Kombarova, Tat’yana I.; Ivanov, Sergey A.; Kadnikova, Lidiya A.; Somov, Aleksey N.; Dentovskaya, Svetlana V.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia pestis Caf1 is a multifunctional protein responsible for antiphagocytic activity and is a key protective antigen. It is generally conserved between globally distributed Y. pestis strains, but Y. pestis subsp. microtus biovar caucasica strains circulating within populations of common voles in Georgia and Armenia were reported to carry a single substitution of alanine to serine. We investigated polymorphism of the Caf1 sequences among other Y. pestis subsp. microtus strains, which have a limited virulence in guinea pigs and in humans. Sequencing of caf1 genes from 119 Y. pestis strains belonging to different biovars within subsp. microtus showed that the Caf1 proteins exist in three isoforms, the global type Caf1NT1 (Ala48 Phe117), type Caf1NT2 (Ser48 Phe117) found in Transcaucasian-highland and Pre-Araks natural plague foci #4–7, and a novel Caf1NT3 type (Ala48 Val117) endemic in Dagestan-highland natural plague focus #39. Both minor types are the progenies of the global isoform. In this report, Caf1 polymorphism was analyzed by comparing predicted intrinsic disorder propensities and potential protein-protein interactivities of the three Caf1 isoforms. The analysis revealed that these properties of Caf1 protein are minimally affected by its polymorphism. All protein isoforms could be equally detected by an immunochromatography test for plague at the lowest protein concentration tested (1.0 ng/mL), which is the detection limit. When compared to the classic Caf1NT1 isoform, the endemic Caf1NT2 or Caf1NT3 had lower immunoreactivity in ELISA and lower indices of self- and cross-protection. Despite a visible reduction in cross-protection between all Caf1 isoforms, our data suggest that polymorphism in the caf1 gene may not allow the carriers of Caf1NT2 or Caf1NT3 variants escaping from the Caf1NT1-mediated immunity to plague in the case of a low-dose flea-borne infection. PMID:27606595

  6. Structure of Yeast Poly(A) Polymerase in Complex with a Peptide from Fip1, an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke,G.; Ezeokonkwo, C.; Balbo, P.; Stafford, W.; Moore, C.; Bohm, A.

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, the mRNA processing enzyme poly(A) polymerase is tethered to the much larger 3'-end processing complex via Fip1, a 36 kDa protein of unknown structure. We report the 2.6 Angstroms crystal structure of yeast poly(A) polymerase in complex with a peptide containing residues 80-105 of Fip1. The Fip1 peptide binds to the outside surface of the C-terminal domain of the polymerase. On the basis of this structure, we designed a mutant of the polymerase (V498Y, C485R) that is lethal to yeast. The mutant is unable to bind Fip1 but retains full polymerase activity. Fip1 is found in all eukaryotes and serves to connect poly(A) polymerase to pre-mRNA processing complexes in yeast, plants, and mammals. However, the Fip1 sequence is highly divergent, and residues on both Pap1 and Fip1 at the observed interaction surface are poorly conserved. Herein we demonstrate using analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, proteolytic studies, and other techniques that, in the absence of Pap1, Fip1 is largely, if not completely, unfolded. We speculate that flexibility may be important for Fip1's function as a molecular scaffold.

  7. Advantages of proteins being disordered

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhirong; Huang, Yongqi

    2014-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed great advances in our understanding of protein structure-function relationships in terms of the ubiquitous existence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). The structural disorder of IDPs/IDRs enables them to play essential functions that are complementary to those of ordered proteins. In addition, IDPs/IDRs are persistent in evolution. Therefore, they are expected to possess some advantages over ordered proteins. In this review, we summarize and survey nine possible advantages of IDPs/IDRs: economizing genome/protein resources, overcoming steric restrictions in binding, achieving high specificity with low affinity, increasing binding rate, facilitating posttranslational modifications, enabling flexible linkers, preventing aggregation, providing resistance to non-native conditions, and allowing compatibility with more available sequences. Some potential advantages of IDPs/IDRs are not well understood and require both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher. The connection with protein design is also briefly discussed. PMID:24532081

  8. Digested disorder, Quarterly intrinsic disorder digest (October-November-December, 2013)

    PubMed Central

    DeForte, Shelly; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    This is the 4th issue of the Digested Disorder series that represents reader's digest of the scientific literature on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrinsic disorder). The current digest issue covers papers published during the fourth quarter of 2013; i.e. during the period of October, November, and December of 2013. Similar to previous issues, the papers are grouped hierarchically by topics they cover, and for each of the included paper a short description is given on its major findings. PMID:28293487

  9. Resolving the ambiguity: Making sense of intrinsic disorder when PDB structures disagree.

    PubMed

    DeForte, Shelly; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-03-01

    Missing regions in X-ray crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) have played a foundational role in the study of intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs), especially in the development of in silico predictors of intrinsic disorder. However, a missing region is only a weak indication of intrinsic disorder, and this uncertainty is compounded by the presence of ambiguous regions, where more than one structure of the same protein sequence "disagrees" in terms of the presence or absence of missing residues. The question is this: are these ambiguous regions intrinsically disordered, or are they the result of static disorder that arises from experimental conditions, ensembles of structures, or domain wobbling? A novel way of looking at ambiguous regions in terms of the pattern between multiple PDB structures has been demonstrated. It was found that the propensity for intrinsic disorder increases as the level of ambiguity decreases. However, it is also shown that ambiguity is more likely to occur as the protein region is placed within different environmental conditions, and even the most ambiguous regions as a set display compositional bias that suggests flexibility. The results suggested that ambiguity is a natural result for many IDPRs crystallized under different conditions and that static disorder and wobbling domains are relatively rare. Instead, it is more likely that ambiguity arises because many of these regions were conditionally or partially disordered.

  10. Order and disorder in intermediate filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Kornreich, Micha; Avinery, Ram; Malka-Gibor, Eti; Laser-Azogui, Adi; Beck, Roy

    2015-09-14

    Intermediate filaments (IFs), important components of the cytoskeleton, provide a versatile, tunable network of self-assembled proteins. IF proteins contain three distinct domains: an α-helical structured rod domain, flanked by intrinsically disordered head and tail domains. Recent studies demonstrated the functional importance of the disordered domains, which differ in length and amino-acid sequence among the 70 different human IF genes. Here, we investigate the biophysical properties of the disordered domains, and review recent findings on the interactions between them. Our analysis highlights key components governing IF functional roles in the cytoskeleton, where the intrinsically disordered domains dictate protein-protein interactions, supramolecular assembly, and macro-scale order.

  11. The yeast Hsp70 homolog Ssb: a chaperone for general de novo protein folding and a nanny for specific intrinsically disordered protein domains.

    PubMed

    Hübscher, Volker; Mudholkar, Kaivalya; Rospert, Sabine

    2017-02-01

    Activation of the heterotrimeric kinase SNF1 via phosphorylation of a specific residue within the α subunit is essential for the release from glucose repression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When glucose is available, SNF1 is maintained in the dephosphorylated, inactive state by the phosphatase Glc7-Reg1. Recent findings suggest that Bmh and Ssb combine their unique client-binding properties to interact with the regulatory region of the SNF1 α subunit and by that stabilize a conformation of SNF1, which is accessible for Glc7-Reg1-dependent dephosphorylation. Together, the 14-3-3 protein Bmh and the Hsp70 homolog Ssb comprise a novel chaperone module, which is required to maintain proper glucose repression in the yeast S. cerevisiae.

  12. Intrinsic disorder mediates cooperative signal transduction in STIM1.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yukio; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Ikegami, Takahisa; Dagliyan, Onur; Jin, Lin; Hall, Damien; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Namba, Keiichi; Akira, Shizuo; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Baba, Yoshihiro; Standley, Daron M

    2014-05-15

    Intrinsically disordered domains have been reported to play important roles in signal transduction networks by introducing cooperativity into protein-protein interactions. Unlike intrinsically disordered domains that become ordered upon binding, the EF-SAM domain in the stromal interaction molecule (STIM) 1 is distinct in that it is ordered in the monomeric state and partially unfolded in its oligomeric state, with the population of the two states depending on the local Ca(2+) concentration. The oligomerization of STIM1, which triggers extracellular Ca(2+) influx, exhibits cooperativity with respect to the local endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) concentration. Although the physiological importance of the oligomerization reaction is well established, the mechanism of the observed cooperativity is not known. Here, we examine the response of the STIM1 EF-SAM domain to changes in Ca(2+) concentration using mathematical modeling based on in vitro experiments. We find that the EF-SAM domain partially unfolds and dimerizes cooperatively with respect to Ca(2+) concentration, with Hill coefficients and half-maximal activation concentrations very close to the values observed in vivo for STIM1 redistribution and extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Our mathematical model of the dimerization reaction agrees quantitatively with our analytical ultracentrifugation-based measurements and previously published free energies of unfolding. A simple interpretation of these results is that Ca(2+) loss effectively acts as a denaturant, enabling cooperative dimerization and robust signal transduction. We present a structural model of the Ca(2+)-unbound EF-SAM domain that is consistent with a wide range of evidence, including resistance to proteolytic cleavage of the putative dimerization portion.

  13. Functional Anthology of Intrinsic Disorder. II. Cellular Components, Domains, Technical Terms, Developmental Processes and Coding Sequence Diversities Correlated with Long Disordered Regions

    PubMed Central

    Vucetic, Slobodan; Xie, Hongbo; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Dunker, A. Keith; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2008-01-01

    Biologically active proteins without stable ordered structure (i.e., intrinsically disordered proteins) are attracting increased attention. Functional repertoires of ordered and disordered proteins are very different, and the ability to differentiate whether a given function is associated with intrinsic disorder or with a well-folded protein is crucial for modern protein science. However, there is a large gap between the number of proteins experimentally confirmed to be disordered and their actual number in nature. As a result, studies of functional properties of confirmed disordered proteins, while helpful in revealing the functional diversity of protein disorder, provide only a limited view. To overcome this problem, a bioinformatics approach for comprehensive study of functional roles of protein disorder was proposed in the first paper of this series (Xie H., Vucetic S., Iakoucheva L.M., Oldfield C.J., Dunker A.K., Obradovic Z., Uversky V.N. (2006) Functional anthology of intrinsic disorder. I. Biological processes and functions of proteins with long disordered regions. J. Proteome Res.). Applying this novel approach to Swiss-Prot sequences and functional keywords, we found over 238 and 302 keywords to be strongly positively or negatively correlated, respectively, with long intrinsically disordered regions. This paper describes ~90 Swiss-Prot keywords attributed to the cellular components, domains, technical terms, developmental processes and coding sequence diversities possessing strong positive and negative correlation with long disordered regions. PMID:17391015

  14. Exploiting protein intrinsic flexibility in drug design.

    PubMed

    Lukman, Suryani; Verma, Chandra S; Fuentes, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Molecular recognition in biological systems relies on the existence of specific attractive interactions between two partner molecules. Structure-based drug design seeks to identify and optimize such interactions between ligands and their protein targets. The approach followed in medicinal chemistry follows a combination of careful analysis of structural data together with experimental and/or theoretical studies on the system. This chapter focuses on the fact that a protein is not fully characterized by a single structure, but by an ensemble of states, some of them represent "hidden conformations" with cryptic binding sites. We highlight case studies where both experimental and computational methods have been used to mutually drive each other in an attempt to improve the success of the drug design approaches.Advances in both experimental techniques and computational methods have greatly improved our physico-chemical understanding of the functional mechanisms in biomolecules and opened a debate about the interplay between molecular structure and biomolecular function. The beautiful static pictures of protein structures may have led to neglecting the intrinsic protein flexibility, however we are entering a new era where more sophisticated methods are used to exploit this ability of macromolecules, and this will definitely lead to the inclusion of the notion in the pharmaceutical field of drug design.

  15. PONDR-FIT: A Meta-Predictor of Intrinsically Disordered Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bin; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Williams, Robert W.; Dunker, A. Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2010-01-01

    Protein intrinsic disorder is becoming increasingly recognized in proteomics research. While lacking structure, many regions of disorder have been associated with biological function. There are many different experimental methods for characterizing intrinsically disordered proteins and regions; nevertheless, the prediction of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence remains a useful strategy especially for many large-scale proteomics investigations. Here we introduced a consensus artificial neural network (ANN) prediction method, which was developed by combining the outputs of several individual disorder predictors. By eight-fold cross-validation, this meta-predictor, called PONDR-FIT, was found to improve the prediction accuracy over a range of 3 to 20% with an average of 11% compared to the single predictors, depending on the datasets being used. Analysis of the errors shows that the worst accuracy still occurs for short disordered regions with less than ten residues, as well as for the residues close to order/disorder boundaries. Increased understanding of the underlying mechanism by which such meta-predictors give improved predictions will likely promote the further development of protein disorder predictors. The access to PONDR-FIT is available at www.disprot.org. PMID:20100603

  16. Abundance and functional roles of intrinsic disorder in the antimicrobial peptides of the NK-lysin family.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Haitham A; Al-Maghrabi, Omar A; Ahmed, Ekram S; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2017-03-01

    NK-lysins are antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that participate in the innate immune response and also have several pivotal roles in various biological processes. Such multifunctionality is commonly found among intrinsically disordered proteins. However, NK-lysins have never been systematically analyzed for intrinsic disorder. To fill this gap, the amino acid sequences of NK-lysins from various species were collected from UniProt and used for the comprehensive computational analysis to evaluate the propensity of these proteins for intrinsic disorder and to investigate the potential roles of disordered regions in NK-lysin functions. We analyzed abundance and peculiarities of intrinsic disorder distribution in all-known NK-lysins and showed that many NK-lysins are expected to have substantial levels of intrinsic disorder. Curiously, high level of intrinsic disorder was also found even in two proteins with known 3D-strucutres (NK-lysin from pig and human granulysin). Many of the identified disordered regions can be involved in protein-protein interactions. In fact, NK-lysins are shown to contain three to eight molecular recognition features; i.e. short structure-prone segments which are located within the long disordered regions and have a potential to undergo a disorder-to-order transition upon binding to a partner. Furthermore, these disordered regions are expected to have several sites of various posttranslational modifications. Our study shows that NK-lysins, which are AMPs with a set of prominent roles in the innate immune response, are expected to abundantly possess intrinsically disordered regions that might be related to multifunctionality of these proteins in the signal transduction pathways controlling the host response to pathogenic agents.

  17. High-Density Single-Layer Coating of Gold Nanoparticles onto Multiple Substrates by Using an Intrinsically Disordered Protein of α-Synuclein for Nanoapplications.

    PubMed

    Bhak, Ghibom; Lee, Junghee; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Chung, Dong Young; Kang, Jin Hyoun; Oh, Soojung; Lee, Jungsup; Kang, Jin Soo; Yoo, Ji Mun; Yang, Jee Eun; Rhoo, Kun Yil; Park, Sunghak; Lee, Somin; Nam, Ki Tae; Jeon, Noo Li; Jang, Jyongsik; Hong, Byung Hee; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoon, Myung-Han; Paik, Seung R

    2017-03-15

    Functional graffiti of nanoparticles onto target surface is an important issue in the development of nanodevices. A general strategy has been introduced here to decorate chemically diverse substrates with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the form of a close-packed single layer by using an omni-adhesive protein of α-synuclein (αS) as conjugated with the particles. Since the adsorption was highly sensitive to pH, the amino acid sequence of αS exposed from the conjugates and its conformationally disordered state capable of exhibiting structural plasticity are considered to be responsible for the single-layer coating over diverse surfaces. Merited by the simple solution-based adsorption procedure, the particles have been imprinted to various geometric shapes in 2-D and physically inaccessible surfaces of 3-D objects. The αS-encapsulated AuNPs to form a high-density single-layer coat has been employed in the development of nonvolatile memory, fule-cell, solar-cell, and cell-culture platform, where the outlying αS has played versatile roles such as a dielectric layer for charge retention, a sacrificial layer to expose AuNPs for chemical catalysis, a reaction center for silicification, and biointerface for cell attachment, respectively. Multiple utilizations of the αS-based hybrid NPs, therefore, could offer great versatility to fabricate a variety of NP-integrated advanced materials which would serve as an indispensable component for widespread applications of high-performance nanodevices.

  18. Major intrinsic proteins in biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Claus Hélix

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes define the structural and functional boundaries in living cells and their organelles. The integrity of the cell depends on its ability to separate inside from outside and yet at the same time allow massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting-the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells internal pH and salt concentration. Also known as water channels or aquaporins they are highly efficient membrane pore proteins some of which are capable of transporting water at very high rates up to 10(9) molecules per second. Some MIPs transport other small, uncharged solutes, such as glycerol and other permeants such as carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide and the metalloids antimonite, arsenite, silicic and boric acid depending on the effective restriction mechanism of the protein. The flux properties of MIPs thus lead to the question ifMIPs can be used in separation devices or as sensor devices based on, e.g., the selective permeation of metalloids. In principle a MIP based membrane sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually impermeable to anything but water or the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport

  19. TOP-IDP-scale: a new amino acid scale measuring propensity for intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Campen, Andrew; Williams, Ryan M; Brown, Celeste J; Meng, Jingwei; Uversky, Vladimir N; Dunker, A Keith

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins carry out various biological functions while lacking ordered secondary and/or tertiary structure. In order to find general intrinsic properties of amino acid residues that are responsible for the absence of ordered structure in intrinsically disordered proteins we surveyed 517 amino acid scales. Each of these scales was taken as an independent attribute for the subsequent analysis. For a given attribute value X, which is averaged over a consecutive string of amino acids, and for a given data set having both ordered and disordered segments, the conditional probabilities P(s(o) | x) and P(s(d) | x) for order and disorder, respectively, can be determined for all possible values of X. Plots of the conditional probabilities P(s(o) | x) and P(s(o) | x) versus X give a pair of curves. The area between these two curves divided by the total area of the graph gives the area ratio value (ARV), which is proportional to the degree of separation of the two probability curves and, therefore, provides a measure of the given attribute's power to discriminate between order and disorder. As ARV falls between zero and one, larger ARV corresponds to the better discrimination between order and disorder. Starting from the scale with the highest ARV, we applied a simulated annealing procedure to search for alternative scale values and have managed to increase the ARV by more than 10%. The ranking of the amino acids in this new TOP-IDP scale is as follows (from order promoting to disorder promoting): W, F, Y, I, M, L, V, N, C, T, A, G, R, D, H, Q, K, S, E, P. A web-based server has been created to apply the TOP-IDP scale to predict intrinsically disordered proteins (http://www.disprot.org/dev/disindex.php).

  20. Intrinsic connectivity networks within cerebellum and beyond in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Amianto, F; D'Agata, F; Lavagnino, L; Caroppo, P; Abbate-Daga, G; Righi, D; Scarone, S; Bergui, M; Mortara, P; Fassino, S

    2013-10-01

    Cerebellum seems to have a role both in feeding behavior and emotion regulation; therefore, it is a region that warrants further neuroimaging studies in eating disorders, severe conditions that determine a significant impairment in the physical and psychological domain. The aim of this study was to examine the cerebellum intrinsic connectivity during functional magnetic resonance imaging resting state in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and healthy controls (CN). Resting state brain activity was decomposed into intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) using group spatial independent component analysis on the resting blood oxygenation level dependent time courses of 12 AN, 12 BN, and 10 CN. We extracted the cerebellar ICN and compared it between groups. Intrinsic connectivity within the cerebellar network showed some common alterations in eating disordered compared to healthy subjects (e.g., a greater connectivity with insulae, vermis, and paravermis and a lesser connectivity with parietal lobe); AN and BN patients were characterized by some peculiar alterations in connectivity patterns (e.g., greater connectivity with the insulae in AN compared to BN, greater connectivity with anterior cingulate cortex in BN compared to AN). Our data are consistent with the presence of different alterations in the cerebellar network in AN and BN patients that could be related to psychopathologic dimensions of eating disorders.

  1. Computational approaches for evaluating the effect of sequence variations and the intrinsically disordered C-terminal region of the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein on the interaction with tyrosine kinase Src.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Paula; Peñaranda, Natalia; Zamora, María Antonia; del Pilar Delgado, María; Bohorquez, Eliana; Castro, Harold; Barrios, Andrés Fernando González; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    The Helicobacter pylori CagA protein was the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified as important in the development of human malignancies such as gastric cancer. It is not clear how it is able to deregulate a set of cell control mechanisms to induce carcinogenesis following translocation into human gastric epithelial cells. It is likely, however, that structural variations in the CagA sequence alter its affinity with the host proteins inducing differences in the pathogenicity of different H. pylori strains. Using the recently elucidated N-terminal 3D structure of H. pylori CagA, information on the full cagA gene sequence, and intrinsically disordered protein structure predictions methods we evaluated the interaction of different CagA variants with the kinase Src. An automated docking followed by molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore CagA interaction modes with Src, one of its cellular partners. The computational approach let us establish that even in the presence of the same number and type of EPIYA motifs, CagA protein can reveal different spatial distributions. Based on the lowest affinity energy and higher number of interactions it was established that the principal forces governing the CagA-Src interaction are electrostatic. Results showed that EPIYA-D models presents higher affinity with some host proteins than EPIYA-C. Thus, we highlight the importance and advantage of the use of computational tools in combining chemical and biological data with bioinformatics for modeling and prediction purposes in some cases where experimental techniques present limitations.

  2. Protein conformational disorder and enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg, Cindy; Hilvert, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Though lacking a well-defined three-dimensional structure, intrinsically unstructured proteins are ubiquitous in nature. These molecules play crucial roles in many cellular processes, especially signaling and regulation. Surprisingly, even enzyme catalysis can tolerate substantial disorder. This observation contravenes conventional wisdom but is relevant to an understanding of how protein dynamics modulates enzyme function. This chapter reviews properties and characteristics of disordered proteins, emphasizing examples of enzymes that lack defined structures, and considers implications of structural disorder for catalytic efficiency and evolution.

  3. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses.

  4. Effects of Crowding and Environment on the Evolution of Conformational Ensembles of the Multi-Stimuli-Responsive Intrinsically Disordered Protein, Rec1-Resilin: A Small-Angle Scattering Investigation.

    PubMed

    Balu, Rajkamal; Mata, Jitendra P; Knott, Robert; Elvin, Christopher M; Hill, Anita J; Choudhury, Namita R; Dutta, Naba K

    2016-07-14

    In this study, we explore the overall structural ensembles and transitions of a biomimetic, multi-stimuli-responsive, intrinsically disordered protein (IDP), Rec1-resilin. The structural transition of Rec1-resilin with change in molecular crowding and environment is evaluated using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering. The quantitative analyses of the experimental scattering data using a combination of computational models allowed comprehensive description of the structural evolution, organization, and conformational ensembles of Rec1-resilin in response to the changes in concentration, pH, and temperature. Rec1-resilin in uncrowded solutions demonstrates the equilibrium intrinsic structure quality of an IDP with radius of gyration Rg ∼ 5 nm, and a scattering function for the triaxial ellipsoidal model best fit the experimental dataset. On crowding (increase in concentration >10 wt %), Rec1-resilin molecules exert intermolecular repulsive force of interaction, the Rg value reduces with a progressive increase in concentration, and molecular chains transform from a Gaussian coil to a fully swollen coil. It is also revealed that the structural organization of Rec1-resilin dynamically transforms from a rod (pH 2) to coil (pH 4.8) and to globular (pH 12) as a function of pH. The findings further support the temperature-triggered dual-phase-transition behavior of Rec1-resilin, exhibiting rod-shaped structural organization below the upper critical solution temperature (∼4 °C) and a large but compact structure above the lower critical solution temperature (∼75 °C). This work attempted to correlate unusual responsiveness of Rec1-resilin to the evolution of conformational ensembles.

  5. Transient helicity in intrinsically disordered Axin-1 studied by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bomblies, Rainer; Luitz, Manuel Patrick; Scanu, Sandra; Madl, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Many natural proteins are, as a whole or in part, intrinsically disordered. Frequently, such intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) undergo a transition to a defined and often helical conformation upon binding to partner molecules. The intrinsic propensity of an IDR sequence to fold into a helical conformation already in the absence of a binding partner can have a decisive influence on the binding process and affinity. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we have investigated the tendency of regions of Axin-1, an intrinsically disordered scaffolding protein of the WNT signaling pathway, to form helices in segments interacting with binding partners. Secondary chemical shifts from NMR measurements show an increased helical population in these regions. Systematic application of MD advanced sampling approaches on peptide segments of Axin-1 reproduces the experimentally observed tendency and allows insights into the distribution of segment conformations and free energies of helix formation. The results, however, were found to dependent on the force field water model. Recent water models specifically designed for IDRs significantly reduce the predicted helical content and do not improve the agreement with experiment. PMID:28355271

  6. The activity and stability of the intrinsically disordered Cip/Kip protein family are regulated by non-receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Otieno, Steve; Lelli, Moreno; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The Cip/Kip family of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors includes p21Cip1, p27Kip1 and p57Kip2. Their kinase inhibitory activities are mediated by a homologous N-terminal kinase-inhibitory domain (KID). The Cdk inhibitory activity and stability of p27 have been shown to be regulated by a two-step phosphorylation mechanism involving a tyrosine residue within the KID and a threonine residue within the flexible C-terminus. We show that these residues are conserved in p21 and p57, suggesting that a similar phosphorylation cascade regulates these Cdk inhibitors. However, the presence of a cyclin binding motif within its C-terminus alters the regulatory interplay between p21 and Cdk2/cyclin A, and its responses to tyrosine phosphorylation and altered p21:Cdk2/cyclin A stoichiometry. We also show that the Cip/Kip proteins can be phosphorylated in vitro by representatives of many non-receptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) sub-families, suggesting that NRTKs may generally regulate the activity and stability of these Cdk inhibitors. Our results further suggest that the Cip/Kip proteins integrate signals from various NRTK pathways and cell cycle regulation. PMID:25463440

  7. A FRET-Based Method for Probing the Conformational Behavior of an Intrinsically Disordered Repeat Domain from Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-22

    2003) Designing repeat proteins: Well-expressed, soluble and stable proteins from combinatorial libraries of consensus ankyrin repeat proteins. J. Mol...A FRET-Based Method for Probing the Conformational Behavior of an Intrinsically Disordered Repeat Domain from Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase...changes exhibited by intrinsically disordered proteins is necessary as we continue to unravel their myriad biological functions. In repeats in toxin

  8. FOXP in Tetrapoda: Intrinsically Disordered Regions, Short Linear Motifs and their evolutionary significance.

    PubMed

    Viscardi, Lucas Henriques; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Paré, Pamela; Fagundes, Nelson Jurandi Rosa; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Paixão-Côrtes, Vanessa Rodrigues; Bau, Claiton Henrique Dotto; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2017-03-02

    The FOXP subfamily is probably the most extensively characterized subfamily of the forkhead superfamily, playing important roles in development and homeostasis in vertebrates. Intrinsically disorder protein regions (IDRs) are protein segments that exhibit multiple physical interactions and play critical roles in various biological processes, including regulation and signaling. IDRs in proteins may play an important role in the evolvability of genetic systems. In this study, we analyzed 77 orthologous FOXP genes/proteins from Tetrapoda, regarding protein disorder content and evolutionary rate. We also predicted the number and type of short linear motifs (SLIMs) in the IDRs. Similar levels of protein disorder (approximately 70%) were found for FOXP1, FOXP2, and FOXP4. However, for FOXP3, which is shorter in length and has a more specific function, the disordered content was lower (30%). Mammals showed higher protein disorders for FOXP1 and FOXP4 than non-mammals. Specific analyses related to linear motifs in the four genes showed also a clear differentiation between FOXPs in mammals and non-mammals. We predicted for the first time the role of IDRs and SLIMs in the FOXP gene family associated with possible adaptive novelties within Tetrapoda. For instance, we found gain and loss of important phosphorylation sites in the Homo sapiens FOXP2 IDR regions, with possible implication for the evolution of human speech.

  9. Intrinsic disorder in pathogenic and non-pathogenic microbes: discovering and analyzing the unfoldomes of early-branching eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Amrita; Sullivan, William J; Radivojac, Predrag; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2008-04-01

    Parasitic protozoal infections have long been known to cause profound degrees of sickness and death in humans as well as animal populations. Despite the increase in the number of annotated genomes available for a large variety of protozoa, a great deal more has yet to be learned about them, from their fundamental physiology to mechanisms invoked during host-pathogen interactions. Most of these genomes share a common feature, namely a high prevalence of low complexity regions in their predicted proteins, which is believed to contribute to the uniqueness of the individual species within this diverse group of early-branching eukaryotes. In the case of Plasmodium species, which cause malaria, such regions have also been reported to hamper the identification of homologues, thus making functional genomics exceptionally challenging. One of the better accepted theories accounting for the high number of low complexity regions is the presence of intrinsic disorder in these microbes. In this study we compare the degree of disordered proteins that are predicted to be expressed in many such ancient eukaryotic cells. Our findings indicate an unusual bias in the amino acids comprising protozoal proteomes, and show that intrinsic disorder is remarkably abundant among their predicted proteins. Additionally, the intrinsically disordered regions tend to be considerably longer in the early-branching eukaryotes. An analysis of a Plasmodium falciparum interactome indicates that protein-protein interactions may be at least one function of the intrinsic disorder. This study provides a bioinfomatics basis for the discovery and analysis of unfoldomes (the complement of intrinsically disordered proteins in a given proteome) of early-branching eukaryotes. It also provides new insights into the evolution of intrinsic disorder in the context of adapting to a parasitic lifestyle and lays the foundation for further work on the subject.

  10. Forkhead followed by disordered tail: The intrinsically disordered regions of FOXO3a

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Marshall, Christopher B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead box Class O is one of 19 subfamilies of the Forkhead box family, comprising 4 human transcription factors: FOXO1, FOXO3a, FOXO4, and FOXO6, which are involved in many crucial cellular processes. FOXO3a is a tumor suppressor involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes, and plays essential roles in metabolism, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. In its role as a transcription factor, the FOXO3a binds a consensus Forkhead response element DNA sequence, and recruits transcriptional coactivators to activate gene transcription. FOXO3a has additional functions, such as regulating p53-mediated apoptosis and activating kinase ATM. With the exception of the structured DNA-binding forkhead domain, most of the FOXO3a sequence comprises intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), including 3 regions (CR1-3) that are conserved within the FOXO subfamily. Numerous studies have demonstrated that these IDRs directly mediate many of the diverse functions of FOXO3a. These regions contain post-translational modification and protein-protein interaction sites that integrate upstream signals to maintain homeostasis. Thus, the FOXO3a IDRs are emerging as key mediators of diverse regulatory processes, and represent an important target for the future development of therapeutics for FOXO3a-related diseases.

  11. Conformational heterogeneity and intrinsic disorder in enzyme regulation: Glucokinase as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Larion, Mioara; Miller, Brian; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Many human proteins are predicted to contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), yet their occurrence in enzymes is notably rare. Human pancreatic glucokinase (GCK) is one of a small, but growing number of enzymes shown to possess an IDR. In this commentary, we summarize the results of recent biophysical studies that provide evidence for a functionally significant disorder-order transition within the IDR of GCK during the enzyme's catalytic cycle. High-resolution NMR studies indicate that kinetic cooperativity in GCK results from glucose-mediated millisecond conformational dynamics within the structurally heterogeneous and partially disordered small domain of this monomeric enzyme, whereby the precise timescale of these motions is critical for the manifestation of the kinetic cooperativity effect. GCK provides an excellent case study for understanding how structural and dynamic alterations within an IDR enable novel regulatory mechanisms. These studies also establish GCK as a model system for investigating the functional consequences of disorder and conformational heterogeneity in enzymatic systems in general.

  12. Effect of O-Linked Glycosylation on the Equilibrium Structural Ensemble of Intrinsically Disordered Polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-12-24

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), which provides a large proteome diversity. Previous work on glycosylation of globular proteins has revealed remarkable effects of glycosylation on protein function, altering the folding stability and structure and/or altering the protein surface which affects their binding characteristics. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of large proteins are also frequently glycosylated, yet how glycosylation affects their function remains to be elucidated. An important open question is, does glycosylation affect IDP structure or binding characteristics or both? In this work, we particularly address the structural effects of O-linked glycosylation by investigating glycosylated and unglycosylated forms of two different IDPs, tau174-183 and human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), by all-atom explicit solvent simulations. We simulate these IDPs in aqueous solution for O-linked glycosylated and unglycosylated forms by employing two modern all-atom force fields for which glycan parameters are also available. We find that O-linked glycosylation only has a modest effect on equilibrium structural ensembles of IDPs, for the cases studied here, which suggests that the functional role of glycosylation may be primarily exerted by modulation of the protein binding characteristics rather than structure.

  13. An intrinsically disordered linker plays a critical role in bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Buske, P J; Mittal, Anuradha; Pappu, Rohit V; Levin, Petra Anne

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, animals, fungi, and many single celled eukaryotes, division is initiated by the formation of a ring of cytoskeletal protein at the nascent division site. In bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ serves as the foundation for the cytokinetic ring. A conserved feature of FtsZ is an intrinsically disordered peptide known as the C-terminal linker. Chimeric experiments suggest the linker acts as a flexible boom allowing FtsZ to associate with the membrane through a conserved C-terminal domain and also modulates interactions both between FtsZ subunits and between FtsZ and modulatory proteins in the cytoplasm.

  14. An intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover.

    PubMed

    Yang, Won Ho; Aziz, Peter V; Heithoff, Douglas M; Mahan, Michael J; Smith, Jeffrey W; Marth, Jamey D

    2015-11-03

    The composition and functions of the secreted proteome are controlled by the life spans of different proteins. However, unlike intracellular protein fate, intrinsic factors determining secreted protein aging and turnover have not been identified and characterized. Almost all secreted proteins are posttranslationally modified with the covalent attachment of N-glycans. We have discovered an intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover linked to the stepwise elimination of saccharides attached to the termini of N-glycans. Endogenous glycosidases, including neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), neuraminidase 3 (Neu3), beta-galactosidase 1 (Glb1), and hexosaminidase B (HexB), possess hydrolytic activities that temporally remodel N-glycan structures, progressively exposing different saccharides with increased protein age. Subsequently, endocytic lectins with distinct binding specificities, including the Ashwell-Morell receptor, integrin αM, and macrophage mannose receptor, are engaged in N-glycan ligand recognition and the turnover of secreted proteins. Glycosidase inhibition and lectin deficiencies increased protein life spans and abundance, and the basal rate of N-glycan remodeling varied among distinct proteins, accounting for differences in their life spans. This intrinsic multifactorial mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover contributes to health and the outcomes of disease.

  15. An intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Won Ho; Aziz, Peter V.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Mahan, Michael J.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Marth, Jamey D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition and functions of the secreted proteome are controlled by the life spans of different proteins. However, unlike intracellular protein fate, intrinsic factors determining secreted protein aging and turnover have not been identified and characterized. Almost all secreted proteins are posttranslationally modified with the covalent attachment of N-glycans. We have discovered an intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover linked to the stepwise elimination of saccharides attached to the termini of N-glycans. Endogenous glycosidases, including neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), neuraminidase 3 (Neu3), beta-galactosidase 1 (Glb1), and hexosaminidase B (HexB), possess hydrolytic activities that temporally remodel N-glycan structures, progressively exposing different saccharides with increased protein age. Subsequently, endocytic lectins with distinct binding specificities, including the Ashwell–Morell receptor, integrin αM, and macrophage mannose receptor, are engaged in N-glycan ligand recognition and the turnover of secreted proteins. Glycosidase inhibition and lectin deficiencies increased protein life spans and abundance, and the basal rate of N-glycan remodeling varied among distinct proteins, accounting for differences in their life spans. This intrinsic multifactorial mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover contributes to health and the outcomes of disease. PMID:26489654

  16. The interplay of intrinsic disorder and macromolecular crowding on α-synuclein fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Nobu C.; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2016-02-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is an intrinsically disordered protein which is considered to be one of the causes of Parkinson's disease. This protein forms amyloid fibrils when in a highly concentrated solution. The fibril formation of α-syn is induced not only by increases in α-syn concentration but also by macromolecular crowding. In order to investigate the coupled effect of the intrinsic disorder of α-syn and macromolecular crowding, we construct a lattice gas model of α-syn in contact with a crowding agent reservoir based on statistical mechanics. The main assumption is that α-syn can be expressed as coarse-grained particles with internal states coupled with effective volume; and disordered states are modeled by larger particles with larger internal entropy than other states. Thanks to the simplicity of the model, we can exactly calculate the number of conformations of crowding agents, and this enables us to prove that the original grand canonical ensemble with a crowding agent reservoir is mathematically equivalent to a canonical ensemble without crowding agents. In this expression, the effect of macromolecular crowding is absorbed in the internal entropy of disordered states; it is clearly shown that the crowding effect reduces the internal entropy. Based on Monte Carlo simulation, we provide scenarios of crowding-induced fibril formation. We also discuss the recent controversy over the existence of helically folded tetramers of α-syn, and suggest that macromolecular crowding is the key to resolving the controversy.

  17. Untapped Potential of Disordered Proteins in Current Druggable Human Proteome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gang; Wu, Zhonghua; Wang, Kui; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in design and characterization of drugs often rely on the structure of their protein targets. However, a large fraction of proteins lack unique 3-D structures and exist as highly dynamic structural ensembles. These intrinsically disordered proteins are involved in pathogenesis of various human diseases and are highly abundant in eukaryotes. Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current druggable human proteome covering 12 drug classes and 18 major classes of drug targets we show a significant bias toward high structural coverage and low abundance of intrinsic disorder. We review reasons for this bias including widespread use of the structural information in various stages of drug development and characterization process and difficulty with attaining structures for the intrinsically disordered proteins. We also discuss future of intrinsically disordered proteins as drug targets. Given the overall high disorder content of the human proteome and current bias of the druggable human proteome toward structural proteins, it is inevitable that disordered proteins will have to raise up on the list of prospective drug targets. The protein disorder-assisted drug design can draw from current rational drug design techniques and would also need novel approaches that no longer rely on a unique protein structure.

  18. Caulobacter PopZ forms an intrinsically disordered hub in organizing bacterial cell poles

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Joshua A.; Follett, Shelby E.; Wang, Haibi; Meadows, Christopher P.; Varga, Krisztina; Bowman, Grant R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their relative simplicity, bacteria have complex anatomy at the subcellular level. At the cell poles of Caulobacter crescentus, a 177-amino acid (aa) protein called PopZ self-assembles into 3D polymeric superstructures. Remarkably, we find that this assemblage interacts directly with at least eight different proteins, which are involved in cell cycle regulation and chromosome segregation. The binding determinants within PopZ include 24 aa at the N terminus, a 32-aa region near the C-terminal homo-oligomeric assembly domain, and portions of an intervening linker region. Together, the N-terminal 133 aa of PopZ are sufficient for interacting with all binding partners, even in the absence of homo-oligomeric assembly. Structural analysis of this region revealed that it is intrinsically disordered, similar to p53 and other hub proteins that organize complex signaling networks in eukaryotic cells. Through live-cell photobleaching, we find rapid binding kinetics between PopZ and its partners, suggesting many pole-localized proteins become concentrated at cell poles through rapid cycles of binding and unbinding within the PopZ scaffold. We conclude that some bacteria, similar to their eukaryotic counterparts, use intrinsically disordered hub proteins for network assembly and subcellular organization. PMID:27791060

  19. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-18

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  20. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure–high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C–B–C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials. PMID:26777140

  1. Looking at the carcinogenicity of human insulin analogues via the intrinsic disorder prism.

    PubMed

    Redwan, Elrashdy M; Linjawi, Moustafa H; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-03-17

    Therapeutic insulin, in its native and biosynthetic forms as well as several currently available insulin analogues, continues to be the protein of most interest to researchers. From the time of its discovery to the development of modern insulin analogues, this important therapeutic protein has passed through several stages and product generations. Beside the well-known link between diabetes and cancer risk, the currently used therapeutic insulin analogues raised serious concerns due to their potential roles in cancer initiation and/or progression. It is possible that structural variations in some of the insulin analogues are responsible for the appearance of new oncogenic species with high binding affinity to the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) receptor. The question we are trying to answer in this work is: are there any specific features of the distribution of intrinsic disorder propensity within the amino acid sequences of insulin analogues that may provide an explanation for the carcinogenicity of the altered insulin protein?

  2. Mechanism of the intrinsic arginine finger in heterotrimeric G proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Daniel; Teuber, Christian; Tennigkeit, Stefan A.; Schröter, Grit; Gerwert, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are crucial molecular switches that maintain a large number of physiological processes in cells. The signal is encoded into surface alterations of the Gα subunit that carries GTP in its active state and GDP in its inactive state. The ability of the Gα subunit to hydrolyze GTP is essential for signal termination. Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerates this process. A key player in this catalyzed reaction is an arginine residue, Arg178 in Gαi1, which is already an intrinsic part of the catalytic center in Gα in contrast to small GTPases, at which the corresponding GTPase-activating protein (GAP) provides the arginine “finger.” We applied time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy in combination with isotopic labeling and site-directed mutagenesis to reveal the molecular mechanism, especially of the role of Arg178 in the intrinsic Gαi1 mechanism and the RGS4-catalyzed mechanism. Complementary biomolecular simulations (molecular mechanics with molecular dynamics and coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) were performed. Our findings show that Arg178 is bound to γ-GTP for the intrinsic Gαi1 mechanism and pushed toward a bidentate α-γ-GTP coordination for the Gαi1·RGS4 mechanism. This movement induces a charge shift toward β-GTP, increases the planarity of γ-GTP, and thereby catalyzes the hydrolysis. PMID:27911799

  3. Mechanism of the intrinsic arginine finger in heterotrimeric G proteins.

    PubMed

    Mann, Daniel; Teuber, Christian; Tennigkeit, Stefan A; Schröter, Grit; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2016-12-13

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are crucial molecular switches that maintain a large number of physiological processes in cells. The signal is encoded into surface alterations of the Gα subunit that carries GTP in its active state and GDP in its inactive state. The ability of the Gα subunit to hydrolyze GTP is essential for signal termination. Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerates this process. A key player in this catalyzed reaction is an arginine residue, Arg178 in Gαi1, which is already an intrinsic part of the catalytic center in Gα in contrast to small GTPases, at which the corresponding GTPase-activating protein (GAP) provides the arginine "finger." We applied time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy in combination with isotopic labeling and site-directed mutagenesis to reveal the molecular mechanism, especially of the role of Arg178 in the intrinsic Gαi1 mechanism and the RGS4-catalyzed mechanism. Complementary biomolecular simulations (molecular mechanics with molecular dynamics and coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) were performed. Our findings show that Arg178 is bound to γ-GTP for the intrinsic Gαi1 mechanism and pushed toward a bidentate α-γ-GTP coordination for the Gαi1·RGS4 mechanism. This movement induces a charge shift toward β-GTP, increases the planarity of γ-GTP, and thereby catalyzes the hydrolysis.

  4. The inverted free energy landscape of an intrinsically disordered peptide by simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Granata, Daniele; Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Habchi, Johnny; Galvagnion, Celine; De Simone, Alfonso; Camilloni, Carlo; Laio, Alessandro; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-10-26

    The free energy landscape theory has been very successful in rationalizing the folding behaviour of globular proteins, as this representation provides intuitive information on the number of states involved in the folding process, their populations and pathways of interconversion. We extend here this formalism to the case of the Aβ40 peptide, a 40-residue intrinsically disordered protein fragment associated with Alzheimer's disease. By using an advanced sampling technique that enables free energy calculations to reach convergence also in the case of highly disordered states of proteins, we provide a precise structural characterization of the free energy landscape of this peptide. We find that such landscape has inverted features with respect to those typical of folded proteins. While the global free energy minimum consists of highly disordered structures, higher free energy regions correspond to a large variety of transiently structured conformations with secondary structure elements arranged in several different manners, and are not separated from each other by sizeable free energy barriers. From this peculiar structure of the free energy landscape we predict that this peptide should become more structured and not only more compact, with increasing temperatures, and we show that this is the case through a series of biophysical measurements.

  5. Structural characterization of Hsp12, the heat shock protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in aqueous solution where it is intrinsically disordered and in detergent micelles where it is locally α-helical.

    PubMed

    Singarapu, Kiran K; Tonelli, Marco; Chow, Darius C; Frederick, Ronnie O; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2011-12-16

    Hsp12 (heat shock protein 12) belongs to the small heat shock protein family, partially characterized as a stress response, stationary phase entry, late embryonic abundant-like protein located at the plasma membrane to protect membrane from desiccation. Here, we report the structural characterization of Hsp12 by NMR and biophysical techniques. The protein was labeled uniformly with nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 so that its conformation could be determined in detail both in aqueous solution and in two membrane-mimetic environments, SDS and dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. Secondary structural elements determined from assigned chemical shifts indicated that Hsp12 is dynamically disordered in aqueous solution, whereas it gains four helical stretches in the presence of SDS micelles and a single helix in presence of DPC. These conclusions were reinforced by circular dichroism spectra of the protein in all three environments. The lack of long range interactions in NOESY spectra indicated that the helices present in SDS micelles do not pack together. R(1) and R(2), relaxation and heteronuclear NOE measurements showed that the protein is disordered in aqueous solution but becomes more ordered in presence of detergent micelles. NMR spectra collected in presence of paramagnetic spin relaxation agents (5DSA, 16DSA, and Gd(DTPA-BMA)) indicated that the amphipathic α-helices of Hsp12 in SDS micelles lie on the membrane surface. These observations are in agreement with studies suggesting that Hsp12 functions to protect the membrane from desiccation.

  6. Conformational Dissection of a Viral Intrinsically Disordered Domain Involved in Cellular Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Sebastián; Salvay, Andres G.; Chemes, Lucía B.; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder is abundant in viral genomes and provides conformational plasticity to its protein products. In order to gain insight into its structure-function relationships, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of structural propensities within the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain from the human papillomavirus type-16 E7 oncoprotein (E7N). Two E7N segments located within the conserved CR1 and CR2 regions present transient α-helix structure. The helix in the CR1 region spans residues L8 to L13 and overlaps with the E2F mimic linear motif. The second helix, located within the highly acidic CR2 region, presents a pH-dependent structural transition. At neutral pH the helix spans residues P17 to N29, which include the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor LxCxE binding motif (residues 21–29), while the acidic CKII-PEST region spanning residues E33 to I38 populates polyproline type II (PII) structure. At pH 5.0, the CR2 helix propagates up to residue I38 at the expense of loss of PII due to charge neutralization of acidic residues. Using truncated forms of HPV-16 E7, we confirmed that pH-induced changes in α-helix content are governed by the intrinsically disordered E7N domain. Interestingly, while at both pH the region encompassing the LxCxE motif adopts α-helical structure, the isolated 21–29 fragment including this stretch is unable to populate an α-helix even at high TFE concentrations. Thus, the E7N domain can populate dynamic but discrete structural ensembles by sampling α-helix-coil-PII-ß-sheet structures. This high plasticity may modulate the exposure of linear binding motifs responsible for its multi-target binding properties, leading to interference with key cell signaling pathways and eventually to cellular transformation by the virus. PMID:24086265

  7. Minute Time Scale Prolyl Isomerization Governs Antibody Recognition of an Intrinsically Disordered Immunodominant Epitope*

    PubMed Central

    Fassolari, Marisol; Chemes, Lucia B.; Gallo, Mariana; Smal, Clara; Sánchez, Ignacio E.; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Conformational rearrangements in antibody·antigen recognition are essential events where kinetic discrimination of isomers expands the universe of combinations. We investigated the interaction mechanism of a monoclonal antibody, M1, raised against E7 from human papillomavirus, a prototypic viral oncoprotein and a model intrinsically disordered protein. The mapped 12-amino acid immunodominant epitope lies within a “hinge” region between the N-terminal intrinsically disordered and the C-terminal globular domains. Kinetic experiments show that despite being within an intrinsically disordered region, the hinge E7 epitope has at least two populations separated by a high energy barrier. Nuclear magnetic resonance traced the origin of this barrier to a very slow (t½ ∼4 min) trans-cis prolyl isomerization event involving changes in secondary structure. The less populated (10%) cis isomer is the binding-competent species, thus requiring the 90% of molecules in the trans configuration to isomerize before binding. The association rate for the cis isomer approaches 6 × 107 m−1 s−1, a ceiling for antigen-antibody interactions. Mutagenesis experiments showed that Pro-41 in E7Ep was required for both binding and isomerization. After a slow postbinding unimolecular rearrangement, a consolidated complex with KD = 1.2 × 10−7 m is reached. Our results suggest that presentation of this viral epitope by the antigen-presenting cells would have to be “locked” in the cis conformation, in opposition to the most populated trans isomer, in order to select the specific antibody clone that goes through affinity and kinetic maturation. PMID:23504368

  8. Native globular actin has a thermodynamically unstable quasi-stationary structure with elements of intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Irina M; Povarova, Olga I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-02-01

    The native form of globular actin, G-actin, is formed in vivo as a result of complex post-translational folding processes that require ATP energy expenditure and are assisted by the 70 kDa heat shock protein, prefoldin and chaperonin containing TCP-1. G-actin is stabilized by the binding of one ATP molecule and one Ca(2+) ion (or Mg(2+) in vivo). Chemical denaturants, heating or Ca(2+) removal transform native actin (N) into 'inactivated actin' (I), a compact oligomer comprising 14-16 subunits. Viscogenic and crowding agents slow this process but do not stop it. The lack of calcium in the solution accelerates the spontaneous N → I transition. Thus, native G-actin has a kinetically stable (as a result of the high free energy barrier between the N and I states) but thermodynamically unstable structure, which, in the absence of Ca(2+) or other bivalent metal ions, spontaneously converts to the thermodynamically stable I state. It was noted that native actin has much in common with intrinsically disordered proteins: it has functionally important disordered regions; it is constantly in complex with one of its numerous partners; and it plays key roles in many cellular processes, in a manner similar to disordered hub proteins. By analyzing actin folding in vivo and unfolding in vitro, we advanced the hypothesis that proteins in a native state may have a thermodynamically unstable quasi-stationary structure. The kinetically stable native state of these proteins appears forcibly under the influence of intracellular folding machinery. The denaturation of such proteins is always irreversible because the inactivated state, for which the structure is determined by the amino acid sequence of a protein, comprises the thermodynamically stable state under physiological conditions.

  9. The intracellular distal tail of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is intrinsically disordered: implications for NHE1 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth; Bjerre, Gabriel; Kjaergaard, Magnus; Pedersen, Stine F; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2011-05-03

    Intrinsic disorder is important for protein regulation, yet its role in regulation of ion transport proteins is essentially uninvestigated. The ubiquitous plasma membrane carrier protein Na(+)/H(+) Exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) plays pivotal roles in cellular pH and volume homeostasis, and its dysfunction is implicated in several clinically important diseases. This study shows, for the first time for any carrier protein, that the distal part of the C-terminal intracellular tail (the cdt, residues V686-Q815) from human (h) NHE1 is intrinsically disordered. Further, we experimentally demonstrated the presence of a similar region of intrinsic disorder (ID) in NHE1 from the teleost fish Pleuronectes americanus (paNHE1), and bioinformatic analysis suggested ID to be conserved in the NHE1 family. The sequential variation in structure propensity as determined by NMR, but not the amplitude, was largely conserved between the h- and paNHE1cdt. This suggests that both proteins contain molecular recognition features (MoRFs), i.e., local, transiently formed structures within an ID region. The functional relevance of the most conserved MoRF was investigated by introducing a point mutation that significantly disrupted the putative binding feature. When this mutant NHE1 was expressed in full length NHE1 in AP1 cells, it exhibited impaired trafficking to the plasma membrane. This study demonstrated that the distal regulatory domain of NHE1 is intrinsically disordered yet contains conserved regions of transient structure. We suggest that normal NHE1 function depends on a protein recognition element within the ID region that may be linked to NHE1 trafficking via an acidic ER export motif.

  10. Protein amyloids develop an intrinsic fluorescence signature during aggregation†

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Fiona T. S.; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; Kumita, Janet R.; Bertoncini, Carlos W.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2017-01-01

    We report observations of an intrinsic fluorescence in the visible range, which develops during the aggregation of a range of polypeptides, including the disease-related human peptides amyloid-β(1–40) and (1–42), lysozyme and tau. Characteristic fluorescence properties such as the emission lifetime and spectra were determined experimentally. This intrinsic fluorescence is independent of the presence of aromatic side-chain residues within the polypeptide structure. Rather, it appears to result from electronic levels that become available when the polypeptide chain folds into a cross-β sheet scaffold similar to what has been reported to take place in crystals. We use these findings to quantify protein aggregation in vitro by fluorescence imaging in a label-free manner. PMID:23420088

  11. Protein misfolding disorders and macroautophagy

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, Fiona M; Moreau, Kevin; Rubinsztein, David C

    2011-01-01

    A large group of diseases, termed protein misfolding disorders, share the common feature of the accumulation of misfolded proteins. The possibility of a common mechanism underlying either the pathogenesis or therapy for these diseases is appealing. Thus, there is great interest in the role of protein degradation via autophagy in such conditions where the protein is found in the cytoplasm. Here we review the growing evidence supporting a role for autophagic dysregulation as a contributing factor to protein accumulation and cellular toxicity in certain protein misfolding disorders and discuss the available evidence that upregulation of autophagy may be a valuable therapeutic strategy. PMID:21087849

  12. G protein-coupled receptors show unusual patterns of intrinsic unfolding.

    PubMed

    Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Prilusky, Jaime; Sussman, Joel L; Goldman, Adrian

    2005-02-01

    Intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs) or IUP-like regions often play key roles in controlling processes ranging from transcription to the cell cycle. In silico such proteins can be identified by their sequence properties; they have low hydrophobicity and high net charge. In this study, we applied the FoldIndex (http://bioportal.weizmann.ac.il/fldbin/findex) program to analyze human G protein-coupled receptors and compared them with membrane proteins of known structure and with IUPs. We show that human G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) extramembranous domains include long (>50 residues) disordered segments, unlike membrane proteins of known structure. The predicted disorder occurred primarily in the N-terminal, C-terminal and third intracellular domain regions: 55, 69 and 56% of the human GPCRs were disordered in these regions, respectively. This increased flexibility may therefore be critical for GPCR function. Surprisingly, however, the kinds of residues used in GPCR unstructured regions were different than in hitherto-identified IUPs. The GPCR third intracellular loop domains contain very high percentages of Arg, Lys and His residues, especially Arg, but the percentage of Glu, Asp and Pro is no higher than in folded proteins. We propose that this has structural and functional consequences.

  13. Electrostatics and Intrinsic Disorder Drive Translocon Binding of the SRP Receptor FtsY

    PubMed Central

    Draycheva, Albena; Bornemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Integral membrane proteins in bacteria are co‐translationally targeted to the SecYEG translocon for membrane insertion via the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway. The SRP receptor FtsY and its N‐terminal A domain, which is lacking in any structural model of FtsY, were studied using NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. The A domain is mainly disordered and highly flexible; it binds to lipids via its N terminus and the C‐terminal membrane targeting sequence. The central A domain binds to the translocon non‐specifically and maintains disorder. Translocon targeting and binding of the A domain is driven by electrostatic interactions. The intrinsically disordered A domain tethers FtsY to the translocon, and because of its flexibility, allows the FtsY NG domain to scan a large area for binding to the NG domain of ribosome‐bound SRP, thereby promoting the formation of the quaternary transfer complex at the membrane. PMID:27346853

  14. Amyloid-like fibrils formed from intrinsically disordered caseins: physicochemical and nanomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Pan, Kang; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-08-07

    Amyloid-like fibrils are studied because of their significance in understanding pathogenesis and creating functional materials. Amyloid-like fibrils have been studied by heating globular proteins at acidic conditions. In the present study, intrinsically disordered α-, β-, and κ-caseins were studied to form amyloid-like fibrils at pH 2.0 and 90 °C. No fibrils were observed for α-caseins, and acid hydrolysis was found to be the rate-limiting step of fibrillation of β- and κ-caseins. An increase of β-sheet structure was observed after fibrillation. Nanomechanic analysis of long amyloid-like fibrils using peak-force quantitative nanomechanical atomic force microscopy showed the lowest and highest Young's modulus for β-casein (2.35 ± 0.29 GPa) and κ-casein (4.14 ± 0.66 GPa), respectively. The dispersion with β-casein fibrils had a viscosity more than 10 and 5 times higher than those of κ-casein and β-lactoglobulin, respectively, at 0.1 s(-1) at comparable concentrations. The current findings may assist not only the understanding of amyloid fibril formation but also the development of novel functional materials from disordered proteins.

  15. The intrinsically disordered RNR inhibitor Sml1 is a dynamic dimer

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Jens; Liljedahl, Leena; Bárány-Wallje, Elsa; Sønderby, Pernille; Kristensen, Line Hyltoft; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Dyson, H. Jane; Wright, Peter E.; Poulsen, Flemming M.; Mäler, Lena; Gräslund, Astrid; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2009-01-01

    Sml1 is a small ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulatory protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that binds to and inhibits RNR activation. NMR studies of 15N-labeled Sml1 (104 residues), as well as of a truncated variant (residues 50-104), have allowed characterization of their molecular properties. Sml1 belongs to the class of intrinsically disordered proteins with high degree of dynamics and very little stable structures. Earlier suggestions for a dimeric structure of Sml1 were confirmed and from translation diffusion NMR measurements a dimerization dissociation constant of 0.1 mM at 4 °C could be determined. The hydrodynamic radius for the monomeric form of Sml1 was determined to be 23.4 Å corresponding to a protein size in between a globular protein and a coil. The dimer formation results in a hydrodynamic radius of 34.4 Å. The observed chemical shifts showed in agreement with previous studies two segments with transient helical structure, residues 4-20 and 60-86, and relaxation studies clearly showed restricted motion in these segments. A spin label attached to C14 showed long range interactions with residues 60-70 and 85-95, suggesting that the N-terminal domain folds onto the C-terminal domain. Importantly, protease degradation studies combined with mass-spectrometry indicated that the N-terminal domain is degraded before the C-terminal region and thus may serve as a protection against proteolysis of the functionally important C-terminal region. The dimer formation was not associated with significant induction of structure, but was found to provide further protection against proteolysis. We propose that this molecular shielding and protection of vital functional structures from degradation by functionally unimportant sites may be a general attribute of other natively disordered proteins. PMID:19086274

  16. Protein domain definition should allow for conditional disorder.

    PubMed

    Yegambaram, Kavestri; Bulloch, Esther M M; Kingston, Richard L

    2013-11-01

    Proteins are often classified in a binary fashion as either structured or disordered. However this approach has several deficits. Firstly, protein folding is always conditional on the physiochemical environment. A protein which is structured in some circumstances will be disordered in others. Secondly, it hides a fundamental asymmetry in behavior. While all structured proteins can be unfolded through a change in environment, not all disordered proteins have the capacity for folding. Failure to accommodate these complexities confuses the definition of both protein structural domains and intrinsically disordered regions. We illustrate these points with an experimental study of a family of small binding domains, drawn from the RNA polymerase of mumps virus and its closest relatives. Assessed at face value the domains fall on a structural continuum, with folded, partially folded, and near unstructured members. Yet the disorder present in the family is conditional, and these closely related polypeptides can access the same folded state under appropriate conditions. Any heuristic definition of the protein domain emphasizing conformational stability divides this domain family in two, in a way that makes no biological sense. Structural domains would be better defined by their ability to adopt a specific tertiary structure: a structure that may or may not be realized, dependent on the circumstances. This explicitly allows for the conditional nature of protein folding, and more clearly demarcates structural domains from intrinsically disordered regions that may function without folding.

  17. Structural and Functional Insights into the Cryoprotection of Membranes by the Intrinsically Disordered Dehydrins*

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Matthew W.; Boddington, Kelly F.; Warnica, Josephine M.; Atkinson, John; McKenna, Sarah; Madge, Jeffrey; Barker, Christine H.; Graether, Steffen P.

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration can be due to desiccation caused by a lack of environmental water or to freezing caused by a lack of liquid water. Plants have evolved a large family of proteins called LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins, which include the intrinsically disordered dehydrin (dehydration protein) family, to combat these abiotic stresses. Although transcription and translation studies have shown a correlation between dehydration stress and the presence of dehydrins, the biochemical mechanisms have remained somewhat elusive. We examine here the effect and structure of a small model dehydrin (Vitis riparia K2) on the protection of membranes from freeze-thaw stress. This protein is able to bind to liposomes containing phosphatidic acid and protect the liposomes from fusing after freeze-thaw treatment. The presence of K2 did not measurably affect liposome surface accessibility or lipid mobility but did lower its membrane transition temperature by 3 °C. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate as a membrane model, we examined the NMR structure of K2 in the presence and absence of the micelle. Biochemical and NMR experiments show that the conserved, lysine-rich segments are involved in the binding of the dehydrin to a membrane, whereas the poorly conserved φ segments play no role in binding or protection. PMID:26370084

  18. Intrinsically Disordered Titin PEVK as a Molecular Velcro: Salt-Bridge Dynamics and Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jeffrey; Tsai, Wanxia; Wittebort, Richard; Wang, Kuan

    2009-03-01

    Titin is a giant modular protein (3-4 MDa) found in the muscle sarcomere, where the intrinsically disordered and elastic PEVK segment plays a major role in the passive tension of skeletal and heart tissues. We have proposed that salt-bridges play a central role in the elasticity of PEVK. The 50 kDa engineered PEVK polyprotein shows well-resolved NMR spectra at all concentrations. From long-range NOE's, we observed stable K to E salt-bridges. Simulated annealing with NMR restraints yielded a manifold of structures for an exon 172 trimer. Steered molecular dynamics simulations were done to study how the manifold of salt-bridges evolves during the stretching experiment. Repeated SMD simulations at slow velocity (0.0005 nm/ps) showed force spectra consistent with experimental AFM force spectra of the polyprotein. SMD shows that salt-bridges occur even at high degrees of stretch and that these short range interactions are in integral part of the mechanical properties of PEVK. We propose that the long-range, non-stereospecific nature of electrostatic interactions provide a facile mechanism to tether and untether the flexible chains, which in turn affect elasticity as well as control the accessibility of protein-protein interaction to these nanogel-like proteins.

  19. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    to its (loose) association with the protein. Note that spin relaxation data are indispensable in determining the dynamic status of the peptide. Such data can be properly modeled only on a basis of bona fide MD simulations, as shown in our study. We anticipate that in future the field will move away from the ensemble view of protein disorder and toward more sophisticated MD models. This will require further optimization of force fields, aimed specifically at disordered systems. Efforts in this direction have been recently initiated by several research groups; the empirical salt-bridge correction proposed in our work falls in the same category. MD models obtained with the help of suitably refined force fields and guided by experimental NMR data will provide a powerful insight into an intricate world of disordered biomolecules.

  20. Distance-dependent intrinsic fluorescence of proteins on aluminum nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbay, Nuriye; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Ray, Krishanu

    2012-03-01

    In the past several years we have demonstrated the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) and the significant changes in the photophysical properties of fluorophores in the presence of metallic nanostructures and nanoparticles using ensemble spectroscopic studies. In the represented study, we explored the distance effect on intrinsic fluorescence of proteins adsorbed on our layer-by-layer assembled metallic nanostructures. The study is expected to provide more information on the importance of positioning the proteins at a particular distance for enhanced fluorescence from metallic structures. For the present study, we considered using easy and inexpensive LbL technique to provide welldefined distance from metallic surface. The explored proteins were adsorbed on different numbers of alternate layers of poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH). SA and BSA were electrostatically attached to the positively charged PAH layer. We obtained a maximum of ~11-fold and 9-fold increase in fluorescence intensity from SA and BSA, respectively. And also we observed ~3-fold decrease in BSA lifetime on metallic nanostructures than those on bare control quartz slides. This study reveals the distance dependence of protein fluorescence.

  1. How disordered is my protein and what is its disorder for? A guide through the "dark side" of the protein universe.

    PubMed

    Lieutaud, Philippe; Ferron, François; Uversky, Alexey V; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N; Longhi, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    In the last 2 decades it has become increasingly evident that a large number of proteins are either fully or partially disordered. Intrinsically disordered proteins lack a stable 3D structure, are ubiquitous and fulfill essential biological functions. Their conformational heterogeneity is encoded in their amino acid sequences, thereby allowing intrinsically disordered proteins or regions to be recognized based on properties of these sequences. The identification of disordered regions facilitates the functional annotation of proteins and is instrumental for delineating boundaries of protein domains amenable to structural determination with X-ray crystallization. This article discusses a comprehensive selection of databases and methods currently employed to disseminate experimental and putative annotations of disorder, predict disorder and identify regions involved in induced folding. It also provides a set of detailed instructions that should be followed to perform computational analysis of disorder.

  2. Chemical perturbation of an intrinsically disordered region of TFIID distinguishes two modes of transcription initiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengjian; Boskovic, Zarko; Hussain, Mahmud M; Hu, Wenxin; Inouye, Carla; Kim, Han-Je; Abole, A Katherine; Doud, Mary K; Lewis, Timothy A; Koehler, Angela N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Tjian, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins/regions (IDPs/IDRs) are proteins or peptide segments that fail to form stable 3-dimensional structures in the absence of partner proteins. They are abundant in eukaryotic proteomes and are often associated with human diseases, but their biological functions have been elusive to study. In this study, we report the identification of a tin(IV) oxochloride-derived cluster that binds an evolutionarily conserved IDR within the metazoan TFIID transcription complex. Binding arrests an isomerization of promoter-bound TFIID that is required for the engagement of Pol II during the first (de novo) round of transcription initiation. However, the specific chemical probe does not affect reinitiation, which requires the re-entry of Pol II, thus, mechanistically distinguishing these two modes of transcription initiation. This work also suggests a new avenue for targeting the elusive IDRs by harnessing certain features of metal-based complexes for mechanistic studies, and for the development of novel pharmaceutical interventions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07777.001 PMID:26314865

  3. Looking at the carcinogenicity of human insulin analogues via the intrinsic disorder prism

    PubMed Central

    Redwan, Elrashdy M.; Linjawi, Moustafa H.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic insulin, in its native and biosynthetic forms as well as several currently available insulin analogues, continues to be the protein of most interest to researchers. From the time of its discovery to the development of modern insulin analogues, this important therapeutic protein has passed through several stages and product generations. Beside the well-known link between diabetes and cancer risk, the currently used therapeutic insulin analogues raised serious concerns due to their potential roles in cancer initiation and/or progression. It is possible that structural variations in some of the insulin analogues are responsible for the appearance of new oncogenic species with high binding affinity to the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) receptor. The question we are trying to answer in this work is: are there any specific features of the distribution of intrinsic disorder propensity within the amino acid sequences of insulin analogues that may provide an explanation for the carcinogenicity of the altered insulin protein? PMID:26983499

  4. The Argonaute-binding platform of NRPE1 evolves through modulation of intrinsically disordered repeats.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Joshua T; Beilstein, Mark A; Mosher, Rebecca A

    2016-12-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins are important effectors in RNA silencing pathways, but they must interact with other machinery to trigger silencing. Ago hooks have emerged as a conserved motif responsible for interaction with Ago proteins, but little is known about the sequence surrounding Ago hooks that must restrict or enable interaction with specific Argonautes. Here we investigated the evolutionary dynamics of an Ago-binding platform in NRPE1, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase V. We compared NRPE1 sequences from > 50 species, including dense sampling of two plant lineages. This study demonstrates that the Ago-binding platform of NRPE1 retains Ago hooks, intrinsic disorder, and repetitive character while being highly labile at the sequence level. We reveal that loss of sequence conservation is the result of relaxed selection and frequent expansions and contractions of tandem repeat arrays. These factors allow a complete restructuring of the Ago-binding platform over 50-60 million yr. This evolutionary pattern is also detected in a second Ago-binding platform, suggesting it is a general mechanism. The presence of labile repeat arrays in all analyzed NRPE1 Ago-binding platforms indicates that selection maintains repetitive character, potentially to retain the ability to rapidly restructure the Ago-binding platform.

  5. SASSIE: A program to study intrinsically disordered biological molecules and macromolecular ensembles using experimental scattering restraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Joseph E.; Raghunandan, Sindhu; Nanda, Hirsh; Krueger, Susan

    2012-02-01

    A program to construct ensembles of biomolecular structures that are consistent with experimental scattering data are described. Specifically, we generate an ensemble of biomolecular structures by varying sets of backbone dihedral angles that are then filtered using experimentally determined restraints to rapidly determine structures that have scattering profiles that are consistent with scattering data. We discuss an application of these tools to predict a set of structures for the HIV-1 Gag protein, an intrinsically disordered protein, that are consistent with small-angle neutron scattering experimental data. We have assembled these algorithms into a program called SASSIE for structure generation, visualization, and analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins and other macromolecular ensembles using neutron and X-ray scattering restraints. Program summaryProgram title: SASSIE Catalogue identifier: AEKL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 991 624 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 826 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python, C/C++, Fortran Computer: PC/Mac Operating system: 32- and 64-bit Linux (Ubuntu 10.04, Centos 5.6) and Mac OS X (10.6.6) RAM: 1 GB Classification: 3 External routines: Python 2.6.5, numpy 1.4.0, swig 1.3.40, scipy 0.8.0, Gnuplot-py-1.8, Tcl 8.5, Tk 8.5, Mac installation requires aquaterm 1.0 (or X window system) and Xcode 3 development tools. Nature of problem: Open source software to generate structures of disordered biological molecules that subsequently allow for the comparison of computational and experimental results is limiting the use of scattering resources. Solution method: Starting with an all atom model of a protein, for example, users can input

  6. Dynamics of GCN4 Facilitate DNA Interaction: A Model-Free Analysis of an Intrinsically Disordered Region

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Michelle L.; Byrd, R. Andrew; Palmer, Arthur G.

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and proteins with intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are known to play important roles in regulatory and signaling pathways. A critical aspect of these functions is the ability of IDP/IDRs to form highly specific complexes with target molecules. However, elucidation of the contributions of conformational dynamics to function has been limited by challenges associated with structural heterogeneity of IDP/IDRs. Using NMR spin relaxation parameters (15N R1, 15N R2, and {1H}-15N heteronuclear NOE) collected at four static magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T, we have analyzed the backbone dynamics of the basic leucine-zipper (bZip) domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor GCN4, whose DNA binding domain is intrinsically disordered in the absence of DNA substrate. We demonstrate that the extended Model-free analysis can be applied to proteins with IDRs such as apo GCN4 and that these results significantly extend previous NMR studies of GCN4 dynamics performed using a single static magnetic field of 11.74 T [Bracken, et al. (1999) J. Mol. Biol., 285, 2133–2146] and correlate well with molecular dynamics simulations [Robustelli, et al. (2013) J. Chem. Theory Comput., 9, 5190–5200]. In contrast to the earlier work, data at multiple static fields allows the time scales of internal dynamics of GCN4 to be reliably quantified. Large amplitude dynamic fluctuations in the DNA-binding region have correlation times (τs ≈ 1.4–2.5 ns) consistent with a two-step mechanism in which partially ordered bZip conformations of GCN4 form initial encounter complexes with DNA and then rapidly rearrange to the high affinity state with fully formed basic region recognition helices. PMID:26661739

  7. SPA: Short peptide analyzer of intrinsic disorder status of short peptides

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bin; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lu, Hua; Dunker, A. Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2010-01-01

    Disorder prediction for short peptides is important and difficult. All modern predictors have to be optimized on a preselected dataset prior to prediction. In the succeeding prediction process, the predictor works on a query sequence or its short segment. For implementing the prediction smoothly and obtaining sound prediction results, a specific length of the sequence or segment is usually required. The need of the preselected dataset in the optimization process and the length limitation in the prediction process restrict predictors’ performance. To minimize the influence of these limitations, we developed a method for the prediction of intrinsic disorder in short peptides based on large dataset sampling and statistics. As evident from the data analysis, this method provides more reliable prediction of the intrinsic disorder status of short peptides. PMID:20497238

  8. Interactions of Yeast Dynein with Dynein Light Chain and Dynactin: GENERAL IMPLICATIONS FOR INTRINSICALLY DISORDERED DUPLEX SCAFFOLDS IN MULTIPROTEIN ASSEMBLIES.

    PubMed

    Jie, Jing; Löhr, Frank; Barbar, Elisar

    2015-09-25

    Intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) duplexes composed of two IDP chains cross-linked by bivalent partner proteins form scaffolds for assembly of multiprotein complexes. The N-terminal domain of dynein intermediate chain (N-IC) is one such IDP that forms a bivalent scaffold with multiple dynein light chains including LC8, a hub protein that promotes duplex formation of diverse IDP partners. N-IC also binds a subunit of the dynein regulator, dynactin. Here we characterize interactions of a yeast ortholog of N-IC (N-Pac11) with yeast LC8 (Dyn2) or with the intermediate chain-binding subunit of yeast dynactin (Nip100). Residue level changes in Pac11 structure are monitored by NMR spectroscopy, and binding energetics are monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). N-Pac11 is monomeric and primarily disordered except for a single α-helix (SAH) at the N terminus and a short nascent helix, LH, flanked by the two Dyn2 recognition motifs. Upon binding Dyn2, the only Pac11 residues making direct protein-protein interactions are in and immediately flanking the recognition motifs. Dyn2 binding also orders LH residues of Pac11. Upon binding Nip100, only Pac11 SAH residues make direct protein-protein interactions, but LH residues at a distant sequence position and L1 residues in an adjacent linker are also ordered. The long distance, ligand-dependent ordering of residues reveals new elements of dynamic structure within IDP linker regions.

  9. Intrinsic characteristics of Min proteins on the cell division of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yoshie; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Norihito; Umeda, Akiko; Kadota, Yoshu; Kira, Mizuki; Okazaki, Ami; Matsumura, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Tetsuro

    2016-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori divides in the human stomach resulting in persistent infections and causing various disorders. Bacterial cell division is precisely coordinated by many molecules, including FtsZ and Min proteins. However, the role of Min proteins in H. pylori division is poorly understood. We investigated the functional characteristics of Min proteins in wild-type HPK5 and five HPK5-derivative mutants using morphological and genetic approaches. All mutants showed a filamentous shape. However, the bacterial cell growth and viability of three single-gene mutants (minC, minD, minE) were similar to that of the wild-type. The coccoid form number was lowest in the minE-disruptant, indicating that MinE contributes to the coccoid form conversion during the stationary phase. Immunofluorescence microscopic observations showed that FtsZ was dispersedly distributed throughout the bacterial cell irrespective of nucleoid position in only minD-disruptants, indicating that MinD is involved in the nucleoid occlusion system. A chase assay demonstrated that MinC loss suppressed FtsZ-degradation, indicating that FtsZ degrades in a MinC-dependent manner. Molecular interactions between FtsZ and Min proteins were confirmed by immunoprecipitation (IP)-western blotting (WB), suggesting the functional cooperation of these molecules during bacterial cell division. This study describes the intrinsic characteristics of Min proteins and provides new insights into H. pylori cell division.

  10. Three reasons protein disorder analysis makes more sense in the light of collagen.

    PubMed

    Smithers, Ben; Oates, Matt E; Tompa, Peter; Gough, Julian

    2016-05-01

    We have identified that the collagen helix has the potential to be disruptive to analyses of intrinsically disordered proteins. The collagen helix is an extended fibrous structure that is both promiscuous and repetitive. Whilst its sequence is predicted to be disordered, this type of protein structure is not typically considered as intrinsic disorder. Here, we show that collagen-encoding proteins skew the distribution of exon lengths in genes. We find that previous results, demonstrating that exons encoding disordered regions are more likely to be symmetric, are due to the abundance of the collagen helix. Other related results, showing increased levels of alternative splicing in disorder-encoding exons, still hold after considering collagen-containing proteins. Aside from analyses of exons, we find that the set of proteins that contain collagen significantly alters the amino acid composition of regions predicted as disordered. We conclude that research in this area should be conducted in the light of the collagen helix.

  11. Polybivalency and disordered proteins in ordering macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Barbar, Elisar; Nyarko, Afua

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are prevalent in macromolecular assemblies and are thought to mediate protein recognition in complex regulatory processes and signaling pathways. The formation of a polybivalent scaffold is a key process by which IDPs drive early steps in macromolecular assemblies. Three intrinsically disordered proteins, IC, Swallow and Nup159, are core components, respectively, of cytoplasmic dynein, bicoid mRNA localization apparatus, and nuclear pore complexes. In all three systems, the hub protein LC8 recognizes on the IDP, short linear motifs that are fully disordered in the apo form, but adopt a β-strand when bound to LC8. The IDP/LC8 complex forms a bivalent scaffold primed to bind additional bivalent ligands. Scaffold formation also promotes self-association and/or higher order organization of the IDP components at a site distant from LC8 binding. Rigorous thermodynamic analyses imply that association of additional bivalent ligands is driven by entropic effects where the first binding event is weak but subsequent binding of additional ligands occurs with higher affinity. Here, we review specific examples of macromolecular assemblies in which polybivalency of aligned IDP duplexes not only enhances binding affinity and results in formation of a stable complex but also compensates unfavorable steric and enthalpic interactions. We propose that polybivalent scaffold assembly involving IDPs and LC8-like proteins is a general process in the cell biology of a class of multi-protein structures that are stable yet fine-tuned for diverse cellular requirements.

  12. Expanding the proteome: disordered and alternatively folded proteins.

    PubMed

    Dyson, H Jane

    2011-11-01

    Proteins provide much of the scaffolding for life, as well as undertaking a variety of essential catalytic reactions. These characteristic functions have led us to presuppose that proteins are in general functional only when well structured and correctly folded. As we begin to explore the repertoire of possible protein sequences inherent in the human and other genomes, two stark facts that belie this supposition become clear: firstly, the number of apparent open reading frames in the human genome is significantly smaller than appears to be necessary to code for all of the diverse proteins in higher organisms, and secondly that a significant proportion of the protein sequences that would be coded by the genome would not be expected to form stable three-dimensional (3D) structures. Clearly the genome must include coding for a multitude of alternative forms of proteins, some of which may be partly or fully disordered or incompletely structured in their functional states. At the same time as this likelihood was recognized, experimental studies also began to uncover examples of important protein molecules and domains that were incompletely structured or completely disordered in solution, yet remained perfectly functional. In the ensuing years, we have seen an explosion of experimental and genome-annotation studies that have mapped the extent of the intrinsic disorder phenomenon and explored the possible biological rationales for its widespread occurrence. Answers to the question 'why would a particular domain need to be unstructured?' are as varied as the systems where such domains are found. This review provides a survey of recent new directions in this field, and includes an evaluation of the role not only of intrinsically disordered proteins but also of partially structured and highly dynamic members of the disorder-order continuum.

  13. Wide-line NMR and DSC studies on intrinsically disordered p53 transactivation domain and its helically pre-structured segment

    PubMed Central

    Tompa, Peter; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Bokor, Mónika; Kamasa, Pawel; Tantos, Ágnes; Fritz, Beáta; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Lee, Chewook; Verebélyi, Tamás; Tompa, Kálmán

    2016-01-01

    Wide-line 1H NMR intensity and differential scanning calorimetry measurements were carried out on the intrinsically disordered 73-residue full transactivation domain (TAD) of the p53 tumor suppressor protein and two peptides: one a wild type p53 TAD peptide with a helix pre-structuring property, and a mutant peptide with a disabled helix-forming propensity. Measurements were carried out in order to characterize their water and ion binding characteristics. By quantifying the number of hydrate water molecules, we provide a microscopic description for the interactions of water with a wild-type p53 TAD and two p53 TAD peptides. The results provide direct evidence that intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and a less structured peptide not only have a higher hydration capacity than globular proteins, but are also able to bind a larger amount of charged solute ions. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 497-501] PMID:27418282

  14. Influence of disorder on magnetic properties and intrinsic anomalous hall effect in epitaxial Co2FeAl film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, K. K.; Miao, J.; Xu, X. G.; Wu, Y.; Zhao, J. H.; Jiang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the influence of disorder on magnetic properties and intrinsic anomalous Hall effects in epitaxial single crystalline full Heusler alloy Co2FeAl. The magnetic properties in both ordered and disordered films are proved by X ray absorption spectroscopy and X ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements. Using a proper scaling, we have extracted the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity (AHC) of the films. The intrinsic AHC in the as deposited films is thickness dependent, but in the annealed ones the value is nearly constant, which is ascribed to modified the Fermi surface due to disordering.

  15. Polycation-π interactions are a driving force for molecular recognition by an intrinsically disordered oncoprotein family.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianhui; Ng, Sheung Chun; Tompa, Peter; Lee, Kevin A W; Chan, Hue Sun

    2013-01-01

    Molecular recognition by intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) commonly involves specific localized contacts and target-induced disorder to order transitions. However, some IDPs remain disordered in the bound state, a phenomenon coined "fuzziness", often characterized by IDP polyvalency, sequence-insensitivity and a dynamic ensemble of disordered bound-state conformations. Besides the above general features, specific biophysical models for fuzzy interactions are mostly lacking. The transcriptional activation domain of the Ewing's Sarcoma oncoprotein family (EAD) is an IDP that exhibits many features of fuzziness, with multiple EAD aromatic side chains driving molecular recognition. Considering the prevalent role of cation-π interactions at various protein-protein interfaces, we hypothesized that EAD-target binding involves polycation- π contacts between a disordered EAD and basic residues on the target. Herein we evaluated the polycation-π hypothesis via functional and theoretical interrogation of EAD variants. The experimental effects of a range of EAD sequence variations, including aromatic number, aromatic density and charge perturbations, all support the cation-π model. Moreover, the activity trends observed are well captured by a coarse-grained EAD chain model and a corresponding analytical model based on interaction between EAD aromatics and surface cations of a generic globular target. EAD-target binding, in the context of pathological Ewing's Sarcoma oncoproteins, is thus seen to be driven by a balance between EAD conformational entropy and favorable EAD-target cation-π contacts. Such a highly versatile mode of molecular recognition offers a general conceptual framework for promiscuous target recognition by polyvalent IDPs.

  16. Amygdala-based intrinsic functional connectivity and anxiety disorders in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Toazza, Rudineia; Franco, Alexandre Rosa; Buchweitz, Augusto; Molle, Roberta Dalle; Rodrigues, Danitsa Marcos; Reis, Roberta Sena; Mucellini, Amanda Brondani; Esper, Nathalia Bianchini; Aguzzoli, Cristiano; Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2016-11-30

    Anxiety disorders (AD) are the most prevalent group of psychiatric disorders in adolescents and young adults. Nevertheless, the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders is still poorly understood. This study investigated differences in the functional connectivity of intrinsic amygdala-based networks of participants with and without AD. Resting state fMRI data were obtained from 18 participants with an AD and 19 healthy comparison individuals. Psychiatric diagnosis was assessed using standardized structured interviews. The comparison between groups was carried out using functional connectivity maps from six seed regions defined using probabilistic maps bilaterally within the amygdala (basolateral, superficial and centromedial amygdala). We found significant between-group differences in five clusters, which showed aberrant functional connectivity with the left basolateral amygdala: right precentral gyrus, right cingulate gyrus, bilateral precuneus, and right superior frontal gyrus in subjects with AD as compared with the comparison subjects. For the comparison subjects, the correlations between the amygdala and the five clusters were either non-significant, or negative. The present study suggests there is an intrinsic disruption in the communication between left basolateral amygdala and a network of brain regions involved with emotion regulation, and with the default mode network in adolescents and young adults with anxiety disorders.

  17. Balanced Protein–Water Interactions Improve Properties of Disordered Proteins and Non-Specific Protein Association

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some frequently encountered deficiencies in all-atom molecular simulations, such as nonspecific protein–protein interactions being too strong, and unfolded or disordered states being too collapsed, suggest that proteins are insufficiently well solvated in simulations using current state-of-the-art force fields. To address these issues, we make the simplest possible change, by modifying the short-range protein–water pair interactions, and leaving all the water–water and protein–protein parameters unchanged. We find that a modest strengthening of protein–water interactions is sufficient to recover the correct dimensions of intrinsically disordered or unfolded proteins, as determined by direct comparison with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data. The modification also results in more realistic protein-protein affinities, and average solvation free energies of model compounds which are more consistent with experiment. Most importantly, we show that this scaling is small enough not to affect adversely the stability of the folded state, with only a modest effect on the stability of model peptides forming α-helix and β-sheet structures. The proposed adjustment opens the way to more accurate atomistic simulations of proteins, particularly for intrinsically disordered proteins, protein–protein association, and crowded cellular environments. PMID:25400522

  18. SilE is an intrinsically disordered periplasmic “molecular sponge” involved in bacterial silver resistance

    PubMed Central

    Asiani, Karishma R.; Williams, Huw; Bird, Louise; Jenner, Matthew; Searle, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ag+ resistance was initially found on the Salmonella enetrica serovar Typhimurium multi‐resistance plasmid pMG101 from burns patients in 1975. The putative model of Ag+ resistance, encoded by the sil operon from pMG101, involves export of Ag+ via an ATPase (SilP), an effluxer complex (SilCFBA) and a periplasmic chaperon of Ag+ (SilE). SilE is predicted to be intrinsically disordered. We tested this hypothesis using structural and biophysical studies and show that SilE is an intrinsically disordered protein in its free apo‐form but folds to a compact structure upon optimal binding to six Ag+ ions in its holo‐form. Sequence analyses and site‐directed mutagenesis established the importance of histidine and methionine containing motifs for Ag+‐binding, and identified a nucleation core that initiates Ag+‐mediated folding of SilE. We conclude that SilE is a molecular sponge for absorbing metal ions. PMID:27085056

  19. Subclassifying disordered proteins by the CH-CDF plot method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Oldfield, Christopher; Meng, Jingwei; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N; Romero, Pedro; Dunker, A Keith

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are associated with a wide range of functions. We suggest that sequence-based subtypes, which we call flavors, may provide the basis for different biological functions. The problem is to find a method that separates IDPs into different flavor / function groups. Here we discuss one approach, the (Charge-Hydropathy) versus (Cumulative Distribution Function) plot or CH-CDF plot, which is based the combined use of the CH and CDF disorder predictors. These two predictors are based on significantly different inputs and methods. This CH-CDF plot partitions all proteins into 4 groups: structured, mixed, disordered, and rare. Studies of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries and homologous show different structural biases for each group classified by the CH-CDF plot. The mixed class has more order-promoting residues and more ordered regions than the disordered class. To test whether this partition accomplishes any functional separation, we performed gene ontology (GO) term analysis on each class. Some functions are indeed found to be related to subtypes of disorder: the disordered class is highly active in mitosis-related processes among others. Meanwhile, the mixed class is highly associated with signaling pathways, where having both ordered and disordered regions could possibly be important.

  20. Protein disorder in plants: a view from the chloroplast

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The intrinsically unstructured state of some proteins, observed in all living organisms, is essential for basic cellular functions. In this field the available information from plants is limited but it has been reached a point where these proteins can be comprehensively classified on the basis of disorder, function and evolution. Results Our analysis of plant genomes confirms that nuclear-encoded proteins follow the same trend than other multi-cellular eukaryotes; however, chloroplast- and mitochondria- encoded proteins conserve the patterns of Archaea and Bacteria, in agreement with their phylogenetic origin. Based on current knowledge about gene transference from the chloroplast to the nucleus, we report a strong correlation between the rate of disorder of transferred and nuclear-encoded proteins, even for polypeptides that play functional roles back in the chloroplast. We further investigate this trend by reviewing the set of chloroplast ribosomal proteins, one of the most representative transferred gene clusters, finding that the ribosomal large subunit, assembled from a majority of nuclear-encoded proteins, is clearly more unstructured than the small one, which integrates mostly plastid-encoded proteins. Conclusions Our observations suggest that the evolutionary dynamics of the plant nucleus adds disordered segments to genes alike, regardless of their origin, with the notable exception of proteins currently encoded in both genomes, probably due to functional constraints. PMID:22970728

  1. Multiscaled exploration of coupled folding and binding of an intrinsically disordered molecular recognition element in measles virus nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Chu, Xiakun; Longhi, Sonia; Roche, Philippe; Han, Wei; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Numerous relatively short regions within intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) serve as molecular recognition elements (MoREs). They fold into ordered structures upon binding to their partner molecules. Currently, there is still a lack of in-depth understanding of how coupled binding and folding occurs in MoREs. Here, we quantified the unbound ensembles of the α-MoRE within the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein. We developed a multiscaled approach by combining a physics-based and an atomic hybrid model to decipher the mechanism by which the α-MoRE interacts with the X domain of the measles virus phosphoprotein. Our multiscaled approach led to remarkable qualitative and quantitative agreements between the theoretical predictions and experimental results (e.g., chemical shifts). We found that the free α-MoRE rapidly interconverts between multiple discrete partially helical conformations and the unfolded state, in accordance with the experimental observations. We quantified the underlying global folding–binding landscape. This leads to a synergistic mechanism in which the recognition event proceeds via (minor) conformational selection, followed by (major) induced folding. We also provided evidence that the α-MoRE is a compact molten globule-like IDP and behaves as a downhill folder in the induced folding process. We further provided a theoretical explanation for the inherent connections between “downhill folding,” “molten globule,” and “intrinsic disorder” in IDP-related systems. Particularly, we proposed that binding and unbinding of IDPs proceed in a stepwise way through a “kinetic divide-and-conquer” strategy that confers them high specificity without high affinity. PMID:24043820

  2. Intrinsic protein flexibility in regulation of cell proliferation: advantages for signaling and opportunities for novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Follis, Ariele Viacava; Galea, Charles A; Kriwacki, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that intrinsically disordered (or unstructured) proteins (IDPs, or IUPs) are found in organisms from all kingdoms of life. In eukaryotes, IDPs are highly abundant and perform a wide range of biological functions, including regulation and signaling. Despite increased interest in understanding the structural biology of IDPs, questions remain regarding the mechanisms through which disordered proteins perform their biological function(s). In other words, what are the relationships between disorder and function for IDPs? Several excellent reviews have recently been published that discuss the structural properties of IDPs.1-3 Here, we discuss two IDP systems which illustrate features of dynamic complexes. In the first section, we discuss two IDPs, p21 and p27, which regulate the mammalian cell division cycle by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). In the second section, we discuss recent results from Follis, Hammoudeh, Metallo and coworkers demonstrating that the IDP Myc can be bound and inhibited by small molecules through formation of dynamic complexes. Previous studies have shown that polypeptide segments of p21 and p27 are partially folded in isolation and fold further upon binding their biological targets. Interestingly, some portions of p27 which bind to and inhibit Cdk2/cyclin A remain flexible in the bound complex. This residual flexibility allows otherwise buried tyrosine residues within p27 to be phosphorylated by nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). Tyrosine phosphorylation relieves kinase inhibition, triggering Cdk2-mediated phosphorylation of a threonine residue within the flexible C-terminus of p27. This, in turn, marks p27 for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, unleashing full Cdk2 activity which drives cell cycle progression. p27, thus, constitutes a conduit for transmission of proliferative signals via posttranslational modifications. Importantly, activation of the p27 signaling conduit by oncogenic NRTKs

  3. Intrinsic and extrinsic negative regulators of nuclear protein transport processes

    PubMed Central

    Sekimoto, Toshihiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear–cytoplasmic protein transport is a critical process in cellular events. The identification of transport signals (nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal) and their receptors has facilitated our understanding of this expanding field. Nuclear transport must be appropriately regulated to deliver proteins through the nuclear pore when their functions are required in the nucleus, and to export them into the cytoplasm when they are not needed in the nucleus. Altered nuclear transport processes have been observed in stressed cells, which would change gene expressions. Some viruses interfere with nuclear transport in host cells to evade immune defense. Moreover, certain transport factors negatively regulate nuclear protein transport in cells. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of nuclear–cytoplasmic trafficking not only provides important information about cellular processes, but also is of use for developing specific inhibitors for transport pathways. PMID:22672474

  4. An Overview of Practical Applications of Protein Disorder Prediction and Drive for Faster, More Accurate Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Gumm, Jordan; Karki, Suman; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Protein disordered regions are segments of a protein chain that do not adopt a stable structure. Thus far, a variety of protein disorder prediction methods have been developed and have been widely used, not only in traditional bioinformatics domains, including protein structure prediction, protein structure determination and function annotation, but also in many other biomedical fields. The relationship between intrinsically-disordered proteins and some human diseases has played a significant role in disorder prediction in disease identification and epidemiological investigations. Disordered proteins can also serve as potential targets for drug discovery with an emphasis on the disordered-to-ordered transition in the disordered binding regions, and this has led to substantial research in drug discovery or design based on protein disordered region prediction. Furthermore, protein disorder prediction has also been applied to healthcare by predicting the disease risk of mutations in patients and studying the mechanistic basis of diseases. As the applications of disorder prediction increase, so too does the need to make quick and accurate predictions. To fill this need, we also present a new approach to predict protein residue disorder using wide sequence windows that is applicable on the genomic scale. PMID:26198229

  5. An Overview of Practical Applications of Protein Disorder Prediction and Drive for Faster, More Accurate Predictions.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Gumm, Jordan; Karki, Suman; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2015-07-07

    Protein disordered regions are segments of a protein chain that do not adopt a stable structure. Thus far, a variety of protein disorder prediction methods have been developed and have been widely used, not only in traditional bioinformatics domains, including protein structure prediction, protein structure determination and function annotation, but also in many other biomedical fields. The relationship between intrinsically-disordered proteins and some human diseases has played a significant role in disorder prediction in disease identification and epidemiological investigations. Disordered proteins can also serve as potential targets for drug discovery with an emphasis on the disordered-to-ordered transition in the disordered binding regions, and this has led to substantial research in drug discovery or design based on protein disordered region prediction. Furthermore, protein disorder prediction has also been applied to healthcare by predicting the disease risk of mutations in patients and studying the mechanistic basis of diseases. As the applications of disorder prediction increase, so too does the need to make quick and accurate predictions. To fill this need, we also present a new approach to predict protein residue disorder using wide sequence windows that is applicable on the genomic scale.

  6. The intrinsic disorder related alloy scattering in ZrNiSn half-Heusler thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hanhui; Wang, Heng; Fu, Chenguang; Liu, Yintu; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2014-11-03

    The intrinsic structural disorder dramatically affects the thermal and electronic transport in semiconductors. Although normally considered an ordered compound, the half-Heusler ZrNiSn displays many transport characteristics of a disordered alloy. Similar to the (Zr,Hf)NiSn based solid solutions, the unsubstituted ZrNiSn compound also exhibits charge transport dominated by alloy scattering, as demonstrated in this work. The unexpected charge transport, even in ZrNiSn which is normally considered fully ordered, can be explained by the Ni partially filling interstitial sites in this half-Heusler system. The influence of the disordering and defects in crystal structure on the electron transport process has also been quantitatively analyzed in ZrNiSn1-xSbx with carrier concentration nH ranging from 5.0 × 10(19) to 2.3 × 10(21) cm(-3) by changing Sb dopant content. The optimized carrier concentration nH ≈ 3-4 × 10(20) cm(-2) results in ZT ≈ 0.8 at 875K. This work suggests that MNiSn (M = Hf, Zr, Ti) and perhaps most other half-Heusler thermoelectric materials should be considered highly disordered especially when trying to understand the electronic and phonon structure and transport features.

  7. The intrinsic disorder related alloy scattering in ZrNiSn half-Heusler thermoelectric materials

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hanhui; Wang, Heng; Fu, Chenguang; Liu, Yintu; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic structural disorder dramatically affects the thermal and electronic transport in semiconductors. Although normally considered an ordered compound, the half-Heusler ZrNiSn displays many transport characteristics of a disordered alloy. Similar to the (Zr,Hf)NiSn based solid solutions, the unsubstituted ZrNiSn compound also exhibits charge transport dominated by alloy scattering, as demonstrated in this work. The unexpected charge transport, even in ZrNiSn which is normally considered fully ordered, can be explained by the Ni partially filling interstitial sites in this half-Heusler system. The influence of the disordering and defects in crystal structure on the electron transport process has also been quantitatively analyzed in ZrNiSn1-xSbx with carrier concentration nH ranging from 5.0×1019 to 2.3×1021 cm−3 by changing Sb dopant content. The optimized carrier concentration nH ≈ 3–4×1020 cm−2 results in ZT ≈ 0.8 at 875K. This work suggests that MNiSn (M = Hf, Zr, Ti) and perhaps most other half-Heusler thermoelectric materials should be considered highly disordered especially when trying to understand the electronic and phonon structure and transport features. PMID:25363573

  8. Two Isoforms of Yersinia pestis Plasminogen Activator Pla: Intraspecies Distribution, Intrinsic Disorder Propensity, and Contribution to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Dentovskaya, Svetlana V.; Platonov, Mikhail E.; Svetoch, Tat’yana E.; Kopylov, Pavel Kh.; Kombarova, Tat’yana I.; Ivanov, Sergey A.; Shaikhutdinova, Rima Z.; Kolombet, Lyubov’ V.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Ablamunits, Vitaly G.; Motin, Vladimir L.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown previously that several endemic Y. pestis isolates with limited virulence contained the I259 isoform of the outer membrane protease Pla, while the epidemic highly virulent strains possessed only the T259 Pla isoform. Our sequence analysis of the pla gene from 118 Y. pestis subsp. microtus strains revealed that the I259 isoform was present exclusively in the endemic strains providing a convictive evidence of more ancestral origin of this isoform. Analysis of the effects of the I259T polymorphism on the intrinsic disorder propensity of Pla revealed that the I259T mutation slightly increases the intrinsic disorder propensity of the C-terminal tail of Pla and makes this protein slightly more prone for disorder-based protein-protein interactions, suggesting that the T259 Pla could be functionally more active than the I259 Pla. This assumption was proven experimentally by assessing the coagulase and fibrinolytic activities of the two Pla isoforms in human plasma, as well as in a direct fluorometric assay with the Pla peptide substrate. The virulence testing of Pla-negative or expressing the I259 and T259 Pla isoforms Y. pestis subsp. microtus and subsp. pestis strains did not reveal any significant difference in LD50 values and dose-dependent survival assays between them by using a subcutaneous route of challenge of mice and guinea pigs or intradermal challenge of mice. However, a significant decrease in time-to-death was observed in animals infected with the epidemic T259 Pla-producing strains as compared to the parent Pla-negative variants. Survival curves of the endemic I259 Pla+ strains fit between them, but significant difference in mean time to death post infection between the Pla−strains and their I259 Pla+ variants could be seen only in the isogenic set of subsp. pestis strains. These findings suggest an essential role for the outer membrane protease Pla evolution in Y. pestis bubonic infection exacerbation that is necessary for

  9. Intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectral features of cottonseed protein fractions and the effects of denaturants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the functional and physicochemical properties of cottonseed protein, we investigated the intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectral features of cottonseed protein isolate (CSPI) and sequentially extracted water (CSPw) and alkali (CSPa) protein fractions, an...

  10. Is there a biological cost of protein disorder? Analysis of cancer-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Pajkos, Mátyás; Mészáros, Bálint; Simon, István; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna

    2012-01-01

    As many diseases can be traced back to altered protein function, studying the effect of genetic variations at the level of proteins can provide a clue to understand how changes at the DNA level lead to various diseases. Cellular processes rely not only on proteins with well-defined structure but can also involve intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that exist as highly flexible ensembles of conformations. Disordered proteins are mostly involved in signaling and regulatory processes, and their functional repertoire largely complements that of globular proteins. However, it was also suggested that protein disorder entails an increased biological cost. This notion was supported by a set of individual IDPs involved in various diseases, especially in cancer, and the increased amount of disorder observed among disease-associated proteins. In this work, we tested if there is any biological risk associated with protein disorder at the level of single nucleotide mutations. Specifically, we analyzed the distribution of mutations within ordered and disordered segments. Our results demonstrated that while neutral polymorphisms were more likely to occur within disordered segments, cancer-associated mutations had a preference for ordered regions. Additionally, we proposed an alternative explanation for the association of protein disorder and the involvement in cancer with the consideration of functional annotations. Individual examples also suggested that although disordered segments are fundamental functional elements, their presence is not necessarily accompanied with an increased mutation rate in cancer. The presented study can help to understand how the different structural properties of proteins influence the consequences of genetic mutations.

  11. Metal-enhanced intrinsic fluorescence of proteins and label-free bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Krishanu; Szmacinski, Henryk; Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2010-02-01

    Most of the applications of fluorescence require the use of labeled drugs and labeled biomolecules. Due to the need of labeling biomolecules with extrinsic fluorophores, there is a rapidly growing interest in methods which provide label-free detection (LFD). Proteins are highly fluorescent, which is due primarily to tryptophan residues. However, since most proteins contain tryptophan, this emission is not specific for proteins of interest in a biological sample. This is one of the reasons of not utilizing intrinsic tryptophan emission from proteins to detect specific proteins. Here, we present the intrinsic fluorescence for several proteins bound to the silver or aluminum metal nanostructured surfaces. We demonstrate the metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) of proteins with different numbers of tryptophan residues. Large increases in fluorescence intensity and decreases in lifetime provide the means of direct detection of bound protein without separation from the unbound. We present specific detection of individual types of proteins and measure the binding kinetics of proteins such as IgG and streptavidin. Additionally, specific detection of IgG and streptavidin has been accomplished in the presence of large concentrations of other proteins in sample solutions. These results will allow design of surface-based assays with biorecognitive layer that specifically bind the protein of interest and thus enhance its intrinsic fluorescence. The present study demonstrates the occurrence of MEF in the UV region and thus opens new possibilities to study tryptophan-containing proteins without labeling with longer wavelength fluorophores and provides an approach to label-free detection of biomolecules.

  12. Membrane binding mode of intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits depends on lipid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Sigalov, Alexander B.; Hendricks, Gregory M.

    2009-11-13

    Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling subunits including {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} all contain one or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), tyrosine residues of which are phosphorylated upon receptor triggering. Membrane binding-induced helical folding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} ITAMs is thought to control TCR activation. However, the question whether or not lipid binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} is necessarily accompanied by a folding transition of ITAMs remains open. In this study, we investigate whether the membrane binding mechanisms of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depend on the membrane model used. Circular dichroic and fluorescence data indicate that binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} to detergent micelles and unstable vesicles is accompanied by a disorder-to-order transition, whereas upon binding to stable vesicles these proteins remain unfolded. Using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we show that upon protein binding, unstable vesicles fuse and rupture. In contrast, stable vesicles remain intact under these conditions. This suggests different membrane binding modes for {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depending on the bilayer stability: (1) coupled binding and folding, and (2) binding without folding. These findings explain the long-standing puzzle in the literature and highlight the importance of the choice of an appropriate membrane model for protein-lipid interactions studies.

  13. The driving forces of membrane remodeling by non-intrinsically curved proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Christopher J.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Schmid, Eva M.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2011-03-01

    Membranes are dynamically remodeled during numerous processes essential to cells. Among the most well-studied effectors of this remodeling are BAR family proteins, which are small and have a banana-like intrinsic curvature that senses, forms, and stabilizes curved membranes without expending energy as ATP or GTP. Recent experiments in reduced systems have shown, however, that small proteins that feature no such intrinsic curvature can similarly cluster at and dramatically remodel membranes. These proteins have no distinguishing features other than their size and their membrane-binding sites, and the dominant effect that is driving curvature is not well understood. Here, we present a coarse-grained simulation study that captures protein steric and binding effects as well as membrane fluctuations at large scales. We use this model to systematically test for the role that such attributes play in the resulting dynamics and equilibrium structures of remodeling processes that feature this motif.

  14. Structural features and interfacial properties of WH2, β-thymosin domains and other intrinsically disordered domains in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics.

    PubMed

    Renault, Louis; Deville, Célia; van Heijenoort, Carine

    2013-11-01

    Many actin-binding proteins (ABPs) use complex multidomain architectures to integrate and coordinate multiple signals and interactions with the dynamic remodeling of actin cytoskeleton. In these proteins, small segments that are intrinsically disordered in their unbound native state can be functionally as important as identifiable folded units. These functional intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are however difficult to identify and characterize in vitro. Here, we try to summarize the state of the art in understanding the structural features and interfacial properties of IDRs involved in actin self-assembly dynamics. Recent structural and functional insights into the regulation of widespread, multifunctional WH2/β-thymosin domains, and of other IDRs such as those associated with WASP/WAVE, formin or capping proteins are examined. Understanding the functional versatility of IDRs in actin assembly requires apprehending by multiple structural and functional approaches their large conformational plasticity and dynamics in their interactions. In many modular ABPs, IDRs relay labile interactions with multiple partners and act as interaction hubs in interdomain and protein-protein interfaces. They thus control multiple conformational transitions between the inactive and active states or between various active states of multidomain ABPs, and play an important role to coordinate the high turnover of interactions in actin self-assembly dynamics.

  15. Understanding disordered and unfolded proteins using single-molecule FRET and polymer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Hagen

    2016-12-01

    Understanding protein folding and the functional properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) requires detailed knowledge of the forces that act in polypeptide chains. These forces determine the dimensions and dynamics of unfolded and disordered proteins and have been suggested to impact processes such as the coupled binding and folding of IDPs, or the rate of protein folding reactions. Much of the progress in understanding the physical and chemical properties of unfolded and intrinsically disordered polypeptide chains has been made possible by the recent developments in single-molecule fluorescence techniques. However, the interpretation of the experimental results requires concepts from polymer physics in order to be understood. Here, I review some of the theories used to describe the dimensions of unfolded polypeptide chains under varying solvent conditions together with their more recent application to experimental data.

  16. Structure/Function Implications in a Dynamic Complex of the Intrinsically Disordered Sic1 with the Cdc4 Subunit of an SCF Ubiquitin Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Mittag, Tanja; Marsh, Joseph; Grishaev, Alexander; Orlicky, Stephen; Lin, Hong; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2010-11-22

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can form highly dynamic complexes with partner proteins. One such dynamic complex involves the intrinsically disordered Sic1 with its partner Cdc4 in regulation of yeast cell cycle progression. Phosphorylation of six N-terminal Sic1 sites leads to equilibrium engagement of each phosphorylation site with the primary binding pocket in Cdc4, the substrate recognition subunit of a ubiquitin ligase. ENSEMBLE calculations using experimental nuclear magnetic resonance and small-angle X-ray scattering data reveal significant transient structure in both phosphorylation states of the isolated ensembles (Sic1 and pSic1) that modulates their electrostatic potential, suggesting a structural basis for the proposed strong contribution of electrostatics to binding. A structural model of the dynamic pSic1-Cdc4 complex demonstrates the spatial arrangements in the ubiquitin ligase complex. These results provide a physical picture of a protein that is predominantly disordered in both its free and bound states, enabling aspects of its structure/function relationship to be elucidated.

  17. Structure/function implications in a dynamic complex of the intrinsically disordered Sic1 with the Cdc4 subunit of an SCF ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Tanja; Marsh, Joseph; Grishaev, Alexander; Orlicky, Stephen; Lin, Hong; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2010-03-14

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can form highly dynamic complexes with partner proteins. One such dynamic complex involves the intrinsically disordered Sic1 with its partner Cdc4 in regulation of yeast cell cycle progression. Phosphorylation of six N-terminal Sic1 sites leads to equilibrium engagement of each phosphorylation site with the primary binding pocket in Cdc4, the substrate recognition subunit of a ubiquitin ligase. ENSEMBLE calculations using experimental nuclear magnetic resonance and small-angle X-ray scattering data reveal significant transient structure in both phosphorylation states of the isolated ensembles (Sic1 and pSic1) that modulates their electrostatic potential, suggesting a structural basis for the proposed strong contribution of electrostatics to binding. A structural model of the dynamic pSic1-Cdc4 complex demonstrates the spatial arrangements in the ubiquitin ligase complex. These results provide a physical picture of a protein that is predominantly disordered in both its free and bound states, enabling aspects of its structure/function relationship to be elucidated.

  18. Compaction and binding properties of the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of Henipavirus nucleoprotein as unveiled by deletion studies.

    PubMed

    Blocquel, David; Habchi, Johnny; Gruet, Antoine; Blangy, Stéphanie; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Henipaviruses are recently emerged severe human pathogens within the Paramyxoviridae family. Their genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N) within a helical nucleocapsid that recruits the polymerase complex via the phosphoprotein (P). We have previously shown that in Henipaviruses the N protein possesses an intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain, N(TAIL), which undergoes α-helical induced folding in the presence of the C-terminal domain (P(XD)) of the P protein. Using computational approaches, we previously identified within N(TAIL) four putative molecular recognition elements (MoREs) with different structural propensities, and proposed a structural model for the N(TAIL)-P(XD) complex where the MoRE encompassing residues 473-493 adopt an α-helical conformation at the P(XD) surface. In this work, for each N(TAIL) protein, we designed four deletion constructs bearing different combinations of the predicted MoREs. Following purification of the N(TAIL) truncated proteins from the soluble fraction of E. coli, we characterized them in terms of their conformational, spectroscopic and binding properties. These studies provided direct experimental evidence for the structural state of the four predicted MoREs, and showed that two of them have clear α-helical propensities, with the one spanning residues 473-493 being strictly required for binding to P(XD). We also showed that Henipavirus N(TAIL) and P(XD) form heterologous complexes, indicating that the P(XD) binding regions are functionally interchangeable between the two viruses. By combining spectroscopic and conformational analyses, we showed that the content in regular secondary structure is not a major determinant of protein compaction.

  19. The intrinsically disordered linker of E. coli SSB is critical for the release from single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Yin; Wilczek, Luke A; Pottinger, Sasheen; Manosas, Maria; Yu, Cong; Nguyenduc, Trong; Bianco, Piero R

    2017-04-01

    The Escherichia coli single stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) is crucial for DNA replication, recombination and repair. Within each process, it has two seemingly disparate roles: it stabilizes single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates generated during DNA processing and, forms complexes with a group of proteins known as the SSB-interactome. Key to both roles is the C-terminal, one-third of the protein, in particular the intrinsically disordered linker (IDL). Previously, they have shown using a series of linker deletion mutants that the IDL links both ssDNA and target protein binding by mediating interactions with the oligosaccharide/oligonucleotide binding fold in the target. In this study, they examine the role of the linker region in SSB function in a variety of DNA metabolic processes in vitro. Using the same linker mutants, the results show that in addition to association reactions (either DNA or protein), the IDL is critical for the release of SSB from DNA. This release can be under conditions of ssDNA competition or active displacement by a DNA helicase or recombinase. Consistent with their previous work these results indicate that SSB linker mutants are defective for SSB-SSB interactions, and when the IDL is removed a terminal SSB-DNA complex results. Formation of this complex inhibits downstream processing of DNA by helicases such as RecG or PriA as well as recombination, mediated by RecA. A model, based on the evidence herein, is presented to explain how the IDL acts in SSB function.

  20. A novel plant major intrinsic protein in Physcomitrella patens most similar to bacterial glycerol channels.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Sofia; Lebrun, Anne-Sophie; Nordén, Kristina; Chaumont, François; Johanson, Urban

    2005-09-01

    A gene encoding a novel fifth type of major intrinsic protein (MIP) in plants has been identified in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Phylogenetic analyses show that this protein, GlpF-like intrinsic protein (GIP1;1), is closely related to a subclass of glycerol transporters in bacteria that in addition to glycerol are highly permeable to water. A likely explanation of the occurrence of this bacterial-like MIP in P. patens is horizontal gene transfer. The expressed P. patens GIP1;1 gene contains five introns and encodes a unique C-loop extension of approximately 110 amino acid residues that has no obvious similarity with any other known protein. Based on alignments and structural comparisons with other MIPs, GIP1;1 is suggested to have retained the permeability for glycerol but not for water. Studies on heterologously expressed GIP1;1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirm the predicted substrate specificity. Interestingly, proteins of one of the plant-specific subgroups of MIPs, the NOD26-like intrinsic proteins, are also facilitating the transport of glycerol and have previously been suggested to have evolved from a horizontally transferred bacterial gene. Further studies on localization and searches for GIP1;1 homologs in other plants will clarify the function and significance of this new plant MIP.

  1. Post-translational modifications of the intrinsically disordered terminal domains of histone H1: effects on secondary structure and chromatin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Roque, A; Ponte, I; Suau, P

    2016-04-21

    H1 linker histones are involved both in the maintenance of chromatin higher-order structure and in gene regulation. H1 binds to linker DNA regions on the surface of the nucleosome. In higher eukaryotes, H1 contains three distinct domains: a short N-terminal domain (NTD), a central globular domain, and a long C-terminal domain (CTD). Terminal domains determine subtype specificity and to a large extent the linker DNA binding and chromatin condensing properties of histone H1. This review is focused on the recent numerous studies that have provided insights in the role of H1 terminal domains in chromatin dynamics. The N- and C-terminal domains behave as intrinsically disordered proteins with coupled binding and folding. We examine the potential kinetic advantages of intrinsic disorder in the recognition of the specific H1 binding sites in chromatin. As typical intrinsically disordered regions, H1 terminal domains are post-translationally modified. Post-translational modifications in the NTD determine the interaction of histone H1 with other proteins involved in heterochromatin formation and transcriptional regulation, while phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinases modulates the secondary structure of the CTD and chromatin condensation. We review the arguments in favor of the involvement of H1 hyperphosphorylation in metaphase chromatin condensation and of partial phosphorylation in interphase chromatin relaxation. In addition, the interplay of histone H1 and other chromatin architectural proteins, such as proteins of the high-mobility group, protamines, and MeCP2, is associated with changes in chromatin structure.

  2. Fluorescent rare earth solutions as intrinsic wavelength standards for protein fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Anderle, Heinz; Weber, Alfred

    2017-02-01

    Trivalent Gd, Tm, and Dy solutions can be used as intrinsic excitation and emission standards to validate the UV and violet-blue wavelength accuracy of a spectrofluorimeter. Europium extends the range into the red. To attain sufficient sensitivity, these luminescent rare earth ions require deuterated reagents or carbonate complexation, which allow the use of ordinary water and thus preparation in virtually any laboratory. Such solutions are particularly valuable as system suitability standards (SST) for protein fluorescence spectroscopy to detect red shifts of the intrinsic fluorescence maximum in stability and storage studies.

  3. Evolutionary volatile Cysteines and protein disorder in the fast evolving tunicate Oikopleura dioica.

    PubMed

    Berná, Luisa; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is regarded as the most conservative amino acid in nature, something that does not occur in the tunicate Oikopleura dioica, where this amino acid is one of the fastest evolving. In this work we analyze some of the causes of this intriguing absence of conservation. Considering the well-known stabilizing role of Cys, it was first investigated whether the lack of conservation was accompanied by an increase in intrinsic protein disorder. In contrast to expectations, it was found that O. dioica is the chordate that has the lowest levels of intrinsic disorder, while vertebrates (represented by Bos taurus) contain the most disordered proteins. Oikopleura proteins are shorter than their homologs in other Chordates (Ciona and B. taurus proteins are respectively 11% and 18% longer). This process of protein shortening was more intense in intrinsic disordered regions. As a result proteins became not only shorter but also more compact. It is also reported here that the conservation/divergence behavior of Cys depends on whether they are located in ordered or disordered regions. In the four species analyzed, disordered Cys are majorly (> 75%) not conserved at all. Ordered Cys instead, are much more free to diverge in Oikopleura than in the other chordates. We hypothesize that the preferential deletion of disordered regions resulted in a decreased protein disorder and a direct elimination (by deletion) of many ancestral Cys. Besides, the alterations (shortening or complete elimination) of some disordered regions (loops/random coils) probably promoted further Cys evolutionary volatility, because some ancestral Cys (and other amino acids which play a role in stability like Trp) located outside deleted regions became redundant due to the loss of their stabilizing partners.

  4. iPDA: integrated protein disorder analyzer.

    PubMed

    Su, Chung-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Yu; Hsu, Chen-Ming

    2007-07-01

    This article presents a web server iPDA, which aims at identifying the disordered regions of a query protein. Automatic prediction of disordered regions from protein sequences is an important problem in the study of structural biology. The proposed classifier DisPSSMP2 is different from several existing disorder predictors by its employment of position-specific scoring matrices with respect to physicochemical properties (PSSMP), where the physicochemical properties adopted here especially take the disorder propensity of amino acids into account. The web server iPDA integrates DisPSSMP2 with several other sequence predictors in order to investigate the functional role of the detected disordered region. The predicted information includes sequence conservation, secondary structure, sequence complexity and hydrophobic clusters. According to the proportion of the secondary structure elements predicted, iPDA dynamically adjusts the cutting threshold of determining protein disorder. Furthermore, a pattern mining package for detecting sequence conservation is embedded in iPDA for discovering potential binding regions of the query protein, which is really helpful to uncovering the relationship between protein function and its primary sequence. The web service is available at http://biominer.bime.ntu.edu.tw/ipda and mirrored at http://biominer.cse.yzu.edu.tw/ipda.

  5. iPDA: integrated protein disorder analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chung-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Yu; Hsu, Chen-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a web server iPDA, which aims at identifying the disordered regions of a query protein. Automatic prediction of disordered regions from protein sequences is an important problem in the study of structural biology. The proposed classifier DisPSSMP2 is different from several existing disorder predictors by its employment of position-specific scoring matrices with respect to physicochemical properties (PSSMP), where the physicochemical properties adopted here especially take the disorder propensity of amino acids into account. The web server iPDA integrates DisPSSMP2 with several other sequence predictors in order to investigate the functional role of the detected disordered region. The predicted information includes sequence conservation, secondary structure, sequence complexity and hydrophobic clusters. According to the proportion of the secondary structure elements predicted, iPDA dynamically adjusts the cutting threshold of determining protein disorder. Furthermore, a pattern mining package for detecting sequence conservation is embedded in iPDA for discovering potential binding regions of the query protein, which is really helpful to uncovering the relationship between protein function and its primary sequence. The web service is available at http://biominer.bime.ntu.edu.tw/ipda and mirrored at http://biominer.cse.yzu.edu.tw/ipda. PMID:17553839

  6. Crystal structure of the carbapenem intrinsic resistance protein CarG.

    PubMed

    Tichy, E M; Luisi, B F; Salmond, G P C

    2014-05-01

    In the Gram-negative enterobacterium Erwinia (Pectobacterium) and Serratia sp. ATCC 39006, intrinsic resistance to the carbapenem antibiotic 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid is mediated by the CarF and CarG proteins, by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report a high-resolution crystal structure for the Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 carbapenem resistance protein CarG. This structure of CarG is the first in the carbapenem intrinsic resistance (CIR) family of resistance proteins from carbapenem-producing bacteria. The crystal structure shows the protein to form a homodimer, in agreement with results from analytical gel filtration. The structure of CarG does not show homology with any known antibiotic resistance proteins nor does it belong to any well-characterised protein structural family. However, it is a close structural homologue of the bacterial inhibitor of invertebrate lysozyme, PliI-Ah, with some interesting structural variations, including the absence of the catalytic site responsible for lysozyme inhibition. Both proteins show a unique β-sandwich fold with short terminal α-helices. The core of the protein is formed by stacked anti-parallel sheets that are individually very similar in the two proteins but differ in their packing interface, causing the splaying of the two sheets in CarG. Furthermore, a conserved cation binding site identified in CarG is absent from the homologue.

  7. Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Ruszczynska, Katarzyna; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Paczek, Leszek

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We predicted buffering capacity of yeast proteome from protein abundance data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured total buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that proteins contribute insignificantly to buffering capacity. -- Abstract: Intracellular pH is maintained by a combination of the passive buffering of cytoplasmic dissociable compounds and several active systems. Over the years, a large portion of and possibly most of the cell's intrinsic (i.e., passive non-bicarbonate) buffering effect was attributed to proteins, both in higher organisms and in yeast. This attribution was not surprising, given that the concentration of proteins with multiple protonable/deprotonable groups in the cell exceeds the concentration of free protons by a few orders of magnitude. Using data from both high-throughput experiments and in vitro laboratory experiments, we tested this concept. We assessed the buffering capacity of the yeast proteome using protein abundance data and compared it to our own titration of yeast cytoplasm. We showed that the protein contribution is less than 1% of the total intracellular buffering capacity. As confirmed with NMR measurements, inorganic phosphates play a crucial role in the process. These findings also shed a new light on the role of proteomes in maintaining intracellular pH. The contribution of proteins to the intrinsic buffering capacity is negligible, and proteins might act only as a recipient of signals for changes in pH.

  8. Major intrinsic proteins and arsenic transport in plants: new players and their potential role.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Gerd P; Jahn, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic and highly abundant metalloid that endangers human health through drinking water and the food chain. The most common forms of As in the environment re arsenate [As(V)] and arsenite [As(III)]. As(V) is a nonfunctional phosphate analog that enters the food chain via plant phosphate transporters. Recently, evidence was provided that uptake of As(III)--the second most abundant As species in soils--is mediated by plant nodulin26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), a subfamily of plant major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Specific NIPs are also essential for the uptake of the metalloids boron and silicon and aquaglyceroporins from microbes and mammals were shown to be the major routes of As uptake. Therefore As(III) transport through MIPs is a conserved and ancient feature. In this chapter we summarize the current view on As transport in plants and address the potential physiological significance of As(III) transport through NIPs.

  9. Intrinsic disorder and multiple phosphorylations constrain the evolution of the flightin N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Lemas, Dominick; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Ballif, Bryan A; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2016-03-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding phosphoprotein that originated in the ancestor to Pancrustacea ~500 MYA. In Drosophila melanogaster, flightin is essential for length determination and flexural rigidity of thick filaments. Here, we show that among 12 Drosophila species, the N-terminal region is characterized by low sequence conservation, low pI, a cluster of phosphorylation sites, and a high propensity to intrinsic disorder (ID) that is augmented by phosphorylation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified eight phosphorylation sites within a 29 amino acid segment in the N-terminal region of D. melanogaster flightin. We show that phosphorylation of D. melanogaster flightin is modulated during flight and, through a comparative analysis to orthologs from other Drosophila species, we found phosphorylation sites that remain invariant, sites that retain the charge character, and sites that are clade-specific. While the number of predicted phosphorylation sites differs across species, we uncovered a conserved pattern that relates the number of phosphorylation sites to pI and ID. Extending the analysis to orthologs of other insects, we found additional conserved features in flightin despite the near absence of sequence identity. Collectively, our results demonstrate that structural constraints demarcate the evolution of the highly variable N-terminal region.

  10. Intrinsic disorder as a generalizable strategy for the rational design of highly responsive, allosterically cooperative receptors.

    PubMed

    Simon, Anna J; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Ricci, Francesco; Plaxco, Kevin W

    2014-10-21

    Control over the sensitivity with which biomolecular receptors respond to small changes in the concentration of their target ligand is critical for the proper function of many cellular processes. Such control could likewise be of utility in artificial biotechnologies, such as biosensors, genetic logic gates, and "smart" materials, in which highly responsive behavior is of value. In nature, the control of molecular responsiveness is often achieved using "Hill-type" cooperativity, a mechanism in which sequential binding events on a multivalent receptor are coupled such that the first enhances the affinity of the next, producing a steep, higher-order dependence on target concentration. Here, we use an intrinsic-disorder-based mechanism that can be implemented without requiring detailed structural knowledge to rationally introduce this potentially useful property into several normally noncooperative biomolecules. To do so, we fabricate a tandem repeat of the receptor that is destabilized (unfolded) via the introduction of a long, unstructured loop. The first binding event requires the energetically unfavorable closing of this loop, reducing its affinity relative to that of the second binding event, which, in contrast occurs at a preformed site. Using this approach, we have rationally introduced cooperativity into three unrelated DNA aptamers, achieving in the best of these a Hill coefficient experimentally indistinguishable from the theoretically expected maximum. The extent of cooperativity and thus the steepness of the binding transition are, moreover, well modeled as simple functions of the energetic cost of binding-induced folding, speaking to the quantitative nature of this design strategy.

  11. Trehalose induces functionally active conformation in the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain of glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shagufta H; Jasuja, Ravi; Kumar, Raj

    2016-08-05

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a classic member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and plays pivotal roles in human physiology at the level of gene regulation. Various constellations of cellular cofactors are required to associate with GR to activate/repress genes. The effects of specific ligands on the AF2 structure and consequent preferential binding of co-activators or co-repressors have helped our understanding of the mechanisms involved. But the data so far fall short of fully explaining GR actions. We believe that this is because work so far has largely avoided detailed examination of the contributions of AF1 to overall GR actions. It has been shown that the GR containing only the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the DNA-binding domain (GR500) is constitutively quite active in stimulating transcription from simple promoters. However, we are only beginning to understand structure and functions of GR500 in spite of the fact that AF1 located within the NTD serves as major transactivation domain for GR. Lack of this information has hampered our complete understanding of how GR regulates its target gene(s). The major obstacle in determining GR500 structure has been due to its intrinsically disordered NTD conformation, frequently found in transcription factors. In this study, we tested whether a naturally occurring osmolyte, trehalose, can promote functionally ordered conformation in GR500. Our data show that in the presence of trehalose, GR500 is capable of formation of a native-like functionally folded conformation.

  12. Coupled folding and binding kinetics in the intrinsically disordered peptide IA3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ranjani; Ganesh, Omjoy; Edison, Arthur; Hagen, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    IA3 is an intrinsically disordered 68 residue peptide and is an endogenous inhibitor of yeast proteinase A (YPrA). X-ray crystallography of the IA3.YPrA complex [Li et al, Nat. Struct. Biol. (7), 113-117 (2000)] indicates that the N-terminus of IA3 adopts an alpha-helical fold when it is bound to the YPrA active site. We have used equilibrium circular dichroism and multi-wavelength, nanosecond time-resolved laser temperature-jump spectroscopy to study the coupled folding and binding interaction of IA3 with YPrA. Our initial measurements of the rate of helix formation in free IA3 indicate mono-exponential folding kinetics that extrapolate to kF˜ 10^5/s at room temperature in aqueous solutions. By comparing this rate to the kinetics we observe for IA3 interacting with YPrA, we can assess possible mechanisms for the coupled folding and binding of IA3.

  13. Affinity purification of human m-calpain through an intrinsically disordered inhibitor, calpastatin

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hung Huy; Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Calpains are calcium-activated proteases that have biomedical and biotechnological potential. Their activity is tightly regulated by their endogenous inhibitor, calpastatin that binds to the enzyme only in the presence of calcium. Conventional approaches to purify calpain comprise multiple chromatographic steps, and are labor-intensive, leading to low yields. Here we report a new purification procedure for the human m-calpain based on its reversible calcium-mediated interaction with the intrinsically disordered calpastatin. We exploit the specific binding properties of human calpastatin domain 1 (hCSD1) to physically capture human m-calpain from a complex biological mixture. The dissociation of the complex is mediated by chelating calcium, upon which heterodimeric calpain elutes while hCSD1 remains immobilized onto the stationary phase. This novel affinity-based purification was compared to the conventional multistep purification strategy and we find that it is robust, it yields a homogeneous preparation, it can be scaled up easily and it rests on a non-disruptive step that maintains close to physiological conditions that allow further biophysical and functional studies. PMID:28319173

  14. Intrinsic disorder and multiple phosphorylations constrain the evolution of the flightin N-terminal region

    PubMed Central

    Lemas, Dominick; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Ballif, Bryan A.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2015-01-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding phosphoprotein that originated in the ancestor to Pancrustacea ~500 MYA. In Drosophila melanogaster, flightin is essential for length determination and flexural rigidity of thick filaments. Here, we show that among 12 Drosophila species, the N-terminal region is characterized by low sequence conservation, low pI, a cluster of phosphorylation sites, and a high propensity to intrinsic disorder (ID) that is augmented by phosphorylation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified eight phosphorylation sites within a 29 amino acid segment in the N-terminal region of D. melanogaster flightin. We show that phosphorylation of D. melanogaster flightin is modulated during flight and, through a comparative analysis to orthologs from other Drosophila species, we found phosphorylation sites that remain invariant, sites that retain the charge character, and sites that are clade-specific. While the number of predicted phosphorylation sites differs across species, we uncovered a conserved pattern that relates the number of phosphorylation sites to pI and ID. Extending the analysis to orthologs of other insects, we found additional conserved features in flightin despite the near absence of sequence identity. Collectively, our results demonstrate that structural constraints demarcate the evolution of the highly variable N-terminal region. PMID:26691840

  15. Intrinsic temperature sensitivity of influenza C virus hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Takashita, Emi; Muraki, Yasushi; Sugawara, Kanetsu; Asao, Hironobu; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Koji; Tsuji, Takashi; Hongo, Seiji; Ohara, Yoshiro; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Ozawa, Makoto; Matsuzaki, Yoko

    2012-12-01

    Influenza C virus replicates more efficiently at 33°C than at 37°C. To determine whether hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion protein (HEF), a surface glycoprotein of influenza C virus, is a restricting factor for this temperature sensitivity, we analyzed the biological and biochemical properties of HEF at 33°C and 37°C. We found that HEF exhibits intrinsic temperature sensitivities for surface expression and fusion activity.

  16. Intrinsic Kinetics Fluctuations as Cause of Growth Inhomogeneity in Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1998-01-01

    Intrinsic kinetics instabilities in the form of growth step bunching during the crystallization of the protein lysozyme from solution were characterized by in situ high-resolution optical interferometry. Compositional variations (striations) in the crystal, which potentially decrease its utility, e.g., for molecular structure studies by diffraction methods, were visualized by polarized light reflection microscopy. A spatiotemporal correlation was established between the sequence of moving step bunches and the striations.

  17. Rapid Brownian Motion Primes Ultrafast Reconstruction of Intrinsically Disordered Phe-Gly Repeats Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Moussavi-Baygi, R.; Mofrad, M. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins, such as Phe-Gly repeat domains, alters drastically when they are confined in, and tethered to, nan channels. This has challenged our understanding of how they serve to selectively facilitate translocation of nuclear transport receptor (NTR)-bearing macromolecules. Heterogeneous FG-repeats, tethered to the NPC interior, nonuniformly fill the channel in a diameter-dependent manner and adopt a rapid Brownian motion, thereby forming a porous and highly dynamic polymeric meshwork that percolates in radial and axial directions and features two distinguishable zones: a dense hydrophobic rod-like zone located in the center, and a peripheral low-density shell-like zone. The FG-meshwork is locally disrupted upon interacting with NTR-bearing macromolecules, but immediately reconstructs itself between 0.44 μs and 7.0 μs, depending on cargo size and shape. This confers a perpetually-sealed state to the NPC, and is solely due to rapid Brownian motion of FG-repeats, not FG-repeat hydrophobic bonds. Elongated-shaped macromolecules, both in the presence and absence of NTRs, penetrate more readily into the FG-meshwork compared to their globular counterparts of identical volume and surface chemistry, highlighting the importance of the shape effects in nucleocytoplasmic transport. These results can help our understanding of geometrical effects in, and the design of, intelligent and responsive biopolymer-based materials in nanofiltration and artificial nanopores. PMID:27470900

  18. Effects of Linker Length and Transient Secondary Structure Elements in the Intrinsically Disordered Notch RAM Region on Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Kathryn P; Johnson, Scott E; Hatem, Christine L; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2015-11-06

    Formation of the bivalent interaction between the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and the transcription factor CBF-1/RBP-j, Su(H), Lag-1 (CSL) is a key event in Notch signaling because it switches Notch-responsive genes from a repressed state to an activated state. Interaction of the intrinsically disordered RBP-j-associated molecule (RAM) region of NICD with CSL is thought to both disrupt binding of corepressor proteins to CSL and anchor NICD to CSL, promoting interaction of the ankyrin domain of NICD with CSL through an effective concentration mechanism. To quantify the role of disorder in the RAM linker region on the effective concentration enhancement of Notch transcriptional activation, we measured the effects of linker length variation on activation. The resulting activation profile has general features of a worm-like chain model for effective concentration. However, deviations from the model for short sequence deletions suggest that RAM contains sequence-specific structural elements that may be important for activation. Structural characterization of the RAM linker with sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and NMR spectroscopy reveals that the linker is compact and contains three transient helices and two extended and dynamic regions. To test if these secondary structure elements are important for activation, we made sequence substitutions to change the secondary structure propensities of these elements and measured transcriptional activation of the resulting variants. Substitutions to two of these nonrandom elements (helix 2, extended region 1) have effects on activation, but these effects do not depend on the nature of the substituting residues. Thus, the primary sequences of these elements, but not their secondary structures, are influencing signaling.

  19. Discrete Molecular Dynamics Approach to the Study of Disordered and Aggregating Proteins.

    PubMed

    Emperador, Agustí; Orozco, Modesto

    2017-03-14

    We present a refinement of the Coarse Grained PACSAB force field for Discrete Molecular Dynamics (DMD) simulations of proteins in aqueous conditions. As the original version, the refined method provides good representation of the structure and dynamics of folded proteins but provides much better representations of a variety of unfolded proteins, including some very large, impossible to analyze by atomistic simulation methods. The PACSAB/DMD method also reproduces accurately aggregation properties, providing good pictures of the structural ensembles of proteins showing a folded core and an intrinsically disordered region. The combination of accuracy and speed makes the method presented here a good alternative for the exploration of unstructured protein systems.

  20. Soy protein reduces serum cholesterol by both intrinsic and food displacement mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David J A; Mirrahimi, Arash; Srichaikul, Korbua; Berryman, Claire E; Wang, Li; Carleton, Amanda; Abdulnour, Shahad; Sievenpiper, John L; Kendall, Cyril W C; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2010-12-01

    The apparently smaller LDL cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering effect of soy in recent studies has prompted the U.S. FDA to reexamine the heart health claim previously allowed for soy products. We therefore attempted to estimate the intrinsic and extrinsic (displacement) potential of soy in reducing LDL-C to determine whether the heart health claim for soy continues to be justified. The intrinsic effect of soy was derived from a meta-analysis using soy studies (20-133 g/d soy protein) included in the recent AHA Soy Advisory. The extrinsic effect of soy in displacing foods higher in saturated fat and cholesterol was estimated using predictive equations for LDL-C and NHANES III population survey data with the substitution of 13-58 g/d soy protein for animal protein foods. The meta-analysis of the AHA Soy Advisory data gave a mean LDL-C reduction of 0.17 mmol/L (n = 22; P < 0.0001) or 4.3% for soy, which was confirmed in 11 studies reporting balanced macronutrient profiles. The estimated displacement value of soy (13-58 g/d) using NHANES III population survey data was a 3.6-6.0% reduction in LDL-C due to displacement of saturated fats and cholesterol from animal foods. The LDL-C reduction attributable to the combined intrinsic and extrinsic effects of soy protein foods ranged from 7.9 to 10.3%. Thus, soy remains one of a few food components that reduces serum cholesterol (>4%) when added to the diet.

  1. A novel intrinsically disordered outer membrane lipoprotein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds various cytokines and plays a role in biofilm response to interleukin-1β and interleukin-8

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Tuominen, Heidi; Beklen, Arzu; Torittu, Annamari; Oscarsson, Jan; Sormunen, Raija; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Permi, Perttu; Ihalin, Riikka

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not have a well-defined and stable 3-dimensional fold. Some IDPs can function as either transient or permanent binders of other proteins and may interact with an array of ligands by adopting different conformations. A novel outer membrane lipoprotein, bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI) of the opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds a key gatekeeper proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. Because the amino acid sequence of the novel lipoprotein resembles that of fibrinogen binder A of Haemophilus ducreyi, BilRI could have the potential to bind other proteins, such as host matrix proteins. However, from the tested host matrix proteins, BilRI interacted with neither collagen nor fibrinogen. Instead, the recombinant non-lipidated BilRI, which was intrinsically disordered, bound various pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10. Moreover, BilRI played a role in the in vitro sensing of IL-1β and IL-8 because low concentrations of cytokines did not decrease the amount of extracellular DNA in the matrix of bilRI− mutant biofilm as they did in the matrix of wild-type biofilm when the biofilms were exposed to recombinant cytokines for 22 hours. BilRI played a role in the internalization of IL-1β in the gingival model system but did not affect either IL-8 or IL-6 uptake. However, bilRI deletion did not entirely prevent IL-1β internalization, and the binding of cytokines to BilRI was relatively weak. Thus, BilRI might sequester cytokines on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans to facilitate the internalization process in low local cytokine concentrations. PMID:27459270

  2. A novel intrinsically disordered outer membrane lipoprotein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds various cytokines and plays a role in biofilm response to interleukin-1β and interleukin-8.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Tuominen, Heidi; Beklen, Arzu; Torittu, Annamari; Oscarsson, Jan; Sormunen, Raija; Pöllänen, Marja T; Permi, Perttu; Ihalin, Riikka

    2017-02-17

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not have a well-defined and stable 3-dimensional fold. Some IDPs can function as either transient or permanent binders of other proteins and may interact with an array of ligands by adopting different conformations. A novel outer membrane lipoprotein, bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI) of the opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds a key gatekeeper proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. Because the amino acid sequence of the novel lipoprotein resembles that of fibrinogen binder A of Haemophilus ducreyi, BilRI could have the potential to bind other proteins, such as host matrix proteins. However, from the tested host matrix proteins, BilRI interacted with neither collagen nor fibrinogen. Instead, the recombinant non-lipidated BilRI, which was intrinsically disordered, bound various pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10. Moreover, BilRI played a role in the in vitro sensing of IL-1β and IL-8 because low concentrations of cytokines did not decrease the amount of extracellular DNA in the matrix of bilRI(-) mutant biofilm as they did in the matrix of wild-type biofilm when the biofilms were exposed to recombinant cytokines for 22 hours. BilRI played a role in the internalization of IL-1β in the gingival model system but did not affect either IL-8 or IL-6 uptake. However, bilRI deletion did not entirely prevent IL-1β internalization, and the binding of cytokines to BilRI was relatively weak. Thus, BilRI might sequester cytokines on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans to facilitate the internalization process in low local cytokine concentrations.

  3. ICA 512, an autoantigen of type I diabetes, is an intrinsic membrane protein of neurosecretory granules.

    PubMed Central

    Solimena, M; Dirkx, R; Hermel, J M; Pleasic-Williams, S; Shapiro, J A; Caron, L; Rabin, D U

    1996-01-01

    Islet cell autoantigen (ICA) 512 is a novel autoantigen of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) which is homologous to receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases (++PTPases). We show that ICA 512 is an intrinsic membrane protein of secretory granules expressed in insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells as well as in virtually all other peptide-secreting endocrine cells and neurons containing neurosecretory granules. ICA 512 is cleaved at its luminal domain and, following exposure at the cell surface, recycles to the Golgi complex region and is sorted into newly formed secretory granules. By immunoprecipitation, anti-ICA 512 autoantibodies were detected in 15/17 (88%) newly diagnosed IDDM patients, but not in 10/10 healthy subjects. These results suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation participates in some aspect of secretory granule function common to all neuroendocrine cells and that a subset of autoantibodies in IDDM is directed against an integral membrane protein of insulin-containing granules. Images PMID:8641276

  4. An experimental study of GFP-based FRET, with application to intrinsically unstructured proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoo; Galiacy, Stephane D.; Briscoe, Gina; Erickson, Harold P.

    2007-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules by inserting folded or intrinsically unstructured proteins between CyPet and Ypet. We discovered that most of the enhanced FRET signal previously reported for this pair was due to enhanced dimerization, so we engineered a monomerizing mutation into each. An insert containing a single fibronectin type III domain (3.7 nm end-to-end) gave a moderate FRET signal while a two-domain insert (7.0 nm) gave no FRET. We then tested unstructured proteins of various lengths, including the charged-plus-PQ domain of ZipA, the tail domain of α-adducin, and the C-terminal tail domain of FtsZ. The structures of these FRET constructs were also studied by electron microscopy and sedimentation. A 12 amino acid linker and the N-terminal 33 amino acids of the charged domain of the ZipA gave strong FRET signals. The C-terminal 33 amino acids of the PQ domain of the ZipA and several unstructured proteins with 66–68 amino acids gave moderate FRET signals. The 150 amino acid charged-plus-PQ construct gave a barely detectable FRET signal. FRET efficiency was calculated from the decreased donor emission to estimate the distance between donor and acceptor. The donor–acceptor distance varied for unstructured inserts of the same length, suggesting that they had variable stiffness (persistence length). We conclude that GFP-based FRET can be useful for studying intrinsically unstructured proteins, and we present a range of calibrated protein inserts to experimentally determine the distances that can be studied. PMID:17586775

  5. Nucleosome and DNA-protein condensed structures in solution from flow birefringence and intrinsic viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    Highly sensitive streaming birefringence measurements combined with intrinsic viscosity are used to characterize the shape anisometry and optical anisotropy of nucleosomes over a range of salt concentration > 30 mM KCl and of structures obtained by the condensation of high molecular weight DNA with polylysine. These measurements appear useful for several reasons. Both streaming birefringence and intrinsic viscosity are hydrodynamic properties based upon the rotational diffusion of macromolecular particles and hence are inherently more sensitive to details of particle anisometry than are hydrodynamic properties based upon translational diffusion. An established body of both hydrodynamic and continuum dielectric optical theory is available with which to interpret streaming birefringence results. Extinction angles (i.e., mean orientation angles of particles in a velocity gradient) are entirely hydrodynamic properties, and hence can be interpreted through the rotational coefficient to characterize particle anisometry and to estimate absolute dimensions. The ratio of Maxwell coefficient to intrinsic viscosity is proportional to the absolute particle anisotropy. The high optical anisotropy of DNA relative to that of associated protein permits certain details of tertiary structure and shape anisometry to be estimated from the observed optical anisotropy compared to optical models involving the DNA alone. The method is essentially independent of solvent.

  6. The structural basis for the intrinsic disorder of the actin filament: the "lateral slipping" model

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    contributes to the outer part of the massive base. Quantitative evaluation of successive crossover spacings along individual F-actin filaments revealed the deviations from the mean repeat to be compensatory, i.e., short crossovers frequently followed long ones and vice versa. The variable crossover spacings and diameter of the F-actin filament together with the local unraveling of the two long-pitch helical strands are explained in terms of varying amounts of compensatory "lateral slipping" of the two strands past each other roughly perpendicular to the filament axis. This intrinsic disorder of the actin filament may enable the actin moiety to play a more active role in actin-myosin-based force generation than merely act as a rigid passive cable as has hitherto been assumed. PMID:1918159

  7. Metabolism in rats of selenium from intrinsically and extrinsically labeled isolated soy protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, A.C.; Weaver, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    Absorption, retention and tissue accumulation by rats of /sup 75/Se from intrinsically labeled isolated soy protein were compared with utilization of /sup 75/Se from the extrinsic sources of (/sup 75/Se)selenite, (/sup 75/Se)selenate or (/sup 75/Se)selenomethionine. Extrinsic sources of selenium were given by gavage or mixed with isolated soy protein. There were no differences in absorption and retention of /sup 75/Se from intrinsically labeled soy diet compared to the three extrinsically labeled soy diets. Of the three extrinsic sources tested, /sup 75/Se from selenate was better absorbed than from selenite or selenomethionine when incorporated into a soy diet. Absorption of /sup 75/Se was significantly lower when given to animals in gavage solution than when mixed with soy diets. After a 14-d test period, retention of /sup 75/Se was the same for all four soy diet groups. In gavaged groups, /sup 75/Se from selenomethionine was retained to a greater extent than /sup 75/Se from selenite. The liver, testes and kidney accumulated more /sup 75/Se from the test meal than did the blood and lungs. In the testes more /sup 75/Se from selenite and selenate was accumulated than from selenomethionine-labeled diets. Selenium absorption from the soy isolate source was very high (86-96%), indicating that, although soy does not normally contain high levels of selenium, the selenium present is well absorbed from this plant source.

  8. Parallel Detection of Intrinsic Fluorescence from Peptides and Proteins for Quantification During Mass Spectrometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jason D.; Hilger, Ryan T.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Tervo, Mark A.; Scalf, Mark; Shortreed, Michael R.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2011-01-01

    Direct mass spectrometric quantification of peptides and proteins is compromised by the wide variabilities in ionization efficiency which are hallmarks of both the MALDI and ESI ionization techniques. We describe here the implementation of a fluorescence detection system for measurement of the UV-excited intrinsic fluorescence (UV-IF) from peptides and proteins just prior to their exit and electrospray ionization from an ESI capillary. The fluorescence signal provides a quantifiable measure of the amount of the protein or peptide present, while direct or tandem mass spectrometric analysis (MS/MS) on the ESI-generated ions provides information on identity. We fabricated an inexpensive, modular, fluorescence excitation and detection device utilizing an ultraviolet light-emitting diode for excitation in a ~300 nL fluorescence detection cell integrated into the fused-silica separation column. The fluorescence signal was linear over 3 orders of magnitude with on-column limits of detection in the low femtomole range. Chromatographically separated intact proteins analyzed using UV-IF prior to top-down mass spectrometry demonstrated sensitive detection of proteins as large as 77 kDa. PMID:21314137

  9. Topology and phosphorylation of soybean nodulin-26, an intrinsic protein of the peribacteroid membrane

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Soybean nodulin-26, a homologue of bovine eye lens major intrinsic protein (MIP-26), is an integral protein of the peribacteroid membrane in symbiotic root nodules. It comprises 271 amino acids with six potential transmembrane domains and lacks an amino-terminal signal sequence. A full-length nodulin-26 cDNA and its various deletion derivatives were transcribed in vitro after linking them to bacteriophage T3 promoter. In vitro translation of these transcripts in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate, in the presence or absence of canine pancreatic microsomal membranes, suggested that nodulin-26 is cotranslationally inserted into the microsomes without a cleavable signal peptide. The first two transmembrane domains (103 amino acids) of the protein are sufficient for microsomal membrane insertion. Membrane-translocated nodulin-26 binds to Con-A and is sensitive to endoglycosidase-H treatment, suggesting that it is glycosylated. Native nodulin-26 from root nodules retains its sugar moiety as it, too, binds to Con-A. Chemical cleavage mapping at cysteine residues, a trypsin protection assay, and the Con-A binding affinity of nodulin-26 suggested that both the NH2 and COOH termini of this protein are on the cytoplasmic surface of the peribacteroid membrane, while the glycosidic residue is on the surface of the membrane facing the bacteroids. In vitro phosphorylation experiments showed that nodulin-26 is a major phosphorylated protein in the peribacteroid membrane. This phosphorylation is mediated by a Ca(2+)-dependent, calmodulin- independent protein kinase located in the peribacteriod membrane. Externally supplied acid phosphatase dephosphorylates this protein, but alkaline phosphatase does not. Based on its homology with several eukaryotic and prokaryotic channel-type membrane proteins, nodulin-26 may form a channel translocating specific molecules to the bacteroids during endosymbiosis in legume plants. PMID:1629242

  10. Characterising intra- and inter-intrinsic network synchrony in combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Dunkley, Benjamin T; Doesburg, Sam M; Jetly, Rakesh; Sedge, Paul A; Pang, Elizabeth W; Taylor, Margot J

    2015-11-30

    Soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit elevated gamma-band synchrony in left fronto-temporal cortex, and connectivity measures in these regions correlate with comorbidities and PTSD severity, which suggests increased gamma synchrony is related to symptomology. However, little is known about the role of intrinsic, phase-synchronised networks in the disorder. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we characterised spectral connectivity in the default-mode, salience, visual, and attention networks during resting-state in a PTSD population and a trauma-exposed control group. Intrinsic network connectivity was examined in canonical frequency bands. We observed increased inter-network synchronisation in the PTSD group compared with controls in the gamma (30-80 Hz) and high-gamma range (80-150 Hz). Analyses of connectivity and symptomology revealed that PTSD severity was positively associated with beta synchrony in the ventral-attention-to-salience networks, and gamma synchrony within the salience network, but also negatively correlated with beta synchrony within the visual network. These novel results show that frequency-specific, network-level atypicalities may reflect trauma-related alterations of ongoing functional connectivity, and correlations of beta synchrony in attentional-to-salience and visual networks with PTSD severity suggest complicated network interactions mediate symptoms. These results contribute to accumulating evidence that PTSD is a complicated network-based disorder expressed as altered neural interactions.

  11. A comprehensive overview of computational protein disorder prediction methods†

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Eickholt, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a growing acknowledgement that a large proportion of proteins within most proteomes contain disordered regions. Disordered regions are segments of the protein chain which do not adopt a stable structure. Recognition of disordered regions in a protein is of great importance for protein structure prediction, protein structure determination and function annotation as these regions have a close relationship with protein expression and functionality. As a result, a great many protein disorder prediction methods have been developed so far. Here, we present an overview of current protein disorder prediction methods including an analysis of their advantages and shortcomings. In order to help users to select alternative tools under different circumstances, we also evaluate 23 disorder predictors on the benchmark data of the most recent round of the Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and assess their accuracy using several complementary measures. PMID:21874190

  12. Role of FET proteins in neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Svetoni, Francesca; Frisone, Paola; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and multiple sclerosis (MS) affect different neuronal cells, and have a variable age of onset, clinical symptoms, and pathological features. Despite the great progress in understanding the etiology of these disorders, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Among the processes affected in neurodegenerative diseases, alteration in RNA metabolism is emerging as a crucial player. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are involved at all stages of RNA metabolism and display a broad range of functions, including modulation of mRNA transcription, splicing, editing, export, stability, translation and localization and miRNA biogenesis, thus enormously impacting regulation of gene expression. On the other hand, aberrant regulation of RBP expression or activity can contribute to disease onset and progression. Recent reports identified mutations causative of neurological disorders in the genes encoding a family of RBPs named FET (FUS/TLS, EWS and TAF15). This review summarizes recent works documenting the involvement of FET proteins in the pathology of ALS, FTLD, essential tremor (ET) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, clinical implications of recent advances in FET research are critically discussed. PMID:27415968

  13. Understanding the structural ensembles of a highly extended disordered protein.

    PubMed

    Daughdrill, Gary W; Kashtanov, Stepan; Stancik, Amber; Hill, Shannon E; Helms, Gregory; Muschol, Martin; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2012-01-01

    Developing a comprehensive description of the equilibrium structural ensembles for intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is essential to understanding their function. The p53 transactivation domain (p53TAD) is an IDP that interacts with multiple protein partners and contains numerous phosphorylation sites. Multiple techniques were used to investigate the equilibrium structural ensemble of p53TAD in its native and chemically unfolded states. The results from these experiments show that the native state of p53TAD has dimensions similar to a classical random coil while the chemically unfolded state is more extended. To investigate the molecular properties responsible for this behavior, a novel algorithm that generates diverse and unbiased structural ensembles of IDPs was developed. This algorithm was used to generate a large pool of plausible p53TAD structures that were reweighted to identify a subset of structures with the best fit to small angle X-ray scattering data. High weight structures in the native state ensemble show features that are localized to protein binding sites and regions with high proline content. The features localized to the protein binding sites are mostly eliminated in the chemically unfolded ensemble; while, the regions with high proline content remain relatively unaffected. Data from NMR experiments support these results, showing that residues from the protein binding sites experience larger environmental changes upon unfolding by urea than regions with high proline content. This behavior is consistent with the urea-induced exposure of nonpolar and aromatic side-chains in the protein binding sites that are partially excluded from solvent in the native state ensemble.

  14. Metalloido-porins: Essentiality of Nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins in metalloid transport.

    PubMed

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Diehn, Till Arvid; Bienert, Gerd Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Metalloids are a group of physiologically important elements ranging from the essential to the highly toxic. Arsenic, antimony, germanium, and tellurium are highly toxic to plants themselves and to consumers of metalloid-contaminated plants. Boron, silicon, and selenium fulfill essential or beneficial functions in plants. However, when present at high concentrations, boron and selenium cause toxicity symptoms that are detrimental to plant fitness and yield. Consequently, all plants require efficient membrane transport systems to control the uptake and extrusion of metalloids into or out of the plant and their distribution within the plant body. Several Nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs) that belong to the aquaporin plant water channel protein family facilitate the diffusion of uncharged metalloid species. Genetic, physiological, and molecular evidence is that NIPs from primitive to higher plants not only transport all environmentally important metalloids, but that these proteins have a major role in the uptake, translocation, and extrusion of metalloids in plants. As most of the metalloid-permeable NIP aquaporins are impermeable or are poorly permeable to water, these NIP channel proteins should be considered as physiologically essential metalloido-porins.

  15. Influence of the membrane potential on the free energy of an intrinsic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, B

    1997-01-01

    A modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation is developed from statistical mechanical considerations to describe the influence of the transmembrane potential on macromolecular systems. Using a Green's function formalism, the electrostatic free energy of a protein associated with the membrane is expressed as the sum of three terms: a contribution from the energy required to charge the system's capacitance, a contribution corresponding to the interaction of the protein charges with the membrane potential, and a contribution corresponding to a voltage-independent reaction field free energy. The membrane potential, which is due to the polarization interface, is calculated in the absence of the protein charges, whereas the reaction field is calculated in the absence of transmembrane potential. Variations in the capacitive energy associated with typical molecular processes are negligible under physiological conditions. The formulation of the theory is closely related to standard algorithms used to solve the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and only small modifications to current source codes are required for its implementation. The theory is illustrated by examining the voltage-dependent membrane insertion of a simple polyalanine alpha-helix and by computing the electrostatic potential across a 60-A-diameter sphere meant to represent a large intrinsic protein. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9414213

  16. Discrete Molecular Dynamics Can Predict Helical Prestructured Motifs in Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyou-Hoon; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Tompa, Péter; Kalmár, Lajos; Hegedűs, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack a stable tertiary structure, but their short binding regions termed Pre-Structured Motifs (PreSMo) can form transient secondary structure elements in solution. Although disordered proteins are crucial in many biological processes and designing strategies to modulate their function is highly important, both experimental and computational tools to describe their conformational ensembles and the initial steps of folding are sparse. Here we report that discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) simulations combined with replica exchange (RX) method efficiently samples the conformational space and detects regions populating α-helical conformational states in disordered protein regions. While the available computational methods predict secondary structural propensities in IDPs based on the observation of protein-protein interactions, our ab initio method rests on physical principles of protein folding and dynamics. We show that RX-DMD predicts α-PreSMos with high confidence confirmed by comparison to experimental NMR data. Moreover, the method also can dissect α-PreSMos in close vicinity to each other and indicate helix stability. Importantly, simulations with disordered regions forming helices in X-ray structures of complexes indicate that a preformed helix is frequently the binding element itself, while in other cases it may have a role in initiating the binding process. Our results indicate that RX-DMD provides a breakthrough in the structural and dynamical characterization of disordered proteins by generating the structural ensembles of IDPs even when experimental data are not available. PMID:24763499

  17. Intrinsic Functional Connectivity of Amygdala-Based Networks in Adolescent Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Amy K.; Fudge, Julie L.; Kelly, Clare; Perry, Justin S. A.; Daniele, Teresa; Carlisi, Christina; Benson, Brenda; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Milham, Michael P.; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) typically begins during adolescence and can persist into adulthood. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disorder remain unclear. Recent evidence from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) studies in adults suggests disruptions in amygdala-based circuitry; the…

  18. Ordered Self-Assembly Mechanism of a Spherical Oncoprotein Oligomer Triggered by Zinc Removal and Stabilized by an Intrinsically Disordered Domain

    PubMed Central

    Smal, Clara; Alonso, Leonardo G.; Wetzler, Diana E.; Heer, Angeles; de Prat Gay, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-assembly is a common theme in proteins of unrelated sequences or functions. The human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein is an extended dimer with an intrinsically disordered domain, that can form large spherical oligomers. These are the major species in the cytosol of HPV transformed and cancerous cells. E7 binds to a large number of targets, some of which lead to cell transformation. Thus, the assembly process not only is of biological relevance, but represents a model system to investigate a widely distributed mechanism. Methodology/Principal Findings Using various techniques, we monitored changes in secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure in a time course manner. By applying a robust kinetic model developed by Zlotnik, we determined the slow formation of a monomeric “Z-nucleus” after zinc removal, followed by an elongation phase consisting of sequential second-order events whereby one monomer is added at a time. This elongation process takes place at a strikingly slow overall average rate of one monomer added every 28 seconds at 20 µM protein concentration, strongly suggesting either a rearrangement of the growing complex after binding of each monomer or the existence of a “conformation editing” mechanism through which the monomer binds and releases until the appropriate conformation is adopted. The oligomerization determinant lies within its small 5 kDa C-terminal globular domain and, remarkably, the E7 N-terminal intrinsically disordered domain stabilizes the oligomer, preventing an insoluble amyloid route. Conclusion We described a controlled ordered mechanism with features in common with soluble amyloid precursors, chaperones, and other spherical oligomers, thus sharing determining factors for symmetry, size and shape. In addition, such a controlled and discrete polymerization reaction provides a valuable tool for nanotechnological applications. Finally, its increased immunogenicity related to its supramolecular structure is the

  19. Deletion of a C-terminal intrinsically disordered region of WRINKLED1 affects its stability and enhances oil accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Kong, Que; Grix, Michael; Mantyla, Jenny J; Yang, Yang; Benning, Christoph; Ohlrogge, John B

    2015-09-01

    WRINKLED1 (WRI1) is a key transcription factor governing plant oil biosynthesis. We characterized three intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) in Arabidopsis WRI1, and found that one C-terminal IDR of AtWRI1 (IDR3) affects the stability of AtWRI1. Analysis by bimolecular fluorescence complementation and yeast-two-hybrid assays indicated that the IDR3 domain does not determine WRI1 stability by interacting with BTB/POZ-MATH proteins connecting AtWRI1 with CULLIN3-based E3 ligases. Analysis of the WRI1 sequence revealed that a putative PEST motif (proteolytic signal) is located at the C-terminal region of AtWRI1(IDR) (3). We also show that a 91 amino acid domain at the C-terminus of AtWRI1 without the PEST motif is sufficient for transactivation. We found that removal of the PEST motif or mutations in putative phosphorylation sites increased the stability of AtWRI1, and led to increased oil biosynthesis when these constructs were transiently expressed in tobacco leaves. Oil content was also increased in the seeds of stable transgenic wri1-1 plants expressing AtWRI1 with mutations in the IDR3-PEST motif. Taken together, our data suggest that intrinsic disorder of AtWRI1(IDR3) may facilitate exposure of the PEST motif to protein kinases. Thus, phosphorylation of the PEST motif in the AtWRI1(IDR) (3) domain may affect AtWRI1-mediated plant oil biosynthesis. The results obtained here suggest a means to increase accumulation of oils in plant tissues through WRI1 engineering.

  20. Two-state protein model with water interactions: Influence of temperature on the intrinsic viscosity of myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Bakk, Audun

    2001-06-01

    We describe a single-domain protein as a two-state system with water interactions. Around the unfolded apolar parts of the protein we incorporate the hydration effect by introducing hydrogen bonds between the water molecules in order to mimic the {open_quotes}icelike{close_quotes} shell structure. Intrinsic viscosity, proportional to the effective hydrodynamic volume, for sperm whale metmyoglobin is assigned from experimental data in the folded and in the denaturated state. By weighing statistically the two states against the degree of folding, we express the total intrinsic viscosity. The temperature dependence of the intrinsic viscosity, for different chemical potentials, is in good correspondence with experimental data [P. L. Privalov , J. Mol. Biol. >190, 487 (1986)]. Cold and warm unfolding, common to small globular proteins, is also a result of the model.

  1. Expression of calcium-buffering proteins in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Renato; Marques, Maria Julia; Khurana, Tejvir S; Santo Neto, Humberto

    2015-06-01

    Intrinsic laryngeal muscles (ILM) are highly specialized muscles involved in phonation and airway protection, with unique properties that allow them to perform extremely rapid contractions and to escape from damage in muscle dystrophy. Due to that, they may differ from limb muscles in several physiological aspects. Because a better ability to handle intracellular calcium has been suggested to explain ILM unique properties, we hypothesized that the profile of the proteins that regulate calcium levels in ILM is different from that in a limb muscle. Calcium-related proteins were analyzed in the ILM, cricothyroid (CT), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from male Sprague-Dawley rats (8 weeks of age) using quantitative PCR and western blotting. Higher expression of key Ca(2+) regulatory proteins was detected in ILM compared to TA, such as the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-reuptake proteins (Sercas 1 and 2), the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, phospholamban, and the Ca(2+)-binding protein calsequestrin. Parvalbumin, calmodulin and the ATPase, Ca(2+)-transporting, and plasma membrane 1 were also expressed at higher levels in ILM compared to TA. The store-operated calcium entry channel molecule was decreased in ILM compared to the limb muscle and the voltage-dependent L-type and ryanodine receptor were expressed at similar levels in ILM and TA. These results show that ILM have a calcium regulation system profile suggestive of a better ability to handle calcium changes in comparison to limb muscles, and this may provide a mechanistic insight for their unique pathophysiological properties.

  2. Expression of calcium-buffering proteins in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Renato; Marques, Maria Julia; Khurana, Tejvir S; Santo Neto, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic laryngeal muscles (ILM) are highly specialized muscles involved in phonation and airway protection, with unique properties that allow them to perform extremely rapid contractions and to escape from damage in muscle dystrophy. Due to that, they may differ from limb muscles in several physiological aspects. Because a better ability to handle intracellular calcium has been suggested to explain ILM unique properties, we hypothesized that the profile of the proteins that regulate calcium levels in ILM is different from that in a limb muscle. Calcium-related proteins were analyzed in the ILM, cricothyroid (CT), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from male Sprague–Dawley rats (8 weeks of age) using quantitative PCR and western blotting. Higher expression of key Ca2+ regulatory proteins was detected in ILM compared to TA, such as the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-reuptake proteins (Sercas 1 and 2), the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, phospholamban, and the Ca2+-binding protein calsequestrin. Parvalbumin, calmodulin and the ATPase, Ca2+-transporting, and plasma membrane 1 were also expressed at higher levels in ILM compared to TA. The store-operated calcium entry channel molecule was decreased in ILM compared to the limb muscle and the voltage-dependent L-type and ryanodine receptor were expressed at similar levels in ILM and TA. These results show that ILM have a calcium regulation system profile suggestive of a better ability to handle calcium changes in comparison to limb muscles, and this may provide a mechanistic insight for their unique pathophysiological properties. PMID:26109185

  3. Alanine and proline content modulate global sensitivity to discrete perturbations in disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Perez, Romel B; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew; Whitten, Steven T

    2014-12-01

    Molecular transduction of biological signals is understood primarily in terms of the cooperative structural transitions of protein macromolecules, providing a mechanism through which discrete local structure perturbations affect global macromolecular properties. The recognition that proteins lacking tertiary stability, commonly referred to as intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), mediate key signaling pathways suggests that protein structures without cooperative intramolecular interactions may also have the ability to couple local and global structure changes. Presented here are results from experiments that measured and tested the ability of disordered proteins to couple local changes in structure to global changes in structure. Using the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein as an experimental model, a set of proline (PRO) and alanine (ALA) to glycine (GLY) substitution variants were designed to modulate backbone conformational propensities without introducing non-native intramolecular interactions. The hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) was used to monitor changes in global structure. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the GLY substitutions decreased polyproline II (PP(II)) propensities relative to the wild type, as expected, and fluorescence methods indicated that substitution-induced changes in R(h) were not associated with folding. The experiments showed that changes in local PP(II) structure cause changes in R(h) that are variable and that depend on the intrinsic chain propensities of PRO and ALA residues, demonstrating a mechanism for coupling local and global structure changes. Molecular simulations that model our results were used to extend the analysis to other proteins and illustrate the generality of the observed PRO and alanine effects on the structures of IDPs.

  4. DisProt 7.0: a major update of the database of disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Damiano; Tabaro, Francesco; Mičetić, Ivan; Necci, Marco; Quaglia, Federica; Oldfield, Christopher J; Aspromonte, Maria Cristina; Davey, Norman E; Davidović, Radoslav; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Elofsson, Arne; Gasparini, Alessandra; Hatos, András; Kajava, Andrey V; Kalmar, Lajos; Leonardi, Emanuela; Lazar, Tamas; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Macossay-Castillo, Mauricio; Meszaros, Attila; Minervini, Giovanni; Murvai, Nikoletta; Pujols, Jordi; Roche, Daniel B; Salladini, Edoardo; Schad, Eva; Schramm, Antoine; Szabo, Beata; Tantos, Agnes; Tonello, Fiorella; Tsirigos, Konstantinos D; Veljković, Nevena; Ventura, Salvador; Vranken, Wim; Warholm, Per; Uversky, Vladimir N; Dunker, A Keith; Longhi, Sonia; Tompa, Peter; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2017-01-04

    The Database of Protein Disorder (DisProt, URL: www.disprot.org) has been significantly updated and upgraded since its last major renewal in 2007. The current release holds information on more than 800 entries of IDPs/IDRs, i.e. intrinsically disordered proteins or regions that exist and function without a well-defined three-dimensional structure. We have re-curated previous entries to purge DisProt from conflicting cases, and also upgraded the functional classification scheme to reflect continuous advance in the field in the past 10 years or so. We define IDPs as proteins that are disordered along their entire sequence, i.e. entirely lack structural elements, and IDRs as regions that are at least five consecutive residues without well-defined structure. We base our assessment of disorder strictly on experimental evidence, such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (primary techniques) and a broad range of other experimental approaches (secondary techniques). Confident and ambiguous annotations are highlighted separately. DisProt 7.0 presents classified knowledge regarding the experimental characterization and functional annotations of IDPs/IDRs, and is intended to provide an invaluable resource for the research community for a better understanding structural disorder and for developing better computational tools for studying disordered proteins.

  5. DisProt 7.0: a major update of the database of disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, Damiano; Tabaro, Francesco; Mičetić, Ivan; Necci, Marco; Quaglia, Federica; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Aspromonte, Maria Cristina; Davey, Norman E.; Davidović, Radoslav; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Elofsson, Arne; Gasparini, Alessandra; Hatos, András; Kajava, Andrey V.; Kalmar, Lajos; Leonardi, Emanuela; Lazar, Tamas; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Macossay-Castillo, Mauricio; Meszaros, Attila; Minervini, Giovanni; Murvai, Nikoletta; Pujols, Jordi; Roche, Daniel B.; Salladini, Edoardo; Schad, Eva; Schramm, Antoine; Szabo, Beata; Tantos, Agnes; Tonello, Fiorella; Tsirigos, Konstantinos D.; Veljković, Nevena; Ventura, Salvador; Vranken, Wim; Warholm, Per; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith; Longhi, Sonia; Tompa, Peter; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2017-01-01

    The Database of Protein Disorder (DisProt, URL: www.disprot.org) has been significantly updated and upgraded since its last major renewal in 2007. The current release holds information on more than 800 entries of IDPs/IDRs, i.e. intrinsically disordered proteins or regions that exist and function without a well-defined three-dimensional structure. We have re-curated previous entries to purge DisProt from conflicting cases, and also upgraded the functional classification scheme to reflect continuous advance in the field in the past 10 years or so. We define IDPs as proteins that are disordered along their entire sequence, i.e. entirely lack structural elements, and IDRs as regions that are at least five consecutive residues without well-defined structure. We base our assessment of disorder strictly on experimental evidence, such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (primary techniques) and a broad range of other experimental approaches (secondary techniques). Confident and ambiguous annotations are highlighted separately. DisProt 7.0 presents classified knowledge regarding the experimental characterization and functional annotations of IDPs/IDRs, and is intended to provide an invaluable resource for the research community for a better understanding structural disorder and for developing better computational tools for studying disordered proteins. PMID:27899601

  6. The Structure of Intrinsically Disordered Peptides Implicated in Amyloid Diseases: Insights from Fully Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun; Shea, Joan-Emma

    Protein aggregation involves the self-assembly of proteins into large β-sheet-rich complexes. This process can be the result of aberrant protein folding and lead to "amyloidosis," a condition characterized by deposits of protein aggregates known as amyloids on various organs of the body [1]. Amyloid-related diseases include, among others, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and type II diabetes [2, 3, 4]. In other instances, however, protein aggregation is not a pathological process, but rather a functional one, with aggregates serving as structural scaffolds in a number of organisms [5].

  7. Deducing the functional characteristics of the human selenoprotein SELK from the structural properties of its intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Polo, Andrea; Colonna, Giovanni; Guariniello, Stefano; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Costantini, Susan

    2016-03-01

    The intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) cannot be described by a single structural representation but, due to their high structural fluctuation, through conformational ensembles. Certainly, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent a useful tool to study their different conformations capturing the conformational distribution. Our group is focusing on the structural characterization of proteins belonging to the seleno-proteome due to their involvement in cancer. They present disordered domains central for their biological function, and, in particular, SELK is a single-pass transmembrane protein that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane (ER) with a C-terminal domain exposed to the cytoplasm that is known to interact with different components of the endoplasmic reticulum associated to the protein degradation (ERAD) pathway. This protein is found to be up-expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and in other cancers. In this work we performed a detailed analysis of the C-terminal domain sequence of SELK and discovered that it is characterized by many prolines, and four negatively and eleven positively charged residues, which are crucial for its biological activity. This region can be considered as a weak polyelectrolyte and, specifically, a polycation, with high disordered propensity and different phosphorylation sites dislocated along the sequence. Then, we modeled its three-dimensional structure by performing MD simulations in water at neutral pH to analyze the structural stability as well as to identify the presence of HUB residues that play a key structural role as evidenced by the residue-residue interaction network analysis. Through this approach, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of SELK (i) presents a poor content of regular secondary structure elements, (ii) is dynamically stabilized by a network of intra-molecular H-bonds and H-bonds with water molecules, (iii) is highly fluctuating and, therefore, can be described only through a

  8. Sequence- and Temperature-Dependent Properties of Unfolded and Disordered Proteins from Atomistic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zerze, Gül H; Best, Robert B; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-11-19

    We use all-atom molecular simulation with explicit solvent to study the properties of selected intrinsically disordered proteins and unfolded states of foldable proteins, which include chain dimensions and shape, secondary structure propensity, solvent accessible surface area, and contact formation. We find that the qualitative scaling behavior of the chains matches expectations from theory under ambient conditions. In particular, unfolded globular proteins tend to be more collapsed under the same conditions than charged disordered sequences of the same length. However, inclusion of explicit solvent in addition naturally captures temperature-dependent solvation effects, which results in an initial collapse of the chains as temperature is increased, in qualitative agreement with experiment. There is a universal origin to the collapse, revealed in the change of hydration of individual residues as a function of temperature: namely, that the initial collapse is driven by unfavorable solvation free energy of individual residues, which in turn has a strong temperature dependence. We also observe that in unfolded globular proteins, increased temperature also initially favors formation of native-like (rather than non-native-like) structure. Our results help to establish how sequence encodes the degree of intrinsic disorder or order as well as its response to changes in environmental conditions.

  9. The Neurite Outgrowth Inhibitory Nogo-A-Δ20 Region Is an Intrinsically Disordered Segment Harbouring Three Stretches with Helical Propensity

    PubMed Central

    Bibow, Stefan; Schwab, Martin E.; Riek, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery from central neurotrauma, such as spinal cord injury, is limited by myelin-associated inhibitory proteins. The most prominent example, Nogo-A, imposes an inhibitory cue for nerve fibre growth via two independent domains: Nogo-A-Δ20 (residues 544–725 of the rat Nogo-A sequence) and Nogo-66 (residues 1026–1091). Inhibitory signalling from these domains causes a collapse of the neuronal growth cone via individual receptor complexes, centred around sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) for Nogo-A-Δ20 and Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) for Nogo-66. Whereas the helical conformation of Nogo-66 has been studied extensively, only little structural information is available for the Nogo-A-Δ20 region. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess potential residual structural propensities of the intrinsically disordered Nogo-A-Δ20. Using triple resonance experiments, we were able to assign 94% of the non-proline backbone residues. While secondary structure analysis and relaxation measurements highlighted the intrinsically disordered character of Nogo-A-Δ20, three stretches comprising residues 561EAIQESL567, 639EAMNVALKALGT650, and 693SNYSEIAK700 form transient α-helical structures. Interestingly, 561EAIQESL567 is situated directly adjacent to one of the most conserved regions of Nogo-A-Δ20 that contains a binding motif for β1-integrin. Likewise, 639EAMNVALKALGT650 partially overlaps with the epitope recognized by 11C7, a Nogo-A-neutralizing antibody that promotes functional recovery from spinal cord injury. Diffusion measurements by pulse-field gradient NMR spectroscopy suggest concentration- and oxidation state-dependent dimerisation of Nogo-A-Δ20. Surprisingly, NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data could not validate previously shown binding of extracellular loops of S1PR2 to Nogo-A-Δ20. PMID:27611089

  10. Alterations of Intrinsic Brain Connectivity Patterns in Depression and Bipolar Disorders: A Critical Assessment of Magnetoencephalography-Based Evidence.

    PubMed

    Alamian, Golnoush; Hincapié, Ana-Sofía; Combrisson, Etienne; Thiery, Thomas; Martel, Véronique; Althukov, Dmitrii; Jerbi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Despite being the object of a thriving field of clinical research, the investigation of intrinsic brain network alterations in psychiatric illnesses is still in its early days. Because the pathological alterations are predominantly probed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), many questions about the electrophysiological bases of resting-state alterations in psychiatric disorders, particularly among mood disorder patients, remain unanswered. Alongside important research using electroencephalography (EEG), the specific recent contributions and future promise of magnetoencephalography (MEG) in this field are not fully recognized and valued. Here, we provide a critical review of recent findings from MEG resting-state connectivity within major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). The clinical MEG resting-state results are compared with those previously reported with fMRI and EEG. Taken together, MEG appears to be a promising but still critically underexploited technique to unravel the neurophysiological mechanisms that mediate abnormal (both hyper- and hypo-) connectivity patterns involved in MDD and BD. In particular, a major strength of MEG is its ability to provide source-space estimations of neuromagnetic long-range rhythmic synchronization at various frequencies (i.e., oscillatory coupling). The reviewed literature highlights the relevance of probing local and interregional rhythmic synchronization to explore the pathophysiological underpinnings of each disorder. However, before we can fully take advantage of MEG connectivity analyses in psychiatry, several limitations inherent to MEG connectivity analyses need to be understood and taken into account. Thus, we also discuss current methodological challenges and outline paths for future research. MEG resting-state studies provide an important window onto perturbed spontaneous oscillatory brain networks and hence supply an important complement to fMRI-based resting-state measurements in

  11. Alterations of Intrinsic Brain Connectivity Patterns in Depression and Bipolar Disorders: A Critical Assessment of Magnetoencephalography-Based Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Alamian, Golnoush; Hincapié, Ana-Sofía; Combrisson, Etienne; Thiery, Thomas; Martel, Véronique; Althukov, Dmitrii; Jerbi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Despite being the object of a thriving field of clinical research, the investigation of intrinsic brain network alterations in psychiatric illnesses is still in its early days. Because the pathological alterations are predominantly probed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), many questions about the electrophysiological bases of resting-state alterations in psychiatric disorders, particularly among mood disorder patients, remain unanswered. Alongside important research using electroencephalography (EEG), the specific recent contributions and future promise of magnetoencephalography (MEG) in this field are not fully recognized and valued. Here, we provide a critical review of recent findings from MEG resting-state connectivity within major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). The clinical MEG resting-state results are compared with those previously reported with fMRI and EEG. Taken together, MEG appears to be a promising but still critically underexploited technique to unravel the neurophysiological mechanisms that mediate abnormal (both hyper- and hypo-) connectivity patterns involved in MDD and BD. In particular, a major strength of MEG is its ability to provide source-space estimations of neuromagnetic long-range rhythmic synchronization at various frequencies (i.e., oscillatory coupling). The reviewed literature highlights the relevance of probing local and interregional rhythmic synchronization to explore the pathophysiological underpinnings of each disorder. However, before we can fully take advantage of MEG connectivity analyses in psychiatry, several limitations inherent to MEG connectivity analyses need to be understood and taken into account. Thus, we also discuss current methodological challenges and outline paths for future research. MEG resting-state studies provide an important window onto perturbed spontaneous oscillatory brain networks and hence supply an important complement to fMRI-based resting-state measurements in

  12. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae

    PubMed Central

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST) and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups. PMID:26307970

  13. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae.

    PubMed

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2015-08-20

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST) and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups.

  14. Protein disorder--a breakthrough invention of evolution?

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, Avner; Schaefer, Christian; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schmidberger, Markus; Punta, Marco; Rost, Burkhard

    2011-06-01

    As an operational definition, we refer to regions in proteins that do not adopt regular three-dimensional structures in isolation, as disordered regions. An antipode to disorder would be 'well-structured' rather than 'ordered'. Here, we argue for the following three hypotheses. Firstly, it is more useful to picture disorder as a distinct phenomenon in structural biology than as an extreme example of protein flexibility. Secondly, there are many very different flavors of protein disorder, nevertheless, it seems advantageous to portray the universe of all possible proteins in terms of two main types: well-structured, disordered. There might be a third type 'other' but we have so far no positive evidence for this. Thirdly, nature uses protein disorder as a tool to adapt to different environments. Protein disorder is evolutionarily conserved and this maintenance of disorder is highly nontrivial. Increasingly integrating protein disorder into the toolbox of a living cell was a crucial step in the evolution from simple bacteria to complex eukaryotes. We need new advanced computational methods to study this new milestone in the advance of protein biology.

  15. Dietary proteins and functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Erica; Crowe, Sheila E

    2013-05-01

    Food intolerance is a common complaint amongst patients with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders (FGIDs), including those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia, as well as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although there has been a longstanding interest in the possible role of food allergy in IBS, there are limited data supporting the association. However, the prevalence of food allergy is sufficiently high that patients with FGID may also have food allergies or hypersensitivities. Food intolerances or sensitivities are reactions to foods, which are not due to immunological mechanisms. Lactose intolerance is common in the general population and can mimic symptoms of FGID or coexist with FGID. As discussed in other articles in this series, other carbohydrate intolerances may be responsible for symptom generation in patients with IBS and perhaps other FGIDs. There is a great interest in the role of a major dietary protein, gluten, in the production of symptoms that are very similar to those of patients with celiac disease without the enteropathy that characterizes celiac disease. Emerging research into a syndrome known as nonceliac gluten sensitivity suggests a heterogeneous condition with some features of celiac disease but often categorized as FGIDs, including IBS. This article summarizes the role of dietary proteins in the symptoms and pathophysiology of FGIDs.

  16. An intrinsically disordered peptide from Ebola virus VP35 controls viral RNA synthesis by modulating nucleoprotein-RNA interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Daisy  W.; Borek, Dominika; Luthra, Priya; Binning, Jennifer  M.; Anantpadma, Manu; Liu, Gai; Harvey, Ian B.; Su, Zhaoming; Endlich-Frazier, Ariel; Pan, Juanli; Shabman, Reed  S.; Chiu, Wah; Davey, Robert  A.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Basler, Christopher  F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya  K.

    2015-04-01

    During viral RNA synthesis, Ebola virus (EBOV) nucleoprotein (NP) alternates between an RNA-template-bound form and a template-free form to provide the viral polymerase access to the RNA template. In addition, newly synthesized NP must be prevented from indiscriminately binding to noncognate RNAs. Here, we investigate the molecular bases for these critical processes. We identify an intrinsically disordered peptide derived from EBOV VP35 (NPBP, residues 20–48) that binds NP with high affinity and specificity, inhibits NP oligomerization, and releases RNA from NP-RNA complexes in vitro. The structure of the NPBP/ΔNPNTD complex, solved to 3.7 Å resolution, reveals how NPBP peptide occludes a large surface area that is important for NP-NP and NP-RNA interactions and for viral RNA synthesis. Together, our results identify a highly conserved viral interface that is important for EBOV replication and can be targeted for therapeutic development.

  17. Major intrinsic proteins repertoire of Morus notabilis and their expression profiles in different species.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Vinay Kumar; Khurana, Paramjit

    2017-02-01

    Leaf moisture content in Morus is a significant trait regulating the yield of silk production. Studies have shown that fresh leaves or leaves with high water content are preferably eaten by silk worm. Water and certain other molecules transport in plants is known to be regulated by aquaporins or Major Intrinsic Proteins (MIPs). Members of the MIP gene family have also been implicated in plant development and stress responsiveness. To understand how members of MIP gene family are regulated and evolved, we carried out an extensive analysis of the gene family. We identified a total of 36 non redundant MIPs in Morus notabilis genome, belonging to five subfamilies PIPs, TIPs, NIPs, XIPs and SIPs) have been identified. We performed a Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analysis and looked at distribution of cis elements in their 2K upstream regulatory region to reveal their putative roles in various stresses and developmental aspects. Expression analysis in developmental stages revealed their tissue preferential expression pattern in diverse vegetative and reproductive tissues. Comparison of expression profiles in the leaves of three species including Morus notabilis, Morus serrata and Morus laevigata led to identification of differential expression in these species. In all, this study elaborates a basic insight into the structure, function and evolutionary analysis of MIP gene family in Morus which is hitherto unavailable. Our analysis will provide a ready reference to the mulberry research community involved in the Morus improvement program.

  18. The Eucalyptus Tonoplast Intrinsic Protein (TIP) Gene Subfamily: Genomic Organization, Structural Features, and Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcela I.; Takeda, Agnes A. S.; Bravo, Juliana P.; Maia, Ivan G.

    2016-01-01

    Plant aquaporins are water channels implicated in various physiological processes, including growth, development and adaptation to stress. In this study, the Tonoplast Intrinsic Protein (TIP) gene subfamily of Eucalyptus, an economically important woody species, was investigated and characterized. A genome-wide survey of the Eucalyptus grandis genome revealed the presence of eleven putative TIP genes (referred as EgTIP), which were individually assigned by phylogeny to each of the classical TIP1–5 groups. Homology modeling confirmed the presence of the two highly conserved NPA (Asn-Pro-Ala) motifs in the identified EgTIPs. Residue variations in the corresponding selectivity filters, that might reflect differences in EgTIP substrate specificity, were observed. All EgTIP genes, except EgTIP5.1, were transcribed and the majority of them showed organ/tissue-enriched expression. Inspection of the EgTIP promoters revealed the presence of common cis-regulatory elements implicated in abiotic stress and hormone responses pointing to an involvement of the identified genes in abiotic stress responses. In line with these observations, additional gene expression profiling demonstrated increased expression under polyethylene glycol-imposed osmotic stress. Overall, the results obtained suggest that these novel EgTIPs might be functionally implicated in eucalyptus adaptation to stress. PMID:27965702

  19. The Importance of Intrinsically Disordered Segments of Cardiac Troponin in Modulating Function by Phosphorylation and Disease-Causing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Papadaki, Maria; Marston, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Troponin plays a central role in regulation of muscle contraction. It is the Ca2+ switch of striated muscles including the heart and in the cardiac muscle it is physiologically modulated by PKA-dependent phosphorylation at Ser22 and 23. Many cardiomyopathy-related mutations affect Ca2+ regulation and/or disrupt the relationship between Ca2+ binding and phosphorylation. Unlike the mechanism of heart activation, the modulation of Ca2+-sensitivity by phosphorylation of the cardiac specific N-terminal segment of TnI (1–30) is structurally subtle and has proven hard to investigate. The crystal structure of cardiac troponin describes only the relatively stable core of the molecule and the crucial mobile parts of the molecule are missing including TnI C-terminal region, TnI (1–30), TnI (134–149) (“inhibitory” peptide) and the C-terminal 28 amino acids of TnT that are intrinsically disordered. Recent studies have been performed to answer this matter by building structural models of cardiac troponin in phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states based on peptide NMR studies. Now these have been updated by more recent concepts derived from molecular dynamic simulations treating troponin as a dynamic structure. The emerging model confirms the stable core structure of troponin and the mobile structure of the intrinsically disordered segments. We will discuss how we can describe these segments in terms of dynamic transitions between a small number of states, with the probability distributions being altered by phosphorylation and by HCM or DCM-related mutations that can explain how Ca2+-sensitivity is modulated by phosphorylation and the effects of mutations. PMID:27853436

  20. Ability of a salivary intrinsically unstructured protein to bind different tannin targets revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Canon, Francis; Giuliani, Alexandre; Paté, Franck; Sarni-Manchado, Pascale

    2010-09-01

    Astringency is thought to result from the interaction between salivary proline-rich proteins (PRP) that belong to the intrinsically unstructured protein group (IUP), and tannins, which are phenolic compounds. IUPs have the ability to bind several and/or different targets. At the same time, tannins have different chemical features reported to contribute to the sensation of astringency. The ability of both electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry to investigate the noncovalent interaction occurring between a human salivary PRP, IB5, and a model tannin, epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EgCG), has been reported. Herein, we extend this method to study the effect of tannin chemical features on their interaction with IB5. We used five model tannins, epigallocatechin (EgC), epicatechin 3-O-gallate (ECG), epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EgCG), procyanidin dimer B2 and B2 3'-O-gallate, which cover the main tannin chemical features: presence of a gallate moiety (galloylation), the degree of polymerization, and the degree of B ring hydroxylation. We show the ability of IB5 to bind these tannins. We report differences in stoichiometries and in stability of the IB5•1 tannin complexes. These results demonstrate the main role of hydroxyl groups in these interactions and show the involvement of hydrogen bonds. Finally, these results are in line with sensory analysis, by Vidal et al. (J Sci Food Agric 83:564-573, 2003) pointing out that the chain length and the level of galloylation are the main factors affecting astringency perception.

  1. Therapeutic targeting of polycomb and BET bromodomain proteins in diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Piunti, Andrea; Hashizume, Rintaro; Morgan, Marc A; Bartom, Elizabeth T; Horbinski, Craig M; Marshall, Stacy A; Rendleman, Emily J; Ma, Quanhong; Takahashi, Yoh-Hei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Misharin, Alexander V; Abshiru, Nebiyu A; Lulla, Rishi R; Saratsis, Amanda M; Kelleher, Neil L; James, C David; Shilatifard, Ali

    2017-02-27

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a highly aggressive pediatric brainstem tumor characterized by rapid and uniform patient demise. A heterozygous point mutation of histone H3 occurs in more than 80% of these tumors and results in a lysine-to-methionine substitution (H3K27M). Expression of this histone mutant is accompanied by a reduction in the levels of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), and this is hypothesized to be a driving event of DIPG oncogenesis. Despite a major loss of H3K27me3, PRC2 activity is still detected in DIPG cells positive for H3K27M. To investigate the functional roles of H3K27M and PRC2 in DIPG pathogenesis, we profiled the epigenome of H3K27M-mutant DIPG cells and found that H3K27M associates with increased H3K27 acetylation (H3K27ac). In accordance with previous biochemical data, the majority of the heterotypic H3K27M-K27ac nucleosomes colocalize with bromodomain proteins at the loci of actively transcribed genes, whereas PRC2 is excluded from these regions; this suggests that H3K27M does not sequester PRC2 on chromatin. Residual PRC2 activity is required to maintain DIPG proliferative potential, by repressing neuronal differentiation and function. Finally, to examine the therapeutic potential of blocking the recruitment of bromodomain proteins by heterotypic H3K27M-K27ac nucleosomes in DIPG cells, we performed treatments in vivo with BET bromodomain inhibitors and demonstrate that they efficiently inhibit tumor progression, thus identifying this class of compounds as potential therapeutics in DIPG.

  2. Intrinsic Functional Connectivity in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Science in Development.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, F Xavier; Aoki, Yuta

    2016-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) without an explicit task, i.e., resting state fMRI, of individuals with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is growing rapidly. Early studies were unaware of the vulnerability of this method to even minor degrees of head motion, a major concern in the field. Recent efforts are implementing various strategies to address this source of artifact along with a growing set of analytical tools. Availability of the ADHD-200 Consortium dataset, a large-scale multi-site repository, is facilitating increasingly sophisticated approaches. In parallel, investigators are beginning to explicitly test the replicability of published findings. In this narrative review, we sketch out broad, overarching hypotheses being entertained while noting methodological uncertainties. Current hypotheses implicate the interplay of default, cognitive control (frontoparietal) and attention (dorsal, ventral, salience) networks in ADHD; functional connectivities of reward-related and amygdala-related circuits are also supported as substrates for dimensional aspects of ADHD. Before these can be further specified and definitively tested, we assert the field must take on the challenge of mapping the "topography" of the analytical space, i.e., determining the sensitivities of results to variations in acquisition, analysis, demographic and phenotypic parameters. Doing so with openly available datasets will provide the needed foundation for delineating typical and atypical developmental trajectories of brain structure and function in neurodevelopmental disorders including ADHD when applied to large-scale multi-site prospective longitudinal studies such as the forthcoming Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study.

  3. Genealogy of an ancient protein family: the Sirtuins, a family of disordered members

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sirtuins genes are widely distributed by evolution and have been found in eubacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. While prokaryotic and archeal species usually have one or two sirtuin homologs, in humans as well as in eukaryotes we found multiple versions and in mammals this family is comprised of seven different homologous proteins being all NAD-dependent de-acylases. 3D structures of human SIRT2, SIRT3, and SIRT5 revealed the overall conformation of the conserved core domain but they were unable to give a structural information about the presence of very flexible and dynamically disordered regions, the role of which is still structurally and functionally unclear. Recently, we modeled the 3D-structure of human SIRT1, the most studied member of this family, that unexpectedly emerged as a member of the intrinsically disordered proteins with its long disordered terminal arms. Despite clear similarities in catalytic cores between the human sirtuins little is known of the general structural characteristics of these proteins. The presence of disorder in human SIRT1 and the propensity of these proteins in promoting molecular interactions make it important to understand the underlying mechanisms of molecular recognition that reasonably should involve terminal segments. The mechanism of recognition, in turn, is a prerequisite for the understanding of any functional activity. Aim of this work is to understand what structural properties are shared among members of this family in humans as well as in other organisms. Results We have studied the distribution of the structural features of N- and C-terminal segments of sirtuins in all known organisms to draw their evolutionary histories by taking into account average length of terminal segments, amino acid composition, intrinsic disorder, presence of charged stretches, presence of putative phosphorylation sites, flexibility, and GC content of genes. Finally, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of the putative

  4. Enhanced Boron Tolerance in Plants Mediated by Bidirectional Transport Through Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2016-02-23

    High boron (B) concentration is toxic to plants that limit plant productivity. Recent studies have shown the involvement of the members of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family in controlling B transport. Here, we have provided experimental evidences showing the bidirectional transport activity of rice OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6. Boron transport ability of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 were displayed in yeast HD9 mutant strain (∆fps1∆acr3∆ycf1) as a result of increased B sensitivity, influx and accumulation by OsPIP1;3, and rapid efflux activity by OsPIP2;6. RT-PCR analysis showed strong upregulation of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 transcripts in roots by B toxicity. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 exhibited enhanced tolerance to B toxicity. Furthermore, B concentration was significantly increased after 2 and 3 hours of tracer boron ((10)B) treatment. Interestingly, a rapid efflux of (10)B from the roots of the transgenic plants was observed within 1 h of (10)B treatment. Boron tolerance in OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 lines was inhibited by aquaporin inhibitors, silver nitrate and sodium azide. Our data proved that OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 are indeed involved in both influx and efflux of boron transport. Manipulation of these PIPs could be highly useful in improving B tolerance in crops grown in high B containing soils.

  5. An intrinsically disordered region of RPN10 plays a key role in restricting ubiquitin chain elongation in RPN10 monoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Puig-Sàrries, Pilar; Bijlmakers, Marie-José; Zuin, Alice; Bichmann, Anne; Pons, Miquel; Crosas, Bernat

    2015-08-01

    Despite being a common mechanism in eukaryotes, the process by which protein monoubiquitination is produced and regulated in vivo is not completely understood. We present here the analysis of the process of monoubiquitination of the proteasomal subunit Rpn10 (regulatory particle non-ATPase 10), involved in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated substrates. Rpn10 is monoubiquitinated in vivo by the Nedd4 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated 4) enzyme Rsp5 (reverses SPT-phenotype protein 5) and this modification impairs the interaction of Rpn10 with substrates, having a regulatory effect on proteasome function. Remarkably, a disordered region near the ubiquitin-interacting motif of Rpn10 plays a role in the restriction of the polyubiquitin extension activity of Rsp5. Mutations in this disordered region promote ubiquitin chain extension of Rpn10. Thus, our work sheds light on the molecular basis and the functional relevance of a type of monoubiquitination that is driven by the substrate. Moreover, we uncover a putative role for disordered regions in modulating ubiquitin-protein ligation.

  6. DisPredict: A Predictor of Disordered Protein Using Optimized RBF Kernel

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Sumaiya; Hoque, Md Tamjidul

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins or, regions perform important biological functions through their dynamic conformations during binding. Thus accurate identification of these disordered regions have significant implications in proper annotation of function, induced fold prediction and drug design to combat critical diseases. We introduce DisPredict, a disorder predictor that employs a single support vector machine with RBF kernel and novel features for reliable characterization of protein structure. DisPredict yields effective performance. In addition to 10-fold cross validation, training and testing of DisPredict was conducted with independent test datasets. The results were consistent with both the training and test error minimal. The use of multiple data sources, makes the predictor generic. The datasets used in developing the model include disordered regions of various length which are categorized as short and long having different compositions, different types of disorder, ranging from fully to partially disordered regions as well as completely ordered regions. Through comparison with other state of the art approaches and case studies, DisPredict is found to be a useful tool with competitive performance. DisPredict is available at https://github.com/tamjidul/DisPredict_v1.0. PMID:26517719

  7. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (λEX ∼ 280 nm, λEM ∼ 350 nm), in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the protein’s) local environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET), a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins. PMID:25490136

  8. An Intrinsically Disordered APLF Links Ku, DNA-PKcs, and XRCC4-DNA Ligase IV in an Extended Flexible Non-homologous End Joining Complex.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Michal; Yu, Yaping; Radhakrishnan, Sarvan K; Chokshi, Chirayu; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Kuzdovich, Monica; Remesh, Soumya G; Fang, Shujuan; Tomkinson, Alan E; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Tainer, John A

    2016-12-30

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in human cells is initiated by Ku heterodimer binding to a DSB, followed by recruitment of core NHEJ factors including DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), XRCC4-like factor (XLF), and XRCC4 (X4)-DNA ligase IV (L4). Ku also interacts with accessory factors such as aprataxin and polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase-like factor (APLF). Yet, how these factors interact to tether, process, and ligate DSB ends while allowing regulation and chromatin interactions remains enigmatic. Here, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and mutational analyses show APLF is largely an intrinsically disordered protein that binds Ku, Ku/DNA-PKcs (DNA-PK), and X4L4 within an extended flexible NHEJ core complex. X4L4 assembles with Ku heterodimers linked to DNA-PKcs via flexible Ku80 C-terminal regions (Ku80CTR) in a complex stabilized through APLF interactions with Ku, DNA-PK, and X4L4. Collective results unveil the solution architecture of the six-protein complex and suggest cooperative assembly of an extended flexible NHEJ core complex that supports APLF accessibility while possibly providing flexible attachment of the core complex to chromatin. The resulting dynamic tethering furthermore, provides geometric access of L4 catalytic domains to the DNA ends during ligation and of DNA-PKcs for targeted phosphorylation of other NHEJ proteins as well as trans-phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs on the opposing DSB without disrupting the core ligation complex. Overall the results shed light on evolutionary conservation of Ku, X4, and L4 activities, while explaining the observation that Ku80CTR and DNA-PKcs only occur in a subset of higher eukaryotes.

  9. An Intrinsically Disordered APLF Links Ku, DNA-PKcs, and XRCC4-DNA Ligase IV in an Extended Flexible Non-homologous End Joining Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Michal; Yu, Yaping; Radhakrishnan, Sarvan K.; Chokshi, Chirayu; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Kuzdovich, Monica; Remesh, Soumya G.; Fang, Shujuan; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in human cells is initiated by Ku heterodimer binding to a DSB, followed by recruitment of core NHEJ factors including DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), XRCC4-like factor (XLF), and XRCC4 (X4)-DNA ligase IV (L4). Ku also interacts with accessory factors such as aprataxin and polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase-like factor (APLF). Yet, how these factors interact to tether, process, and ligate DSB ends while allowing regulation and chromatin interactions remains enigmatic. Here, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and mutational analyses show APLF is largely an intrinsically disordered protein that binds Ku, Ku/DNA-PKcs (DNA-PK), and X4L4 within an extended flexible NHEJ core complex. X4L4 assembles with Ku heterodimers linked to DNA-PKcs via flexible Ku80 C-terminal regions (Ku80CTR) in a complex stabilized through APLF interactions with Ku, DNA-PK, and X4L4. Collective results unveil the solution architecture of the six-protein complex and suggest cooperative assembly of an extended flexible NHEJ core complex that supports APLF accessibility while possibly providing flexible attachment of the core complex to chromatin. The resulting dynamic tethering furthermore, provides geometric access of L4 catalytic domains to the DNA ends during ligation and of DNA-PKcs for targeted phosphorylation of other NHEJ proteins as well as trans-phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs on the opposing DSB without disrupting the core ligation complex. Overall the results shed light on evolutionary conservation of Ku, X4, and L4 activities, while explaining the observation that Ku80CTR and DNA-PKcs only occur in a subset of higher eukaryotes. PMID:27875301

  10. Effect of Intrinsic Twist on Length of Crystalline and Disordered Regions in Cellulose Microfibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nili, Abdolmadjid; Shklyaev, Oleg; Zhao, Zhen; Zhong, Linghao; Crespi, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biological material in the world. It provides mechanical reinforcement for plant cell wall, and could potentially serve as renewable energy source for biofuel. Native cellulose forms a non-centrosymmetric chiral crystal due to lack of roto-inversion symmetry of constituent glucose chains. Chirality of cellulose crystal could result in an overall twist. Competition between unwinding torsional/extensional and twisting energy terms leads to twist induced frustration along fibril's axis. The accumulated frustration could be the origin of periodic disordered regions observed in cellulose microfibrils. These regions could play significant role in properties of cellulose bundles and ribbons as well as biological implications on plant cell walls. We propose a mechanical model based on Frenkel-Kontorova mechanism to investigate effects of radius dependent twist on crystalline size in cellulose microfibrils. Parameters of the model are adjusted according to all-atom molecular simulations. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as part of The Center for LignoCellulose Structure and Formation, an Energy Frontier Research Center

  11. iHADAMAC: A complementary tool for sequential resonance assignment of globular and highly disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Sophie; Plevin, Michael J.; Willbold, Dieter; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    An experiment, iHADAMAC, is presented that yields information on the amino-acid type of individual residues in a protein by editing the 1H- 15N correlations into seven different 2D spectra, each corresponding to a different class of amino-acid types. Amino-acid type discrimination is realized via a Hadamard encoding scheme based on four different spin manipulations as recently introduced in the context of the sequential HADAMAC experiment. Both sequential and intra-residue HADAMAC experiments yield highly complementary information that greatly facilitate resonance assignment of proteins with high frequency degeneracy, as demonstrated here for a 188-residue intrinsically disordered protein fragment of the hepatitis C virus protein NS5A.

  12. Controllable activation of nanoscale dynamics in a disordered protein alters binding kinetics

    DOE PAGES

    Callaway, David J. E.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas; ...

    2017-03-08

    The phosphorylation of specific residues in a flexible disordered activation loop yields precise control of signal transduction. One paradigm is the phosphorylation of S339/S340 in the intrinsically disordered tail of the multi-domain scaffolding protein NHERF1, which affects the intracellular localization and trafficking of NHERF1 assembled signaling complexes. Using neutron spin echo spectroscopy (NSE), we show salt-concentration-dependent excitation of nanoscale motion at the tip of the C-terminal tail in the phosphomimic S339D/S340D mutant. The “tip of the whip” that is unleashed is near the S339/S340 phosphorylation site and flanks the hydrophobic Ezrin-binding motif. The kinetic association rate constant of the bindingmore » of the S339D/S340D mutant to the FERM domain of Ezrin is sensitive to buffer salt concentration, correlating with the excited nanoscale dynamics. The results suggest that electrostatics modulates the activation of nanoscale dynamics of an intrinsically disordered protein, controlling the binding kinetics of signaling partners. Furthermore NSE can pinpoint the nanoscale dynamics changes in a highly specific manner.« less

  13. The intrinsically disordered distal face of nucleoplasmin recognizes distinct oligomerization states of histones.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Isbaal; Fernández-Rivero, Noelia; Arranz, Rocío; Aloria, Kerman; Finn, Ron; Arizmendi, Jesús M; Ausió, Juan; Valpuesta, José María; Muga, Arturo; Prado, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    The role of Nucleoplasmin (NP) as a H2A-H2B histone chaperone has been extensively characterized. To understand its putative interaction with other histone ligands, we have characterized its ability to bind H3-H4 and histone octamers. We find that the chaperone forms distinct complexes with histones, which differ in the number of molecules that build the assembly and in their spatial distribution. When complexed with H3-H4 tetramers or histone octamers, two NP pentamers form an ellipsoidal particle with the histones located at the center of the assembly, in stark contrast with the NP/H2A-H2B complex that contains up to five histone dimers bound to one chaperone pentamer. This particular assembly relies on the ability of H3-H4 to form tetramers either in solution or as part of the octamer, and it is not observed when a variant of H3 (H3C110E), unable to form stable tetramers, is used instead of the wild-type protein. Our data also suggest that the distal face of the chaperone is involved in the interaction with distinct types of histones, as supported by electron microscopy analysis of the different NP/histone complexes. The use of the same structural region to accommodate all type of histones could favor histone exchange and nucleosome dynamics.

  14. Environmental Pressure May Change the Composition Protein Disorder in Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schlessinger, Avner; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Many prokaryotic organisms have adapted to incredibly extreme habitats. The genomes of such extremophiles differ from their non-extremophile relatives. For example, some proteins in thermophiles sustain high temperatures by being more compact than homologs in non-extremophiles. Conversely, some proteins have increased volumes to compensate for freezing effects in psychrophiles that survive in the cold. Here, we revealed that some differences in organisms surviving in extreme habitats correlate with a simple single feature, namely the fraction of proteins predicted to have long disordered regions. We predicted disorder with different methods for 46 completely sequenced organisms from diverse habitats and found a correlation between protein disorder and the extremity of the environment. More specifically, the overall percentage of proteins with long disordered regions tended to be more similar between organisms of similar habitats than between organisms of similar taxonomy. For example, predictions tended to detect substantially more proteins with long disordered regions in prokaryotic halophiles (survive high salt) than in their taxonomic neighbors. Another peculiar environment is that of high radiation survived, e.g. by Deinococcus radiodurans. The relatively high fraction of disorder predicted in this extremophile might provide a shield against mutations. Although our analysis fails to establish causation, the observed correlation between such a simplistic, coarse-grained, microscopic molecular feature (disorder content) and a macroscopic variable (habitat) remains stunning.

  15. The effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy on intrinsic functional brain networks in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Qingjiu; Wang, Jinhui; Wu, Zhaomin; Wang, Peng; Sun, Li; Cai, Taisheng; Wang, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious psychological treatment for adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the neural processes underlying the benefits of CBT are not well understood. This study aims to unravel psychosocial mechanisms for treatment ADHD by exploring the effects of CBT on functional brain networks. Ten adults with ADHD were enrolled and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired before and after a 12-session CBT. Twelve age- and gender-matched healthy controls were also scanned. We constructed whole-brain functional connectivity networks using graph-theory approaches and further computed the changes of regional functional connectivity strength (rFCS) between pre- and post-CBT in ADHD for measuring the effects of CBT. The results showed that rFCS was increased in the fronto-parietal network and cerebellum, the brain regions that were most often affected by medication, in adults with ADHD following CBT. Furthermore, the enhanced functional coupling between bilateral superior parietal gyrus was positively correlated with the improvement of ADHD symptoms following CBT. Together, these findings provide evidence that CBT can selectively modulate the intrinsic network connectivity in the fronto-parietal network and cerebellum and suggest that the CBT may share common brain mechanism with the pharmacology in adults with ADHD.

  16. An intrinsically disordered peptide from Ebola virus VP35 controls viral RNA synthesis by modulating nucleoprotein-RNA interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Leung, Daisy  W.; Borek, Dominika; Luthra, Priya; ...

    2015-04-01

    During viral RNA synthesis, Ebola virus (EBOV) nucleoprotein (NP) alternates between an RNA-template-bound form and a template-free form to provide the viral polymerase access to the RNA template. In addition, newly synthesized NP must be prevented from indiscriminately binding to noncognate RNAs. Here, we investigate the molecular bases for these critical processes. We identify an intrinsically disordered peptide derived from EBOV VP35 (NPBP, residues 20–48) that binds NP with high affinity and specificity, inhibits NP oligomerization, and releases RNA from NP-RNA complexes in vitro. The structure of the NPBP/ΔNPNTD complex, solved to 3.7 Å resolution, reveals how NPBP peptide occludesmore » a large surface area that is important for NP-NP and NP-RNA interactions and for viral RNA synthesis. Together, our results identify a highly conserved viral interface that is important for EBOV replication and can be targeted for therapeutic development.« less

  17. Interspecific adaptation by binary choice at de novo polyomavirus T antigen site through accelerated codon-constrained Val-Ala toggling within an intrinsically disordered region.

    PubMed

    Lauber, Chris; Kazem, Siamaque; Kravchenko, Alexander A; Feltkamp, Mariet C W; Gorbalenya, Alexander E

    2015-05-26

    It is common knowledge that conserved residues evolve slowly. We challenge generality of this central tenet of molecular biology by describing the fast evolution of a conserved nucleotide position that is located in the overlap of two open reading frames (ORFs) of polyomaviruses. The de novo ORF is expressed through either the ALTO protein or the Middle T antigen (MT/ALTO), while the ancestral ORF encodes the N-terminal domain of helicase-containing Large T (LT) antigen. In the latter domain the conserved Cys codon of the LXCXE pRB-binding motif constrains codon evolution in the overlapping MT/ALTO ORF to a binary choice between Val and Ala codons, termed here as codon-constrained Val-Ala (COCO-VA) toggling. We found the rate of COCO-VA toggling to approach the speciation rate and to be significantly accelerated compared to the baseline rate of chance substitution in a large monophyletic lineage including all viruses encoding MT/ALTO and three others. Importantly, the COCO-VA site is located in a short linear motif (SLiM) of an intrinsically disordered region, a typical characteristic of adaptive responders. These findings provide evidence that the COCO-VA toggling is under positive selection in many polyomaviruses, implying its critical role in interspecific adaptation, which is unprecedented for conserved residues.

  18. Digested disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Krishna D; DeForte, Shelly; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins grows fast. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a “Digested Disorder” project and represent a new issue of reader’s digest of the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrinsic disorder). The current digest issue covers papers published during the third quarter of 2013; i.e., during the period of June, July, and September of 2013. Similar to previous issues, the papers are grouped hierarchically by topics they cover, and for each of the included paper a short description is given on its major findings. PMID:28232877

  19. Gecko proteins induce the apoptosis of bladder cancer 5637 cells by inhibiting Akt and activating the intrinsic caspase cascade

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geun-Young; Park, Soon Yong; Jo, Ara; Kim, Mira; Leem, Sun-Hee; Jun, Woo-Jin; Shim, Sang In; Lee, Sang Chul; Chung, Jin Woong

    2015-01-01

    Gecko proteins have long been used as anti-tumor agents in oriental medicine, without any scientific background. Although anti-tumor effects of Gecko proteins on several cancers were recently reported, their effect on bladder cancer has not been investigated. Thus, we explored the anti-tumor effect of Gecko proteins and its cellular mechanisms in human bladder cancer 5637 cells. Gecko proteins significantly reduced the viability of 5637 cells without any cytotoxic effect on normal cells. These proteins increased the Annexin-V staining and the amount of condensed chromatin, demonstrating that the Gecko proteinsinduced cell death was caused by apoptosis. Gecko proteins suppressed Akt activation, and the overexpression of constitutively active form of myristoylated Akt prevented Gecko proteins-induced death of 5637 cells. Furthermore, Gecko proteins activated caspase 9 and caspase 3/7. Taken together, our data demonstrated that Gecko proteins suppressed the Akt pathway and activated the intrinsic caspase pathway, leading to the apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 531-536] PMID:26246284

  20. Gecko proteins induce the apoptosis of bladder cancer 5637 cells by inhibiting Akt and activating the intrinsic caspase cascade.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geun-Young; Park, Soon Yong; Jo, Ara; Kim, Mira; Leem, Sun-Hee; Jun, Woo-Jin; Shim, Sang In; Lee, Sang Chul; Chung, Jin Woong

    2015-09-01

    Gecko proteins have long been used as anti-tumor agents in oriental medicine, without any scientific background. Although anti-tumor effects of Gecko proteins on several cancers were recently reported, their effect on bladder cancer has not been investigated. Thus, we explored the anti-tumor effect of Gecko proteins and its cellular mechanisms in human bladder cancer 5637 cells. Gecko proteins significantly reduced the viability of 5637 cells without any cytotoxic effect on normal cells. These proteins increased the Annexin-V staining and the amount of condensed chromatin, demonstrating that the Gecko proteinsinduced cell death was caused by apoptosis. Gecko proteins suppressed Akt activation, and the overexpression of constitutively active form of myristoylated Akt prevented Gecko proteins-induced death of 5637 cells. Furthermore, Gecko proteins activated caspase 9 and caspase 3/7. Taken together, our data demonstrated that Gecko proteins suppressed the Akt pathway and activated the intrinsic caspase pathway, leading to the apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 531-536].

  1. Assessing induced folding within the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the Henipavirus nucleoproteins by site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Marlène; Habchi, Johnny; El Habre, Zeina; Nesme, Léo; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Belle, Valérie; Longhi, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    This work aims at characterizing structural transitions within the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein (NTAIL) from the Nipah and Hendra viruses, two recently emerged pathogens gathered within the Henipavirus genus. To this end, we used site-directed spin labeling combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the α-helical-induced folding that Henipavirus NTAIL domains undergo in the presence of the C-terminal X domain of the phosphoprotein (PXD). For each NTAIL protein, six positions located within four previously proposed molecular recognition elements (MoREs) were targeted for spin labeling, with three of these positions (475, 481, and 487) falling within the MoRE responsible for binding to PXD (Box3). A detailed analysis of the impact of the partner protein on the labeled NTAIL variants revealed a dramatic modification in the environment of the spin labels grafted within Box3, with the observed modifications supporting the formation of an induced α-helix within this region. In the free state, the slightly lower mobility of the spin labels grafted within Box3 as compared to the other positions suggests the existence of a transiently populated α-helix, as already reported for measles virus (MeV) NTAIL. Comparison with the well-characterized MeV NTAIL-PXD system, allowed us to validate the structural models of Henipavirus NTAIL-PXD complexes that we previously proposed. In addition, this study highlighted a few notable differences between the Nipah and Hendra viruses. In particular, the observation of composite spectra for the free form of the Nipah virus NTAIL variants spin labeled in Box3 supports conformational heterogeneity of this partly pre-configured α-helix, with the pre-existence of stable α-helical segments. Altogether these results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of the Henipavirus NTAIL-PXD binding reaction.

  2. Function and structure of inherently disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Dunker, A Keith; Silman, Israel; Uversky, Vladimir N; Sussman, Joel L

    2008-12-01

    The application of bioinformatics methodologies to proteins inherently lacking 3D structure has brought increased attention to these macromolecules. Here topics concerning these proteins are discussed, including their prediction from amino acid sequence, their enrichment in eukaryotes compared to prokaryotes, their more rapid evolution compared to structured proteins, their organization into specific groups, their structural preferences, their half-lives in cells, their contributions to signaling diversity (via high contents of multiple-partner binding sites, post-translational modifications, and alternative splicing), their distinct functional repertoire compared to that of structured proteins, and their involvement in diseases.

  3. Unravelling intrinsic efficacy and ligand bias at G protein coupled receptors: A practical guide to assessing functional data.

    PubMed

    Stott, Lisa A; Hall, David A; Holliday, Nicholas D

    2016-02-01

    Stephenson's empirical definition of an agonist, as a ligand with binding affinity and intrinsic efficacy (the ability to activate the receptor once bound), underpins classical receptor pharmacology. Quantifying intrinsic efficacy using functional concentration response relationships has always presented an experimental challenge. The requirement for realistic determination of efficacy is emphasised by recent developments in our understanding of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, with recognition that some ligands stabilise different active conformations of the receptor, leading to pathway-selective, or biased agonism. Biased ligands have potential as therapeutics with improved selectivity and clinical efficacy, but there are also pitfalls to the identification of pathway selective effects. Here we explore the basics of concentration response curve analysis, beginning with the need to distinguish ligand bias from other influences of the functional system under study. We consider the different approaches that have been used to quantify and compare biased ligands, many of which are based on the Black and Leff operational model of agonism. Some of the practical issues that accompany these analyses are highlighted, with opportunities to improve estimates in future, particularly in the separation of true agonist intrinsic efficacy from the contributions of system dependent coupling efficiency. Such methods are by their nature practical approaches, and all rely on Stephenson's separation of affinity and efficacy parameters, which are interdependent at the mechanistic level. Nevertheless, operational analysis methods can be justified by mechanistic models of GPCR activation, and if used wisely are key elements to biased ligand identification.

  4. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  5. Assessing Energetic Contributions to Binding from a Disordered Region in a Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    S Cho; C Swaminathan; D Bonsor; M Kerzic; R Guan; J Yang; C Kieke; P Anderson; D Kranz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Many functional proteins are at least partially disordered prior to binding. Although the structural transitions upon binding of disordered protein regions can influence the affinity and specificity of protein complexes, their precise energetic contributions to binding are unknown. Here, we use a model protein-protein interaction system in which a locally disordered region has been modified by directed evolution to quantitatively assess the thermodynamic and structural contributions to binding of disorder-to-order transitions. Through X-ray structure determination of the protein binding partners before and after complex formation and isothermal titration calorimetry of the interactions, we observe a correlation between protein ordering and binding affinity for complexes along this affinity maturation pathway. Additionally, we show that discrepancies between observed and calculated heat capacities based on buried surface area changes in the protein complexes can be explained largely by heat capacity changes that would result solely from folding the locally disordered region. Previously developed algorithms for predicting binding energies of protein-protein interactions, however, are unable to correctly model the energetic contributions of the structural transitions in our model system. While this highlights the shortcomings of current computational methods in modeling conformational flexibility, it suggests that the experimental methods used here could provide training sets of molecular interactions for improving these algorithms and further rationalizing molecular recognition in protein-protein interactions.

  6. Identifying residual structure in intrinsically disordered systems: a 2D IR spectroscopic study of the GVGXPGVG peptide.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Joshua; Roy, Santanu; Reppert, Mike; Baer, Marcel; Marx, Dominik; Jansen, Thomas La Cour; Knoester, Jasper; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-03-21

    The peptide amide-I vibration of a proline turn encodes information on the turn structure. In this study, FTIR, two-dimensional IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations were employed to characterize the varying turn conformations that exist in the GVGX(L)PGVG family of disordered peptides. This analysis revealed that changing the size of the side chain at the X amino acid site from Gly to Ala to Val substantially alters the conformation of the peptide. To quantify this effect, proline peak shifts and intensity changes were compared to a structure-based spectroscopic model. These simulated spectra were used to assign the population of type-II β turns, bulged turns, and irregular β turns for each peptide. Of particular interest was the Val variant commonly found in the protein elastin, which contained a 25% population of irregular β turns containing two peptide hydrogen bonds to the proline C═O.

  7. Anatomy of protein disorder, flexibility and disease-related mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui-Chun; Chung, Sun Sook; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca

    2015-01-01

    Integration of protein structural information with human genetic variation and pathogenic mutations is essential to understand molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of polymorphisms on protein interactions and cellular processes. We investigate occurrences of non-synonymous SNPs in ordered and disordered protein regions by systematic mapping of common variants and disease-related SNPs onto these regions. We show that common variants accumulate in disordered regions; conversely pathogenic variants are significantly depleted in disordered regions. These different occurrences of pathogenic and common SNPs can be attributed to a negative selection on random mutations in structurally highly constrained regions. New approaches in the study of quantitative effects of pathogenic-related mutations should effectively account for all the possible contexts and relative functional constraints in which the sequence variation occurs. PMID:26322316

  8. The bacterial tubulin FtsZ requires its intrinsically disordered linker to direct robust cell wall construction

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Kousik; Miguel, Amanda; Desmarais, Samantha M.; Meier, Elizabeth L.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Goley, Erin D.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial GTPase FtsZ forms a cytokinetic ring at midcell, recruits the division machinery, and orchestrates membrane and peptidoglycan cell wall invagination. However, the mechanism for FtsZ regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism is unknown. The FtsZ GTPase domain is separated from its membrane-anchoring C-terminal conserved (CTC) peptide by a disordered C-terminal linker (CTL). Here, we investigate CTL function in Caulobacter crescentus. Strikingly, production of FtsZ lacking the CTL (ΔCTL) is lethal: cells become filamentous, form envelope bulges, and lyse, resembling treatment with β-lactam antibiotics. This phenotype is produced by FtsZ polymers bearing the CTC and a CTL shorter than 14 residues. Peptidoglycan synthesis still occurs downstream of ΔCTL, however cells expressing ΔCTL exhibit reduced peptidoglycan crosslinking and longer glycan strands than wildtype. Importantly, midcell proteins are still recruited to sites of ΔCTL assembly. We propose that FtsZ regulates peptidoglycan metabolism through a CTL-dependent mechanism that extends beyond simple protein recruitment. PMID:26099469

  9. Expression of selected proteins of the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis in human leukocytes exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Iwaniuk, A; Jabłońska, E; Jabłoński, J; Ratajczak-Wrona, W; Garley, M

    2015-06-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a xenobiotic widespread in human environment capable of regulating the lifespan of immune cells. In this study, we examined the roles of the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)/death receptor 5 (DR5) complex and the Fas molecule in the induction of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway in human neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to NDMA. Also we assessed these proteins ability to trigger the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in those cells. For this purpose, we examined the expression of Fas-associated protein with death domain, truncated Bid (tBid) proteins, and apoptogenic factors such as apoptosis-inducing factor, Smac/Diablo, Omi/HtrA2, and caspase-3 as an indication of accomplished apoptosis phenomenon. PMNs and PBMCs were isolated from whole blood by density gradient centrifugation using Polymorphrep. Apoptotic cells were assessed with flow cytometry using a ready-made kit. The expression of proapoptotic molecules was investigated by Western blot analysis of PMNs and PBMCs treated with NDMA and/or rhTRAIL. The obtained results confirm the proapoptotic effects of NDMA on the examined human leukocytes and indicate an active participation of the TRAIL/DR5 complex and Fas protein in the process of apoptosis. Moreover, the research revealed distinct mechanisms of intrinsic apoptosis pathway activation between PMNs and PBMCs exposed to NDMA, as confirmed by the different levels of tBid, Smac/Diablo, Omi/HtrA2, and caspase-3 expression in those cells.

  10. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Intrinsic Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders: Advanced Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (ASWPD), Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (DSWPD), Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (N24SWD), and Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (ISWRD). An Update for 2015

    PubMed Central

    Auger, R. Robert; Burgess, Helen J.; Emens, Jonathan S.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Sharkey, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analyses (where appropriate) were performed and the GRADE approach was used to update the previous American Academy of Sleep Medicine Practice Parameters on the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. Available data allowed for positive endorsement (at a second-tier degree of confidence) of strategically timed melatonin (for the treatment of DSWPD, blind adults with N24SWD, and children/ adolescents with ISWRD and comorbid neurological disorders), and light therapy with or without accompanying behavioral interventions (adults with ASWPD, children/adolescents with DSWPD, and elderly with dementia). Recommendations against the use of melatonin and discrete sleep-promoting medications are provided for demented elderly patients, at a second- and first-tier degree of confidence, respectively. No recommendations were provided for remaining treatments/ populations, due to either insufficient or absent data. Areas where further research is needed are discussed. Citation: Auger RR, Burgess HJ, Emens JS, Deriy LV, Thomas SM, Sharkey KM. Clinical practice guideline for the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders: advanced sleep-wake phase disorder (ASWPD), delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD), non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder (N24SWD), and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder (ISWRD). An update for 2015. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1199–1236. PMID:26414986

  11. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker’s yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to “ postdict ” the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  12. Biotinylated Quercetin as an Intrinsic Photoaffinity Proteomics Probe for the Identification of Quercetin Target Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongsheng E.; Hunt, Clayton R.; Chen, Jiawei; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Quercetin is a flavonoid natural product that is found in many foods and has been found to have a wide range of medicinal effects. Though a number of quercetin binding proteins have been identified, there has been no systematic approach to identifying all potential targets of quercetin. We describe an O7- biotinylated derivative of quercetin (BioQ) that can act as a photoaffinity proteomics reagent for capturing quercetin binding proteins, which can then be identified by LC MS/MS. BioQ was shown to inhibit heat induction of HSP70 with almost the same efficiency as quercetin, and to both inhibit and photocrosslink to CK2 kinase, a known target of quercetin involved in activation of the heat shock transcription factor. BioQ was also able to pull down a number of proteins from unheated and heated Jurkat cells following UV-irradiation that could be detected by both silver staining and Western blot analysis with an anti-biotin antibody. Analysis of the protein bands by trypsinization and LC MS/MS led to the identification of heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90 as possible quercetin target proteins, along with ubiquitin-activating enzyme, a spliceosomal protein, RuvB-like 2 ATPases, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3. In addition, a mitochondrial ATPase was identified that has been previously shown to be a target of quercetin. Most of the proteins identified have also been previously suggested to be potential anticancer targets, suggesting that quercetin's antitumor activity may be due to its ability to inhibit multiple target proteins. PMID:21798748

  13. Protein disorder prediction by condensed PSSM considering propensity for order or disorder

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chung-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Yu; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2006-01-01

    Background More and more disordered regions have been discovered in protein sequences, and many of them are found to be functionally significant. Previous studies reveal that disordered regions of a protein can be predicted by its primary structure, the amino acid sequence. One observation that has been widely accepted is that ordered regions usually have compositional bias toward hydrophobic amino acids, and disordered regions are toward charged amino acids. Recent studies further show that employing evolutionary information such as position specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) improves the prediction accuracy of protein disorder. As more and more machine learning techniques have been introduced to protein disorder detection, extracting more useful features with biological insights attracts more attention. Results This paper first studies the effect of a condensed position specific scoring matrix with respect to physicochemical properties (PSSMP) on the prediction accuracy, where the PSSMP is derived by merging several amino acid columns of a PSSM belonging to a certain property into a single column. Next, we decompose each conventional physicochemical property of amino acids into two disjoint groups which have a propensity for order and disorder respectively, and show by experiments that some of the new properties perform better than their parent properties in predicting protein disorder. In order to get an effective and compact feature set on this problem, we propose a hybrid feature selection method that inherits the efficiency of uni-variant analysis and the effectiveness of the stepwise feature selection that explores combinations of multiple features. The experimental results show that the selected feature set improves the performance of a classifier built with Radial Basis Function Networks (RBFN) in comparison with the feature set constructed with PSSMs or PSSMPs that adopt simply the conventional physicochemical properties. Conclusion Distinguishing

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Quality Control Failure in Myelin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Vera G.; Touvier, Thierry; D'Antonio, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Reaching the correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the proper function of a protein. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secreted and transmembrane proteins are synthesized and folded. To guarantee high fidelity of protein synthesis and maturation in the ER, cells have evolved ER-protein quality control (ERQC) systems, which assist protein folding and promptly degrade aberrant gene products. Only correctly folded proteins that pass ERQC checkpoints are allowed to exit the ER and reach their final destination. Misfolded glycoproteins are detected and targeted for degradation by the proteasome in a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). The excess of unstructured proteins in the ER triggers an adaptive signal transduction pathway, called unfolded protein response (UPR), which in turn potentiates ERQC activities in order to reduce the levels of aberrant molecules. When the situation cannot be restored, the UPR drives cells to apoptosis. Myelin-forming cells of the central and peripheral nervous system (oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells) synthesize a large amount of myelin proteins and lipids and therefore are particularly susceptible to ERQC failure. Indeed, deficits in ERQC and activation of ER stress/UPR have been implicated in several myelin disorders, such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher and Krabbe leucodystrophies, vanishing white matter disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. Here we discuss recent evidence underlying the importance of proper ERQC functions in genetic disorders of myelinating glia. PMID:28101003

  15. Arsenite induces apoptosis in human mesenchymal stem cells by altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by activating intrinsic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Santosh; Shi Yongli; Wang Feng; Wang He

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Environmental exposure to arsenic is an important public health issue. The effects of arsenic on different tissues and organs have been intensively studied. However, the effects of arsenic on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have not been reported. This study is designed to investigate the cell death process caused by arsenite and its related underlying mechanisms on MSCs. The rationale is that absorbed arsenic in the blood circulation can reach to the bone marrow and may affect the cell survival of MSCs. Methods: MSCs of passage 1 were purchased from Tulane University, grown till 70% confluency level and plated according to the experimental requirements followed by treatment with arsenite at various concentrations and time points. Arsenite (iAs{sup III}) induced cytotoxic effects were confirmed by cell viability and cell cycle analysis. For the presence of canonic apoptosis markers; DNA damage, exposure of intramembrane phosphotidylserine, protein and m-RNA expression levels were analyzed. Results: iAs{sup III} induced growth inhibition, G2-M arrest and apoptotic cell death in MSCs, the apoptosis induced by iAs{sup III} in the cultured MSCs was, via altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by involving intrinsic pathway. Conclusion: iAs{sup III} can induce apoptosis in bone marrow-derived MSCs via Bcl-2 family proteins, regulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Due to the multipotency of MSC, acting as progenitor cells for a variety of connective tissues including bone, adipose, cartilage and muscle, these effects of arsenic may be important in assessing the health risk of the arsenic compounds and understanding the mechanisms of arsenic-induced harmful effects.

  16. Disorder in Milk Proteins: α-Lactalbumin. Part B. A Multifunctional Whey Protein Acting as an Oligomeric Molten Globular "Oil Container" in the Anti-Tumorigenic Drugs, Liprotides.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N; Permyakov, Serge E; Breydo, Leonid; Redwan, Elrashdy M; Almehdar, Hussein A; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2016-07-15

    This is a second part of the three-part article from a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. We continue to describe α-lactalbumin, a small globular Ca2+-binding protein, which besides being one of the two components of lactose synthase that catalyzes the final step of the lactose biosynthesis in the lactating mammary gland, possesses a multitude of other functions. In fact, recent studies indicated that some partially folded forms of this protein possess noticeable bactericidal activity and other forms might be related to induction of the apoptosis of tumor cells. In its anti-tumorigenic function, oligomeric α-lactalbumin serves as a founding member of a new family of anticancer drugs termed liprotides (for lipids and partially denatured proteins), where an oligomeric molten globular protein acts as an "oil container" or cargo for the delivery of oleic acid to the cell membranes.

  17. Charge transport in disordered films of non-redox proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, P. P.; Della Torre, A.; del Mercato, L. L.; Chiuri, R.; Bramanti, A.; Calabi, F.; Maruccio, G.; Cingolani, R.; Rinaldi, R.

    2006-07-01

    Electrical conduction in solid state disordered multilayers of non-redox proteins is demonstrated by two-terminal transport experiments at the nanoscale and by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM/STS experiments). We also show that the conduction of the biomolecular films can be modulated by means of a gate field. These results may lead to the implementation of protein-based three-terminal nanodevices and open important new perspectives for a wide range of bioelectronic/biosensing applications.

  18. Spatial Propagation and Localization of Blood Coagulation Are Regulated by Intrinsic and Protein C Pathways, Respectively

    PubMed Central

    Panteleev, Mikhail A.; Ovanesov, Mikhail V.; Kireev, Dmitrii A.; Shibeko, Aleksei M.; Sinauridze, Elena I.; Ananyeva, Natalya M.; Butylin, Andrey A.; Saenko, Evgueni L.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.

    2006-01-01

    Blood coagulation in vivo is a spatially nonuniform, multistage process: coagulation factors from plasma bind to tissue factor (TF)-expressing cells, become activated, dissociate, and diffuse into plasma to form enzymatic complexes on the membranes of activated platelets. We studied spatial regulation of coagulation using two approaches: 1), an in vitro experimental model of clot formation in a thin layer of plasma activated by a monolayer of TF-expressing cells; and 2), a computer simulation model. Clotting in factor VIII- and factor XI-deficient plasmas was initiated normally, but further clot elongation was impaired in factor VIII- and, at later stages, in factor XI-deficient plasma. The data indicated that clot elongation was regulated by factor Xa formation by intrinsic tenase, whereas factor IXa was formed by extrinsic tenase on activating cells and diffused into plasma, thus sustaining clot growth. Far from the activating cells, additional factor IXa was produced by factor XIa. Exogenously added TF had no effect on the clot growth rate, suggesting that plasma TF does not contribute significantly to the clot propagation process in a reaction-diffusion system without flow. Addition of thrombomodulin at 3–100 nM caused dose-dependent termination of clot elongation with a final clot size of 2–0.2 mm. These results identify roles of specific coagulation pathways at different stages of spatial clot formation (initiation, elongation, and termination) and provide a possible basis for their therapeutic targeting. PMID:16326897

  19. Multiple oxygen entry pathways in globin proteins revealed by intrinsic pathway identification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Masayoshi; Kurisaki, Ikuo; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2015-12-01

    Each subunit of human hemoglobin (HbA) stores an oxygen molecule (O2) in the binding site (BS) cavity near the heme group. The BS is buried in the interior of the subunit so that there is a debate over the O2 entry pathways from solvent to the BS; histidine gate or multiple pathways. To elucidate the O2 entry pathways, we executed ensemble molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of T-state tetramer HbA in high concentration O2 solvent to simulate spontaneous O2 entry from solvent into the BS. By analyzing 128 independent 8 ns MD trajectories by intrinsic pathway identification by clustering (IPIC) method, we found 141 and 425 O2 entry events into the BS of the α and β subunits, respectively. In both subunits, we found that multiple O2 entry pathways through inside cavities play a significant role for O2 entry process of HbA. The rate constants of O2 entry estimated from the MD trajectories correspond to the experimentally observed values. In addition, by analyzing monomer myoglobin, we verified that the high O2 concentration condition can reproduce the ratios of each multiple pathway in the one-tenth lower O2 concentration condition. These indicate the validity of the multiple pathways obtained in our MD simulations.

  20. Transduction of human recombinant proteins into mitochondria as a protein therapeutic approach for mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Lefkothea C; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S

    2011-11-01

    Protein therapy is considered an alternative approach to gene therapy for treatment of genetic-metabolic disorders. Human protein therapeutics (PTs), developed via recombinant DNA technology and used for the treatment of these illnesses, act upon membrane-bound receptors to achieve their pharmacological response. On the contrary, proteins that normally act inside the cells cannot be developed as PTs in the conventional way, since they are not able to "cross" the plasma membrane. Furthermore, in mitochondrial disorders, attributed either to depleted or malfunctioned mitochondrial proteins, PTs should also have to reach the subcellular mitochondria to exert their therapeutic potential. Nowadays, there is no effective therapy for mitochondrial disorders. The development of PTs, however, via the Protein Transduction Domain (PTD) technology offered new opportunities for the deliberate delivery of human recombinant proteins inside eukaryotic subcellular organelles. To this end, mitochondrial disorders could be clinically encountered with the delivery of human mitochondrial proteins (engineered via recombinant DNA and PTD technologies) at specific intramitochondrial sites to exert their function. Overall, PTD-mediated Protein Replacement Therapy emerges as a suitable model system for the therapeutic approach for mitochondrial disorders.

  1. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-01-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity. Images PMID:6286971

  2. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-06-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity.

  3. Age-related changes in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles: analysis of muscle fibers, muscle fiber proteins, and subneural apparatuses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Taguchi, Aki; Motoyoshi, Kazumi; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Desaki, Junzo

    2013-03-01

    We compared age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of aged and young adult rats by determining the number and diameter of muscle fibers, contractile muscle protein (myosin heavy chain isoforms, MHC) composition, and the morphology of the subneural apparatuses. In aged rats, both the numbers and the diameters of muscle fibers decreased in the cricothyroid (CT) muscle. The number of fibers, but not diameter, decreased in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. In the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle, neither the number nor the diameter of fibers changed significantly. Aging was associated with a decrease in type IIB and an increase in type IIA MHC isoform levels in CT muscle, but no such changes were observed in the TA or PCA muscles. Morphological examination of primary synaptic clefts of the subneural apparatus revealed that aging resulted in decreased labyrinthine and increased depression types in only the CT muscle. In the aged group, morphologically immature subneural apparatuses were found infrequently in the CT muscle, indicating continued tissue remodeling. We suggest, therefore, that age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles primarily involve the CT muscle, whereas the structures of the TA and PCA muscles may better resist aging processes and therefore are less vulnerable to functional impairment. This may reflect differences in their roles; the CT muscle controls the tone of the vocal folds, while the TA and PCA muscles play an essential role in vital activities such as respiration and swallowing.

  4. Understanding Protein Non-Folding

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the family of intrinsically disordered proteins, members of which fail to form rigid 3-D structures under physiological conditions, either along their entire lengths or only in localized regions. Instead, these intriguing proteins/regions exist as dynamic ensembles within which atom positions and backbone Ramachandran angles exhibit extreme temporal fluctuations without specific equilibrium values. Many of these intrinsically disordered proteins are known to carry out important biological functions which, in fact, depend on the absence of specific 3-D structure. The existence of such proteins does not fit the prevailing structure-function paradigm, which states that unique 3-D structure is a prerequisite to function. Thus, the protein structure-function paradigm has to be expanded to include intrinsically disordered proteins and alternative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and function. This shift in the paradigm represents a major breakthrough for biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, as it opens new levels of understanding with regard to the complex life of proteins. This review will try to answer the following questions: How were intrinsically disordered proteins discovered? Why don't these proteins fold? What is so special about intrinsic disorder? What are the functional advantages of disordered proteins/regions? What is the functional repertoire of these proteins? What are the relationships between intrinsically disordered proteins and human diseases? PMID:20117254

  5. Effects of protein molecular weight on the intrinsic material properties and release kinetics of wet spun polymeric microfiber delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Lavin, Danya M; Zhang, Linda; Furtado, Stacia; Hopkins, Richard A; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Wet spun microfibers have great potential for the design of multifunctional controlled release scaffolds. Understanding aspects of drug delivery and mechanical strength, specific to protein molecular weight, may aid in the optimization and development of wet spun fiber platforms. This study investigated the intrinsic material properties and release kinetics of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) wet spun microfibers encapsulating proteins with varying molecular weights. A cryogenic emulsion technique developed in our laboratory was used to encapsulate insulin (5.8 kDa), lysozyme (14.3 kDa) and bovine serum albumin (BSA, 66.0 kDa) within wet spun microfibers (~100 μm). Protein loading was found to significantly influence mechanical strength and drug release kinetics of PLGA and PLLA microfibers in a molecular-weight-dependent manner. BSA encapsulation resulted in the most significant decrease in strength and ductility for both PLGA and PLLA microfibers. Interestingly, BSA-loaded PLGA microfibers had a twofold increase (8±2 MPa to 16±1 MPa) in tensile strength and a fourfold increase (3±1% to 12±6%) in elongation until failure in comparison to PLLA microfibers. PLGA and PLLA microfibers exhibited prolonged protein release up to 63 days in vitro. Further analysis with the Korsmeyer-Peppas kinetic model determined that the mechanism of protein release was dependent on Fickian diffusion. These results emphasize the critical role protein molecular weight has on the properties of wet spun filaments, highlighting the importance of designing small molecular analogues to replace growth factors with large molecular weights.

  6. The intrinsic conformational features of amino acids from a protein coil library and their applications in force field development.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Han, Wei; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2013-03-14

    The local conformational (φ, ψ, χ) preferences of amino acid residues remain an active research area, which are important for the development of protein force fields. In this perspective article, we first summarize spectroscopic studies of alanine-based short peptides in aqueous solution. While most studies indicate a preference for the P(II) conformation in the unfolded state over α and β conformations, significant variations are also observed. A statistical analysis from various coil libraries of high-resolution protein structures is then summarized, which gives a more coherent view of the local conformational features. The φ, ψ, χ distributions of the 20 amino acids have been obtained from a protein coil library, considering both backbone and side-chain conformational preferences. The intrinsic side-chain χ(1) rotamer preference and χ(1)-dependent Ramachandran plot can be generally understood by combining the interaction of the side-chain Cγ/Oγ atom with two neighboring backbone peptide groups. Current all-atom force fields such as AMBER ff99sb-ILDN, ff03 and OPLS-AA/L do not reproduce these distributions well. A method has been developed by combining the φ, ψ plot of alanine with the influence of side-chain χ(1) rotamers to derive the local conformational features of various amino acids. It has been further applied to improve the OPLS-AA force field. The modified force field (OPLS-AA/C) reproduces experimental (3)J coupling constants for various short peptides quite well. It also better reproduces the temperature-dependence of the helix-coil transition for alanine-based peptides. The new force field can fold a series of peptides and proteins with various secondary structures to their experimental structures. MD simulations of several globular proteins using the improved force field give significantly less deviation (RMSD) to experimental structures. The results indicate that the local conformational features from coil libraries are valuable for

  7. Probing Structural Transitions in the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminal Domain of the Measles Virus Nucleoprotein by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Cyanylated Cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Bischak, Connor G.; Longhi, Sonia; Snead, David M.; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Terrer, Elodie; Londergan, Casey H.

    2010-01-01

    Four single-cysteine variants of the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (NTAIL) were cyanylated at cysteine and their infrared spectra in the C≡N stretching region were recorded both in the absence and in the presence of one of the physiological partners of NTAIL, namely the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein. Consistent with previous studies showing that XD triggers a disorder-to-order transition within NTAIL, the C≡N stretching bands of the infrared probe were found to be significantly affected by XD, with this effect being position-dependent. When the cyanylated cysteine side chain is solvent-exposed throughout the structural transition, its changing linewidth reflects a local gain of structure. When the probe becomes partially buried due to binding, its frequency reports on the mean hydrophobicity of the microenvironment surrounding the labeled side chain of the bound form. The probe moiety is small compared to other common covalently attached spectroscopic probes, thereby minimizing possible steric hindrance/perturbation at the binding interface. These results show for the first time to our knowledge the suitability of site-specific cysteine mutagenesis followed by cyanylation and infrared spectroscopy to document structural transitions occurring within intrinsically disordered regions, with regions involved in binding and folding being identifiable at the residue level. PMID:20816082

  8. Novel Role for Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) in the Restriction of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 by the Cellular Intrinsic Antiviral Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Kristen L.; Wasson, Peter; McFarlane, Steven; Tong, Lily; Brown, James R.; Grant, Kyle G.; Domingues, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is used by the intrinsic antiviral immune response to restrict viral pathogens, such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Despite characterization of the host factors that rely on SUMOylation to exert their antiviral effects, the enzymes that mediate these SUMOylation events remain to be defined. We show that unconjugated SUMO levels are largely maintained throughout infection regardless of the presence of ICP0, the HSV-1 SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase. Moreover, in the absence of ICP0, high-molecular-weight SUMO-conjugated proteins do not accumulate if HSV-1 DNA does not replicate. These data highlight the continued importance for SUMO signaling throughout infection. We show that the SUMO ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) is upregulated during HSV-1 infection and localizes to nuclear domains that contain viral DNA. PIAS4 is recruited to sites associated with HSV-1 genome entry through SUMO interaction motif (SIM)-dependent mechanisms that are destabilized by ICP0. In contrast, PIAS4 accumulates in replication compartments through SIM-independent mechanisms irrespective of ICP0 expression. Depletion of PIAS4 enhances the replication of ICP0-null mutant HSV-1, which is susceptible to restriction by the intrinsic antiviral immune response. The mechanisms of PIAS4-mediated restriction are synergistic with the restriction mechanisms of a characterized intrinsic antiviral factor, promyelocytic leukemia protein, and are antagonized by ICP0. We provide the first evidence that PIAS4 is an intrinsic antiviral factor. This novel role for PIAS4 in intrinsic antiviral immunity contrasts with the known roles of PIAS proteins as suppressors of innate immunity. IMPORTANCE Posttranslational modifications with small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins regulate multiple aspects of host immunity and viral replication. The protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) family of SUMO ligases is predominantly associated

  9. Topology of membrane sulfhydryl groups in the human erythrocyte. Demonstration of a non-reactive population in intrinsic proteins.

    PubMed

    Haest, C W; Kamp, D; Deuticke, B

    1981-05-06

    A major fraction of the protein sulfhydryl groups of human erythrocyte membranes can be oxidized to disulfide bonds by the lipid soluble reagent, diamide, and the hydrophilic reagent, tetrathionate. Furthermore, the same fraction also reacts with the monofunctional reagent, N-ethylmaleimide. About 20% of the SH groups, however, do not react with any of these agents even upon prolonged treatment and increased concentrations. These 'non-reacting' SH groups were now localized by a procedure involving blockage of the accessible SH groups by non-labeled N-ethylmaleimide or by diamide, subsequent isolation and solubilization of the membranes in SDS and labelling of the now accessible, residual SH groups with N-[ethyl-2-3H]ethylmaleimide. The distribution of the radioactivity over the peptide fractions shows that the non-reacting SH groups are mainly localized in the intrinsic proteins, while essentially all of the SH groups of the extrinsic protein, spectrin, are reactive. After solubilization of the membranes with Triton X-100 the non-reacting SH groups became reactive towards N-ethylmaleimide. It is proposed that lack of reaction of SH groups in the native membranes is due to their localization within the hydrophobic core of the membrane.

  10. Selective regulation of intrinsic membrane proteins in HepG2

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.C.; Wolkoff, A.W.; Morell, A.G.; Stockert, R.J.

    1987-05-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) and insulin receptor (IR) are cell-surface glycoproteins whose activity varies with the state of cellular differentiation. Expression of ASGP-R, IR and an organic anion binding protein (OABP) was studied in HepG2 cells grown in minimal essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), dialyzed FBS (dFBS) or serum from other species and corresponding to different physiological states of the liver. Cells grown in MEM-10% FBS maximally express ASGP-R and IR binding activity at confluence while OABP antigen appears independent of the state of cellular proliferation. Growth in dFBS reduces expression of ASGP-R and IR at confluence by 60-80% without altering OABP content, total cellular protein synthesis, or /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. Immunoblot of these cells reveals virtually no mature, 45 kDa ASGP-R, but a small amount of 36 kDa protein; metabolic labelling with /sup 35/S-methionine shows reduced synthesis of 45 kDa ASGP-R and absence of the 36 kDa antigen. Northern blot analysis of ASGP-R mRNA levels suggests post-translational regulation is affected. Normal expression of ASGP-R and IR are restored by addition of a 300-350 dalton fraction of FBS to medium.

  11. Purification and characterization of Band 3, the major intrinsic membrane protein of the bovine erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, H; Makino, S

    1980-03-01

    Band 3 from bovine erythrocyte membranes was isolated in a state of high purity by the following steps in the presence of a nonionic detergent, nonaethyleneglycol n-dodecyl ether (C12E9): (1) selective removal of Band 2.6 from ghosts by solubilization with 2% C12E9 (2) extraction of Band 3-rich fraction with 4% C12E9 from 2% C12E9-treated membrane residues, and (3) purification of Band 3 by aminoethyl-conjugated Sepharose 4B column chromatography. Human Band 3 was also purified in good yield by aminoethyl-conjugated Sepharose 4B column chromatography of erythrocyte membrane proteins solubilized with 1% C12E9 and treated with 2,3-dimethymaleic anhydride. There were no significant differences in CD spectra in C12E9, amino acid compositions, and migration mobilities in sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis between bovine and human Band 3. Calculations of average hydrophobicity and discriminant function demonstrated that bovine Band 3 could be categorized as a typical integral membrane protein. Bovine Band 3 showed a tendency to form a dimer and higher aggregates in 0.1% C12E9; these were resistant to dissociation into monomers in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution and, further, the protein retained residual secondary structure in highly concentrated guanidine hydrochloride solution, indicating the possible presence of an extended sequence of hydrophobic amino acid residues.

  12. Intrinsically disordered proteins and prostate cancer: pouring new wine in an old bottle

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    An inconvenient truth in urology is that despite decades of intense research, prostate cancer (PCa) has remained one of the most prevalent cancers and leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men, particularly in the industrialized world.1 It is rather sobering to acknowledge that even with early diagnosis and treatment, the incidence and death due to the disease are almost paradoxically projected to increase in the coming decades.2 PMID:27427556

  13. Pathogenic protein seeding in Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Jucker, Mathias; Walker, Lary C

    2011-10-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins is a seminal occurrence in a remarkable variety of neurodegenerative disorders. In Alzheimer disease (the most prevalent cerebral proteopathy), the two principal aggregating proteins are β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau. The abnormal assemblies formed by conformational variants of these proteins range in size from small oligomers to the characteristic lesions that are visible by optical microscopy, such as senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Pathologic similarities with prion disease suggest that the formation and spread of these proteinaceous lesions might involve a common molecular mechanism-corruptive protein templating. Experimentally, cerebral β-amyloidosis can be exogenously induced by exposure to dilute brain extracts containing aggregated Aβ seeds. The amyloid-inducing agent probably is Aβ itself, in a conformation generated most effectively in the living brain. Once initiated, Aβ lesions proliferate within and among brain regions. The induction process is governed by the structural and biochemical nature of the Aβ seed, as well as the attributes of the host, reminiscent of pathogenically variant prion strains. The concept of prionlike induction and spreading of pathogenic proteins recently has been expanded to include aggregates of tau, α-synuclein, huntingtin, superoxide dismutase-1, and TDP-43, which characterize such human neurodegenerative disorders as frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Parkinson/Lewy body disease, Huntington disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Our recent finding that the most effective Aβ seeds are small and soluble intensifies the search in bodily fluids for misfolded protein seeds that are upstream in the proteopathic cascade, and thus could serve as predictive diagnostics and the targets of early, mechanism-based interventions. Establishing the clinical implications of corruptive protein templating will require further mechanistic and epidemiologic investigations

  14. Intrinsic Relative Activities of Opioid Agonists in Activating Gα proteins and Internalizing Receptor: Differences between Human and Mouse Receptors

    PubMed Central

    DiMattio, Kelly M.; Ehlert, Frederick J.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators recently identified biased opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi−G) and receptor internalization (RAi−I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi−G − Log RAi−I, RAi−G/RAi−I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1–17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed. PMID:26057692

  15. Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) in plants: a complex gene family with major impacts on plant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Kerrie L; Bhave, Mrinal

    2007-10-01

    The ubiquitous cell membrane proteins called aquaporins are now firmly established as channel proteins that control the specific transport of water molecules across cell membranes in all living organisms. The aquaporins are thus likely to be of fundamental significance to all facets of plant growth and development affected by plant-water relations. A majority of plant aquaporins have been found to share essential structural features with the human aquaporin and exhibit water-transporting ability in various functional assays, and some have been shown experimentally to be of critical importance to plant survival. Furthermore, substantial evidence is now available from a number of plant species that shows differential gene expression of aquaporins in response to abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, or cold and clearly establishes the aquaporins as major players in the response of plants to conditions that affect water availability. This review summarizes the function and regulation of these genes to develop a greater understanding of the response of plants to water insufficiency, and particularly, to identify tolerant genotypes of major crop species including wheat and rice and plants that are important in agroforestry.

  16. Protein Destabilization as a Common Factor in Diverse Inherited Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Rachel L.; Das, Jhuma; Diaz, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    Protein destabilization by amino acid substitutions is proposed to play a prominent role in widespread inherited human disorders, not just those known to involve protein misfolding and aggregation. To test this hypothesis, we computationally evaluate the effects on protein stability of all possible amino acid substitutions in 20 disease-associated proteins with multiple identified pathogenic missense mutations. For 18 of the 20 proteins studied, substitutions at known positions of pathogenic mutations are significantly more likely to destabilize the native protein fold (as indicated by more positive values of ΔΔG). Thus, positions identified as sites of disease-associated mutations, as opposed to non-disease-associated sites, are predicted to be more vulnerable to protein destabilization upon amino acid substitution. This finding supports the notion that destabilization of native protein structure underlies the pathogenicity of broad set of missense mutations, even in cases where reduced protein stability and/or aggregation are not characteristic of the disease state. PMID:26584803

  17. Disorder enhanced intrinsic electroresistance in Sm0.60Sr0.40Mn1-xFexO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, S. T.; Saber, M. M.; Alagoz, H. S.; Biggart, K.; Bouveyron, R.; Khan, Mahmud; Jung, J.; Chow, K. H.

    2012-06-01

    The intrinsic electroresistance (ER) of polycrystalline Sm0.60Sr0.40Mn1-xFexO3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.02) have been investigated by magnetotransport measurements. It is found that the ER increases with x while it is suppressed by a magnetic field. These observations imply that the ER increases dramatically with the inhomogeneity in the samples. The possible mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior are discussed.

  18. An intrinsic gut leptin-melanocortin pathway modulates intestinal microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Li, Xiaosong; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Chan, Lawrence; Schwartz, Gary J; Chua, Streamson C; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2010-07-01

    Fat is delivered to tissues by apoB-containing lipoproteins synthesized in the liver and intestine with the help of an intracellular chaperone, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). Leptin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue, acts in the brain and on peripheral tissues to regulate fat storage and metabolism. Our aim was to identify the role of leptin signaling in MTP regulation and lipid absorption using several mouse models deficient in leptin receptor (LEPR) signaling and downstream effectors. Mice with spontaneous LEPR B mutations or targeted ablation of LEPR B in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) or agouti gene related peptide (AGRP) expressing cells had increased triglyceride in plasma, liver, and intestine. Furthermore, melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) knockout mice expressed a similar triglyceride phenotype, suggesting that leptin might regulate intestinal MTP expression through the melanocortin pathway. Mechanistic studies revealed that the accumulation of triglyceride in the intestine might be secondary to decreased expression of MTP and lipid absorption in these mice. Surgical and chemical blockade of vagal efferent outflow to the intestine in wild-type mice failed to alter the triglyceride phenotype, demonstrating that central neural control mechanisms were likely not involved in the observed regulation of intestinal MTP. Instead, we found that enterocytes express LEPR, POMC, AGRP, and MC4R. We propose that a peripheral, local gut signaling mechanism involving LEPR B and MC4R regulates intestinal MTP and controls intestinal lipid absorption.

  19. An inhibitor of the kinesin spindle protein activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway independently of p53 and de novo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weikang; South, Victoria J; Diehl, Ronald E; Davide, Joseph P; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Fraley, Mark E; Arrington, Kenneth L; Lobell, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    The kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a microtubule motor protein, is essential for the formation of bipolar spindles during mitosis. Inhibition of KSP activates the spindle checkpoint and causes apoptosis. It was shown that prolonged inhibition of KSP activates Bax and caspase-3, which requires a competent spindle checkpoint and couples with mitotic slippage. Here we investigated how Bax is activated by KSP inhibition and the roles of Bax and p53 in KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis. We demonstrate that small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Bax greatly attenuates KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis and that Bax activation is upstream of caspase activation. This indicates that Bax mediates the lethality of KSP inhibitors and that KSP inhibition provokes apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway where Bax activation is prior to caspase activation. Although the BH3-only protein Puma is induced after mitotic slippage, suppression of de novo protein synthesis that abrogates Puma induction does not block activation of Bax or caspase-3, indicating that Bax activation is triggered by a posttranslational event. Comparison of KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis between matched cell lines containing either functional or deficient p53 reveals that inhibition of KSP induces apoptosis independently of p53 and that p53 is dispensable for spindle checkpoint function. Thus, KSP inhibitors should be active in p53-deficient tumors.

  20. An Inhibitor of the Kinesin Spindle Protein Activates the Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway Independently of p53 and De Novo Protein Synthesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weikang; South, Victoria J.; Diehl, Ronald E.; Davide, Joseph P.; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Fraley, Mark E.; Arrington, Kenneth L.; Lobell, Robert B.

    2007-01-01

    The kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a microtubule motor protein, is essential for the formation of bipolar spindles during mitosis. Inhibition of KSP activates the spindle checkpoint and causes apoptosis. It was shown that prolonged inhibition of KSP activates Bax and caspase-3, which requires a competent spindle checkpoint and couples with mitotic slippage. Here we investigated how Bax is activated by KSP inhibition and the roles of Bax and p53 in KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis. We demonstrate that small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Bax greatly attenuates KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis and that Bax activation is upstream of caspase activation. This indicates that Bax mediates the lethality of KSP inhibitors and that KSP inhibition provokes apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway where Bax activation is prior to caspase activation. Although the BH3-only protein Puma is induced after mitotic slippage, suppression of de novo protein synthesis that abrogates Puma induction does not block activation of Bax or caspase-3, indicating that Bax activation is triggered by a posttranslational event. Comparison of KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis between matched cell lines containing either functional or deficient p53 reveals that inhibition of KSP induces apoptosis independently of p53 and that p53 is dispensable for spindle checkpoint function. Thus, KSP inhibitors should be active in p53-deficient tumors. PMID:17101792

  1. Characterization of Leishmania donovani aquaporins shows presence of subcellular aquaporins similar to tonoplast intrinsic proteins of plants.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Neha; Mandal, Swati; Seth, Chandan; Saint, Malika; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy; Ghosh, Indira; Madhubala, Rentala

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania donovani, a protozoan parasite, resides in the macrophages of the mammalian host. The aquaporin family of proteins form important components of the parasite-host interface. The parasite-host interface could be a potential target for chemotherapy. Analysis of L. major and L. infantum genomes showed the presence of five aquaporins (AQPs) annotated as AQP9 (230aa), AQP putative (294aa), AQP-like protein (279aa), AQP1 (314aa) and AQP-like protein (596aa). We report here the structural modeling, localization and functional characterization of the AQPs from L. donovani. LdAQP1, LdAQP9, LdAQP2860 and LdAQP2870 have the canonical NPA-NPA motifs, whereas LdAQP putative has a non-canonical NPM-NPA motif. In the carboxyl terminal to the second NPA box of all AQPs except AQP1, a valine/alanine residue was found instead of the arginine. In that respect these four AQPs are similar to tonoplast intrinsic proteins in plants, which are localized to intracellular organelles. Confocal microscopy of L. donovani expressing GFP-tagged AQPs showed an intracellular localization of LdAQP9 and LdAQP2870. Real-time PCR assays showed expression of all aquaporins except LdAQP2860, whose level was undetectable. Three-dimensional homology modeling of the AQPs showed that LdAQP1 structure bears greater topological similarity to the aquaglyceroporin than to aquaporin of E. coli. The pore of LdAQP1 was very different from the rest in shape and size. The cavity of LdAQP2860 was highly irregular and undefined in geometry. For functional characterization, four AQP proteins were heterologously expressed in yeast. In the fps1Δ yeast cells, which lacked the key aquaglyceroporin, LdAQP1 alone displayed an osmosensitive phenotype indicating glycerol transport activity. However, expression of LdAQP1 and LdAQP putative in a yeast gpd1Δ strain, deleted for glycerol production, conferred osmosensitive phenotype indicating water transport activity or aquaporin function. Our analysis for the first

  2. An Intrinsically Disordered Region of the Acetyltransferase p300 with Similarity to Prion-Like Domains Plays a Role in Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kirilyuk, Alexander; Shimoji, Mika; Catania, Jason; Sahu, Geetaram; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Giordano, Antonio; Albanese, Christopher; Mocchetti, Italo; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura

    2012-01-01

    Several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders and cancer are associated with abnormal accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Proteins with high tendency to aggregate include the p53 gene product, TAU and alpha synuclein. The potential toxicity of aberrantly folded proteins is limited via their transport into intracellular sub-compartments, the aggresomes, where misfolded proteins are stored or cleared via autophagy. We have identified a region of the acetyltransferase p300 that is highly disordered and displays similarities with prion-like domains. We show that this region is encoded as an alternative spliced variant independently of the acetyltransferase domain, and provides an interaction interface for various misfolded proteins, promoting their aggregation. p300 enhances aggregation of TAU and of p53 and is a component of cellular aggregates in both tissue culture cells and in alpha-synuclein positive Lewy bodies of patients affected by Parkinson disease. Down-regulation of p300 impairs aggresome formation and enhances cytotoxicity induced by misfolded protein stress. These data unravel a novel activity of p300, offer new insights into the function of disordered domains and implicate p300 in pathological aggregation that occurs in neurodegeneration and cancer. PMID:23133622

  3. Targeting protein kinases in central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chico, Laura K.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Watterson, D. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases are a growing drug target class in disorders in peripheral tissues, but the development of kinase-targeted therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases remains a challenge, largely owing to issues associated specifically with CNS drug discovery. However, several candidate therapeutics that target CNS protein kinases are now in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. We review candidate compounds and discuss selected CNS protein kinases that are emerging as important therapeutic targets. In addition, we analyse trends in small-molecule properties that correlate with key challenges in CNS drug discovery, such as blood–brain barrier penetrance and cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism, and discuss the potential of future approaches that will integrate molecular-fragment expansion with pharmacoinformatics to address these challenges. PMID:19876042

  4. A novel mutation in the major intrinsic protein (MIP) associated with autosomal dominant congenital cataracts in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Jiang, Jin; Zhu, Yanan; Li, Jinyu; Jin, Chongfei; Shentu, Xingchao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To detect the underlying genetic defect in a Chinese family affected with bilateral congenital cataracts. Methods A detailed family history and clinical data were recorded. Mutation screening was performed in the nuclear cataract-related gene by bidirectional sequencing of the amplified products. The mutation was verified by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). Results Two cataract phenotypes were observed within this family: one eye exhibited Y-suture and nuclear pulverulent opacification of the lens, while the others exhibited complete opacification in the fetal nuclear region. Sequencing of the candidate genes detected a heterozygous c.319G>A change in the coding region of the major intrinsic protein (MIP), resulting in the substitution of a highly conserved Valine by Isoleucine (p.V107I).The mutation was confirmed by DHPLC. Conclusions This study has identified a novel MIP mutation, p.V107I in a Chinese family with congenital cataracts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cataracts caused by a mutation in the second extracellular loop domain of MIP. PMID:20361015

  5. Protein unfolding transitions in an intrinsically unstable annexin domain: molecular dynamics simulation and comparison with nuclear magnetic resonance data.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tru; Smith, Jeremy C; Sanson, Alain

    2002-08-01

    Unfolding transitions of an intrinsically unstable annexin domain and the unfolded state structure have been examined using multiple approximately 10-ns molecular dynamics simulations. Three main basins are observed in the configurational space: native-like state, compact partially unfolded or intermediate compact state, and the unfolded state. In the native-like state fluctuations are observed that are nonproductive for unfolding. During these fluctuations, after an initial loss of approximately 20% of the core residue native contacts, the core of the protein transiently completely refolds to the native state. The transition from the native-like basin to the partially unfolded compact state involves approximately 75% loss of native contacts but little change in the radius of gyration or core hydration properties. The intermediate state adopts for part of the time in one of the trajectories a novel highly compact salt-bridge stabilized structure that can be identified as a conformational trap. The intermediate-to-unfolded state transition is characterized by a large increase in the radius of gyration. After an initial relaxation the unfolded state recovers a native-like topology of the domain. The simulated unfolded state ensemble reproduces in detail experimental nuclear magnetic resonance data and leads to a convincing complete picture of the unfolded domain.

  6. Evidence for an Intrinsic Toxicity of Phosphatidylcholine to Sec14p-dependent Protein Transport from the Yeast Golgi Complex

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhigang; Fang, Min; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2001-01-01

    Yeast phosphatidylinositol-transfer protein (Sec14p) is essential for Golgi secretory function and cell viability. This requirement of Sec14p is relieved by genetic inactivation of the cytidine diphosphate-choline pathway for phosphatidycholine (PtdCho) biosynthesis. Standard phenotypic analyses indicate that inactivation of the phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) pathway for PtdCho biosynthesis, however, does not rescue the growth and secretory defects associated with Sec14p deficiency. We now report inhibition of choline uptake from the media reveals an efficient “bypass Sec14p” phenotype associated with PtdEtn-methylation pathway defects. We further show that the bypass Sec14p phenotype associated with PtdEtn-methylation pathway defects resembles other bypass Sec14p mutations in its dependence on phospholipase D activity. Finally, we find that increased dosage of enzymes that catalyze phospholipase D-independent turnover of PtdCho, via mechanisms that do not result in a direct production of phosphatidic acid or diacylglycerol, effect a partial rescue of sec14-1ts-associated growth defects. Taken together, these data support the idea that PtdCho is intrinsically toxic to yeast Golgi secretory function. PMID:11294911

  7. Constitutive overexpression of soybean plasma membrane intrinsic protein GmPIP1;6 confers salt tolerance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Under saline conditions, plant growth is depressed via osmotic stress and salt can accumulate in leaves leading to further depression of growth due to reduced photosynthesis and gas exchange. Aquaporins are proposed to have a major role in growth of plants via their impact on root water uptake and leaf gas exchange. In this study, soybean plasma membrane intrinsic protein 1;6 (GmPIP1;6) was constitutively overexpressed to evaluate the function of GmPIP1;6 in growth regulation and salt tolerance in soybean. Results GmPIP1;6 is highly expressed in roots as well as reproductive tissues and the protein targeted to the plasma membrane in onion epidermis. Treatment with 100 mM NaCl resulted in reduced expression initially, then after 3 days the expression was increased in root and leaves. The effects of constitutive overexpression of GmPIP1;6 in soybean was examined under normal and salt stress conditions. Overexpression in 2 independent lines resulted in enhanced leaf gas exchange, but not growth under normal conditions compared to wild type (WT). With 100 mM NaCl, net assimilation was much higher in the GmPIP1;6-Oe and growth was enhanced relative to WT. GmPIP1;6-Oe plants did not have higher root hydraulic conductance (Lo) under normal conditions, but were able to maintain Lo under saline conditions compared to WT which decreased Lo. GmPIP1;6-Oe lines grown in the field had increased yield resulting mainly from increased seed size. Conclusions The general impact of overexpression of GmPIP1;6 suggests that it may be a multifunctional aquaporin involved in root water transport, photosynthesis and seed loading. GmPIP1;6 is a valuable gene for genetic engineering to improve soybean yield and salt tolerance. PMID:24998596

  8. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  9. Interactions of intrinsically disordered Thellungiella salsuginea dehydrins TsDHN-1 and TsDHN-2 with membranes - synergistic effects of lipid composition and temperature on secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Luna N; Chen, Lin; Nazim, Sumaiya; Bamm, Vladimir V; Yaish, Mahmoud W; Moffatt, Barbara A; Dutcher, John R; Harauz, George

    2010-10-01

    Dehydrins are intrinsically disordered (unstructured) proteins that are expressed in plants experiencing stressful conditions such as drought or low temperature. Dehydrins are typically found in the cytosol and nucleus, but also associate with chloroplasts, mitochondria, and the plasma membrane. Although their role is not completely understood, it has been suggested that they stabilize proteins or membrane structures during environmental stress, the latter association mediated by formation of amphipathic α-helices by conserved regions called the K-segments. Thellungiella salsuginea is a crucifer that thrives in the Canadian sub-Arctic (Yukon Territory) where it grows on saline-rich soils and experiences periods of both extreme cold and drought. We have cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli two dehydrins from this plant, denoted TsDHN-1 (acidic) and TsDHN-2 (basic). Here, we show using transmission-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy that ordered secondary structure is induced and stabilized in these proteins by association with large unilamellar vesicles emulating the lipid compositions of plant plasma and organellar membranes. Moreover, this induced folding is enhanced at low temperatures, lending credence to the hypothesis that dehydrins stabilize plant outer and organellar membranes in conditions of cold.

  10. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association.

  11. A Group 6 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Common Bean Is a Disordered Protein with Extended Helical Structure and Oligomer-forming Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y.; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O.; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M.; Reyes, José L.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  12. A novel donor splice-site mutation of major intrinsic protein gene associated with congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lu; Liu, Wenqiang; Feng, Wenguo; Wang, Xing; Dang, Hui; Gao, Luna; Yao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the disease-causing gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. Methods Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on all members of a Chinese family with congenital cataract. Nine genes associated with congenital cataract were screened using direct DNA sequencing. Mutations were confirmed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The mutated major intrinsic protein (MIP) minigene, which carries the disease-causing splice-site mutation, and the wild-type (WT) MIP minigene were constructed using the pcDNA3.1 expression vector. Wild-type and mutant MIP minigene constructs were transiently transfected into HeLa cells. After 48 h of incubation at 37 °C, total RNA isolation and reverse transcription (RT)–PCR analysis were performed, and PCR products were separated and confirmed with sequencing. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel splice-site mutation in intron 3 (c.606+1 G>A) of the MIP gene. To investigate the manner in which the splice donor mutation could affect mRNA splicing, WT and mutant MIP minigenes were inserted in the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. Constructs were transfected into HeLa cells. RT–PCR analysis showed that the donor splice site mutation led to deletion of exon 3 in the mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. Conclusions The present study identified a novel donor splice-site mutation (c.606+1G>A) in the MIP gene in a Chinese family with congenital cataract. In vitro RT–PCR analysis showed that this splice-site mutation resulted in the deletion of exon 3 from mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. This is the first report to show that donor splice-site mutation in MIP gene can cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. PMID:24319327

  13. Ribosomal protein gene mapping and human chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmochi, N.; Goodman, N.; Page, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    In Drosophila, the Minute phenotype (reduced body size, diminished viability and fertility, and short, thin bristles) results from heterozygous deficiencies (deletions) at any one of 50 loci scattered about the genome. A handful of these Minute loci have been molecularly characterized, and all have been found to encode ribosomal proteins. Thus, the Minute phenotype appears to result from reduced protein synthetic capacity in flies with one rather than two copies of a given ribosomal protein (rp) gene. We are pursuing the possibility that similar reductions in protein synthetic capacity--again resulting from rp gene deficiencies--might underlie phenotypes associated with certain chromosomal disorders in humans. We and our colleagues have reported findings consistent with a role for RPS4 deficiency in the etiology of certain features of Turner syndrome, a complex human disorder classically associated with an XO karyotype. We are intrigued by the possibility that deficiencies of other human rp genes might cause phenotypic abnormalities similar to those seen in Turner syndrome--just as deficiencies of any of a number of Drosophila rp genes cause the Minute phenotype. We must first learn the chromosomal map position of each of the estimated 83 human rp genes. The task of mapping the functional (intron