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Sample records for intrinsically photoresponsive neurons

  1. Extrinsic photoresponse enhancement under additional intrinsic photoexcitation in organic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kounavis, P.

    2016-06-28

    Dual light beam photoresponse experiments are employed to explore the photoresponse under simultaneous extrinsic and intrinsic photoexcitation of organic semiconductors. The photoresponse of a red modulated light extrinsic photoexcitation is found that can be significantly enhanced under an additional blue bias-light intrinsic photoexcitation in two terminal pentacene films on glass substrates. From the frequency resolved photoresponse, it is deduced that the phenomenon of photoresponse enhancement can be attributed to an increase in the extrinsic photogeneration rate of the red modulated light and/or an improvement of the drift velocity of carriers under an additional blue light intrinsic photoexcitation. The possible predominant extrinsic photogeneration mechanism, which can be compatible with the observed dependence of the photoresponse enhancement on the frequency and on the light intensities of the red and blue light excitation, is the singlet exciton dissociation through electron transfer to acceptor-like traps. Moreover, an improvement in the drift velocity of carriers traversing grain boundaries with potential energy barriers, which may be reduced by trapping of minority carriers created from the intrinsic photoexcitation, may partly contribute to the photoresponse enhancement.

  2. Extrinsic and intrinsic photoresponse in monodisperse carbon nanotube thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sczygelski, Erik; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Wu, Chung-Chiang; Arnold, Heather N.; Everaerts, Ken; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.; Lauhon, Lincoln J.

    2013-02-01

    Spectroscopic, time-resolved scanning photocurrent microscopy is shown to distinguish the intrinsic photoresponse of monodisperse semiconducting (99%) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from the extrinsic photoresponse of the substrate. A persistent positive photocurrent induced by near-infrared excitation is attributed to the generation of free carriers by inter-band excitation in SWCNTs. For shorter excitation wavelengths, absorption by the Si substrate generates two types of photocurrent: a transient positive photoresponse, identified as a displacement current, and a persistent negative photocurrent that arises from photogating of the SWCNT thin film.

  3. Photoresponse diversity among the five types of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiwu; Stafford, Ben K; Godin, Ashley L; King, W Michael; Wong, Kwoon Y

    2014-04-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) mediate non-image-forming visual responses, including pupillary constriction, circadian photoentrainment and suppression of pineal melatonin secretion. Five morphological types of ipRGCs, M1-M5, have been identified in mice. In order to understand their functions better, we studied the photoresponses of all five cell types, by whole-cell recording from fluorescently labelled ipRGCs visualized using multiphoton microscopy. All ipRGC types generated melanopsin-based ('intrinsic') as well as synaptically driven ('extrinsic') light responses. The intrinsic photoresponses of M1 cells were lower threshold, higher amplitude and faster than those of M2-M5. The peak amplitudes of extrinsic light responses differed among the ipRGC types; however, the responses of all cell types had comparable thresholds, kinetics and waveforms, and all cells received rod input. While all five types exhibited inhibitory amacrine-cell and excitatory bipolar-cell inputs from the 'on' channel, M1 and M3 received additional 'off'-channel inhibition, possibly through their 'off'-sublamina dendrites. The M2-M5 ipRGCs had centre-surround-organized receptive fields, implicating a capacity to detect spatial contrast. In contrast, the receptive fields of M1 cells lacked surround antagonism, which might be caused by the surround of the inhibitory input nullifying the surround of the excitatory input. All ipRGCs responded robustly to a wide range of motion speeds, and M1-M4 cells appeared tuned to different speeds, suggesting that they might analyse the speed of motion. Retrograde labelling revealed that M1-M4 cells project to the superior colliculus, suggesting that the contrast and motion information signalled by these cells could be used by this sensorimotor area to detect novel objects and motion in the visual field.

  4. Diverse precerebellar neurons share similar intrinsic excitability

    PubMed Central

    Kolkman, Kristine E.; McElvain, Lauren E.; du Lac, Sascha

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum dedicates a majority of the brain’s neurons to processing a wide range of sensory, motor, and cognitive signals. Stereotyped circuitry within the cerebellar cortex suggests that similar computations are performed throughout the cerebellum, but little is known about whether diverse precerebellar neurons are specialized for the nature of the information they convey. In vivo recordings indicate that firing responses to sensory or motor stimuli vary dramatically across different precerebellar nuclei, but whether this reflects diverse synaptic inputs or differentially tuned intrinsic excitability has not been determined. We targeted whole-cell patch clamp recordings to neurons in 8 precerebellar nuclei which were retrogradely labeled from different regions of the cerebellum in mice. Intrinsic physiology was compared across neurons in the medial vestibular, external cuneate, lateral reticular, prepositus hypoglossi, supragenual, Roller/intercalatus, reticularis tegmenti pontis (NRTP), and pontine nuclei. Within the firing domain, precerebellar neurons were remarkably similar. Firing faithfully followed temporally modulated inputs, could be sustained at high rates, and was a linear function of input current over a wide range of inputs and firing rates. Pharmacological analyses revealed common expression of Kv3 currents, which were essential for a wide linear firing range, and of SK currents, which were essential for a wide linear input range. In contrast, membrane properties below spike threshold varied considerably within and across precerebellar nuclei, as evidenced by variability in postinhibitory rebound firing. Our findings indicate that diverse precerebellar neurons perfom similar scaling computations on their inputs but may be differentially tuned to synaptic inhibition. PMID:22090493

  5. Intrinsic choroidal neurons in the duck eye express galanin.

    PubMed

    Schrödl, F; Brehmer, A; Neuhuber, W L

    2000-09-11

    Recently, it has been shown that the choroid of the duck eye harbours approximately 1,000 intrinsic choroidal neurons positive for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Their connections and functional significance are largely unknown. This study was performed to establish a typical chemical code for these neurons and to define their targets by using immunocytochemistry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Almost all intrinsic choroidal neurons coexpressed galanin (GAL), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/NADPH-diaphorase. A few stained for GAL and/or nNOS only. Among extrinsic ganglia, GAL/VIP/nNOS coexpressing neurons were only found in the pterygopalatine ganglion where they accounted for approximately 30% of the neuronal population. Thus, GAL/VIP/nNOS-positive nerve fibres around branches of the ciliary artery and within the nonvascular smooth muscle stroma of the choroid may originate mainly from intrinsic neurons and to some extent in a subpopulation of pterygopalatine ganglionic neurons exhibiting the same chemical coding. Close contacts of GAL-positive fibres upon intrinsic choroidal neurons may indicate reciprocal connections between them. Thus, intrinsic choroidal neurons may represent peripherally displaced pterygopalatine ganglion neurons forming a local network for regulation of vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle tone in the duck choroid. They may be integrated in the neuronal circuitry controlling intraocular pressure, choroidal thickness, accommodation, and axial bulbus length. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Real-time neuronal homeostasis by coordinating VGSC intrinsic properties.

    PubMed

    Ge, Rongjing; Chen, Na; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2009-09-25

    Homeostasis of internal environment and cellular metabolism ensures cells' functions to be stable in living organisms. Cellular homeostasis is believed to be maintained via feedback or feedforward manners. We report a novel mechanism that maintains neuronal homeostasis through coordinating the intrinsic properties of single molecules concurrently. Spike encoding and sodium channel dynamics at cortical neurons were studied by patch-clamp recording. Voltage-gated sodium channels set refractory period and threshold potential toward different directions to stabilize the energetic barrier for firing sequential action potentials. This neuronal homeostasis is not affected by intracellular Ca(2+) signals and membrane potentials. Real-time homeostasis maintains precise and reliable neuronal encoding without any destabilization.

  7. Possible Involvement of Cone Opsins in Distinct Photoresponses of Intrinsically Photosensitive Dermal Chromatophores in Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shyh-Chi; Robertson, R. Meldrum; Hawryshyn, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    Dermal specialized pigment cells (chromatophores) are thought to be one type of extraretinal photoreceptors responsible for a wide variety of sensory tasks, including adjusting body coloration. Unlike the well-studied image-forming function in retinal photoreceptors, direct evidence characterizing the mechanism of chromatophore photoresponses is less understood, particularly at the molecular and cellular levels. In the present study, cone opsin expression was detected in tilapia caudal fin where photosensitive chromatophores exist. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed co-existence of different cone opsins within melanophores and erythrophores. By stimulating cells with six wavelengths ranging from 380 to 580 nm, we found melanophores and erythrophores showed distinct photoresponses. After exposed to light, regardless of wavelength presentation, melanophores dispersed and maintained cell shape in an expansion stage by shuttling pigment granules. Conversely, erythrophores aggregated or dispersed pigment granules when exposed to short- or middle/long-wavelength light, respectively. These results suggest that diverse molecular mechanisms and light-detecting strategies may be employed by different types of tilapia chromatophores, which are instrumental in pigment pattern formation. PMID:23940562

  8. Intrinsic biophysical diversity decorrelates neuronal firing while increasing information content.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Krishnan; Urban, Nathaniel N

    2010-10-01

    Although examples of variation and diversity exist throughout the nervous system, their importance remains a source of debate. Even neurons of the same molecular type have notable intrinsic differences. Largely unknown, however, is the degree to which these differences impair or assist neural coding. We examined the outputs from a single type of neuron, the mitral cells of the mouse olfactory bulb, to identical stimuli and found that each cell's spiking response was dictated by its unique biophysical fingerprint. Using this intrinsic heterogeneity, diverse populations were able to code for twofold more information than their homogeneous counterparts. In addition, biophysical variability alone reduced pair-wise output spike correlations to low levels. Our results indicate that intrinsic neuronal diversity is important for neural coding and is not simply the result of biological imprecision.

  9. Measure of synchrony in the activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons.

    PubMed

    Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Jacquemet, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Recent multielectrode array recordings in ganglionated plexi of canine atria have opened the way to the study of population dynamics of intrinsic cardiac neurons. These data provide critical insights into the role of local processing that these ganglia play in the regulation of cardiac function. Low firing rates, marked non-stationarity, interplay with the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems and artifacts generated by myocardial activity create new constraints not present in brain recordings for which almost all neuronal analysis techniques have been developed. We adapted and extended the jitter-based synchrony index (SI) to (1) provide a robust and computationally efficient tool for assessing the level and statistical significance of SI between cardiac neurons, (2) estimate the bias on SI resulting from neuronal activity possibly hidden in myocardial artifacts, (3) quantify the synchrony or anti-synchrony between neuronal activity and the phase in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. The method was validated on firing time series from a total of 98 individual neurons identified in 8 dog experiments. SI ranged from -0.14 to 0.66, with 23 pairs of neurons with SI > 0.1. The estimated bias due to artifacts was typically <1%. Strongly cardiovascular- and pulmonary-related neurons (SI > 0.5) were found. Results support the use of jitter-based SI in the context of intrinsic cardiac neurons.

  10. Measure of synchrony in the activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons

    PubMed Central

    Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Armour, J. Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Jacquemet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Recent multielectrode array recordings in ganglionated plexi of canine atria have opened the way to the study of population dynamics of intrinsic cardiac neurons. These data provide critical insights into the role of local processing that these ganglia play in the regulation of cardiac function. Low firing rates, marked non-stationarity, interplay with the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems and artifacts generated by myocardial activity create new constraints not present in brain recordings for which almost all neuronal analysis techniques have been developed. We adapted and extended the jitter-based synchrony index (SI) to (1) provide a robust and computationally-efficient tool for assessing the level and statistical significance of SI between cardiac neurons, (2) estimate the bias on SI resulting from neuronal activity possibly hidden in myocardial artifacts, (3) quantify the synchrony or anti-synchrony between neuronal activity and the phase in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. The method was validated on firing time series from a total of 98 individual neurons identified in 8 dog experiments. SI ranged from −0.14 to 0.66, with 23 pairs of neurons with SI>0.1. The estimated bias due to artifacts was typically < 1%. Strongly cardiovascular- and pulmonary-related neurons (SI>0.5) were found. Results support the use of jitter-based synchrony index in the context of intrinsic cardiac neurons. PMID:24621585

  11. Intrinsic and integrative properties of substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fu-Ming; Lee, Christian R.

    2011-01-01

    The GABA projection neurons of the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) are output neurons for the basal ganglia and thus critical for movement control. Their most striking neurophysiological feature is sustained, spontaneous high frequency spike firing. A fundamental question is: what are the key ion channels supporting the remarkable firing capability in these neurons? Recent studies indicate that these neurons express tonically active TRPC3 channels that conduct a Na-dependent inward current even at hyperpolarized membrane potentials. When the membrane potential reaches −60 mV, a voltage-gated persistent sodium current (INaP) starts to activate, further depolarizing the membrane potential. At or slightly below −50 mV, the large transient voltage-activated sodium current (INaT) starts to activate and eventually triggers the rapid rising phase of action potentials. SNr GABA neurons have a higher density of (INaT), contributing to the faster rise and larger amplitude of action potentials, compared with the slow-spiking dopamine neurons. INaT also recovers from inactivation more quickly in SNr GABA neurons than in nigral dopamine neurons. In SNr GABA neurons, the rising phase of the action potential triggers the activation of high-threshold, inactivation-resistant Kv3-like channels that can rapidly repolarize the membrane. These intrinsic ion channels provide SNr GABA neurons with the ability to fire spontaneous and sustained high frequency spikes. Additionally, robust GABA inputs from direct pathway medium spiny neurons in the striatum and GABA neurons in the globus pallidus may inhibit and silence SNr GABA neurons, whereas glutamate synaptic input from the subthalamic nucleus may induce burst firing in SNr GABA neurons. Thus, afferent GABA and glutamate synaptic inputs sculpt the tonic high frequency firing of SNr GABA neurons and the consequent inhibition of their targets into an integrated motor control signal that is further fine-tuned by neuromodulators

  12. Learning and Aging Related Changes in Intrinsic Neuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Oh, M. Matthew; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2010-01-01

    A goal of many laboratories that study aging is to find a key cellular change(s) that can be manipulated and restored to a young-like state, and thus, reverse the age-related cognitive deficits. We have chosen to focus our efforts on the alteration of intrinsic excitability (as reflected by the postburst afterhyperpolarization, AHP) during the learning process in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We have consistently found that the postburst AHP is significantly reduced in hippocampal pyramidal neurons from young adults that have successfully learned a hippocampus-dependent task. In the context of aging, the baseline intrinsic excitability of hippocampal neurons is decreased and therefore cognitive learning is impaired. In aging animals that are able to learn, neuron changes in excitability similar to those seen in young neurons during learning occur. Our challenge, then, is to understand how and why excitability changes occur in neurons from aging brains and cause age-associated learning impairments. After understanding the changes, we should be able to formulate strategies for reversing them, thus making old neurons function more as they did when they were young. Such a reversal should rescue the age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:20552042

  13. Sleep Interacts with Aβ to Modulate Intrinsic Neuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, Masashi; Lone, Shahnaz R.; Liu, Sha; Liu, Qili; Zhang, Julia; Spira, Adam P.; Wu, Mark N.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Emerging data suggest an important relationship between sleep and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), but how poor sleep promotes the development of AD remains unclear. Results Here, using a Drosophila model of AD, we provide evidence suggesting that changes in neuronal excitability underlie the effects of sleep loss on AD pathogenesis. β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation leads to reduced and fragmented sleep, while chronic sleep deprivation increases Aβ burden. Moreover, enhancing sleep reduces Aβ deposition. Increasing neuronal excitability phenocopies the effects of reducing sleep on Aβ, and decreasing neuronal activity blocks the elevated Aβ accumulation induced by sleep deprivation. At the single neuron level, we find that chronic sleep deprivation, as well as Aβ expression, enhances intrinsic neuronal excitability. Importantly, these data reveal that sleep loss exacerbates Aβ–induced hyperexcitability and suggest that defects in specific K+ currents underlie the hyperexcitability caused by sleep loss and Aβ expression. Finally, we show that feeding levetiracetam, an anti-epileptic medication, to Aβ-expressing flies suppresses neuronal excitability and significantly prolongs their lifespan. Conclusions Our findings directly link sleep loss to changes in neuronal excitability and Aβ accumulation and further suggest that neuronal hyperexcitability is an important mediator of Aβ toxicity. Taken together, these data provide a mechanistic framework for a positive feedback loop, whereby sleep loss and neuronal excitation accelerate the accumulation of Aβ, a key pathogenic step in the development of AD. PMID:25754641

  14. Intrinsic Properties of Larval Zebrafish Neurons in Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Hiromi; Delargy, Alison H.; Yokogawa, Tohei; Urban, Jason M.; Burgess, Harold A.; Ono, Fumihito

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral effects of ethanol have been studied in multiple animal models including zebrafish. Locomotion of zebrafish larvae is resistant to high concentrations of ethanol in bath solution. This resistance has been attributed to a lower systemic concentration of ethanol in zebrafish when compared with bath solution, although the mechanism to maintain such a steep gradient is unclear. Here we examined whether the intrinsic properties of neurons play roles in this resistance. In order to minimize the contribution of metabolism and diffusional barriers, larvae were hemisected and the anterior half immersed in a range of ethanol concentrations thereby ensuring the free access of bath ethanol to the brain. The response to vibrational stimuli of three types of reticulospinal neurons: Mauthner neurons, vestibulospinal neurons, and MiD3 neurons were examined using an intracellular calcium indicator. The intracellular [Ca2+] response in MiD3 neurons decreased in 100 mM ethanol, while Mauthner neurons and vestibulospinal neurons required >300 mM ethanol to elicit similar effects. The ethanol effect in Mauthner neurons was reversible following removal of ethanol. Interestingly, activities of MiD3 neurons displayed spontaneous recovery in 300 mM ethanol, suggestive of acute tolerance. Finally, we examined with mechanical vibration the startle response of free-swimming larvae in 300 mM ethanol. Ethanol treatment abolished long latency startle responses, suggesting a functional change in neural processing. These data support the hypothesis that individual neurons in larval zebrafish brains have distinct patterns of response to ethanol dictated by specific molecular targets. PMID:23658822

  15. Inducing repetitive action potential firing in neurons via synthesized photoresponsive nanoscale cellular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Lu, Siyuan; Madhukar, Anupam

    2013-02-01

    Recently we reported an analysis that examined the potential of synthesized photovoltaic functional abiotic nanosystems (PVFANs) to modulate membrane potential and activate action potential firing in neurons. Here we extend the analysis to delineate the requirements on the electronic energy levels and the attendant photophysical properties of the PVFANs to induce repetitive action potential under continuous light, a capability essential for the proposed potential application of PVFANs as retinal cellular prostheses to compensate for loss of photoreceptors. We find that repetitive action potential firing demands two basic characteristics in the electronic response of the PVFANs: an exponential dependence of the PVFAN excited state decay rate on the membrane potential and a three-state system such that, following photon absorption, the electron decay from the excited state to the ground state is via intermediate state(s) whose lifetime is comparable to the refractory time following an action potential. In this study, the potential of synthetic photovoltaic functional abiotic nanosystems (PVFANs) is examined under continuous light to modulate membrane potential and activate action potential firing in neurons with the proposed potential application of PVFANs as retinal cellular prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intrinsically Active and Pacemaker Neurons in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Populations

    PubMed Central

    Illes, Sebastian; Jakab, Martin; Beyer, Felix; Gelfert, Renate; Couillard-Despres, Sébastien; Schnitzler, Alfons; Ritter, Markus; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) self-organize into functional neuronal assemblies in vitro, generating synchronous network activities. Intriguingly, PSC-derived neuronal assemblies develop spontaneous activities that are independent of external stimulation, suggesting the presence of thus far undetected intrinsically active neurons (IANs). Here, by using mouse embryonic stem cells, we provide evidence for the existence of IANs in PSC-neuronal networks based on extracellular multielectrode array and intracellular patch-clamp recordings. IANs remain active after pharmacological inhibition of fast synaptic communication and possess intrinsic mechanisms required for autonomous neuronal activity. PSC-derived IANs are functionally integrated in PSC-neuronal populations, contribute to synchronous network bursting, and exhibit pacemaker properties. The intrinsic activity and pacemaker properties of the neuronal subpopulation identified herein may be particularly relevant for interventions involving transplantation of neural tissues. IANs may be a key element in the regulation of the functional activity of grafted as well as preexisting host neuronal networks. PMID:24672755

  17. Intrinsic Oscillations of Neocortex Generated by Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Laurie R.; Amitai, Yael; Connors, Barry W.

    1991-01-01

    Rhythmic activity in the neocortex varies with different behavioral and pathological states and in some cases may encode sensory information. However, the neural mechanisms of these oscillations are largely unknown. Many pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the neocortex showed prolonged, 5- to 12-hertz rhythmic firing patterns at threshold. Rhythmic firing was due to intrinsic membrane properties, sodium conductances were essential for rhythmicity, and calcium-dependent conductances strongly modified rhythmicity. Isolated slices of neocortex generated epochs of 4- to 10-hertz synchronized activity when N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated channels were facilitated. Layer 5 was both necessary and sufficient to produce these synchronized oscillations. Thus, synaptic networks of intrinsically rhythmic neurons in layer 5 may generate or promote certain synchronized oscillations of the neocortex.

  18. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bingchen; Shen, Xiaonan; Shang, Jingzhi; Cong, Chunxiao; Yang, Weihuang; Eginligil, Mustafa E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg; Yu, Ting E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-11-01

    High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup), while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  19. Intrinsic regenerative mechanisms of central nervous system neurons.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Rieko; Ueno, Masaki; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2009-10-01

    Injuries to the adult central nervous system (CNS), such as spinal cord injury and brain contusion, can cause permanent functional deficits if axonal connections are broken. Spontaneous functional recovery rarely occurs. It has been widely accepted that the extracellular environment of the CNS inhibits neuronal regeneration. However, it should be noted that another reason for injured neurons failing to regenerate is their weak intrinsic ability to do so. The regeneration of injured neurons is a process involving many intracellular phenomena, including cytoskeletal changes, gene and protein expression, and changes in the responsiveness to extracellular cues. The capacity of injured neurons to regenerate is modulated to some extent by changes in the expression of intracellular signaling molecules such as glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate. Knowledge of these effects has guided the development of animal models for regenerative therapies of CNS injury. Enhancing the intrinsic regenerative machinery of injured axons in the adult CNS is a potentially powerful strategy for treating patients with a CNS injury.

  20. Stimulus sensitivity and neuromodulatory properties of noisy intrinsic neuronal oscillators.

    PubMed

    Huber, M T; Krieg, J C; Dewald, M; Voigt, K; Braun, H A

    1998-01-01

    Intrinsic subthreshold oscillations in the membrane potential are a common property of many neurons in the peripheral and central nervous system. When such oscillations are combined with noise, interesting signal encoding and neuromodulatory properties are obtained which allow, for example, sensitivity adjustment or differential encoding of stimuli. Here we demonstrate that a noisy Hodgkin/Huxley-model for subthreshold oscillations, when tuned to maximum sensitivity, can be significantly modulated by even minor physiological changes in the oscillation parameters amplitude or frequency. Given the ubiquity of subthreshold oscillating neurons, it can be assumed that these findings reflect principle encoding properties which are relevant for an understanding of sensitivity and neuromodulation in peripheral and central neurons.

  1. Oxytocin Neurones: Intrinsic Mechanisms Governing the Regularity of Spiking Activity.

    PubMed

    Maícas Royo, J; Brown, C H; Leng, G; MacGregor, D J

    2016-04-01

    Oxytocin neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus are osmoresponsive and, with all other things being equal, they fire at a mean rate that is proportional to the plasma sodium concentration. However, individual spike times are governed by highly stochastic events, namely the random occurrences of excitatory synaptic inputs, the probability of which is increased by increasing extracellular osmotic pressure. Accordingly, interspike intervals (ISIs) are very irregular. In the present study, we show, by statistical analyses of firing patterns in oxytocin neurones, that the mean firing rate as measured in bins of a few seconds is more regular than expected from the variability of ISIs. This is consistent with an intrinsic activity-dependent negative-feedback mechanism. To test this, we compared observed neuronal firing patterns with firing patterns generated by a leaky integrate-and-fire model neurone, modified to exhibit activity-dependent mechanisms known to be present in oxytocin neurones. The presence of a prolonged afterhyperpolarisation (AHP) was critical for the ability to mimic the observed regularisation of mean firing rate, although we also had to add a depolarising afterpotential (DAP; sometimes called an afterdepolarisation) to the model to match the observed ISI distributions. We tested this model by comparing its behaviour with the behaviour of oxytocin neurones exposed to apamin, a blocker of the medium AHP. Good fits indicate that the medium AHP actively contributes to the firing patterns of oxytocin neurones during non-bursting activity, and that oxytocin neurones generally express a DAP, even though this is usually masked by superposition of a larger AHP. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  2. Neuromodulation targets intrinsic cardiac neurons to attenuate neuronally mediated atrial arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, David D.; Southerland, E. Marie; Hoover, Donald B.; Beaumont, Eric; Armour, J. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether atrial fibrillation (AF) results from excessive activation of intrinsic cardiac neurons (ICNs) and, if so, whether select subpopulations of neurons therein represent therapeutic targets for suppression of this arrhythmogenic potential. Trains of five electrical stimuli (0.3–1.2 mA, 1 ms) were delivered during the atrial refractory period to mediastinal nerves (MSN) on the superior vena cava to evoke AF. Neuroanatomical studies were performed by injecting the neuronal tracer DiI into MSN sites that induced AF. Functional studies involved recording of neuronal activity in situ from the right atrial ganglionated plexus (RAGP) in response to MSN stimulation (MSNS) prior to and following neuromodulation involving either preemptive spinal cord stimulation (SCS; T1–T3, 50 Hz, 200-ms duration) or ganglionic blockade (hexamethonium, 5 mg/kg). The tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) neuronal tracer labeled a subset (13.2%) of RAGP neurons, which also colocalized with cholinergic or adrenergic markers. A subset of DiI-labeled RAGP neurons were noncholinergic/nonadrenergic. MSNS evoked an ∼4-fold increase in RAGP neuronal activity from baseline, which SCS reduced by 43%. Hexamethonium blocked MSNS-evoked increases in neuronal activity. MSNS evoked AF in 78% of right-sided MSN sites, which SCS reduced to 33% and hexamethonium reduced to 7%. MSNS-induced bradycardia was maintained with SCS but was mitigated by hexamethonium. We conclude that MSNS activates subpopulations of intrinsic cardiac neurons, thereby resulting in the formation of atrial arrhythmias leading to atrial fibrillation. Stabilization of ICN local circuit neurons by SCS or the local circuit and autonomic efferent neurons with hexamethonium reduces the arrhythmogenic potential. PMID:22088304

  3. Neuronal intrinsic barriers for axon regeneration in the adult CNS

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fang; He, Zhigang

    2010-01-01

    A major reason for the devastating and permanent disabilities after spinal cord and other types of CNS injury is the failure of injured axons to regenerate and to re-build the functional circuits. Thus, a long-standing goal has been to develop strategies that could promote axon regeneration and restore functions. Recent studies revealed that simply removing extracellular inhibitory activities is insufficient for successful axon regeneration in the adult CNS. On the other side, evidence from different species and different models is accumulating to support the notion that diminished intrinsic regenerative ability of mature neurons is a major contributor to regeneration failure. This review will summarize the molecular mechanisms regulating intrinsic axon growth capacity in the adult CNS and discuss potential implications for therapeutic strategies. PMID:20418094

  4. Intrinsic response of thoracic propriospinal neurons to axotomy.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Justin R; Middelton, Frank A; Stelzner, Dennis J

    2010-06-04

    Central nervous system axons lack a robust regenerative response following spinal cord injury (SCI) and regeneration is usually abortive. Supraspinal pathways, which are the most commonly studied for their regenerative potential, demonstrate a limited regenerative ability. On the other hand, propriospinal (PS) neurons, with axons intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than their supraspinal counterparts, but remain relatively understudied in regards to spinal cord injury. Utilizing laser microdissection, gene-microarray, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we focused on the intrinsic post-axotomy response of specifically labelled thoracic propriospinal neurons at periods from 3-days to 1-month following T9 spinal cord injury. We found a strong and early (3-days post injury, p.i) upregulation in the expression of genes involved in the immune/inflammatory response that returned towards normal by 1-week p.i. In addition, several regeneration associated and cell survival/neuroprotective genes were significantly up-regulated at the earliest p.i. period studied. Significant upregulation of several growth factor receptor genes (GFRa1, Ret, Lifr) also occurred only during the initial period examined. The expression of a number of pro-apoptotic genes up-regulated at 3-days p.i. suggest that changes in gene expression after this period may have resulted from analyzing surviving TPS neurons after the cell death of the remainder of the axotomized TPS neuronal population. Taken collectively these data demonstrate that thoracic propriospinal (TPS) neurons mount a very dynamic response following low thoracic axotomy that includes a strong regenerative response, but also results in the cell death of many axotomized TPS neurons in the first week after spinal cord injury. These data also suggest that the immune/inflammatory response may have an important role in mediating the early strong regenerative response, as well as the apoptotic response

  5. From induction to conduction: how intrinsic transcriptional priming of extrinsic neuronal connectivity shapes neuronal identity.

    PubMed

    Russ, Jeffrey B; Kaltschmidt, Julia A

    2014-10-01

    Every behaviour of an organism relies on an intricate and vastly diverse network of neurons whose identity and connectivity must be specified with extreme precision during development. Intrinsically, specification of neuronal identity depends heavily on the expression of powerful transcription factors that direct numerous features of neuronal identity, including especially properties of neuronal connectivity, such as dendritic morphology, axonal targeting or synaptic specificity, ultimately priming the neuron for incorporation into emerging circuitry. As the neuron's early connectivity is established, extrinsic signals from its pre- and postsynaptic partners feedback on the neuron to further refine its unique characteristics. As a result, disruption of one component of the circuitry during development can have vital consequences for the proper identity specification of its synaptic partners. Recent studies have begun to harness the power of various transcription factors that control neuronal cell fate, including those that specify a neuron's subtype-specific identity, seeking insight for future therapeutic strategies that aim to reconstitute damaged circuitry through neuronal reprogramming.

  6. Regulation of intrinsic neuronal properties for axon growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ferdinando; Gianola, Sara; Corvetti, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of neuritic growth is crucial for neural development, adaptation and repair. The intrinsic growth potential of nerve cells is determined by the activity of specific molecular sets, which sense environmental signals and sustain structural extension of neurites. The expression and function of these molecules are dynamically regulated by multiple mechanisms, which adjust the actual growth properties of each neuron population at different ontogenetic stages or in specific conditions. The neuronal potential for axon elongation and regeneration are restricted at the end of development by the concurrent action of several factors associated with the final maturation of neurons and of the surrounding tissue. In the adult, neuronal growth properties can be significantly modulated by injury, but they are also continuously tuned in everyday life to sustain physiological plasticity. Strict regulation of structural remodelling and neuritic elongation is thought to be required to maintain specific patterns of connectivity in the highly complex mammalian CNS. Accordingly, procedures that neutralize such mechanisms effectively boost axon growth in both intact and injured nervous system. Even in these conditions, however, aberrant connections are only formed in the presence of unusual external stimuli or experience. Therefore, growth regulatory mechanisms play an essentially permissive role by setting the responsiveness of neural circuits to environmental stimuli. The latter exert an instructive action and determine the actual shape of newly formed connections. In the light of this notion, efficient therapeutic interventions in the injured CNS should combine targeted manipulations of growth control mechanisms with task-specific training and rehabilitation paradigms.

  7. Intrinsic Cholinergic Neurons in the Hippocampus: Fact or Artifact?

    PubMed Central

    Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Rinnofner, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh) is synthesized and released exclusively from the terminals of the long-axon afferents whose cell bodies reside in the medial septum and diagonal band. The search for intrinsic cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus has a long history; however evidence for the existence of these neurons has been inconsistent, with most investigators failing to detect them using in situ hybridization or immunohistochemical staining of the cholinergic markers, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Advances in the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice expressing a reporter protein under the control of the genomic elements of the Chat gene (Chat-BAC mice) have facilitated studies of cholinergic neurons. Such mice show robust and faithful expression of the reporter proteins in all known cholinergic cell populations. The availability of the Chat-BAC mice re-ignited interest in hippocampal cholinergic interneurons, because a small number of such reporter-expressing cells is frequently observed in the hippocampus of these mice. However, to date, attempts to confirm that these neurons co-express the endogenous cholinergic marker ChAT, or release ACh, have been unsuccessful. Without such confirmatory evidence it is best to conclude that there are no cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus. Similar considerations apply to other BAC transgenic lines, whose utility as a discovery tool for cell populations heretofore not known to express the genes of interest encoded by the BACs, must be validated by methods that detect expression of the endogenous genes. PMID:27014052

  8. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Here, our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.

  9. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    DOE PAGES

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; ...

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spikemore » due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Here, our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.« less

  10. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations. PMID:27095423

  11. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons.

    PubMed

    Dieni, Cristina V; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B; Kuo, Chay T; Wadiche, Jacques I; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.

  12. Differences in intrinsic amplitudes of neuronal oscillators improve synchronization in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie

    2017-09-01

    In mammals, a main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates the ˜24 h rhythms of behavioral and physiological activities exposed to a natural 24 light-dark cycle or even under constant darkness. The rhythms originate from self-sustained oscillations of the SCN neurons, which differ in both intrinsic periods and intrinsic amplitudes. The intrinsic periods and the intrinsic amplitudes were found to be bound to specific regions in the previous experiments. In particular, neurons of smaller amplitudes and larger periods are located in a ventrolateral part, and neurons of larger amplitudes and smaller periods are in a dorsomedial part. In the present study, we examined the effects of the differences in the intrinsic frequencies and the differences in the intrinsic amplitudes of neuronal oscillators on the synchronization, respectively. We found that the differences in the intrinsic frequencies weaken the synchronization, whereas the differences in the intrinsic amplitudes strengthen the synchronization. Our finding may shed light on the effects of the heterogenous properties of individual neurons on the collective behaviors of the SCN network and provide a way to enhance the synchronization.

  13. Respiratory neuron characterization reveals intrinsic bursting properties in isolated adult turtle brainstems (Trachemys scripta)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephen M.; Hedrick, Michael S.; Krause, Bryan M.; Nilles, Jacob P.; Chapman, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    It is not known whether respiratory neurons with intrinsic bursting properties exist within ectothermic vertebrate respiratory control systems. Thus, isolated adult turtle brainstems spontaneously producing respiratory motor output were used to identify and classify respiratory neurons based on their firing pattern relative to hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity. Most respiratory neurons (183/212) had peak activity during the expiratory phase, while inspiratory, post-inspiratory, and novel pre-expiratory neurons were less common. During synaptic blockade conditions, ~10% of respiratory neurons fired bursts of action potentials, with post-inspiratory cells (6/9) having the highest percentage of intrinsic burst properties. Most intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons were clustered at the level of the vagus (X) nerve root. Synaptic inhibition blockade caused seizure-like activity throughout the turtle brainstem, which shows that the turtle respiratory control system is not transformed into a network driven by intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons. We hypothesize that intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons are evolutionarily conserved and represent a potential rhythmogenic mechanism contributing to respiration in adult turtles. PMID:25462012

  14. Multiple forms of activity-dependent intrinsic plasticity in layer V cortical neurones in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Jeanne T; Mahon, Séverine; Tiret, Pascale; Genet, Stéphane; Delord, Bruno; Charpier, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is classically considered as the neuronal substrate for learning and memory. However, activity-dependent changes in neuronal intrinsic excitability have been reported in several learning-related brain regions, suggesting that intrinsic plasticity could also participate to information storage. Compared to synaptic plasticity, there has been little exploration of the properties of induction and expression of intrinsic plasticity in an intact brain. Here, by the means of in vivo intracellular recordings in the rat we have examined how the intrinsic excitability of layer V motor cortex pyramidal neurones is altered following brief periods of repeated firing. Changes in membrane excitability were assessed by modifications in the discharge frequency versus injected current (F–I) curves. Most (∼64%) conditioned neurones exhibited a long-lasting intrinsic plasticity, which was expressed either by selective changes in the current threshold or in the slope of the F–I curve, or by concomitant changes in both parameters. These modifications in the neuronal input–output relationship led to a global increase or decrease in intrinsic excitability. Passive electrical membrane properties were unaffected by the intracellular conditioning, indicating that intrinsic plasticity resulted from modifications of voltage-gated ion channels. These results demonstrate that neocortical pyramidal neurones can express in vivo a bidirectional use-dependent intrinsic plasticity, modifying their sensitivity to weak inputs and/or the gain of their input–output function. These multiple forms of experience-dependent intrinsic changes, which expand the computational abilities of individual neurones, could shape new network dynamics and thus might participate in the formation of mnemonic motor engrams. PMID:19433575

  15. COMPENSATION FOR VARIABLE INTRINSIC NEURONAL EXCITABILITY BY CIRCUIT-SYNAPTIC INTERACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Grashow, Rachel; Brookings, Ted; Marder, Eve

    2010-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work indicates that neurons tune themselves to maintain target levels of excitation by modulating ion channel expression and synaptic strengths. As a result, functionally equivalent circuits can produce similar activity despite disparate underlying network and cellular properties. To experimentally test the extent to which synaptic and intrinsic conductances can produce target activity in the presence of variability in neuronal intrinsic properties, we used the dynamic clamp to create hybrid two-cell circuits built from four types of stomatogastric (STG) neurons coupled to the same model Morris-Lecar neuron by reciprocal inhibition. We measured six intrinsic properties (input resistance, minimum membrane potential, firing rate in response to +1nA of injected current, slope of the FI curve, spike height and spike voltage threshold) of Dorsal Gastric (DG), Gastric Mill (GM), Lateral Pyloric (LP) and Pyloric Dilator (PD) neurons from male crabs, Cancer borealis. The intrinsic properties varied two to seven-fold in each cell type. We coupled each biological neuron to the Morris-Lecar model with seven different values of inhibitory synaptic conductance, and also used the dynamic clamp to add seven different values of an artificial h-conductance, thus creating 49 different circuits for each biological neuron. Despite the variability in intrinsic excitability, networks formed from each neuron produced similar circuit performance at some values of synaptic and h-conductances. This work experimentally confirms results from previous modeling studies; tuning synaptic and intrinsic conductances can yield similar circuit output from neurons with variable intrinsic excitability. PMID:20610748

  16. Learning Enhances Intrinsic Excitability in a Subset of Lateral Amygdala Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sehgal, Megha; Ehlers, Vanessa L.; Moyer, James R., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Learning-induced modulation of neuronal intrinsic excitability is a metaplasticity mechanism that can impact the acquisition of new memories. Although the amygdala is important for emotional learning and other behaviors, including fear and anxiety, whether learning alters intrinsic excitability within the amygdala has received very little…

  17. Learning Enhances Intrinsic Excitability in a Subset of Lateral Amygdala Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sehgal, Megha; Ehlers, Vanessa L.; Moyer, James R., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Learning-induced modulation of neuronal intrinsic excitability is a metaplasticity mechanism that can impact the acquisition of new memories. Although the amygdala is important for emotional learning and other behaviors, including fear and anxiety, whether learning alters intrinsic excitability within the amygdala has received very little…

  18. Learning enhances intrinsic excitability in a subset of lateral amygdala neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Megha; Ehlers, Vanessa L.; Moyer, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Learning-induced modulation of neuronal intrinsic excitability is a metaplasticity mechanism that can impact the acquisition of new memories. Although the amygdala is important for emotional learning and other behaviors, including fear and anxiety, whether learning alters intrinsic excitability within the amygdala has received very little attention. Fear conditioning was combined with intracellular recordings to investigate the effects of learning on the intrinsic excitability of lateral amygdala (LA) neurons. To assess time-dependent changes, brain slices were prepared either immediately or 24-h post-conditioning. Fear conditioning significantly enhanced excitability of LA neurons, as evidenced by both decreased afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and increased neuronal firing. These changes were time-dependent such that reduced AHPs were evident at both time points whereas increased neuronal firing was only observed at the later (24-h) time point. Moreover, these changes occurred within a subset (32%) of LA neurons. Previous work also demonstrated that learning-related changes in synaptic plasticity are also evident in less than one-third of amygdala neurons, suggesting that the neurons undergoing intrinsic plasticity may be critical for fear memory. These data may be clinically relevant as enhanced LA excitability following fear learning could influence future amygdala-dependent behaviors. PMID:24554670

  19. FGF14 regulates the intrinsic excitability of cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    PubMed

    Shakkottai, Vikram G; Xiao, Maolei; Xu, Lin; Wong, Michael; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Ornitz, David M; Yamada, Kelvin A

    2009-01-01

    A missense mutation in the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14) gene underlies SCA27, an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia in humans. Mice with a targeted disruption of the Fgf14 locus (Fgf14(-/-)) develop ataxia resembling human SCA27. We tested the hypothesis that loss of FGF14 affects the firing properties of Purkinje neurons, which play an important role in motor control and coordination. Current clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons in cerebellar slices revealed attenuated spontaneous firing in Fgf14(-/-) neurons. Unlike in the wild type animals, more than 80% of Fgf14(-/-) Purkinje neurons were quiescent and failed to fire repetitively in response to depolarizing current injections. Immunohistochemical examination revealed reduced expression of Nav1.6 protein in Fgf14(-/-) Purkinje neurons. Together, these observations suggest that FGF14 is required for normal Nav1.6 expression in Purkinje neurons, and that the loss of FGF14 impairs spontaneous and repetitive firing in Purkinje neurons by altering the expression of Nav1.6 channels.

  20. Dissecting mechanisms of brain aging by studying the intrinsic excitability of neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Valerio; Richman, Jeffrey; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies using vertebrate and invertebrate animal models have shown aging associated changes in brain function. Importantly, changes in soma size, loss or regression of dendrites and dendritic spines and alterations in the expression of neurotransmitter receptors in specific neurons were described. Despite this understanding, how aging impacts intrinsic properties of individual neurons or circuits that govern a defined behavior is yet to be determined. Here we discuss current understanding of specific electrophysiological changes in individual neurons and circuits during aging. PMID:25610394

  1. [New strategy to promote adult spinal cord regeneration: enhance adult neurons' intrinsic growth capability].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping

    2009-01-01

    Injured adult spinal cord neurons are usually unable to regenerate their axons due to the inhibitory environment and low intrinsic regenerative capability. One of the main strategies to promote spinal cord regeneration is blocking and/or neutralizing the inhibitory factors or their common inhibitory signal pathway. However, overcoming inhibition alone is insufficient to cause extensive regeneration when neurons' intrinsic growth state has not been activated. Therefore, it becomes one of the most interested targets for promoting spinal cord regeneration that how to enhance adult neurons' intrinsic growth capability, such as elevating adult neuron cAMP/PKA level, blocking Rho/ROCK pathway, modulating transcriptional factors etc., such that they no longer response to inhibitory environment. In this paper we will review the current research findings and recent progresses in this field.

  2. Intrinsic Membrane Hyperexcitability of ALS Patient-Derived Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wainger, Brian J.; Kiskinis, Evangelos; Mellin, Cassidy; Wiskow, Ole; Han, Steve S.W.; Sandoe, Jackson; Perez, Numa P.; Williams, Luis A.; Lee, Seungkyu; Boulting, Gabriella; Berry, James D.; Brown, Robert H.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.; Bean, Bruce P.; Eggan, Kevin; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease of the motor nervous system. We show using multi-electrode array and patch clamp recordings that hyperexcitability detected by clinical neurophysiological studies of ALS patients is recapitulated in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motor neurons from ALS patients harboring superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), C9orf72 and fused-in-sarcoma mutations. Motor neurons produced from a genetically corrected, but otherwise isogenic, SOD1+/+ stem cell line do not display the hyperexcitability phenotype. SOD1A4V/+ ALS patient-derived motor neurons have reduced delayed-rectifier potassium current amplitudes relative to control-derived motor neurons, a deficit that may underlie their hyperexcitability. The Kv7 channel activator retigabine both blocks the hyperexcitability and improves motor neuron survival in vitro when tested in SOD1 mutant ALS cases. Therefore, electrophysiological characterization of human stem cell-derived neurons can reveal disease-related mechanisms and identify therapeutic candidates. PMID:24703839

  3. Intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurones from the rat dorsal and ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Kelly A; Islam, Tasnim; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-11-15

    The hippocampus has a central role in learning and memory. Although once considered a relatively homogenous structure along the longitudinal axis, it has become clear that the rodent hippocampus can be anatomically and functionally divided into a dorsal component generally associated with spatial navigation, and a ventral component primarily associated with non-spatial functions that involve an emotional component. The ventral hippocampus (VHC) is also more sensitive to epileptogenic stimuli than the dorsal hippocampus (DHC), and seizures tend to originate in the VHC before spreading to other brain regions. Although synaptic and biochemical differences in DHC and VHC have been investigated, the intrinsic excitability of individual neurones from the DHC and VHC has received surprisingly little attention. In this study, we have characterized the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal neurones from the DHC and the VHC using the whole-cell current-clamp method. Our results demonstrate that somatic current injections of equal magnitude elicit significantly more action potentials in VHC neurones than DHC neurones, and that this difference stems from the more depolarized resting membrane potential (RMP; 7 mV) and higher input resistance (R(in); 46 M measured from RMP) observed in VHC neurones. These differences in RMP and R(in) were also observed in dendritic whole-cell current-clamp recordings. Furthermore, morphological reconstructions of individual neurones revealed significant differences in the dendritic branching pattern between DHC and VHC neurones that could, in principle, contribute to the lower somatic R(in) of DHC neurones. Together, our results highlight significant differences in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal neurones across the longitudinal hippocampal axis, and suggest that VHC neurones are intrinsically more excitable than DHC neurones. This difference is likely to predispose the VHC to hyperexcitability.

  4. Intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurones from the rat dorsal and ventral hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Kelly A; Islam, Tasnim; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The hippocampus has a central role in learning and memory. Although once considered a relatively homogenous structure along the longitudinal axis, it has become clear that the rodent hippocampus can be anatomically and functionally divided into a dorsal component generally associated with spatial navigation, and a ventral component primarily associated with non-spatial functions that involve an emotional component. The ventral hippocampus (VHC) is also more sensitive to epileptogenic stimuli than the dorsal hippocampus (DHC), and seizures tend to originate in the VHC before spreading to other brain regions. Although synaptic and biochemical differences in DHC and VHC have been investigated, the intrinsic excitability of individual neurones from the DHC and VHC has received surprisingly little attention. In this study, we have characterized the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal neurones from the DHC and the VHC using the whole-cell current-clamp method. Our results demonstrate that somatic current injections of equal magnitude elicit significantly more action potentials in VHC neurones than DHC neurones, and that this difference stems from the more depolarized resting membrane potential (RMP; Δ7 mV) and higher input resistance (Rin; Δ46 MΩ measured from RMP) observed in VHC neurones. These differences in RMP and Rin were also observed in dendritic whole-cell current-clamp recordings. Furthermore, morphological reconstructions of individual neurones revealed significant differences in the dendritic branching pattern between DHC and VHC neurones that could, in principle, contribute to the lower somatic Rin of DHC neurones. Together, our results highlight significant differences in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal neurones across the longitudinal hippocampal axis, and suggest that VHC neurones are intrinsically more excitable than DHC neurones. This difference is likely to predispose the VHC to hyperexcitability

  5. miR-155 Deletion in Mice Overcomes Neuron-Intrinsic and Neuron-Extrinsic Barriers to Spinal Cord Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mandrekar-Colucci, Shweta; Hall, Jodie C.E.; Sweet, David R.; Schmitt, Philipp J.; Xu, Xinyang; Guan, Zhen; Mo, Xiaokui; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    Axon regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) fails due to neuron-intrinsic mechanisms and extracellular barriers including inflammation. microRNA (miR)-155–5p is a small, noncoding RNA that negatively regulates mRNA translation. In macrophages, miR-155-5p is induced by inflammatory stimuli and elicits a response that could be toxic after SCI. miR-155 may also independently alter expression of genes that regulate axon growth in neurons. Here, we hypothesized that miR-155 deletion would simultaneously improve axon growth and reduce neuroinflammation after SCI by acting on both neurons and macrophages. New data show that miR-155 deletion attenuates inflammatory signaling in macrophages, reduces macrophage-mediated neuron toxicity, and increases macrophage-elicited axon growth by ∼40% relative to control conditions. In addition, miR-155 deletion increases spontaneous axon growth from neurons; adult miR-155 KO dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons extend 44% longer neurites than WT neurons. In vivo, miR-155 deletion augments conditioning lesion-induced intraneuronal expression of SPRR1A, a regeneration-associated gene; ∼50% more injured KO DRG neurons expressed SPRR1A versus WT neurons. After dorsal column SCI, miR-155 KO mouse spinal cord has reduced neuroinflammation and increased peripheral conditioning-lesion-enhanced axon regeneration beyond the epicenter. Finally, in a model of spinal contusion injury, miR-155 deletion improves locomotor function at postinjury times corresponding with the arrival and maximal appearance of activated intraspinal macrophages. In miR-155 KO mice, improved locomotor function is associated with smaller contusion lesions and decreased accumulation of inflammatory macrophages. Collectively, these data indicate that miR-155 is a novel therapeutic target capable of simultaneously overcoming neuron-intrinsic and neuron-extrinsic barriers to repair after SCI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Axon regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) fails

  6. Intrinsic properties of the sodium sensor neurons in the rat median preoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Voisin, Aurore N.; Mouginot, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The essential role of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) in the integration of chemosensory information associated with the hydromineral state of the rat relies on the presence of a unique population of sodium (Na+) sensor neurons. Little is known about the intrinsic properties of these neurons; therefore, we used whole cell recordings in acute brain slices to determine the electrical fingerprints of this specific neural population of rat MnPO. The data collected from a large sample of neurons (115) indicated that the Na+ sensor neurons represent a majority of the MnPO neurons in situ (83%). These neurons displayed great diversity in both firing patterns induced by transient depolarizing current steps and rectifying properties activated by hyperpolarizing current steps. This diversity of electrical properties was also present in non-Na+ sensor neurons. Subpopulations of Na+ sensor neurons could be distinguished, however, from the non-Na+ sensor neurons. The firing frequency was higher in Na+ sensor neurons, showing irregular spike discharges, and the amplitude of the time-dependent rectification was weaker in the Na+ sensor neurons than in non-Na+ sensor neurons. The diversity among the electrical properties of the MnPO neurons contrasts with the relative function homogeneity (Na+ sensing). However, this diversity might be correlated with a variety of direct synaptic connections linking the MnPO to different brain areas involved in various aspects of the restoration and conservation of the body fluid homeostasis. PMID:22874426

  7. Intrinsic neuronal properties switch the mode of information transmission in networks.

    PubMed

    Gjorgjieva, Julijana; Mease, Rebecca A; Moody, William J; Fairhall, Adrienne L

    2014-12-01

    Diverse ion channels and their dynamics endow single neurons with complex biophysical properties. These properties determine the heterogeneity of cell types that make up the brain, as constituents of neural circuits tuned to perform highly specific computations. How do biophysical properties of single neurons impact network function? We study a set of biophysical properties that emerge in cortical neurons during the first week of development, eventually allowing these neurons to adaptively scale the gain of their response to the amplitude of the fluctuations they encounter. During the same time period, these same neurons participate in large-scale waves of spontaneously generated electrical activity. We investigate the potential role of experimentally observed changes in intrinsic neuronal properties in determining the ability of cortical networks to propagate waves of activity. We show that such changes can strongly affect the ability of multi-layered feedforward networks to represent and transmit information on multiple timescales. With properties modeled on those observed at early stages of development, neurons are relatively insensitive to rapid fluctuations and tend to fire synchronously in response to wave-like events of large amplitude. Following developmental changes in voltage-dependent conductances, these same neurons become efficient encoders of fast input fluctuations over few layers, but lose the ability to transmit slower, population-wide input variations across many layers. Depending on the neurons' intrinsic properties, noise plays different roles in modulating neuronal input-output curves, which can dramatically impact network transmission. The developmental change in intrinsic properties supports a transformation of a networks function from the propagation of network-wide information to one in which computations are scaled to local activity. This work underscores the significance of simple changes in conductance parameters in governing how neurons

  8. More than a bystander: the contributions of intrinsic skeletal muscle defects in motor neuron diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Justin G.; Ferrier, Andrew; Kothary, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and spinal-bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) are devastating diseases characterized by the degeneration of motor neurons. Although the molecular causes underlying these diseases differ, recent findings have highlighted the contribution of intrinsic skeletal muscle defects in motor neuron diseases. The use of cell culture and animal models has led to the important finding that muscle defects occur prior to and independently of motor neuron degeneration in motor neuron diseases. In SMA for instance, the muscle specific requirements of the SMA disease-causing gene have been demonstrated by a series of genetic rescue experiments in SMA models. Conditional ALS mouse models expressing a muscle specific mutant SOD1 gene develop atrophy and muscle degeneration in the absence of motor neuron pathology. Treating SBMA mice by over-expressing IGF-1 in a skeletal muscle-specific manner attenuates disease severity and improves motor neuron pathology. In the present review, we provide an in depth description of muscle intrinsic defects, and discuss how they impact muscle function in these diseases. Furthermore, we discuss muscle-specific therapeutic strategies used to treat animal models of SMA, ALS, and SBMA. The study of intrinsic skeletal muscle defects is crucial for the understanding of the pathophysiology of these diseases and will open new therapeutic options for the treatment of motor neuron diseases. PMID:24391590

  9. Development and modulation of intrinsic membrane properties control the temporal precision of auditory brain stem neurons.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Delwen L; Gleiss, Sarah A; Berger, Christina; Kümpfbeck, Franziska S; Ammer, Julian J; Felmy, Felix

    2015-01-15

    Passive and active membrane properties determine the voltage responses of neurons. Within the auditory brain stem, refinements in these intrinsic properties during late postnatal development usually generate short integration times and precise action-potential generation. This developmentally acquired temporal precision is crucial for auditory signal processing. How the interactions of these intrinsic properties develop in concert to enable auditory neurons to transfer information with high temporal precision has not yet been elucidated in detail. Here, we show how the developmental interaction of intrinsic membrane parameters generates high firing precision. We performed in vitro recordings from neurons of postnatal days 9-28 in the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of Mongolian gerbils, an auditory brain stem structure that converts excitatory to inhibitory information with high temporal precision. During this developmental period, the input resistance and capacitance decrease, and action potentials acquire faster kinetics and enhanced precision. Depending on the stimulation time course, the input resistance and capacitance contribute differentially to action-potential thresholds. The decrease in input resistance, however, is sufficient to explain the enhanced action-potential precision. Alterations in passive membrane properties also interact with a developmental change in potassium currents to generate the emergence of the mature firing pattern, characteristic of coincidence-detector neurons. Cholinergic receptor-mediated depolarizations further modulate this intrinsic excitability profile by eliciting changes in the threshold and firing pattern, irrespective of the developmental stage. Thus our findings reveal how intrinsic membrane properties interact developmentally to promote temporally precise information processing.

  10. Complete Firing-Rate Response of Neurons with Complex Intrinsic Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Puelma Touzel, Maximilian; Wolf, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The response of a neuronal population over a space of inputs depends on the intrinsic properties of its constituent neurons. Two main modes of single neuron dynamics–integration and resonance–have been distinguished. While resonator cell types exist in a variety of brain areas, few models incorporate this feature and fewer have investigated its effects. To understand better how a resonator’s frequency preference emerges from its intrinsic dynamics and contributes to its local area’s population firing rate dynamics, we analyze the dynamic gain of an analytically solvable two-degree of freedom neuron model. In the Fokker-Planck approach, the dynamic gain is intractable. The alternative Gauss-Rice approach lifts the resetting of the voltage after a spike. This allows us to derive a complete expression for the dynamic gain of a resonator neuron model in terms of a cascade of filters on the input. We find six distinct response types and use them to fully characterize the routes to resonance across all values of the relevant timescales. We find that resonance arises primarily due to slow adaptation with an intrinsic frequency acting to sharpen and adjust the location of the resonant peak. We determine the parameter regions for the existence of an intrinsic frequency and for subthreshold and spiking resonance, finding all possible intersections of the three. The expressions and analysis presented here provide an account of how intrinsic neuron dynamics shape dynamic population response properties and can facilitate the construction of an exact theory of correlations and stability of population activity in networks containing populations of resonator neurons. PMID:26720924

  11. Intrinsic and Innate Defenses of Neurons: Détente with the Herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Enquist, Lynn W; Leib, David A

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinvasive herpesviruses have evolved to efficiently infect and establish latency in neurons. The nervous system has limited capability to regenerate, so immune responses therein are carefully regulated to be nondestructive, with dependence on atypical intrinsic and innate defenses. In this article we review studies of some of these noncanonical defense pathways and how herpesvirus gene products counter them, highlighting the contributions that primary neuronal in vitro models have made to our understanding of this field. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Microglial responses around intrinsic CNS neurons are correlated with axonal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microglia/macrophages and lymphocytes (T-cells) accumulate around motor and primary sensory neurons that are regenerating axons but there is little or no microglial activation or T-cell accumulation around axotomised intrinsic CNS neurons, which do not normally regenerate axons. We aimed to establish whether there was an inflammatory response around the perikarya of CNS neurons that were induced to regenerate axons through a peripheral nerve graft. Results When neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and red nucleus were induced to regenerate axons along peripheral nerve grafts, a marked microglial response was found around their cell bodies, including the partial enwrapping of some regenerating neurons. T-cells were found amongst regenerating TRN neurons but not rubrospinal neurons. Axotomy alone or insertion of freeze-killed nerve grafts did not induce a similar perineuronal inflammation. Nerve grafts in the corticospinal tracts did not induce axonal regeneration or a microglial or T-cell response in the motor cortex. Conclusions These results strengthen the evidence that perineuronal microglial accumulation (but not T-cell accumulation) is involved in axonal regeneration by intrinsic CNS and other neurons. PMID:20137064

  13. Microglial responses around intrinsic CNS neurons are correlated with axonal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shokouhi, Bahman N; Wong, Bernadette Z Y; Siddiqui, Samir; Lieberman, A Robert; Campbell, Gregor; Tohyama, Koujiro; Anderson, Patrick N

    2010-02-05

    Microglia/macrophages and lymphocytes (T-cells) accumulate around motor and primary sensory neurons that are regenerating axons but there is little or no microglial activation or T-cell accumulation around axotomised intrinsic CNS neurons, which do not normally regenerate axons. We aimed to establish whether there was an inflammatory response around the perikarya of CNS neurons that were induced to regenerate axons through a peripheral nerve graft. When neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and red nucleus were induced to regenerate axons along peripheral nerve grafts, a marked microglial response was found around their cell bodies, including the partial enwrapping of some regenerating neurons. T-cells were found amongst regenerating TRN neurons but not rubrospinal neurons. Axotomy alone or insertion of freeze-killed nerve grafts did not induce a similar perineuronal inflammation. Nerve grafts in the corticospinal tracts did not induce axonal regeneration or a microglial or T-cell response in the motor cortex. These results strengthen the evidence that perineuronal microglial accumulation (but not T-cell accumulation) is involved in axonal regeneration by intrinsic CNS and other neurons.

  14. Slow Conductances Could Underlie Intrinsic Phase-Maintaining Properties of Isolated Lobster (Panulirus interruptus) Pyloric Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Buchman, Einat; Weaver, Adam L.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.; Hobbs, Kevin H.

    2009-01-01

    The rhythmic pyloric network of the lobster stomatogastric system approximately maintains phase (that is, the burst durations and durations between the bursts of its neurons change proportionally) when network cycle period is altered by current injection into the network pacemaker (Hooper, 1997a,b). When isolated from the network and driven by rhythmic hyperpolarizing current pulses, the delay to firing after each pulse of at least one network neuron type (Pyloric, PY) varies in a phase-maintaining manner when cycle period is varied (Hooper, 1998). These variations require PY neurons to have intrinsic mechanisms that respond to changes in neuron activity on time scales at least as long as two seconds. Slowly activating and deactivating conductances could provide such a mechanism. We tested this possibility by building models containing various slow conductances. This work showed that such conductances could indeed support intrinsic phase-maintenance and we show here results for one such conductance, a slow potassium conductance. These conductances supported phase maintenance because their mean activation level changed, hence altering neuron post-inhibition firing delay, when the rhythmic input to the neuron changed. Switching the sign of the dependence of slow conductance activation and deactivation on membrane potential resulted in neuron delays switching to change in an anti-phase maintaining manner. These data suggest that slow conductances or similar slow processes such as changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could underlie phase maintenance in pyloric network neurons. PMID:19211890

  15. Intrinsic Neuronal Excitability Is Reversibly Altered by a Single Experience in Fear Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Elizabeth A.; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Learning is known to cause alterations in intrinsic cellular excitability but, to date, these changes have been seen only after multiple training trials. A powerful learning task that can be quickly acquired and extinguished with a single trial is fear conditioning. Rats were trained and extinguished on a hippocampus-dependent form of fear conditioning to determine whether learning-related changes in intrinsic excitability could be observed after a few training trials and a single extinction trial. Following fear training, hippocampal slices were made and intrinsic excitability was assayed via whole cell recordings from CA1 neurons. Alterations in intrinsic excitability, assayed by the postburst afterhyperpolarization and firing frequency accommodation, were observed after only three trials of contextual or trace-cued fear conditioning. Animals that had been trained in contextual and trace-cued fear were then extinguished. Context fear-conditioned animals extinguished in a single trial and the changes in intrinsic excitability were reversed. Trace-cue conditioned animals only partially extinguished in a single trial and reductions in excitability remained. Thus a single learning experience is sufficient to alter intrinsic excitability. This dramatically extends observations of learning-specific changes in intrinsic neuronal excitability previously observed in paradigms requiring many training trials, suggesting the excitability changes have a basic role in acquiring new information. PMID:19726729

  16. Distribution and Intrinsic Membrane Properties of Basal Forebrain GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, James T.; Yang, Chun; Franciosi, Serena; Winston, Stuart; Abarr, Kathleen K.; Rigby, Matthew S.; Yanagawa, Yuchio; McCarley, Robert W.; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2013-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) strongly regulates cortical activation, sleep homeostasis, and attention. Many BF neurons involved in these processes are GABAergic, including a subpopulation of projection neurons containing the calcium-binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). However, technical difficulties in identification have prevented a precise mapping of the distribution of GABAergic and GABA/PV+ neurons in the mouse or a determination of their intrinsic membrane properties. Here we used mice expressing fluorescent proteins in GABAergic (GAD67-GFP knock-in mice) or PV+ neurons (PV-Tomato mice) to study these neurons. Immunohistochemical staining for GABA in GAD67-GFP mice confirmed that GFP selectively labeled BF GABAergic neurons. GFP+ neurons and fibers were distributed throughout the BF, with the highest density in the magnocellular preoptic area (MCPO). Immunohistochemistry for PV indicated that the majority of PV+ neurons in the BF were large (>20 μm) or medium-sized (15–20 μm) GFP+ neurons. Most medium and large-sized BF GFP+ neurons, including those retrogradely labeled from the neocortex, were fast-firing and spontaneously active in vitro. They exhibited prominent hyperpolarization-activated inward currents and subthreshold “spikelets,” suggestive of electrical coupling. PV+ neurons recorded in PV-Tomato mice had similar properties but had significantly narrower action potentials and a higher maximal firing frequency. Another population of smaller GFP+ neurons had properties similar to striatal projection neurons. The fast firing and electrical coupling of BF GABA/PV+ neurons, together with their projections to cortical interneurons and the thalamic reticular nucleus, suggest a strong and synchronous control of the neocortical fast rhythms typical of wakefulness and REM sleep. PMID:23254904

  17. ATF3 increases the intrinsic growth state of DRG neurons to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Seijffers, Rhona; Mills, Charles D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2007-07-25

    Peripheral axons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, but not their central axons in the dorsal columns, regenerate after injury. However, if the neurons are conditioned by a peripheral nerve injury into an actively growing state, the rate of peripheral axonal growth is accelerated and the injured central axons begin to regenerate. The growth-promoting effects of conditioning injuries have two components, increased axonal growth and a reduced response to inhibitory myelin cues. We have examined which transcription factors activated by peripheral axonal injury may mediate the conditioning effect by regulating expression of effectors that increase the intrinsic growth state of the neurons. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a prime candidate because it is induced in all injured DRG neurons after peripheral, but not central, axonal damage. To investigate if ATF3 promotes regeneration, we generated transgenic mice that constitutively express this transcription factor in non-injured adult DRG neurons. The rate of peripheral nerve regeneration was enhanced in the transgenic mice to an extent comparable to that produced by a preconditioning nerve injury. The expression of some growth-associated genes, such as SPRR1A, but not others like GAP-43, was increased in the non-injured neurons. ATF3 increased DRG neurite elongation when cultured on permissive substrates but did not overcome the inhibitory effects of myelin or promote central axonal regeneration in the spinal cord in vivo. We conclude that ATF3 contributes to nerve regeneration by increasing the intrinsic growth state of injured neurons.

  18. The h channel mediates location dependence and plasticity of intrinsic phase response in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Rishikesh; Johnston, Daniel

    2008-05-28

    The presence of phenomenological inductances in neuronal membrane has been known for more than one-half a century. Despite this, the dramatic contributions of such inductive elements to the amplitude and, especially, phase of neuronal impedance, and their roles in modulating temporal dynamics of neuronal responses have surprisingly remained unexplored. In this study, we demonstrate that the h channel contributes a location-dependent and plastic phenomenological inductive component to the input impedance of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Specifically, we show that the h channels introduce an apparent negative delay in the local voltage response of these neurons with respect to the injected current within the theta frequency range. The frequency range and the extent of this lead expand with increases in h current either through hyperpolarization, or with increasing distance of dendritic location from the soma. We also demonstrate that a spatially widespread increase in this inductive phase component accompanies long-term potentiation. Finally, using impedance analysis, we show that both location and activity dependence of intrinsic phase response are attributable not to changes in a capacitive or a leak component, but to changes in h-channel properties. Our results suggest that certain voltage-gated ion channels can differentially regulate internal time delays within neurons, thus providing them with an independent control mechanism in temporal coding of neuronal information. Our analyses and results also establish impedance as a powerful measure of intrinsic dynamics and excitability, given that it quantifies temporal relationships among signals and excitability as functions of input frequency.

  19. Diversity of intrinsic frequency encoding patterns in rat cortical neurons--mechanisms and possible functions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jing; Robinson, Hugh P C; Feng, Jianfeng

    2010-03-19

    Extracellular recordings of single neurons in primary and secondary somatosensory cortices of monkeys in vivo have shown that their firing rate can increase, decrease, or remain constant in different cells, as the external stimulus frequency increases. We observed similar intrinsic firing patterns (increasing, decreasing or constant) in rat somatosensory cortex in vitro, when stimulated with oscillatory input using conductance injection (dynamic clamp). The underlying mechanism of this observation is not obvious, and presents a challenge for mathematical modelling. We propose a simple principle for describing this phenomenon using a leaky integrate-and-fire model with sinusoidal input, an intrinsic oscillation and Poisson noise. Additional enhancement of the gain of encoding could be achieved by local network connections amongst diverse intrinsic response patterns. Our work sheds light on the possible cellular and network mechanisms underlying these opposing neuronal responses, which serve to enhance signal detection.

  20. Ionic mechanisms for intrinsic slow oscillations in thalamic relay neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Destexhe, A; Babloyantz, A; Sejnowski, T J

    1993-01-01

    The oscillatory properties of single thalamocortical neurons were investigated by using a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model that included Ca2+ diffusion, the low-threshold Ca2+ current (lT) and the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (lh). lh was modeled by double activation kinetics regulated by intracellular Ca2+. The model exhibited waxing and waning oscillations consisting of 1-25-s bursts of slow oscillations (3.5-4 Hz) separated by long silent periods (4-20 s). During the oscillatory phase, the entry of Ca2+ progressively shifted the activation function of lh, terminating the oscillations. A similar type of waxing and waning oscillation was also observed, in the absence of Ca2+ regulation of lh, from the combination of lT, lh, and a slow K+ current. Singular approximation showed that for both models, the activation variables of lh controlled the dynamics of thalamocortical cells. Dynamical analysis of the system in a phase plane diagram showed that waxing and waning oscillations arose when lh entrained the system alternately between stationary and oscillating branches. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8274647

  1. Anatomic, intrinsic, and synaptic properties of dorsal and ventral division neurons in rat medial geniculate body.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, E L; Smith, P H

    1999-05-01

    Anatomic, intrinsic, and synaptic properties of dorsal and ventral division neurons in rat medial geniculate body. Presently little is known about what basic synaptic and cellular mechanisms are employed by thalamocortical neurons in the two main divisions of the auditory thalamus to elicit their distinct responses to sound. Using intracellular recording and labeling methods, we characterized anatomic features, membrane properties, and synaptic inputs of thalamocortical neurons in the dorsal (MGD) and ventral (MGV) divisions in brain slices of rat medial geniculate body. Quantitative analysis of dendritic morphology demonstrated that tufted neurons in both divisions had shorter dendrites, smaller dendritic tree areas, more profuse branching, and a greater dendritic polarization compared with stellate neurons, which were only found in MGD. Tufted neuron dendritic polarization was not as strong or consistent as earlier Golgi studies suggested. MGV and MGD cells had similar intrinsic properties except for an increased prevalence of a depolarizing sag potential in MGV neurons. The sag was the only intrinsic property correlated with cell morphology, seen only in tufted neurons in either division. Many MGV and MGD neurons received excitatory and inhibitory inferior colliculus (IC) inputs (designated IN/EX or EX/IN depending on excitation/inhibition sequence). However, a significant number only received excitatory inputs (EX/O) and a few only inhibitory (IN/O). Both MGV and MGD cells displayed similar proportions of response combinations, but suprathreshold EX/O responses only were observed in tufted neurons. Excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs and IPSPs) had multiple distinguishable amplitude levels implying convergence. Excitatory inputs activated alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors the relative contributions of which were variable. For IN/EX cells with suprathreshold inputs

  2. Neurally released pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide enhances guinea pig intrinsic cardiac neurone excitability.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, John D; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Hoover, Donald B; Parsons, Rodney L

    2007-07-01

    Intracellular recordings were made in vitro from guinea-pig cardiac ganglia to determine whether endogenous neuropeptides such as pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) or substance P released during tetanic neural stimulation modulate cardiac neurone excitability and/or contribute to slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (sEPSPs). When nicotinic and muscarinic receptors were blocked by hexamethonium and atropine, 20 Hz stimulation for 10 s initiated a sEPSP in all innervated neurones. In 40% of the cells, excitability was enhanced after termination of the sEPSP. This suggested that non-cholinergic receptor-mediated mechanisms contributed to the sEPSP and modulated neuronal excitability. Exogenous PACAP and substance P initiated a slow depolarization in the neurones whereas neuronal excitability was only increased by PACAP. When ganglia were treated with the PAC1 antagonist PACAP6-38 (500 nM), the sEPSP evoked by 20 Hz stimulation was reduced by approximately 50% and an enhanced excitability occurred in only 10% of the cells. These observations suggested that PACAP released from preganglionic nerve terminals during tetanic stimulation enhanced neuronal excitability and evoked sEPSPs. After addition of 1 nM PACAP to the bath, 7 of 9 neurones exhibited a tonic firing pattern whereas in untreated preparations, the neurons had a phasic firing pattern. PACAP6-38 (500 nM) diminished the increase in excitability caused by 1 nM PACAP so that only 4 of 13 neurones exhibited a tonic firing pattern and the other 9 cells retained a phasic firing pattern. These findings indicate that PACAP can be released by tetanic neural stimulation in vitro and increase the excitability of intrinsic cardiac neurones. We hypothesize that in vivo PACAP released during preganglionic firing may modulate neurotransmission within the intrinsic cardiac ganglia.

  3. Neuronal development is promoted by weakened intrinsic antioxidant defences due to epigenetic repression of Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Karen F.S.; Al-Mubarak, Bashayer; Martel, Marc-André; McKay, Sean; Wheelan, Nicola; Hasel, Philip; Márkus, Nóra M.; Baxter, Paul; Deighton, Ruth F.; Serio, Andrea; Bilican, Bilada; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Meakin, Paul J.; Ashford, Michael L.J.; Wyllie, David J.A.; Scannevin, Robert H.; Chandran, Siddharthan; Hayes, John D.; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2015-01-01

    Forebrain neurons have weak intrinsic antioxidant defences compared with astrocytes, but the molecular basis and purpose of this is poorly understood. We show that early in mouse cortical neuronal development in vitro and in vivo, expression of the master-regulator of antioxidant genes, transcription factor NF-E2-related-factor-2 (Nrf2), is repressed by epigenetic inactivation of its promoter. Consequently, in contrast to astrocytes or young neurons, maturing neurons possess negligible Nrf2-dependent antioxidant defences, and exhibit no transcriptional responses to Nrf2 activators, or to ablation of Nrf2's inhibitor Keap1. Neuronal Nrf2 inactivation seems to be required for proper development: in maturing neurons, ectopic Nrf2 expression inhibits neurite outgrowth and aborization, and electrophysiological maturation, including synaptogenesis. These defects arise because Nrf2 activity buffers neuronal redox status, inhibiting maturation processes dependent on redox-sensitive JNK and Wnt pathways. Thus, developmental epigenetic Nrf2 repression weakens neuronal antioxidant defences but is necessary to create an environment that supports neuronal development. PMID:25967870

  4. Neonatal tissue injury reduces the intrinsic excitability of adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Baccei, M L

    2014-01-03

    Tissue damage during the neonatal period evokes long-lasting changes in nociceptive processing within the adult spinal cord which contribute to persistent alterations in pain sensitivity. However, it remains unclear if the observed modifications in neuronal activity within the mature superficial dorsal horn (SDH) following early injury reflect shifts in the intrinsic membrane properties of these cells. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to identify the effects of neonatal surgical injury on the intrinsic excitability of both GABAergic and presumed glutamatergic neurons within lamina II of the adult SDH using in vitro patch clamp recordings from spinal cord slices prepared from glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein (Gad-GFP) mice. The results demonstrate that hindpaw surgical incision at postnatal day (P) 3 altered the passive membrane properties of both Gad-GFP and adjacent, non-GFP neurons in the mature SDH, as evidenced by decreased membrane resistance and more negative resting potentials in comparison to naïve littermate controls. This was accompanied by a reduction in the prevalence of spontaneous activity within the GABAergic population. Both Gad-GFP and non-GFP neurons displayed a significant elevation in rheobase and decreased instantaneous firing frequency after incision, suggesting that early tissue damage lowers the intrinsic membrane excitability of adult SDH neurons. Isolation of inward-rectifying K(+) (K(ir)) currents revealed that neonatal incision significantly increased K(ir) conductance near physiological membrane potentials in GABAergic, but not glutamatergic, lamina II neurons. Overall, these findings suggest that neonatal tissue injury causes a long-term dampening of intrinsic firing across the general population of lamina II interneurons, but the underlying ionic mechanisms may be cell-type specific. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Intrinsic cardiac neurons involved in cardiac regulation possess alpha 1-, alpha 2-, beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Armour, J A

    1997-03-01

    To determine whether intrinsic cardiac neurons involved in cardiac regulation possess alpha 1-, alpha 2-, beta 1-, or beta 2-adrenoceptors. The alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine, the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, the beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist prenaterol and the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist terbutaline were administered individually to a population of spontaneously active intrinsic cardiac neurons either locally (10 microL of 100 microM solution; eight dogs) or via the local arterial blood supply (0.1 mL of 100 microM solution; 20 dogs) in artificially ventilated, open chest anesthetized dogs. Neuronal and cardiac effects induced by each of the adrenergic agonists were also tested in the presence of an antagonist selective to each adrenoceptor subtype studied. The activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons was modified by at least one of the adrenoceptor agonists tested, and 34% of the spontaneously active neurons were affected by all four agonists. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonists either increased or decreased neuronal activity, depending on the population of neurons studied. On the other hand, the activity generated by intrinsic cardiac neurons was augmented by beta-adrenoceptor agonists. Ventricular contractile force increased when intrinsic cardiac neurons were excited by adrenoceptor agonists. The spontaneous activity generated by neurons was suppressed by beta-adrenoceptor, but not alpha-adrenoceptor, blockade. Neuronal and cardiovascular responses were no longer elicited by an agonist in the presence of its selective antagonist; they were elicited in the presence of antagonists to the other receptor subtypes studied. Intrinsic cardiac neurons involved in cardiac regulation possess alpha 1-, alpha 2-, beta 1- or beta 2-adrenoceptors. Intrinsic cardiac adrenergic neurons receive tonic inputs via beta-, but not alpha-, adrenoceptors. These data indicate that adrenergic blockade may affect cardiac function, in part, via modification of the intrinsic

  6. Suppressive Effects of Resveratrol Treatment on The Intrinsic Evoked Excitability of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Meftahi, Gholamhossein; Ghotbedin, Zohreh; Eslamizade, Mohammad Javad; Hosseinmardi, Narges; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, has a wide range of desirable biological actions. Despite a growing body of evidence indicating that resveratrol induces changes in neu- ronal function, little effort, if any, has been made to investigate the cellular effect of res- veratrol treatment on intrinsic neuronal properties. Materials and Methods This experimental study was performed to examine the acute effects of resveratrol (100 µM) on the intrinsic evoked responses of rat Cornu Ammonis (CA1) pyramidal neurons in brain slices, using whole cell patch clamp re- cording under current clamp conditions. Results Findings showed that resveratrol treatment caused dramatic changes in evoked responses of pyramidal neurons. Its treatment induced a significant (P<0.05) increase in the after hyperpolarization amplitude of the first evoked action potential. Resveratrol-treated cells displayed a significantly broader action potential (AP) when compared with either control or vehicle-treated groups. In addition, the mean instantaneous firing frequency between the first two action potentials was significantly lower in resveratrol-treated neurons. It also caused a significant reduction in the time to maximum decay of AP. The rheobase current and the utilization time were both significantly greater following resveratrol treatment. Neurons exhibited a significantly depolarized voltage threshold when exposed to resveratrol. Conclusion Results provide direct electrophysiological evidence for the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on pyramidal neurons, at least in part, by reducing the evoked neural activity. PMID:26464825

  7. Bursts of recurrent excitation in the activation of intrinsic sensory neurons of the intestine.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, P P

    2004-01-01

    Sensory neurons intrinsic to the wall of the intestine receive input from stimuli in the lumen. These stimuli interact with the mucosal epithelium causing release of sensory mediators that depolarize the sensory nerve terminals. The depolarization and the subsequent pattern of action potential (AP) discharge controls the type and magnitude of the reflex evoked. The characteristics of this AP discharge were investigated in 60 intrinsic sensory neurons from the myenteric plexus of the guinea-pig ileum. Intracellular electrophysiological recordings were made from neurons near intact mucosa during electrical stimulation of the mucosa and/or neuronal soma. Most neurons (87%) responded to mucosal stimulation with a burst of 3.8+/-0.3 APs (average instantaneous frequency, fINT 39+/-4 Hz). In 38%, a somatically evoked AP triggered a similar burst of 2.9+/-0.3 APs (fINT 52+/-6 Hz) while in 50% of neurons, there was ongoing spontaneous bursting (3.8+/-0.2 APs, fINT 48+/-6 Hz). APs in all of these bursts had an inflection on the rising phase and they persisted during somatic hyperpolarization indicating they were generated in a distal process rather than the soma. Collision experiments confirmed this and suggested that bursts originated near the mucosal sensory nerve terminals. A reduction in membrane excitability reduced the number of APs in a burst suggesting a brief depolarizing event, such as a voltage- or ligand-gated ion channel, was responsible. Bursting behavior in the intrinsic sensory neurons is common for mucosal stimuli and may involve a novel transmitter acting at the sensory nerve terminal. Further, some bursting involves positive feedback between the nerve terminals and other elements in the epithelium. This is a novel and potentially important component of intestinal sensory transduction.

  8. Intrinsic and extrinsic cues regulate the daily profile of mouse lateral habenula neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Sakhi, Kanwal; Wegner, Sven; Belle, Mino D C; Howarth, Michael; Delagrange, Philippe; Brown, Timothy M; Piggins, Hugh D

    2014-01-01

    The epithalamic lateral habenula (LHb) is implicated as part of the mammalian brain's circadian system. Anatomical evidence suggests that the LHb receives extrinsic circadian timing cues from retinal ganglion cells and the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Intriguingly, some LHb neurones contain the molecular circadian clock, but it is unclear if and how intrinsic and extrinsic circadian processes influence neuronal activity in the mouse LHb. Here, using an in vitro brain slice preparation isolating the LHb from the SCN, we show through whole-cell patch-clamp recordings that LHb neurones exhibit heterogeneity in their resting state, but the majority spontaneously fire action potentials (APs). Discharge rate of APs varied from low firing in the early day to higher firing later in the day and was absent in LHb brain slices prepared from Cry1−/−Cry2−/− mice that lack a functional molecular clock. Low amplitude circadian oscillations in the molecular circadian clock were also monitored in LHb brain slices, but were absent in Cry1−/−Cry2−/− LHb brain tissue. A putative neurochemical output signal of the SCN, prokineticin 2 (PK2), inhibited some LHb neurones by elevating the frequency of GABA release in the LHb. Using multi-electrode recordings in vivo, we found that LHb neurones sluggishly respond to retinal illumination, suggesting that they receive such information through polysynaptic processes. In summary, our results show for the first time that intrinsic circadian signals are important for regulating LHb neuronal state, while the SCN-derived signal PK2 is less influential. Moreover, we demonstrate that mouse LHb neurones have access to and can respond to visual input, but such signals are unlikely to be directly communicated to the LHb. Broadly, these findings raise the possibility that intrinsic circadian signals are likely to be influential in shaping LHb contributions to cognition and emotionality. PMID:25194046

  9. Intrinsic and extrinsic cues regulate the daily profile of mouse lateral habenula neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Sakhi, Kanwal; Wegner, Sven; Belle, Mino D C; Howarth, Michael; Delagrange, Philippe; Brown, Timothy M; Piggins, Hugh D

    2014-11-15

    The epithalamic lateral habenula (LHb) is implicated as part of the mammalian brain's circadian system. Anatomical evidence suggests that the LHb receives extrinsic circadian timing cues from retinal ganglion cells and the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Intriguingly, some LHb neurones contain the molecular circadian clock, but it is unclear if and how intrinsic and extrinsic circadian processes influence neuronal activity in the mouse LHb. Here, using an in vitro brain slice preparation isolating the LHb from the SCN, we show through whole-cell patch-clamp recordings that LHb neurones exhibit heterogeneity in their resting state, but the majority spontaneously fire action potentials (APs). Discharge rate of APs varied from low firing in the early day to higher firing later in the day and was absent in LHb brain slices prepared from Cry1(-/-)Cry2(-/-) mice that lack a functional molecular clock. Low amplitude circadian oscillations in the molecular circadian clock were also monitored in LHb brain slices, but were absent in Cry1(-/-)Cry2(-/-) LHb brain tissue. A putative neurochemical output signal of the SCN, prokineticin 2 (PK2), inhibited some LHb neurones by elevating the frequency of GABA release in the LHb. Using multi-electrode recordings in vivo, we found that LHb neurones sluggishly respond to retinal illumination, suggesting that they receive such information through polysynaptic processes. In summary, our results show for the first time that intrinsic circadian signals are important for regulating LHb neuronal state, while the SCN-derived signal PK2 is less influential. Moreover, we demonstrate that mouse LHb neurones have access to and can respond to visual input, but such signals are unlikely to be directly communicated to the LHb. Broadly, these findings raise the possibility that intrinsic circadian signals are likely to be influential in shaping LHb contributions to cognition and emotionality. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of

  10. miR-155 Deletion in Mice Overcomes Neuron-Intrinsic and Neuron-Extrinsic Barriers to Spinal Cord Repair.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Andrew D; Mandrekar-Colucci, Shweta; Hall, Jodie C E; Sweet, David R; Schmitt, Philipp J; Xu, Xinyang; Guan, Zhen; Mo, Xiaokui; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Popovich, Phillip G

    2016-08-10

    Axon regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) fails due to neuron-intrinsic mechanisms and extracellular barriers including inflammation. microRNA (miR)-155-5p is a small, noncoding RNA that negatively regulates mRNA translation. In macrophages, miR-155-5p is induced by inflammatory stimuli and elicits a response that could be toxic after SCI. miR-155 may also independently alter expression of genes that regulate axon growth in neurons. Here, we hypothesized that miR-155 deletion would simultaneously improve axon growth and reduce neuroinflammation after SCI by acting on both neurons and macrophages. New data show that miR-155 deletion attenuates inflammatory signaling in macrophages, reduces macrophage-mediated neuron toxicity, and increases macrophage-elicited axon growth by ∼40% relative to control conditions. In addition, miR-155 deletion increases spontaneous axon growth from neurons; adult miR-155 KO dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons extend 44% longer neurites than WT neurons. In vivo, miR-155 deletion augments conditioning lesion-induced intraneuronal expression of SPRR1A, a regeneration-associated gene; ∼50% more injured KO DRG neurons expressed SPRR1A versus WT neurons. After dorsal column SCI, miR-155 KO mouse spinal cord has reduced neuroinflammation and increased peripheral conditioning-lesion-enhanced axon regeneration beyond the epicenter. Finally, in a model of spinal contusion injury, miR-155 deletion improves locomotor function at postinjury times corresponding with the arrival and maximal appearance of activated intraspinal macrophages. In miR-155 KO mice, improved locomotor function is associated with smaller contusion lesions and decreased accumulation of inflammatory macrophages. Collectively, these data indicate that miR-155 is a novel therapeutic target capable of simultaneously overcoming neuron-intrinsic and neuron-extrinsic barriers to repair after SCI. Axon regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) fails due to neuron-intrinsic

  11. STIM1 Regulates Somatic Ca(2+) Signals and Intrinsic Firing Properties of Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Changhyeon; Jang, Dong Cheol; Jung, Dayoon; Kim, Yong Gyu; Shim, Hyun Geun; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Lee, Yong-Seok; Linden, David J; Worley, Paul F; Kim, Sang Jeong

    2017-09-13

    Control of Ca(2+) flux between the cytosol and intracellular Ca(2+) stores is essential for maintaining normal cellular function. It has been well established in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells that stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) initiates and regulates refilling Ca(2+) into the ER. Here, we describe a novel, additional role for STIM1, the regulation of free cytosolic Ca(2+), and the consequent control of spike firing in neurons. Among central neurons, cerebellar Purkinje neurons express the highest level of STIM1, and they fire continuously in the absence of stimulation, making somatic Ca(2+) homeostasis of particular importance. By using Purkinje neuron-specific STIM1 knock-out (STIM1(PKO)) male mice, we found that the deletion of STIM1 delayed clearance of cytosolic Ca(2+) in the soma during ongoing neuronal firing. Deletion of STIM1 also reduced the Purkinje neuronal excitability and impaired intrinsic plasticity without affecting long-term synaptic plasticity. In vestibulo-ocular reflex learning, STIM1(PKO) male mice showed severe deficits in memory consolidation, whereas they were normal in memory acquisition. Our results suggest that STIM1 is critically involved in the regulation of the neuronal excitability and the intrinsic plasticity of the Purkinje neurons as well as cerebellar memory consolidation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), which regulates the refilling of ER Ca(2+), has been investigated in several systems including the CNS. In addition to a previous study showing that STIM1 regulates dendritic ER Ca(2+) refilling and mGluR1-mediated synaptic transmission, we provide compelling evidence describing a novel role of STIM1 in spike firing Purkinje neurons. We found that STIM1 regulates cytosolic Ca(2+) clearance of the soma during spike firing, and the interruption of this cytosolic Ca(2+) clearing disrupts neuronal excitability and cerebellar memory consolidation. Our results provide new insights into

  12. Neuronal intrinsic properties shape naturally evoked sensory inputs in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Reali, Cecilia; Russo, Raúl E.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic electrophysiological properties arising from specific combinations of voltage-gated channels are fundamental for the performance of small neural networks in invertebrates, but their role in large-scale vertebrate circuits remains controversial. Although spinal neurons have complex intrinsic properties, some tasks produce high-conductance states that override intrinsic conductances, minimizing their contribution to network function. Because the detection and coding of somato-sensory information at early stages probably involves a relatively small number of neurons, we speculated that intrinsic electrophysiological properties are likely involved in the processing of sensory inputs by dorsal horn neurons (DHN). To test this idea, we took advantage of an integrated spinal cord–hindlimbs preparation from turtles allowing the combination of patch-clamp recordings of DHN embedded in an intact network, with accurate control of the extracellular milieu. We found that plateau potentials and low threshold spikes (LTS) -mediated by L- and T-type Ca2+channels, respectively- generated complex dynamics by interacting with naturally evoked synaptic potentials. Inhibitory receptive fields could be changed in sign by activation of the LTS. On the other hand, the plateau potential transformed sensory signals in the time domain by generating persistent activity triggered on and off by brief sensory inputs and windup of the response to repetitive sensory stimulation. Our findings suggest that intrinsic properties dynamically shape sensory inputs and thus represent a major building block for sensory processing by DHN. Intrinsic conductances in DHN appear to provide a mechanism for plastic phenomena such as dynamic receptive fields and sensitization to pain. PMID:24399934

  13. The intrinsic electrophysiological properties of mammalian neurons: insights into central nervous system function.

    PubMed

    Llinás, R R

    1988-12-23

    This article reviews the electroresponsive properties of single neurons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). In some of these cells the ionic conductances responsible for their excitability also endow them with autorhythmic electrical oscillatory properties. Chemical or electrical synaptic contacts between these neurons often result in network oscillations. In such networks, autorhythmic neurons may act as true oscillators (as pacemakers) or as resonators (responding preferentially to certain firing frequencies). Oscillations and resonance in the CNS are proposed to have diverse functional roles, such as (i) determining global functional states (for example, sleep-wakefulness or attention), (ii) timing in motor coordination, and (iii) specifying connectivity during development. Also, oscillation, especially in the thalamo-cortical circuits, may be related to certain neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review proposes that the autorhythmic electrical properties of central neurons and their connectivity form the basis for an intrinsic functional coordinate system that provides internal context to sensory input.

  14. The Intrinsic Electrophysiological Properties of Mammalian Neurons: Insights into Central Nervous System Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo R.

    1988-12-01

    This article reviews the electroresponsive properties of single neurons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). In some of these cells the ionic conductances responsible for their excitability also endow them with autorhythmic electrical oscillatory properties. Chemical or electrical synaptic contacts between these neurons often result in network oscillations. In such networks, autorhytmic neurons may act as true oscillators (as pacemakers) or as resonators (responding preferentially to certain firing frequencies). Oscillations and resonance in the CNS are proposed to have diverse functional roles, such as (i) determining global functional states (for example, sleep-wakefulness or attention), (ii) timing in motor coordination, and (iii) specifying connectivity during development. Also, oscillation, especially in the thalamo-cortical circuits, may be related to certain neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review proposes that the autorhythmic electrical properties of central neurons and their connectivity form the basis for an intrinsic functional coordinate system that provides internal context to sensory input.

  15. Lack of Motor Neuron Differentiation is an Intrinsic Property of the Mouse Secondary Neural Tube

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Alisa S.W.; Tang, Louisa S.C.; Copp, Andrew J.; Roelink, Henk

    2016-01-01

    The cranial part of the amniote neural tube is formed by folding and fusion of the ectoderm-derived neural plate (primary neurulation). After posterior neuropore closure, however, the caudal neural tube is formed by cavitation of tail bud mesenchyme (secondary neurulation). In mouse embryos, the secondary neural tube expresses several genes important in early patterning and induction, in restricted domains similar to the primary neural tube, yet it does not undergo neuronal differentiation, but subsequently degenerates. Although the secondary neural tube, isolated from surrounding tissues, is responsive to exogenous Sonic Hedgehog proteins in vitro, motor neuron differentiation is never observed. This cannot be attributed to the properties of the secondary notochord, since it is able to induce motor neuron differentiation in naïve chick neural plate explants. Taken together, these results support that the lack of motor neuron differentiation is an intrinsic property of the mouse secondary neural tube. PMID:20960561

  16. Dynamic regulation of midbrain dopamine neuron activity: intrinsic, synaptic, and plasticity mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, H; Paladini, C A

    2011-12-15

    Although the roles of dopaminergic signaling in learning and behavior are well established, it is not fully understood how the activity of dopaminergic neurons is dynamically regulated under different conditions in a constantly changing environment. Dopamine neurons must integrate sensory, motor, and cognitive information online to inform the organism to pursue outcomes with the highest reward probability. In this article, we provide an overview of recent advances on the intrinsic, extrinsic (i.e., synaptic), and plasticity mechanisms controlling dopamine neuron activity, mostly focusing on mechanistic studies conducted using ex vivo brain slice preparations. We also hope to highlight some unresolved questions regarding information processing that takes place at dopamine neurons, thereby stimulating further investigations at different levels of analysis.

  17. Dynamic Regulation of Midbrain Dopamine Neuron Activity: Intrinsic, Synaptic, and Plasticity Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Hitoshi; Paladini, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the roles of dopaminergic signaling in learning and behavior are well established, it is not fully understood how the activity of dopaminergic neurons is dynamically regulated under different conditions in a constantly changing environment. Dopamine neurons must integrate sensory, motor, and cognitive information online to inform the organism to pursue outcomes with the highest reward probability. In this article, we provide an overview of recent advances on the intrinsic, extrinsic (i.e., synaptic), and plasticity mechanisms controlling dopamine neuron activity, mostly focusing on mechanistic studies conducted using ex vivo brain slice preparations. We also hope to highlight some unresolved questions regarding information processing that takes place at dopamine neurons, thereby stimulating further investigations at different levels of analysis. PMID:21872647

  18. Intrinsic electrical properties of mammalian neurons and CNS function: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2014-01-01

    This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons. It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function. The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function.

  19. Intrinsic electrical properties of mammalian neurons and CNS function: a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2014-01-01

    This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons. It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function. The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function. PMID:25408634

  20. Altered intrinsic and synaptic properties of lumbosacral dorsal horn neurons in a mouse model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Kristen E; Keely, Simon; Walker, Marjorie M; Brichta, Alan M; Graham, Brett A; Callister, Robert J

    2017-08-23

    Visceral pain in inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal conditions is a major clinical problem. The exact mechanisms underlying the development of pain, during and after visceral inflammation, are unknown clinical and pre-clinical evidence that suggests plasticity within the spinal cord dorsal horn is a contributing factor. Here we use an in vivo preparation and patch-clamp electrophysiology to test whether the synaptic and intrinsic properties of superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons are altered 5days after the induction of mild colitis in adult male mice (i.e. during acute inflammation of the colon). Whole-cell recordings were made from lumbosacral (L6-S1) superficial dorsal horn neurons (SDH), in animals under isoflurane anesthesia. Noxious colorectal distension (CRD) was used to identify SDH neurons with colonic inputs, while stimulation of the hind paw and tail was employed to assess convergent cutaneous input. Following inflammation, a significantly increased proportion of SDH neurons received both colonic and cutaneous inputs, compared to neurons in naïve animals. In addition, the nature and magnitude of responses to CRD and cutaneous stimulation differed in inflamed animals, as was spontaneous excitatory synaptic drive. Conversely, several measures of intrinsic excitability were altered in a manner that would decrease SDH network excitability following colitis. We propose that during inflammation, sensitization of colonic afferents results in increased signaling to the SDH. This is accompanied by plasticity in SDH neurons whereby their intrinsic properties are changed to compensate for altered afferent activity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intrinsic determinants of synaptic phenotype: an experimental study of abducens internuclear neurons connecting with anomalous targets.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, R R; Benítez-Temiño, B; Pastor, A M

    2002-01-01

    The present experiments investigate the role of postsynaptic neurons in the morphological differentiation of presynaptic terminals that are formed de novo in the adult CNS. Abducens internuclear neurons in the adult cat were chosen as the experimental model. These neurons project onto the contralateral medial rectus motoneurons of the oculomotor nucleus. Abducens internuclear axon terminals were identified by their anterograde labeling with biocytin and analyzed at the electron microscopic level. To promote the formation of new synapses, two different experimental approaches were used. First, after the selective ablation of medial rectus motoneurons with ricin, abducens internuclear neurons reinnervated the neighboring oculomotor internuclear neurons. Second, after axotomy followed by embryonic cerebellar grafting, abducens internuclear axons invaded the implanted tissue and established synaptic connections in both the molecular and granule cell layer. Boutons contacting the oculomotor internuclear neurons developed ultrastructural characteristics that resembled the control synapses on medial rectus motoneurons. In the grafted cerebellar tissue, abducens internuclear axons and terminals did not resemble climbing or mossy fibers but showed similarities with control boutons. However, labeled boutons analyzed in the granule cell layer established a higher number of synaptic contacts than controls. This could reflect a trend towards the mossy fiber phenotype, although labeled boutons significantly differed in every measured parameter with the mossy fiber rosettes found in the graft. We conclude that at least for the abducens internuclear neurons, the ultrastructural differentiation of axon terminals reinnervating novel targets in the adult brain seems to be mainly under intrinsic control, with little influence by postsynaptic cells.

  2. Homeostasis of intrinsic excitability in hippocampal neurones: dynamics and mechanism of the response to chronic depolarization.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Timothy; van Rossum, Mark C W; Wyllie, David J A

    2010-01-01

    In order to maintain stable functionality in the face of continually changing input, neurones in the CNS must dynamically modulate their electrical characteristics. It has been hypothesized that in order to retain stable network function, neurones possess homeostatic mechanisms which integrate activity levels and alter network and cellular properties in such a way as to counter long-term perturbations. Here we describe a simple model system where we investigate the effects of sustained neuronal depolarization, lasting up to several days, by exposing cultures of primary hippocampal pyramidal neurones to elevated concentrations (10-30 mm) of KCl. Following exposure to KCl, neurones exhibit lower input resistances and resting potentials, and require more current to be injected to evoke action potentials. This results in a rightward shift in the frequency-input current (FI) curve which is explained by a simple linear model of the subthreshold I-V relationship. No changes are observed in action potential profiles, nor in the membrane potential at which action potentials are evoked. Furthermore, following depolarization, an increase in subthreshold potassium conductance is observed which is accounted for within a biophysical model of the subthreshold I-V characteristics of neuronal membranes. The FI curve shift was blocked by the presence of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine, whilst antagonism of NMDA receptors did not interfere with the effect. Finally, changes in the intrinsic properties of neurones are reversible following removal of the depolarizing stimulus. We suggest that this experimental system provides a convenient model of homeostatic regulation of intrinsic excitability, and permits the study of temporal characteristics of homeostasis and its dependence on stimulus magnitude.

  3. Characterization of intrinsic properties of cingulate pyramidal neurons in adult mice after nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is important for cognitive and sensory functions including memory and chronic pain. Glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission undergo long-term potentiation in ACC pyramidal cells after peripheral injury. Less information is available for the possible long-term changes in neuronal action potentials or intrinsic properties. In the present study, we characterized cingulate pyramidal cells in the layer II/III of the ACC in adult mice. We then examined possible long-term changes in intrinsic properties of the ACC pyramidal cells after peripheral nerve injury. In the control mice, we found that there are three major types of pyramidal cells according to their action potential firing pattern: (i) regular spiking (RS) cells (24.7%), intrinsic bursting (IB) cells (30.9%), and intermediate (IM) cells (44.4%). In a state of neuropathic pain, the population distribution (RS: 21.3%; IB: 31.2%; IM: 47.5%) and the single action potential properties of these three groups were indistinguishable from those in control mice. However, for repetitive action potentials, IM cells from neuropathic pain animals showed higher initial firing frequency with no change for the properties of RS and IB neurons from neuropathic pain mice. The present results provide the first evidence that, in addition to synaptic potentiation reported previously, peripheral nerve injury produces long-term plastic changes in the action potentials of cingulate pyramidal neurons in a cell type-specific manner. PMID:20015370

  4. Effect of Autaptic Activity on Intrinsic Coherence Resonance in Newman-Watts Networks of Stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Gong, Yubing

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of autaptic activity on intrinsic coherence resonance (CR) induced by channel noise in Newman-Watts (NW) networks of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons. It is found that autaptic strength and autaptic delay have a big effect on the intrinsic CR. As autaptic strength increases, there is optimal autaptic strength by which the intrinsic CR is most highly enhanced. Autaptic delay can enhance, reduce, or destroy the intrinsic CR, depending on the delay length. Moreover, there are optimal coupling strength and network randomness by which autaptic activity can most highly enhance the intrinsic CR. These results show that autaptic activity has different effects on the intrinsic CR in the neuronal networks, and it can most highly enhance the intrinsic CR at optimal coupling strength and network randomness. These findings could find potential implications of channel noise and autaptic activity for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  5. Heterogeneous intrinsic excitability of murine spiral ganglion neurons is determined by Kv1 and HCN channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Lee, E; Davis, R L

    2014-01-17

    The spiral ganglion conveys afferent auditory information predominantly through a single class of type I neurons that receive signals from inner hair cell sensory receptors. These auditory primary afferents, like in other systems (Puopolo and Belluzzi, 1998; Gascon and Moqrich, 2010; Leao et al., 2012) possess a marked diversity in their electrophysiological features (Taberner and Liberman, 2005). Consistent with these observations, when the auditory primary afferents were assessed in neuronal explants separated from their peripheral and central targets it was found that individual neurons were markedly heterogeneous in their endogenous electrophysiological features. One aspect of this heterogeneity, obvious throughout the ganglion, was their wide range of excitability as assessed by voltage threshold measurements (Liu and Davis, 2007). Thus, while neurons in the base differed significantly from apical and middle neurons in their voltage thresholds, each region showed distinctly wide ranges of values. To determine whether the resting membrane potentials (RMPs) of these neurons correlate with the threshold distribution and to identify the ion channel regulatory elements underlying heterogeneous neuronal excitability in the ganglion, patch-clamp recordings were made from postnatal day (P5-8) murine spiral ganglion neurons in vitro. We found that RMP mirrored the tonotopic threshold distribution, and contributed an additional level of heterogeneity in each cochlear location. Pharmacological experiments further indicated that threshold and RMP was coupled through the Kv1 current, which had a dual impact on both electrophysiological parameters. Whereas, hyperpolarization-activated cationic channels decoupled these two processes by primarily affecting RMP without altering threshold level. Thus, beyond mechanical and synaptic specializations, ion channel regulation of intrinsic membrane properties imbues spiral ganglion neurons with different excitability levels, a

  6. Intrinsic voltage dynamics govern the diversity of spontaneous firing profiles in basal forebrain noncholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dolly, J. Oliver; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous firing and behavior-related changes in discharge profiles of basal forebrain (BF) neurons are well documented, albeit the mechanisms underlying the variety of activity modes and intermodal transitions remain elusive. With the use of cell-attached recordings, this study identifies a range of spiking patterns in diagonal band Broca (DBB) noncholinergic cells of rats and tentatively categorizes them into low-rate random, tonic, and cluster firing activities. It demonstrates further that the multiplicity of discharge profiles is sustained intrinsically and persists after blockade of glutamate-, glycine/GABA-, and cholinergic synaptic inputs. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors, blockade of voltage-gated Ca2+-, and small conductance (SK) Ca2+-activated K+ currents as well as chelating of intracellular Ca2+ concentration accelerate low-rate random and tonic firing and favor transition of neurons into cluster firing mode. A similar trend towards higher discharge rates with switch of neurons into cluster firing has been revealed by activation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors with the NPY or NPY1 receptor agonist [Leu31,Pro34]-NPY. Whole cell current-clamp analysis demonstrates that the variety of spiking modes and intermodal transitions could be induced within the same neuronal population by injection of bias depolarizing or hyperpolarizing currents. Taken together, these data demonstrate the intrinsic and highly variable character of regenerative firing in BF noncholinergic cells, subject to powerful modulation by classical neurotransmitters, NPY, and small membrane currents. PMID:22496531

  7. Selective Gating of Neuronal Activity by Intrinsic Properties in Distinct Motor Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many neural circuits show fast reconfiguration following altered sensory or modulatory inputs to generate stereotyped outputs. In the motor circuit of Xenopus tadpoles, I study how certain voltage-dependent ionic currents affect firing thresholds and contribute to circuit reconfiguration to generate two distinct motor patterns, swimming and struggling. Firing thresholds of excitatory interneurons [i.e., descending interneurons (dINs)] in the swimming central pattern generator are raised by depolarization due to the inactivation of Na+ currents. In contrast, the thresholds of other types of neurons active in swimming or struggling are raised by hyperpolarization from the activation of fast transient K+ currents. The firing thresholds are then compared with the excitatory synaptic drives, which are revealed by blocking action potentials intracellularly using QX314 during swimming and struggling. During swimming, transient K+ currents lower neuronal excitability and gate out neurons with weak excitation, whereas their inactivation by strong excitation in other neurons increases excitability and enables fast synaptic potentials to drive reliable firing. During struggling, continuous sensory inputs lead to high levels of network excitation. This allows the inactivation of Na+ currents and suppression of dIN activity while inactivating transient K+ currents, recruiting neurons that are not active in swimming. Therefore, differential expression of these currents between neuron types can explain why synaptic strength does not predict firing reliability/intensity during swimming and struggling. These data show that intrinsic properties can override fast synaptic potentials, mediate circuit reconfiguration, and contribute to motor–pattern switching. PMID:26156983

  8. Intrinsic modulation of pulse-coupled integrate-and-fire neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombes, S.; Lord, G. J.

    1997-11-01

    Intrinsic neuromodulation is observed in sensory and neuromuscular circuits and in biological central pattern generators. We model a simple neuronal circuit with a system of two pulse-coupled integrate-and-fire neurons and explore the parameter regimes for periodic firing behavior. The inclusion of biologically realistic features shows that the speed and onset of neuronal response plays a crucial role in determining the firing phase for periodic rhythms. We explore the neurophysiological function of distributed delays arising from both the synaptic transmission process and dendritic structure as well as discrete delays associated with axonal communication delays. Bifurcation and stability diagrams are constructed with a mixture of simple analysis, numerical continuation and the Kuramoto phase-reduction technique. Moreover, we show that, for asynchronous behavior, the strength of electrical synapses can control the firing rate of the system.

  9. Multiple neuropeptides in cholinergic motor neurons of Aplysia: evidence for modulation intrinsic to the motor circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Cropper, E.C.; Lloyd, P.E.; Reed, W.; Tenenbaum, R.; Kupfermann, I.; Weiss, K.R.

    1987-05-01

    Changes in Aplysia biting responses during food arousal are partially mediated by the serotonergic metacerebral cells (MCCs). The MCCs potentiate contractions of a muscle utilized in biting, the accessory radula closer (ARCM), when contractions are elicited by stimulation of either of the two cholinergic motor neurons B15 or B16 that innervate the muscle. The authors have now shown that ARCM contractions may also be potentiated by peptide cotransmitters in the ARCM motor neurons. They found that motor neuron B15 contains small cardioactive peptides A and B (SCP/sub A/ and SCP/sub B/) i.e., whole B15 neurons were bioactive on the SCP-sensitive Helix heart, as were reverse-phase HPLC fractions of B15 neurons that eluted like synthetic SCP/sub A/ and SCP/sub B/. Furthermore, (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled B15 peptides precisely coeluted with synthetic SCP/sub A/ and SCP/sub B/. SCP/sub B/-like immunoreactivity was associated with dense-core vesicles in the soma of B15 and in neuritic varicosities and terminals in the ARCM. B16 motor neurons did not contain SCP/sub A/ or SCP/sub B/ but contained an unidentified bioactive peptide. RP-HPLC of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled B16s resulted in one major peak of radioactivity that did not coelute with either SCP and which, when subject to Edman degradation, yielded (/sup 35/S)methionine in positions where there is no methionine in the SCPs. Exogenously applied B16 peptide potentiated ARCM contractions elicited by stimulation of B15 or B16 neurons. Thus, in this system there appear to be two types of modulation; one type arises from the MCCs and is extrinsic to the motor system, whereas the second type arises from the motor neurons themselves and hence is intrinsic.

  10. The Correlation Structure of Local Neuronal Networks Intrinsically Results from Recurrent Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Tetzlaff, Tom; Diesmann, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Correlated neuronal activity is a natural consequence of network connectivity and shared inputs to pairs of neurons, but the task-dependent modulation of correlations in relation to behavior also hints at a functional role. Correlations influence the gain of postsynaptic neurons, the amount of information encoded in the population activity and decoded by readout neurons, and synaptic plasticity. Further, it affects the power and spatial reach of extracellular signals like the local-field potential. A theory of correlated neuronal activity accounting for recurrent connectivity as well as fluctuating external sources is currently lacking. In particular, it is unclear how the recently found mechanism of active decorrelation by negative feedback on the population level affects the network response to externally applied correlated stimuli. Here, we present such an extension of the theory of correlations in stochastic binary networks. We show that (1) for homogeneous external input, the structure of correlations is mainly determined by the local recurrent connectivity, (2) homogeneous external inputs provide an additive, unspecific contribution to the correlations, (3) inhibitory feedback effectively decorrelates neuronal activity, even if neurons receive identical external inputs, and (4) identical synaptic input statistics to excitatory and to inhibitory cells increases intrinsically generated fluctuations and pairwise correlations. We further demonstrate how the accuracy of mean-field predictions can be improved by self-consistently including correlations. As a byproduct, we show that the cancellation of correlations between the summed inputs to pairs of neurons does not originate from the fast tracking of external input, but from the suppression of fluctuations on the population level by the local network. This suppression is a necessary constraint, but not sufficient to determine the structure of correlations; specifically, the structure observed at finite network

  11. Spinal cord injury and the neuron-intrinsic regeneration-associated gene program.

    PubMed

    Fagoe, Nitish D; van Heest, Jessica; Verhaagen, Joost

    2014-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects millions of people worldwide and causes a significant physical, emotional, social and economic burden. The main clinical hallmark of SCI is the permanent loss of motor, sensory and autonomic function below the level of injury. In general, neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) are incapable of regeneration, whereas injury to the peripheral nervous system is followed by axonal regeneration and usually results in some degree of functional recovery. The weak neuron-intrinsic regeneration-associated gene (RAG) response upon injury is an important reason for the failure of neurons in the CNS to regenerate an axon. This response consists of the expression of many RAGs, including regeneration-associated transcription factors (TFs). Regeneration-associated TFs are potential key regulators of the RAG program. The function of some regeneration-associated TFs has been studied in transgenic and knock-out mice and by adeno-associated viral vector-mediated overexpression in injured neurons. Here, we review these studies and propose that AAV-mediated gene delivery of combinations of regeneration-associated TFs is a potential strategy to activate the RAG program in injured CNS neurons and achieve long-distance axon regeneration.

  12. Application of proteasomal inhibitors to mouse sympathetic neurons activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Lang-Rollin, Isabelle; Vekrellis, Konstantinos; Wang, Qiaohong; Rideout, Hardy J; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2004-09-01

    Proteasomal dysfunction may play a role in a number of neurodegenerative conditions, and in particular Parkinson's disease (PD) and related Lewy body (LB) diseases. Application of proteasomal inhibitors to neuronal cell culture systems is associated with survival-promoting effects or with cell death depending on the model system. We have applied pharmacological proteasomal inhibitors to cultured neonatal mouse sympathetic neurons in order to investigate whether these catecholaminergic neurons, which are affected in PD, are sensitive to proteasomal inhibition and, if so, which cell death pathway is activated. We report here that proteasomal inhibition leads to apoptotic death of mouse sympathetic neurons. This death is accompanied by caspase 3 activation and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and is abrogated by caspase inhibition. Bax deletion prevented both cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation, and also provided complete protection against proteasomal inhibition-induced death. Bcl-2 overexpression achieved a similar survival-promoting effect. There was no change in Bax levels following proteasomal inhibition, suggesting that Bax itself is not regulated by the proteasome in this cell culture system, and that a primary increase in Bax is unlikely to account for death. In contrast, levels of the BH3-only protein, Bim, increased with proteasomal inhibition. We conclude that proteasomal inhibition of mouse sympathetic neurons activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway involving bcl-2 family members and the mitochondria.

  13. Bidirectional Modulation of Intrinsic Excitability in Rat Prelimbic Cortex Neuronal Ensembles and Non-Ensembles after Operant Learning.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Leslie R; Warren, Brandon L; Venniro, Marco; Harte, Tyler C; McPherson, Kylie B; Beidel, Jennifer; Bossert, Jennifer M; Shaham, Yavin; Bonci, Antonello; Hope, Bruce T

    2017-09-06

    Learned associations between environmental stimuli and rewards drive goal-directed learning and motivated behavior. These memories are thought to be encoded by alterations within specific patterns of sparsely distributed neurons called neuronal ensembles that are activated selectively by reward-predictive stimuli. Here, we use the Fos promoter to identify strongly activated neuronal ensembles in rat prelimbic cortex (PLC) and assess altered intrinsic excitability after 10 d of operant food self-administration training (1 h/d). First, we used the Daun02 inactivation procedure in male FosLacZ-transgenic rats to ablate selectively Fos-expressing PLC neurons that were active during operant food self-administration. Selective ablation of these neurons decreased food seeking. We then used male FosGFP-transgenic rats to assess selective alterations of intrinsic excitability in Fos-expressing neuronal ensembles (FosGFP(+)) that were activated during food self-administration and compared these with alterations in less activated non-ensemble neurons (FosGFP(-)). Using whole-cell recordings of layer V pyramidal neurons in an ex vivo brain slice preparation, we found that operant self-administration increased excitability of FosGFP(+) neurons and decreased excitability of FosGFP(-) neurons. Increased excitability of FosGFP(+) neurons was driven by increased steady-state input resistance. Decreased excitability of FosGFP(-) neurons was driven by increased contribution of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels. Injections of the specific SK channel antagonist apamin into PLC increased Fos expression but had no effect on food seeking. Overall, operant learning increased intrinsic excitability of PLC Fos-expressing neuronal ensembles that play a role in food seeking but decreased intrinsic excitability of Fos(-) non-ensembles.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Prefrontal cortex activity plays a critical role in operant learning, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are

  14. Characterization of glutamatergic neurons in the rat atrial intrinsic cardiac ganglia that project to the cardiac ventricular wall.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Miller, Kenneth E

    2016-08-04

    The intrinsic cardiac nervous system modulates cardiac function by acting as an integration site for regulating autonomic efferent cardiac output. This intrinsic system is proposed to be composed of a short cardio-cardiac feedback control loop within the cardiac innervation hierarchy. For example, electrophysiological studies have postulated the presence of sensory neurons in intrinsic cardiac ganglia (ICG) for regional cardiac control. There is still a knowledge gap, however, about the anatomical location and neurochemical phenotype of sensory neurons inside ICG. In the present study, rat ICG neurons were characterized neurochemically with immunohistochemistry using glutamatergic markers: vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1; VGLUT2), and glutaminase (GLS), the enzyme essential for glutamate production. Glutamatergic neurons (VGLUT1/VGLUT2/GLS) in the ICG that have axons to the ventricles were identified by retrograde tracing of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injected in the ventricular wall. Co-labeling of VGLUT1, VGLUT2, and GLS with the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was used to evaluate the relationship between post-ganglionic autonomic neurons and glutamatergic neurons. Sequential labeling of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in adjacent tissue sections was used to evaluate the co-localization of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in ICG neurons. Our studies yielded the following results: (1) ICG contain glutamatergic neurons with GLS for glutamate production and VGLUT1 and 2 for transport of glutamate into synaptic vesicles; (2) atrial ICG contain neurons that project to ventricle walls and these neurons are glutamatergic; (3) many glutamatergic ICG neurons also were cholinergic, expressing VAChT; (4) VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 co-localization occurred in ICG neurons with variation of their protein expression level. Investigation of both glutamatergic and cholinergic ICG neurons could help in better understanding the function of the intrinsic cardiac

  15. Fear extinction induces mGluR5-mediated synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in infralimbic neurons.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda-Orengo, Marian T; Lopez, Ana V; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Porter, James T

    2013-04-24

    Studies suggest that plasticity in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL) in rodents and its homolog in humans is necessary for inhibition of fear during the recall of fear extinction. The recall of extinction is impaired by locally blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) activation in IL during extinction training. This finding suggests that mGluR5 stimulation may lead to IL plasticity needed for fear extinction. To test this hypothesis, we recorded AMPA and NMDA currents, AMPA receptor (AMPAR) rectification, and intrinsic excitability in IL pyramidal neurons in slices from trained rats using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We observed that fear extinction increases the AMPA/NMDA ratio, consistent with insertion of AMPARs into IL synapses. In addition, extinction training increased inward rectification, suggesting that extinction induces the insertion of calcium-permeable (GluA2-lacking) AMPARs into IL synapses. Consistent with this, selectively blocking calcium-permeable AMPARs with Naspm reduced the AMPA EPSCs in IL neurons to a larger degree after extinction. Extinction-induced changes in AMPA/NMDA ratio, rectification, and intrinsic excitability were blocked with an mGluR5 antagonist. These findings suggest that mGluR5 activation leads to consolidation of fear extinction by regulating the intrinsic excitability of IL neurons and modifying the composition of AMPARs in IL synapses. Therefore, impaired mGluR5 activity in IL synapses could be one factor that causes inappropriate modulation of fear expression leading to anxiety disorders.

  16. Spike-dependent intrinsic plasticity increases firing probability in rat striatal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Séverine; Casassus, Guillaume; Mulle, Christophe; Charpier, Stéphane

    2003-08-01

    The collision of pre- and postsynaptic activity is known to provide a trigger for controlling the gain of synaptic transmission between neurons. Here, using in vivo intracellular recordings of rat striatal output neurons, we analyse the effect of a single action potential, generated by ongoing synaptic activity, on subsequent excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex. This pairing induced a short-term increase in the probability that cortically evoked EPSPs caused striatal cells to fire. This enhanced EPSP-spike coupling was associated with a decrease in the voltage firing threshold with no apparent change in the synaptic strength itself. Antidromic action potentials in striatal cells were also able to induce the facilitation while subthreshold EPSPs were ineffective, indicating that the postsynaptic spike was necessary and sufficient for the induction of the plasticity. A prior spontaneous action potential also enhanced the probability with which directly applied current pulses elicited firing, suggesting that the facilitation originated from changes in the intrinsic electrical properties of the postsynaptic cell. Using whole-cell recordings in cortico-striatal slices, we found that the increase in membrane excitability as well as in EPSP-spike coupling was abolished by low concentration of 4-aminopyridine. This suggests that the intrinsic plasticity results from a time-dependent modulation of a striatal voltage-dependent potassium current available close to the firing threshold. Action potentials thus provide a postsynaptic signal, not only for associative synaptic plasticity but also for activity-dependent intrinsic plasticity, which directly controls the efficacy of coupling between pre- and postsynaptic neurons.

  17. Spike-Dependent Intrinsic Plasticity Increases Firing Probability in Rat Striatal Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Séverine; Casassus, Guillaume; Mulle, Christophe; Charpier, Stéphane

    2003-01-01

    The collision of pre- and postynaptic activity is known to provide a trigger for controlling the gain of synaptic transmission between neurons. Here, using in vivo intracellular recordings of rat striatal output neurons, we analyse the effect of a single action potential, generated by ongoing synaptic activity, on subsequent excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex. This pairing induced a short-term increase in the probability that cortically evoked EPSPs caused striatal cells to fire. This enhanced EPSP-spike coupling was associated with a decrease in the voltage firing threshold with no apparent change in the synaptic strength itself. Antidromic action potentials in striatal cells were also able to induce the facilitation while subthreshold EPSPs were ineffective, indicating that the postsynaptic spike was necessary and sufficient for the induction of the plasticity. A prior spontaneous action potential also enhanced the probability with which directly applied current pulses elicited firing, suggesting that the facilitation originated from changes in the intrinsic electrical properties of the postsynaptic cell. Using whole-cell recordings in cortico-striatal slices, we found that the increase in membrane excitability as well as in EPSP-spike coupling was abolished by low concentration of 4-aminopyridine. This suggests that the intrinsic plasticity results from a time-dependent modulation of a striatal voltage-dependent potassium current available close to the firing threshold. Action potentials thus provide a postsynaptic signal, not only for associative synaptic plasticity but also for activity-dependent intrinsic plasticity, which directly controls the efficacy of coupling between pre- and postsynaptic neurons. PMID:12844508

  18. Intrinsic choroidal neurons in the chicken eye: chemical coding and synaptic input

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Karin; Brehmer, Axel; Neuhuber, Winfried L.; Reitsamer, Herbert; Nickla, Debora

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic choroidal neurons (ICNs) exist in some primates and bird species. They may act on both vascular and non-vascular smooth muscle cells, potentially influencing choroidal blood flow. Here, we report on the chemical coding of ICNs and eye-related cranial ganglia in the chicken, an important model in myopia research, and further to determine synaptic input onto ICN. Chicken choroid, ciliary, superior cervical, pterygopalatine, and trigeminal ganglia were prepared for double or triple immunohistochemistry of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), dopamine-β-hydroxylase, galanin (GAL), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), somatostatin (SOM), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), vesicular monoamine-transporter 2 (VMAT2), and α-smooth muscle actin. For documentation, light, fluorescence, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used. Chicken ICNs express nNOS/VIP/GAL and do not express ChAT and SOM. ICNs are approached by TH/VMAT2-, CGRP-, and ChAT-positive nerve fibers. About 50% of the pterygopalatine ganglion neurons and about 9% of the superior cervical ganglion neurons share the same chemical code as ICN. SOM-positive neurons in the ciliary ganglion are GAL/NOS negative. CGRP-positive neurons in the trigeminal ganglion lack GAL/SOM. The neurochemical phenotype and synaptic input of ICNs in chicken resemble that of other bird and primate species. Because ICNs lack cholinergic markers, they cannot be readily incorporated into current concepts of the autonomic nervous system. The data obtained provide the basis for the interpretation of future functional experiments to clarify the role of these cells in achieving ocular homeostasis. PMID:20607273

  19. Nitric oxide is an activity-dependent regulator of target neuron intrinsic excitability.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Joern R; Robinson, Susan W; Tong, Huaxia; Haustein, Martin D; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Cornelia; Forsythe, Ian D

    2011-07-28

    Activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength are well established as mediating long-term plasticity underlying learning and memory, but modulation of target neuron excitability could complement changes in synaptic strength and regulate network activity. It is thought that homeostatic mechanisms match intrinsic excitability to the incoming synaptic drive, but evidence for involvement of voltage-gated conductances is sparse. Here, we show that glutamatergic synaptic activity modulates target neuron excitability and switches the basis of action potential repolarization from Kv3 to Kv2 potassium channel dominance, thereby adjusting neuronal signaling between low and high activity states, respectively. This nitric oxide-mediated signaling dramatically increases Kv2 currents in both the auditory brain stem and hippocampus (>3-fold) transforming synaptic integration and information transmission but with only modest changes in action potential waveform. We conclude that nitric oxide is a homeostatic regulator, tuning neuronal excitability to the recent history of excitatory synaptic inputs over intervals of minutes to hours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cell-intrinsic mechanisms of temperature compensation in a grasshopper sensory receptor neuron

    PubMed Central

    Roemschied, Frederic A; Eberhard, Monika JB; Schleimer, Jan-Hendrik; Ronacher, Bernhard; Schreiber, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Changes in temperature affect biochemical reaction rates and, consequently, neural processing. The nervous systems of poikilothermic animals must have evolved mechanisms enabling them to retain their functionality under varying temperatures. Auditory receptor neurons of grasshoppers respond to sound in a surprisingly temperature-compensated manner: firing rates depend moderately on temperature, with average Q10 values around 1.5. Analysis of conductance-based neuron models reveals that temperature compensation of spike generation can be achieved solely relying on cell-intrinsic processes and despite a strong dependence of ion conductances on temperature. Remarkably, this type of temperature compensation need not come at an additional metabolic cost of spike generation. Firing rate-based information transfer is likely to increase with temperature and we derive predictions for an optimal temperature dependence of the tympanal transduction process fostering temperature compensation. The example of auditory receptor neurons demonstrates how neurons may exploit single-cell mechanisms to cope with multiple constraints in parallel. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02078.001 PMID:24843016

  1. Intrinsic chemosensitivity of rostral ventrolateral medullary sympathetic premotor neurons in the in situ arterially perfused preparation of rats.

    PubMed

    Koganezawa, Tadachika; Paton, Julian F R

    2014-11-01

    Brainstem hypoperfusion is a major excitant of sympathetic activity triggering hypertension, but the exact mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. A major source of excitatory drive to preganglionic sympathetic neurons originates from the ongoing activity of premotor neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons). The chemosensitivity profile of physiologically characterized RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons during hypoxia and hypercapnia remains unclear. We examined whether physiologically characterized RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons can sense brainstem ischaemia intrinsically. We addressed this issue in a unique in situ arterially perfused preparation before and after a complete blockade of fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. During hypercapnic hypoxia, respiratory modulation of RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons was lost, but tonic firing of most RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons was elevated. After blockade of fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons continued to fire and exhibited an excitatory firing response to hypoxia but not hypercapnia. This study suggests that RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons can sustain high levels of neuronal discharge when oxygen is scarce. The intrinsic ability of RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons to maintain responsivity to brainstem hypoxia is an important mechanism ensuring adequate arterial pressure, essential for maintaining cerebral perfusion in the face of depressed ventilation and/or high cerebral vascular resistance.

  2. Sustaining intrinsic growth capacity of adult neurons promotes spinal cord regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Skinner, Kate; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2005-11-01

    The peripheral axonal branch of primary sensory neurons readily regenerates after peripheral nerve injury, but the central branch, which courses in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, does not. However, if a peripheral nerve is transected before a spinal cord injury, sensory neurons that course in the dorsal columns will regenerate, presumably because their intrinsic growth capacity is enhanced by the priming peripheral nerve lesion. As the effective priming lesion is made before the spinal cord injury it would clearly have no clinical utility, and unfortunately, a priming lesion made after a spinal cord injury results in an abortive regenerative response. Here, we show that two priming lesions, one made at the time of a spinal cord injury and a second 1 week after a spinal cord injury, in fact, promote dramatic regeneration, within and beyond the lesion. The first lesion, we hypothesize, enhances intrinsic growth capacity, and the second one sustains it, providing a paradigm for promoting CNS regeneration after injury. primary afferents | dorsal columns | neurite outgrowth | sprouting | priming

  3. Muscarinic receptors modulate the intrinsic excitability of infralimbic neurons and consolidation of fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Santini, Edwin; Sepulveda-Orengo, Marian; Porter, James T

    2012-08-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying pharmacological compounds that could be used to facilitate fear extinction. Recently, we showed that the modulation of M-type K(+) channels regulates the intrinsic excitability of infralimbic (IL) neurons and fear expression. As muscarinic acetylcholine receptors inhibit M-type K(+) channels, cholinergic inputs to IL may have an important role in controlling IL excitability and, thereby, fear expression and extinction. To test this model, we combined whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and auditory fear conditioning. In prefrontal brain slices, muscarine enhanced the intrinsic excitability of IL neurons by reducing the M-current and the slow afterhyperpolarization, resulting in an increased number of spikes with shorter inter-spike intervals. Next, we examined the role of endogenous activation of muscarinic receptors in fear extinction. Systemic injected scopolamine (Scop) (muscarinic receptor antagonist) before or immediately after extinction training impaired recall of extinction 24-h later, suggesting that muscarinic receptors are critically involved in consolidation of extinction memory. Similarly, infusion of Scop into IL before extinction training also impaired recall of extinction 24-h later. Finally, we demonstrated that systemic injections of the muscarinic agonist, cevimeline (Cev), given before or immediately after extinction training facilitated recall of extinction the following day. Taken together, these findings suggest that cholinergic inputs to IL have a critical role in modulating consolidation of fear extinction and that muscarinic agonists such as Cev might be useful for facilitating extinction memory in patients suffering from anxiety disorders.

  4. Intrinsic frequency response patterns in mechano-sensory neurons of the leech.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Linda; Scherbarth, Frank; Chagnaud, Boris; Felmy, Felix

    2017-07-15

    Animals employ mechano-sensory systems to detect and explore their environment. Mechano-sensation encompasses stimuli such as constant pressure, surface movement or vibrations at various intensities that need to be segregated in the central nervous system. Besides different receptor structures, sensory filtering via intrinsic response properties could provide a convenient way to solve this problem. In leech, three major mechano-sensory cell types can be distinguished, according to their stimulus sensitivity, as nociceptive, pressure and touch cells. Using intracellular recordings, we show that the different mechano-sensory neuron classes in Hirudo medicinalis differentially respond supra-threshold to distinct frequencies of sinusoidal current injections between 0.2 and 20 Hz. Nociceptive cells responded with a low-pass filter characteristic, pressure cells as high-pass filters and touch cells as an intermediate band-pass filter. Each class of mechano-sensory neurons is thus intrinsically tuned to a specific frequency range of voltage oscillation that could help segregate mechano-sensory information centrally. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Intrinsic frequency response patterns in mechano-sensory neurons of the leech

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Linda; Scherbarth, Frank; Chagnaud, Boris

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animals employ mechano-sensory systems to detect and explore their environment. Mechano-sensation encompasses stimuli such as constant pressure, surface movement or vibrations at various intensities that need to be segregated in the central nervous system. Besides different receptor structures, sensory filtering via intrinsic response properties could provide a convenient way to solve this problem. In leech, three major mechano-sensory cell types can be distinguished, according to their stimulus sensitivity, as nociceptive, pressure and touch cells. Using intracellular recordings, we show that the different mechano-sensory neuron classes in Hirudo medicinalis differentially respond supra-threshold to distinct frequencies of sinusoidal current injections between 0.2 and 20 Hz. Nociceptive cells responded with a low-pass filter characteristic, pressure cells as high-pass filters and touch cells as an intermediate band-pass filter. Each class of mechano-sensory neurons is thus intrinsically tuned to a specific frequency range of voltage oscillation that could help segregate mechano-sensory information centrally. PMID:28546342

  6. Spike-Frequency Adaptation and Intrinsic Properties of an Identified, Looming-Sensitive Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Gabbiani, Fabrizio; Krapp, Holger G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated in vivo the characteristics of spike-frequency adaptation and the intrinsic membrane properties of an identified, looming-sensitive interneuron of the locust optic lobe, the lobula giant movement detector (LGMD). The LGMD had an input resistance of 4–5 MΩ, a membrane time constant of about 8 ms, and exhibited inward rectification and rebound spiking after hyperpolarizing current pulses. Responses to depolarizing current pulses revealed the neuron’s intrinsic bursting properties and pronounced spike-frequency adaptation. The characteristics of adaptation, including its time course, the attenuation of the firing rate, the mutual dependency of these two variables, and their dependency on injected current, closely followed the predictions of a model first proposed to describe the adaptation of cat visual cortex pyramidal neurons in vivo. Our results thus validate the model in an entirely different context and suggest that it might be applicable to a wide variety of neurons across species. Spike-frequency adaptation is likely to play an important role in tuning the LGMD and in shaping the variability of its responses to visual looming stimuli. PMID:16571737

  7. M1 muscarinic activation induces long-lasting increase in intrinsic excitability of striatal projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaohui; Dickerson, Jonathan W; Rook, Jerri M; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Xiang, Zixiu

    2017-05-15

    The dorsolateral striatum is critically involved in movement control and motor learning. Striatal function is regulated by a variety of neuromodulators including acetylcholine. Previous studies have shown that cholinergic activation excites striatal principal projection neurons, medium spiny neurons (MSNs), and this action is mediated by muscarinic acetylcholine subtype 1 receptors (M1) through modulating multiple potassium channels. In the present study, we used electrophysiology techniques in conjunction with optogenetic and pharmacological tools to determine the long-term effects of striatal cholinergic activation on MSN intrinsic excitability. A transient increase in acetylcholine release in the striatum by optogenetic stimulation resulted in a long-lasting increase in excitability of MSNs, which was associated with hyperpolarizing shift of action potential threshold and decrease in afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude, leading to an increase in probability of EPSP-action potential coupling. The M1 selective antagonist VU0255035 prevented, while the M1 selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM) VU0453595 potentiated the cholinergic activation-induced persistent increase in MSN intrinsic excitability, suggesting that M1 receptors are critically involved in the induction of this long-lasting response. This M1 receptor-dependent long-lasting change in MSN intrinsic excitability could have significant impact on striatal processing and might provide a novel mechanism underlying cholinergic regulation of the striatum-dependent motor learning and cognitive function. Consistent with this, behavioral studies indicate that potentiation of M1 receptor signaling by VU0453595 enhanced performance of mice in cue-dependent water-based T-maze, a dorsolateral striatum-dependent learning task. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Recoverin depletion accelerates cone photoresponse recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Jingjing; Keim, Jennifer; Kastenhuber, Edda; Gesemann, Matthias; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal Ca2+-binding protein Recoverin has been shown to regulate phototransduction termination in mammalian rods. Here we identify four recoverin genes in the zebrafish genome, rcv1a, rcv1b, rcv2a and rcv2b, and investigate their role in modulating the cone phototransduction cascade. While Recoverin-1b is only found in the adult retina, the other Recoverins are expressed throughout development in all four cone types, except Recoverin-1a, which is expressed only in rods and UV cones. Applying a double flash electroretinogram (ERG) paradigm, downregulation of Recoverin-2a or 2b accelerates cone photoresponse recovery, albeit at different light intensities. Exclusive recording from UV cones via spectral ERG reveals that knockdown of Recoverin-1a alone has no effect, but Recoverin-1a/2a double-knockdowns showed an even shorter recovery time than Recoverin-2a-deficient larvae. We also showed that UV cone photoresponse kinetics depend on Recoverin-2a function via cone-specific kinase Grk7a. This is the first in vivo study demonstrating that cone opsin deactivation kinetics determine overall photoresponse shut off kinetics. PMID:26246494

  9. Identification of Intrinsic Axon Growth Modulators for Intact CNS Neurons after Injury.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kathren L; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Kim, In-Jung; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Cafferty, William B J

    2017-03-14

    Functional deficits persist after spinal cord injury (SCI) because axons in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) fail to regenerate. However, modest levels of spontaneous functional recovery are typically observed after trauma and are thought to be mediated by the plasticity of intact circuitry. The mechanisms underlying intact circuit plasticity are not delineated. Here, we characterize the in vivo transcriptome of sprouting intact neurons from Ngr1 null mice after partial SCI. We identify the lysophosphatidic acid signaling modulators LPPR1 and LPAR1 as intrinsic axon growth modulators for intact corticospinal motor neurons after adjacent injury. Furthermore, in vivo LPAR1 inhibition or LPPR1 overexpression enhances sprouting of intact corticospinal tract axons and yields greater functional recovery after unilateral brainstem lesion in wild-type mice. Thus, the transcriptional profile of injury-induced sprouting of intact neurons reveals targets for therapeutic enhancement of axon growth initiation and new synapse formation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Emergence of intrinsic bursting in trigeminal sensory neurons parallels the acquisition of mastication in weanling rats.

    PubMed

    Brocard, Frédéric; Verdier, Dorly; Arsenault, Isabel; Lund, James P; Kolta, Arlette

    2006-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that a subpopulation of neurons in the dorsal principal sensory trigeminal nucleus are not simple sensory relays to the thalamus but may form the core of the central pattern generating circuits responsible for mastication. In this paper, we used whole cell patch recordings in brain stem slices of young rats to show that these neurons have intrinsic bursting abilities that persist in absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Application of different K(+) channel blockers affected duration and firing rate of bursts, but left bursting ability intact. Bursting was voltage dependent and was abolished by low concentrations of Na(+) channel blockers. The proportion of bursting neurons increased dramatically in the second postnatal week, in parallel with profound changes in several electrophysiological properties. This is the period in which masticatory movements appear and mature. Bursting was associated with the development of an afterdepolarization that depend on maturation of a persistent sodium conductance (I(NaP)). An interesting finding was that the occurrence of bursting and the magnitude of I(NaP) were both modulated by the extracellular concentration of Ca(2+). Lowering extracellular [Ca(2+)] increased both I(NaP) and probability of bursting. We suggest that these mechanisms underlie burst generation in mastication and that similar processes may be found in other motor pattern generators.

  11. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Induces Intrinsic Alterations in Na Channel Gating in Layer II Medial Entorhinal Cortex Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hargus, Nicholas J.; Merrick, Ellen C.; Nigam, Aradhya; Kalmar, Christopher L.; Baheti, Aparna R.; Bertram, Edward H.; Patel, Manoj K.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy involving the limbic structures of the temporal lobe. Layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex (EC) form the major excitatory input into the hippocampus via the perforant path and consist of non-stellate and stellate neurons. These neurons are spared and hyper-excitable in TLE. The basis for the hyper-excitability is likely multifactorial and may include alterations in intrinsic properties. In a rat model of TLE, medial EC (mEC) non-stellate and stellate neurons had significantly higher action potential (AP) firing frequencies than in control. The increase remained in the presence of synaptic blockers, suggesting intrinsic mechanisms. Since sodium (Na) channels play a critical role in AP generation and conduction we sought to determine if Na channel gating parameters and expression levels were altered in TLE. Na channel currents recorded from isolated mEC TLE neurons revealed increased Na channel conductances, depolarizing shifts in inactivation parameters and larger persistent (INaP) and resurgent (INaR) Na currents. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed increased staining of Nav1.6 within the axon initial segment and Nav1.2 within the cell bodies of mEC TLE neurons. These studies provide support for additional intrinsic alterations within mEC layer II neurons in TLE and implicate alterations in Na channel activity and expression, in part, for establishing the profound increase in intrinsic membrane excitability of mEC layer II neurons in TLE. These intrinsic changes, together with changes in the synaptic network, could support seizure activity in TLE. PMID:20946956

  12. Developmental Profiles of the Intrinsic Properties and Synaptic Function of Auditory Neurons in Preterm and Term Baboon Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sei Eun; Lee, Seul Yi; Blanco, Cynthia L.

    2014-01-01

    The human fetus starts to hear and undergoes major developmental changes in the auditory system during the third trimester of pregnancy. Although there are significant data regarding development of the auditory system in rodents, changes in intrinsic properties and synaptic function of auditory neurons in developing primate brain at hearing onset are poorly understood. We performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of principal neurons in the medial nucleus of trapezoid body (MNTB) in preterm and term baboon brainstem slices to study the structural and functional maturation of auditory synapses. Each MNTB principal neuron received an excitatory input from a single calyx of Held terminal, and this one-to-one pattern of innervation was already formed in preterm baboons delivered at 67% of normal gestation. There was no difference in frequency or amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic synaptic currents between preterm and term MNTB neurons. In contrast, the frequency of spontaneous GABAA/glycine receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic synaptic currents, which were prevalent in preterm MNTB neurons, was significantly reduced in term MNTB neurons. Preterm MNTB neurons had a higher input resistance than term neurons and fired in bursts, whereas term MNTB neurons fired a single action potential in response to suprathreshold current injection. The maturation of intrinsic properties and dominance of excitatory inputs in the primate MNTB allow it to take on its mature role as a fast and reliable relay synapse. PMID:25143619

  13. Characterization of neuronal intrinsic properties and synaptic transmission in layer I of anterior cingulate cortex from adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The neurons in neocortex layer I (LI) provide inhibition to the cortical networks. Despite increasing use of mice for the study of brain functions, few studies were reported about mouse LI neurons. In the present study, we characterized intrinsic properties of LI neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a key cortical area for sensory and cognitive functions, by using whole-cell patch clamp recording approach. Seventy one neurons in LI and 12 pyramidal neurons in LII/III were recorded. Although all of the LI neurons expressed continuous adapting firing characteristics, the unsupervised clustering results revealed five groups in the ACC, including: Spontaneous firing neurons; Delay-sAHP neurons, Delay-fAHP neurons, and two groups of neurons with ADP, named ADP1 and ADP2, respectively. Using pharmacological approaches, we found that LI neurons received both excitatory (mediated by AMPA, kainate and NMDA receptors), and inhibitory inputs (which were mediated by GABAA receptors). Our studies provide the first report characterizing the electrophysiological properties of neurons in LI of the ACC from adult mice. PMID:22818293

  14. Vagus nerve stimulation mitigates intrinsic cardiac neuronal and adverse myocyte remodeling postmyocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Eric; Southerland, Elizabeth M.; Hardwick, Jean C.; Wright, Gary L.; Ryan, Shannon; Li, Ying; KenKnight, Bruce H.; Armour, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to determine whether chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) mitigates myocardial infarction (MI)-induced remodeling of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICNS), along with the cardiac tissue it regulates. Guinea pigs underwent VNS implantation on the right cervical vagus. Two weeks later, MI was produced by ligating the ventral descending coronary artery. VNS stimulation started 7 days post-MI (20 Hz, 0.9 ± 0.2 mA, 14 s on, 48 s off; VNS-MI, n = 7) and was compared with time-matched MI animals with sham VNS (MI n = 7) vs. untreated controls (n = 8). Echocardiograms were performed before and at 90 days post-MI. At termination, IC neuronal intracellular voltage recordings were obtained from whole-mount neuronal plexuses. MI increased left ventricular end systolic volume (LVESV) 30% (P = 0.027) and reduced LV ejection fraction (LVEF) 6.5% (P < 0.001) at 90 days post-MI compared with baseline. In the VNS-MI group, LVESV and LVEF did not differ from baseline. IC neurons showed depolarization of resting membrane potentials and increased input resistance in MI compared with VNS-MI and sham controls (P < 0.05). Neuronal excitability and sensitivity to norepinephrine increased in MI and VNS-MI groups compared with controls (P < 0.05). Synaptic efficacy, as determined by evoked responses to stimulating input axons, was reduced in VNS-MI compared with MI or controls (P < 0.05). VNS induced changes in myocytes, consistent with enhanced glycogenolysis, and blunted the MI-induced increase in the proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (P < 0.05). VNS mitigates MI-induced remodeling of the ICNS, correspondingly preserving ventricular function via both neural and cardiomyocyte-dependent actions. PMID:26276818

  15. Vagus nerve stimulation mitigates intrinsic cardiac neuronal and adverse myocyte remodeling postmyocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Eric; Southerland, Elizabeth M; Hardwick, Jean C; Wright, Gary L; Ryan, Shannon; Li, Ying; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims to determine whether chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) mitigates myocardial infarction (MI)-induced remodeling of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICNS), along with the cardiac tissue it regulates. Guinea pigs underwent VNS implantation on the right cervical vagus. Two weeks later, MI was produced by ligating the ventral descending coronary artery. VNS stimulation started 7 days post-MI (20 Hz, 0.9 ± 0.2 mA, 14 s on, 48 s off; VNS-MI, n = 7) and was compared with time-matched MI animals with sham VNS (MI n = 7) vs. untreated controls (n = 8). Echocardiograms were performed before and at 90 days post-MI. At termination, IC neuronal intracellular voltage recordings were obtained from whole-mount neuronal plexuses. MI increased left ventricular end systolic volume (LVESV) 30% (P = 0.027) and reduced LV ejection fraction (LVEF) 6.5% (P < 0.001) at 90 days post-MI compared with baseline. In the VNS-MI group, LVESV and LVEF did not differ from baseline. IC neurons showed depolarization of resting membrane potentials and increased input resistance in MI compared with VNS-MI and sham controls (P < 0.05). Neuronal excitability and sensitivity to norepinephrine increased in MI and VNS-MI groups compared with controls (P < 0.05). Synaptic efficacy, as determined by evoked responses to stimulating input axons, was reduced in VNS-MI compared with MI or controls (P < 0.05). VNS induced changes in myocytes, consistent with enhanced glycogenolysis, and blunted the MI-induced increase in the proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (P < 0.05). VNS mitigates MI-induced remodeling of the ICNS, correspondingly preserving ventricular function via both neural and cardiomyocyte-dependent actions.

  16. Chronic homocysteine exposure causes changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Christina; Uebachs, Mischa; Beck, Heinz; Linnebank, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Homocystinuria is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by plasma homocysteine levels up to 500 μM, premature vascular events and mental retardation. Mild elevations of homocysteine plasma levels up to 25 μM, which are common in the general population, are associated with vascular disease, cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. Several mechanisms of homocysteine neurotoxicity have been investigated. However, information on putative effects of hyperhomocysteinemia on the electrophysiology of neurons is limited. To screen for such effects, we examined primary cultures of mouse hippocampal neurons with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Homocysteine was applied intracellularly (100 μM), or cell cultures were incubated with 100 μM homocysteine for 24 h. Membrane voltage was measured in current-clamp mode, and action potential firing was induced with short and prolonged current injections. Single action potentials induced by short current injections (5 ms) were not altered by acute application or incubation of homocysteine. When we elicited trains of action potentials with prolonged current injections (200 ms), a broadening of action potentials during repetitive firing was observed in control neurons. This spike broadening was unaltered by acute application of homocysteine. However, it was significantly diminished when incubation with homocysteine was extended to 24 h prior to recording. Furthermore, the number of action potentials elicited by low current injections was reduced after long-term incubation with homocysteine, but not by the acute application. After 24 h of homocysteine incubation, the input resistance was reduced which might have contributed to the observed alterations in membrane excitability. We conclude that homocysteine exposure causes changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons as a mechanism of neurological symptoms of hyperhomocysteinemia.

  17. Ethanol exposure in early adolescence inhibits intrinsic neuronal plasticity via sigma-1 receptor activation in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sabeti, Jilla

    2011-01-01

    Background We demonstrated previously that rats exposed to chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapors in early adolescence show increased magnitudes of long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory transmission when recorded at dendritic synapses in hippocampus. Large amplitude LTP following CIE exposure is mediated by sigma-1 receptors; however, not yet addressed is the role of sigma-1 receptors in modulating the intrinsic properties of neurons to alter their action potential firing during LTP. Methods Activity-induced plasticity of spike firing was investigated using rat hippocampal slice recordings to measure changes in both field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and population spikes (pop. spikes) concomitantly at dendritic inputs and soma of CA1 pyramidal neurons, respectively. Results We observed unique modifications in plasticity of action potential firing in hippocampal slices from CIE exposed adolescent rats, where the induction of large amplitude LTP by 100 Hz stimulations was accompanied by reduced CA1 neuronal excitability—reflected as decreased pop. spike efficacy and impaired activity-induced fEPSP-to-spike (E-S) potentiation. By contrast, LTP induction in ethanol-naïve control slices resulted in increased spike efficacy and robust E-S potentiation. E-S potentiation impairments emerged at 24 hr after CIE treatment cessation, but not before the alcohol withdrawal period, and were restored with bath-application of the sigma-1 receptor selective antagonist BD1047, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Further evidence revealed a significantly shortened somatic fEPSP time course in adolescent CIE-withdrawn hippocampal slices during LTP; however, paired-pulse data show no apparent correspondence between E-S dissociation and altered recurrent feedback inhibition. Conclusions Results here suggest that acute withdrawal from adolescent CIE exposure triggers sigma-1 receptors that act to depress the efficacy of excitatory inputs in triggering

  18. Ethanol exposure in early adolescence inhibits intrinsic neuronal plasticity via sigma-1 receptor activation in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Sabeti, Jilla

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrated previously that rats exposed to chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapors in early adolescence show increased magnitudes of long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory transmission when recorded at dendritic synapses in hippocampus. Large amplitude LTP following CIE exposure is mediated by sigma-1 receptors; however, not yet addressed is the role of sigma-1 receptors in modulating the intrinsic properties of neurons to alter their action potential firing during LTP. Activity-induced plasticity of spike firing was investigated using rat hippocampal slice recordings to measure changes in both field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and population spikes (pop. spikes) concomitantly at dendritic inputs and soma of CA1 pyramidal neurons, respectively. We observed unique modifications in plasticity of action potential firing in hippocampal slices from CIE exposed adolescent rats, where the induction of large amplitude LTP by 100 Hz stimulations was accompanied by reduced CA1 neuronal excitability--reflected as decreased pop. spike efficacy and impaired activity-induced fEPSP-to-spike (E-S) potentiation. In contrast, LTP induction in ethanol-naïve control slices resulted in increased spike efficacy and robust E-S potentiation. E-S potentiation impairments emerged at 24 hours after CIE treatment cessation, but not before the alcohol withdrawal period, and were restored with bath-application of the sigma-1 receptor selective antagonist BD1047, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist d-AP5. Further evidence revealed a significantly shortened somatic fEPSP time course in adolescent CIE-withdrawn hippocampal slices during LTP; however, paired-pulse data show no apparent correspondence between E-S dissociation and altered recurrent feedback inhibition. Results here suggest that acute withdrawal from adolescent CIE exposure triggers sigma-1 receptors that act to depress the efficacy of excitatory inputs in triggering action potentials during LTP. Such

  19. Long-term potentiation in rat hippocampal neurons is accompanied by spatially widespread changes in intrinsic oscillatory dynamics and excitability.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Rishikesh; Johnston, Daniel

    2007-12-20

    Oscillations in neural activity are a prominent feature of many brain states. Individual hippocampal neurons exhibit intrinsic membrane potential oscillations and intrinsic resonance in the theta frequency range. We found that the subthreshold resonance frequency of CA1 pyramidal neurons was location dependent, varying more than 3-fold between the soma and the distal dendrites. Furthermore, activity- and NMDA-receptor-dependent long-term plasticity increased this resonance frequency through changes in h channel properties. The increase in resonance frequency and an associated reduction in excitability were nearly identical in the soma and the first 300 mum of the apical dendrites. These spatially widespread changes accompanying long-term synaptic potentiation also reduced the neuron's ability to elicit spikes evoked through a nonpotentiated synaptic pathway. Our results suggest that the frequency response of these neurons depends on the dendritic location of their inputs and that activity can regulate their response dynamics within an oscillating neural network.

  20. Synaptic mechanisms underlying functional dichotomy between intrinsic-bursting and regular-spiking neurons in auditory cortical layer 5.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujiao J; Kim, Young-Joo; Ibrahim, Leena A; Tao, Huizhong W; Zhang, Li I

    2013-03-20

    Corticofugal projections from the primary auditory cortex (A1) have been shown to play a role in modulating subcortical processing. However, functional properties of the corticofugal neurons and their synaptic circuitry mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we performed in vivo whole-cell recordings from layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons in the rat A1 and found two distinct neuronal classes according to their functional properties. Intrinsic-bursting (IB) neurons, the L5 corticofugal neurons, exhibited early and rather unselective spike responses to a wide range of frequencies. The exceptionally broad spectral tuning of IB neurons was attributable to their broad excitatory inputs with long temporal durations and inhibitory inputs being more narrowly tuned than excitatory inputs. This uncommon pattern of excitatory-inhibitory interplay was attributed initially to a broad thalamocortical convergence onto IB neurons, which also receive temporally prolonged intracortical excitatory input as well as feedforward inhibitory input at least partially from more narrowly tuned fast-spiking inhibitory neurons. In contrast, regular-spiking neurons, which are mainly corticocortical, exhibited sharp frequency tuning similar to L4 pyramidal cells, underlying which are well-matched purely intracortical excitation and inhibition. The functional dichotomy among L5 pyramidal neurons suggests two distinct processing streams. The spectrally and temporally broad synaptic integration in IB neurons may ensure robust feedback signals to facilitate subcortical function and plasticity in a general manner.

  1. Psychostimulant-induced plasticity of intrinsic neuronal excitability in ventral subiculum.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Donald C; Moore, Shannon J; Staff, Nathan P; Spruston, Nelson

    2003-10-29

    Psychostimulant drugs such as amphetamine are prescribed to increase vigilance, suppress appetite, and treat attention disorders, but they powerfully activate the dopamine system and have serious abuse potential. Repeated psychostimulant exposure induces neuronal plasticity within the mesolimbic dopamine system. Here we present evidence that repeated amphetamine exposure results in a suppression of intrinsic neuronal excitability in the ventral subiculum, a hippocampal region that activates dopamine neurotransmission. We used patch-clamp recordings from brain slices obtained at different times after withdrawal from repeated amphetamine exposure to determine the long-term effects of amphetamine on subicular excitability. Using several postsynaptic indices of sodium channel function, our results show that excitability is decreased for days, but not weeks, after repeated amphetamine exposure. The resulting increase in action potential threshold and decrease in postsynaptic amplification of excitatory synaptic input provide the first direct evidence that psychostimulants induce plasticity of hippocampal output and suggest one mechanism by which drug withdrawal may influence limbic dopamine-dependent learning and memory.

  2. Effect of GABAergic inhibition on odorant concentration coding in mushroom body intrinsic neurons of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Froese, Anja; Szyszka, Paul; Menzel, Randolf

    2014-03-01

    Kenyon cells, the intrinsic neurons of the insect mushroom body, have the intriguing property of responding in a sparse way to odorants. Sparse neuronal codes are often invariant to changes in stimulus intensity and duration, and sparse coding often depends on global inhibition. We tested if this is the case for honeybees' Kenyon cells, too, and used in vivo Ca²⁺ imaging to record their responses to different odorant concentrations. Kenyon cells responded not only to the onset of odorant stimuli (ON responses), but also to their termination (OFF responses). Both, ON and OFF responses increased with increasing odorant concentration. ON responses were phasic and invariant to the duration of odorant stimuli, while OFF responses increased with increasing odorant duration. Pharmacological blocking of GABA receptors in the brain revealed that ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors attenuate Kenyon cells' ON responses without changing their OFF responses. Ionotropic GABA(A) receptors attenuated Kenyon cell ON responses more strongly than metabotropic GABA(B) receptors. However, the response dynamic, temporal resolution and paired-pulse depression did not depend on GABA(A) transmission. These data are discussed in the context of mechanisms leading to sparse coding in Kenyon cells.

  3. Neuronal and Astroglial Correlates Underlying Spatiotemporal Intrinsic Optical Signal in the Rat Hippocampal Slice

    PubMed Central

    Pál, Ildikó; Nyitrai, Gabriella; Kardos, Julianna; Héja, László

    2013-01-01

    Widely used for mapping afferent activated brain areas in vivo, the label-free intrinsic optical signal (IOS) is mainly ascribed to blood volume changes subsequent to glial glutamate uptake. By contrast, IOS imaged in vitro is generally attributed to neuronal and glial cell swelling, however the relative contribution of different cell types and molecular players remained largely unknown. We characterized IOS to Schaffer collateral stimulation in the rat hippocampal slice using a 464-element photodiode-array device that enables IOS monitoring at 0.6 ms time-resolution in combination with simultaneous field potential recordings. We used brief half-maximal stimuli by applying a medium intensity 50 Volt-stimulus train within 50 ms (20 Hz). IOS was primarily observed in the str. pyramidale and proximal region of the str. radiatum of the hippocampus. It was eliminated by tetrodotoxin blockade of voltage-gated Na+ channels and was significantly enhanced by suppressing inhibitory signaling with gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor antagonist picrotoxin. We found that IOS was predominantly initiated by postsynaptic Glu receptor activation and progressed by the activation of astroglial Glu transporters and Mg2+-independent astroglial N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Under control conditions, role for neuronal K+/Cl− cotransporter KCC2, but not for glial Na+/K+/Cl− cotransporter NKCC1 was observed. Slight enhancement and inhibition of IOS through non-specific Cl− and volume-regulated anion channels, respectively, were also depicted. High-frequency IOS imaging, evoked by brief afferent stimulation in brain slices provide a new paradigm for studying mechanisms underlying IOS genesis. Major players disclosed this way imply that spatiotemporal IOS reflects glutamatergic neuronal activation and astroglial response, as observed within the hippocampus. Our model may help to better interpret in vivo IOS and support diagnosis in the future. PMID:23469218

  4. Neuronal and astroglial correlates underlying spatiotemporal intrinsic optical signal in the rat hippocampal slice.

    PubMed

    Pál, Ildikó; Nyitrai, Gabriella; Kardos, Julianna; Héja, László

    2013-01-01

    Widely used for mapping afferent activated brain areas in vivo, the label-free intrinsic optical signal (IOS) is mainly ascribed to blood volume changes subsequent to glial glutamate uptake. By contrast, IOS imaged in vitro is generally attributed to neuronal and glial cell swelling, however the relative contribution of different cell types and molecular players remained largely unknown. We characterized IOS to Schaffer collateral stimulation in the rat hippocampal slice using a 464-element photodiode-array device that enables IOS monitoring at 0.6 ms time-resolution in combination with simultaneous field potential recordings. We used brief half-maximal stimuli by applying a medium intensity 50 Volt-stimulus train within 50 ms (20 Hz). IOS was primarily observed in the str. pyramidale and proximal region of the str. radiatum of the hippocampus. It was eliminated by tetrodotoxin blockade of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and was significantly enhanced by suppressing inhibitory signaling with gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor antagonist picrotoxin. We found that IOS was predominantly initiated by postsynaptic Glu receptor activation and progressed by the activation of astroglial Glu transporters and Mg(2+)-independent astroglial N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Under control conditions, role for neuronal K(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter KCC2, but not for glial Na(+)/K(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1 was observed. Slight enhancement and inhibition of IOS through non-specific Cl(-) and volume-regulated anion channels, respectively, were also depicted. High-frequency IOS imaging, evoked by brief afferent stimulation in brain slices provide a new paradigm for studying mechanisms underlying IOS genesis. Major players disclosed this way imply that spatiotemporal IOS reflects glutamatergic neuronal activation and astroglial response, as observed within the hippocampus. Our model may help to better interpret in vivo IOS and support diagnosis in the future.

  5. Axonal Regeneration Induced by Blockade of Glial Inhibitors Coupled with Activation of Intrinsic Neuronal Growth Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Hasan, Omar; Arzeno, Alexander; Benowitz, Larry I.; Cafferty, William B. J.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Several pharmacological approaches to promote neural repair and recovery after CNS injury have been identified. Blockade of either astrocyte-derived chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) or oligodendrocyte-derived NogoReceptor (NgR1) ligands reduces extrinsic inhibition of axonal growth, though combined blockade of these distinct pathways has not been tested. The intrinsic growth potential of adult mammalian neurons can be promoted by several pathways, including pre-conditioning injury for dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and macrophage activation for retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Singly, pharmacological interventions have restricted efficacy without foreign cells, mechanical scaffolds or viral gene therapy. Here, we examined combinations of pharmacological approaches and assessed the degree of axonal regeneration. After mouse optic nerve crush injury, NgR1-/- neurons regenerate RGC axons as extensively as do zymosan-injected, macrophage-activated WT mice. Synergistic enhancement of regeneration is achieved by combining these interventions in zymosan-injected NgR1-/- mice. In rats with a spinal dorsal column crush injury, a preconditioning peripheral sciatic nerve axotomy, or NgR1(310)ecto-Fc decoy protein treatment or ChondroitinaseABC (ChABC) treatment independently support similar degrees of regeneration by ascending primary afferent fibers into the vicinity of the injury site. Treatment with two of these three interventions does not significantly enhance the degree of axonal regeneration. In contrast, triple therapy combining NgR1 decoy, ChABC and preconditioning, allows axons to regenerate millimeters past the spinal cord injury site. The benefit of a pre-conditioning injury is most robust, but a peripheral nerve injury coincident with, or 3 days after, spinal cord injury also synergizes with NgR1 decoy and ChABC. Thus, maximal axonal regeneration and neural repair is achieved by combining independently effective pharmacological approaches. PMID

  6. Intrinsic Membrane Properties of Pre-oromotor Neurons in the Intermediate Zone of the Medullary Reticular Formation

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Sharmila; Boulant, Jack A.; Chen, Zhixiong; Travers, Joseph B.

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in the lower brainstem that control consummatory behavior are widely distributed in the reticular formation (RF) of the pons and medulla. The intrinsic membrane properties of neurons within this distributed system shape complex excitatory and inhibitory inputs from both orosensory and central structures implicated in homeostatic control to produce coordinated oromotor patterns. The current study explored the intrinsic membrane properties of neurons in the intermediate subdivision of the medullary reticular formation (IRt). Neurons in the IRt receive input from the overlying (gustatory) nucleus of the solitary tract and project to the oromotor nuclei. Recent behavioral pharmacology studies as well as computational modeling suggest that inhibition in the IRt plays an important role in the transition from a taste-initiated oromotor pattern of ingestion to one of rejection. The present study explored the impact of hyperpolarization on membrane properties. In response to depolarization, neurons responded with either a tonic discharge, an irregular/burst pattern or were spike-adaptive. A hyperpolarizing pre-pulse modulated the excitability of most (82%) IRt neurons to subsequent depolarization. Instances of both increased (30%) and decreased (52%) excitability were observed. Currents induced by the hyperpolarization included an outward 4-AP sensitive K+ current that suppressed excitability and an inward cation current that increased excitability. These currents are also present in other subpopulations of RF neurons that influence the oromotor nuclei and we discuss how these currents could alter ring characteristics to impact pattern generation. PMID:20338224

  7. Distinct intrinsic and synaptic properties of pre-sympathetic and pre-parasympathetic output neurons in Barrington's nucleus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue-Xian; Li, De-Pei; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2013-08-01

    Barrington's nucleus (BN), commonly known as the pontine micturition center, controls micturition and other visceral functions through projections to the spinal cord. In this study, we developed a rat brain slice preparation to determine the intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms regulating pre-sympathetic output (PSO) and pre-parasympathetic output (PPO) neurons in the BN using patch-clamp recordings. The PSO and PPO neurons were retrogradely labeled by injecting fluorescent tracers into the intermediolateral region of the spinal cord at T13-L1 and S1-S2 levels, respectively. There were significantly more PPO than PSO neurons within the BN. The basal activity and membrane potential were significantly lower in PPO than in PSO neurons, and A-type K(+) currents were significantly larger in PPO than in PSO neurons. Blocking A-type K(+) channels increased the excitability more in PPO than in PSO neurons. Stimulting μ-opioid receptors inhibited firing in both PPO and PSO neurons. The glutamatergic EPSC frequency was much lower, whereas the glycinergic IPSC frequency was much higher, in PPO than in PSO neurons. Although blocking GABAA receptors increased the excitability of both PSO and PPO neurons, blocking glycine receptors increased the firing activity of PPO neurons only. Furthermore, blocking ionotropic glutamate receptors decreased the excitability of PSO neurons but paradoxically increased the firing activity of PPO neurons by reducing glycinergic input. Our findings indicate that the membrane and synaptic properties of PSO and PPO neurons in the BN are distinctly different. This information improves our understanding of the neural circuitry and central mechanisms regulating the bladder and other visceral organs. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Regulation of intrinsic excitability in hippocampal neurons by activity-dependent modulation of the Kv2.1 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Durga P.; Misonou, Hiroaki; Pan, Sheng-Jun; Held, Joshua E.; Surmeier, D. James; Trimmer, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Kv2.1 is the prominent somatodendritic sustained or delayed rectifier voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel in mammalian central neurons, and is a target for activity-dependent modulation via calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation. Using hanatoxin-mediated block of Kv2.1 we show that, in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, glutamate stimulation leads to significant hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation gating properties of the Kv2.1-component of delayed rectifier K+ (IK) currents. In computer models of hippocampal neurons, these glutamate-stimulated shifts in the gating of the Kv2.1-component of IK lead to a dramatic suppression of action potential firing frequency. Current-clamp experiments in cultured rat hippocampal neurons showed glutamate-stimulation induced a similar suppression of neuronal firing frequency. Membrane depolarization also resulted in similar hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependent gating properties of neuronal IK currents, and suppression of neuronal firing. The glutamate-induced effects on neuronal firing were eliminated by hanatoxin, but not by dendrotoxin-K, a blocker of Kv1.1-containing channels. These studies together demonstrate a specific contribution of modulation of Kv2.1 channels in the activity-dependent regulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability. PMID:19276663

  9. Adiponectin regulates contextual fear extinction and intrinsic excitability of dentate gyrus granule neurons through AdipoR2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, D; Wang, X; Wang, B; Garza, J C; Fang, X; Wang, J; Scherer, P E; Brenner, R; Zhang, W; Lu, X-Y

    2017-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by exaggerated fear expression and impaired fear extinction. The underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of PTSD are largely unknown. The current pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for PTSD are either ineffective or temporary with high relapse rates. Here we report that adiponectin-deficient mice exhibited normal contextual fear conditioning but displayed slower extinction learning. Infusions of adiponectin into the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus in fear-conditioned mice facilitated extinction of contextual fear. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in brain slices revealed that intrinsic excitability of DG granule neurons was enhanced by adiponectin deficiency and suppressed after treatment with the adiponectin mimetic AdipoRon, which were associated with increased input resistance and hyperpolarized resting membrane potential, respectively. Moreover, deletion of AdipoR2, but not AdipoR1 in the DG, resulted in augmented fear expression and reduced extinction, accompanied by intrinsic hyperexcitability of DG granule neurons. Adiponectin and AdipoRon failed to induce facilitation of fear extinction and elicit inhibition of intrinsic excitability of DG neurons in AdipoR2 knockout mice. These results indicated that adiponectin action via AdipoR2 was both necessary and sufficient for extinction of contextual fear and intrinsic excitability of DG granule neurons, implying that enhancing or dampening DG neuronal excitability may cause resistance to or facilitation of extinction. Therefore, our findings provide a functional link between adiponectin/AdipoR2 activation, DG neuronal excitability and contextual fear extinction, and suggest that targeting adiponectin/AdipoR2 may be used to strengthen extinction-based exposure therapies for PTSD. PMID:27137743

  10. Optimization of Intrinsic Stochastic Resonance in Adaptive Newman-Watts Network of Channel Blocked Hodgkin-Huxley Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Gong, Yubing; Wu, Yanan

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we study stochastic resonance (SR) induced by channel noise in adaptive weighted Newman-Watts networks of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with channel blocking (CB). It is found that the intrinsic SR is dependent on adaptive coupling and is strongly enhanced when the changing rate of adaptive coupling is optimal, and this phenomenon is independent of sodium and potassium CB levels. As CB increases, the channel noise for SR decreases, but the strength of intrinsic SR nearly does not change in the presence of adaptive coupling, which is different from the case for fixed coupling. These results show that intrinsic SR can be enhanced and optimized by adaptive coupling, and CB's effect on the intrinsic SR can be reduced by adaptive coupling. This implies that adaptive coupling could more efficiently improve the time precision of information processing in neural systems.

  11. Spatiotemporal memory is an intrinsic property of networks of dissociated cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ju, Han; Dranias, Mark R; Banumurthy, Gokulakrishna; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-03-04

    The ability to process complex spatiotemporal information is a fundamental process underlying the behavior of all higher organisms. However, how the brain processes information in the temporal domain remains incompletely understood. We have explored the spatiotemporal information-processing capability of networks formed from dissociated rat E18 cortical neurons growing in culture. By combining optogenetics with microelectrode array recording, we show that these randomly organized cortical microcircuits are able to process complex spatiotemporal information, allowing the identification of a large number of temporal sequences and classification of musical styles. These experiments uncovered spatiotemporal memory processes lasting several seconds. Neural network simulations indicated that both short-term synaptic plasticity and recurrent connections are required for the emergence of this capability. Interestingly, NMDA receptor function is not a requisite for these short-term spatiotemporal memory processes. Indeed, blocking the NMDA receptor with the antagonist APV significantly improved the temporal processing ability of the networks, by reducing spontaneously occurring network bursts. These highly synchronized events have disastrous effects on spatiotemporal information processing, by transiently erasing short-term memory. These results show that the ability to process and integrate complex spatiotemporal information is an intrinsic property of generic cortical networks that does not require specifically designed circuits. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354040-12$15.00/0.

  12. A detailed, conductance-based computer model of intrinsic sensory neurons of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Jordan D; Bornstein, Joel C; Gwynne, Rachel M; Koussoulas, Katerina; Thomas, Evan A

    2014-09-01

    Intrinsic sensory neurons (ISNs) of the enteric nervous system respond to stimuli such as muscle tension, muscle length, distortion of the mucosa, and the chemical content in the lumen. ISNs form recurrent networks that probably drive many intestinal motor patterns and reflexes. ISNs express a large number of voltage- and calcium-gated ion channels, some of which are modified by inflammation or repeated physiological stimuli, but how interactions between different ionic currents in ISNs produce both normal and pathological behaviors in the intestine remains unclear. We constructed a model of ISNs including voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels, N-type calcium channels, big conductance calcium-dependent potassium (BK) channels, calcium-dependent nonspecific cation channels (NSCa), intermediate conductance calcium-dependent potassium (IK) channels, hyperpolarization-activated cation (Ih) channels, and internal calcium dynamics. The model was based on data from the literature and our electrophysiological studies. The model reproduced responses to short or long depolarizing current pulses and responses to long hyperpolarizing current pulses. Sensitivity analysis showed that Ih, IK, NSCa, and BK have the largest influence on the number of action potentials observed during prolonged depolarizations. The model also predicts that changes to the voltage of activation for Ih have a large influence on excitability, but changes to the time constant of activation for Ih have a minor effect. Our model identifies how interactions between different iconic currents influence the excitability of ISNs and highlights an important role for Ih in enteric neuroplasticity resulting from disease.

  13. Intrinsic excitability state of local neuronal population modulates signal propagation in feed-forward neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ruixue; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xilei; Qin, Yingmei; Wang, Haixu

    2015-04-01

    Reliable signal propagation across distributed brain areas is an essential requirement for cognitive function, and it has been investigated extensively in computational studies where feed-forward network (FFN) is taken as a generic model. But it is still unclear how distinct local network states, which are intrinsically generated by synaptic interactions within each layer, would affect the ability of FFN to transmit information. Here we investigate the impact of such network states on propagating transient synchrony (synfire) and firing rate by a combination of numerical simulations and analytical approach. Specifically, local network dynamics is attributed to the competition between excitatory and inhibitory neurons within each layer. Our results show that concomitant with different local network states, the performance of signal propagation differs dramatically. For both synfire propagation and firing rate propagation, there exists an optimal local excitability state, respectively, that optimizes the performance of signal propagation. Furthermore, we find that long-range connections strongly change the dependence of spiking activity propagation on local network state and propose that these two factors work jointly to determine information transmission across distributed networks. Finally, a simple mean field approach that bridges response properties of long-range connectivity and local subnetworks is utilized to reveal the underlying mechanism.

  14. Ovarian hormone deficiency reduces intrinsic excitability and abolishes acute estrogen sensitivity in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wendy W.; Adelman, John P.; Maylie, James

    2011-01-01

    Premature and uncompensated loss of ovarian hormones following ovariectomy (OVX) elevates the risks of cognitive impairment and dementia. These risks are prevented with estrogen (E2)-containing hormone replacement therapy initiated shortly following OVX but not after substantial delay. Currently the cellular bases underlying these clinical findings are unknown. At the cellular level, intrinsic membrane properties regulate the efficiency of synaptic inputs to initiate output action potentials (APs), thereby affecting neuronal communication hence cognitive processing. This study tested the hypothesis that in CA1 pyramidal neurons, intrinsic membrane properties and their acute regulation by E2 require ovarian hormones for maintenance. Whole-cell current clamp recordings were performed on neurons from ~7 months old OVX rats that experienced either short-term (10 days, control OVX) or long-term (5 months, OVXLT) ovarian hormone deficiency. The results reveal that long-term hormone deficiency reduced intrinsic membrane excitability (IE) as measured by the number of evoked action potentials (APs) and firing duration for a given current injection. This was accompanied by AP broadening, an increased slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP), and faster accumulation of NaV channel inactivation during repetitive firing. In the control OVX neurons, E2 acutely increased IE and reduced the sAHP. In contrast, acute regulation of IE by E2 was absent in the OVXLT neurons. Since the degree of IE of hippocampal pyramidal neurons is positively related with hippocampus-dependent learning ability, and modulation of IE is observed following successful learning, these findings provide a framework for understanding hormone deficiency-related cognitive impairment and the critical window for therapy initiation. PMID:21325532

  15. Intrinsic Plasticity Induced by Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors via Enhancement of High Threshold KV Currents in Sound Localizing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hamlet, William R.; Lu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic plasticity has emerged as an important mechanism regulating neuronal excitability and output under physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we report a novel form of intrinsic plasticity. Using perforated patch clamp recordings, we examined the modulatory effects of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) on voltage-gated potassium (KV) currents and the firing properties of neurons in the chicken nucleus laminaris (NL), the first central auditory station where interaural time cues are analyzed for sound localization. We found that activation of mGluR II by synthetic agonists resulted in a selective increase of the high threshold KV currents. More importantly, synaptically released glutamate (with reuptake blocked) also enhanced the high threshold KV currents. The enhancement was frequency-coding region dependent, being more pronounced in low frequency neurons compared to middle and high frequency neurons. The intracellular mechanism involved the Gβγ signaling pathway associated with phospholipase C and protein kinase C. The modulation strengthened membrane outward rectification, sharpened action potentials, and improved the ability of NL neurons to follow high frequency inputs. These data suggest that mGluR II provides a feedforward modulatory mechanism that may regulate temporal processing under the condition of heightened synaptic inputs. PMID:26964678

  16. The role of mitochondria-mediated intrinsic death pathway in gingerdione derivative I6-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ho; Chen, Po-See; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Huang, Li-Jiau; Gean, Po-Wu; Chiu, Ted-H

    2012-03-01

    Neuronal death induced by I6 displayed apoptotic characteristics but the precise mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In the present studies, I6 at 24 h after intraperitoneal administration significantly decreased the density of surviving neurons and increased caspase-3 activity in frontal cortex, suggesting that peripherally administered I6 may cross BBB to induce CNS toxicity. In rat embryonic primary cortical cells, I6-induced reduction of mitochondrial viability and neuronal apoptosis was inhibited by vitamin E. In addition, I6-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused the disruption of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP), the release of cytochrome c, the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), resulting in activation of mitochondrial-mediated intrinsic death pathway. Pre-treatment with antioxidant vitamin E or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely abolished the I6-induced generation of ROS, loss of MMP, release of cytochrome c, activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and cleavage of PARP. Carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP), a mitochondrial uncoupler, significantly reduced I6-induced neuronal death as well as caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. These results suggest that I6 induces neuronal death by promoting intracellular ROS production to cause a loss of MMP that result in release of cytochrome c and activation of mitochondria-mediated intrinsic death pathway.

  17. miR-128 regulates neuronal migration, outgrowth and intrinsic excitability via the intellectual disability gene Phf6

    PubMed Central

    Franzoni, Eleonora; Booker, Sam A; Parthasarathy, Srinivas; Rehfeld, Frederick; Grosser, Sabine; Srivatsa, Swathi; Fuchs, Heiko R; Tarabykin, Victor; Vida, Imre; Wulczyn, F Gregory

    2015-01-01

    miR-128, a brain-enriched microRNA, has been implicated in the control of neurogenesis and synaptogenesis but its potential roles in intervening processes have not been addressed. We show that post-transcriptional mechanisms restrict miR-128 accumulation to post-mitotic neurons during mouse corticogenesis and in adult stem cell niches. Whereas premature miR-128 expression in progenitors for upper layer neurons leads to impaired neuronal migration and inappropriate branching, sponge-mediated inhibition results in overmigration. Within the upper layers, premature miR-128 expression reduces the complexity of dendritic arborization, associated with altered electrophysiological properties. We show that Phf6, a gene mutated in the cognitive disorder Börjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome, is an important regulatory target for miR-128. Restoring PHF6 expression counteracts the deleterious effect of miR-128 on neuronal migration, outgrowth and intrinsic physiological properties. Our results place miR-128 upstream of PHF6 in a pathway vital for cortical lamination as well as for the development of neuronal morphology and intrinsic excitability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04263.001 PMID:25556700

  18. Oxytocin is expressed by both intrinsic sensory and secretomotor neurons in the enteric nervous system of guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Ji, Ruihua; Gao, Xiaofei; Fu, Jiqiang; Guo, Wei; Song, Xianmin; Zhao, Xiaolin; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Shi, Xueyin; He, Cheng; Xiang, Zhenghua

    2011-05-01

    Single- and double-immunostaining techniques were used systematically to study the distribution pattern and neurochemical density of oxytocin-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons in the digestive tract of the guinea pig. Oxytocin immunoreactivity was distributed widely in the guinea pig gastrointestinal tract; 3%, 13%, 17%, 15%, and 10% of ganglion neurons were immunoreactive for oxytocin in the myenteric plexuses of the gastric corpus, jejunum, ileum, proximal colon, and distal colon, respectively, and 36%, 40%, 52%, and 56% of ganglion neurons were immunoreactive for oxytocin in the submucosal plexuses of the jejunum, ileum, proximal colon, and distal colon, respectively. In the myenteric plexus, oxytocin was expressed exclusively in the intrinsic enteric afferent neurons, as identified by calbindin 28 K. In the submucosal plexuses, oxytocin was expressed in non-cholinergic secretomotor neurons, as identified by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. Oxytocin-ir nerve fibers in the inner circular muscle layer possibly arose from the myenteric oxytocin-ir neurons, and oxytocin-ir nerve fibers in the mucosa possibly arose from both the myenteric and submucosal oxytocin-ir neurons. Thus, oxytocin in the digestive tract might be involved in gastrointestinal tract motility mainly via the regulation of the inner circular muscle and the balance of the absorption and secretion of water and electrolytes.

  19. Increased Cell-Intrinsic Excitability Induces Synaptic Changes in New Neurons in the Adult Dentate Gyrus That Require Npas4

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Shuyin; Antolin, Salome; Lin, Chia-Wei; Lin, Ying-Xi

    2013-01-01

    Electrical activity regulates the manner in which neurons mature and form connections to each other. However, it remains unclear whether increased single-cell activity is sufficient to alter the development of synaptic connectivity of that neuron or whether a global increase in circuit activity is necessary. To address this question, we genetically increased neuronal excitability of in vivo individual adult-born neurons in the mouse dentate gyrus via expression of a voltage-gated bacterial sodium channel. We observed that increasing the excitability of new neurons in an otherwise unperturbed circuit leads to changes in both their input and axonal synapses. Furthermore, the activity-dependent transcription factor Npas4 is necessary for the changes in the input synapses of these neurons, but it is not involved in changes to their axonal synapses. Our results reveal that an increase in cell-intrinsic activity during maturation is sufficient to alter the synaptic connectivity of a neuron with the hippocampal circuit and that Npas4 is required for activity-dependent changes in input synapses. PMID:23637184

  20. Organic photoresponse materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Dong, Huanli; Zhu, Hongfei; Meng, Qing; Gong, Xiong; Hu, Wenping

    2012-03-07

    Organic photoresponse materials and devices are critically important to organic optoelectronics and energy crises. The activities of photoresponse in organic materials can be summarized in three effects, photoconductive, photovoltaic and optical memory effects. Correspondingly, devices based on the three effects can be divided into (i) photoconductive devices such as photodetectors, photoreceptors, photoswitches and phototransistors, (ii) photovoltaic devices such as organic solar cells, and (iii) optical data storage devices. It is expected that this systematic analysis of photoresponse materials and devices could be a guide for the better understanding of structure-property relationships of organic materials and provide key clues for the fabrication of high performance organic optoelectronic devices, the integration of them in circuits and the application of them in renewable green energy strategies (critical review, 452 references).

  1. Photo-responsive polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Dong, Ruijiao; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2014-09-07

    Photo-responsive polymeric micelles have received increasing attention in both academic and industrial fields due to their efficient photo-sensitive nature and unique nanostructure. In view of the photo-reaction mechanism, photo-responsive polymeric micelles can be divided into five major types: (1) photoisomerization polymeric micelles, (2) photo-induced rearrangement polymeric micelles, (3) photocleavage polymeric micelles, (4) photo-induced crosslinkable polymeric micelles, and (5) photo-induced energy conversion polymeric micelles. This review highlights the recent advances of photo-responsive polymeric micelles, including the design, synthesis and applications in various biomedical fields. Especially, the influence of different photo-reaction mechanisms on the morphology, structure and properties of the polymeric micelles is emphasized. Finally, the possible future directions and perspectives in this emerging area are briefly discussed.

  2. The h channel mediates location-dependence and plasticity of intrinsic phase response in rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Rishikesh; Johnston, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The presence of phenomenological inductances in neuronal membrane has been known for more than half a century. In spite of this, the dramatic contributions of such inductive elements to the amplitude and, especially, phase of neuronal impedance, and their roles in modulating temporal dynamics of neuronal responses have surprisingly remained unexplored. In this study, we demonstrate that the h channel contributes a location-dependent and plastic phenomenological inductive component to the input impedance of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Specifically, we show that the h channels introduce an apparent negative delay in the local voltage response of these neurons with respect to the injected current within the theta frequency range. The frequency-range and the extent of this lead expand with increases in h current either through hyperpolarization, or with increasing distance of dendritic location from the soma. We also demonstrate that a spatially widespread increase in this inductive phase component accompanies long-term potentiation. Finally, employing impedance analysis, we show that both location- and activity-dependence of intrinsic phase response are not due to changes in a capacitive or a leak component, but due to changes in h channel properties. Our results suggest that certain voltage-gated ion channels can differentially regulate internal time delays within neurons, thus providing them with an independent control mechanism in temporal coding of neuronal information. Our analyses and results also establish impedance as a powerful measure of intrinsic dynamics and excitability, given that it quantifies excitability and temporal relationships among signals as functions of input frequency. PMID:18509046

  3. Inhibitory motor innervation of the gall bladder musculature by intrinsic neurones containing nitric oxide in the Australian Brush-tailed possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

    PubMed Central

    Meedeniya, A; Al-Jiffry, B; Konomi, H; Schloithe, A; Toouli, J; Saccone, G

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Gall bladder functions are modulated by neurones intrinsic to the organ. Data are available on the neurochemical composition of intrinsic and extrinsic nerves innervating the gall bladder but are lacking on specific functional classes of gall bladder neurones.
AIMS—To characterise the intrinsic motor neurones of the gall bladder and identify their roles using pharmacological techniques.
METHODS—Retrograde tracing from the possum gall bladder muscle in vitro allowed identification of intrinsic motor neurones. Subsequently, their content of choline acetyltransferase and nitric oxide synthase, markers of acetylcholine and nitric oxide containing neurones, was established using immunohistochemical techniques. Organ bath pharmacology was used to evaluate neurotransmission by acetylcholine and nitric oxide in gall bladder muscle strips.
RESULTS—Innervation of the gall bladder musculature by neurones of both the muscular and serosal plexuses was demonstrated. A large proportion (62%) of these motor neurones were immunoreactive for nitric oxide synthase. All gall bladder neurones showed immunoreactivity for choline acetyltransferase. Organ bath pharmacology confirmed the neuroanatomical data, showing acetylcholine and nitric oxide mediating neurotransmission to the gall bladder musculature.
CONCLUSIONS—Neurones containing acetylcholine and nitric oxide, located within the muscular and serosal plexuses, provide excitatory and inhibitory motor innervation of the gall bladder, respectively. The large inhibitory innervation suggests active relaxation of the gall bladder during filling, mediated by intrinsic nerves.


Keywords: excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission; gall bladder; motility; nitric oxide; acetylcholine; possum PMID:11600474

  4. Inhibitory motor innervation of the gall bladder musculature by intrinsic neurones containing nitric oxide in the Australian brush-tailed possum (Trichosurus vulpecula).

    PubMed

    Meedeniya, A C; Al-Jiffry, B O; Konomi, H; Schloithe, A C; Toouli, J; Saccone, G T

    2001-11-01

    Gall bladder functions are modulated by neurones intrinsic to the organ. Data are available on the neurochemical composition of intrinsic and extrinsic nerves innervating the gall bladder but are lacking on specific functional classes of gall bladder neurones. To characterise the intrinsic motor neurones of the gall bladder and identify their roles using pharmacological techniques. Retrograde tracing from the possum gall bladder muscle in vitro allowed identification of intrinsic motor neurones. Subsequently, their content of choline acetyltransferase and nitric oxide synthase, markers of acetylcholine and nitric oxide containing neurones, was established using immunohistochemical techniques. Organ bath pharmacology was used to evaluate neurotransmission by acetylcholine and nitric oxide in gall bladder muscle strips. Innervation of the gall bladder musculature by neurones of both the muscular and serosal plexuses was demonstrated. A large proportion (62%) of these motor neurones were immunoreactive for nitric oxide synthase. All gall bladder neurones showed immunoreactivity for choline acetyltransferase. Organ bath pharmacology confirmed the neuroanatomical data, showing acetylcholine and nitric oxide mediating neurotransmission to the gall bladder musculature. Neurones containing acetylcholine and nitric oxide, located within the muscular and serosal plexuses, provide excitatory and inhibitory motor innervation of the gall bladder, respectively. The large inhibitory innervation suggests active relaxation of the gall bladder during filling, mediated by intrinsic nerves.

  5. Leptin modulates the intrinsic excitability of AgRP/NPY neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Baver, Scott B; Hope, Kevin; Guyot, Shannon; Bjørbaek, Christian; Kaczorowski, Catherine; O'Connell, Kristen M S

    2014-04-16

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH) is a brain region critical for regulation of food intake and a primary area for the action of leptin in the CNS. In lean mice, the adipokine leptin inhibits neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neuronal activity, resulting in decreased food intake. Here we show that diet-induced obesity in mice is associated with persistent activation of NPY neurons and a failure of leptin to reduce the firing rate or hyperpolarize the resting membrane potential. However, the molecular mechanism whereby diet uncouples leptin's effect on neuronal excitability remains to be fully elucidated. In NPY neurons from lean mice, the Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine inhibited leptin-induced changes in input resistance and spike rate. Consistent with this, we found that ARH NPY neurons have a large, leptin-sensitive delayed rectifier K(+) current and that leptin sensitivity of this current is blunted in neurons from diet-induced obese mice. This current is primarily carried by Kv2-containing channels, as the Kv2 channel inhibitor stromatoxin-1 significantly increased the spontaneous firing rate in NPY neurons from lean mice. In HEK cells, leptin induced a significant hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of Kv2.1 but had no effect on the function of the closely related channel Kv2.2 when these channels were coexpressed with the long isoform of the leptin receptor LepRb. Our results suggest that dynamic modulation of somatic Kv2.1 channels regulates the intrinsic excitability of NPY neurons to modulate the spontaneous activity and the integration of synaptic input onto these neurons in the ARH.

  6. Leptin Modulates the Intrinsic Excitability of AgRP/NPY Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Baver, Scott B.; Hope, Kevin; Guyot, Shannon; Bjørbaek, Christian; Kaczorowski, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH) is a brain region critical for regulation of food intake and a primary area for the action of leptin in the CNS. In lean mice, the adipokine leptin inhibits neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neuronal activity, resulting in decreased food intake. Here we show that diet-induced obesity in mice is associated with persistent activation of NPY neurons and a failure of leptin to reduce the firing rate or hyperpolarize the resting membrane potential. However, the molecular mechanism whereby diet uncouples leptin's effect on neuronal excitability remains to be fully elucidated. In NPY neurons from lean mice, the Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine inhibited leptin-induced changes in input resistance and spike rate. Consistent with this, we found that ARH NPY neurons have a large, leptin-sensitive delayed rectifier K+ current and that leptin sensitivity of this current is blunted in neurons from diet-induced obese mice. This current is primarily carried by Kv2-containing channels, as the Kv2 channel inhibitor stromatoxin-1 significantly increased the spontaneous firing rate in NPY neurons from lean mice. In HEK cells, leptin induced a significant hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of Kv2.1 but had no effect on the function of the closely related channel Kv2.2 when these channels were coexpressed with the long isoform of the leptin receptor LepRb. Our results suggest that dynamic modulation of somatic Kv2.1 channels regulates the intrinsic excitability of NPY neurons to modulate the spontaneous activity and the integration of synaptic input onto these neurons in the ARH. PMID:24741039

  7. Reduced Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Contributes to Enhanced Intrinsic Excitability in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons from PrP−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Stemkowski, Patrick L.; Gandini, Maria A.; Black, Stefanie A.; Zhang, Zizhen; Souza, Ivana A.; Chen, Lina; Zamponi, Gerald W.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been linked to increased neuronal excitability and synaptic activity in the hippocampus. We have previously shown that synaptic activity in hippocampi of PrP-null mice is increased due to enhanced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function. Here, we focused on the effect of PRNP gene knock-out (KO) on intrinsic neuronal excitability, and in particular, the underlying ionic mechanism in hippocampal neurons cultured from P0 mouse pups. We found that the absence of PrPC profoundly affected the firing properties of cultured hippocampal neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers. The membrane impedance was greater in PrP-null neurons, and this difference was abolished by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker ZD7288 (100 μM). HCN channel activity appeared to be functionally regulated by PrPC. The amplitude of voltage sag, a characteristic of activating HCN channel current (Ih), was decreased in null mice. Moreover, Ih peak current was reduced, along with a hyperpolarizing shift in activation gating and slower kinetics. However, neither HCN1 nor HCN2 formed a biochemical complex with PrPC. These results suggest that the absence of PrP downregulates the activity of HCN channels through activation of a cell signaling pathway rather than through direct interactions. This in turn contributes to an increase in membrane impedance to potentiate neuronal excitability. PMID:27047338

  8. Calcium-sensing receptor antagonist NPS2390 attenuates neuronal apoptosis though intrinsic pathway following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhaoliang; Song, Zhengfei; Wan, Yingfeng; Wang, Kun; Mo, Lianjie; Wang, Yirong

    2017-03-20

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiates a complex cascade of neurochemical and signaling changes that leads to neuronal apoptosis, which contributes to poor outcomes for patients with TBI. Previous study indicates that calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) activation contributes to neuron death in focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion mice, however, its role in neuronal apoptosis after TBI is not well-established. Using a controlled cortical impact model in rats, the present study was designed to determine the effect of CaSR inhibitor NPS2390 upon neuronal apoptosis after TBI. Rats were randomly distributed into three groups undergoing the sham surgery or TBI procedure, and NPS2390 (1.5 mg/kg) was infused subcutaneously at 30 min and 120 min after TBI. All rats were sacrificed at 24 h after TBI. Our data indicated that NPS2390 significantly reduced the brain edema and improved the neurological function after TBI. In addition, NPS2390 decreased caspase-3 levels and the number of apoptotic neurons. Furthermore, NPS2390 up-regulated anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 expression and down-regulated pro-apoptotic protein Bax, and reduced subsequent release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In summary, this study indicated that inhibition of CaSR by NPS2390 attenuates neuronal apoptosis after TBI, in part, through modulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  9. Activation of InsP3 receptors is sufficient for inducing graded intrinsic plasticity in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ashhad, Sufyan; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The synaptic plasticity literature has focused on establishing necessity and sufficiency as two essential and distinct features in causally relating a signaling molecule to plasticity induction, an approach that has been surprisingly lacking in the intrinsic plasticity literature. In this study, we complemented the recently established necessity of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors (InsP3R) in a form of intrinsic plasticity by asking if InsP3R activation was sufficient to induce intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. Specifically, incorporation of d-myo-InsP3 in the recording pipette reduced input resistance, maximal impedance amplitude, and temporal summation but increased resonance frequency, resonance strength, sag ratio, and impedance phase lead. Strikingly, the magnitude of plasticity in all these measurements was dependent on InsP3 concentration, emphasizing the graded dependence of such plasticity on InsP3R activation. Mechanistically, we found that this InsP3-induced plasticity depended on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. Moreover, this calcium-dependent form of plasticity was critically reliant on the release of calcium through InsP3Rs, the influx of calcium through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels, and on the protein kinase A pathway. Our results delineate a causal role for InsP3Rs in graded adaptation of neuronal response dynamics, revealing novel regulatory roles for the endoplasmic reticulum in neural coding and homeostasis. PMID:25552640

  10. Analysis of the role of the low threshold currents IT and Ih in intrinsic delta oscillations of thalamocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Amarillo, Yimy; Mato, Germán; Nadal, Marcela S.

    2015-01-01

    Thalamocortical neurons are involved in the generation and maintenance of brain rhythms associated with global functional states. The repetitive burst firing of TC neurons at delta frequencies (1–4 Hz) has been linked to the oscillations recorded during deep sleep and during episodes of absence seizures. To get insight into the biophysical properties that are the basis for intrinsic delta oscillations in these neurons, we performed a bifurcation analysis of a minimal conductance-based thalamocortical neuron model including only the IT channel and the sodium and potassium leak channels. This analysis unveils the dynamics of repetitive burst firing of TC neurons, and describes how the interplay between the amplifying variable mT and the recovering variable hT of the calcium channel IT is sufficient to generate low threshold oscillations in the delta band. We also explored the role of the hyperpolarization activated cationic current Ih in this reduced model and determine that, albeit not required, Ih amplifies and stabilizes the oscillation. PMID:25999847

  11. Lack of the transcription factor C/EBPδ impairs the intrinsic capacity of peripheral neurons for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lopez de Heredia, Luis; Magoulas, Charalambos

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), in contrast to those of the central nervous system, have a remarkable capacity to repair themselves after injury, yet the mechanisms underlying this regenerative propensity of peripheral neurons are far from completely understood. Here we show that the transcription factor CCAAT enhancer binding protein delta (C/EBPδ) is necessary for the efficient axonal regeneration of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons after sciatic nerve crush injury. Loss of C/EBPδ substantially impairs axonal growth in dissociated cultured DRG neurons. In addition, lack of C/EPBδ causes a major reduction in the regenerative response of DRG neurons to a conditioning lesion, which is a well known paradigm of injury that enhances axonal growth due to a transcription-dependent cell body response. C/EBPδ is required for the induction of selected regeneration-associated genes. For example, the expression of SPRR1A (small proline-rich repeat protein 1A) is greatly reduced in DRG neurons of C/EBPδ knockout mice during axonal regeneration compared to those in wild-type mice, while the expression of GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43) and galanin is not affected. Nevertheless, the expected prompt recovery of sciatic nerve function after injury is severely impaired in C/EBPδ knockout mice, having a delay time of approximately 1 month for reaching the full function of recovering wild-type mice, suggesting that a transcription mechanism mediated by C/EBPδ is required for efficient axonal regeneration. Taken together, our results identify C/EBPδ as a crucial component of the transcriptional regulatory machinery which underlies the intrinsic capacity of peripheral neurons for axonal regeneration.

  12. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Determinants of Neuronal Development: Relation to Infantile Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciaranello, Roland D.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The autistic syndrome is considered in the context of a disorder of brain development. The authors conclude that disruption of developmental loci most probably occurs in the end stages of neuronal development, after migrating neurons have reached their final place in the brain and are elaborating communicative processes. (Author)

  13. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Determinants of Neuronal Development: Relation to Infantile Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciaranello, Roland D.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The autistic syndrome is considered in the context of a disorder of brain development. The authors conclude that disruption of developmental loci most probably occurs in the end stages of neuronal development, after migrating neurons have reached their final place in the brain and are elaborating communicative processes. (Author)

  14. p53 Regulates the neuronal intrinsic and extrinsic responses affecting the recovery of motor function following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Floriddia, Elisa M; Rathore, Khizr I; Tedeschi, Andrea; Quadrato, Giorgia; Wuttke, Anja; Lueckmann, Jan-Matthis; Kigerl, Kristina A; Popovich, Phillip G; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2012-10-03

    Following spinal trauma, the limited physiological axonal sprouting that contributes to partial recovery of function is dependent upon the intrinsic properties of neurons as well as the inhibitory glial environment. The transcription factor p53 is involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, cell survival, and axonal outgrowth, suggesting p53 as key modifier of axonal and glial responses influencing functional recovery following spinal injury. Indeed, in a spinal cord dorsal hemisection injury model, we observed a significant impairment in locomotor recovery in p53(-/-) versus wild-type mice. p53(-/-) spinal cords showed an increased number of activated microglia/macrophages and a larger scar at the lesion site. Loss- and gain-of-function experiments suggested p53 as a direct regulator of microglia/macrophages proliferation. At the axonal level, p53(-/-) mice showed a more pronounced dieback of the corticospinal tract (CST) and a decreased sprouting capacity of both CST and spinal serotoninergic fibers. In vivo expression of p53 in the sensorimotor cortex rescued and enhanced the sprouting potential of the CST in p53(-/-) mice, while, similarly, p53 expression in p53(-/-) cultured cortical neurons rescued a defect in neurite outgrowth, suggesting a direct role for p53 in regulating the intrinsic sprouting ability of CNS neurons. In conclusion, we show that p53 plays an important regulatory role at both extrinsic and intrinsic levels affecting the recovery of motor function following spinal cord injury. Therefore, we propose p53 as a novel potential multilevel therapeutic target for spinal cord injury.

  15. Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity Beyond Synapse – Pre- and Post-Synaptic Plasticity of Intrinsic Neuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Debanne, Dominique; Poo, Mu-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Long-lasting plasticity of synaptic transmission is classically thought to be the cellular substrate for information storage in the brain. Recent data indicate however that it is not the whole story and persistent changes in the intrinsic neuronal excitability have been shown to occur in parallel to the induction of long-term synaptic modifications. This form of plasticity depends on the regulation of voltage-gated ion channels. Here we review the experimental evidence for plasticity of neuronal excitability induced at pre- or postsynaptic sites when long-term plasticity of synaptic transmission is induced with Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP) protocols. We describe the induction and expression mechanisms of the induced changes in excitability. Finally, the functional synergy between synaptic and non-synaptic plasticity and their spatial extent are discussed. PMID:21423507

  16. A Cell Line Producing Recombinant Nerve Growth Factor Evokes Growth Responses in Intrinsic and Grafted Central Cholinergic Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernfors, Patrik; Ebendal, Ted; Olson, Lars; Mouton, Peter; Stromberg, Ingrid; Persson, Hakan

    1989-06-01

    The rat β nerve growth factor (NGF) gene was inserted into a mammalian expression vector and cotransfected with a plasmid conferring resistance to neomycin into mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. From this transfection a stable cell line was selected that contains several hundred copies of the rat NGF gene and produces excess levels of recombinant NGF. Such genetically modified cells were implanted into the rat brain as a probe for in vivo effects of NGF on central nervous system neurons. In a model of the cortical cholinergic deficits in Alzheimer disease, we demonstrate a marked increase in the survival of, and fiber outgrowth from, grafts of fetal basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as well as stimulation of fiber formation by intact adult intrinsic cholinergic circuits in the cerebral cortex. Adult cholinergic interneurons in intact striatum also sprout vigorously toward implanted fibroblasts. Our results suggest that this model has implications for future treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Neurons derived from patients with bipolar disorder divide into intrinsically different sub-populations of neurons, predicting the patients' responsiveness to lithium.

    PubMed

    Stern, S; Santos, R; Marchetto, M C; Mendes, A P D; Rouleau, G A; Biesmans, S; Wang, Q-W; Yao, J; Charnay, P; Bang, A G; Alda, M; Gage, F H

    2017-02-28

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a progressive psychiatric disorder with more than 3% prevalence worldwide. Affected individuals experience recurrent episodes of depression and mania, disrupting normal life and increasing the risk of suicide greatly. The complexity and genetic heterogeneity of psychiatric disorders have challenged the development of animal and cellular models. We recently reported that hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived fibroblasts of BD patients are electrophysiologically hyperexcitable. Here we used iPSCs derived from Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B-lymphocytes to verify that the hyperexcitability of DG-like neurons is reproduced in this different cohort of patients and cells. Lymphocytes are readily available for research with a large number of banked lines with associated patient clinical description. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of over 460 neurons to characterize neurons derived from control individuals and BD patients. Extensive functional analysis showed that intrinsic cell parameters are very different between the two groups of BD neurons, those derived from lithium (Li)-responsive (LR) patients and those derived from Li-non-responsive (NR) patients, which led us to partition our BD neurons into two sub-populations of cells and suggested two different subdisorders. Training a Naïve Bayes classifier with the electrophysiological features of patients whose responses to Li are known allows for accurate classification with more than 92% success rate for a new patient whose response to Li is unknown. Despite their very different functional profiles, both populations of neurons share a large, fast after-hyperpolarization (AHP). We therefore suggest that the large, fast AHP is a key feature of BD and a main contributor to the fast, sustained spiking abilities of BD neurons. Confirming our previous report with fibroblast-derived DG neurons, chronic Li treatment reduced

  18. Contributions of intrinsic membrane dynamics to fast network oscillations with irregular neuronal discharges.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Caroline; Brunel, Nicolas; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2005-12-01

    During fast oscillations in the local field potential (40-100 Hz gamma, 100-200 Hz sharp-wave ripples) single cortical neurons typically fire irregularly at rates that are much lower than the oscillation frequency. Recent computational studies have provided a mathematical description of such fast oscillations, using the leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron model. Here, we extend this theoretical framework to populations of more realistic Hodgkin-Huxley-type conductance-based neurons. In a noisy network of GABAergic neurons that are connected randomly and sparsely by chemical synapses, coherent oscillations emerge with a frequency that depends sensitively on the single cell's membrane dynamics. The population frequency can be predicted analytically from the synaptic time constants and the preferred phase of discharge during the oscillatory cycle of a single cell subjected to noisy sinusoidal input. The latter depends significantly on the single cell's membrane properties and can be understood in the context of the simplified exponential integrate-and-fire (EIF) neuron. We find that 200-Hz oscillations can be generated, provided the effective input conductance of single cells is large, so that the single neuron's phase shift is sufficiently small. In a two-population network of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory neurons, recurrent excitation can either decrease or increase the population rhythmic frequency, depending on whether in a neuron the excitatory synaptic current follows or precedes the inhibitory synaptic current in an oscillatory cycle. Detailed single-cell properties have a substantial impact on population oscillations, even though rhythmicity does not originate from pacemaker neurons and is an emergent network phenomenon.

  19. Genetic Inhibition of CaMKII in Dorsal Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Reduces Functional Excitatory Synapses and Enhances Intrinsic Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Klug, Jason R.; Mathur, Brian N.; Kash, Thomas L.; Wang, Hui-Dong; Matthews, Robert T.; Robison, A. J.; Anderson, Mark E.; Deutch, Ariel Y.; Lovinger, David M.; Colbran, Roger J.; Winder, Danny G.

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). CaMKII is dynamically regulated by changes in dopamine signaling, as occurs in Parkinson's disease as well as addiction. Although CaMKII has been extensively studied in the hippocampus where it regulates excitatory synaptic transmission, relatively little is known about how it modulates neuronal function in the striatum. Therefore, we examined the impact of selectively overexpressing an EGFP-fused CaMKII inhibitory peptide (EAC3I) in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) using a novel transgenic mouse model. EAC3I-expressing cells exhibited markedly decreased excitatory transmission, indicated by a decrease in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). This decrease was not accompanied by changes in the probability of release, levels of glutamate at the synapse, or changes in dendritic spine density. CaMKII regulation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is a major means by which the kinase regulates neuronal function in the hippocampus. We found that the decrease in striatal excitatory transmission seen in the EAC3I mice is mimicked by deletion of GluA1. Further, while CaMKII inhibition decreased excitatory transmission onto MSNs, it increased their intrinsic excitability. These data suggest that CaMKII plays a critical role in setting the excitability rheostat of striatal MSNs by coordinating excitatory synaptic drive and the resulting depolarization response. PMID:23028932

  20. Genetic inhibition of CaMKII in dorsal striatal medium spiny neurons reduces functional excitatory synapses and enhances intrinsic excitability.

    PubMed

    Klug, Jason R; Mathur, Brian N; Kash, Thomas L; Wang, Hui-Dong; Matthews, Robert T; Robison, A J; Anderson, Mark E; Deutch, Ariel Y; Lovinger, David M; Colbran, Roger J; Winder, Danny G

    2012-01-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). CaMKII is dynamically regulated by changes in dopamine signaling, as occurs in Parkinson's disease as well as addiction. Although CaMKII has been extensively studied in the hippocampus where it regulates excitatory synaptic transmission, relatively little is known about how it modulates neuronal function in the striatum. Therefore, we examined the impact of selectively overexpressing an EGFP-fused CaMKII inhibitory peptide (EAC3I) in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) using a novel transgenic mouse model. EAC3I-expressing cells exhibited markedly decreased excitatory transmission, indicated by a decrease in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). This decrease was not accompanied by changes in the probability of release, levels of glutamate at the synapse, or changes in dendritic spine density. CaMKII regulation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is a major means by which the kinase regulates neuronal function in the hippocampus. We found that the decrease in striatal excitatory transmission seen in the EAC3I mice is mimicked by deletion of GluA1. Further, while CaMKII inhibition decreased excitatory transmission onto MSNs, it increased their intrinsic excitability. These data suggest that CaMKII plays a critical role in setting the excitability rheostat of striatal MSNs by coordinating excitatory synaptic drive and the resulting depolarization response.

  1. Differences in synaptic and intrinsic properties result in topographic heterogeneity of temporal processing of neurons within the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Lina; Pecka, Michael; Kajopoulos, Jasmin; Gleiss, Helge; Li, Lu; Leibold, Christian; Felmy, Felix

    2016-11-01

    The identification and characterization of organization principals is essential for the understanding of neural function of brain areas. The inferior colliculus (IC) represents a midbrain nexus involved in numerous aspects of auditory processing. Likewise, neurons throughout the IC are tuned to a diverse range of specific stimulus features. Yet beyond a topographic arrangement of the cochlea-inherited frequency tuning, the functional organization of the IC is not well understood. Particularly, a common principle that links the diverse tuning characteristics is unknown. Here we used in vitro patch clamp recordings combined with laser-uncaging, and in vivo single cell recordings to study the spatial and functional organization principles of the central IC. We identified a topographic bias of ascending synaptic input timing that is balanced between inhibition and excitation and co-varies with in vivo first-spike latency. This bias was paralleled post-synaptically by differences in biophysical membrane properties and firing patterns, with integrating neurons predominantly found in the dorso-medial part, and coincidence-detector neurons biased to the ventro-lateral IC. Importantly, these cellular and network features translated into distinct temporal processing capabilities irrespectively of the neurons' characteristic frequency. Our data therefore imply that heterogeneity of synaptic inputs, intrinsic properties and temporal processing are functional principles that underlie the spatial organization of the central IC.

  2. Intrinsic protective mechanisms of the neuron-glia network against glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Matsutani, Tomoo; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2016-04-01

    Gliomas arising in the brain parenchyma infiltrate into the surrounding brain and break down established complex neuron-glia networks. However, mounting evidence suggests that initially the network microenvironment of the adult central nervous system (CNS) is innately non-permissive to glioma cell invasion. The main players are inhibitory molecules in CNS myelin, as well as proteoglycans associated with astrocytes. Neural stem cells, and neurons themselves, possess inhibitory functions against neighboring tumor cells. These mechanisms have evolved to protect the established neuron-glia network, which is necessary for brain function. Greater insight into the interaction between glioma cells and the surrounding neuron-glia network is crucial for developing new therapies for treating these devastating tumors while preserving the important and complex neural functions of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Motor Training Promotes Both Synaptic and Intrinsic Plasticity of Layer II/III Pyramidal Neurons in the Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Yasumasa; Ito, Nana; Yamamoto, Yui; Owada, Yuji; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Mitsushima, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Motor skill training induces structural plasticity at dendritic spines in the primary motor cortex (M1). To further analyze both synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in the layer II/III area of M1, we subjected rats to a rotor rod test and then prepared acute brain slices. Motor skill consistently improved within 2 days of training. Voltage clamp analysis showed significantly higher α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/N-methyl-d-aspartate (AMPA/NMDA) ratios and miniature EPSC amplitudes in 1-day trained rats compared with untrained rats, suggesting increased postsynaptic AMPA receptors in the early phase of motor learning. Compared with untrained controls, 2-days trained rats showed significantly higher miniature EPSC amplitude and frequency. Paired-pulse analysis further demonstrated lower rates in 2-days trained rats, suggesting increased presynaptic glutamate release during the late phase of learning. One-day trained rats showed decreased miniature IPSC frequency and increased paired-pulse analysis of evoked IPSC, suggesting a transient decrease in presynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release. Moreover, current clamp analysis revealed lower resting membrane potential, higher spike threshold, and deeper afterhyperpolarization in 1-day trained rats—while 2-days trained rats showed higher membrane potential, suggesting dynamic changes in intrinsic properties. Our present results indicate dynamic changes in glutamatergic, GABAergic, and intrinsic plasticity in M1 layer II/III neurons after the motor training. PMID:27193420

  4. Intrinsic Hippocampal Excitability Changes of Opposite Signs and Different Origins in CA1 and CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Underlie Aging-Related Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Oh, M. Matthew; Simkin, Dina; Disterhoft, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related cognitive deficits have been attributed to dysfunction of neurons due to failures at synaptic or intrinsic loci, or both. Given the importance of the hippocampus for successful encoding of memory and that the main output of the hippocampus is via the CA1 pyramidal neurons, much of the research has been focused on identifying the aging-related changes of these CA1 pyramidal neurons. We and others have discovered that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following a train of action potentials is greatly enlarged in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged animals. This enlarged postburst AHP is a significant factor in reducing the intrinsic excitability of these neurons, and thus limiting their activity in the neural network during learning. Based on these data, it has largely been thought that aging-related cognitive deficits are attributable to reduced activity of pyramidal neurons. However, recent in vivo and ex vivo studies provide compelling evidence that aging-related deficits could also be due to a converse change in CA3 pyramidal neurons, which show increased activity with aging. In this review, we will incorporate these recent findings and posit that an interdependent dynamic dysfunctional change occurs within the hippocampal network, largely due to altered intrinsic excitability in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which ultimately leads to the aging-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27375440

  5. The Sodium-Potassium Pump Controls the Intrinsic Firing of the Cerebellar Purkinje Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Michael D.; Wall, Mark J.; Press, Daniel A.; Feng, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, cerebellar Purkinje cells can intrinsically fire action potentials in a repeating trimodal or bimodal pattern. The trimodal pattern consists of tonic spiking, bursting, and quiescence. The bimodal pattern consists of tonic spiking and quiescence. It is unclear how these firing patterns are generated and what determines which firing pattern is selected. We have constructed a realistic biophysical Purkinje cell model that can replicate these patterns. In this model, Na+/K+ pump activity sets the Purkinje cell's operating mode. From rat cerebellar slices we present Purkinje whole cell recordings in the presence of ouabain, which irreversibly blocks the Na+/K+ pump. The model can replicate these recordings. We propose that Na+/K+ pump activity controls the intrinsic firing mode of cerbellar Purkinje cells. PMID:23284664

  6. Intrinsic excitability varies by sex in prepubertal striatal medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dorris, David M.; Cao, Jinyan; Willett, Jaime A.; Hauser, Caitlin A.

    2014-01-01

    Sex differences in neuron electrophysiological properties were traditionally associated with brain regions directly involved in reproduction in adult, postpubertal animals. There is growing acknowledgement that sex differences can exist in other developmental periods and brain regions as well. This includes the dorsal striatum (caudate/putamen), which shows robust sex differences in gene expression, neuromodulator action (including dopamine and 17β-estradiol), and relevant sensorimotor behaviors and pathologies such as the responsiveness to drugs of abuse. Here we examine whether these sex differences extend to striatal neuron electrophysiology. We test the hypothesis that passive and active medium spiny neuron (MSN) electrophysiological properties in prepubertal rat dorsal striatum differ by sex. We made whole cell recordings from male and females MSNs from acute brain slices. The slope of the evoked firing rate to current injection curve was increased in MSNs recorded from females compared with males. The initial action potential firing rate was increased in MSNs recorded from females compared with males. Action potential after-hyperpolarization peak was decreased, and threshold was hyperpolarized in MSNs recorded from females compared with males. No sex differences in passive electrophysiological properties or miniature excitatory synaptic currents were detected. These findings indicate that MSN excitability is increased in prepubertal females compared with males, providing a new mechanism that potentially contributes to generating sex differences in striatal-mediated processes. Broadly, these findings demonstrate that sex differences in neuron electrophysiological properties can exist prepuberty in brain regions not directly related to reproduction. PMID:25376786

  7. Light at the end of the channel: optical manipulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability with chemical photoswitches

    PubMed Central

    Mourot, Alexandre; Tochitsky, Ivan; Kramer, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that control the movement of ions across the cell membrane. They are the molecular machines that make neurons excitable by enabling the initiation and propagation of action potentials (APs). Rapid signaling within and between neurons requires complex molecular processes that couple the sensing of membrane voltage or neurotransmitter release to the fast opening and closing of the ion channel gate. Malfunction of an ion channel's sensing or gating module can have disastrous pathological consequences. However, linking molecular changes to the modulation of neural circuits and ultimately to a physiological or pathological state is not a straightforward task. It requires precise and sophisticated methods of controlling the function of ion channels in their native environment. To address this issue we have developed new photochemical tools that enable the remote control of neuronal ion channels with light. Due to its optical nature, our approach permits the manipulation of the nervous system with high spatial, temporal and molecular precision that will help us understand the link between ion channel function and physiology. In addition, this strategy may also be used in the clinic for the direct treatment of some neuronal disorders. PMID:23518818

  8. Contrasting alterations to synaptic and intrinsic properties in upper-cervical superficial dorsal horn neurons following acute neck muscle inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic pain in axial structures, like the back and neck, are difficult to treat, and have incidence as high as 15%. Surprisingly, most preclinical work on pain mechanisms focuses on cutaneous structures in the limbs and animal models of axial pain are not widely available. Accordingly, we developed a mouse model of acute cervical muscle inflammation and assessed the functional properties of superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons. Results Male C57/Bl6 mice (P24-P40) were deeply anaesthetised (urethane 2.2 g/kg i.p) and the rectus capitis major muscle (RCM) injected with 40 μl of 2% carrageenan. Sham animals received vehicle injection and controls remained anaesthetised for 2 hrs. Mice in each group were sacrificed at 2 hrs for analysis. c-Fos staining was used to determine the location of activated neurons. c-Fos labelling in carrageenan-injected mice was concentrated within ipsilateral (87% and 63% of labelled neurons in C1 and C2 segments, respectively) and contralateral laminae I - II with some expression in lateral lamina V. c-Fos expression remained below detectable levels in control and sham animals. In additional experiments, whole cell recordings were obtained from visualised SDH neurons in transverse slices in the ipsilateral C1 and C2 spinal segments. Resting membrane potential and input resistance were not altered. Mean spontaneous EPSC amplitude was reduced by ~20% in neurons from carrageenan-injected mice versus control and sham animals (20.63 ± 1.05 vs. 24.64 ± 0.91 and 25.87 ± 1.32 pA, respectively). The amplitude (238 ± 33 vs. 494 ± 96 and 593 ± 167 pA) and inactivation time constant (12.9 ± 1.5 vs. 22.1 ± 3.6 and 15.3 ± 1.4 ms) of the rapid A type potassium current (IAr), the dominant subthreshold current in SDH neurons, were reduced in carrageenan-injected mice. Conclusions Excitatory synaptic drive onto, and important intrinsic properties (i.e., IAr) within SDH neurons are

  9. Vertical organization of gamma-aminobutyric acid-accumulating intrinsic neuronal systems in monkey cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    DeFelipe, J.; Jones, E.G.

    1985-12-01

    Light and electron microscopic methods were used to examine the neurons in the monkey cerebral cortex labeled autoradiographically following the uptake and transport of (/sup 3/H)-gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Nonpyramidal cell somata in the sensory-motor areas and primary visual area (area 17) were labeled close to the injection site and at distances of 1 to 1.5 mm beyond the injection site, indicating labeling by retrograde axoplasmic transport. This labeling occurred preferentially in the vertical dimension of the cortex. Prior injections of colchicine, an inhibitor of axoplasmic transport, abolished all labeling of somata except those within the injection site. In each area, injections of superficial layers (I to III) produced labeling of clusters of cell somata in layer V, and injections of the deep layers (V and VI) produced labeling of clusters of cell somata in layers II and III. In area 17, injections of the superficial layers produced dense retrograde cell labeling in three bands: in layers IVC, VA, and VI. Vertically oriented chains of silver grains linked the injection sites with the resulting labeled cell clusters. In all areas, the labeling of cells in the horizontal dimension was insignificant. Electron microscopic examination of labeled neurons confirms that the neurons labeled at a distance from an injection site are nonpyramidal neurons, many with somata so small that they would be mistaken for neuroglial cells light microscopically. They receive few axosomatic synapses, most of which have symmetric membrane thickenings. The vertical chains of silver grains overlie neuronal processes identifiable as both dendrites and myelinated axons, but unmyelinated axons may also be included. The clusters of (/sup 3/H)GABA-labeled cells are joined to one another and to adjacent unlabeled cells by junctional complexes, including puncta adherentia and multi-lamellar cisternal complexes.

  10. Loss of sensory input increases the intrinsic excitability of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Breton, Jean-Didier; Stuart, Greg J

    2009-11-01

    Development of the cortical map is experience dependent, with different critical periods in different cortical layers. Previous work in rodent barrel cortex indicates that sensory deprivation leads to changes in synaptic transmission and plasticity in layer 2/3 and 4. Here, we studied the impact of sensory deprivation on the intrinsic properties of layer 5 pyramidal neurons located in rat barrel cortex using simultaneous somatic and dendritic recording. Sensory deprivation was achieved by clipping all the whiskers on one side of the snout. Loss of sensory input did not change somatic active and resting membrane properties, and did not influence dendritic action potential (AP) backpropagation. In contrast, sensory deprivation led to an increase in the percentage of layer 5 pyramidal neurons showing burst firing. This was associated with a reduction in the threshold for generation of dendritic calcium spikes during high-frequency AP trains. Cell-attached recordings were used to assess changes in the properties and expression of dendritic HCN channels. These experiments indicated that sensory deprivation caused a decrease in HCN channel density in distal regions of the apical dendrite. To assess the contribution of HCN down-regulation on the observed increase in dendritic excitability following sensory deprivation, we investigated the impact of blocking HCN channels. Block of HCN channels removed differences in dendritic calcium electrogenesis between control and deprived neurons. In conclusion, these observations indicate that sensory loss leads to increased dendritic excitability of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, they suggest that increased dendritic calcium electrogenesis following sensory deprivation is mediated in part via down-regulation of dendritic HCN channels.

  11. Mechanisms of Gain Control by Voltage-Gated Channels in Intrinsically-Firing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ameera X.; Burdakov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Gain modulation is a key feature of neural information processing, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In single neurons, gain can be measured as the slope of the current-frequency (input-output) relationship over any given range of inputs. While much work has focused on the control of basal firing rates and spike rate adaptation, gain control has been relatively unstudied. Of the limited studies on gain control, some have examined the roles of synaptic noise and passive somatic currents, but the roles of voltage-gated channels present ubiquitously in neurons have been less explored. Here, we systematically examined the relationship between gain and voltage-gated ion channels in a conductance-based, tonically-active, model neuron. Changes in expression (conductance density) of voltage-gated channels increased (Ca2+ channel), reduced (K+ channels), or produced little effect (h-type channel) on gain. We found that the gain-controlling ability of channels increased exponentially with the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window (voltage range associated with firing). For depolarization-activated channels, this produced a greater channel current per action potential at higher firing rates. This allowed these channels to modulate gain by contributing to firing preferentially at states of higher excitation. A finer analysis of the current-voltage relationship during tonic firing identified narrow voltage windows at which the gain-modulating channels exerted their effects. As a proof of concept, we show that h-type channels can be tuned to modulate gain by changing the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window. These results show how the impact of an ion channel on gain can be predicted from the relationship between channel kinetics and the membrane potential during firing. This is potentially relevant to understanding input-output scaling in a wide class of neurons found throughout the brain and other nervous systems

  12. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Bradley D.; Huang, Yanhua H.; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8 h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD. PMID:21962531

  13. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Winters, Bradley D; Huang, Yanhua H; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M

    2011-10-28

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD.

  14. Photoresponsive Smart Coloration Electrochromic Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Yun, Tae Gwang; Kim, Donghyuk; Kim, Yong Ho; Park, Minkyu; Hyun, Seungmin; Han, Seung Min

    2017-08-01

    Electrochromic devices have been widely adopted in energy saving applications by taking advantage of the electrode coloration, but it is critical to develop a new electrochromic device that can undergo smart coloration and can have a wide spectrum in transmittance in response to input light intensity while also functioning as a rechargeable energy storage system. In this study, a photoresponsive electrochromic supercapacitor based on cellulose-nanofiber/Ag-nanowire/reduced-graphene-oxide/WO3 -composite electrode that is capable of undergoing "smart" reversible coloration while simultaneously functioning as a reliable energy-storage device is developed. The fabricated device exhibits a high coloration efficiency of 64.8 cm(2) C(-1) and electrochemical performance with specific capacitance of 406.0 F g(-1) , energy/power densities of 40.6-47.8 Wh kg(-1) and 6.8-16.9 kW kg(-1) . The electrochromic supercapacitor exhibits excellent cycle reliability, where 75.0% and 94.1% of its coloration efficiency and electrochemical performance is retained, respectively, beyond 10 000 charge-discharge cycles. Cyclic fatigue tests show that the developed device is mechanically durable and suitable for wearable electronics applications. The smart electrochromic supercapacitor system is then integrated with a solar sensor to enable photoresponsive coloration where the transmittance changes in response to varying light intensity. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Trace Fear Conditioning Differentially Modulates Intrinsic Excitability of Medial Prefrontal Cortex-Basolateral Complex of Amygdala Projection Neurons in Infralimbic and Prelimbic Cortices.

    PubMed

    Song, Chenghui; Ehlers, Vanessa L; Moyer, James R

    2015-09-30

    Neuronal activity in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critical for the formation of trace fear memory, yet the cellular mechanisms underlying these memories remain unclear. One possibility involves the modulation of intrinsic excitability within mPFC neurons that project to the basolateral complex of amygdala (BLA). The current study used a combination of retrograde labeling and in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to examine the effect of trace fear conditioning on the intrinsic excitability of layer 5 mPFC-BLA projection neurons in adult rats. Trace fear conditioning significantly enhanced the intrinsic excitability of regular spiking infralimbic (IL) projection neurons, as evidenced by an increase in the number of action potentials after current injection. These changes were also associated with a reduction in spike threshold and an increase in h current. In contrast, trace fear conditioning reduced the excitability of regular spiking prelimbic (PL) projection neurons, through a learning-related decrease of input resistance. Interestingly, the amount of conditioned freezing was (1) positively correlated with excitability of IL-BLA projection neurons after conditioning and (2) negatively correlated with excitability of PL-BLA projection neurons after extinction. Trace fear conditioning also significantly enhanced the excitability of burst spiking PL-BLA projection neurons. In both regions, conditioning-induced plasticity was learning specific (observed in conditioned but not in pseudoconditioned rats), flexible (reversed by extinction), and transient (lasted <10 d). Together, these data suggest that intrinsic plasticity within mPFC-BLA projection neurons occurs in a subregion- and cell-type-specific manner during acquisition, consolidation, and extinction of trace fear conditioning. Significance statement: Frontal lobe-related function is vital for a variety of important behaviors, some of which decline during aging. This study involves a novel

  16. Trace Fear Conditioning Differentially Modulates Intrinsic Excitability of Medial Prefrontal Cortex–Basolateral Complex of Amygdala Projection Neurons in Infralimbic and Prelimbic Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chenghui; Ehlers, Vanessa L.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critical for the formation of trace fear memory, yet the cellular mechanisms underlying these memories remain unclear. One possibility involves the modulation of intrinsic excitability within mPFC neurons that project to the basolateral complex of amygdala (BLA). The current study used a combination of retrograde labeling and in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to examine the effect of trace fear conditioning on the intrinsic excitability of layer 5 mPFC–BLA projection neurons in adult rats. Trace fear conditioning significantly enhanced the intrinsic excitability of regular spiking infralimbic (IL) projection neurons, as evidenced by an increase in the number of action potentials after current injection. These changes were also associated with a reduction in spike threshold and an increase in h current. In contrast, trace fear conditioning reduced the excitability of regular spiking prelimbic (PL) projection neurons, through a learning-related decrease of input resistance. Interestingly, the amount of conditioned freezing was (1) positively correlated with excitability of IL-BLA projection neurons after conditioning and (2) negatively correlated with excitability of PL-BLA projection neurons after extinction. Trace fear conditioning also significantly enhanced the excitability of burst spiking PL-BLA projection neurons. In both regions, conditioning-induced plasticity was learning specific (observed in conditioned but not in pseudoconditioned rats), flexible (reversed by extinction), and transient (lasted <10 d). Together, these data suggest that intrinsic plasticity within mPFC–BLA projection neurons occurs in a subregion- and cell-type-specific manner during acquisition, consolidation, and extinction of trace fear conditioning. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Frontal lobe-related function is vital for a variety of important behaviors, some of which decline during aging. This study involves a novel

  17. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ-overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2-5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1-42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ-(500 nM) and vehicle-(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub-threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated "sag". Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra-threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after-hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients.

  18. Inactivating ion channels augment robustness of subthreshold intrinsic response dynamics to parametric variability in hippocampal model neurons.

    PubMed

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2012-11-15

    Voltage-gated ion channels play a critical role in regulating neuronal intrinsic response dynamics (IRD). Here, we computationally analysed the roles of the two inactivating subthreshold conductances (A and T), individually and in various combinations with the non-inactivating h conductance, in regulating several physiological IRD measurements in the theta frequency range. We found that the independent presence of a T conductance, unlike that of an h conductance, was unable to sustain an inductive phase lead in the theta frequency range, despite its ability to mediate theta frequency resonance. The A conductance, on the other hand, when expressed independently, acted in a manner similar to a leak conductance with reference to most IRD measurements. Next, analysing the impact of pair-wise coexpression of these channels, we found that the coexpression of the h and T conductances augmented the range of parameters over which they sustained resonance and inductive phase lead. Additionally, coexpression of the A conductance with the h or the T conductance elicited changes in IRD measurements that were similar to those obtained with the expression of a leak conductance with a resonating conductance. Finally, to understand the global sensitivity of IRD measurements to all parameters associated with models expressing all three channels, we generated 100,000 neuronal models, each built with a unique set of parametric values. We categorized valid models among these by matching their IRD measurements with experimental counterparts, and found that functionally similar models could be achieved even when underlying parameters displayed tremendous variability and exhibited weak pair-wise correlations. Our results suggest that the three prominent subthreshold conductances contribute differently to intrinsic excitability and to phase coding. We postulate that the differential expression and activity-dependent plasticity of these conductances contribute to robustness of subthreshold

  19. Dynamics of Intrinsic Dendritic Calcium Signaling during Tonic Firing of Thalamic Reticular Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chausson, Patrick; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C.

    2013-01-01

    The GABAergic neurons of the nucleus reticularis thalami that control the communication between thalamus and cortex are interconnected not only through axo-dendritic synapses but also through gap junctions and dendro-dendritic synapses. It is still unknown whether these dendritic communication processes may be triggered both by the tonic and the T-type Ca2+ channel-dependent high frequency burst firing of action potentials displayed by nucleus reticularis neurons during wakefulness and sleep, respectively. Indeed, while it is known that activation of T-type Ca2+ channels actively propagates throughout the dendritic tree, it is still unclear whether tonic action potential firing can also invade the dendritic arborization. Here, using two-photon microscopy, we demonstrated that dendritic Ca2+ responses following somatically evoked action potentials that mimic wake-related tonic firing are detected throughout the dendritic arborization. Calcium influx temporally summates to produce dendritic Ca2+ accumulations that are linearly related to the duration of the action potential trains. Increasing the firing frequency facilitates Ca2+ influx in the proximal but not in the distal dendritic compartments suggesting that the dendritic arborization acts as a low-pass filter in respect to the back-propagating action potentials. In the more distal compartment of the dendritic tree, T-type Ca2+ channels play a crucial role in the action potential triggered Ca2+ influx suggesting that this Ca2+ influx may be controlled by slight changes in the local dendritic membrane potential that determine the T-type channels’ availability. We conclude that by mediating Ca2+ dynamic in the whole dendritic arborization, both tonic and burst firing of the nucleus reticularis thalami neurons might control their dendro-dendritic and electrical communications. PMID:23991078

  20. From the intrinsic properties to the functional role of a neuron phenotype: an example from electric fish during signal trade-off.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Javier; Caputi, Angel A

    2013-07-01

    This review deals with the question: what is the relationship between the properties of a neuron and the role that the neuron plays within a given neural circuit? Answering this kind of question requires collecting evidence from multiple neuron phenotypes and comparing the role of each type in circuits that perform well-defined computational tasks. The focus here is on the spherical neurons in the electrosensory lobe of the electric fish Gymnotus omarorum. They belong to the one-spike-onset phenotype expressed at the early stages of signal processing in various sensory modalities and diverse taxa. First, we refer to the one-spike neuron intrinsic properties, their foundation on a low-threshold K(+) conductance, and the potential roles of this phenotype in different circuits within a comparative framework. Second, we present a brief description of the active electric sense of weakly electric fish and the particularities of spherical one-spike-onset neurons in the electrosensory lobe of G. omarorum. Third, we introduce one of the specific tasks in which these neurons are involved: the trade-off between self- and allo-generated signals. Fourth, we discuss recent evidence indicating a still-undescribed role for the one-spike phenotype. This role deals with the blockage of the pathway after being activated by the self-generated electric organ discharge and how this blockage favors self-generated electrosensory information in the context of allo-generated interference. Based on comparative analysis we conclude that one-spike-onset neurons may play several functional roles in animal sensory behavior. There are specific adaptations of the neuron's 'response function' to the circuit and task. Conversely, the way in which a task is accomplished depends on the intrinsic properties of the neurons involved. In short, the role of a neuron within a circuit depends on the neuron and its functional context.

  1. Maternal mobile phone exposure alters intrinsic electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Razavinasab, Moazamehosadat; Moazzami, Kasra; Shabani, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Some studies have shown that exposure to electromagnetic field (EMF) may result in structural damage to neurons. In this study, we have elucidated the alteration in the hippocampal function of offspring Wistar rats (n = 8 rats in each group) that were chronically exposed to mobile phones during their gestational period by applying behavioral, histological, and electrophysiological tests. Rats in the EMF group were exposed to 900 MHz pulsed-EMF irradiation for 6 h/day. Whole cell recordings in hippocampal pyramidal cells in the mobile phone groups did show a decrease in neuronal excitability. Mobile phone exposure was mostly associated with a decrease in the number of action potentials fired in spontaneous activity and in response to current injection in both male and female groups. There was an increase in the amplitude of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in mobile phone rats compared with the control. The results of the passive avoidance and Morris water maze assessment of learning and memory performance showed that phone exposure significantly altered learning acquisition and memory retention in male and female rats compared with the control rats. Light microscopy study of brain sections of the control and mobile phone-exposed rats showed normal morphology.Our results suggest that exposure to mobile phones adversely affects the cognitive performance of both female and male offspring rats using behavioral and electrophysiological techniques. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Are all spinal segments equal: intrinsic membrane properties of superficial dorsal horn neurons in the developing and mature mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, M A; Harris, B M; Anderson, W B; Brichta, A M; Graham, B A; Callister, R J

    2012-01-01

    Neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH; laminae I–II) of the spinal cord process nociceptive information from skin, muscle, joints and viscera. Most of what we know about the intrinsic properties of SDH neurons comes from studies in lumbar segments of the cord even though clinical evidence suggests nociceptive signals from viscera and head and neck tissues are processed differently. This ‘lumbar-centric’ view of spinal pain processing mechanisms also applies to developing SDH neurons. Here we ask whether the intrinsic membrane properties of SDH neurons differ across spinal cord segments in both the developing and mature spinal cord. Whole cell recordings were made from SDH neurons in slices of upper cervical (C2–4), thoracic (T8–10) and lumbar (L3–5) segments in neonatal (P0–5) and adult (P24–45) mice. Neuronal input resistance (RIN), resting membrane potential, AP amplitude, half-width and AHP amplitude were similar across spinal cord regions in both neonates and adults (∼100 neurons for each region and age). In contrast, these intrinsic membrane properties differed dramatically between neonates and adults. Five types of AP discharge were observed during depolarizing current injection. In neonates, single spiking dominated (∼40%) and the proportions of each discharge category did not differ across spinal regions. In adults, initial bursting dominated in each spinal region, but was significantly more prevalent in rostral segments (49% of neurons in C2–4 vs. 29% in L3–5). During development the dominant AP discharge pattern changed from single spiking to initial bursting. The rapid A-type potassium current (IAr) dominated in neonates and adults, but its prevalence decreased (∼80%vs. ∼50% of neurons) in all regions during development. IAr steady state inactivation and activation also changed in upper cervical and lumbar regions during development. Together, our data show the intrinsic properties of SDH neurons are generally conserved

  3. Vagus nerve stimulation mitigates intrinsic cardiac neuronal remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic pressure overload in guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Eric; Wright, Gary L.; Southerland, Elizabeth M.; Li, Ying; Chui, Ray; KenKnight, Bruce H.; Armour, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) mitigates pressure overload (PO)-induced remodeling of the cardioneural interface. Guinea pigs (n = 48) were randomized to right or left cervical vagus (RCV or LCV) implant. After 2 wk, chronic left ventricular PO was induced by partial (15–20%) aortic constriction. Of the 31 animals surviving PO induction, 10 were randomized to RCV VNS, 9 to LCV VNS, and 12 to sham VNS. VNS was delivered at 20 Hz and 1.14 ± 0.03 mA at a 22% duty cycle. VNS commenced 10 days after PO induction and was maintained for 40 days. Time-matched controls (n = 9) were evaluated concurrently. Echocardiograms were obtained before and 50 days after PO. At termination, intracellular current-clamp recordings of intrinsic cardiac (IC) neurons were studied in vitro to determine effects of therapy on soma characteristics. Ventricular cardiomyocyte sizes were assessed with histology along with immunoblot analysis of selected proteins in myocardial tissue extracts. In sham-treated animals, PO increased cardiac output (34%, P < 0.004), as well as systolic (114%, P < 0.04) and diastolic (49%, P < 0.002) left ventricular volumes, a hemodynamic response prevented by VNS. PO-induced enhancements of IC synaptic efficacy and muscarinic sensitivity of IC neurons were mitigated by chronic VNS. Increased myocyte size, which doubled in PO (P < 0.05), was mitigated by RCV. PO hypertrophic myocardium displayed decreased glycogen synthase (GS) protein levels and accumulation of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GS. These PO-induced changes in GS were moderated by left VNS. Chronic VNS targets IC neurons accompanying PO to obtund associated adverse cardiomyocyte remodeling. PMID:26993230

  4. Vagus nerve stimulation mitigates intrinsic cardiac neuronal remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic pressure overload in guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Eric; Wright, Gary L; Southerland, Elizabeth M; Li, Ying; Chui, Ray; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2016-05-15

    Our objective was to determine whether chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) mitigates pressure overload (PO)-induced remodeling of the cardioneural interface. Guinea pigs (n = 48) were randomized to right or left cervical vagus (RCV or LCV) implant. After 2 wk, chronic left ventricular PO was induced by partial (15-20%) aortic constriction. Of the 31 animals surviving PO induction, 10 were randomized to RCV VNS, 9 to LCV VNS, and 12 to sham VNS. VNS was delivered at 20 Hz and 1.14 ± 0.03 mA at a 22% duty cycle. VNS commenced 10 days after PO induction and was maintained for 40 days. Time-matched controls (n = 9) were evaluated concurrently. Echocardiograms were obtained before and 50 days after PO. At termination, intracellular current-clamp recordings of intrinsic cardiac (IC) neurons were studied in vitro to determine effects of therapy on soma characteristics. Ventricular cardiomyocyte sizes were assessed with histology along with immunoblot analysis of selected proteins in myocardial tissue extracts. In sham-treated animals, PO increased cardiac output (34%, P < 0.004), as well as systolic (114%, P < 0.04) and diastolic (49%, P < 0.002) left ventricular volumes, a hemodynamic response prevented by VNS. PO-induced enhancements of IC synaptic efficacy and muscarinic sensitivity of IC neurons were mitigated by chronic VNS. Increased myocyte size, which doubled in PO (P < 0.05), was mitigated by RCV. PO hypertrophic myocardium displayed decreased glycogen synthase (GS) protein levels and accumulation of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GS. These PO-induced changes in GS were moderated by left VNS. Chronic VNS targets IC neurons accompanying PO to obtund associated adverse cardiomyocyte remodeling.

  5. Mechanism of Ghrelin-Induced Gastric Contractions in Suncus murinus (House Musk Shrew): Involvement of Intrinsic Primary Afferent Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Anupom; Aizawa, Sayaka; Sakata, Ichiro; Goswami, Chayon; Oda, Sen-ichi; Sakai, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    Here, we have reported that motilin can induce contractions in a dose-dependent manner in isolated Suncus murinus (house musk shrew) stomach. We have also shown that after pretreatment with a low dose of motilin (10−10 M), ghrelin also induces gastric contractions at levels of 10−10 M to 10−7 M. However, the neural mechanism of ghrelin action in the stomach has not been fully revealed. In the present study, we studied the mechanism of ghrelin-induced contraction in vitro using a pharmacological method. The responses to ghrelin in the stomach were almost completely abolished by hexamethonium and were significantly suppressed by the administration of phentolamine, prazosin, ondansetron, and naloxone. Additionally, N-nitro-l-arginine methylester significantly potentiated the contractions. Importantly, the mucosa is essential for ghrelin-induced, but not motilin-induced, gastric contractions. To evaluate the involvement of intrinsic primary afferent neurons (IPANs), which are multiaxonal neurons that pass signals from the mucosa to the myenteric plexus, we examined the effect of the IPAN-related pathway on ghrelin-induced contractions and found that pretreatment with adenosine and tachykinergic receptor 3 antagonists (SR142801) significantly eliminated the contractions and GR113808 (5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 antagonist) almost completely eliminated it. The results indicate that ghrelin stimulates and modulates suncus gastric contractions through cholinergic, adrenergic, serotonergic, opioidergic neurons and nitric oxide synthases in the myenteric plexus. The mucosa is also important for ghrelin-induced gastric contractions, and IPANs may be the important interneurons that pass the signal from the mucosa to the myenteric plexus. PMID:23565235

  6. Alterations in CA1 pyramidal neuronal intrinsic excitability mediated by Ih channel currents in a rat model of amyloid beta pathology.

    PubMed

    Eslamizade, M J; Saffarzadeh, F; Mousavi, S M M; Meftahi, G H; Hosseinmardi, N; Mehdizadeh, M; Janahmadi, M

    2015-10-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by changing the neuronal excitability. However, the cellular mechanisms by which accumulation of Aβ affects intrinsic neuronal properties are not well understood. The effect of bilateral intra-frontal cortex Aβ (1-42) peptide injection on the intrinsic excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with particular focus on the contribution of hyperpolarization-activated (Ih) channel currents was examined using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Passive avoidance memory impairment and morphological changes in rats receiving intra-frontal Aβ treatment were observed, which was associated with significant changes both in passive and active intrinsic electrical membrane properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Electrophysiological recording showed a significant decrease in neuronal excitability associated with an augmentation in the first spike after-hyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude. In addition, the depolarizing sag voltage was altered in neurons recorded from Aβ-treated group. In voltage-clamp condition, a hyperpolarizing activated inward current sensitive to ZD7288 and capsaicin was significantly increased in neurons from Aβ-treated rats. The Ih current density was increased and the activation curve was shifted toward less negative potential in the Aβ-treated group as compared to control group. The enhancing effect of Aβ treatment on Ih current was confirmed by showing upregulation of the mRNA of HCN1 channel in the CA1 pyramidal layer of hippocampi. These findings suggest the contribution of Ih and possibly TRPV1 channel currents to the changes induced by Aβ treatment in the intrinsic membrane properties, which, in turn, may provide therapeutic targets for treatment of AD. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intrinsic membrane plasticity via increased persistent sodium conductance of cholinergic neurons in the rat laterodorsal tegmental nucleus contributes to cocaine-induced addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Kamii, Hironori; Kurosawa, Ryo; Taoka, Naofumi; Shinohara, Fumiya; Minami, Masabumi; Kaneda, Katsuyuki

    2015-05-01

    The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) is a brainstem nucleus implicated in reward processing and is one of the main sources of cholinergic afferents to the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Neuroplasticity in this structure may affect the excitability of VTA dopamine neurons and mesocorticolimbic circuitry. Here, we provide evidence that cocaine-induced intrinsic membrane plasticity in LDT cholinergic neurons is involved in addictive behaviors. After repeated experimenter-delivered cocaine exposure, ex vivo whole-cell recordings obtained from LDT cholinergic neurons revealed an induction of intrinsic membrane plasticity in regular- but not burst-type neurons, resulting in increased firing activity. Pharmacological examinations showed that increased riluzole-sensitive persistent sodium currents, but not changes in Ca(2+) -activated BK, SK or voltage-dependent A-type potassium conductance, mediated this plasticity. In addition, bilateral microinjection of riluzole into the LDT immediately before the test session in a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm inhibited the expression of cocaine-induced CPP. These findings suggest that intrinsic membrane plasticity in LDT cholinergic neurons is causally involved in the development of cocaine-induced addictive behaviors. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Effect of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity on Intrinsic Coherence Resonance in Newman-Watts Stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley Neuronal Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) on coherence resonance (CR) induced by channel noise in adaptive Newman-Watts stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks. It is found that STDP can either enhance or suppress the intrinsic CR when the adjusting rate of STDP decreases or increases. STDP can alter the effects of network randomness and network size on the intrinsic CR. Under STDP, for electrical coupling there are optimal network randomness and network size by which the intrinsic CR becomes strongest, however, for chemical coupling the intrinsic CR is always enhanced as network randomness or network size increases, which are different from the results for fixed coupling. These results show that the intrinsic CR of the neuronal networks can be either enhanced or suppressed by STDP, and there are optimal network randomness and network size by which the intrinsic CR becomes strongest. These findings could provide a new insight into the role of STDP for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  9. Polarization-sensitive photoresponse of nanographite

    SciTech Connect

    Obraztsov, Petr A.; Mikheev, Gennady M.; Garnov, Sergei V.; Obraztsov, Alexander N.; Svirko, Yuri P.

    2011-02-28

    We report on polarization-sensitive direct current photoresponse of nanographite films in a 532-4000 nm spectral range. It is found that irradiation of the nanographite by the nanosecond laser pulses produces the electric current with intensity depending on the incidence angle and polarization of the laser beam. The obtained dependencies of the photoresponse on wavelength and polarization of excitation laser beam are discussed in terms of the surface photogalvanic and photon drag effects.

  10. Increased intrinsic excitability of muscle vasoconstrictor preganglionic neurons may contribute to the elevated sympathetic activity in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Briant, Linford J B; Stalbovskiy, Alexey O; Nolan, Matthew F; Champneys, Alan R; Pickering, Anthony E

    2014-12-01

    Hypertension is associated with pathologically increased sympathetic drive to the vasculature. This has been attributed to increased excitatory drive to sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) from brainstem cardiovascular control centers. However, there is also evidence supporting increased intrinsic excitability of SPN. To test this hypothesis, we made whole cell recordings of muscle vasoconstrictor-like (MVClike) SPN in the working-heart brainstem preparation of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. The MVClike SPN have a higher spontaneous firing frequency in the SH rat (3.85 ± 0.4 vs. 2.44 ± 0.4 Hz in WKY; P = 0.011) with greater respiratory modulation of their activity. The action potentials of SH SPN had smaller, shorter afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and showed diminished transient rectification indicating suppression of an A-type potassium conductance (IA). We developed mathematical models of the SPN to establish if changes in their intrinsic properties in SH rats could account for their altered firing. Reduction of the maximal conductance density of IA by 15-30% changed the excitability and output of the model from the WKY to a SH profile, with increased firing frequency, amplified respiratory modulation, and smaller AHPs. This change in output is predominantly a consequence of altered synaptic integration. Consistent with these in silico predictions, we found that intrathecal 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) increased sympathetic nerve activity, elevated perfusion pressure, and augmented Traube-Hering waves. Our findings indicate that IA acts as a powerful filter on incoming synaptic drive to SPN and that its diminution in the SH rat is potentially sufficient to account for the increased sympathetic output underlying hypertension. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Increased intrinsic excitability of muscle vasoconstrictor preganglionic neurons may contribute to the elevated sympathetic activity in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford J. B.; Stalbovskiy, Alexey O.; Nolan, Matthew F.; Champneys, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with pathologically increased sympathetic drive to the vasculature. This has been attributed to increased excitatory drive to sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) from brainstem cardiovascular control centers. However, there is also evidence supporting increased intrinsic excitability of SPN. To test this hypothesis, we made whole cell recordings of muscle vasoconstrictor-like (MVClike) SPN in the working-heart brainstem preparation of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. The MVClike SPN have a higher spontaneous firing frequency in the SH rat (3.85 ± 0.4 vs. 2.44 ± 0.4 Hz in WKY; P = 0.011) with greater respiratory modulation of their activity. The action potentials of SH SPN had smaller, shorter afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and showed diminished transient rectification indicating suppression of an A-type potassium conductance (IA). We developed mathematical models of the SPN to establish if changes in their intrinsic properties in SH rats could account for their altered firing. Reduction of the maximal conductance density of IA by 15–30% changed the excitability and output of the model from the WKY to a SH profile, with increased firing frequency, amplified respiratory modulation, and smaller AHPs. This change in output is predominantly a consequence of altered synaptic integration. Consistent with these in silico predictions, we found that intrathecal 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) increased sympathetic nerve activity, elevated perfusion pressure, and augmented Traube-Hering waves. Our findings indicate that IA acts as a powerful filter on incoming synaptic drive to SPN and that its diminution in the SH rat is potentially sufficient to account for the increased sympathetic output underlying hypertension. PMID:25122704

  12. Variability in State-Dependent Plasticity of Intrinsic Properties during Cell-Autonomous Self-Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis in Hippocampal Model Neurons1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Sunandha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract How do neurons reconcile the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with perpetual switches in patterns of afferent activity? Here, we assessed state-dependent evolution of calcium homeostasis in a population of hippocampal pyramidal neuron models, through an adaptation of a recent study on stomatogastric ganglion neurons. Calcium homeostasis was set to emerge through cell-autonomous updates to 12 ionic conductances, responding to different types of synaptically driven afferent activity. We first assessed the impact of theta-frequency inputs on the evolution of ionic conductances toward maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Although calcium homeostasis emerged efficaciously across all models in the population, disparate changes in ionic conductances that mediated this emergence resulted in variable plasticity to several intrinsic properties, also manifesting as significant differences in firing responses across models. Assessing the sensitivity of this form of plasticity, we noted that intrinsic neuronal properties and the firing response were sensitive to the target calcium concentration and to the strength and frequency of afferent activity. Next, we studied the evolution of calcium homeostasis when afferent activity was switched, in different temporal sequences, between two behaviorally distinct types of activity: theta-frequency inputs and sharp-wave ripples riding on largely silent periods. We found that the conductance values, intrinsic properties, and firing response of neurons exhibited differential robustness to an intervening switch in the type of afferent activity. These results unveil critical dissociations between different forms of homeostasis, and call for a systematic evaluation of the impact of state-dependent switches in afferent activity on neuronal intrinsic properties during neural coding and homeostasis. PMID:26464994

  13. Variability in State-Dependent Plasticity of Intrinsic Properties during Cell-Autonomous Self-Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis in Hippocampal Model Neurons(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Sunandha; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2015-01-01

    How do neurons reconcile the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with perpetual switches in patterns of afferent activity? Here, we assessed state-dependent evolution of calcium homeostasis in a population of hippocampal pyramidal neuron models, through an adaptation of a recent study on stomatogastric ganglion neurons. Calcium homeostasis was set to emerge through cell-autonomous updates to 12 ionic conductances, responding to different types of synaptically driven afferent activity. We first assessed the impact of theta-frequency inputs on the evolution of ionic conductances toward maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Although calcium homeostasis emerged efficaciously across all models in the population, disparate changes in ionic conductances that mediated this emergence resulted in variable plasticity to several intrinsic properties, also manifesting as significant differences in firing responses across models. Assessing the sensitivity of this form of plasticity, we noted that intrinsic neuronal properties and the firing response were sensitive to the target calcium concentration and to the strength and frequency of afferent activity. Next, we studied the evolution of calcium homeostasis when afferent activity was switched, in different temporal sequences, between two behaviorally distinct types of activity: theta-frequency inputs and sharp-wave ripples riding on largely silent periods. We found that the conductance values, intrinsic properties, and firing response of neurons exhibited differential robustness to an intervening switch in the type of afferent activity. These results unveil critical dissociations between different forms of homeostasis, and call for a systematic evaluation of the impact of state-dependent switches in afferent activity on neuronal intrinsic properties during neural coding and homeostasis.

  14. IL-6 promotes regeneration and functional recovery after cortical spinal tract injury by reactivating intrinsic growth program of neurons and enhancing synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Wen, Huizhong; Ou, Shan; Cui, Jian; Fan, Dehua

    2012-07-01

    Most neurons in adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) fail to regenerate their axons after injury. Peripherally conditioned primary sensory neurons have an increased capacity to regenerate their central processes. Recent studies demonstrate that a conditioning lesion increased intrinsic growth capability is associated with the up-regulation of a group of growth-associated genes, one of the most established is interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which IL-6 exerts its beneficial effect on axonal regeneration and functional recovery remain to be elucidated. The purpose of this study is to further investigate the molecular mechanisms of IL-6 in promoting regeneration and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, we demonstrate that in vitro administration of IL-6 enhances neurite outgrowth of neurons on an inhibitory substrate myelin proteins, accompanied by increased expression of growth-associated genes GAP-43, SPRR1A and Arginase I. In vivo, intrathecal delivery of IL-6 for 7 days after cortical spinal tract injury induces synaptic rearrangements of sprouting axons and increases the expression of mTOR in neurons surrounding the lesion site, accompanied by improved functional recovery. In conclusion, our results show that IL-6 increases the expression of growth-associated genes and induces the expression of mTOR in lesion adjacent neurons, resulting in reactivating the intrinsic growth program of neurons to promote axonal regrowth and functional recovery after SCI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Interleukin(IL)-1 Regulates Ozone-enhanced Tracheal Smooth Muscle Responsiveness by Increasing Substance P (SP) Production in Intrinsic Airway Neurons of Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z.-X.; Barker, J. S.; Batchelor, T. P.; Dey, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to ozone induces airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) mediated partly by SP released from nerve terminals of intrinsic airway neurons. Our recent studies showed that IL-1, an important multifunctional proinflammatory cytokine, increases synthesis and release of SP from intrinsic airway neurons. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible involvement of endogenous IL-1 in modulating neural responses associated with ozone-enhanced airway responsiveness. Ferrets were exposed to 2 ppm ozone or filtered air for 3 hrs. IL-1 in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was significantly increased in ozone-exposed animals and responses of tracheal smooth muscle to methacholine (MCh) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were elevated significantly. Both the SP nerve fiber density in tracheal smooth muscle and the number of SP-containing neurons in airway ganglia were significantly increased following ozone exposure. Pretreatment with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 Ra) significantly diminished ozone-enhanced airway responses to EFS as well as ozone-increased SP in the airway. To selectively investigate intrinsic airway neurons, segments of ferret trachea were maintained in culture conditions for 24 hrs to eliminate extrinsic contributions from sensory nerves. The segments were then exposed to 2 ppm ozone in vitro for 3 hrs. The changes of ozone-induced airway responses to MCh and EFS, and the SP levels in airway neurons paralleled those observed with in vivo ozone exposure. The ozone-enhanced airway responses and neuronal SP levels were inhibited by pretreatment with IL-1 Ra. These findings show that IL-1 is released during ozone exposure enhances airway responsiveness by modulating SP expression in airway neurons. PMID:18718561

  16. Heterogeneity of Intrinsic and Synaptic Properties of Neurons in the Ventral and Dorsal Parts of the Ventral Nucleus of the Lateral Lemniscus

    PubMed Central

    Caspari, Franziska; Baumann, Veronika J.; Garcia-Pino, Elisabet; Koch, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    The ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL) provides a major inhibitory projection to the inferior colliculus (IC). Neurons in the VNLL respond with various firing patterns and different temporal precision to acoustic stimulation. The present study investigates the underlying intrinsic and synaptic properties of various cell types in different regions of the VNLL, using in vitro electrophysiological recordings from acute brain slices of mice and immunohistochemistry. We show that the biophysical membrane properties and excitatory input characteristics differed between dorsal and ventral VNLL neurons. Neurons in the ventral VNLL displayed an onset-type firing pattern and little hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih). Stimulation of lemniscal inputs evoked a large all-or-none excitatory response similar to Calyx of Held synapses in neurons in the lateral part of the ventral VNLL. Neurons that were located within the fiber tract of the lateral lemniscus, received several and weak excitatory input fibers. In the dorsal VNLL onset-type and sustained firing neurons were intermingled. These neurons showed large Ih and were strongly immunopositive for the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (HCN1) subunit. Both neuron types received several excitatory inputs that were weaker and slower compared to ventrolateral VNLL neurons. Using a mouse model that expresses channelrhodopsin under the promotor of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) suggests that dorsal and ventral neurons were inhibitory since they were all depolarized by light stimulation. The diverse membrane and input properties in dorsal and ventral VNLL neurons suggest differential roles of these neurons for sound processing. PMID:26635535

  17. Heterogeneity of Intrinsic and Synaptic Properties of Neurons in the Ventral and Dorsal Parts of the Ventral Nucleus of the Lateral Lemniscus.

    PubMed

    Caspari, Franziska; Baumann, Veronika J; Garcia-Pino, Elisabet; Koch, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    The ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL) provides a major inhibitory projection to the inferior colliculus (IC). Neurons in the VNLL respond with various firing patterns and different temporal precision to acoustic stimulation. The present study investigates the underlying intrinsic and synaptic properties of various cell types in different regions of the VNLL, using in vitro electrophysiological recordings from acute brain slices of mice and immunohistochemistry. We show that the biophysical membrane properties and excitatory input characteristics differed between dorsal and ventral VNLL neurons. Neurons in the ventral VNLL displayed an onset-type firing pattern and little hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih). Stimulation of lemniscal inputs evoked a large all-or-none excitatory response similar to Calyx of Held synapses in neurons in the lateral part of the ventral VNLL. Neurons that were located within the fiber tract of the lateral lemniscus, received several and weak excitatory input fibers. In the dorsal VNLL onset-type and sustained firing neurons were intermingled. These neurons showed large Ih and were strongly immunopositive for the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (HCN1) subunit. Both neuron types received several excitatory inputs that were weaker and slower compared to ventrolateral VNLL neurons. Using a mouse model that expresses channelrhodopsin under the promotor of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) suggests that dorsal and ventral neurons were inhibitory since they were all depolarized by light stimulation. The diverse membrane and input properties in dorsal and ventral VNLL neurons suggest differential roles of these neurons for sound processing.

  18. Butadiene-based photoresponsive soft materials.

    PubMed

    Das, Suresh; Varghese, Shinto; Kumar, N S Saleesh

    2010-02-02

    The creation of stimuli-responsive materials offers considerable challenges in the area of material science. The use of light as an external stimulus has particular advantages because it can bring about rapid transformations in remote regions in a very precise manner. Naturally occurring photoresponsive systems provide the motivation for developing corresponding artificial systems using molecular self-assembly to address issues such as quantum efficiency, selectivity, and amplification. A practical strategy for developing photoresponsive materials is to utilize molecules that can undergo considerable change in shape on photoisomerization. Although the photoisomerization of polyenes between their linear all-trans isomer and bent cis isomers has been extensively investigated in solution and in organized media because of its relevance to naturally occurring photoresponsive systems, its use in developing artificial photoresponsive systems has not been well explored. This feature article provides an overview of photoresponsive soft materials such as liquid crystals and gels with special emphasis on our recent studies related to the use of the butadiene chromophore for the design of such materials. The role of molecular self-assembly in controlling the photochemical and photophysical properties of these molecules is also discussed.

  19. Photoresponsive liquid marbles and dry water.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tristan Tsai Yuan; Ahsan, Aniq; Reithofer, Michael R; Tay, Siok Wei; Tan, Sze Yu; Hor, Tzi Sum Andy; Chin, Jia Min; Chew, Benny Kia Jia; Wang, Xiaobai

    2014-04-01

    Stimuli-responsive liquid marbles for controlled release typically rely on organic moieties that require lengthy syntheses. We report herein a facile, one-step synthesis of hydrophobic and oleophobic TiO2 nanoparticles that display photoresponsive wettability. Water liquid marbles stabilized by these photoresponsive TiO2 particles were found to be stable when shielded from ultraviolet (UV) radiation; however, they quickly collapsed after being irradiated with 302 nm UV light. Oil- and organic-solvent-based liquid marbles could also be fabricated using oleophobic TiO2 nanoparticles and show similar UV-induced collapse. Finally, we demonstrated the formation of the micronized form of water liquid marbles, also known as dry water, by homogenization of the TiO2 nanoparticles with water. The TiO2 dry water displayed a similar photoresponse, whereby the micronized liquid marbles collapsed after irradiation and the dry water turned from a free-flowing powder to a paste. Hence, by exploiting the photoresponsive wettability of TiO2, we fabricated liquid marbles and dry water that display photoresponse and studied the conditions required for their collapse.

  20. Intrinsic properties of lumbar motor neurones in the adult G127insTGGG superoxide dismutase-1 mutant mouse in vivo: evidence for increased persistent inward currents.

    PubMed

    Meehan, C F; Moldovan, M; Marklund, S L; Graffmo, K S; Nielsen, J B; Hultborn, H

    2010-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by a preferential loss of motor neurones. Previous publications using in vitro neonatal preparations suggest an increased excitability of motor neurones in various superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) mutant mice models of ALS which may contribute to excitotoxicity of the motor neurones. Using intracellular recording, we tested this hypothesis in vivo in the adult presymptomatic G127insTGGG (G127X) SOD1 mutant mouse model of ALS. At resting membrane potentials the basic intrinsic properties of lumbar motor neurones in the adult presymptomatic G127X mutant are not significantly different from those of wild type. However, at more depolarized membrane potentials, motor neurones in the G127X SOD1 mutants can sustain higher frequency firing, showing less spike frequency adaption (SFA) and with persistent inward currents (PICs) being activated at lower firing frequencies and being more pronounced. We demonstrated that, in vivo, at resting membrane potential, spinal motor neurones of the adult G127X mice do not show an increased excitability. However, when depolarized they show evidence of an increased PIC and less SFA which may contribute to excitotoxicity of these neurones as the disease progresses. © 2010 The Authors. Acta Physiologica © 2010 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  1. Antidromic firing occurs spontaneously on thalamic relay neurons: triggering of somatic intrinsic burst discharges by ectopic action potentials.

    PubMed

    Pinault, D; Pumain, R

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-two identified thalamocortical relay neurons were recorded extracellularly in the ventral posterior thalamic nucleus in 29 urethane-anaesthetized rats. Electrical stimulations were applied to the contralateral vibrissae or to the ipsilateral neocortex for ortho- or antidromic activation. The critical period following a known somatic action potential and during which no antidromic response could reach the soma was systematically determined for each cell using a collision test. Thus, the possible ectopic axonal origin of a given impulse could be determined. Thalamic neurons displayed either tonic or phasic firing modes, the latter characterized by episodes of rhythmic high-frequency burst discharges. The present results suggest that such bursts were generated at the soma and probably involved an intrinsic mechanism, since: (1) a modulation of the somatic excitability with an excitatory or inhibitory amino acid affected the intra-burst structure; (2) an antidromic test action potential collided with the second or any of the later impulses of such bursts; (3) an orthodromic activation could evoke a burst structurally similar to a natural one; and (4) the duration of the first interval of such an evoked burst was always inferior to the sum of the critical period plus the antidromic conduction time, ruling out the possibility that it might have been entirely ectopically generated on thalamic terminals. The results further show that a spontaneous ectopic axonal impulse could trigger a somatic burst, since: (1) an electrically-evoked antidromic action potential could trigger a burst structurally similar to a spontaneous one; (2) on 42% of the tested thalamic cells, a known antidromic action potential delivered during the critical period following a spontaneous single impulse could not collide with it: in many cases such non-collisions were seen with the first action potential of a burst; and (3) with increasing ionophoretic doses, GABA could: (i) convert bursts to

  2. Purinergic modulation of adult guinea pig cardiomyocytes in long term cultures and co-cultures with extracardiac or intrinsic cardiac neurones.

    PubMed

    Horackova, M; Huang, M H; Armour, J A

    1994-05-01

    To determine the capacity of ATP to modify cardiomyocytes directly or indirectly via peripheral autonomic neurones, the effects of various purinergic agents were studied on long term cultures of adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes and their co-cultures with extracardiac (stellate ganglion) or intrinsic cardiac neurones. Ventricular myocytes and cardiac neurones were enzymatically dissociated and plated together or alone (myocytes only). Myocyte cultures were used for experiments after three to six weeks. The electrical and contractile properties of cultured myocytes and myocyte-neuronal networks were investigated. The spontaneous beating frequency of ventricular myocytes co-cultured with stellate ganglion neurones increased by approximately 140% (p < 0.001) following superfusion with 10(-5) M ATP. This effect was not modified significantly by tetrodotoxin or by beta adrenoceptor blockade (10(-5) M timolol), but was eliminated following application of the P2 antagonist suramin (10(-5) M). Basal spontaneous contractile rate was reduced by approximately 86% (p < 0.001) in the presence of suramin, indicating the existence of tonically active purinergic synaptic mechanisms in stellate ganglion neurone-myocyte cocultures. Suramin did not significantly affect non-innervated myocyte cultures. ATP increased myocyte contractile rate in intrinsic cardiac neurone-myocyte co-cultures by approximately 40% (p < 0.01) under control conditions, but when beta adrenergic receptors of tetrodotoxin sensitive neural responses were blocked, ATP induced greater augmentation (> 100%). In contrast, ATP induced much smaller effects in non-innervated myocyte cultures (approximately 26%, p < 0.01). Analogues of AT) showed the following order of potency: ATP > UTP > MSATP > beta gamma ATP > alpha beta ATP. Adenosine (10(-4) M) attenuated the beating frequency of myocytes in both types of co-culture, while not significantly affecting non-innervated myocyte cultures. The experimental model used

  3. Mechanisms creating transient and sustained photoresponses in mammalian retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiwu; Reifler, Aaron N; Schroeder, Melanie M; Jaeckel, Elizabeth R; Chervenak, Andrew P; Wong, Kwoon Y

    2017-03-06

    Retinal neurons use sustained and transient light responses to encode visual stimuli of different frequency ranges, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In particular, although earlier studies in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) proposed seven potential mechanisms, all seven have since been disputed, and it remains unknown whether different RGC types use different mechanisms or how many mechanisms are used by each type. Here, we conduct a comprehensive survey in mice and rats of 12 candidate mechanisms that could conceivably produce tonic rod/cone-driven ON responses in intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) and transient ON responses in three types of direction-selective RGCs (TRHR+, Hoxd10+ ON, and Hoxd10+ ON-OFF cells). We find that the tonic kinetics of ipRGCs arises from their substantially above-threshold resting potentials, input from sustained ON bipolar cells, absence of amacrine cell inhibition of presynaptic ON bipolar cells, and mGluR7-mediated maintenance of light-evoked glutamatergic input. All three types of direction-selective RGCs receive input from transient ON bipolar cells, and each type uses additional strategies to promote photoresponse transience: presynaptic inhibition and dopaminergic modulation for TRHR+ cells, center/surround antagonism and relatively negative resting potentials for Hoxd10+ ON cells, and presynaptic inhibition for Hoxd10+ ON-OFF cells. We find that the sustained nature of ipRGCs' rod/cone-driven responses depends neither on melanopsin nor on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, whereas the transience of the direction-selective cells' responses is influenced neither by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor desensitization nor by glutamate uptake. For all cells, we further rule out spike frequency adaptation and intracellular Ca(2+) as determinants of photoresponse kinetics. In conclusion, different RGC types use diverse mechanisms to produce sustained or

  4. Mechanisms creating transient and sustained photoresponses in mammalian retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiwu; Jaeckel, Elizabeth R.; Chervenak, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    Retinal neurons use sustained and transient light responses to encode visual stimuli of different frequency ranges, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In particular, although earlier studies in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) proposed seven potential mechanisms, all seven have since been disputed, and it remains unknown whether different RGC types use different mechanisms or how many mechanisms are used by each type. Here, we conduct a comprehensive survey in mice and rats of 12 candidate mechanisms that could conceivably produce tonic rod/cone-driven ON responses in intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) and transient ON responses in three types of direction-selective RGCs (TRHR+, Hoxd10+ ON, and Hoxd10+ ON-OFF cells). We find that the tonic kinetics of ipRGCs arises from their substantially above-threshold resting potentials, input from sustained ON bipolar cells, absence of amacrine cell inhibition of presynaptic ON bipolar cells, and mGluR7-mediated maintenance of light-evoked glutamatergic input. All three types of direction-selective RGCs receive input from transient ON bipolar cells, and each type uses additional strategies to promote photoresponse transience: presynaptic inhibition and dopaminergic modulation for TRHR+ cells, center/surround antagonism and relatively negative resting potentials for Hoxd10+ ON cells, and presynaptic inhibition for Hoxd10+ ON-OFF cells. We find that the sustained nature of ipRGCs’ rod/cone-driven responses depends neither on melanopsin nor on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, whereas the transience of the direction-selective cells’ responses is influenced neither by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor desensitization nor by glutamate uptake. For all cells, we further rule out spike frequency adaptation and intracellular Ca2+ as determinants of photoresponse kinetics. In conclusion, different RGC types use diverse mechanisms to produce sustained or

  5. Investigation of photoresponse in cadmium sulfide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sheo K.; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Srivastava, Rajneesh K.; Dubey, K. C.; Shukla, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we report on the photo-response of CdS nanoparticles prepared by simple solid state reaction method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) study has confirmed the formation of cubical zinc blende (c) phase. In the photo-response study, voltage dependence of photocurrent and darkcurrent as well as temporal rise and decay of photocurrent of CdS nanoparticles have been investigated. The photo-response of prepared sample has been measured under visible illumination using thick film of powder with out any binder. The photocurrent (Ipc) and darkcurrent (Idc) follow power law with applied voltage i.e. I α Vr. The rise and decay of photocurrent show negative photoconductivity.

  6. Investigation of photoresponse in cadmium sulfide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Sheo K. E-mail: dr.sheokmishra@gmail.com; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Shukla, R. K.; Srivastava, Rajneesh K.; Dubey, K. C.

    2015-06-24

    In this work, we report on the photo-response of CdS nanoparticles prepared by simple solid state reaction method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) study has confirmed the formation of cubical zinc blende (c) phase. In the photo-response study, voltage dependence of photocurrent and darkcurrent as well as temporal rise and decay of photocurrent of CdS nanoparticles have been investigated. The photo-response of prepared sample has been measured under visible illumination using thick film of powder with out any binder. The photocurrent (I{sub pc}) and darkcurrent (I{sub dc}) follow power law with applied voltage i.e. I α V{sup r}. The rise and decay of photocurrent show negative photoconductivity.

  7. Dorsal-ventral organization of theta-like activity intrinsic to entorhinal stellate neurons is mediated by differences in stochastic current fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Paul D; Pastoll, Hugh; Nolan, Matthew F

    2011-06-15

    The membrane potential dynamics of stellate neurons in layer II of the medial entorhinal cortex are important for neural encoding of location. Previous studies suggest that these neurons generate intrinsic theta-frequency membrane potential oscillations, with a period that depends on neuronal location on the dorsal–ventral axis of themedial entorhinal cortex, and which in behaving animals could support generation of grid-like spatial firing fields. To address the nature and organization of this theta-like activity, we adopt the Lombmethod of least-squares spectral analysis. We demonstrate that peaks in frequency spectra that differ significantly from Gaussian noise do not necessarily imply the existence of a periodic oscillator, but can instead arise from filtered stochastic noise or a stochastic random walk. We show that theta-like membrane potential activity recorded fromstellate neurons in mature brain slices is consistentwith stochastic mechanisms, but not with generation by a periodic oscillator. The dorsal–ventral organization of intrinsic theta-likemembrane potential activity, and themodification of this activity during block of HCN channels, both reflect altered frequency distributions of stochastic spectral peaks, rather than tuning of a periodic oscillator. Our results demonstrate the importance of distinguishing periodic oscillations from stochastic processes.We suggest that dorsal–ventral tuning of theta-like membrane potential activity is due to differences in stochastic current fluctuations resulting from organization of ion channels that also control synaptic integration.

  8. Dorsal–ventral organization of theta-like activity intrinsic to entorhinal stellate neurons is mediated by differences in stochastic current fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Paul D; Pastoll, Hugh; Nolan, Matthew F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The membrane potential dynamics of stellate neurons in layer II of the medial entorhinal cortex are important for neural encoding of location. Previous studies suggest that these neurons generate intrinsic theta-frequency membrane potential oscillations, with a period that depends on neuronal location on the dorsal–ventral axis of the medial entorhinal cortex, and which in behaving animals could support generation of grid-like spatial firing fields. To address the nature and organization of this theta-like activity, we adopt the Lomb method of least-squares spectral analysis. We demonstrate that peaks in frequency spectra that differ significantly from Gaussian noise do not necessarily imply the existence of a periodic oscillator, but can instead arise from filtered stochastic noise or a stochastic random walk. We show that theta-like membrane potential activity recorded from stellate neurons in mature brain slices is consistent with stochastic mechanisms, but not with generation by a periodic oscillator. The dorsal–ventral organization of intrinsic theta-like membrane potential activity, and the modification of this activity during block of HCN channels, both reflect altered frequency distributions of stochastic spectral peaks, rather than tuning of a periodic oscillator. Our results demonstrate the importance of distinguishing periodic oscillations from stochastic processes. We suggest that dorsal–ventral tuning of theta-like membrane potential activity is due to differences in stochastic current fluctuations resulting from organization of ion channels that also control synaptic integration. PMID:21502290

  9. A distinct class of slow (~0.2-2 Hz) intrinsically bursting layer 5 pyramidal neurons determines UP/DOWN state dynamics in the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Magor L; Gunner, David; Bao, Ying; Connelly, William M; Isaac, John T R; Hughes, Stuart W; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2015-04-08

    During sleep and anesthesia, neocortical neurons exhibit rhythmic UP/DOWN membrane potential states. Although UP states are maintained by synaptic activity, the mechanisms that underlie the initiation and robust rhythmicity of UP states are unknown. Using a physiologically validated model of UP/DOWN state generation in mouse neocortical slices whereby the cholinergic tone present in vivo is reinstated, we show that the regular initiation of UP states is driven by an electrophysiologically distinct subset of morphologically identified layer 5 neurons, which exhibit intrinsic rhythmic low-frequency burst firing at ~0.2-2 Hz. This low-frequency bursting is resistant to block of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission but is absent when slices are maintained in a low Ca(2+) medium (an alternative, widely used model of cortical UP/DOWN states), thus explaining the lack of rhythmic UP states and abnormally prolonged DOWN states in this condition. We also characterized the activity of various other pyramidal and nonpyramidal neurons during UP/DOWN states and found that an electrophysiologically distinct subset of layer 5 regular spiking pyramidal neurons fires earlier during the onset of network oscillations compared with all other types of neurons recorded. This study, therefore, identifies an important role for cell-type-specific neuronal activity in driving neocortical UP states.

  10. Transient chaos and associated system-intrinsic switching of spacetime patterns in two synaptically coupled layers of Morris-Lecar neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartle, Harrison; Wackerbauer, Renate

    2017-09-01

    Spatiotemporal chaos collapses to either a rest state or a propagating pulse solution in a single layer of diffusively coupled, excitable Morris-Lecar neurons. Weak synaptic coupling of two such layers reveals system intrinsic switching of spatiotemporal activity patterns within and between the layers at irregular times. Within a layer, switching sequences include spatiotemporal chaos, erratic and regular pulse propagation, spontaneous network wide neuron activity, and rest state. A momentary substantial reduction in neuron activity in one layer can reinitiate transient spatiotemporal chaos in the other layer, which can induce a swap of spatiotemporal chaos with a pulse state between the layers. Presynaptic input maximizes the distance between propagating pulses, in contrast to pulse merging in the absence of synapses.

  11. Photoresponsive properties of ultrathin silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Duy P.; Macdonald, Thomas J.; Nann, Thomas; Thierry, Benjamin E-mail: benjamin.thierry@unisa.edu.au; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Stockmann, Regina; Offenhäusser, Andreas E-mail: benjamin.thierry@unisa.edu.au

    2014-12-08

    Functional silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are promising building blocks in the design of highly sensitive photodetectors and bio-chemical sensors. We systematically investigate the photoresponse properties of ultrathin SiNWs (20 nm) fabricated using a size-reduction method based on e-beam lithography and tetramethylammonium hydroxide wet-etching. The high-quality SiNWs were able to detect light from the UV to the visible range with excellent sensitivity (∼1 pW/array), good time response, and high photoresponsivity (R ∼ 2.5 × 10{sup 4 }A/W). Improvement of the ultrathin SiNWs' photoresponse has been observed in comparison to 40 nm counter-part nanowires. These properties are attributable to the predominance surface-effect due to the high surface-to-volume ratio of ultrathin SiNWs. Long-term measurements at different temperatures in both the forward and reverse bias directions demonstrated the stability and reliability of the fabricated device. By sensitizing the fabricated SiNW arrays with cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDs), hybrid QD SiNW devices displayed an improvement in photocurrent response under UV light, while preserving their performance in the visible light range. The fast, stable, and high photoresponse of these hybrid nanostructures is promising towards the development of optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  12. Orexin Receptor Activation Generates Gamma Band Input to Cholinergic and Serotonergic Arousal System Neurons and Drives an Intrinsic Ca(2+)-Dependent Resonance in LDT and PPT Cholinergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Gumenchuk, Iryna; Kang, Bryan; Steger, Catherine; Lynn, Elizabeth; Molina, Nancy E; Eisenberg, Leonard M; Leonard, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz) - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT) and pedunculopontine (PPT) tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR) neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca(2+)-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin) neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca(2+)-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca(2+)-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4-14 Hz) and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca(2+) dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep, and intracortical gamma.

  13. Orexin Receptor Activation Generates Gamma Band Input to Cholinergic and Serotonergic Arousal System Neurons and Drives an Intrinsic Ca2+-Dependent Resonance in LDT and PPT Cholinergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Gumenchuk, Iryna; Kang, Bryan; Steger, Catherine; Lynn, Elizabeth; Molina, Nancy E.; Eisenberg, Leonard M.; Leonard, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30–60 Hz) – a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT) and pedunculopontine (PPT) tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR) neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin) neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4–14 Hz) and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep, and intracortical gamma. PMID

  14. The role of hyperpolarization-activated cationic current in spike-time precision and intrinsic resonance in cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gastrein, Philippe; Campanac, Emilie; Gasselin, Célia; Cudmore, Robert H; Bialowas, Andrzej; Carlier, Edmond; Fronzaroli-Molinieres, Laure; Ankri, Norbert; Debanne, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide modulated current (I(h)) sets resonance frequency within the θ-range (5–12 Hz) in pyramidal neurons. However, its precise contribution to the temporal fidelity of spike generation in response to stimulation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses remains unclear. In conditions where pharmacological blockade of I(h) does not affect synaptic transmission, we show that postsynaptic h-channels improve spike time precision in CA1 pyramidal neurons through two main mechanisms. I(h) enhances precision of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP)--spike coupling because I(h) reduces peak EPSP duration. I(h) improves the precision of rebound spiking following inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons and sets pacemaker activity in stratum oriens interneurons because I(h) accelerates the decay of both IPSPs and after-hyperpolarizing potentials (AHPs). The contribution of h-channels to intrinsic resonance and EPSP waveform was comparatively much smaller in CA3 pyramidal neurons. Our results indicate that the elementary mechanisms by which postsynaptic h-channels control fidelity of spike timing at the scale of individual neurons may account for the decreased theta-activity observed in hippocampal and neocortical networks when h-channel activity is pharmacologically reduced.

  15. Long-term spinal cord stimulation modifies canine intrinsic cardiac neuronal properties and ganglionic transmission during high-frequency repetitive activation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frank M; Vermeulen, Michel; Cardinal, René

    2016-07-01

    Long-term spinal cord stimulation (SCS) applied to cranial thoracic SC segments exerts antiarrhythmic and cardioprotective actions in the canine heart in situ. We hypothesized that remodeling of intrinsic cardiac neuronal and synaptic properties occur in canines subjected to long-term SCS, specifically that synaptic efficacy may be preferentially facilitated at high presynaptic nerve stimulation frequencies. Animals subjected to continuous SCS for 5-8 weeks (long-term SCS: n = 17) or for 1 h (acute SCS: n = 4) were compared with corresponding control animals (long-term: n = 15, acute: n = 4). At termination, animals were anesthetized, the heart was excised and neurones from the right atrial ganglionated plexus were identified and studied in vitro using standard intracellular microelectrode technique. Main findings were as follows: (1) a significant reduction in whole cell membrane input resistance and acceleration of the course of AHP decay identified among phasic neurones from long-term SCS compared with controls, (2) significantly more robust synaptic transmission to rundown in long-term SCS during high-frequency (10-40 Hz) presynaptic nerve stimulation while recording from either phasic or accommodating postsynaptic neurones; this was associated with significantly greater posttrain excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) numbers in long-term SCS than control, and (3) synaptic efficacy was significantly decreased by atropine in both groups. Such changes did not occur in acute SCS In conclusion, modification of intrinsic cardiac neuronal properties and facilitation of synaptic transmission at high stimulation frequency in long-term SCS could improve physiologically modulated vagal inputs to the heart. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  16. Hetereogeneity in Neuronal Intrinsic Properties: A Possible Mechanism for Hub-Like Properties of the Rat Anterior Cingulate Cortex during Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is vital for a range of brain functions requiring cognitive control and has highly divergent inputs and outputs, thus manifesting as a hub in connectomic analyses. Studies show diverse functional interactions within the ACC are associated with network oscillations in the β (20–30 Hz) and γ (30-80 Hz) frequency range. Oscillations permit dynamic routing of information within cortex, a function that depends on bandpass filter–like behavior to selectively respond to specific inputs. However, a putative hub region such as ACC needs to be able to combine inputs from multiple sources rather than select a single input at the expense of others. To address this potential functional dichotomy, we modeled local ACC network dynamics in the rat in vitro. Modal peak oscillation frequencies in the β- and γ-frequency band corresponded to GABAAergic synaptic kinetics as seen in other regions; however, the intrinsic properties of ACC principal neurons were highly diverse. Computational modeling predicted that this neuronal response diversity broadened the bandwidth for filtering rhythmic inputs and supported combination—rather than selection—of different frequencies within the canonical γ and β electroencephalograph bands. These findings suggest that oscillating neuronal populations can support either response selection (routing) or combination, depending on the interplay between the kinetics of synaptic inhibition and the degree of heterogeneity of principal cell intrinsic conductances. PMID:28275720

  17. Hetereogeneity in Neuronal Intrinsic Properties: A Possible Mechanism for Hub-Like Properties of the Rat Anterior Cingulate Cortex during Network Activity.

    PubMed

    Adams, Natalie E; Sherfey, Jason S; Kopell, Nancy J; Whittington, Miles A; LeBeau, Fiona E N

    2017-01-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is vital for a range of brain functions requiring cognitive control and has highly divergent inputs and outputs, thus manifesting as a hub in connectomic analyses. Studies show diverse functional interactions within the ACC are associated with network oscillations in the β (20-30 Hz) and γ (30-80 Hz) frequency range. Oscillations permit dynamic routing of information within cortex, a function that depends on bandpass filter-like behavior to selectively respond to specific inputs. However, a putative hub region such as ACC needs to be able to combine inputs from multiple sources rather than select a single input at the expense of others. To address this potential functional dichotomy, we modeled local ACC network dynamics in the rat in vitro. Modal peak oscillation frequencies in the β- and γ-frequency band corresponded to GABAAergic synaptic kinetics as seen in other regions; however, the intrinsic properties of ACC principal neurons were highly diverse. Computational modeling predicted that this neuronal response diversity broadened the bandwidth for filtering rhythmic inputs and supported combination-rather than selection-of different frequencies within the canonical γ and β electroencephalograph bands. These findings suggest that oscillating neuronal populations can support either response selection (routing) or combination, depending on the interplay between the kinetics of synaptic inhibition and the degree of heterogeneity of principal cell intrinsic conductances.

  18. Targeted Labeling of Neurons in a Specific Functional Micro-domain of the Neocortex by Combining Intrinsic Signal and Two-photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    O'Herron, Philip; Shen, Zhiming; Lu, Zhongyang; Schramm, Adrien E.; Levy, Manuel; Kara, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    In the primary visual cortex of non-rodent mammals, neurons are clustered according to their preference for stimulus features such as orientation1-4, direction5-7, ocular dominance8,9 and binocular disparity9. Orientation selectivity is the most widely studied feature and a continuous map with a quasi-periodic layout for preferred orientation is present across the entire primary visual cortex10,11. Integrating the synaptic, cellular and network contributions that lead to stimulus selective responses in these functional maps requires the hybridization of imaging techniques that span sub-micron to millimeter spatial scales. With conventional intrinsic signal optical imaging, the overall layout of functional maps across the entire surface of the visual cortex can be determined12. The development of in vivo two-photon microscopy using calcium sensitive dyes enables one to determine the synaptic input arriving at individual dendritic spines13 or record activity simultaneously from hundreds of individual neuronal cell bodies6,14. Consequently, combining intrinsic signal imaging with the sub-micron spatial resolution of two-photon microscopy offers the possibility of determining exactly which dendritic segments and cells contribute to the micro-domain of any functional map in the neocortex. Here we demonstrate a high-yield method for rapidly obtaining a cortical orientation map and targeting a specific micro-domain in this functional map for labeling neurons with fluorescent dyes in a non-rodent mammal. With the same microscope used for two-photon imaging, we first generate an orientation map using intrinsic signal optical imaging. Then we show how to target a micro-domain of interest using a micropipette loaded with dye to either label a population of neuronal cell bodies or label a single neuron such that dendrites, spines and axons are visible in vivo. Our refinements over previous methods facilitate an examination of neuronal structure-function relationships with sub

  19. Otx1 promotes basal dendritic growth and regulates intrinsic electrophysiological and synaptic properties of layer V pyramidal neurons in mouse motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-F; Liu, L-X; Cao, H-T; Ou, L; Qu, J; Wang, Y; Chen, J-G

    2015-01-29

    The transcription factor Otx1 is specifically expressed in layer V pyramidal cells (L5PCs) in the cerebral cortex. Otx1 null mutant mice have a defect in the developmental axon pruning of L5PCs and show epileptic seizures. However, the role of Otx1 in electrophysiology, morphology and synaptology of the cortical neurons has not been fully investigated. This study examines the influences of Otx1 on neuronal properties of L5PCs by loss- and gain-of-function approaches. Mice with an Otx1-null mutation had decreased structural measurements of basal dendrites in L5PCs. In contrast, the size of basal dendrites was increased in the Otx1-over-expressed pyramidal cells (PCs) in L2/3 where the gene normally does not express. PCs showed burst and non-burst firing patterns of action potentials. The proportion of burst firing neurons was reduced in the Otx1 mutant but increased in the neurons over-expressing Otx1. Although the burst firing population decreased, the proportion of those bursting neurons with a low threshold increased in the Otx1 mutant mice. Moreover, excitatory facilitating synaptic connections formed between L5PCs were predominant in the Otx1 mutant mice, which greatly contrasted with the predominant depressing synaptic connections in the controls. Taken together, it suggests an enhanced activity of neuronal network in the cortex of Otx1 mutant mice. These data indicate that the Otx1 expression is essential for the normal development of dendritic morphology, intrinsic electrophysiology and synaptic dynamics of L5PCs. This study provides new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the spatial and temporal regulation of neuronal and synaptic properties of L5PCs, and improves our understanding on the generation of epileptic seizures. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation Induces Neuronal Apoptosis by Noradrenaline Acting on Alpha1 Adrenoceptor and by Triggering Mitochondrial Intrinsic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Somarajan, Bindu I.; Khanday, Mudasir A.; Mallick, Birendra N.

    2016-01-01

    intrinsic pathway for inducing neuronal apoptosis in REMS-deprived rat brain. PMID:27014180

  1. ETHANOL ACTION ON DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS IN THE VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA: INTERACTION WITH INTRINSIC ION CHANNELS AND NEUROTRANSMITTER INPUTS

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Hitoshi; Morrisett, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    The dopaminergic system originating in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) has been extensively studied over the past decades as a critical neural substrate involved in the development of alcoholism and addiction to other drugs of abuse. Accumulating evidence indicates that ethanol modulates the functional output of this system by directly affecting the firing activity of VTA dopamine neurons, whereas withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure leads to a reduction in the functional output of these neurons. This chapter will provide an update on the mechanistic investigations of the acute ethanol action on dopamine neuron activity and the neuroadaptations/plasticities in the VTA produced by previous ethanol experience. PMID:20813245

  2. A defined heteromeric KV1 channel stabilizes the intrinsic pacemaking and regulates the output of deep cerebellar nuclear neurons to thalamic targets.

    PubMed

    Ovsepian, Saak V; Steuber, Volker; Le Berre, Marie; O'Hara, Liam; O'Leary, Valerie B; Dolly, J Oliver

    2013-04-01

    The output of the cerebellum to the motor axis of the central nervous system is orchestrated mainly by synaptic inputs and intrinsic pacemaker activity of deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) projection neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that the soma of these cells is enriched with K(V)1 channels produced by mandatory multi-merization of K(V)1.1, 1.2 α and KV β2 subunits. Being constitutively active, the K(+) current (IK(V)1) mediated by these channels stabilizes the rate and regulates the temporal precision of self-sustained firing of these neurons. Placed strategically, IK(V)1 provides a powerful counter-balance to prolonged depolarizing inputs, attenuates the rebound excitation, and dampens the membrane potential bi-stability. Somatic location with low activation threshold render IK(V)1 instrumental in voltage-dependent de-coupling of the axon initial segment from the cell body of projection neurons, impeding invasion of back-propagating action potentials into the somato-dendritic compartment. The latter is also demonstrated to secure the dominance of clock-like somatic pacemaking in driving the regenerative firing activity of these neurons, to encode time variant inputs with high fidelity. Through the use of multi-compartmental modelling and retro-axonal labelling, the physiological significance of the described functions for processing and communication of information from the lateral DCN to thalamic relay nuclei is established.

  3. A defined heteromeric KV1 channel stabilizes the intrinsic pacemaking and regulates the output of deep cerebellar nuclear neurons to thalamic targets

    PubMed Central

    Ovsepian, Saak V; Steuber, Volker; Le Berre, Marie; O’Hara, Liam; O’Leary, Valerie B; Dolly, J Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The output of the cerebellum to the motor axis of the central nervous system is orchestrated mainly by synaptic inputs and intrinsic pacemaker activity of deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) projection neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that the soma of these cells is enriched with KV1 channels produced by mandatory multi-merization of KV1.1, 1.2 α and KVβ2 subunits. Being constitutively active, the K+ current (IKV1) mediated by these channels stabilizes the rate and regulates the temporal precision of self-sustained firing of these neurons. Placed strategically, IKV1 provides a powerful counter-balance to prolonged depolarizing inputs, attenuates the rebound excitation, and dampens the membrane potential bi-stability. Somatic location with low activation threshold render IKV1 instrumental in voltage-dependent de-coupling of the axon initial segment from the cell body of projection neurons, impeding invasion of back-propagating action potentials into the somato-dendritic compartment. The latter is also demonstrated to secure the dominance of clock-like somatic pacemaking in driving the regenerative firing activity of these neurons, to encode time variant inputs with high fidelity. Through the use of multi-compartmental modelling and retro-axonal labelling, the physiological significance of the described functions for processing and communication of information from the lateral DCN to thalamic relay nuclei is established. PMID:23318870

  4. A Photoresponsive Smart Covalent Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ning; Ding, Xuesong; Kim, Jangbae; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-07-20

    Ordered π-columnar structures found in covalent organic frameworks (COFs) render them attractive as smart materials. However, external-stimuli-responsive COFs have not been explored. Here we report the design and synthesis of a photoresponsive COF with anthracene units as the photoresponsive π-building blocks. The COF is switchable upon photoirradiation to yield a concavo-convex polygon skeleton through the interlayer [4π+4π] cycloaddition of anthracene units stacked in the π-columns. This cycloaddition reaction is thermally reversible; heating resets the anthracene layers and regenerates the COF. These external-stimuli-induced structural transformations are accompanied by profound changes in properties, including gas adsorption, π-electronic function, and luminescence. The results suggest that COFs are useful for designing smart porous materials with properties that are controllable by external stimuli.

  5. Dopamine modulates two potassium currents and inhibits the intrinsic firing properties of an identified motor neuron in a central pattern generator network.

    PubMed

    Kloppenburg, P; Levini, R M; Harris-Warrick, R M

    1999-01-01

    The two pyloric dilator (PD) neurons are components [along with the anterior burster (AB) neuron] of the pacemaker group of the pyloric network in the stomatogastric ganglion of the spiny lobster Panulirus interruptus. Dopamine (DA) modifies the motor pattern generated by the pyloric network, in part by exciting or inhibiting different neurons. DA inhibits the PD neuron by hyperpolarizing it and reducing its rate of firing action potentials, which leads to a phase delay of PD relative to the electrically coupled AB and a reduction in the pyloric cycle frequency. In synaptically isolated PD neurons, DA slows the rate of recovery to spike after hyperpolarization. The latency from a hyperpolarizing prestep to the first action potential is increased, and the action potential frequency as well as the total number of action potentials are decreased. When a brief (1 s) puff of DA is applied to a synaptically isolated, voltage-clamped PD neuron, a small voltage-dependent outward current is evoked, accompanied by an increase in membrane conductance. These responses are occluded by the combined presence of the potassium channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium. In voltage-clamped PD neurons, DA enhances the maximal conductance of a voltage-sensitive transient potassium current (IA) and shifts its Vact to more negative potentials without affecting its Vinact. This enlarges the "window current" between the voltage activation and inactivation curves, increasing the tonically active IA near the resting potential and causing the cell to hyperpolarize. Thus DA's effect is to enhance both the transient and resting K+ currents by modulating the same channels. In addition, DA enhances the amplitude of a calcium-dependent potassium current (IO(Ca)), but has no effect on a sustained potassium current (IK(V)). These results suggest that DA hyperpolarizes and phase delays the activity of the PD neurons at least in part by modulating their intrinsic postinhibitory recovery

  6. Multiple cell photoresponsive amorphous alloys and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ovshinsky, S.R.; Adler, D.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes an improved photoresponsive tandem multiple solar cell device. The device comprising: at least a first and second superimposed cell of various materials. The first cell being formed of a silicon alloy material. The second cell including an amorphous silicon alloy semiconductor cell body having an active photoresponsive region in which radiation can impinge to produce charge carriers, the amorphous cell body including at least one density of states reducing element. The element being fluorine. The amorphous cell body further including a band gap adjusting element therein at least in the photoresponsive region to enhance the radiation absorption thereof, the adjusting element being germanium: the second cell being a multi-layer body having deposited semiconductor layers of opposite (p and n) conductivity type; and the first cell being formed with the second cell in substantially direct Junction contact therebetween. The first and second cells designed to generate substantially matched currents from each cell from a light source directed through the first cell and into the second cell.

  7. In vitro Neurons in Mammalian Cortical Layer 4 Exhibit Intrinsic Oscillatory Activity in the 10- to 50-Hz Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Grace, Anthony A.; Yarom, Yosef

    1991-02-01

    We report here the presence of fast subthreshold oscillatory potentials recorded in vitro from neurons within layer 4 of the guinea pig frontal cortex. Two types of oscillatory neurons were recorded: (i) One type exhibited subthreshold oscillations whose frequency increased with membrane depolarization and encompassed a range of 10-45 Hz. Action potentials in this type of neuron demonstrated clear after-hyperpolarizations. (ii) The second type of neuron was characterized by narrow-frequency oscillations near 35-50 Hz. These oscillations often outlasted the initiating depolarizing stimulus. No calcium component could be identified in their action potential. In both types of cell the subthreshold oscillations were tetrodotoxin-sensitive, indicating that the depolarizing phase of the oscillation was generated by a voltage-dependent sodium conductance. The initial depolarizing phase was followed by a potassium conductance responsible for the falling phase of the oscillatory wave. In both types of cell, the subthreshold oscillation could trigger spikes at the oscillatory frequency, if the membrane was sufficiently depolarized. Combining intracellular recordings with Lucifer yellow staining showed that the narrow-frequency oscillatory activity was produced by a sparsely spinous interneuron located in layer 4 of the cortex. This neuron has extensive local axonal collaterals that ramify in layers 3 and 4 such that they may contribute to the columnar synchronization of activity in the 40- to 50-Hz range. Cortical activity in this frequency range has been proposed as the basis for the "conjunctive properties" of central nervous system networks.

  8. Enhanced intrinsic excitability and EPSP-spike coupling accompany enriched environment-induced facilitation of LTP in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ruchi; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2012-03-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is a well-established paradigm for studying naturally occurring changes in synaptic efficacy in the hippocampus that underlie experience-induced modulation of learning and memory in rodents. Earlier research on the effects of EE on hippocampal plasticity focused on long-term potentiation (LTP). Whereas many of these studies investigated changes in synaptic weight, little is known about potential contributions of neuronal excitability to EE-induced plasticity. Here, using whole-cell recordings in hippocampal slices, we address this gap by analyzing the impact of EE on both synaptic plasticity and intrinsic excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Consistent with earlier reports, EE increased contextual fear memory and dendritic spine density on CA1 cells. Furthermore, EE facilitated LTP at Schaffer collateral inputs to CA1 pyramidal neurons. Analysis of the underlying causes for enhanced LTP shows EE to increase the frequency but not amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. However, presynaptic release probability, assayed using paired-pulse ratios and use-dependent block of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor currents, was not affected. Furthermore, CA1 neurons fired more action potentials (APs) in response to somatic depolarization, as well as during the induction of LTP. EE also reduced spiking threshold and after-hyperpolarization amplitude. Strikingly, this EE-induced increase in excitability caused the same-sized excitatory postsynaptic potential to fire more APs. Together, these findings suggest that EE may enhance the capacity for plasticity in CA1 neurons, not only by strengthening synapses but also by enhancing their efficacy to fire spikes-and the two combine to act as an effective substrate for amplifying LTP.

  9. Role of Ongoing, Intrinsic Activity of Neuronal Populations for Quantitative Neuroimaging of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Based Networks

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Coman, Daniel; Blumenfeld, Hal; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A primary objective in neuroscience is to determine how neuronal populations process information within networks. In humans and animal models, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is gaining increasing popularity for network mapping. Although neuroimaging with fMRI—conducted with or without tasks—is actively discovering new brain networks, current fMRI data analysis schemes disregard the importance of the total neuronal activity in a region. In task fMRI experiments, the baseline is differenced away to disclose areas of small evoked changes in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. In resting-state fMRI experiments, the spotlight is on regions revealed by correlations of tiny fluctuations in the baseline (or spontaneous) BOLD signal. Interpretation of fMRI-based networks is obscured further, because the BOLD signal indirectly reflects neuronal activity, and difference/correlation maps are thresholded. Since the small changes of BOLD signal typically observed in cognitive fMRI experiments represent a minimal fraction of the total energy/activity in a given area, the relevance of fMRI-based networks is uncertain, because the majority of neuronal energy/activity is ignored. Thus, another alternative for quantitative neuroimaging of fMRI-based networks is a perspective in which the activity of a neuronal population is accounted for by the demanded oxidative energy (CMRO2). In this article, we argue that network mapping can be improved by including neuronal energy/activity of both the information about baseline and small differences/fluctuations of BOLD signal. Thus, total energy/activity information can be obtained through use of calibrated fMRI to quantify differences of ΔCMRO2 and through resting-state positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements for average CMRO2. PMID:22433047

  10. Synaptic and intrinsic homeostatic mechanisms cooperate to increase L2/3 pyramidal neuron excitability during a late phase of critical period plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lambo, Mary E; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2013-05-15

    Visual deprivation profoundly affects visual cortical response properties, but the activity-dependent plasticity mechanisms that underlie these changes are poorly understood. Monocular deprivation (MD) induces ocular dominance (OD) shifts through biphasic changes in cortical excitability, first decreasing responsiveness to the deprived eye, and then slowly increasing responsiveness to both the deprived and spared eyes. It has been suggested that this slow gain of responsiveness is due to homeostatic synaptic scaling, but this prediction has not been tested directly. Here we show that, in rat monocular and binocular primary visual cortex (V1m and V1b), postsynaptic strength onto layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons is modulated in a biphasic manner by MD, first undergoing a net decrease after 1 and 2 d MD, increasing back to baseline after 3 d, and finally undergoing a net potentiation between 3 and 6 d. The time course and direction of these synaptic changes match well the known changes in visual responsiveness during OD plasticity. Viral-mediated delivery of the GluA2 C-tail in vivo blocked these synaptic changes, indicating that, like synaptic scaling in vitro, AMPA receptor trafficking via the GluA2 C-tail is required for the delayed increase in postsynaptic strength. Finally, we also observed a delayed increase in the intrinsic excitability of L2/3 pyramidal neurons following prolonged MD. These data indicate that synaptic and intrinsic homeostatic mechanisms cooperate to increase excitability of L2/3 pyramidal neurons following prolonged MD, and suggest that these homeostatic mechanisms contribute to the delayed gain of visual responsiveness during OD plasticity.

  11. Cholinergic neurons in the caudate-putamen complex proper are intrinsically organized: a combined Evans blue and acetylcholinesterase analysis.

    PubMed

    Woolf, N J; Butcher, L L

    1981-11-01

    In an attempt to determine whether or not acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-containing neurons of the caudate-putamen proper were the source of striatal efferent fibers, we infused Evans Blue, a retrogradely transported fluorescent label, into the globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra, or retrorubral area. Following microscopic analysis of the striatum for Evans Blue-labelled somata, the same brain sections were processed for AChE according to the pharmacohistochemical regimen and, after additional microscopic evaluation, were counterstained with cresyl violet. Histology for Nissl substance revealed that the areal density of cell bodies in the caudate-putamen complex proper was about 1510 somata/mm2. Striatal neurons labelled with Evans Blue, those considered to be projection cells, were medium-sized (approximate minor and major dimensions: 11 X 14 microns), had a density of roughly 833 cells/mm2, and were predominantly oval with lesser proportions being fusiform, triangular, or round. Each of the target structures received input from approximately 55% (range = 26-78%) of the total population of striatal neurons in regions where the projection cellsions: 11 X 14 microns), had a density of roughly 833 cells/mm2, and were predominantly oval with lesser proportions being fusiform, triangular, or round. Each of the target structures received input from approximately 55% (range = 26-78%) of the total population of striatal neurons in regions where the projection cellsions: 11 X 14 microns), had a density of roughly 833 cells/mm2, and were predominantly oval with lesser proportions being fusiform, triangular, or round. Each of the target structures received input from approximately 55% (range = 26-78%) of the total population of striatal neurons in regions where the projection cells were located. The two types of AChE-containing somata in the caudate-putamen complex proper--the medium-sized, lightly staining Type A and the large, intensely staining Type B

  12. Photoresponse of atomically thin MoS2 layers and their planar heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Kallatt, Sangeeth; Umesh, Govindarao; Bhat, Navakanta; Majumdar, Kausik

    2016-08-18

    MoS2 monolayers exhibit excellent light absorption and large thermoelectric power, which are, however, accompanied by a very strong exciton binding energy - resulting in complex photoresponse characteristics. We study the electrical response to scanning photo-excitation on MoS2 monolayer (1L) and bilayer (2L) devices, and also on monolayer/bilayer (1L/2L) planar heterojunction and monolayer/few-layer/multi-layer (1L/FL/ML) planar double heterojunction devices to unveil the intrinsic mechanisms responsible for photocurrent generation in these materials and junctions. A strong photoresponse modulation is obtained by scanning the position of the laser spot, as a consequence of controlling the relative dominance of a number of layer dependent properties, including (i) the photoelectric effect (PE), (ii) the photothermoelectric effect (PTE), (iii) the excitonic effect, (iv) hot photo-electron injection from metal, and (v) carrier recombination. The monolayer and bilayer devices show a peak photoresponse when the laser is focused at the source junction, while the peak position shifts to the monolayer/few-layer junction in the heterostructure devices. The photoresponse is found to be dependent on the incoming light polarization when the source junction is illuminated, although the polarization sensitivity drastically reduces at the monolayer/few-layer heterojunction. Finally, we investigate the laser position dependent transient response of the photocurrent to reveal that trapping of carriers in SiO2 at the source junction is a critical factor to determine the transient response in 2D photodetectors, and also show that, by a systematic device design, such trapping can be avoided in the heterojunction devices, resulting in a fast transient response. The insights obtained will play an important role in designing a fast 2D TMD based photodetector and related optoelectronic and thermoelectric devices.

  13. Combined extrinsic and intrinsic manipulations exert complementary neuronal enrichment in embryonic rat neural precursor cultures: an in vitro and in vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Furmanski, Orion; Gajavelli, Shyam; Lee, Jeung Woon; Collado, Maria E; Jergova, Stanislava; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2009-07-01

    Numerous central nervous system (CNS) disorders share a common pathology in dysregulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibitory signaling. Transplantation of GABA-releasing cells at the site of disinhibition holds promise for alleviating disease symptoms with fewer side effects than traditional drug therapies. We manipulated fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 deprivation and mammalian achaete-scute homolog (MASH)1 transcription factor levels in an attempt to amplify the default GABAergic neuronal fate in cultured rat embryonic neural precursor cells (NPCs) for use in transplantation studies. Naïve and MASH1 lentivirus-transduced NPCs were maintained in FGF-2 or deprived of FGF-2 for varying lengths of time. Immunostaining and quantitative analysis showed that GABA- and beta-III-tubulin-immunoreactive cells generally decreased through successive passages, suggesting a loss of neurogenic potential in rat neurospheres expanded in vitro. However, FGF-2 deprivation resulted in a small, but significantly increased population of GABAergic cells derived from passaged neurospheres. In contrast to naïve and GFP lentivirus-transduced clones, MASH1 transduction resulted in increased bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and clonal colony size. Western blotting showed that MASH1 overexpression and FGF-2 deprivation additively increased beta-III-tubulin and decreased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (CNPase) expression, whereas FGF-2 deprivation alone attenuated glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. These results suggest that low FGF-2 signaling and MASH1 activity can operate in concert to enrich NPC cultures for a GABA neuronal phenotype. When transplanted into the adult rat spinal cord, this combination also yielded GABAergic neurons. These findings indicate that, even for successful utilization of the default GABAergic neuronal precursor fate, a combination of both extrinsic and intrinsic manipulations will likely be necessary to realize the full

  14. Functional Effects of Schizophrenia-Linked Genetic Variants on Intrinsic Single-Neuron Excitability: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Halnes, Geir; Devor, Anna; Witoelar, Aree; Bettella, Francesco; Djurovic, Srdjan; Wang, Yunpeng; Einevoll, Gaute T.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies have identified a large number of genetic risk factors for schizophrenia (SCZ) featuring ion channels and calcium transporters. For some of these risk factors, independent prior investigations have examined the effects of genetic alterations on the cellular electrical excitability and calcium homeostasis. In the present proof-of-concept study, we harnessed these experimental results for modeling of computational properties on layer V cortical pyramidal cells and identified possible common alterations in behavior across SCZ-related genes. Methods We applied a biophysically detailed multicompartmental model to study the excitability of a layer V pyramidal cell. We reviewed the literature on functional genomics for variants of genes associated with SCZ and used changes in neuron model parameters to represent the effects of these variants. Results We present and apply a framework for examining the effects of subtle single nucleotide polymorphisms in ion channel and calcium transporter-encoding genes on neuron excitability. Our analysis indicates that most of the considered SCZ-related genetic variants affect the spiking behavior and intracellular calcium dynamics resulting from summation of inputs across the dendritic tree. Conclusions Our results suggest that alteration in the ability of a single neuron to integrate the inputs and scale its excitability may constitute a fundamental mechanistic contributor to mental disease, alongside the previously proposed deficits in synaptic communication and network behavior. PMID:26949748

  15. Activity-dependent depression of the spike after-depolarization generates long-lasting intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D

    2009-03-15

    Persistent plastic changes to the intrinsic excitability of neurons have substantial implications for computational processing within the CNS. We have identified and characterized a novel long-lasting form of intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells. Although the patterns of action potential firing elicited in this cell population by depolarizing current injections exhibited considerable diversity, practically all cells produced an initial high frequency (>100 Hz) burst of two to five spikes. This burst involved conductances that were responsible for the prominent spike afterdepolarization of CA3 pyramids. Long-lasting changes in the firing behaviour of CA3 cells were produced by conditioning stimuli (CS) consisting of either periods of depolarization in voltage clamp or periods of short (2 or 4 spikes) high frequency (circa 100 Hz) burst firing at 5 or 10 Hz. CS-induced changes included substantial prolongation of the first inter-spike interval and increased spike jitter. Similar CS-induced changes were seen when the test stimulus used to elicit firing resembled a glutamatergic EPSC. In line with this, a long-lasting depression of the ADP was elicited by the same CS that altered firing patterns of CA3 cells. Conditioning-induced changes in both spiking patterns and ADP amplitude were blocked by buffering intracellular Ca(2+) with BAPTA. Furthermore, the Kv7 channel blocker XE991, a cognitive enhancer, both enhanced the ADP and completely eliminated its conditioning-induced depression. These findings indicate that a persistent enhancement of Kv7 channels, following a transient increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), results in a prolonged depression of the ADP in CA3 pyramidal neurones.

  16. Semiconductor Quantum Dots with Photoresponsive Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Lorenzo; Tang, Sicheng; Zhang, Yang; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Raymo, Françisco M; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    Photochromic or photocaged ligands can be anchored to the outer shell of semiconductor quantum dots in order to control the photophysical properties of these inorganic nanocrystals with optical stimulations. One of the two interconvertible states of the photoresponsive ligands can be designed to accept either an electron or energy from the excited quantum dots and quench their luminescence. Under these conditions, the reversible transformations of photochromic ligands or the irreversible cleavage of photocaged counterparts translates into the possibility to switch luminescence with external control. As an alternative to regulating the photophysics of a quantum dot via the photochemistry of its ligands, the photochemistry of the latter can be controlled by relying on the photophysics of the former. The transfer of excitation energy from a quantum dot to a photocaged ligand populates the excited state of the species adsorbed on the nanocrystal to induce a photochemical reaction. This mechanism, in conjunction with the large two-photon absorption cross section of quantum dots, can be exploited to release nitric oxide or to generate singlet oxygen under near-infrared irradiation. Thus, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and photoresponsive ligands offers the opportunity to assemble nanostructured constructs with specific functions on the basis of electron or energy transfer processes. The photoswitchable luminescence and ability to photoinduce the release of reactive chemicals, associated with the resulting systems, can be particularly valuable in biomedical research and can, ultimately, lead to the realization of imaging probes for diagnostic applications as well as to therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer.

  17. Morinda citrifolia mitigates rotenone-induced striatal neuronal loss in male Sprague-Dawley rats by preventing mitochondrial pathway of intrinsic apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kishore Kumar, S Narasimhan; Deepthy, Jayakumar; Saraswathi, Uthamaraman; Thangarajeswari, Mohan; Yogesh Kanna, Sathyamoorthy; Ezhil, Pannerselvam; Kalaiselvi, Periandavan

    2016-11-24

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting mainly the motor system, as a result of death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. The present scenario of research in PD is directed to identify novel molecules that can be administered individually or co-administered with L-Dopa to prevent the L-Dopa-Induced Dyskinesia (LID) like states that arise during chronic L-Dopa administration. Hence, in this study, we investigated whether Morinda citrifolia has therapeutic effects in rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) with special reference to mitochondrial dysfunction mediated intrinsic apoptosis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were stereotaxically infused with rotenone (3 µg in both SNPc and VTA) and co-treated with the ethyl acetate extract of Morinda citrifolia and levodopa. The results revealed that rotenone-induced cell death was reduced by MCE treatment as measured by decline in the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins. Moreover, MCE treatment significantly augmented the levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl2 and blocks the release of cytochrome c, thereby alleviating the rotenone-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss, as evidenced by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining in the striatum. Taken together, the results suggest that Morinda citrifolia may be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like PD.

  18. Enhanced Ras activity in pyramidal neurons induces cellular hypertrophy and changes in afferent and intrinsic connectivity in synRas mice.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Ulrich; Alpár, Alán; Seeger, Gudrun; Heumann, Rolf; Arendt, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    Neurotrophic actions are critically controlled and transmitted to cellular responses by the small G protein Ras which is therefore essential for normal functioning and plasticity of the nervous system. The present study summarises findings of recent studies on morphological changes in the neocortex of synRas mice expressing Val12-Ha-Ras in vivo under the control of the rat synapsin I promoter. In the here reported model (introduced by Heumann et al. [J. Cell Biol. 151 (2000) 1537]), transgenic Val12-Ha-Ras expression is confined to the pyramidal cell population and starts postnatally at a time, when neurons are postmitotic and their developmental maturation has been basically completed. Expression of Val12-Ha-Ras results in a significant enlargement of pyramidal neurons. Size, complexity and spine density of dendritic trees are increased, which leads, finally, to cortical expansion. However, the main morphological design principles of 'transgenic' pyramidal cells remain preserved. In addition to somato-dendritic changes, expression of Val12-Ha-Ras in pyramidal cells induces augmented axon calibres and upregulates the establishment of efferent boutons. Despite the enlargement of cortical size, the overall density of terminals representing intra- or interhemispheric, specific and non-specific afferents is unchanged or even higher in transgenic mice suggesting a significant increase in the total afferent input to the neocortex. Although interneurons do not express the transgene and are therefore excluded from direct, intrinsic Val12-Ha-Ras effects, they respond with morphological adaptations to structural changes. Thus, dendritic arbours of interneurons are extended to follow the cortical expansion and basket cells establish a denser inhibitory innervation of 'transgenic' pyramidal cells perikarya. It is concluded that expression of Val12-Ha-Ras in pyramidal neurons results in remodelling of neocortical structuring which strongly implicates a crucial involvement of

  19. Subpicosecond electron-hole recombination time and terahertz-bandwidth photoresponse in freestanding GaAs epitaxial mesoscopic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulics, Martin; Zhang, Jie; Serafini, John; Adam, Roman; Grützmacher, Detlev; Sobolewski, Roman

    2012-07-01

    We present the ultrafast (THz-bandwidth) photoresponse from GaAs single-crystal mesoscopic structures, such as freestanding whiskers and platelets fabricated by the top-down technique, transferred onto a substrate of choice, and incorporated into a coplanar strip line. We recorded electrical transients as short as ˜600 fs from an individual whisker photodetector. Analysis of the frequency spectrum of the photoresponse electrical signal showed that, intrinsically, our device was characterized by an ˜150-fs carrier lifetime and an overall 320-fs response. The corresponding 3-dB frequency bandwidth was 1.3 THz—the highest bandwidth ever reported for a GaAs-based photodetector. Simultaneously, as high-quality, epitaxially grown crystals, our GaAs structures exhibited mobility values as high as ˜7300 cm2/V.s, extremely low dark currents, and ˜7% intrinsic detection efficiency, which, together with their experimentally measured photoresponse repetition time of ˜1 ps, makes them uniquely suitable for terahertz-frequency optoelectronic applications, ranging from ultrafast photon detectors and counters to THz-bandwidth optical-to-electrical transducers and photomixers.

  20. Readout of the intrinsic and extrinsic properties of a stimulus from un-experienced neuronal activities: towards cognitive neuroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Farbod Kia, Saba; Åstrand, Elaine; Ibos, Guilhem; Ben Hamed, Suliann

    2011-01-01

    While sensory and motor systems have attracted most of the research effort in the field neuroprosthetics, little attention has been devoted to higher order cortical processes. Here, we propose a first step in the direction of applying neural decoding to the study and manipulation of visuospatial attention, an endogenous process at the interface between sensory and motor functions. To this aim, we investigate whether the offline activity of a population of non-human primate frontal eye field neurons (FEF) in response to an endogenous cue can be readout on a trial by trial basis to provide a precise description of the cue's attributes, namely, its location and identity, but also the allocation of attention following its interpretation. Using a linear decoder, we reach up to 86% correct predictions for the different decoded variables, including the spatial allocation of endogenous attention. We show that the decoding performance drops on incorrect trials, indicating that cue encoding participates to the animal's behavioral performance. Last, we show that the temporal resolution of the decoding influences readout performance. These results are a strong indication of the feasibility of the readout of endogenous variables by standard decoding algorithms, on a suboptimal dataset. However, its validity remains to be proved in a real-time situation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Touch and Zap Method for In Vivo Whole-Cell Patch Recording of Intrinsic and Visual Responses of Cortical Neurons and Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Adrien E.; Marinazzo, Daniele; Gener, Thomas; Graham, Lyle J.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-cell patch recording is an essential tool for quantitatively establishing the biophysics of brain function, particularly in vivo. This method is of particular interest for studying the functional roles of cortical glial cells in the intact brain, which cannot be assessed with extracellular recordings. Nevertheless, a reasonable success rate remains a challenge because of stability, recording duration and electrical quality constraints, particularly for voltage clamp, dynamic clamp or conductance measurements. To address this, we describe “Touch and Zap”, an alternative method for whole-cell patch clamp recordings, with the goal of being simpler, quicker and more gentle to brain tissue than previous approaches. Under current clamp mode with a continuous train of hyperpolarizing current pulses, seal formation is initiated immediately upon cell contact, thus the “Touch”. By maintaining the current injection, whole-cell access is spontaneously achieved within seconds from the cell-attached configuration by a self-limited membrane electroporation, or “Zap”, as seal resistance increases. We present examples of intrinsic and visual responses of neurons and putative glial cells obtained with the revised method from cat and rat cortices in vivo. Recording parameters and biophysical properties obtained with the Touch and Zap method compare favourably with those obtained with the traditional blind patch approach, demonstrating that the revised approach does not compromise the recorded cell. We find that the method is particularly well-suited for whole-cell patch recordings of cortical glial cells in vivo, targeting a wider population of this cell type than the standard method, with better access resistance. Overall, the gentler Touch and Zap method is promising for studying quantitative functional properties in the intact brain with minimal perturbation of the cell's intrinsic properties and local network. Because the Touch and Zap method is performed semi

  2. Photoresponsive, reversible immobilization of virus particles on supramolecular platforms.

    PubMed

    Weineisen, N L; Hommersom, C A; Voskuhl, J; Sankaran, S; Depauw, A M A; Katsonis, N; Jonkheijm, P; Cornelissen, J J L M

    2017-02-07

    Here we report on the covalent attachment of photoresponsive azobenzene moieties to cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV). The modified virus capsids can be reversibly immobilized on cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) bearing surfaces via supramolecular complexation.

  3. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Oginsky, Max F.; Maust, Joel D.; Corthell, John T.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. Objectives We determined whether there are differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity, and basal differences in the striatal neuron function in adult and adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Methods Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on “junk-food” diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Results In rats that became obese after eating “junk-food”, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ~60% at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Conclusions Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals; and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats. PMID:26612617

  4. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not in adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Oginsky, Max F; Maust, Joel D; Corthell, John T; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2016-03-01

    Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. We examined differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity and basal differences in striatal neuron function in adult and in adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on "junk-food" diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine-induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). In rats that became obese after eating junk-food, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ∼60 % at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals, and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats.

  5. Enhanced Photoresponse of Conductive Polymer Nanowires Embedded with Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junchang; Zhong, Liubiao; Sun, Yinghui; Li, Anran; Huang, Jing; Meng, Fanben; Chandran, Bevita K; Li, Shuzhou; Jiang, Lin; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-04-20

    A conductive polymer nanowire embedded with a 1D Au nanoparticle chain with defined size, shape, and interparticle distance is fabricated which demonstrates enhanced photoresponse behavior. The precise and controllable positioning of 1D Au nanoparticle chain in the conductive polymer nanowire plays a critical role in modulating the photoresponse behavior by excitation light wavelength or power due to the coupled-plasmon effect of 1D Au nanoparticle chain.

  6. Photoresponsive Polymers: Converting Light to Mechanical Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaia, Richard A.

    2009-03-01

    The ability to remotely control the creation of mechanical work, rapidly, with high spatial precision, and over long distances, offers many intriguing possibilities. Whether driving direct conformational changes, initiating reversible chemical reactions to release stored strain, or converting the photon to a local temperature increase, combinations of photoactive units, nanoparticles, ordered mesophases and polymeric networks are providing an expansive array of photo-responsive polymer options. By combining these material responses with kinematic concepts, mechanical devices can be demonstrated that exhibiting tunable and controllable macroscopic deformation, high-frequency oscillation or directional motion. Specifically, we will discuss recent investigation of liquid crystal polymer networks containing main chain and pendent azobenzene moieties (azo-LCN) with modulus ˜1.3GPa that are actuated at the absorptive overlap of the cis and trans confirmers (442 nm). Cantilevers and unconstrained beams of these azo-LCNs can be controlled by polarization angle of the source, as well as by a specific optical exposure history (on-off), with responses ranging from lateral motion to oscillations in excess of 30Hz. These phenomena reflect an underlying interaction between the mesophase order, the network architecture and kinematic constraints of the exposed material. In collaboration with Timothy Bunning, Timothy White, Hilmar Koerner, Air Force Research Laboratory; and Nelson Tabiryan, BEAM Co.

  7. Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors: Photoresponse Enhancement Due to Potential Barriers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Potential barriers around quantum dots (QDs) play a key role in kinetics of photoelectrons. These barriers are always created, when electrons from dopants outside QDs fill the dots. Potential barriers suppress the capture processes of photoelectrons and increase the photoresponse. To directly investigate the effect of potential barriers on photoelectron kinetics, we fabricated several QD structures with different positions of dopants and various levels of doping. The potential barriers as a function of doping and dopant positions have been determined using nextnano3 software. We experimentally investigated the photoresponse to IR radiation as a function of the radiation frequency and voltage bias. We also measured the dark current in these QD structures. Our investigations show that the photoresponse increases ~30 times as the height of potential barriers changes from 30 to 130 meV. PMID:27502644

  8. Developmental changes in expression, subcellular distribution, and function of Drosophila N-cadherin, guided by a cell-intrinsic program during neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kurusu, Mitsuhiko; Katsuki, Takeo; Zinn, Kai; Suzuki, Emiko

    2012-06-15

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) perform numerous functions during neural development. An individual CAM can play different roles during each stage of neuronal differentiation; however, little is known about how such functional switching is accomplished. Here we show that Drosophila N-cadherin (CadN) is required at multiple developmental stages within the same neuronal population and that its sub-cellular expression pattern changes between the different stages. During development of mushroom body neurons and motoneurons, CadN is expressed at high levels on growing axons, whereas expression becomes downregulated and restricted to synaptic sites in mature neurons. Phenotypic analysis of CadN mutants reveals that developing axons require CadN for axon guidance and fasciculation, whereas mature neurons for terminal growth and receptor clustering. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CadN downregulation can be achieved in cultured neurons without synaptic contact with other cells. Neuronal silencing experiments using Kir(2.1) indicate that neuronal excitability is also dispensable for CadN downregulation in vivo. Interestingly, downregulation of CadN can be prematurely induced by ectopic expression of a nonselective cation channel, dTRPA1, in developing neurons. Together, we suggest that switching of CadN expression during neuronal differentiation involves regulated cation influx within neurons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Integrated photo-responsive metal oxide semiconductor circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzban D. (Inventor); Dargo, David R. (Inventor); Lyons, John C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An infrared photoresponsive element (RD) is monolithically integrated into a source follower circuit of a metal oxide semiconductor device by depositing a layer of a lead chalcogenide as a photoresistive element forming an ohmic bridge between two metallization strips serving as electrodes of the circuit. Voltage from the circuit varies in response to illumination of the layer by infrared radiation.

  10. Deterioration of autonomic neuronal receptor signaling and mechanisms intrinsic to heart pacemaker cells contribute to age-associated alterations in heart rate variability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Ahmet, Ismayil; Tsutsui, Kenta; Behar, Joachim; Moen, Jack M; Okamoto, Yosuke; Guiriba, Toni-Rose; Liu, Jie; Bychkov, Rostislav; Lakatta, Edward G

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to determine how age-associated changes in mechanisms extrinsic and intrinsic to pacemaker cells relate to basal beating interval variability (BIV) reduction in vivo. Beating intervals (BIs) were measured in aged (23-25 months) and adult (3-4 months) C57BL/6 male mice (i) via ECG in vivo during light anesthesia in the basal state, or in the presence of 0.5 mg mL(-1) atropine + 1 mg mL(-1) propranolol (in vivo intrinsic conditions), and (ii) via a surface electrogram, in intact isolated pacemaker tissue. BIV was quantified in both time and frequency domains using linear and nonlinear indices. Although the average basal BI did not significantly change with age under intrinsic conditions in vivo and in the intact isolated pacemaker tissue, the average BI was prolonged in advanced age. In vivo basal BIV indices were found to be reduced with age, but this reduction diminished in the intrinsic state. However, in pacemaker tissue BIV indices increased in advanced age vs. adults. In the isolated pacemaker tissue, the sensitivity of the average BI and BIV in response to autonomic receptor stimulation or activation of mechanisms intrinsic to pacemaker cells by broad-spectrum phosphodiesterase inhibition declined in advanced age. Thus, changes in mechanisms intrinsic to pacemaker cells increase the average BIs and BIV in the mice of advanced age. Autonomic neural input to pacemaker tissue compensates for failure of molecular intrinsic mechanisms to preserve average BI. But this compensation reduces the BIV due to both the imbalance of autonomic neural input to the pacemaker cells and altered pacemaker cell responses to neural input. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Distinct roles of presynaptic dopamine receptors in the differential modulation of the intrinsic synapses of medium-spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Takeo; Schmauss, Claudia; Rayport, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Background In both schizophrenia and addiction, pathological changes in dopamine release appear to induce alterations in the circuitry of the nucleus accumbens that affect coordinated thought and motivation. Dopamine acts principally on medium-spiny GABA neurons, which comprise 95% of accumbens neurons and give rise to the majority of inhibitory synapses in the nucleus. To examine dopamine action at single medium-spiny neuron synapses, we imaged Ca2+ levels in their presynaptic varicosities in the acute brain slice using two-photon microscopy. Results Presynaptic Ca2+ rises were differentially modulated by dopamine. The D1/D5 selective agonist SKF81297 was exclusively facilitatory. The D2/D3 selective agonist quinpirole was predominantly inhibitory, but in some instances it was facilitatory. Studies using D2 and D3 receptor knockout mice revealed that quinpirole inhibition was either D2 or D3 receptor-mediated, while facilitation was mainly D3 receptor-mediated. Subsets of varicosities responded to both D1 and D2 agonists, showing that there was significant co-expression of these receptor families in single medium-spiny neurons. Neighboring presynaptic varicosities showed strikingly heterogeneous responses to DA agonists, suggesting that DA receptors may be differentially trafficked to individual varicosities on the same medium-spiny neuron axon. Conclusion Dopamine receptors are present on the presynaptic varicosities of medium-spiny neurons, where they potently control GABAergic synaptic transmission. While there is significant coexpression of D1 and D2 family dopamine receptors in individual neurons, at the subcellular level, these receptors appear to be heterogeneously distributed, potentially explaining the considerable controversy regarding dopamine action in the striatum, and in particular the degree of dopamine receptor segregation on these neurons. Assuming that post-receptor signaling is restricted to the microdomains of medium-spiny neuron varicosities

  12. Discovery of a photoresponse amplification mechanism in compensated PN junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuchun; Rahman, Samia N.; Hall, David; Lo, Yu-Hwa; Liu, Yu-Hsin; Sham, L. J.

    2015-01-19

    We report the experimental evidence of uncovering a photoresponse amplification mechanism in heavily doped, partially compensated silicon p-n junctions under very low bias voltage. We show that the observed photocurrent gain occurs at a bias that is more than an order of magnitude below the threshold voltage for conventional impact ionization. Moreover, contrary to the case of avalanche detectors and p-i-n diodes, the amplified photoresponse is enhanced rather than suppressed with increasing temperature. These distinctive characteristics lead us to hypothesize that the inelastic scattering between energetic electrons (holes) and the ionized impurities in the depletion and charge neutral regions of the p-n junction in a cyclic manner plays a significant role in the amplification process. Such an internal signal amplification mechanism, which occurs at much lower bias than impact ionization and favors room temperature over cryogenic temperature, makes it promising for practical device applications.

  13. Direct Observation of High Photoresponsivity in Pure Graphene Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qinglin; He, Jun; Liu, Zongwen

    2017-02-01

    Ultrafast and broad spectral bandwidth photodetectors are desirable attributable to their unique bandstructures. Photodetectors based on graphene have great potential due to graphene's outstanding optical and electrical properties. However, the highest reported values of the photoresponsivity of pure graphene are less than 10 mA/W at room temperature, which significantly limits its potential applications. Here, we report a photoresponsivity of 32 A/W in pure monolayer graphene photodetectors, an improvement of over one order of magnitude for functional graphene nanostructures (<3 A/W). The high photocurrent generation in our devices can be attributed to the high sensitivity of graphene's resistivity to a local change of the electric field induced by photo-excited carriers generated in the light-doping substrate. This dramatically increases the feasibility of using graphene for the next generation of photodetectors.

  14. Versatile Dual Photoresponsive System for Precise Control of Chemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Can; Bing, Wei; Wang, Faming; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-08-22

    A versatile method for photoregulation of chemical reactions was developed through a combination of near-infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) light sensitive materials. This regulatory effect was achieved through photoresponsive modulation of reaction temperature and pH values, two prominent factors influencing reaction kinetics. Photothermal nanomaterial graphene oxide (GO) and photobase reagent malachite green carbinol base (MGCB) were selected for temperature and pH regulation, respectively. Using nanocatalyst- and enzyme-mediated chemical reactions as model systems, we demonstrated the feasibility and high efficiency of this method. In addition, a photoresponsive, multifunctional "Band-aid"-like hydrogel platform was presented for programmable wound healing. Overall, this simple, efficient, and reversible system was found to be effective for controlling a wide variety of chemical reactions. Our work may provide a method for remote and sustainable control over chemical reactions for industrial and biomedical applications.

  15. Direct Observation of High Photoresponsivity in Pure Graphene Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qinglin; He, Jun; Liu, Zongwen

    2017-12-01

    Ultrafast and broad spectral bandwidth photodetectors are desirable attributable to their unique bandstructures. Photodetectors based on graphene have great potential due to graphene's outstanding optical and electrical properties. However, the highest reported values of the photoresponsivity of pure graphene are less than 10 mA/W at room temperature, which significantly limits its potential applications. Here, we report a photoresponsivity of 32 A/W in pure monolayer graphene photodetectors, an improvement of over one order of magnitude for functional graphene nanostructures (<3 A/W). The high photocurrent generation in our devices can be attributed to the high sensitivity of graphene's resistivity to a local change of the electric field induced by photo-excited carriers generated in the light-doping substrate. This dramatically increases the feasibility of using graphene for the next generation of photodetectors.

  16. Method for fabricating photovoltaic device having improved short wavelength photoresponse

    DOEpatents

    Catalano, Anthony W.

    1989-07-04

    Amorphous p-i-n silicon photovoltaic cells with improved short wavelength photoresponse are fabricated with reduced p-dopant contamination at the p/i interface. Residual p-dopants are removed by flushing the deposition chamber with a gaseous mixture capable of reacting with excess doping contaminants prior to the deposition of the i-layer and subsequent to the deposition of the p-layer.

  17. Photoresponsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for controlled doxorubicin release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Cuiping; Wu, Ming; Zhang, Cecheng; Lin, Xinyi; Wei, Zuwu; Zheng, Youshi; Zhang, Da; Zhang, Zhenxi; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-06-01

    Currently, photoresponsive nanomaterials are particularly attractive due to their spatial and temporal controlled drug release abilities. In this work, we report a photoresponsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticle for remote controlled delivery of anticancer drugs. This hybrid nanoparticle comprises three distinct functional components: (i) a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) core to encapsulate doxorubicin; (ii) a soybean lecithin monolayer at the interface of the core and shell to act as a molecular fence to prevent drug leakage; (iii) a photoresponsive polymeric shell with anti-biofouling properties to enhance nanoparticle stability, which could be detached from the nanoparticle to trigger the drug release via a decrease in the nanoparticle’s stability under light irradiation. In vitro results revealed that this core-shell nanoparticle had excellent light-controlled drug release behavior (76% release with light irradiation versus 10% release without light irradiation). The confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results also further demonstrated the light-controlled drug release behavior inside the cancer cells. Furthermore, a CCK8 assay demonstrated that light irradiation could significantly improve the efficiency of killing cancer cells. Meanwhile, whole-animal fluorescence imaging of a tumor-bearing mouse also confirmed that light irradiation could trigger drug release in vivo. Taken together, our data suggested that a hybrid nanoparticle could be a novel light controlled drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  18. Light sensing in a photoresponsive, organic-based complementary inverter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungyoung; Lim, Taehoon; Sim, Kyoseung; Kim, Hyojoong; Choi, Youngill; Park, Keechan; Pyo, Seungmoon

    2011-05-01

    A photoresponsive organic complementary inverter was fabricated and its light sensing characteristics was studied. An organic circuit was fabricated by integrating p-channel pentacene and n-channel copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc) organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) with a polymeric gate dielectric. The F16CuPc OTFT showed typical n-type characteristics and a strong photoresponse under illumination. Whereas under illumination, the pentacene OTFT showed a relatively weak photoresponse with typical p-type characteristics. The characteristics of the organic electro-optical circuit could be controlled by the incident light intensity, a gate bias, or both. The logic threshold (V(M), when V(IN) = V(OUT)) was reduced from 28.6 V without illumination to 19.9 V at 6.94 mW/cm². By using solely optical or a combination of optical and electrical pulse signals, light sensing was demonstrated in this type of organic circuit, suggesting that the circuit can be potentially used in various optoelectronic applications, including optical sensors, photodetectors and electro-optical transceivers.

  19. Photoresponsive Self-Healing Polymer Composite with Photoabsorbing Hybrid Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Chao

    2015-11-18

    Microcapsule-based self-healing polymer materials are highly desirable because they can heal large-volume cracks without changing the original chemical structures of polymers. However, they are limited by processing difficulties and inhomogeneous distributions of two components. Herein, we report a one-component photoresponsive self-healing polymer composite with photoabsorbing hybrid microcapsules (PAHM), which gives the microcapsules photoabsorbing properties by introducing nano-TiO2 particles as photoabsorbing and emulsified agents in the poly(urea-formaldehyde)/TiO2 hybrid shells. Upon mechanical damage and then exposure to light, the photoresponsive healing agents in the cracks will be solidified to allow for self-healing, while the healing agents in the unbroken PAHM will be protected and remain unreacted, which endows this photoresponsive microcapsule-based self-healing composite with self-healing properties like those found in the conventional two-component microcapsule-based systems. Given the universality of this hybrid polymerization method, incorporation of the photoabsorbing particles to conventional polymer shells may further broaden the scope of applications of these widely used materials.

  20. Photodiode-Like Behavior and Excellent Photoresponse of Vertical Si/Monolayer MoS2 Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Xu, Cheng-Yan; Wang, Jia-Ying; Zhen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and their van der Waals heterostructures have been experimentally and theoretically demonstrated as potential candidates for photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices due to the suitable bandgap and excellent light absorption. In this work, we report the observation of photodiode behavior in (both n- and p- type) silicon/monolayer MoS2 vertical heterostructures. The photocurrent and photoresponsivity of heterostructures photodiodes were dependent both on the incident light wavelength and power density, and the highest photoresponsivity of 7.2 A/W was achieved in n-Si/monolayer MoS2 vertical heterostructures photodiodes. Compared with n-Si/MoS2 heterostructures, the photoresponsivity of p-Si/MoS2 heterostructure was much lower. Kelvin probe microscope (KFM) results demonstrated the more efficient separation of photogenerated excitons in n-Si/MoS2 than that in p-Si/MoS2. Coupling KFM results with band alignments of (p-, n-) Si/MoS2 heterostructures, the origins of photodiode-like phenomena of p-Si/MoS2 and n-Si/MoS2 have been unveiled, that is intrinsic built-in electric field in p-n junction, and modulated barrier height and width at the interface in n-n junction. Our work may benefit to the deep understanding of the integration of two-dimensional materials with more conventional three-dimensional semiconductors, and then contribute to the developments in the area of van der Waals heterostructures. PMID:25424301

  1. Controllable photoresponse behavior in a single InAs nanowire phototransistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bang; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Luo, Yanbin; Lu, Qichao; Ren, Xiaomin

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a single InAs nanowire phototransistor with controllable photoresponse behavior. The device is based on a top-gated nanowire field effect transistor with an electron mobility of 5790 cm2 V-1 s-1. In the absence of gate voltage, negative and positive photoresponses are observed under low and high illumination, respectively. By applying a relatively high negative/positive gate voltage, pure positive/negative photoresponse is obtained, respectively. The controllable photoresponse is attributed to a gate-voltage-induced barrier height modulation between the trap state energy level in the photogating layer and the conduction band of nanowire. The device is promising for optoelectronic applications.

  2. GaAs solar cell photoresponse modeling using PC-1D V2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, D. A.; Olsen, L. C.; Dunham, G.; Addis, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    Photoresponse data of high efficiency GaAs solar cells were analyzed using PC-1D V2.1. The approach required to use PC-1D for photoresponse data analysis, and the physical insights gained from performing the analysis are discussed. In particular, the effect of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As heteroface quality was modeled. Photoresponse or spectral quantum efficiency is an important tool in characterizing material quality and predicting cell performance. The strength of the photoresponse measurement lies in the ability to precisely fit the experimental data with a physical model. PC-1D provides a flexible platform for calculations based on these physical models.

  3. cAMP response element-binding protein-mediated gene expression increases the intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lopez de Armentia, Mikel; Jancic, Dragana; Olivares, Roman; Alarcon, Juan M; Kandel, Eric R; Barco, Angel

    2007-12-12

    To investigate the role of CREB-mediated gene expression on the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, we obtained intracellular recordings from pyramidal neurons of transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of CREB, VP16-CREB, in a regulated and restricted manner. We found that transgene expression increased the neuronal excitability and inhibited the slow and medium afterhyperpolarization currents. These changes may contribute to the reduced threshold for LTP observed in these mice. When strong transgene expression was turned on for prolonged period of time, these mice also showed a significant loss of hippocampal neurons and sporadic epileptic seizures. These deleterious effects were dose dependent and could be halted, but not reversed by turning off transgene expression. Our experiments reveal a new role for hippocampal CREB-mediated gene expression, identify the slow afterhyperpolarization as a primary target of CREB action, provide a new mouse model to investigate temporal lobe epilepsy and associated neurodegeneration, and illustrate the risks of cell death associated to a sustained manipulation of this pathway. As a result, our study has important implications for both the understanding of the cellular bases of learning and memory and the consideration of therapies targeted to the CREB pathway.

  4. Temperature-Sensitive Cav1.2 Calcium Channels Support Intrinsic Firing of Pyramidal Neurons and Provide a Target for the Treatment of Febrile Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Radzicki, Daniel; Yau, Hau-Jie; Pollema-Mays, Sarah L.; Mlsna, Lauren; Cho, Kangho; Koh, Sookyong

    2013-01-01

    Febrile seizures are associated with increased brain temperature and are often resistant to treatments with antiepileptic drugs, such as carbamazepine and phenytoin, which are sodium channel blockers. Although they are clearly correlated with the hyperthermic condition, the precise cellular mechanisms of febrile seizures remain unclear. We performed patch-clamp recordings from pyramidal cells in acute rat brain slices at temperatures up to 40°C and found that, at ≥37°C, L-type calcium channels are active at unexpectedly hyperpolarized potentials and drive intrinsic firing, which is also supported by a temperature-dependent, gadolinium-sensitive sodium conductance. Pharmacological data, RT-PCR, and the current persistence in Cav1.3 knock-out mice suggested a critical contribution of Cav1.2 subunits to the temperature-dependent intrinsic firing, which was blocked by nimodipine. Because intrinsic firing may play a critical role in febrile seizures, we tested the effect of nimodipine in an in vivo model of febrile seizures and found that this drug dramatically reduces both the incidence and duration of febrile seizures in rat pups, suggesting new possibilities of intervention for this important pathological condition. PMID:23761887

  5. Enhancing Photoresponsivity of Self-Aligned MoS2 Field-Effect Transistors by Piezo-Phototronic Effect from GaN Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingqiang; Yang, Xiaonian; Gao, Guoyun; Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Haitao; Li, Qiang; Lou, Zheng; Shen, Guozhen; Liao, Lei; Pan, Caofeng; Lin Wang, Zhong

    2016-08-23

    We report high-performance self-aligned MoS2 field-effect transistors (FETs) with enhanced photoresponsivity by the piezo-phototronic effect. The FETs are fabricated based on monolayer MoS2 with a piezoelectric GaN nanowire (NW) as the local gate, and a self-aligned process is employed to define the source/drain electrodes. The fabrication method allows the preservation of the intrinsic property of MoS2 and suppresses the scattering center density in the MoS2/GaN interface, which results in high electrical and photoelectric performances. MoS2 FETs with channel lengths of ∼200 nm have been fabricated with a small subthreshold slope of 64 mV/dec. The photoresponsivity is 443.3 A·W(-1), with a fast response and recovery time of ∼5 ms under 550 nm light illumination. When strain is introduced into the GaN NW, the photoresponsivity is further enhanced to 734.5 A·W(-1) and maintains consistent response and recovery time, which is comparable with that of the mechanical exfoliation of MoS2 transistors. The approach presented here opens an avenue to high-performance top-gated piezo-enhanced MoS2 photodetectors.

  6. Altered Intrinsic Pyramidal Neuron Properties and Pathway-Specific Synaptic Dysfunction Underlie Aberrant Hippocampal Network Function in a Mouse Model of Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Clair A.; Witton, Jonathan; Nowacki, Jakub; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Jones, Matthew W.; Randall, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and deposition of tau protein aggregates is proposed to contribute to cognitive impairments in dementia by disrupting neuronal function in brain regions, including the hippocampus. We used a battery of in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological recordings in the rTg4510 transgenic mouse model, which overexpresses a mutant form of human tau protein, to investigate the effects of tau pathology on hippocampal neuronal function in area CA1 of 7- to 8-month-old mice, an age point at which rTg4510 animals exhibit advanced tau pathology and progressive neurodegeneration. In vitro recordings revealed shifted theta-frequency resonance properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons, deficits in synaptic transmission at Schaffer collateral synapses, and blunted plasticity and imbalanced inhibition at temporoammonic synapses. These changes were associated with aberrant CA1 network oscillations, pyramidal neuron bursting, and spatial information coding in vivo. Our findings relate tauopathy-associated changes in cellular neurophysiology to altered behavior-dependent network function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dementia is characterized by the loss of learning and memory ability. The deposition of tau protein aggregates in the brain is a pathological hallmark of dementia; and the hippocampus, a brain structure known to be critical in processing learning and memory, is one of the first and most heavily affected regions. Our results show that, in area CA1 of hippocampus, a region involved in spatial learning and memory, tau pathology is associated with specific disturbances in synaptic, cellular, and network-level function, culminating in the aberrant encoding of spatial information and spatial memory impairment. These studies identify several novel ways in which hippocampal information processing may be disrupted in dementia, which may provide targets for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:26758828

  7. [Intrinsic cardiac ganglia].

    PubMed

    Birand, Ahmet

    2008-12-01

    Heart has been considered as the source and the seat of emotions, passion and love. But from the dawn of XIXth century, scientists have emphasized that the heart, though life depends on its ceaseless activity, is merely a electromechanical pump, pumping oxygenated blood. Nowadays, we all know that heart pumps blood commensurate with the needs of the body and this unending toil, and its regulation depends on the intrinsic properties of the myocardium, Frank-Starling Law and neurohumoral contribution. It has been understood, though not clearly enough, that these time-tensions may cause structural or functional cardiac impairments and arrhythmias are related to the autonomic nervous system. Less well known and less taken in account in daily cardiology practice is the fact that heart has an intrinsic cardiac nervous system, or "heart brain" consisting of complex ganglia, intrinsic cardiac ganglia containing afferent (receiving), local circuit (interneurons) and efferent (transmitting) sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons. This review enlightens structural and functional aspects of intrinsic cardiac ganglia as the very first step in the regulation of cardiac function. This issue is important for targets of pharmacological treatment and techniques of cardiac surgery interventions as repair of septal defects, valvular interventions and congenital corrections.

  8. Distinct photoresponse in graphene induced by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wen Hui; Nan, Hai Yan; Liu, Qi; Ni, Zhen Hua; Liang, Zheng; Yu, Zhi Hao; Liu, Feng Yuan; Wang, Xin Ran; Hu, Wei Da; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-12

    The graphene-based photodetector with tunable p-p{sup +}-p junctions was fabricated through a simple laser irradiation process. Distinct photoresponse was observed at the graphene (G)-laser irradiated graphene (LIG) junction by scanning photocurrent measurements, and its magnitude can be modulated as a result of a positive correlation between the photocurrent and doping concentration in LIG region. Detailed investigation suggests that the photo-thermoelectric effect, instead of the photovoltaic effect, dominates the photocurrent generation at the G-LIG junctions. Such a simple and low-cost technique offers an alternative way for the fabrication of graphene-based optoelectronic devices.

  9. Photoresponse of double-stacked graphene to Infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Prarthana; Mohapatra, Dipti R; Misra, Abha

    2015-10-14

    We report the photoresponse of stacked graphene layers towards infrared radiation. Graphene is stacked in two configurations, namely, crossed and parallel layers. Raman analysis demonstrated a strong interaction among the stacked graphene layers. Graphene in the crossed configuration exhibited the presence of both negative and positive conductivities; however, other configurations of graphene exhibited positive conductivity only. The presence of negative photoconductivity is proposed to be due to oxygen or oxygen-related functional group absorbents that are trapped in between two monolayers of graphene and act as scattering centers for free carriers. An interesting trend is reported in differential conductivity when stacked layers are compared with multilayers and parallel-stacked graphene layers.

  10. Photoresponse of double-stacked graphene to Infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, Prarthana; Mohapatra, Dipti R.; Misra, Abha

    2015-09-01

    We report the photoresponse of stacked graphene layers towards infrared radiation. Graphene is stacked in two configurations, namely, crossed and parallel layers. Raman analysis demonstrated a strong interaction among the stacked graphene layers. Graphene in the crossed configuration exhibited the presence of both negative and positive conductivities; however, other configurations of graphene exhibited positive conductivity only. The presence of negative photoconductivity is proposed to be due to oxygen or oxygen-related functional group absorbents that are trapped in between two monolayers of graphene and act as scattering centers for free carriers. An interesting trend is reported in differential conductivity when stacked layers are compared with multilayers and parallel-stacked graphene layers.

  11. Distinct photoresponse in graphene induced by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen Hui; Nan, Hai Yan; Liu, Qi; Liang, Zheng; Yu, Zhi Hao; Liu, Feng Yuan; Hu, Wei Da; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xin Ran; Ni, Zhen Hua

    2015-01-01

    The graphene-based photodetector with tunable p-p+-p junctions was fabricated through a simple laser irradiation process. Distinct photoresponse was observed at the graphene (G)-laser irradiated graphene (LIG) junction by scanning photocurrent measurements, and its magnitude can be modulated as a result of a positive correlation between the photocurrent and doping concentration in LIG region. Detailed investigation suggests that the photo-thermoelectric effect, instead of the photovoltaic effect, dominates the photocurrent generation at the G-LIG junctions. Such a simple and low-cost technique offers an alternative way for the fabrication of graphene-based optoelectronic devices.

  12. Single-layer tungsten oxide as intelligent photo-responsive nanoagents for permanent male sterilization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Xianjun; Ran, Xiang; Ju, Enguo; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    Permanent male sterilization has been recognized as useful tools for the development of neuter experimental animals and fattening livestock, as well as efficient control of pet overpopulation. Traditional routes such as surgical ways, chemical injections, and anti-fertility vaccines have addressed these crucial problems with idea outcomes. However, these routes usually bring out serious pain and infection towards animals, as well as induce long-term adverse reaction and immune suppression. Thus, a convenient, but non-surgical strategy for male sterilization under a mild manner is highly desirable. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate a novel platform for male sterilization by using single-layer WO2.72 nanosheets as smart photo-responsive sterilants. Upon a 980 nm irradiation, these nanoagents can possess intrinsic NIR-induced hyperthermia and sensitize the formation of singlet oxygen due to the cooperation of photothermal and photodynamic effects. Mechanism of cellular injury can be attributed to the denaturation of protein and apoptosis-related death. Moreover, long-term toxicity and possible metabolism route after testicular injection are discussed, indicating the neglectable systemic toxicity and high bio-compatibility of our nanoagents. Overall, our strategy can extremely overcome the shortcomings in various routine routes and suggest the new biological application of nanomaterials.

  13. Photoresponsive Wettability in Monolayer Films from Sinapinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Cleverson A. S.; Gomes, Douglas J. C.; de Souza, Nara C.; Silva, Josmary R.

    2013-01-01

    Sinapinic acid is an interesting material because it is both antioxidant and antibacterial agent. In addition, when illuminated with ultraviolet light, it can exhibit the so-called photodimerization process. In this paper, we report on the investigation of monolayer films from 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (sinapinic acid, SinA) deposited onto poly(allylamine hydrochloride), PAH, films. SinA monolayers were prepared by using the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique. Adsorption kinetics curves were well fitted by a biexponential function suggesting that the adsorption process is determined by two mechanisms: nucleation and growth of aggregates. By using wetting contact angle analysis, we have found that SinA monolayers exhibit photoresponsive wettability under UV irradiation (365 nm); that is, wettability decreases with increasing UV irradiation time. The photoresponse of wettability was attributed to photodimerization process. This hypothesis was supported by the dependence of surface morphological structure and absorption on UV irradiation time. The mechanism found in the well-known transcinnamic acid crystals is used to explain the photodimerization process in SinA monolayers. PMID:24302879

  14. Photoresponsive Amphiphilic Macrocycles Containing Main-Chain Azobenzene Polymers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yadong; Wang, Zhao; Li, Yiwen; Zhang, Zhengbiao; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Xiangqiang; Zhou, Nianchen; Zhu, Xiulin

    2015-07-01

    Herein, the first example of photosensitive cyclic amphiphilic homopolymers consisting of multiple biphenyl azobenzene chromophores in the cyclic main chain tethered with hydrophilic tetraethylene glycol monomethyl ether units is presented. The synthetic approach involves sequentially performed thermal catalyzed "click" step-growth polymerization in bulk, and Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) intramolecular cyclization from α-alkyne/ω-azide linear precursors. It is observed that such amphiphilic macrocycles exhibit increased glass transition temperatures (Tg ), slightly faster trans-cis-trans photoisomerization, and enhanced fluorescence emission intensity compared with the corresponding linear polymers. In addition, the cyclic amphiphilic homopolymers self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles with smaller sizes which possess slower photoresponsive behaviors in a tetrahydrofuran/water mixture compared with those of the linear ones. All these interesting observations suggest that the cyclic topology has a great influence on the physical properties and self-assembly behavior of these photoresponsive amphiphilic macrocycles in general. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Colossal Ultraviolet Photoresponsivity of Few-Layer Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Koon, Gavin Kok Wai; Xiang, Du; Han, Cheng; Toh, Chee Tat; Kulkarni, Eeshan S; Verzhbitskiy, Ivan; Carvalho, Alexandra; Rodin, Aleksandr S; Koenig, Steven P; Eda, Goki; Chen, Wei; Neto, A H Castro; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2015-08-25

    Black phosphorus has an orthorhombic layered structure with a layer-dependent direct band gap from monolayer to bulk, making this material an emerging material for photodetection. Inspired by this and the recent excitement over this material, we studied the optoelectronics characteristics of high-quality, few-layer black phosphorus-based photodetectors over a wide spectrum ranging from near-ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (NIR). It is demonstrated for the first time that black phosphorus can be configured as an excellent UV photodetector with a specific detectivity ∼3 × 10(13) Jones. More critically, we found that the UV photoresponsivity can be significantly enhanced to ∼9 × 10(4) A W(-1) by applying a source-drain bias (VSD) of 3 V, which is the highest ever measured in any 2D material and 10(7) times higher than the previously reported value for black phosphorus. We attribute such a colossal UV photoresponsivity to the resonant-interband transition between two specially nested valence and conduction bands. These nested bands provide an unusually high density of states for highly efficient UV absorption due to the singularity of their nature.

  16. Tribotronic Enhanced Photoresponsivity of a MoS2 Phototransistor

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yaokun; Xue, Fei; Wang, Longfei; Chen, Jian; Luo, Jianjun; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted a great attention as an excellent 2D material for future optoelectronic devices. Here, a novel MoS2 tribotronic phototransistor is developed by a conjunction of a MoS2 phototransistor and a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) in sliding mode. When an external friction layer produces a relative sliding on the device, the induced positive charges on the back gate of the MoS2 phototransistor act as a “gate” to increase the channel conductivity as the traditional back gate voltage does. With the sliding distance increases, the photoresponsivity of the device is drastically enhanced from 221.0 to 727.8 A W−1 at the 100 mW cm−2 UV excitation intensity and 1 V bias voltage. This work has extended the emerging tribotronics to the field of photodetection based on 2D material, and demonstrated a new way to realize the adjustable photoelectric devices with high photoresponsivity via human interfacing. PMID:27812472

  17. Tribotronic Enhanced Photoresponsivity of a MoS2 Phototransistor.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yaokun; Xue, Fei; Wang, Longfei; Chen, Jian; Luo, Jianjun; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted a great attention as an excellent 2D material for future optoelectronic devices. Here, a novel MoS2 tribotronic phototransistor is developed by a conjunction of a MoS2 phototransistor and a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) in sliding mode. When an external friction layer produces a relative sliding on the device, the induced positive charges on the back gate of the MoS2 phototransistor act as a "gate" to increase the channel conductivity as the traditional back gate voltage does. With the sliding distance increases, the photoresponsivity of the device is drastically enhanced from 221.0 to 727.8 A W(-1) at the 100 mW cm(-2) UV excitation intensity and 1 V bias voltage. This work has extended the emerging tribotronics to the field of photodetection based on 2D material, and demonstrated a new way to realize the adjustable photoelectric devices with high photoresponsivity via human interfacing.

  18. Dark current and photoresponse characteristics of extended wavelength infrared photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, D.; Perera, A. G. U.; Li, L. H.; Chen, L.; Linfield, E. H.

    2017-07-01

    The dark current and spectral photoresponse thresholds of a semiconductor photodetector are normally determined by the minimum energy gap (Δ) of the material, or the interfacial energy gap of the heterostructure. In this manuscript, we discuss the performance of an asymmetric p-GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructure-based infrared photodetector, which shows an extended wavelength threshold beyond the limit set by Δ. The measured dark current was found to agree well with fits obtained from a 3D carrier drift model using the designed value of Δ ˜ 0.40 eV (˜3.1 μm). In contrast, the spectral photoresponse showed extended wavelength thresholds of ˜68 μm, ˜45 μm, and ˜60 μm at positive, zero, and negative biases, respectively, at 5.3 K. For a reference (symmetric) photodetector, the dark current was fitted with the designed value of Δ ˜0.30 eV, and excellent agreement was obtained for both the measured dark current and spectral response. This underlies the advantage of using asymmetric infrared photo-detector designs, in which an extension to the detected wavelengths can be obtained with little compromise to the dark current characteristics.

  19. Transient photoresponse of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond electrodes in saline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnood, Arman; Simonov, Alexandr N.; Laird, Jamie S.; Maturana, Matias I.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Stacey, Alastair; Ibbotson, Michael R.; Spiccia, Leone; Prawer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Beyond conventional electrically-driven neuronal stimulation methods, there is a growing interest in optically-driven approaches. In recent years, nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) has emerged as a strong material candidate for use in electrically-driven stimulation electrodes. This work investigates the electrochemical activity of N-UNCD in response to pulsed illumination, to assess its potential for use as an optically-driven stimulation electrode. Whilst N-UNCD in the as-grown state exhibits a weak photoresponse, the oxygen plasma treated film exhibits two orders of magnitude enhancement in its sub-bandgap open circuit photovoltage response. The enhancement is attributed to the formation of a dense network of oxygen-terminated diamond nanocrystals at the N-UNCD surface. Electrically connected to the N-UNCD bulk via sub-surface graphitic grain boundaries, these diamond nanocrystals introduce a semiconducting barrier between the sub-surface graphitic semimetal and the electrolyte solution, leading to a photovoltage under irradiation with wavelengths of λ = 450 nm and shorter. Within the safe optical exposure limit of 2 mW mm-2, charge injection capacity of 0.01 mC cm-2 is achieved using a 15 × 15 μm electrode, meeting the requirements for extracellular and intercellular stimulation. The nanoscale nature of processes presented here along with the diamond's biocompatibility and biostability open an avenue for the use of oxygen treated N-UNCD as optically driven stimulating electrodes.

  20. A constant light-genetic screen identifies KISMET as a regulator of circadian photoresponses.

    PubMed

    Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Murad, Alejandro; Rosbash, Michael; Emery, Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Circadian pacemakers are essential to synchronize animal physiology and behavior with the dayrationight cycle. They are self-sustained, but the phase of their oscillations is determined by environmental cues, particularly light intensity and temperature cycles. In Drosophila, light is primarily detected by a dedicated blue-light photoreceptor: CRYPTOCHROME (CRY). Upon light activation, CRY binds to the pacemaker protein TIMELESS (TIM) and triggers its proteasomal degradation, thus resetting the circadian pacemaker. To understand further the CRY input pathway, we conducted a misexpression screen under constant light based on the observation that flies with a disruption in the CRY input pathway remain robustly rhythmic instead of becoming behaviorally arrhythmic. We report the identification of more than 20 potential regulators of CRY-dependent light responses. We demonstrate that one of them, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme KISMET (KIS), is necessary for normal circadian photoresponses, but does not affect the circadian pacemaker. KIS genetically interacts with CRY and functions in PDF-negative circadian neurons, which play an important role in circadian light responses. It also affects daily CRY-dependent TIM oscillations in a peripheral tissue: the eyes. We therefore conclude that KIS is a key transcriptional regulator of genes that function in the CRY signaling cascade, and thus it plays an important role in the synchronization of circadian rhythms with the dayrationight cycle.

  1. Distribution of transition times in a stochastic model of excitable cell: Insights into the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of randomness in neuronal interspike intervals.

    PubMed

    Requena-Carrión, Jesús; Requena-Carrión, Víctor J

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we develop an analytical approach to studying random patterns of activity in excitable cells. Our analytical approach uses a two-state stochastic model of excitable system based on the electrophysiological properties of refractoriness and restitution, which characterize cell recovery after excitation. By applying the notion of probability density flux, we derive the distributions of transition times between states and the distribution of interspike interval (ISI) durations for a constant applied stimulus. The derived ISI distribution is unimodal and, provided that the time spent in the excited state is constant, can be approximated by a Rayleigh peak followed by an exponential tail. We then explore the role of the model parameters in determining the shape of the derived distributions and the ISI coefficient of variation. Finally, we use our analytical results to study simulation results from the stochastic Morris-Lecar neuron and from a three-state extension of the proposed stochastic model, which is capable of reproducing multimodal ISI histograms.

  2. Photoresponse in photoconductor devices fabricated from HgTe-HgCdTe superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, S. D.; Musca, C. A.; Dell, J. M.; Faraone, L.; Becker, C. R.

    2011-01-24

    Results of photoresponse measurements performed on long-wave infrared photoconductors fabricated from HgTe-HgCdTe superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy are presented. Absolute spectral photoresponse measurements as a function of temperature and applied electric field have be undertaken, with the peak photoresponse of 3.3x10{sup 3} V/W measured at 100 K. Sweepout effects were observed for fields greater than 20 V/cm and quantum efficiencies approaching 80% for 5 {mu}m thick devices have been predicted from absorption measurements of grown material.

  3. Control of ionic conductivity of ionic liquid/photoresponsive poly(amide acid) gels by photoirradiation.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Masahiro; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Horie, Kazuyuki; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2007-10-21

    1,3-Dibutylimidazolium bromide was soaked into a polymer network prepared by condensation of 4-4'-diaminoazobenzene, pyromellitic dianhydride and 1,3,5-tri(4-aminophenyl)benzene to form photoresponsive ion conductive gels.

  4. Flexible ultraviolet photodetectors with broad photoresponse based on branched ZnS-ZnO heterostructure nanofilms.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Zhang, Chao; Zhai, Tianyou; Li, Song-Lin; Wang, Xi; Liu, Jiangwei; Jie, Xiao; Liu, Dequan; Liao, Meiyong; Koide, Yasuo; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2014-05-21

    The application of nanofilm networks made of branched ZnS-ZnO nanostructures as a flexible UV photodetector is demonstrated. The fabricated devices show excellent operational characteristics: tunable spectral selectivity, widerange photoresponse, fast response speed, and excellent environmental stability.

  5. High broad-band photoresponsivity of mechanically formed InSe-graphene van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Garry W; Svatek, Simon A; Hague, Lee; Makarovsky, Oleg; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R; Mellor, Christopher J; Beton, Peter H; Eaves, Laurence; Novoselov, Kostya S; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D; Vdovin, Evgeny E; Marsden, Alex J; Wilson, Neil R; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-07-01

    High broad-band photoresponsivity of mechanically formed InSe-graphene van der Waals heterostructures is achieved by exploiting the broad-band transparency of graphene, the direct bandgap of InSe, and the favorable band line up of InSe with graphene. The photoresponsivity exceeds that for other van der Waals heterostructures and the spectral response extends from the near-infrared to the visible spectrum.

  6. Characterizing and modeling the intrinsic light response of rat ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Walch, Olivia J; Zhang, L Samantha; Reifler, Aaron N; Dolikian, Michael E; Forger, Daniel B; Wong, Kwoon Y

    2015-11-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) mediate both image-forming vision and non-image-forming visual responses such as pupillary constriction and circadian photoentrainment. Five types of ipRGCs, named M1-M5, have been discovered in rodents. To further investigate their photoresponse properties, we made multielectrode array spike recordings from rat ipRGCs, classified them into M1, M2/M4, and M3/M5 clusters, and measured their intrinsic, melanopsin-based responses to single and flickering light pulses. Results showed that ipRGC spiking can track flickers up to ∼0.2 Hz in frequency and that flicker intervals between 5 and 14 s evoke the most spikes. We also learned that melanopsin's integration time is intensity and cluster dependent. Using these data, we constructed a mathematical model for each cluster's intrinsic photoresponse. We found that the data for the M1 cluster are best fit by a model that assumes a large photoresponse, causing the cell to enter depolarization block. Our models also led us to hypothesize that the M2/M4 and M3/M5 clusters experience comparable photoexcitation but that the M3/M5 cascade decays significantly faster than the M2/M4 cascade, resulting in different response waveforms between these clusters. These mathematical models will help predict how each ipRGC cluster might respond to stimuli of any waveform and could inform the invention of lighting technologies that promote health through melanopsin stimulation.

  7. Current rectification and asymmetric photoresponse in MoS2 stacking-induced homojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Juan; Zeng, Qingsheng; Zhou, Jiadong; Zhou, Wu; Zhang, Qing; Yan, Jiaxu; Liu, Zheng; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2017-09-01

    The layer-dependent electronic and optoelectronic properties in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been investigated extensively. Current rectification behavior has been demonstrated using heterojunctions constructed from different TMDs materials, as well as single layer-few layer homojunctions utilizing the layer-dependent behavior of TMDs. MoS2 is the best known TMDs and high quality few-layer samples with different stacking sequences can be facilely obtained by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. In this paper, we firstly report the stacking-dependent junctions formed by the interface of AA-AB stacked bilayer MoS2 samples, together with AA bilayer-single layer (AA-1L) and AB bilayer-single layer (AB-1L) junctions. Current rectification and asymmetric photoresponse are observed for the unique AA-AB junctions, similar to that of bilayer-monolayer (2L-1L) junctions. Current mappings clearly show that the photocurrents are mainly localized along the interfaces, confirming that intrinsic junctions are responsible to their electronic/optoelectronic performances, rather than Schottky barrier between electrode and sample. Our finding demonstrates the promise of using stacking-modulated 2D materials for future electronics and optoelectronics. J.X. and Q.S.Z. performed the experiments. J.X.Y. provided band structure simulation. J.D.Z. and Z.L. helped to prepare the samples. W.Z. provided the STEM images. All authors discussed the results. J.X, J.X.Y. and Z.X.S. conceived the study. J.X. and Q.S.Z. wrote the manuscript with contributions from co-authors.

  8. Visual stimuli recruit intrinsically generated cortical ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jae-eun Kang; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The cortical microcircuit is built with recurrent excitatory connections, and it has long been suggested that the purpose of this design is to enable intrinsically driven reverberating activity. To understand the dynamics of neocortical intrinsic activity better, we performed two-photon calcium imaging of populations of neurons from the primary visual cortex of awake mice during visual stimulation and spontaneous activity. In both conditions, cortical activity is dominated by coactive groups of neurons, forming ensembles whose activation cannot be explained by the independent firing properties of their contributing neurons, considered in isolation. Moreover, individual neurons flexibly join multiple ensembles, vastly expanding the encoding potential of the circuit. Intriguingly, the same coactive ensembles can repeat spontaneously and in response to visual stimuli, indicating that stimulus-evoked responses arise from activating these intrinsic building blocks. Although the spatial properties of stimulus-driven and spontaneous ensembles are similar, spontaneous ensembles are active at random intervals, whereas visually evoked ensembles are time-locked to stimuli. We conclude that neuronal ensembles, built by the coactivation of flexible groups of neurons, are emergent functional units of cortical activity and propose that visual stimuli recruit intrinsically generated ensembles to represent visual attributes. PMID:25201983

  9. Visual stimuli recruit intrinsically generated cortical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jae-eun Kang; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-09-23

    The cortical microcircuit is built with recurrent excitatory connections, and it has long been suggested that the purpose of this design is to enable intrinsically driven reverberating activity. To understand the dynamics of neocortical intrinsic activity better, we performed two-photon calcium imaging of populations of neurons from the primary visual cortex of awake mice during visual stimulation and spontaneous activity. In both conditions, cortical activity is dominated by coactive groups of neurons, forming ensembles whose activation cannot be explained by the independent firing properties of their contributing neurons, considered in isolation. Moreover, individual neurons flexibly join multiple ensembles, vastly expanding the encoding potential of the circuit. Intriguingly, the same coactive ensembles can repeat spontaneously and in response to visual stimuli, indicating that stimulus-evoked responses arise from activating these intrinsic building blocks. Although the spatial properties of stimulus-driven and spontaneous ensembles are similar, spontaneous ensembles are active at random intervals, whereas visually evoked ensembles are time-locked to stimuli. We conclude that neuronal ensembles, built by the coactivation of flexible groups of neurons, are emergent functional units of cortical activity and propose that visual stimuli recruit intrinsically generated ensembles to represent visual attributes.

  10. Transient photoresponse of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond electrodes in saline solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnood, Arman Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Stacey, Alastair; Prawer, Steven; Simonov, Alexandr N.; Spiccia, Leone; Laird, Jamie S.; Maturana, Matias I.; Ibbotson, Michael R.

    2016-03-07

    Beyond conventional electrically-driven neuronal stimulation methods, there is a growing interest in optically-driven approaches. In recent years, nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) has emerged as a strong material candidate for use in electrically-driven stimulation electrodes. This work investigates the electrochemical activity of N-UNCD in response to pulsed illumination, to assess its potential for use as an optically-driven stimulation electrode. Whilst N-UNCD in the as-grown state exhibits a weak photoresponse, the oxygen plasma treated film exhibits two orders of magnitude enhancement in its sub-bandgap open circuit photovoltage response. The enhancement is attributed to the formation of a dense network of oxygen-terminated diamond nanocrystals at the N-UNCD surface. Electrically connected to the N-UNCD bulk via sub-surface graphitic grain boundaries, these diamond nanocrystals introduce a semiconducting barrier between the sub-surface graphitic semimetal and the electrolyte solution, leading to a photovoltage under irradiation with wavelengths of λ = 450 nm and shorter. Within the safe optical exposure limit of 2 mW mm{sup −2}, charge injection capacity of 0.01 mC cm{sup −2} is achieved using a 15 × 15 μm electrode, meeting the requirements for extracellular and intercellular stimulation. The nanoscale nature of processes presented here along with the diamond's biocompatibility and biostability open an avenue for the use of oxygen treated N-UNCD as optically driven stimulating electrodes.

  11. Neurons and tumor suppressors.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-08-20

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to enhance neuron plasticity and improve outcome from damage or disease.

  12. Visible light guided manipulation of liquid wettability on photoresponsive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Gibum; Panchanathan, Divya; Mahmoudi, Seyed Reza; Gondal, Mohammed A.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2017-04-01

    Photoresponsive titania surfaces are of great interest due to their unique wettability change upon ultraviolet light illumination. However, their applications are often limited either by the inability to respond to visible light or the need for special treatment to recover the original wettability. Sensitizing TiO2 surfaces with visible light-absorbing materials has been utilized in photovoltaic applications. Here we demonstrate that a dye-sensitized TiO2 surface can selectively change the wettability towards contacting liquids upon visible light illumination due to a photo-induced voltage across the liquid and the underlying surface. The photo-induced wettability change of our surfaces enables external manipulation of liquid droplet motion upon illumination. We show demulsification of surfactant-stabilized brine-in-oil emulsions via coalescence of brine droplets on our dye-sensitized TiO2 surface upon visible light illumination. We anticipate that our surfaces will have a wide range of applications including microfluidic devices with customizable wettability, solar-driven oil-water clean-up and demulsification technologies.

  13. Highly photoresponsive, ZnO nanorod-based photodetector for operation in the visible spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Daniel S.; Hansen, Matthew; Van Keuren, Edward; Hahm, Jong-in

    2017-04-01

    While significant advances have been made for gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-coupled zinc oxide (ZnO) as visibly blind, ultraviolet photodetection devices, very few ZnO nanomaterial systems have been developed specifically for use in the visible wavelength regime. Further efforts to develop ZnO-based visible photodetectors (PDs) are still highly warranted in order to better understand the precise effect of AuNP load, operation wavelength, and beam position on the device output. In this study, we demonstrate significantly enhanced, photoresponse behaviors of AuNP-coupled ZnO nanorod (NR) network devices in the visible wavelength range with their photoresponse capacity comparable to, if not far exceeding, most commercial PDs as well as recently reported, visible, AuNP-coupled ZnO detectors. In addition, the nature and degree of the photoresponsivity enhancement are systematically elucidated by investigating their light-triggered electrical signals under varying incident wavelengths, AuNP amounts, and illumination positions. We discuss a possible photoconduction mechanism of our AuNP-coupled ZnO NR PDs and the origins of the high photoresponsivity. Specifically related to the AuNP amount-dependent photoresponse behaviors, the nanoparticle density yielding photoresponse maxima is explained as the interplay between localized surface plasmon resonance, plasmonic heating, and scattering in our photothermoelectric effect-driven device. We show that the AuNP-coupled ZnO NR PDs can be constructed via a straightforward method without the need for ultrahigh vacuum, sputtering procedures, or photo/electron-beam lithographic tools. Hence, the approach demonstrated in this study may serve as a convenient and viable means to advance the current state of ZnO-based PDs for operation in the visible spectral range with greatly increased photoresponsivity.

  14. Highly photoresponsive, ZnO nanorod-based photodetector for operation in the visible spectral range.

    PubMed

    Choi, Daniel S; Hansen, Matthew; Van Keuren, Edward; Hahm, Jong-In

    2017-04-07

    While significant advances have been made for gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-coupled zinc oxide (ZnO) as visibly blind, ultraviolet photodetection devices, very few ZnO nanomaterial systems have been developed specifically for use in the visible wavelength regime. Further efforts to develop ZnO-based visible photodetectors (PDs) are still highly warranted in order to better understand the precise effect of AuNP load, operation wavelength, and beam position on the device output. In this study, we demonstrate significantly enhanced, photoresponse behaviors of AuNP-coupled ZnO nanorod (NR) network devices in the visible wavelength range with their photoresponse capacity comparable to, if not far exceeding, most commercial PDs as well as recently reported, visible, AuNP-coupled ZnO detectors. In addition, the nature and degree of the photoresponsivity enhancement are systematically elucidated by investigating their light-triggered electrical signals under varying incident wavelengths, AuNP amounts, and illumination positions. We discuss a possible photoconduction mechanism of our AuNP-coupled ZnO NR PDs and the origins of the high photoresponsivity. Specifically related to the AuNP amount-dependent photoresponse behaviors, the nanoparticle density yielding photoresponse maxima is explained as the interplay between localized surface plasmon resonance, plasmonic heating, and scattering in our photothermoelectric effect-driven device. We show that the AuNP-coupled ZnO NR PDs can be constructed via a straightforward method without the need for ultrahigh vacuum, sputtering procedures, or photo/electron-beam lithographic tools. Hence, the approach demonstrated in this study may serve as a convenient and viable means to advance the current state of ZnO-based PDs for operation in the visible spectral range with greatly increased photoresponsivity.

  15. Regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haixin; Sun, Zhenhua; Saito, Mitsuhiro; Yuan, Qinghong; Zhang, Han; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Zhongchang; Fujita, Takeshi; Ding, Feng; Zheng, Zijian; Yan, Feng; Wu, Hongkai; Chen, Mingwei; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2013-07-23

    Defects play significant roles in properties of graphene and related device performances. Most studies of defects in graphene focus on their influences on electronic or luminescent optical properties, while controlling infrared optoelectronic performance of graphene by defect engineering remains a challenge. In the meantime, pristine graphene has very low infrared photoresponses of ~0.01 A/W due to fast photocarrier dynamics. Here we report regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control for the first time. The infrared optoelectronic transport and photocurrent generation are significantly influenced and well controlled by oxygenous defects and structures in reduced graphene oxide. Moreover, remarkable infrared photoresponses are observed in photoconductor devices based on reduced graphene oxide with an external responsivity of ~0.7 A/W, at least over one order of magnitude higher than that from pristine graphene. External quantum efficiencies of infrared devices reach ultrahigh values of ~97%, which to our knowledge is one of the best efficiencies for infrared photoresponses from nonhybrid, pure graphene or graphene-based derivatives. The flexible infrared photoconductor devices demonstrate no photoresponse degradation even after 1000 bending tests. The results open up new routes to control optoelectronic behaviors of graphene for high-performance devices.

  16. Spatially resolved photoresponse on individual ZnO nanorods: correlating morphology, defects and conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Bandopadhyay, K.; Mitra, J.

    2016-01-01

    Electrically active native point defects have a significant impact on the optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanostructures. Control of defect distribution and a detailed understanding of their physical properties are central to designing ZnO in novel functional forms and architecture, which ultimately decides device performance. Defect control is primarily achieved by either engineering nanostructure morphology by tailoring growth techniques or doping. Here, we report conducting atomic force microscopy studies of spatially resolved photoresponse properties on ZnO nanorod surfaces. The photoresponse for super-band gap, ultraviolet excitations show a direct correlation between surface morphology and photoactivity localization. Additionally, the system exhibits significant photoresponse with sub-bandgap, green illumination; the signature energy associated with the deep level oxygen vacancy states. While the local current-voltage characteristics provide evidence of multiple transport processes and quantifies the photoresponse, the local time-resolved photoresponse data evidences large variations in response times (90 ms–50 s), across the surface of a nanorod. The spatially varied photoconductance and the range in temporal response display a complex interplay of morphology, defects and connectivity that brings about the true colour of these ZnO nanostructures. PMID:27334573

  17. Spatially resolved photoresponse on individual ZnO nanorods: correlating morphology, defects and conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, K.; Mitra, J.

    2016-06-01

    Electrically active native point defects have a significant impact on the optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanostructures. Control of defect distribution and a detailed understanding of their physical properties are central to designing ZnO in novel functional forms and architecture, which ultimately decides device performance. Defect control is primarily achieved by either engineering nanostructure morphology by tailoring growth techniques or doping. Here, we report conducting atomic force microscopy studies of spatially resolved photoresponse properties on ZnO nanorod surfaces. The photoresponse for super-band gap, ultraviolet excitations show a direct correlation between surface morphology and photoactivity localization. Additionally, the system exhibits significant photoresponse with sub-bandgap, green illumination; the signature energy associated with the deep level oxygen vacancy states. While the local current-voltage characteristics provide evidence of multiple transport processes and quantifies the photoresponse, the local time-resolved photoresponse data evidences large variations in response times (90 ms–50 s), across the surface of a nanorod. The spatially varied photoconductance and the range in temporal response display a complex interplay of morphology, defects and connectivity that brings about the true colour of these ZnO nanostructures.

  18. The interaction of photo-responsive surfactants with biological macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazwi, Khiza L.

    The interaction of photo-responsive surfactants with proteins has been considered as a means to exert reversible control over a number of aspects of protein structure and function. The azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB) family of cationic surfactants undergo a photo-reversible cis to trans isomerization upon exposure to light of the appropriate wavelength. The trans form of the molecule has a lower dipole moment across its azo linkage, and is more hydrophobic than the cis isomer. This results in a higher binding affinity with proteins for the trans isomer, inducing a greater degree of unfolding of tertiary and secondary structures. The surfactant has been applied to the study of the amyloid fibrillation pathway in insulin, in which the protein self-associates into long, insoluble, rod-like structures. The fibrillation rate in insulin is enhanced in the presence of the trans- isomer while the formation of fibrils is largely inhibited in the presence of the cis- isomer, where amorphous aggregates are observed instead. Additionally early fibrillar species formed in the trans-azoTAB assays exhibit a greater tendency to lateral aggregation than do structures in the pure protein, resulting in a more truncated, bundled final aggregate morphology. Use of the surfactants as a means to control protein quaternary solution structure has also been explored in the subunit dissociation of tetrameric catalase. In the presence of azoTAB surfactants, catalase dissociates first into a super-active dimer, then at higher concentrations into an aggregation prone monomer. Finally, the structural changes associated with azoTAB-induced unfolding of the two domain protein papain are tracked. The denaturation pathway involves a progressive loss in secondary structure with increasing azoTAB concentration, along with a relaxation of the compact tertiary structure, and a spatial separation of the two domains. A number of complementary experimental techniques are combined to determine

  19. Brominated methanes as photoresponsive molecular storage of elemental Br2.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kazumitsu; Tsuda, Akihiko

    2012-10-01

    The photochemical generation of elemental Br(2) from brominated methanes is reported. Br(2) was generated by the vaporization of carbon oxides and HBr through oxidative photodecomposition of brominated methanes under a 20 W low-pressure mercury lamp, wherein the amount and situations of Br(2) generation were photochemically controllable. Liquid CH(2)Br(2) can be used not only as an organic solvent but also for the photoresponsive molecular storage of Br(2), which is of great technical benefit in a variety of organic syntheses and in materials science. By taking advantage of the in situ generation of Br(2) from the organic solvent itself, many organobromine compounds were synthesized in high practical yields with or without the addition of a catalyst. Herein, Br(2) that was generated by the photodecomposition of CH(2)Br(2) retained its reactivity in solution to undergo essentially the same reactions as those that were carried out with solutions of Br(2) dissolved in CH(2)Br(2) that were prepared without photoirradiation. Furthermore, HBr, which was generated during the course of the photodecomposition of CH(2)Br(2), was also available for the substitution of the OH group for the Br group and for the preparation of the HBr salts of amines. Furthermore, the photochemical generation of Br(2) from CH(2)Br(2) was available for the area-selective photochemical bleaching of natural colored plants, such as red rose petals, wherein Br(2) that was generated photochemically from CH(2)Br(2) was painted onto the petal to cause radical oxidations of the chromophoric anthocyanin molecules. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Effects of asymmetric Schottky contacts on photoresponse in tungsten diselenide (WSe2) phototransistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Arnob; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2017-08-01

    We present an investigation of the effects of asymmetric contacts on the photoresponse of a thin film tungsten diselenide (WSe2) phototransistor. We observe different scenarios in photoresponse during gate modulation depending on the metal-semiconductor contacts through which majority carrier (hole) injection occurs. Under illumination, a peak in drain current is observed during gate modulation when hole injection occurs from the higher Schottky barrier contact. On the other hand, regular behavior in photoresponse during gate modulation is observed when hole injection occurs from the opposite direction, the lower Schottky barrier contact. Further, we analyze the possibilities of realizing WSe2 phototransistors with improved performance in terms of responsivity, response time, and detectivity by utilizing asymmetric contact engineering and proper gating. In addition, an interesting shift of the aforementioned peak is detected, with increasing incident light intensity during gate modulation. We demonstrate that this peak shift can be explained by the photogating effect caused by trapped charges.

  1. Photoresponsive coumarin-tethered multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for release of anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Karthik, S; Puvvada, Nagaprasad; Kumar, B N Prashanth; Rajput, Shashi; Pathak, Amita; Mandal, Mahitosh; Singh, N D Pradeep

    2013-06-12

    Recently, photoresponsive nanoparticles have received significant attention because of their ability to provide spatial and temporal control over the drug release. In the present work, we report for the first time photoresponsive multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) fabricated using coumarin-based phototrigger and Fe/Si MNPs for controlled delivery of anticancer drug chlorambucil. Further, newly fabricated photoresponsive multifunctional MNPs were also explored for cell luminescence imaging. In vitro biological studies revealed that coumarin tethered Fe/Si MNPs of ~9 nm size efficiently delivered the anticancer drug chlorambucil into cancer cells and thereby improving the drug action to kill the cancer cells upon irradiation. Such multifunctional MNPs with strong fluorescence, good biocompatibility and efficient photocontrolled drug release ability will be of great benefit in the construction of light-activated multifunctional nano drug delivery systems.

  2. Controlled release of DNA from photoresponsive hyperbranched polyglycerols with oligoamine shells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Wiebke; Quadir, Mohiuddin A; Barnard, Anna; Smith, David K; Haag, Rainer

    2011-12-08

    Two photo-responsive core/shell nanoparticles based on hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) are synthesized for controlled release of DNA. The shell is composed either of bis-(3-aminopropyl)methylamine (AMPA) or pentaethylenehexamine (PEHA) derivatives and is attached to the hPG core with a photo-responsive o-nitrobenzyl linker. Ethidium bromide displacement assay, gel electrophoresis, DLS, and ζ-potential measurements are performed with these nanoparticles. Photo-responsive changes within the carrier scaffold are investigated by irradiating the polymer solution with 350 nm monochromatic light. Fully covered APMA-shelled carriers are found to complex the DNA at an N/P ratio of 10 with an average size ranging from 54 to 78 nm depending on the degree of functionalization of the core.

  3. Optically controllable side-polished fiber attenuator with photoresponsive liquid crystal overlay.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Vincent K S; Li, Zhen; Chen, Zhe; Peng, Peng-Chun; Tang, Jieyuan

    2009-10-26

    This study presents an optically controllable fiber-optic attenuator consisting of side-polished fiber (SPF) with a photoresponsive liquid crystal (LC) overlay operating in the telecommunication wavelength. Attenuation is controlled by a photochemical-induced phase transition of photoresponsive LC, which modulates the evanescent field leaked from the polished area. Before optical field illumination, the photoresponsive LCs are in the light-scattering state and attenuation is high. During photoirradiation, the formation of cis-azobenzene LC disrupts the nematic host and generates a light-transparent state in which the optical loss of the SPF attenuator decreases. The photoinduced tuning range is 15 dB at an environmental temperature of 45 degrees C, and a repeatable and reversible tuning is observed with a response time of less than 5 s. The proposed all-optical controllable attenuator has potential use as an optical signal modulator in an all-fiber telecommunication system.

  4. Review of the recent progress in photoresponsive molecularly imprinted polymers containing azobenzene chromophores.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-bo; Tang, Qian; Gong, Cheng-bin; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah

    2015-11-05

    Photoresponsive molecularly imprinted polymers (PMIPs) containing azobenzene have received wide research attention in recent years and made notable achievements. This article reviews the recent developments on PMIPs containing azobenzene. Topics include the following: (i) brief introduction of azobenzene, molecularly imprinted polymers, and PMIPs containing azobenzene; (ii) progress in functional monomers, cross-linkers, and polymerization conditions; (iii) preparation methods, properties, applications, as well as advantages and disadvantages of conventional PMIPs; (iv) substrate, preparation method, and applications of photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymers; and (v) some perspectives for further development of PMIPs containing azobenzene.

  5. Impact of transparent electrode on photoresponse of ZnO-based phototransistor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seunghyup; Ahn, Seung-Eon Jeon, Yongwoo; Ahn, Ji-Hoon; Song, Ihun; Kim, Jungwoo; Choi, Hyung; Chung, U-in; Park, Jaechul; Jeon, Sanghun; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2013-12-16

    ZnO-based photo-thin film transistors with enhanced photoresponse were developed using transparent conductive oxide contacts. Changing the electrode from opaque Mo to transparent In-Zn-O increases the photocurrent by five orders of magnitude. By changing the opacity of each source and drain electrode, we could observe how the photoresponse is affected. We deduce that the photocurrent generation mechanism is based on an energy band change due to the photon irradiation. More importantly, we reveal that the photocurrent is determined by the energy barrier of injected electrons at the interface between the source electrode and the active layer.

  6. Localized ultraviolet photoresponse in single bent ZnO micro/nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Wen; Yang Ya; Qi Junjie; Zhao Jing; Zhang Yue

    2010-09-27

    The localized ultraviolet photoresponse in single bent ZnO micro/nanowires bridging two Ohmic contacts has been investigated. The ZnO micro/nanowire has a higher photoresponse sensitivity of about 190% at the bent region (bending strain: about 4%) than that at the straight region (about 50%). The rise and decay time constants are almost the same in the straight and bent regions of the ZnO micro/nanowire. A possible mechanism has been proposed and discussed. The bent ZnO micro/nanowires could be potentially useful for fabricating the coupled piezoelectric and optoelectronic nanodevices.

  7. Photoresponses in Gold Nanoparticle Single-Electron Transistors with Molecular Floating Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Makoto; Ishii, Hisao; Ueda, Rieko; Terui, Toshifumi; Imazu, Keisuke; Tamada, Kaoru; Sakano, Takeshi; Matsuda, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    We have proposed a simple method of activating advanced functions in single-electron transistors (SETs) based on the specific properties of individual molecules. As a prototype, we fabricated a copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)-doped SET. The device consists of a gold-nanoparticle (GNP)-based SET doped with CuPc as a photoresponsive floating gate. In this paper, we report the details of the photoresponses of the CuPc-doped SET, such as conductance switching, sensitivity to the wavelength of the incident light, and multiple induced states.

  8. Preparation of cocrystal nanofibres of cobalt octaethylporphyrin and tetracyanoquinodimethane with good photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao-Di; Xiao, Yan; Wang, Feng-Xia; Pan, Ge-Bo

    2014-06-01

    Cocrystal nanofibres of cobalt octaethylporphyrin and tetracyanoquinodimethane were prepared by a facile solution method and fully characterized by SEM, AFM, XRD, Raman, EDX, and UV-vis-NIR. The as-prepared cocrystal nanofibres had smooth surfaces and uniform dimension. When incorporated into prototype devices, they exhibited good photoresponse at ambient conditions. Additionally, the phototransistor characteristics with a maximum I(on)/I(off) ratio of -460 was demonstrated. The facile synthesis and good photoresponse may boost the potential applications of cocrystal-based nanostructures in future miniaturized devices.

  9. A Photoresponsive Orthogonal Supramolecular Complex Based on Host-Guest Interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongsheng; Wagner, Manfred; Saydjari, Andrew K; Mueller, Julius; Winzen, Svenja; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Wu, Si

    2017-02-21

    We synthesized a novel green-light-responsive tetra-ortho-isopropoxy-substituted azobenzene (ipAzo). Cis-ipAzo forms a strong host-guest complex with γ-cyclo dextrin (γ-CD) whereas trans-ipAzo binds weakly. This new photoresponsive host-guest interaction is reverse to the well-known azobenzene (Azo)/α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) complex, which is strong only between trans-Azo and α-CD. By combining the UV-light-responsive Azo/α-CD and green-light-responsive ipAzo/γ-CD host-guest complexes, a photoresponsive orthogonal supramolecular system is developed.

  10. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xintong; Shen, Kang; Bülow, Hannes E

    2015-01-01

    The complex, branched morphology of dendrites is a cardinal feature of neurons and has been used as a criterion for cell type identification since the beginning of neurobiology. Regulated dendritic outgrowth and branching during development form the basis of receptive fields for neurons and are essential for the wiring of the nervous system. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis have been an intensely studied area. In this review, we summarize the major experimental systems that have contributed to our understandings of dendritic development as well as the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that instruct the neurons to form cell type-specific dendritic arbors.

  11. Behavioral and physiological photoresponses to light intensity by intertidal microphytobenthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guoying; Yan, Hongmei; Liu, Chunrong; Mao, Yunxiang

    2017-03-01

    Behavioral and physiological responses to light are the two major mechanisms by which natural microphytobenthic assemblages adapt to the intertidal environment and protect themselves from light stress. The present study investigated these photoresponses with different light intensities over 8 h of illumination, and used a specific inhibitor (Latrunculin A, Lat A) for migration to compare migratory and non-migratory microphytobenthos (MPB). Photosynthetic activity was detected using rapid light curves and induction curves by chlorophyll fluorescence. It showed distinct variation in migratory responses to different light intensities; high light induced downward migration to avoid photoinhibition, and low and medium light (50-250 μmol/(m2·s)) promoted upward migration followed by downward migration after certain period of light exposure. No significant difference in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) or PSII maximal quantum yield (Fv/Fm) was detected between low and medium light irradiance, possibly indicating that only high light influences the photosynthetic capability of MPB. Decreased photosynthetic activity, indicated by three parameters, the maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax), minimum saturating irradiance (E k) and light utilization coefficient (α), was observed in MPB after exposure to prolonged illumination under low and medium light. Lat A effectively inhibited the migration of MPB in all light treatments and induced lower Fv/Fmunder high light (500 and 100 μmol/(m2·s)) and prolonged illumination at 250 μmol/(m2·s), but did not significantly influence Fv/Fmunder low light (0-100 μmol/(m2·s)) or NPQ. The increase of NPQ in Lat A treatments with time implied that the MPB assemblages can recover their physiological photoprotection capacity to adapt to light stress. Non-migratory MPB exhibited lower light use efficiency (lower α) and lower maximum photosynthetic capacity (lower rETRmax) than migratory MPB under light intensities above

  12. Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mar, Fernando M; Bonni, Azad; Sousa, Mónica M

    2014-01-01

    Although neurons execute a cell intrinsic program of axonal growth during development, following the establishment of connections, the developmental growth capacity declines. Besides environmental challenges, this switch largely accounts for the failure of adult central nervous system (CNS) axons to regenerate. Here, we discuss the cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration, including not only the regulation of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, but also the modulation of local protein translation, retrograde and anterograde axonal transport, and microtubule dynamics. We further explore the causes underlying the failure of CNS neurons to mount a vigorous regenerative response, and the paradigms demonstrating the activation of cell intrinsic axon growth programs. Finally, we present potential mechanisms to support axon regeneration, as these may represent future therapeutic approaches to promote recovery following CNS injury and disease. PMID:24531721

  13. ZnO/anthracene based inorganic/organic nanowire heterostructure: Photoresponse and photoluminescence studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dhara, Soumen; Giri, P. K.

    2012-02-15

    The effects of surface modification of vertically aligned ZnO nanowires (NWs) with anthracene for the improved photocurrent, photoresponse, and UV photoluminescence have been investigated in this work. The formation of ZnO/anthracene based inorganic/organic NWs heterostructure by surface capping with anthracene solution was confirmed from the high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transport infrared spectroscopy analyses. After the anthracene capping of ZnO NWs, despite an increase in dark current, we obtained a significant improvement in the photocurrent and photoresponsivity. A sixfold improvement in the UV photocurrent-to-dark current ratio is obtained with capping. Compared to the uncapped NWs, the photoresponse is significantly faster for the ZnO/anthracene system with response and reset times of 1.5 and 1.6 s, respectively. The room temperature photoluminescence spectra show threefold enhanced UV emission with large enhancement in the ratio of UV to green emission intensities. The faster photoresponse and enhanced photocurrent from the ZnO/anthracene heterostructure are explained on the basis of modification of surface defects and interfacial charge transfer process.

  14. Electrochemical Deposition of Azobenzene-Containing Network Films with High-Contrast and Stable Photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruiyang; Zhan, Xuepeng; Yao, Liang; Chen, Qidai; Xie, Zengqi; Ma, Yuguang

    2016-04-01

    To fabricate stable photoresponsive films and devices, a cross-linked network that firmly fixes the position of the chromophores is an ideal structure, because aggregation and/or phase separation effects of chromophores in matrix can be effectively restrained in such robust films. Herein, the in situ electrochemical deposition (ED) of azo-based precursors containing multielectroactive carbazole units is utilized to construct highly cross-linked photoresponsive films. 2-(4-(9,9-bis(6-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)hexyl)-9H-fluoren-2-yl)phenyl)-1-(4-(9,9-bis(6-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)hexyl)-9H-fluoren-7-yl)phenyl)diazene (BFCzAzo) with high solvability in electrolyte solution, high electroactivity, and highly efficient photoresponsive ability is synthesized by Suzuki coupling reaction as a kind of ED precursor. A highly cross-linked photoresponsive film is fabricated by ED method using BFCzAzo as ED precursor. The film can be patterned in large area by irradiation with interfering laser beam (355 nm), and the pattern possesses excellent thermal stability and insoluble ability in both organic and inorganic solvents. Excellent reversibility of the nanostructures is demonstrated by irradiation with 550 nm laser beam.

  15. A photo-responsive metallomesogen for an optically and electrically tunable polarized light modulator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Yoon; Kang, Dong-Gue; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Cheul-Ro; Jeong, Kwang-Un

    2016-10-25

    A palladium(ii)-based metallomesogen with azobenzene was synthesized for the fabrication of an optically and electrically tunable polarized light modulator. Owing to the extended molecular geometry constructed by organometallic chemistry, the photo-responsive metallomesogen showed an excellent orientation in liquid crystal media.

  16. Enhanced Photoresponse of SnSe-Nanocrystals-Decorated WS2 Monolayer Phototransistor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiyan; Xiang, Jianyong; Wen, Fusheng; Yang, Ruilong; Hao, Chunxue; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer WS2 has shown excellent photoresponse properties, but its promising applications in high-sensitivity photodetection suffer from the atomic-thickness-limited adsorption and band-gap-limited spectral selectivity. Here we have carried out investigations on WS2 monolayer based phototransistors with and without decoration of SnSe nanocrystals (NCs) for comparison. Compared to the solely WS2 monolayer, SnSe NCs decoration leads to not only huge enhancement of photoresponse in visible spectrum but also extension to near-infrared. Under excitation of visible light in a vacuum, the responsivity at zero gate bias can be enhanced by more than 45 times to ∼99 mA/W, and the response time is retained in millisecond level. Particularly, with extension of photoresponse to near-infrared (1064 nm), a responsivity of 6.6 mA/W can be still achieved. The excellent photoresponse from visible to near-infrared is considered to benefit from synergism of p-type SnSe NCs and n-type WS2 monolayer, or in other words, the formed p-n heterojunctions between p-type SnSe NCs and n-type WS2 monolayer.

  17. Bulk and surface characterization of novel photoresponsive polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramani, Shivshankar

    This dissertation presents a detailed characterization of two important classes of photoresponsive polymers-polydiacetylenes (PDAs) and azopolymers. Bulk and surface characterization techniques were used to evaluate the structure-property relationships of the PDAs and surface characterization, in particular-atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the azopolymers. PDAs from bis-alkylurethanes of 5,7 dodecadiyn 1,12-diol (viz.,) ETCD, IPUDO and PUDO are of particular interest in view of reports of reversible thermochromic and photochromic phase transitions in these materials. Thermochromism in the above PDAs is associated with a first order phase transition involving expansion of the crystallographic unit cell, the preservation of the urethane hydrogen bonding and possibly some relief of mechanical strain upon heating. Insights into thermochromism obtained from studies of nonthermochromic forms of PDA-ETCD are discussed. Some of the bulk characterization experiments reported In the literature are repeated. The motivation to investigate the surface morphology of the PDA single crystals using AFM was derived from Raman spectroscopy studies of various PDAs in which dispersion of the Raman spectrum indicating surface heterogeneity was observed. Micron scale as well as molecularly resolved images were obtained The micron scale images indicated a variable surface of the crystals. The molecularly resolved images showed a well defined 2-D lattice and are interpreted in terms of known crystallographic data. The surface parameters obtained from AFM measurements are similar to those determined from X-ray diffraction. During an attempt of AFM imaging of IPUDO crystals exposed to 254 nm ultraviolet light, it was observed that these crystals undergo a "macroscopic shattering". In the interest of rigorously defining conditions for photochromism, this research has undertaken a combined study of the surface morphology of the above mentioned PDA crystals by AFM and the

  18. Enhancing intrinsic growth capacity promotes adult CNS regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Yang, Zhong

    2012-01-15

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), the axons do not spontaneously regenerate after injury due to the inhibitory extrinsic environment and a diminished intrinsic regenerative capability. Many previous studies focus largely on characterizing the hostile growth inhibitory molecules in the CNS. In fact, blocking such inhibitory activities by either genetic or pharmacological approaches only allows limited sprouting, and majority of the adult neurons fail to regenerate their axons even provided with permissive substrates. Upon the neural circuits established during development, the intrinsic neuronal growth activity is gradually repressed. Little is known to the mechanisms for transition from the robust growth mode of the immature neurons to the poor growth mode of the mature neurons and the way to reactivate the intrinsic growth capacity after injury. The primary sensory neurons with cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) provide a useful model to develop strategies to enhance the intrinsic growth capacity of neurons. The centrally projecting axons in the adult spinal cord do not regenerate, while the peripheral branches regenerate robustly after injury. Regeneration of the central branches can be significantly enhanced after a prior peripheral branch injury, which is defined as conditioning lesion. We reviewed the mode of conditioning lesion reactivating the intrinsic growth program. Importantly, we summarized the intrinsic neuronal determinants for neurite growth such as cAMP, PTEN/mTOR, APC-Cdh1, KLF4, etc., the mechanisms underlying development-dependent decline of CNS neurons growth ability, and procedures to enhance the intrinsic growth potential. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intermediate intrinsic diversity enhances neural population coding.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Shreejoy J; Padmanabhan, Krishnan; Gerkin, Richard C; Urban, Nathaniel N

    2013-05-14

    Cell-to-cell variability in molecular, genetic, and physiological features is increasingly recognized as a critical feature of complex biological systems, including the brain. Although such variability has potential advantages in robustness and reliability, how and why biological circuits assemble heterogeneous cells into functional groups is poorly understood. Here, we develop analytic approaches toward answering how neuron-level variation in intrinsic biophysical properties of olfactory bulb mitral cells influences population coding of fluctuating stimuli. We capture the intrinsic diversity of recorded populations of neurons through a statistical approach based on generalized linear models. These models are flexible enough to predict the diverse responses of individual neurons yet provide a common reference frame for comparing one neuron to the next. We then use Bayesian stimulus decoding to ask how effectively different populations of mitral cells, varying in their diversity, encode a common stimulus. We show that a key advantage provided by physiological levels of intrinsic diversity is more efficient and more robust encoding of stimuli by the population as a whole. However, we find that the populations that best encode stimulus features are not simply the most heterogeneous, but those that balance diversity with the benefits of neural similarity.

  20. Intermediate intrinsic diversity enhances neural population coding

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Shreejoy J.; Padmanabhan, Krishnan; Gerkin, Richard C.; Urban, Nathaniel N.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell variability in molecular, genetic, and physiological features is increasingly recognized as a critical feature of complex biological systems, including the brain. Although such variability has potential advantages in robustness and reliability, how and why biological circuits assemble heterogeneous cells into functional groups is poorly understood. Here, we develop analytic approaches toward answering how neuron-level variation in intrinsic biophysical properties of olfactory bulb mitral cells influences population coding of fluctuating stimuli. We capture the intrinsic diversity of recorded populations of neurons through a statistical approach based on generalized linear models. These models are flexible enough to predict the diverse responses of individual neurons yet provide a common reference frame for comparing one neuron to the next. We then use Bayesian stimulus decoding to ask how effectively different populations of mitral cells, varying in their diversity, encode a common stimulus. We show that a key advantage provided by physiological levels of intrinsic diversity is more efficient and more robust encoding of stimuli by the population as a whole. However, we find that the populations that best encode stimulus features are not simply the most heterogeneous, but those that balance diversity with the benefits of neural similarity. PMID:23630284

  1. Intrinsic Circuits in the Lateral Central Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Sarah; Sun, Yajie; Klein, Rüdiger

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Network activity in the lateral central amygdala (CeL) plays a crucial role in fear learning and emotional processing. However, the local circuits of the CeL are not fully understood and have only recently begun to be explored in detail. Here, we characterized the intrinsic circuits in the CeL using paired whole-call patch-clamp recordings, immunohistochemistry, and optogenetics in C57BL/6J wild-type and somatostatin-cre (SOM-Cre) mice. Our results revealed that throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the CeL, neurons form inhibitory connections at a rate of ∼29% with an average amplitude of 20 ± 3 pA (at −40 mV). Inhibitory input from a single neuron is sufficient to halt firing in the postsynaptic neuron. Post hoc immunostaining for protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) in wild-type mice and paired recordings in SOM-Cre mice demonstrated that the most common local connections were PKCδ(−) → PKCδ(−) and SOM(+) → SOM(+). Finally, by optogenetically activating either SOM(+) or SOM(−) neurons, we found that almost all neurons in the CeL were innervated by these neuronal populations and that connections between like neurons were stronger than those between different neuronal types. These findings reveal a complex network of connections within the CeL and provide the foundations for future behavior-specific circuit analysis of this complex network. PMID:28374004

  2. Highly photoresponsive charge-sensitive infrared phototransistors with a dynamically controlled optical gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Yang, Le; Yu, Haochi; Weng, Qianchun; Chen, Pingping; Zhang, Bo; Kang, Tingting; Komiyama, Susumu; Lu, Wei; An, Zhenghua

    2016-08-01

    Charge-sensitive infrared phototransistors (CSIPs) with a built-in field-effect-induced amplification mechanism have much higher infrared photoresponsivity ( ≥103 A /W ) than conventional detectors, which is often restricted by background black-body radiation induced saturation. Here, we report that dynamically controlling the electrostatic potential of the photosensitive floating gate of a CSIP can counterbalance this background-induced saturation effect. As a result, the CSIP photoresponsivity can be improved by about one order of magnitude, reaching as high as ˜1.2 ×104 A /W to external blinking light. Our work suggests that time-domain manipulation could be an agile degree of freedom in optimizing the CSIP performance and provide insight into operating more general phototransistors for a wide variety of optoelectronic applications.

  3. Enhanced photoresponsivity in graphene-silicon slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hao E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu; Gu, Tingyi E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu McMillan, James F.; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan; Wong, Chee Wei E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu

    2016-03-14

    We demonstrate the enhanced fast photoresponsivity in graphene hybrid structures by combining the ultrafast dynamics of graphene with improved light-matter interactions in slow-light photonic crystal waveguides. With a 200 μm interaction length, a 0.8 mA/W photoresponsivity is achieved in a graphene-silicon Schottky-like photodetector, with an operating bandwidth in excess of 5 GHz and wavelength range at least from 1480 nm to 1580 nm. Fourfold enhancement of the photocurrent is observed in the slow light region, compared to the wavelength far from the photonic crystal bandedge, for a chip-scale broadband fast photodetector.

  4. The effects of intragrain defects on the local photoresponse of polycrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, N.; Wilmsen, C. W.; Jones, K. A.

    1981-02-01

    Intragrain defects in Wacker cast and Monsanto zone-refined polycrystalline silicon materials were investigated using the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. The EBIC response maps were compared with etch pit, local diffusion length and local photoresponse measurements. It was determined that the Wacker polycrystalline silicon has a much lower density of defects than does the Monsanto polycrystalline silicon and that most of the defects in the Wacker material are not active recombination sites. A correlation was found between the recombination site density, as determined by EBIC, and the local diffusion length. It is shown that a large density of intragrain recombination sites greatly reduces the minority carrier diffusion length and thus can significantly reduce the photoresponse of solar cells.

  5. Photoresponsive polyesters by incorporation of alkoxyphenacyl or coumarin chromophores along the backbone.

    PubMed

    Chamsaz, Elaheh A; Sun, Shuangyi; Maddipatla, Murthy V S N; Joy, Abraham

    2014-02-01

    The synthesis and photochemical characterization of two classes of photoresponsive polyesters are described. These polyesters contain either alkoxyphenacyl or coumarin chromophores embedded along the polymer chain. The alkoxyphenacyl polyesters undergo efficient photoinduced chain scission upon irradiation at 300 nm in solution or as a nanoparticle suspension. At 254 nm the coumarin polyesters undergo polymer chain scission. Irradiation of the coumarin polyesters in solution at 350 nm results in both chain crosslinking and chain scission behavior, while irradiation of the coumarin polyesters as nanoparticles results in chain crosslinking. The properties of the alkoxyphenacyl and coumarin polyesters are influenced by the choice of diacid as seen from their thermal behavior. The use of glutamic acid enabled surface or bulk functionalization of the photoresponsive polymers. In addition, controlled release of Nile Red from coumarin polyester nanoparticles is demonstrated by modulation of the wavelength and intensity of irradiation.

  6. Influence of the porosity on the photoresponse of a liquid crystal elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilkan, Emre; Strueben, Jan; Jin, Xin; Schaber, Clemens F.; Adelung, Rainer; Staubitz, Anne; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2016-04-01

    Azobenzene containing liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are among of the most prominent photoresponsive polymers due to their fast and reversible response to different light stimuli. To bring new functions into the present framework, novel modifications in bulk material morphology are required. Therefore, we produced azobenzene LCE free-standing films with different porosities. While the porosity provided macroscopic morphological changes, at the same time, it induced modifications in alignment of liquid crystal azobenzene units in the films. We found that a high porosity increased the photoresponse of the LCE in terms of bending angle with high significance. Moreover, the porous LCE films showed similar bending forces to those of pore-free LCE films.

  7. Remote activation of a microactuator using a photo-responsive nanoparticle-polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeberoff, Anthony

    Stimulus response materials are a class of novel materials that are currently being explored in various technologies, including biomedical devices and components, food packaging, fabrics, energy harvesting and conversion, and other elementary components such as sensors and actuators. Hybrid organic-inorganic materials such as nanoparticle-polymer composites are attractive candidates as their properties can be significantly tuned for particular applications where selectivity and localized responses are critical factors. In this work we developed and optimized a photo-responsive microactuator that can operate selectively to a specific wavelength of light. The photo-responsive microactuator is comprised of monodispersed microspheres that contain gold nanoparticles. Upon irradiation, these microspheres transduce optical energy to thermal energy, driving a localized phase change in the matrix in which they are embedded. Our remotely powered microactuator can be further realized in applications where decoupling the physical connection of the energy/control source from the actuating component is necessary.

  8. Photoresponse in thin films of WO{sub 3} grown by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Moulik, Samik; Samanta, Sudeshna; Ghosh, Barnali

    2014-06-09

    We report, the photoresponse behaviour of Tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) films of different surface morphology, grown by using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Growth parameters for PLD were changed for two substrates SiO{sub 2}/Si (SO) and SrTiO{sub 3} (STO), such a way which, result nanocrystalline film on SO and needle like structured film on STO. The photoresponse is greatly modified in these two films because of two different surface morphologies. The nanocrystalline film (film on SO) shows distinct photocurrent (PC) ON/OFF states when light was turned on/off, the enhancement of PC is ∼27%. Whereas, the film with needle like structure (film on STO) exhibits significantly enhanced persistent photocurrent even in light off condition, in this case, the enhancement of PC ∼ 50% at room temperature at lowest wavelength (λ = 360 nm) at a nominal bias voltage of 0.1 V.

  9. Influence of the porosity on the photoresponse of a liquid crystal elastomer

    PubMed Central

    Strueben, Jan; Jin, Xin; Schaber, Clemens F.; Adelung, Rainer; Staubitz, Anne; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2016-01-01

    Azobenzene containing liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are among of the most prominent photoresponsive polymers due to their fast and reversible response to different light stimuli. To bring new functions into the present framework, novel modifications in bulk material morphology are required. Therefore, we produced azobenzene LCE free-standing films with different porosities. While the porosity provided macroscopic morphological changes, at the same time, it induced modifications in alignment of liquid crystal azobenzene units in the films. We found that a high porosity increased the photoresponse of the LCE in terms of bending angle with high significance. Moreover, the porous LCE films showed similar bending forces to those of pore-free LCE films. PMID:27152212

  10. Graphene/GaSe-Nanosheet Hybrid: Towards High Gain and Fast Photoresponse

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Rongtao; Liu, Jianwei; Luo, Hongfu; Chikan, Viktor; Wu, Judy Z.

    2016-01-01

    While high photoconductive gain has been recently achieved in graphene-based hybrid phototransistors using semiconductor two-dimensional transition/post-transition metal dichalcogenides or quantum dots sensitizers, obtaining fast photoresponse simutaneously remains a challenge that must be addressed for practical applications. In this paper we report a graphene/GaSe nanosheets hybrid photodetector, in which GaSe nanosheets provide a favorable geometric link to graphene conductive layer through van Der Waals force. After a vacuum annealing process, a high gain in exceeding 107 has been obtained simitaneously with a dynamic response time of around 10 ms for both light on and off. We attribute the high performance to the elimination of possible deep charge traps, most probably at the graphene/GaSe nanosheets interface. This result demonstrates high photoconductive gain and fast photoresponse can be achieved simultaneously and a clean interface is the key to the high performance of these hybrid devices. PMID:26776942

  11. Light-controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles using a rigid, photoresponsive surfactant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youju; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2012-10-21

    We report a new strategy for shape control over the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by using a photoresponsive surfactant based on a modified seed growth method. Owing to photoresponsive properties of the azo group, the designed surfactant, N(1),N(3),N(5)-tris[(4'-azobenzene-4-sulphonic acid)phenyl]benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide, exhibits a distinctive molecular configuration under light leading to different growth processes of AuNPs. As a result, the blackberry-like, spherical AuNPs and multilayered Au plates were successfully prepared in high yield under visible and UV light. The size and morphological control of Au nanocrystals are described and the synthesized Au nanocrystals are evaluated for SERS applications.

  12. Light-controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles using a rigid, photoresponsive surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Youju; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2012-09-01

    We report a new strategy for shape control over the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by using a photoresponsive surfactant based on a modified seed growth method. Owing to photoresponsive properties of the azo group, the designed surfactant, N1,N3,N5-tris[(4'-azobenzene-4-sulphonic acid)phenyl]benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide, exhibits a distinctive molecular configuration under light leading to different growth processes of AuNPs. As a result, the blackberry-like, spherical AuNPs and multilayered Au plates were successfully prepared in high yield under visible and UV light. The size and morphological control of Au nanocrystals are described and the synthesized Au nanocrystals are evaluated for SERS applications.We report a new strategy for shape control over the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by using a photoresponsive surfactant based on a modified seed growth method. Owing to photoresponsive properties of the azo group, the designed surfactant, N1,N3,N5-tris[(4'-azobenzene-4-sulphonic acid)phenyl]benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide, exhibits a distinctive molecular configuration under light leading to different growth processes of AuNPs. As a result, the blackberry-like, spherical AuNPs and multilayered Au plates were successfully prepared in high yield under visible and UV light. The size and morphological control of Au nanocrystals are described and the synthesized Au nanocrystals are evaluated for SERS applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The UV-vis spectra, representative field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images and size distributions of Au seeds (18 nm) and spherical AuNPs (50 nm), photograph images of AuNPs solution and TEM images of blackberry-like AuNPs. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31717f

  13. Improved photoresponse with enhanced photoelectric contribution in fully suspended graphene photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vikram; Capone, Aaron; Strauf, Stefan; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2013-09-27

    Graphene's unique optoelectronic properties are promising to realize photodetectors with ultrafast photoresponse over a wide spectral range from far-infrared to ultraviolet radiation. The underlying mechanism of the photoresponse has been a particular focus of recent work and was found to be either photoelectric or photo-thermoelectric in nature and enhanced by hot carrier effects. Graphene supported by a substrate was found to be dominated by the photo-thermoelectric effect, which is known to be an order of magnitude slower than the photoelectric effect. Here we demonstrate fully-suspended chemical vapor deposition grown graphene microribbon arrays that are dominated by the faster photoelectric effect. Substrate removal was found to enhance the photoresponse by four-fold compared to substrate-supported microribbons. Furthermore, we show that the light-current input/output curves give valuable information about the underlying photophysical process responsible for the generated photocurrent. These findings are promising towards wafer-scale fabrication of graphene photodetectors approaching THz cut-off frequencies.

  14. Enhanced circadian photoresponsiveness after prolonged dark adaptation in seven species of diurnal and nocturnal rodents

    PubMed Central

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies in mice and Syrian hamsters have described an enhancement of circadian photoresponsiveness after exposure to darkness for several weeks. The present study investigated the generality of the phenomenon in 3 diurnal and 4 nocturnal rodent species. In four of the species tested, phase delays of the running-wheel activity rhythm evoked by 1-h light pulses were several-fold larger after 3 to 4 weeks of exposure to darkness than after a single day. This drastic change in photoresponsiveness has important implications for the understanding of the process of photic entrainment. Differences between species that showed a significant effect of dark adaptation and species that showed no effect were not accounted for by temporal niche (diurnal versus nocturnal) or photic sensitivity (albino versus pigmented). Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for inter-species differences in the occurrence of enhanced photoresponsiveness after dark adaptation and to identify the neural substrates of this phenomenon in species that exhibit it. PMID:17116312

  15. Zener Tunneling and Photoresponse of a WS2/Si van der Waals Heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Lan, Changyong; Li, Chun; Wang, Shuai; He, Tianying; Jiao, Tianpeng; Wei, Dapeng; Jing, Wenkui; Li, Luying; Liu, Yong

    2016-07-20

    Van der Waals heterostructures built from two-dimensional materials on a conventional semiconductor offer novel electronic and optoelectronic properties for next-generation information devices. Here we report that by simply stacking a vapor-phase-synthesized multilayer n-type WS2 film onto a p-type Si substrate, a high-responsivity Zener photodiode can be achieved. We find that above a small reverse threshold voltage of 0.5 V, the fabricated heterojunction exhibits Zener tunneling behavior which was confirmed by its negative temperature coefficient of the breakdown voltage. The WS2/Si heterojunction working in the Zener breakdown regime shows a stable and linear photoresponse, a broadband photoresponse ranging from 340 to 1100 nm with a maximum photoresponsivity of 5.7 A/W at 660 nm and a fast response speed of 670 μs. Such high performance can be attributed to the ultrathin depletion layer involved in the WS2/Si p-n junction, on which a strong electric field can be created even with a small reverse voltage and thereby enabling an efficient separation of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs.

  16. Type II GaSb/GaAs quantum rings with extended photoresponse for efficient solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, P. J.; Montesdeoca, D.; Fujita, H.; James, J.; Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Marshall, A. R. J.; Krier, A.

    2016-09-01

    The introduction of GaSb quantum dots (QDs) within a GaAs single junction solar cell is attracting increasing interest as a means of absorbing long wavelength photons to extend the photoresponse and increase the short-circuit current. The band alignment in this system is type-II, such that holes are localized within the GaSb QDs but there is no electron confinement. Compared to InAs QDs this produces a red-shift of the photoresponse which could increase the short-circuit current and improve carrier extraction. GaSb nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) tend to preferentially form quantum rings (QRs) which are less strained and contain fewer defects than the GaSb QDs, which means that they are more suitable for dense stacking in the active region of a solar cell to reduce the accumulation of internal strain and enhance light absorption. Here, we report the growth and fabrication of GaAs based p-i-n solar cells containing ten layers of GaSb QRs. They show extended long wavelength photoresponse into the near-IR up to 1400 nm and enhanced short-circuit current compared to the GaAs control cell due to absorption of low energy photons. Although enhancement of the short-circuit current was observed, the thermionic emission of holes was found to be insufficient for ideal operation at room temperature.

  17. Improved photoresponse with enhanced photoelectric contribution in fully suspended graphene photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vikram; Capone, Aaron; Strauf, Stefan; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2013-01-01

    Graphene's unique optoelectronic properties are promising to realize photodetectors with ultrafast photoresponse over a wide spectral range from far-infrared to ultraviolet radiation. The underlying mechanism of the photoresponse has been a particular focus of recent work and was found to be either photoelectric or photo-thermoelectric in nature and enhanced by hot carrier effects. Graphene supported by a substrate was found to be dominated by the photo-thermoelectric effect, which is known to be an order of magnitude slower than the photoelectric effect. Here we demonstrate fully-suspended chemical vapor deposition grown graphene microribbon arrays that are dominated by the faster photoelectric effect. Substrate removal was found to enhance the photoresponse by four-fold compared to substrate-supported microribbons. Furthermore, we show that the light-current input/output curves give valuable information about the underlying photophysical process responsible for the generated photocurrent. These findings are promising towards wafer-scale fabrication of graphene photodetectors approaching THz cut-off frequencies. PMID:24071929

  18. Strong enhancement of photoresponsivity with shrinking the electrodes spacing in few layer GaSe photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yufei; Cai, Kaiming; Hu, Pingan; Zhao, Lixia; Yan, Tengfei; Luo, Wengang; Zhang, Xinhui; Wu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Kaiyou; Zheng, Houzhi

    2015-01-01

    A critical challenge for the integration of optoelectronics is that photodetectors have relatively poor sensitivities at the nanometer scale. Generally, a large electrodes spacing in photodetectors is required to absorb sufficient light to maintain high photoresponsivity and reduce the dark current. However, this will limit the optoelectronic integration density. Through spatially resolved photocurrent investigation, we find that the photocurrent in metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors based on layered GaSe is mainly generated from the region close to the metal-GaSe interface with higher electrical potential. The photoresponsivity monotonically increases with shrinking the spacing distance before the direct tunneling happens, which was significantly enhanced up to 5,000 AW−1 for the bottom Ti/Au contacted device. It is more than 1,700-fold improvement over the previously reported results. The response time of the Ti/Au contacted devices is about 10–20 ms and reduced down to 270 μs for the devices with single layer graphene as metallic electrodes. A theoretical model has been developed to well explain the photoresponsivity for these two types of device configurations. Our findings realize reducing the size and improving the performance of 2D semiconductor based MSM photodetectors simultaneously, which could pave the way for future high density integration of optoelectronics with high performances. PMID:25632886

  19. Construction of a photo-responsive chimeric histidine kinase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hori, Mayuko; Oka, Shyunsuke; Sugie, Yoshimi; Ohtsuka, Hokuto; Aiba, Hirofumi

    2017-01-31

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS), that are also referred to as His to Asp phosphorelay systems, are involved in widespread cellular responses to diverse signals from bacteria to plants. Previously, we succeeded in reconstructing a cyanobacterial photo-perception system in Escherichia coli by employing a CcaS-CcaR two-component system from Nostoc punctiforme. In this study, we have added a photo-responsive ability to ArcB-ArcA (anoxic redox control) TCS of E. coli by fusing a cyanobacterial photoreceptor domain of CcaS with an intracellular histidine kinase (HK) domain of ArcB. For this, we constructed several chimeric HKs between CcaS and ArcB and found that one chimeric HK, named ArcaS9, has a photo-responsive ability. When ArcaS9 was expressed with an ArcA response regulator in E. coli expressing phycocyanobilin (PCB)-producing enzymes, the expression of sdh, a target gene of ArcB-ArcA TCS was regulated in a light-color-dependent manner. Thus we succeeded in endowing E. coli HK with a photo-responsive ability. This provides an insight into how the sensing ability of HK can be manipulated by a chimeric construct.

  20. A Generalized System for Photo-Responsive Membrane Rupture in Polymersomes

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Neha P.; Robbins, Gregory P.; Rawson, Jeffrey S.; Therien, Michael J.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2011-01-01

    Polymersomes are vesicles whose membranes are comprised of self-assembled block co-polymers. We recently showed that co-encapsulating conjugated multi-porphyrin dyes in a polymersome membrane with ferritin protein in the aqueous lumen confers photo-lability to the polymersome. In the present study, we illustrate that the photo-lability can be extended to vesicles containing dextran, an inert and inexpensive polysaccharide, as the luminal solute. Here we explore how structural features of the polymersome/porphyrin/dextran composite affect its photo-response. Increasing dextran molecular weight, decreasing block copolymer molecular weight, and altering fluorophore-membrane interactions results in increasing the photo-responsiveness of the polymersomes. Amphiphilic interactions of the luminal encapsulant with the membrane coupled with localized heat production in the hydrophobic bilayer likely cause differential thermal expansion in the membrane and the subsequent membrane rupture. This study suggests a general approach to impart photo-responsiveness to any biomimetic vesicle system without chemical modification, as well as a simple, bio-inert method for constructing photo-sensitive carriers for controlled release of encapsulants. PMID:21709747

  1. Strong enhancement of photoresponsivity with shrinking the electrodes spacing in few layer GaSe photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yufei; Cai, Kaiming; Hu, Pingan; Zhao, Lixia; Yan, Tengfei; Luo, Wengang; Zhang, Xinhui; Wu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Kaiyou; Zheng, Houzhi

    2015-01-01

    A critical challenge for the integration of optoelectronics is that photodetectors have relatively poor sensitivities at the nanometer scale. Generally, a large electrodes spacing in photodetectors is required to absorb sufficient light to maintain high photoresponsivity and reduce the dark current. However, this will limit the optoelectronic integration density. Through spatially resolved photocurrent investigation, we find that the photocurrent in metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors based on layered GaSe is mainly generated from the region close to the metal-GaSe interface with higher electrical potential. The photoresponsivity monotonically increases with shrinking the spacing distance before the direct tunneling happens, which was significantly enhanced up to 5,000 AW-1 for the bottom Ti/Au contacted device. It is more than 1,700-fold improvement over the previously reported results. The response time of the Ti/Au contacted devices is about 10-20 ms and reduced down to 270 μs for the devices with single layer graphene as metallic electrodes. A theoretical model has been developed to well explain the photoresponsivity for these two types of device configurations. Our findings realize reducing the size and improving the performance of 2D semiconductor based MSM photodetectors simultaneously, which could pave the way for future high density integration of optoelectronics with high performances.

  2. Strong enhancement of photoresponsivity with shrinking the electrodes spacing in few layer GaSe photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yufei; Cai, Kaiming; Hu, Pingan; Zhao, Lixia; Yan, Tengfei; Luo, Wengang; Zhang, Xinhui; Wu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Kaiyou; Zheng, Houzhi

    2015-01-30

    A critical challenge for the integration of optoelectronics is that photodetectors have relatively poor sensitivities at the nanometer scale. Generally, a large electrodes spacing in photodetectors is required to absorb sufficient light to maintain high photoresponsivity and reduce the dark current. However, this will limit the optoelectronic integration density. Through spatially resolved photocurrent investigation, we find that the photocurrent in metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors based on layered GaSe is mainly generated from the region close to the metal-GaSe interface with higher electrical potential. The photoresponsivity monotonically increases with shrinking the spacing distance before the direct tunneling happens, which was significantly enhanced up to 5,000 AW(-1) for the bottom Ti/Au contacted device. It is more than 1,700-fold improvement over the previously reported results. The response time of the Ti/Au contacted devices is about 10-20 ms and reduced down to 270 μs for the devices with single layer graphene as metallic electrodes. A theoretical model has been developed to well explain the photoresponsivity for these two types of device configurations. Our findings realize reducing the size and improving the performance of 2D semiconductor based MSM photodetectors simultaneously, which could pave the way for future high density integration of optoelectronics with high performances.

  3. Trap-induced photoresponse of solution-synthesized MoS2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngbin; Yang, Jaehyun; Lee, Dain; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Jin-Hong; Kim, Hyoungsub; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2016-04-28

    We investigated, for the first time, the photoresponse characteristics of solution-synthesized MoS2 phototransistors. The photoresponse of the solution-synthesized MoS2 phototransistor was solely determined by the interactions of the photogenerated charge carriers with the surface adsorbates and the interface trap sites. Instead of contributing to the photocurrent, the illumination-generated electron-hole pairs were captured in the trap sites (surface and interface sites) due to the low carrier mobility of the solution-synthesized MoS2. The photogenerated holes discharged ions (oxygen and/or water) adsorbed onto the MoS2 surface and were released as neutral molecules. At the same time, the photogenerated electrons filled the traps present at the interface with the underlying substrate during their transport to the drain electrode. The filled trap sites significantly relieved the band bending near the surface region, which resulted in both a negative shift in the turn-on voltage and an increase in the photocurrent. The time-dependent dynamics of the solution-synthesized MoS2 phototransistors revealed persistent photoconductance due to the trapped electrons at the interface. The photoconductance was recovered by applying a short positive gate pulse. The instantaneous discharge of the trapped electrons dramatically reduced the relaxation time to less than 20 ms. This study provides an important clue to understanding the photoresponses of various optoelectronic devices prepared using solution-synthesized two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  4. Photoresponse properties of BaSi2 film grown on Si (100) by vacuum evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Trinh, Cham; Nakagawa, Yoshihiko; Hara, Kosuke O.; Takabe, Ryota; Suemasu, Takashi; Usami, Noritaka

    2016-07-01

    We have succeeded in the observation of high photoresponsivity of orthorhombic BaSi2 film grown on crystalline Si by a vacuum evaporation method, raising the prospect of its promising application in high-efficiency thin-film solar cells. Photocurrent was observed at photon energies larger than 1.28 eV, which corresponds to the band gap of evaporated BaSi2 film, indicating that the photoresponsivity originates from the BaSi2 film. The effect of the substrate temperature on the film’s properties was also investigated. The films grown at a substrate temperature larger than 500 °C are single-phase polycrystalline BaSi2 films, while those grown at a substrate temperature of 400 °C is a mixture of phases. We confirmed that undoped evaporated BaSi2 films are an n-type material with high carrier concentration. High carrier lifetime of 4.8 and 2.7 μs can be found for the films grown at 500 °C and 400 °C, respectively. BaSi2 film grown at a substrate temperature of 500 °C, which is crack-free and single-phase, shows the best photoresponsivity. The maximum value of photocurrent was obtained at photon energy of 1.9 eV, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 22% under reverse applied voltage of 2 V.

  5. Cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puram, Sidharth V; Bonni, Azad

    2013-12-01

    The proper formation and morphogenesis of dendrites is fundamental to the establishment of neural circuits in the brain. Following cell cycle exit and migration, neurons undergo organized stages of dendrite morphogenesis, which include dendritic arbor growth and elaboration followed by retraction and pruning. Although these developmental stages were characterized over a century ago, molecular regulators of dendrite morphogenesis have only recently been defined. In particular, studies in Drosophila and mammalian neurons have identified numerous cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis that include transcriptional regulators, cytoskeletal and motor proteins, secretory and endocytic pathways, cell cycle-regulated ubiquitin ligases, and components of other signaling cascades. Here, we review cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite patterning and discuss how the characterization of such crucial regulators advances our understanding of normal brain development and pathogenesis of diverse cognitive disorders.

  6. Intrinsic two-dimensional features as textons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, E.; Zetzsche, C.; Rentschler, I.

    1998-01-01

    We suggest that intrinsic two-dimensional (i2D) features, computationally defined as the outputs of nonlinear operators that model the activity of end-stopped neurons, play a role in preattentive texture discrimination. We first show that for discriminable textures with identical power spectra the predictions of traditional models depend on the type of nonlinearity and fail for energy measures. We then argue that the concept of intrinsic dimensionality, and the existence of end-stopped neurons, can help us to understand the role of the nonlinearities. Furthermore, we show examples in which models without strong i2D selectivity fail to predict the correct ranking order of perceptual segregation. Our arguments regarding the importance of i2D features resemble the arguments of Julesz and co-workers regarding textons such as terminators and crossings. However, we provide a computational framework that identifies textons with the outputs of nonlinear operators that are selective to i2D features.

  7. Intrinsic two-dimensional features as textons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, E.; Zetzsche, C.; Rentschler, I.

    1998-01-01

    We suggest that intrinsic two-dimensional (i2D) features, computationally defined as the outputs of nonlinear operators that model the activity of end-stopped neurons, play a role in preattentive texture discrimination. We first show that for discriminable textures with identical power spectra the predictions of traditional models depend on the type of nonlinearity and fail for energy measures. We then argue that the concept of intrinsic dimensionality, and the existence of end-stopped neurons, can help us to understand the role of the nonlinearities. Furthermore, we show examples in which models without strong i2D selectivity fail to predict the correct ranking order of perceptual segregation. Our arguments regarding the importance of i2D features resemble the arguments of Julesz and co-workers regarding textons such as terminators and crossings. However, we provide a computational framework that identifies textons with the outputs of nonlinear operators that are selective to i2D features.

  8. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development. PMID:28252642

  9. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-03-02

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development.

  10. Intrinsic Nilpotent Approximation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    RD-A1II58 265 INTRINSIC NILPOTENT APPROXIMATION(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST 1/2 OF TECH CAMBRIDGE LAB FOR INFORMATION AND, DECISION UMCLRSSI SYSTEMS C...TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Intrinsic Nilpotent Approximation Technical Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER LIDS-R-1482 7. AUTHOR(.) S...certain infinite-dimensional filtered Lie algebras L by (finite-dimensional) graded nilpotent Lie algebras or g . where x E M, (x,,Z) E T*M/O. It

  11. A novel intrinsic electroretinogram response in isolated mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Takao, Motoharu; Fukuda, Yumi; Morita, Takeshi

    2017-08-15

    Since the discovery of intrinsic photosensitive retinal ganglion cell (ipRGC) was reported in 2002, many features specific to this cell type have been described. However, scare information is available on the retinographic components directly reflecting ipRGC activity. In this study, we identified the electroretinogram (microERG) that reflects the photoresponses by ipRGCs in ex vivo preparations of the mouse retina, in which classical photoreceptors (cones and rods) were ablated mechanically and photochemically. MicroERG consisted of three components: a large transient ON response, a small and lazy hump 19s after the onset of the light, and a large transient OFF response. A complete microERG recording required at least 30s of light exposure. MicroERG showed the highest spectral photosensitivity at 478nm. This wavelength corresponds to the peak wavelength in the ipRGCs' photosensitive curve. The psychophysical test using a blue light-emitting diode (LED) light (470nm) revealed that the absolute threshold illuminance for microERG was greater than 12.26 log photons/s/cm(2) in both ON and OFF responses, whereas microERG was not adapted for dark. The amplitude of microERG increased linearly with irradiance. The sensitivity of temporal frequency was high in microERG (at least 100Hz), as suggested by the study on melatonin suppression by flickering light in human subjects (Zelter et al., 2014). Melatonin secretion was suppressed by light via ipRGCs and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. These properties of the photoresponse indicate that microERG may reflect the functions of ipRGC as a luminance detector in the mouse retina. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Melatonin attenuates phenotypic flexibility of energy metabolism in a photoresponsive mammal, the Siberian hamster.

    PubMed

    Boratyński, Jan S; Jefimow, Małgorzata; Wojciechowski, Michał S

    2017-09-01

    The duration of melatonin (MEL) secretion conveys information about day length and initiates a cascade of seasonal phenotypic adjustments in photoresponsive mammals. With shortening days, animals cease reproduction, minimize energy expenditure, enhance thermoregulatory capacity and adjust functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to match the winter increase in energy demands. Within each season, stress plays an important role in the flexible adjustments of a phenotype to environmental perturbations. Recent studies have shown that thermal reaction norms of energy metabolism were narrower in winter-acclimated Siberian hamsters, Phodopus sungorus We tested the hypothesis that physiological changes occurring in response to prolonged MEL signals, including changes in the secretion of stress hormones, are responsible for the seasonal decrease in phenotypic flexibility of energy metabolism in photoresponsive mammals. To quantify reaction norms for basal metabolic rate (BMR) and cortisol (CORT) secretion, male Siberian hamsters maintained at a long (16 h:8 h light:dark) photoperiod were acclimated repeatedly for 12 days to 10 and 28°C. As predicted, the phenotypic flexibility of BMR decreased when animals were supplemented with MEL. However, at the same time, mean CORT concentration and the reaction norm for its secretion in response to changes in acclimation temperature increased. These results suggest that decreased sensitivity of HPA axis to CORT signal, rather than changes in CORT level itself, is responsible for the decreased phenotypic flexibility in photoresponsive species. Our results suggest that decreased phenotypic flexibility in winter, together with increased stress hormone secretion, make photosensitive species more vulnerable to climate change. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Kinetics of Rhodopsin Deactivation and Its Role in Regulating Recovery and Reproducibility of Rod Photoresponse

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Giovanni; Bisegna, Paolo; Lenoci, Leonardo; Andreucci, Daniele; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Hamm, Heidi E.; DiBenedetto, Emmanuele

    2010-01-01

    The single photon response (SPR) in vertebrate phototransduction is regulated by the dynamics of R* during its lifetime, including the random number of phosphorylations, the catalytic activity and the random sojourn time at each phosphorylation level. Because of this randomness the electrical responses are expected to be inherently variable. However the SPR is highly reproducible. The mechanisms that confer to the SPR such a low variability are not completely understood. The kinetics of rhodopsin deactivation is investigated by a Continuous Time Markov Chain (CTMC) based on the biochemistry of rhodopsin activation and deactivation, interfaced with a spatio-temporal model of phototransduction. The model parameters are extracted from the photoresponse data of both wild type and mutant mice, having variable numbers of phosphorylation sites and, with the same set of parameters, the model reproduces both WT and mutant responses. The sources of variability are dissected into its components, by asking whether a random number of turnoff steps, a random sojourn time between steps, or both, give rise to the known variability. The model shows that only the randomness of the sojourn times in each of the phosphorylated states contributes to the Coefficient of Variation (CV) of the response, whereas the randomness of the number of R* turnoff steps has a negligible effect. These results counter the view that the larger the number of decay steps of R*, the more stable the photoresponse is. Our results indicate that R* shutoff is responsible for the variability of the photoresponse, while the diffusion of the second messengers acts as a variability suppressor. PMID:21200415

  14. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Photoresponsive Two-Dimensional GaSe Nanosheet Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Gresback, Ryan G; Tian, Mengkun; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Ivanov, Ilia N; Xiao, Kai; McGuire, Michael A; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B

    2014-01-01

    Here we explore pulsed laser deposition (PLD), a well known and versatile synthesis method principally used for epitaxial oxide thin film growth, for the synthesis of functional metal chalcogenide (GaSe) nanosheet networks by stoichiometric transfer of laser vaporized material from bulk GaSe targets in Ar background gas. Uniform coverage of interconnected, crystalline, few-layer, photoresponsive GaSe nanosheets in both in-plane and out-of-plane orientations were achieved under different ablation plume conditions over ~1.5 cm2 areas. Plume propagation was characterized by in situ ICCD-imaging. High (1 Torr) Ar background gas pressures were found to be crucial for the stoichiometric growth of GaSe nanosheet networks. Individual 1-3 layer GaSe triangular nanosheets of ~ 200 nm domain size were formed within 30 laser pulses, coalescing to form nanosheet networks in as few as 100 laser pulses. The thickness of the deposited networks increased linearly with pulse number, adding layers in a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode while maintaining a surface roughness of 2 GaSe layers for increasing overall thickness. Field effect transistors using these interconnected crystalline GaSe networks showed p-type semiconducting characteristics with mobilities reaching as high as 0.1 cm2V-1s-1. Spectrally-resolved photoresponsivities and external quantum efficiencies ranged from 0.4 AW-1 and 100% at 700 nm, to 1.4 AW-1 and 600 % at 240 nm, respectively. Pulsed laser deposition under these conditions appears to provide a versatile and rapid approach to stoichiometrically transfer and deposit photoresponsive networks of 2D nanosheets with digital thickness control and substrate-scale uniformity for a variety of applications.

  15. Facile fabrication of transparent, broadband photoresponse, self-cleaning multifunctional graphene-TiO2 hybrid films.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiayi; Cao, Yang; He, Junhui

    2014-04-15

    We reported a novel approach to fabricate graphene-TiO2 hybrid films by combination of the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly and the surface sol-gel (SSG) process. The reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets and films were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy, contact angle/interface system, and four-point probe. It was found that the graphene-TiO2 hybrid film showed enhanced photoresponse performance compared with RGO thin film and TiO2 thin film. The photoresponse properties of hybrid films could be manipulated by variation of the cycle numbers of RGO LbL assembly and titanium precursor SSG process. Photoinduced superhydrophility of the hybrid film was shown under broadband light illumination. The obtained transparent, superhydrophilic and conductive graphene-TiO2 hybrid film showed excellent photoresponse, antifogging, and antistatic behaviors.

  16. Surface plasmon polaritons suppress photoresponse of colloidal CdS nanorods in nanogap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peigang; Song, Jia; Pan, Aoqiu; Chen, Jianjun; Wang, Shunli; Shen, Jingqin; Wang, Pengchao; Zhan, Jianming; Qian, Huiqin; Tang, Weihua

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal CdS nanorods ∼4.9 nm in diameter and ∼60 nm long were positioned in gold bow-tie electrodes with a gap of ∼50 nm by an AC dielectrophoresis process to construct optoelectronic devices. The fabricated devices exhibited an excellent photoresponse to white and blue light, but no response to green light. However, the response of the devices to white light could be degraded by green light. This is considered to be related to surface plasmon polaritons suppressing the generation of photo-carriers in the CdS nanorods. The results indicate that surface plasmons do not always benefit nano-optoeletronic devices.

  17. Photoresponse from noble metal nanoparticles-multi walled carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Scarselli, M.; Camilli, L.; Castrucci, P.; De Crescenzi, M.; Matthes, L.; Pulci, O.; Gatto, E.; Venanzi, M.

    2012-12-10

    In this Letter, we investigated the photo-response of multi wall carbon nanotube-based composites obtained from in situ thermal evaporation of noble metals (Au, Ag, and Cu) on the nanotube films. The metal deposition process produced discrete nanoparticles on the nanotube outer walls. The nanoparticle-carbon nanotube films were characterized by photo-electrochemical measurements in a standard three electrode cell. The photocurrent from the decorated carbon nanotubes remarkably increased with respect to that of bare multiwall tubes. With the aid of first-principle calculations, these results are discussed in terms of metal nanoparticle-nanotube interactions and electronic charge transfer at the interface.

  18. GaAs Schottky barrier photo-responsive device and method of fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, G. E.; Leinkram, C. Z.; Okunola, O. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A gallium arsenide photo-responsive device is provided with an intermediate, transparent layer of a refractory metal or alkaline earth metal forming a tenacious bond between a non-hydroscopic oxide layer and a noble metal Schottky barrier layer. The device has a gallium arsenide substrate with a predetermined type conductivity and a gallium arsenide epitaxial layer with the same type conductivity but a lower charge carrier concentration grown on the substrate. The oxide layer is formed to cover the epitaxial layer, and the transparent metal layer followed by the noble metal layer are deposited upon the oxide layer. An interdigitated ohmic contact is then formed upon the noble metal layer.

  19. Erasable thin-film optical diode based on a photoresponsive liquid crystal polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinping; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Huai; Yu, Haifeng

    2014-03-01

    We report a thin-film optical diode written into thin films of a liquid-crystalline polymer (LCP), which is based on the photoinduced LC-to-isotropic phase transition of LCPs. The interference pattern between a collimated and a focused UV laser beam is imprinted as chirped volume-phase gratings in photoresponsive LCP films and no further processing steps like development or liftoff are required for the fabrication. The resultant thin-film device not only possesses the fundamental functions of an optical lens for laser beam focusing, but also shows diode effects with the focusing/defocusing function dependent on the direction of light incidence and orientation of the device. Furthermore, this photonic thin-film lens exhibits a spatially tunable spectroscopic response, revealing a unique physics of secondary excitations of resonance modes of the single-layer LCP waveguide grating structures. This reveals the mechanisms for the focusing/defocusing of laser beams by chirped grating structures. Erasability and reconstructibility of the photoresponsive LCPs guarantee rewritability of the thin-film diode lens.We report a thin-film optical diode written into thin films of a liquid-crystalline polymer (LCP), which is based on the photoinduced LC-to-isotropic phase transition of LCPs. The interference pattern between a collimated and a focused UV laser beam is imprinted as chirped volume-phase gratings in photoresponsive LCP films and no further processing steps like development or liftoff are required for the fabrication. The resultant thin-film device not only possesses the fundamental functions of an optical lens for laser beam focusing, but also shows diode effects with the focusing/defocusing function dependent on the direction of light incidence and orientation of the device. Furthermore, this photonic thin-film lens exhibits a spatially tunable spectroscopic response, revealing a unique physics of secondary excitations of resonance modes of the single-layer LCP

  20. Size dependent photoresponse characteristics of crystalline Ge quantum dots based photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar, Rajshekhar; Manna, Santanu; Ray, Samit K.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the size dependent photoresponse behaviour of crystalline Ge quantum dots (QDs) dispersed within the silica matrix. Our findings demonstrate an increasing nature of EQE with increase in QDs size, which could be attributed to the combined effect of Coulomb interaction of photogenerated carriers, QD/silica interface defects and electric field driven carrier separation and tunneling through the oxide barriers. In this regard, the bias dependent nonlinear response of the photocurrent has been explained on the basis of cold field emission (CFE) model. Besides, the EQE is extended (>100%) for larger sized QDs, suggesting the trapping of slower holes in Ge QDs creating a charge neutrality issue.

  1. The synthesis of monoclinic bismuth vanadate nanoribbons and studies of photoconductive, photoresponse, and photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fengxia; Shao Mingwang; Cheng Liang; Hua Jun; Wei Xianwen

    2009-08-05

    Large-scale, high-purity and uniform BiVO{sub 4} nanoribbons have been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal route without surfactants. The as-prepared BiVO{sub 4} nanoribbons were up to hundreds of micrometers in length, 60-80 nm in width, 15-20 nm in thickness, and grew along the [0 1 0] direction. The photoresponse property of BiVO{sub 4} nanoribbons was measured under different wavelengths. Their photoswitch behavior was also demonstrated. Furthermore, the nanoribbons showed superior photocatalytic activities in the degradation of eosin Y under visible light irradiation.

  2. Photoresponse mechanisms of ultraviolet photodetectors based on colloidal ZnO quantum dot-graphene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ick Son, Dong; Yeon Yang, Hee; Whan Kim, Tae; Il Park, Won

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors were fabricated using the wet spin-coating for ZnO quantum dots (QDs) and the transfer method for the graphene sheet. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images showed that the ZnO QDs were uniformly distributed between the voids of the surface circumferences on the graphene layers. Current-voltage measurements on the UV photodetector at 300 K showed that the ratio of the photocurrent to the dark current was about 1.1 × 104. The rise and the decay times of the UV photodetector were approximately 2 and 1 s, respectively. The photoresponse mechanisms are described on the basis of the experimental results.

  3. Intrinsic mechanisms for adaptive gain rescaling in barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Quesada, Marta; Maravall, Miguel

    2008-01-16

    Barrel cortex neuronal responses adapt to changes in the statistics of complex whisker stimuli. This form of adaptation involves an adjustment in the input-output tuning functions of the neurons, such that their gain rescales depending on the range of the current stimulus distribution. Similar phenomena have been observed in other sensory systems, suggesting that adaptive adjustment of responses to ongoing stimulus statistics is an important principle of sensory function. In other systems, adaptation and gain rescaling can depend on intrinsic properties; however, in barrel cortex, whether intrinsic mechanisms can contribute to adaptation to stimulus statistics is unknown. To examine this, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal cells in acute slices while injecting stochastic current stimuli. We induced changes in statistical context by switching across stimulus distributions. The firing rates of neurons adapted in response to changes in stimulus statistics. Adaptation depended on the form of the changes in stimulus distribution: in vivo-like adaptation occurred only for rectified stimuli that maintained neurons in a persistent state of net depolarization. Under these conditions, neurons rescaled the gain of their input-output functions according to the scale of the stimulus distribution, as observed in vivo. This stimulus-specific adaptation was caused by intrinsic properties and correlated strongly with the amplitude of calcium-dependent slow afterhyperpolarizations. Our results suggest that widely expressed intrinsic mechanisms participate in barrel cortex adaptation but that their recruitment is highly stimulus specific.

  4. Far infrared edge photoresponse and persistent edge transport in an inverted InAs/GaSb heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, G. C.; Olson, B. V.; Hawkins, S. D.; Klem, J. F.; Shaner, E. A.; Pan, W.; Shi, X.

    2016-01-04

    Direct current (DC) transport and far infrared photoresponse were studied an InAs/GaSb double quantum well with an inverted band structure. The DC transport depends systematically upon the DC bias configuration and operating temperature. Surprisingly, it reveals robust edge conduction despite prevalent bulk transport in our device of macroscopic size. Under 180 GHz far infrared illumination at oblique incidence, we measured a strong photovoltaic response. We conclude that quantum spin Hall edge transport produces the observed transverse photovoltages. Overall, our experimental results support a hypothesis that the photoresponse arises from direct coupling of the incident radiation field to edge states.

  5. Enhanced photoresponse of CdS/CMK-3 composite as a candidate for light-harvesting assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Chen, Xudong; Yang, Jin; Yu, Dingshan; Chen, Yujie; Wu, Dingcai; Fu, Ruowen; Zhang, Mingqiu

    2010-01-29

    Two typical carbon materials (ordered mesoporous carbon and carbon nanotube) were chosen as scaffolds in combination with semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) for making light-harvesting assemblies. The effects of interfacial morphology on photoelectric performance of the carbon-based heterostructures have been investigated in detail. The enhanced photoresponse shows a strong dependence on the interfacial morphology as a result of direct interfacial contacts between SQDs and carbon materials, which plays a major role in increasing charge generation at the interface and transport pathways for photoinduced electron transfer. The methodology to enhance the photoresponse through tuning interfacial morphology proves to be a potent alternative in fabricating photochemical energy conversion systems.

  6. Pacemaking Property of RVLM Presympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; da Silva, Melina P.; Souza, George M. P. R.; Lima-Silveira, Ludmila; Karlen-Amarante, Marlusa; Amorim, Mateus R.; Almado, Carlos E. L.; Moraes, Davi J. A.; Machado, Benedito H.

    2016-01-01

    Despite several studies describing the electrophysiological properties of RVLM presympathetic neurons, there is no consensus in the literature about their pacemaking property, mainly due to different experimental approaches used for recordings of neuronal intrinsic properties. In this review we are presenting a historical retrospective about the pioneering studies and their controversies on the intrinsic electrophysiological property of auto-depolarization of these cells in conjunction with recent studies from our laboratory documenting that RVLM presympathetic neurons present pacemaking capacity. We also discuss whether increased sympathetic activity observed in animal models of neurogenic hypertension (CIH and SHR) are dependent on changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of these cells or due to changes in modulatory inputs from neurons of the respiratory network. We also highlight the key role of INaP as the major current contributing to the pacemaking property of RVLM presympathetic neurons. PMID:27713705

  7. Neuronal synchrony: Peculiarity and generality

    PubMed Central

    Nowotny, Thomas; Huerta, Ramon; Rabinovich, Mikhail I.

    2008-01-01

    Synchronization in neuronal systems is a new and intriguing application of dynamical systems theory. Why are neuronal systems different as a subject for synchronization? (1) Neurons in themselves are multidimensional nonlinear systems that are able to exhibit a wide variety of different activity patterns. Their “dynamical repertoire” includes regular or chaotic spiking, regular or chaotic bursting, multistability, and complex transient regimes. (2) Usually, neuronal oscillations are the result of the cooperative activity of many synaptically connected neurons (a neuronal circuit). Thus, it is necessary to consider synchronization between different neuronal circuits as well. (3) The synapses that implement the coupling between neurons are also dynamical elements and their intrinsic dynamics influences the process of synchronization or entrainment significantly. In this review we will focus on four new problems: (i) the synchronization in minimal neuronal networks with plastic synapses (synchronization with activity dependent coupling), (ii) synchronization of bursts that are generated by a group of nonsymmetrically coupled inhibitory neurons (heteroclinic synchronization), (iii) the coordination of activities of two coupled neuronal networks (partial synchronization of small composite structures), and (iv) coarse grained synchronization in larger systems (synchronization on a mesoscopic scale). PMID:19045493

  8. Cholinergic Neurons Excite Cortically Projecting Basal Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; McKenna, James T.; Zant, Janneke C.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in the control of cortical activation and attention. Understanding the modulation of BF neuronal activity is a prerequisite to treat disorders of cortical activation involving BF dysfunction, such as Alzheimer's disease. Here we reveal the interaction between cholinergic neurons and cortically projecting BF GABAergic neurons using immunohistochemistry and whole-cell recordings in vitro. In GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, BF cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) neurons were intermingled with GABAergic (GFP+) neurons. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that cholinergic fibers apposed putative cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing parvalbumin (PV). In coronal BF slices from GAD67-GFP knock-in or PV-tdTomato mice, pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors with bath application of carbachol increased the firing rate of large (>20 μm diameter) BF GFP+ and PV (tdTomato+) neurons, which exhibited the intrinsic membrane properties of cortically projecting neurons. The excitatory effect of carbachol was blocked by antagonists of M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors in two subpopulations of BF GABAergic neurons [large hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and small Ih, respectively]. Ion substitution experiments and reversal potential measurements suggested that the carbachol-induced inward current was mediated mainly by sodium-permeable cation channels. Carbachol also increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic neurons/fibers caused a mecamylamine- and atropine-sensitive inward current in putative GABAergic neurons. Thus, cortically projecting, BF GABAergic/PV neurons are excited by neighboring BF and/or brainstem cholinergic neurons. Loss of cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease may impair cortical activation, in part, through disfacilitation of BF cortically

  9. Optical regulation of protein adsorption and cell adhesion by photoresponsive GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Dong, Mingdong; Besenbacher, Flemming; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2013-10-09

    Interfacing nanowires with living cells is attracting more and more interest due to the potential applications, such as cell culture engineering and drug delivery. We report on the feasibility of using photoresponsive semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) for regulating the behaviors of biomolecules and cells at the nano/biointerface. The GaN NWs have been fabricated by a facile chemical vapor deposition method. The superhydrophobicity to superhydrophilicity transition of the NWs is achieved by UV illumination. Bovine serum albumin adsorption could be modulated by photoresponsive GaN NWs. Tunable cell detachment and adhesion are also observed. The mechanism of the NW surface responsible for modulating both of protein adsorption and cell adhesion is discussed. These observations of the modulation effects on protein adsorption and cell adhesion by GaN NWs could provide a novel approach toward the regulation of the behaviors of biomolecules and cells at the nano/biointerface, which may be of considerable importance in the development of high-performance semiconductor nanowire-based biomedical devices for cell culture engineering, bioseparation, and diagnostics.

  10. Photoresponsive Foams Generated by a Rigid Surfactant Derived from Dehydroabietic Acid.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lan; Xie, Danhua; Song, Binglei; Jiang, Jianzhong; Pei, Xiaomei; Cui, Zhenggang

    2017-08-15

    Innovation in the structure of surfactants is crucial to the construction of a surfactant-based system with intriguing properties. With dehydroabietic acid as a starting material, a nearly totally rigid azobenzene surfactant (R-azo-Na) was synthesized. The trans-R-azo-Na formed stable foams with half-lives of 636, 656, 976, and 872 min for 0.3, 1, 2, and 4 mmol·L(-1) aqueous solutions, respectively. Under UV light irradiation, a fast collapse of the foams was observed, showing an in situ response. The excellent foam stability of trans-R-azo-Na leads to the extremely high photoresponsive efficiency. As revealed by dynamic surface tension and pulsed-field gradient NMR methods, an obvious energy barrier existed in the adsorption/desorption process of trans-R-azo-Na on the air/water interface. The foams formed by trans-R-azo-Na are thus stable against coarsening processes. The results reveal the unique photoresponsive behavior of a surfactant with a rigid hydrophobic skeleton and provide new insights into the structure causing aggregation of surfactants.

  11. Ultrahigh photo-responsivity and detectivity in multilayer InSe nanosheets phototransistors with broadband response

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Wei; Wu, Jing-Bin; Li, Xiaoli; ...

    2015-05-20

    In this paper, we demonstrate the strategies and principles for the performance improvement of layered semiconductor based photodetectors using multilayer indium selenide (InSe) as the model material. It is discovered that multiple reflection interference at the interfaces in the phototransistor device leads to a thickness-dependent photo-response, which provides a guideline to improve the performance of layered semiconductor based phototransistors. The responsivity and detectivity of InSe nanosheet phototransistor can be adjustable using applied gate voltage. Our InSe nanosheet phototransistor exhibits ultrahigh responsivity and detectivity. An ultrahigh external photo-responsivity of ~104 A W-1 can be achieved from broad spectra ranging from UVmore » to near infrared wavelength using our InSe nanosheet photodetectors. The detectivity of multilayer InSe devices is ~1012 to 1013 Jones, which surpasses that of the currently exploited InGaAs photodetectors (1011 to 1012 Jones). Finally, this research shows that multilayer InSe nanosheets are promising materials for high performance photodetectors.« less

  12. Erasable thin-film optical diode based on a photoresponsive liquid crystal polymer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinping; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Huai; Yu, Haifeng

    2014-04-07

    We report a thin-film optical diode written into thin films of a liquid-crystalline polymer (LCP), which is based on the photoinduced LC-to-isotropic phase transition of LCPs. The interference pattern between a collimated and a focused UV laser beam is imprinted as chirped volume-phase gratings in photoresponsive LCP films and no further processing steps like development or liftoff are required for the fabrication. The resultant thin-film device not only possesses the fundamental functions of an optical lens for laser beam focusing, but also shows diode effects with the focusing/defocusing function dependent on the direction of light incidence and orientation of the device. Furthermore, this photonic thin-film lens exhibits a spatially tunable spectroscopic response, revealing a unique physics of secondary excitations of resonance modes of the single-layer LCP waveguide grating structures. This reveals the mechanisms for the focusing/defocusing of laser beams by chirped grating structures. Erasability and reconstructibility of the photoresponsive LCPs guarantee rewritability of the thin-film diode lens.

  13. Ultrahigh photo-responsivity and detectivity in multilayer InSe nanosheets phototransistors with broadband response

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wei; Wu, Jing-Bin; Li, Xiaoli; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Xin; Xiao, Kai; Cao, Wenwu; Yang, Bin; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Basile, Leonardo; Tian, Weiquan; Tan, PingHeng; Hu, PingAn

    2015-05-20

    In this paper, we demonstrate the strategies and principles for the performance improvement of layered semiconductor based photodetectors using multilayer indium selenide (InSe) as the model material. It is discovered that multiple reflection interference at the interfaces in the phototransistor device leads to a thickness-dependent photo-response, which provides a guideline to improve the performance of layered semiconductor based phototransistors. The responsivity and detectivity of InSe nanosheet phototransistor can be adjustable using applied gate voltage. Our InSe nanosheet phototransistor exhibits ultrahigh responsivity and detectivity. An ultrahigh external photo-responsivity of ~104 A W-1 can be achieved from broad spectra ranging from UV to near infrared wavelength using our InSe nanosheet photodetectors. The detectivity of multilayer InSe devices is ~1012 to 1013 Jones, which surpasses that of the currently exploited InGaAs photodetectors (1011 to 1012 Jones). Finally, this research shows that multilayer InSe nanosheets are promising materials for high performance photodetectors.

  14. Photoresponse of a strongly correlated material determined by scanning photocurrent microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kasırga, T Serkan; Sun, Dong; Park, Jae H; Coy, Jim M; Fei, Zaiyao; Xu, Xiaodong; Cobden, David H

    2012-11-01

    The generation of a current by light is a key process in optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. In band semiconductors, depletion fields associated with interfaces separate long-lived photo-induced carriers. However, in systems with strong electron-electron and electron-phonon correlations it is unclear what physics will dominate the photoresponse. Here, we investigate photocurrent in VO(2), an exemplary strongly correlated material known for its dramatic metal-insulator transition at T(c) ≈ 68 °C, which could be useful for optoelectronic detection and switching up to ultraviolet wavelengths. Using scanning photocurrent microscopy on individual suspended VO(2) nanobeams we observe a photoresponse peaked at the metal-insulator boundary but extending throughout both insulating and metallic phases. We determine that the response is photothermal, implying efficient carrier relaxation to a local equilibrium in a manner consistent with strong correlations. Temperature-dependent measurements reveal subtle phase changes within the insulating state. We further demonstrate switching of the photocurrent by optical control of the metal-insulator boundary arrangement. Our work shows the value of applying scanning photocurrent microscopy to nanoscale crystals in the investigation of strongly correlated materials, and the results are relevant for designing and controlling optoelectronic devices employing such materials.

  15. Panchromatic "Dye-Doped" Polymer Solar Cells: From Femtosecond Energy Relays to Enhanced Photo-Response.

    PubMed

    Grancini, Giulia; Sai Santosh Kumar, R; Maiuri, Margherita; Fang, Junfeng; Huck, Wilhelm T S; Alcocer, Marcelo J P; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Cerullo, Giulio; Petrozza, Annamaria; Snaith, Henry J

    2013-02-07

    There has been phenomenal effort synthesizing new low-band gap polymer hole-conductors which absorb into the near-infrared (NIR), leading to >10% efficient all-organic solar cells. However, organic light absorbers have relatively narrow bandwidths, making it challenging to obtain panchromatic absorption in a single organic semiconductor. Here, we demonstrate that (poly[2,6-(4,4-bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b0]dithiophene)-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadia-zole)] (PCPDTBT) can be "photo-sensitized" across the whole visible spectrum by "doping" with a visible absorbing dye, the (2,2,7,7-tetrakis(3-hexyl-5-(7-(4-hexylthiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-9,9-spirobifluorene) (spiro-TBT). Through a comprehensive sub-12 femtosecond-nanosecond spectroscopic study, we demonstrate that extremely efficient and fast energy transfer occurs from the photoexcited spiro-TBT to the PCPDTBT, and ultrafast charge injection happens when the system is interfaced with ZnO as a prototypal electron-acceptor compound. The visible photosensitization can be effectively exploited and gives panchromatic photoresponse in prototype polymer/oxide bilayer photovoltaic diodes. This concept can be successfully adopted for tuning and optimizing the light absorption and photoresponse in a broad range of polymeric and hybrid solar cells.

  16. Photoresponse of a strongly correlated material determined by scanning photocurrent microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasırga, T. Serkan; Sun, Dong; Park, Jae H.; Coy, Jim M.; Fei, Zaiyao; Xu, Xiaodong; Cobden, David H.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of a current by light is a key process in optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. In band semiconductors, depletion fields associated with interfaces separate long-lived photo-induced carriers. However, in systems with strong electron-electron and electron-phonon correlations it is unclear what physics will dominate the photoresponse. Here, we investigate photocurrent in VO2, an exemplary strongly correlated material known for its dramatic metal-insulator transition at Tc ~ 68 °C, which could be useful for optoelectronic detection and switching up to ultraviolet wavelengths. Using scanning photocurrent microscopy on individual suspended VO2 nanobeams we observe a photoresponse peaked at the metal-insulator boundary but extending throughout both insulating and metallic phases. We determine that the response is photothermal, implying efficient carrier relaxation to a local equilibrium in a manner consistent with strong correlations. Temperature-dependent measurements reveal subtle phase changes within the insulating state. We further demonstrate switching of the photocurrent by optical control of the metal-insulator boundary arrangement. Our work shows the value of applying scanning photocurrent microscopy to nanoscale crystals in the investigation of strongly correlated materials, and the results are relevant for designing and controlling optoelectronic devices employing such materials.

  17. Tuning the photo-response in monolayer MoS2 by plasmonic nano-antenna

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiu; Ji, Qingqing; Chu, Saisai; Zhang, Yanfeng; Li, Yan; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Kaihui; Shi, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has recently attracted intense interests due to its remarkable optical properties of valley-selected optical response, strong nonlinear wave mixing and photocurrent/photovoltaic generation and many corresponding potential applications. However, the nature of atomic-thin thickness of monolayer MoS2 leads to inefficient light-matter interactions and thereby hinders its optoelectronic applications. Here we report on the enhanced and controllable photo-response in MoS2 by utilizing surface plasmonic resonance based on metallic nano-antenna with characteristic lateral size of 40 × 80 nm. Our nano-antenna is designed to have one plasmonic resonance in the visible range and can enhance the MoS2 photoluminescence intensity up to 10 folds. The intensity enhancement can be effectively tuned simply by the manipulation of incident light polarization. In addition, we can also control the oscillator strength ratio between exciton and trion states by controlling polarization dependent hot carrier doping in MoS2. Our results demonstrate the possibility in controlling the photo-response in broad two-dimensional materials by well-designed nano-antenna and facilitate its coming optoelectronic applications. PMID:27029570

  18. Intrinsic contractures of the hand.

    PubMed

    Paksima, Nader; Besh, Basil R

    2012-02-01

    Contractures of the intrinsic muscles of the fingers disrupt the delicate and complex balance of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, which allows the hand to be so versatile and functional. The loss of muscle function primarily affects the interphalangeal joints but also may affect etacarpophalangeal joints. The resulting clinical picture is often termed, intrinsic contracture or intrinsic-plus hand. Disruption of the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles has many causes and may be secondary to changes within the intrinsic musculature or the tendon unit. This article reviews diagnosis, etiology, and treatment algorithms in the management of intrinsic contractures of the fingers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits.

  20. Wetting: Intrinsically robust hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2013-04-01

    Ceramic surfaces can be rendered hydrophobic by using polymeric modifiers, but these are not robust to harsh environments. A known family of rare-earth oxide ceramics is now found to exhibit intrinsic hydrophobicity, even after exposure to high temperatures and abrasive wear.

  1. Predicting Intrinsic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation can be predicted from participants' perceptions of the social environment and the task environment (Ryan & Deci, 2000)in terms of control, relatedness and competence. To determine the degree of independence of these factors 251 students in higher vocational education (physiotherapy and hotel management) indicated the extent to…

  2. Evaluating Intrinsic Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    1984-01-01

    A social learning model focusing on intrinsic outcomes of vocational programs is proposed. It would assess technical skills and knowledge, communication skills and literacy, and personal skills and attitudes. Instruments should be devised to measure characteristics of the learning setting, learner involved activities, and nature of consequences of…

  3. Competition and Intrinsic Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripathi, Kailas Nath

    1992-01-01

    Reports on a study of competition, motivation, and performance among 60 adolescents in India. Finds that direct competition with another person led to higher levels of immediate performance. Also finds that indirect competition against a pre-set standard resulted in greater intrinsic motivation. (CFR)

  4. Evaluating Intrinsic Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    1984-01-01

    A social learning model focusing on intrinsic outcomes of vocational programs is proposed. It would assess technical skills and knowledge, communication skills and literacy, and personal skills and attitudes. Instruments should be devised to measure characteristics of the learning setting, learner involved activities, and nature of consequences of…

  5. The Intrinsic Connectome of the Rat Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Oliver; Eipert, Peter; Philipp, Konstanze; Kettlitz, Richard; Fuellen, Georg; Wree, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The connectomes of nervous systems or parts there of are becoming important subjects of study as the amount of connectivity data increases. Because most tract-tracing studies are performed on the rat, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of the amygdala connectome of this species resulting in a meta-study. The data were imported into the neuroVIISAS system, where regions of the connectome are organized in a controlled ontology and network analysis can be performed. A weighted digraph represents the bilateral intrinsic (connections of regions of the amygdala) and extrinsic (connections of regions of the amygdala to non-amygdaloid regions) connectome of the amygdala. Its structure as well as its local and global network parameters depend on the arrangement of neuronal entities in the ontology. The intrinsic amygdala connectome is a small-world and scale-free network. The anterior cortical nucleus (72 in- and out-going edges), the posterior nucleus (45), and the anterior basomedial nucleus (44) are the nuclear regions that posses most in- and outdegrees. The posterior nucleus turns out to be the most important nucleus of the intrinsic amygdala network since its Shapley rate is minimal. Within the intrinsic amygdala, regions were determined that are essential for network integrity. These regions are important for behavioral (processing of emotions and motivation) and functional (memory) performances of the amygdala as reported in other studies. PMID:23248583

  6. Frustration-induced protein intrinsic disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-03-01

    Spontaneous folding into a specific native structure is the most important property of protein to perform their biological functions within organisms. Spontaneous folding is understood on the basis of an energy landscape picture based on the minimum frustration principle. Therefore, frustration seemingly only leads to protein functional disorder. However, frustration has recently been suggested to have a function in allosteric regulation. Functional frustration has the possibility to be a key to our deeper understanding of protein function. To explore another functional frustration, we theoretically examined structural frustration, which is designed to induce intrinsic disorder of a protein and its function through the coupled folding and binding. We extended the Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton model to take into account a frustration effect. With the model, we analyzed the binding part of neuron-restrictive silencer factor and showed that designed structural frustration in it induces intrinsic disorder. Furthermore, we showed that the folding and the binding are cooperative in interacting with a target protein. The cooperativity enables an intrinsically disordered protein to exhibit a sharp switch-like folding response to binding chemical potential change. Through this switch-like response, the structural frustration may contribute to the regulation function of interprotein interaction of the intrinsically disordered protein.

  7. Virus-based Photo-Responsive Nanowires Formed By Linking Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Murali; Abbineni, Gopal; Nimmo, Susan L.; Cao, Binrui; Mao, Chuanbin

    2013-05-01

    Owing to the genetic flexibility and error-free bulk production, bio-nanostructures such as filamentous phage showed great potential in materials synthesis, however, their photo-responsive behaviour is neither explored nor unveiled. Here we show M13 phage genetically engineered with tyrosine residues precisely fused to the major coat protein is converted into a photo-responsive organic nanowire by a site-specific chemical reaction with an aromatic amine to form an azo dye structure on the surface. The resulting azo-M13-phage nanowire exhibits reversible photo-responsive properties due to the photo-switchable cis-trans isomerisation of the azo unit formed on the phage. This result shows that site-specific display of a peptide on bio-nanostructures through site-directed genetic mutagenesis can be translated into site-directed chemical reaction for developing advanced materials. The photo-responsive properties of the azo-M13-phage nanowires may open the door for the development of light controllable smart devices for use in non-linear optics, holography data storage, molecular antenna, and actuators.

  8. Increased excitability of both principle neurons and interneurons during associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Oh, M. Matthew; Disterhoft, John F.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we highlight several studies indicating that modulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability is a key for successful memory formation. Specifically, we will focus our discussion on our hypothesis that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP: a key regulator of intrinsic excitability) is an essential cellular mechanism used by both principle and inhibitory neurons to change their neuronal activity as memory is formed. In addition, we propose that these intrinsic excitability changes occur first in principle neurons, followed by changes in inhibitory neurons; thus maintaining the balance of network activity among neurons for successful encoding and read-out of memory. PMID:24946769

  9. Silicon Neuron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Many researchers have developed neural architectures based on extremely simplified models of neurons . Recently, researchers have developed an analog...electronic model of a neuron that more accurately reproduces its biological counterpart. This electronic neuron was designed to emulate the ionic...currents present in biological neurons . Based on this neural model, we designed and fabricated an eight input neuron on a 2mm by 2mm 40 pin VLSI (very

  10. The Photoresponse of the Gallium Arsenide Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolella, Arthur

    The combining of optical and microwave technology is imminent, especially the integration of optical and microwave circuit functions on the same circuit or chip. Exploring the properties of the metal semiconductor field effect transistor (MESFET) as an optical detector for the detection of microwave and control signals in fiber optic links make sense because the MESFET is the main active component of GaAs MMICs. In this thesis, photocurrents and photovoltages of three MESFETs were measured as a function of the optical input (wavelength, intensity and modulation frequency), electrical input (gate voltage and gate resistance), and device characteristics. A model of the photoresponse, based on the drift and diffusion equations for the current density was developed, which established the internal photovoltaic effect at the channel-substrate interface as the dominant mechanism for the generation of photocurrent in the MESFET. The gain, bandwidth and gain-bandwidth products for each of the major photoeffects were determined mathematically. A maximum photocurrent of 16 mA, and an internal photovoltage of -0.5 volts was measured at 3.5 mW of optical power. The addition of a resistance in the gate circuit enhanced the photoresponse. With a resistor of 1 MOmega, the maximum photocurrent produced was 84.0 mA, resulting from an external photovoltage of 3.07 volts. The dynamic photoresponse of the MESFET as measured, showed a strong dependence with the intensity of the optical signal as well as with bias. The low frequency response varied from -15 dB to -41 dB, and the bandwidth changed from 50 MHz to 5 MHz as the optical signal decreased 18 dB. The low frequency response and bandwidth also showed strong dependence of bias. The low frequency response varied over a 7 dB range and the bandwidth changed from 45 MHz to 100 MHz as the gate was reversed biased (0 to -3.0 volts). Used as an optical detector, the MESFET function successfully in controlling the gain (15 dB) and phase

  11. Intrinsic Axonal Growth and the Drive for Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Following damage to the adult nervous system in conditions like stroke, spinal cord injury, or traumatic brain injury, many neurons die and most of the remaining spared neurons fail to regenerate. Injured neurons fail to regrow both because of the inhibitory milieu in which they reside as well as a loss of the intrinsic growth capacity of the neurons. If we are to develop effective therapeutic interventions that promote functional recovery for the devastating injuries described above, we must not only better understand the molecular mechanisms of developmental axonal growth in hopes of re-activating these pathways in the adult, but at the same time be aware that re-activation of adult axonal growth may proceed via distinct mechanisms. With this knowledge in hand, promoting adult regeneration of central nervous system neurons can become a more tractable and realistic therapeutic endeavor. PMID:27833527

  12. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping

  13. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron’s tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network’s activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  14. Photoelectric polarization-sensitive broadband photoresponse from interface junction states in graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Jing, Lei; Morell, Eric Suarez; ...

    2016-10-24

    Graphene has established itself as a promising optoelectronic material. Many details of the photoresponse (PR) mechanisms in graphene in the THz-to-visible range have been revealed, however, new intricacies continue to emerge. Interface junctions, formed at the boundaries between parts of graphene with different number of layers or different stacking orders, and making connection between electrical contacts, provide another peculiar setup to establish PR. Here, we experimentally demonstrate an enhanced polarization sensitive photoelectric PR in graphene sheets containing interface junctions as compared to homogenous graphene sheets in the visible, infrared, and THz spectral regions. Our numerical simulations show that highly localizedmore » electronic states are created at the interface junctions, and these states exhibit a unique energy spectrum and enhanced probabilities for optical transitions. Here, the interaction of electrons from interface junction states with electromagnetic fields generates a polarization-sensitive PR that is maximal for the polarization direction perpendicular to the junction interface.« less

  15. Photoelectric polarization-sensitive broadband photoresponse from interface junction states in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Jing, Lei; Suarez Morell, Eric; Dyer, Gregory C.; Wickey, Lee; Ovezmyradov, Mekan; Grine, Albert D.; Wanke, Michael C.; Shaner, Eric A.; Lau, Chun Ning; Foa Torres, Luis E. F.; Fistul, Mikhail V.; Efetov, Konstantin B.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has established itself as a promising optoelectronic material. Many details of the photoresponse (PR) mechanisms in graphene in the THz-to-visible range have been revealed, however, new intricacies continue to emerge. Interface junctions, formed at the boundaries between parts of graphene with different number of layers or different stacking orders, and making connection between electrical contacts, provide another peculiar setup to establish PR. Here, we experimentally demonstrate an enhanced polarization sensitive photoelectric PR in graphene sheets containing interface junctions as compared to homogenous graphene sheets in the visible, infrared, and THz spectral regions. Our numerical simulations show that highly localized electronic states are created at the interface junctions, and these states exhibit a unique energy spectrum and enhanced probabilities for optical transitions. The interaction of electrons from interface junction states with electromagnetic fields generates a polarization-sensitive PR that is maximal for the polarization direction perpendicular to the junction interface.

  16. Using silver nanowire antennas to enhance the conversion efficiency of photoresponsive DNA nanomotors

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Yunfei; Chen, Yan; Wang, Ruowen; Du, Chaoling; Yasun, Emir; Tan, Weihong

    2011-01-01

    Plasmonic near-field coupling can induce the enhancement of photoresponsive processes by metal nanoparticles. Advances in nanostructured metal synthesis and theoretical modeling have kept surface plasmons in the spotlight. Previous efforts have resulted in significant intensity enhancement of organic dyes and quantum dots and increased absorption efficiency of optical materials used in solar cells. Here, we report that silver nanostructures can enhance the conversion efficiency of an interesting type of photosensitive DNA nanomotor through coupling with incorporated azobenzene moieties. Spectral overlap between the azobenzene absorption band and plasmonic resonances of silver nanowires increases light absorption of photon-sensitive DNA motor molecules, leading to 85% close-open conversion efficiency. The experimental results are consistent with our theoretical calculations of the electric field distribution. This enhanced conversion of DNA nanomotors holds promise for the development of new types of molecular nanodevices for light manipulative processes and solar energy harvesting. PMID:21596999

  17. Synthesis of Photoresponsive Dual NIR Two-Photon Absorptive [60]Fullerene Triads and Tetrads

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Seaho; Wang, Min; Tan, Loon-Seng; Cooper, Thomas; Hamblin, Michael R.; Chiang, Long Y.

    2013-01-01

    Broadband nonlinear optical (NLO) organic nanostructures exhibiting both ultrafast photoresponse and a large cross-section of two-photon absorption throughout a wide NIR spectrum may make them suitable for use as nonlinear biophotonic materials. We report here the synthesis and characterization of two C60-(antenna)x analogous compounds as branched triad C60(>DPAF-C18)(>CPAF-C2M) and tetrad C60(>DPAF-C18)(>CPAF-C2M)2 nanostructures. These compounds showed approximately equal extinction coefficients of optical absorption over 400–550 nm that corresponds to near-IR two-photon based excitation wavelengths at 780–1,100 nm. Accordingly, they may be utilized as potential precursor candidates to the active-core structures of photosensitizing nanodrugs for 2γ-PDT in the biological optical window of 800–1,050 nm. PMID:23941881

  18. Effect of oxygen deficiency on the photoresponse and reactivity of mixed phase titania thin films

    SciTech Connect

    DeSario, Paul A.; Chen Le; Graham, Michael E.; Gray, Kimberly A.

    2011-05-15

    Nonstoichiometric mixed phased titania nanocomposites (TiO{sub 2-x}) were deposited by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering. The authors explored the role of nonstoichiometry (as defined by oxygen deficiency in synthesis) in mixed phase titania thin films and its effects on the photoresponse and photocatalytic performance for CO{sub 2} reduction to methane under UV and visible light. Oxygen partial pressure was varied during film deposition, yielding different levels of oxygen deficiency in the films. Optimized nonstoichiometric films showed a strong redshift. The authors have identified an optimum set of synthesis conditions for TiO{sub 2-x} films that produce a relative maximum in photocatalytically produced methane under both UV and visible light.

  19. Enantiospecific photoresponse of sterically hindered diarylethenes for chiroptical switches and photomemories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlong; Li, Xin; Xie, Yongshu; Wu, Yue; Li, Mengqi; Wu, Xin-Yan; Zhu, Wei-Hong; Tian, He

    2015-03-01

    Light-driven transcription, replication and enzyme catalysis are critically dependent upon a delicate transfer between molecular and supramolecular chirality. Chemists have well realized the impressive stereospecificity over many thermally accessible cycloaddition with chiral catalysts, but making light work in the enantiomer control of diarylethene photocyclization has proved to be more challenging. Here, we report a unique sterically hindered diarylethene (BBTE) system with absolute enantiospecific photocyclization and cycloreversion. Moreover, we have fully separated all the five thermally stable isomers, consisting of one achiral parallel conformer, one pair of anti-parallel ring-open enantiomers, and another pair of ring-closed enantiomers, whose absolute chiral configurations are entirely elucidated by single X-ray crystallographic analyses. The photo-responsive feature exhibits a reversible, complete enantio-control transformation without racemism, offering an unrivaled unimolecular enantiospecific platform for potential applications as bistable chiroptical switches and all-photonic photomemories with optical rotation as non-destructive readout.

  20. Bio-inspired photoresponse of porphyrin-attached gold nanoparticles on a field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nakazato, Kazuo; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    A bio-inspired photoresponse was engineered in porphyrin-attached Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a field-effect transistor (FET). The system mimics photosynthetic electron transfer, using porphyrin derivatives as photosensitizers and AuNPs as photoelectron counting devices. Porphyrin-protected AuNPs were immobilized onto the gate of an FET via the formation of self-assembled monolayers. Photoinduced electron transfer from the porphyrin led to single electron transfer at the Au nanoparticles, which was monitored via a changing gate voltage on the FET in the presence of organic electrolyte. The further attachment of other functional molecules to this system should enable various other potential functionalities. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nitrogen doping of nanoporous WO3 layers by NH3 treatment for increased visible light photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Nah, Yoon-Chae; Paramasivam, Indhumati; Hahn, Robert; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Schmuki, Patrik

    2010-03-12

    Nanoporous WO(3) layers were grown by electrochemical anodization of W in a fluoride containing electrolyte. These layers were exposed to a thermal treatment in NH(3) to achieve nitrogen doping of the material. The morphology, crystal structure, composition and photoresponse of pure and nitrogen doped WO(3) were compared using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photoelectrochemical measurements. The results clearly show that successful nitrogen doping into WO(3) layers can be achieved by controlling the temperature and time during the NH(3) treatment. Most importantly, it is demonstrated that for the nitrogen doped WO(3) layers the photocurrent is significantly enhanced in the visible light region.

  2. Photoresponsive Bridged Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles with Tunable Morphology for Light-Triggered Plasmid DNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Fatieiev, Yevhen; Croissant, Jonas G; Alsaiari, Shahad; Moosa, Basem A; Anjum, Dalaver H; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-11-18

    Bridged silsesquioxane nanocomposites with tunable morphologies incorporating o-nitrophenylene-ammonium bridges are described. The systematic screening of the sol-gel parameters allowed the material to reach the nanoscale with controlled dense and hollow structures of 100-200 nm. The hybrid composition of silsesquioxanes with 50% organic content homogeneously distributed in the nanomaterials endowed them with photoresponsive properties. Light irradiation was performed to reverse the surface charge of nanoparticles from +46 to -39 mV via a photoreaction of the organic fragments within the particles, as confirmed by spectroscopic monitorings. Furthermore, such nanoparticles were applied for the first time for the on-demand delivery of plasmid DNA in HeLa cancer cells via light actuation.

  3. High photoresponse in room temperature quantum cascade detector based on coupled quantum well design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougakiuchi, Tatsuo; Fujita, Kazuue; Hirohata, Toru; Ito, Akio; Hitaka, Masahiro; Edamura, Tadataka

    2016-12-01

    We report high photoresponse measured in a room temperature quantum cascade detector (QCD) based on a coupled quantum well design that operates with a peak response wavelength of 5.4 μm. The coupled quantum well design is expected to produce higher photocurrents when compared with device active regions that use a combination of simple quantum wells. The coupled quantum well QCD demonstrated high responsivity of 22 mA/W at room temperature with a commonly used 45° wedge-based light coupling configuration. Application of a waveguide configuration to the proposed QCD yielded an elevated responsivity of ˜130 mA/W and a specific detectivity (D*) of 1.1 × 108 cm W-1 Hz1/2 at room temperature.

  4. Reversible Photoresponsive Molecular Alignment of Liquid Crystals at Fluid Interfaces with Persistent Stability.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tongtong; Hu, Qiongzheng; Wang, Yi; Gao, Yanan; Yu, Li

    2016-04-25

    This work demonstrates a noninvasive approach to control alignment of liquid crystals persistently and reversibly at fluid interfaces by using a photoresponsive azobenzene-based surfactant dissolved in an ionic liquid (IL), ethylammonium nitrate (EAN). As the first report on the orientational behavior of LCs at the IL/LC interface, our study also expands current understanding of alignment control of LCs at the aqueous/LC interface by adding electrolytes into aqueous solutions. The threshold concentration for switching the optical responses of LCs can be changed just by simply manipulating the ratio of EAN to H2 O. This work will inspire fundamental studies and novel applications of using the LC-based imaging technique to investigate various chemical and biological events in ILs.

  5. Using silver nanowire antennas to enhance the conversion efficiency of photoresponsive DNA nanomotors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Yunfei; Chen, Yan; Wang, Ruowen; Du, Chaoling; Yasun, Emir; Tan, Weihong

    2011-06-07

    Plasmonic near-field coupling can induce the enhancement of photoresponsive processes by metal nanoparticles. Advances in nanostructured metal synthesis and theoretical modeling have kept surface plasmons in the spotlight. Previous efforts have resulted in significant intensity enhancement of organic dyes and quantum dots and increased absorption efficiency of optical materials used in solar cells. Here, we report that silver nanostructures can enhance the conversion efficiency of an interesting type of photosensitive DNA nanomotor through coupling with incorporated azobenzene moieties. Spectral overlap between the azobenzene absorption band and plasmonic resonances of silver nanowires increases light absorption of photon-sensitive DNA motor molecules, leading to 85% close-open conversion efficiency. The experimental results are consistent with our theoretical calculations of the electric field distribution. This enhanced conversion of DNA nanomotors holds promise for the development of new types of molecular nanodevices for light manipulative processes and solar energy harvesting.

  6. The effect of symmetry on resonant and nonresonant photoresponses in a field-effect terahertz detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. D.; Qin, H. Yang, X. X.; Zhang, Z. P.; Li, X. X.; Zhang, X. Y.; Cai, Y.; Wu, D. M.; Zhang, B. S.; Lewis, R. A.; Sun, Y. F.

    2015-01-19

    The effect of the symmetries in the terahertz (THz) field distribution and the field-effect channel on THz photoresponse is examined. Resonant excitation of cavity plasmon modes and nonresonant self-mixing of THz waves are demonstrated in a GaN/AlGaN two-dimensional electron gas with symmetrically designed nanogates, antennas, and filters. We found that the self-mixing signal can be effectively suppressed by the symmetric design and the resonant response benefits from the residual asymmetry. The findings suggest that a single detector may provide both high sensitivity from the self-mixing mechanism and spectral resolution from the resonant response by optimizing the degree of geometrical and/or electronic symmetries.

  7. Photoresponse Model for Si_(1-x)Ge_x/Si Heterojunction Internal Photoemission Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T.; Park, J. S.; Gunapala, S. D.; Jones, E. W.; Castillo, H. M. Del

    1993-01-01

    A photoresponse model has been developed for the Si_(1-x)Ge_x/Si heterojunction internalphotoemission (HIP) infrared detector at wavelengths corresponding to photon energies less than theFermi energy. A Si_(0.7)Ge_(0.3)/Si HIP detector with a cutoff wavelength of 23 micrometers andan emission coefficient of 0.4 eV^(-1) has been demonstrated. The model agrees with the measureddetector response at lambda greater than 8 micrometers. The potential barrier determined by themodel is in close agreement (difference similar to 4 meV) with the potential barrier determined by theRichardson plot, compared to the discrepancies of 20-50 meV usually observed for PtSi Schottkydetectors.

  8. Photoresponse enhancement in graphene/silicon infrared detector by controlling photocarrier collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xin; Zhang, Hengkai; Tang, Xiaobing; Lai, King W. C.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene/silicon junction based photodetectors have attracted great interest due to their superior characteristics like large photosensitive area, fast photocarrier collection and low dark current. Currently, the weak optical absorption and short photocarrier lifetime of graphene remain major limitations for detection of infrared light with wavelengths above 1.2 μm. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of photocarrier transport in graphene/silicon junction based photodetector and propose a theoretical model to study the design and effect of finger-electrode structures on the photocurrent in graphene. We demonstrate that the top finger-like electrode in graphene/silicon photodetector can be designed to enhance the photocarrier collection efficiency in graphene by reducing the average transport distance of photocarriers. Therefore, the photoresponsivity of the graphene/silicon junction based photodetector can be increased. Our results have successfully demonstrated that by optimizing the design of finger electrodes, 4 times enhancement of photocurrents in graphene can be obtained at room temperature.

  9. Pulsed Near-IR Photoresponse in a Bi-metal Contacted Graphene Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xinghan; Suess, Ryan J; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E; Yan, Jun; Fuhrer, Michael S

    2015-10-06

    We use an ultra-fast near-infrared pulse coincidence technique to study the time, temperature, and power dependence of the photoresponse of a bi-metal contacted graphene photodetector. We observe two components of the photovoltage signal. One component is gate-voltage dependent, linear in power at room temperature and sub-linear at low temperature-consistent with the hot-electron photothermoelectric effect due to absorption in the graphene. The power dependence is consistent with supercollision-dominated cooling in graphene. The other component is gate-voltage independent and linear in temperature and power, which we interpret as due to thermoelectricity of the metal electrodes due to differential light absorption.

  10. Pulsed Near-IR Photoresponse in a Bi-metal Contacted Graphene Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xinghan; Suess, Ryan J.; Drew, H. Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E.; Yan, Jun; Fuhrer, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    We use an ultra-fast near-infrared pulse coincidence technique to study the time, temperature, and power dependence of the photoresponse of a bi-metal contacted graphene photodetector. We observe two components of the photovoltage signal. One component is gate-voltage dependent, linear in power at room temperature and sub-linear at low temperature-consistent with the hot-electron photothermoelectric effect due to absorption in the graphene. The power dependence is consistent with supercollision-dominated cooling in graphene. The other component is gate-voltage independent and linear in temperature and power, which we interpret as due to thermoelectricity of the metal electrodes due to differential light absorption. PMID:26441034

  11. Colloidal Monolayer β-In2Se3 Nanosheets with High Photoresponsivity.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Guilherme; Dogan, Sedat; Bertoni, Giovanni; Giannini, Cinzia; Gaspari, Roberto; Perissinotto, Stefano; Krahne, Roman; Ghosh, Sandeep; Manna, Liberato

    2017-03-01

    We report a low-temperature colloidal synthesis of single-layer, five-atom-thick, β-In2Se3 nanosheets with lateral sizes tunable from ∼300 to ∼900 nm, using short aminonitriles (dicyandiamide or cyanamide) as shape controlling agents. The phase and the monolayer nature of the nanosheets were ascertained by analyzing the intensity ratio between two diffraction peaks from two-dimensional slabs of the various phases, determined by diffraction simulations. These findings were further backed-up by comparing and fitting the experimental X-ray diffraction pattern with Debye formula simulated patterns and with side-view high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging and simulation. The β-In2Se3 nanosheets were found to be indirect band gap semiconductors (Eg = 1.55 eV), and single nanosheet photodetectors demonstrated high photoresponsivity and fast response times.

  12. Role of photoresponse of π electrons in light-driven DNA dissociations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Long Long; Xie, Shi Jie; Kang, Da Wei

    2017-08-01

    The role of photoresponse of π electrons in light-driven DNA dissociations is theoretically studied. A new model combining the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model and the charge ladder model is first proposed. Then the evolutions of π -electronic states and H-bond stretching in the light-driven DNA dissociations are studied. The results show that light irradiation will induce ultrafast charge redistribution among bases, leading to the precursory insulator-to-metallic transition. This electronic transition will assist DNA to dissociate. Effects of screened Coulomb interactions on dissociation dynamics is emphatically discussed. Finally, it is also found that light-driven DNA dissociation preferentially occurs in the adenine-thymine-rich region rather than the guanine-cytosine-rich region.

  13. A hybrid MoS2 nanosheet-CdSe nanocrystal phototransistor with a fast photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Ra, Hyun-Soo; Kwak, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-10-06

    2-Dimensional (2D) and 0-dimensional (0D) hybrid nanostructures have been reported as promising new systems for highly-sensitive and wavelength-tunable photodetectors. Although the performance of hybrid photodetectors was enhanced by charge injection from 0D nanocrystals (NCs) to 2D nanosheets (NSs), the response time of hybrid photodetectors is still very slow due to the trapping and leakage of residual carriers at the interfaces of the hybrid materials. Here, we demonstrate a MoS2/CdSe hybrid phototransistor with enhanced responsivity of 2.5 × 10(5) A W(-1) and detectivity of 1.24 × 10(14) Jones. In addition, the device exhibited a fast rise (τrise) and decay time (τdecay) of 60 ms, respectively. The mechanism for the improved photoresponse time has been discussed using a charge injection model in an n-n type heterojunction energy band diagram of hybrid materials.

  14. Enantiospecific photoresponse of sterically hindered diarylethenes for chiroptical switches and photomemories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlong; Li, Xin; Xie, Yongshu; Wu, Yue; Li, Mengqi; Wu, Xin-Yan; Zhu, Wei-Hong; Tian, He

    2015-01-01

    Light-driven transcription, replication and enzyme catalysis are critically dependent upon a delicate transfer between molecular and supramolecular chirality. Chemists have well realized the impressive stereospecificity over many thermally accessible cycloaddition with chiral catalysts, but making light work in the enantiomer control of diarylethene photocyclization has proved to be more challenging. Here, we report a unique sterically hindered diarylethene (BBTE) system with absolute enantiospecific photocyclization and cycloreversion. Moreover, we have fully separated all the five thermally stable isomers, consisting of one achiral parallel conformer, one pair of anti-parallel ring-open enantiomers, and another pair of ring-closed enantiomers, whose absolute chiral configurations are entirely elucidated by single X-ray crystallographic analyses. The photo-responsive feature exhibits a reversible, complete enantio-control transformation without racemism, offering an unrivaled unimolecular enantiospecific platform for potential applications as bistable chiroptical switches and all-photonic photomemories with optical rotation as non-destructive readout. PMID:25777985

  15. Measurement of Local Reactive and Resistive Photoresponse of a Superconducting Microwave Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlage, Steven M.; Zhuravel, Alexander P.; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    2006-03-01

    Despite the voluminous work on the nature of nonlinear effects in high-temperature superconductors (HTS), the causes are not completely clear and remain under debate. The Laser Scanning Microscope (LSM) is a spatially-resolved method that can simultaneously measure optical and high frequency properties of HTS devices. Earlier results showed high resolution images of non-uniform microwave current distributions near the edge of a patterned transmission line structure [A. P. Zhuravel, A. V. Ustinov, K. S. Harshavardhan, and S. M. Anlage, Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 4979 (2002)]. We have developed a new operational mode in which the microscope separately images the resistive and inductive components of the bolometric photoresponse. The two images show interesting and dramatic differences, leading to new insights about linear and nonlinear properties of HTS microwave devices.

  16. Rational design and application of a redox-active, photoresponsive, discrete metallogelator.

    PubMed

    Afrasiabi, Rouzbeh; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-05-18

    A photoresponsive discrete metallogelator was rationally designed by incorporating a photochromic azobenzene subunit in the structure of a redox-active ferrocene-peptide conjugate. The target molecule was purposefully equipped with a dipeptide unit capable of self-assembly in response to sonication. The designed molecule was shown to undergo supramolecular self-assembly and achieve organogelation in response to ultrasound, light, heat, and redox signals. The sol-gel phase transition of the designed gelator was found to be sensitive to a plethora of input stimuli, allowing the application of the sol-gel transition behavior in basic logic gate operations. A gel-based NOT logic gate operation was realized when the redox-active property of the organogel was examined by using different oxidizing agents. The smart response of the gelator was further exploited in designing XOR operations under oxidizing or non-oxidizing conditions.

  17. On the two subdivisions and intrinsic synaptic connexions in the submandibular ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kawa, K; Roper, S

    1984-01-01

    Parasympathetic neurones in the submandibular ganglion of the rat innervate the submandibular and sublingual salivary glands. Neurones which innervate the submandibular gland (s.m. neurones) are usually located along the salivary ducts which drain both glands. Neurones which innervate the sublingual gland (s.l. neurones) are located in the thin sheet of tissue which lies between the salivary ducts and the lingual nerve. The existence and characteristics of intrinsic synaptic connexions were studied electrophysiologically in these two divisions of the submandibular ganglion. Three days or more after denervating the ganglion two types of excitatory intrinsic synaptic potentials--chemical and electrical--were recorded in ganglion cells. Chemical synaptic responses were reversibly blocked by nicotinic antagonists such as hexamethonium (10 microM) and D-tubocurarine (100 microM). Intrinsic chemical synapses were common among s.m. neurones (present in 72% of neurones) but only 12% of s.l. neurones were coupled with chemical synapses. Electrical coupling was found among 31% of s.m. neurones but was not observed between s.l. neurones. Electrotonic coupling in s.m. neurones in denervated and intact ganglia was directly demonstrated by impaling adjacent neurones with separate micro-electrodes. The average coupling ratio for current pulses injected into one cell and recorded in the adjacent cell was 0.06. During the first 30 days after birth, the number of synaptic inputs from preganglionic (chorda tympani) axons was markedly reduced in both s.m. and s.l. neurones, whereas the incidence of electrical synaptic connexions remained unchanged. The effect of long-term denervation (up to 4 months) on intrinsic synapses was examined. The membrane properties of the parasympathetic neurones and the intrinsic synaptic connexions were maintained without marked changes. It is concluded that the submandibular ganglion in the rat consists of two distinct populations of parasympathetic

  18. Intrinsic neural circuits between dorsal midbrain neurons that control fear-induced responses and seizure activity and nuclei of the pain inhibitory system elaborating postictal antinociceptive processes: a functional neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato L; Ferreira, Célio M R; Ribeiro, Sandro J; Carvalho, Andressa D; Elias-Filho, Daoud H; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2005-02-01

    initial periods of the postictal analgesia, as compared to the involvement of beta-noradrenergic receptor. Neurochemical lesions of the locus coeruleus (LC) and neuronal damage of the dorsal raphe nucleus induced a significant decrease of the postictal analgesia, suggesting the involvement of these nuclei in this antinociceptive process. The functional neuroanatomical study of the neural link between the mesencephalic tectum and nuclei of the central pain inhibitory system showed evidence for the interconnection between superior colliculus, both dorsal and ventral periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), and inferior colliculus. Defensive substrates of the inferior colliculus, also involved with wild running and epilepsy, send inputs toward dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus. Since these nuclei are rich in monoamines and send neural connections toward other monoaminergic nuclei of the brainstem involved with the control of the nociceptive inputs in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, the present results offer a neuroanatomical and psychopharmacological basis for the antinociceptive processes following tonic-clonic seizures.

  19. Photoresponse of resonant tunneling diode photodetectors as a function of bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the photocurrent-voltage relation of resonant tunneling diode (RTD) photodetectors by means of electrooptical transport measurements. The investigated RTDs are based on an Al0.6Ga0.4As/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling structure (RTS) with an integrated GaInNAs absorption layer for light sensing at the telecommunication wavelength of λ= 1.3 μm. Under illumination, photogenerated holes can be captured for accumulation in vicinity to the RTS and modulate the resonant tunneling current that is highly sensitive to changes in the local electrostatic potential. The resulting photocurrent-voltage relation is found to be a nonlinear function of the applied bias voltage, and governed by the interplay of the electronic transport properties of the RTS and the dynamics of photogenerated holes. Time-resolved photocurrent measurements were employed to analyze the dynamics of photogenerated holes. From the photocurrent-time traces the quantum-efficiency and mean lifetime of photogenerated holes can be separately determined. We found that the photoresponse is suppressed by a low quantum efficiency for bias voltages below V <= 1 V. In this regime, the built-in electric field prevents photogenerated holes from accumulation at the RTS. For voltages above V >1 V, the built-in field is compensated by the external bias, and η(V) takes on a constant value. In this regime, the RTD photoresponse is mainly determined by the lifetime of holes accumulated at the RTS. The lifetime is limited by thermionic carrier escape and was found to decrease exponentially with the applied bias voltage.

  20. Photoresponse and trap characteristics of transparent AZO-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Zhao, Meng-Di; He, Yun-Long; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Kun; Wei, Xiao-Xiao; Mao, Wei; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue

    2016-10-01

    AZO-gated and Ni/Au-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs are fabricated successfully, and an excellent transparency of AZO-gated electrode is achieved. After a negative gate bias stress acts on two kinds of the devices, their photoresponse characteristics are investigated by using laser sources with different wavelengths. The effect of photoresponse on AZO-gated electrode device is more obvious than on Ni/Au-gated electrodes device. The electrons are trapped in the AlGaN barrier of AZO-gated HEMT after it has experienced negative gate bias stress, and then the electrons can be excited effectively after it has been illuminated by the light with certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the trap state density D T and the time constant τ T of the AZO-gated Schottky contact are extracted by fitting the measured parallel conductance in a frequency range from 10 kHz to 10 MHz. The constants of the trap range from about 0.35 μs to 20.35 μs, and the trap state density increased from 1.93 × 1013 eV-1·cm-2 at an energy of 0.33 eV to 3.07 × 1011 eV-1·cm-2 at an energy of 0.40 eV. Moreover, the capacitance and conductance measurements are used to characterize the trapping effects under different illumination conditions in AZO-gated HEMTs. Reduced deep trap states' density is confirmed under the illumination of short wavelength light. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61574110, 61574112, and 61106106).

  1. Ultrafast nonlinear photoresponse of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a broadband degenerate investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuo; Wang, Fengqiu; Zhu, Chunhui; Meng, Yafei; Liu, Yujie; Liu, Wenqing; Tang, Jingyi; Liu, Kaihui; Hu, Guohua; Howe, Richard C. T.; Hasan, Tawfique; Zhang, Rong; Shi, Yi; Xu, Yongbing

    2016-04-01

    Understanding of the fundamental photoresponse of carbon nanotubes has broad implications for various photonic and optoelectronic devices. Here, Z-scan and pump-probe spectroscopy performed across 600-2400 nm were combined to give a broadband `degenerate' mapping of the nonlinear absorption properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In contrast to the views obtained from non-degenerate techniques, sizable saturable absorption is observed from the visible to the near-infrared range, including the spectral regions between semiconducting excitonic peaks and metallic tube transitions. In addition, the broadband mapping unambiguously reveals a photobleaching to photoinduced absorption transition feature within the first semiconducting excitonic band ~2100 nm, quantitatively marking the long-wavelength cut-off for saturable absorption of the SWNTs investigated. Our findings present a much clearer physical picture of SWNTs' nonlinear absorption characteristics, and help provide updated design guidelines for SWNT based nonlinear optical devices.Understanding of the fundamental photoresponse of carbon nanotubes has broad implications for various photonic and optoelectronic devices. Here, Z-scan and pump-probe spectroscopy performed across 600-2400 nm were combined to give a broadband `degenerate' mapping of the nonlinear absorption properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In contrast to the views obtained from non-degenerate techniques, sizable saturable absorption is observed from the visible to the near-infrared range, including the spectral regions between semiconducting excitonic peaks and metallic tube transitions. In addition, the broadband mapping unambiguously reveals a photobleaching to photoinduced absorption transition feature within the first semiconducting excitonic band ~2100 nm, quantitatively marking the long-wavelength cut-off for saturable absorption of the SWNTs investigated. Our findings present a much clearer physical picture of

  2. 3-Dimensional photonic crystal surface enhanced upconversion emission for improved near-infrared photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenbin; Su, Liap Tat; Chen, Rui; Chen, Hu; Wang, Yi; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Sun, Handong; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2014-01-21

    The enhancement of upconversion luminescence of lanthanide-ion doped fluoride upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) is particularly important and highly required for their myriad applications in sensing, photoelectronic devices and bio-imaging. In this work, the amplification of luminescence in NaYF4:Yb/Er and NaYF4:Yb/Tm UCNPs in close proximity to the three-dimensional photonic crystal (3D PC) surface for improved near-infrared photoresponse of a carbon nanotube-based phototransistor is reported. The self-assembled opal 3D PCs with polystyrene sphere sizes of 200, 290 and 360 nm that exhibit reflection peaks of 450, 650 and 800 nm respectively were used for upconversion enhancement, and around 30 times enhancement was obtained for NaYF4:Yb/Er and NaYF4:Yb/Tm UCNPs. Time-resolved upconversion emission and 3D PC transmittance-dependent upconversion enhancement reveal that the enhanced absorption and the extraction effects, resulting from the enhanced non-resonant pump excitation field and the strong coherent scattering provided by 3D PCs respectively, are responsible for the large enhancement. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the prepared 3D PC/NaYF4:Yb/Tm UCNP coupled material layer was introduced into the carbon nanotube-based phototransistor. It is shown that the photoresponsivity of the device to near-infrared light was improved by 10 times with respect to the control device with carbon nanotubes only, which reveals the promising applications of this coupled material in photoelectronic devices such as photovoltaics and other types of phototransistors.

  3. Hollow mesoporous raspberry-like colloids with removable caps as photoresponsive nanocontainers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chi; West, Kevin R.; Scherman, Oren A.

    2016-04-01

    The fabrication, characterisation and controlled cargo release of hollow mesoporous raspberry-like colloids (HMRCs), which are assembled by utilising host-guest complexation of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) are described. CB[8] is employed as a supramolecular linker to `stick' the viologen functionalised paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles onto an azobenzene functionalised hollow mesoporous silica core. The formed HMRCs are photoresponsive and can be reversibly disassembled upon light irradiation, endowing them with an ability to release loaded cargo under photocontrol. While the assembled HMRCs retain cargo inside their cavity, disassembled particles with their iron oxide nanoparticle `caps' removed will release the loaded cargo through the mesoporous shell of the hollow silica colloids. A model system using a boronic acid derivative as the cargo in the HMRCs and Alizarin Red salt as a sensor for the released boronic acid is demonstrated.The fabrication, characterisation and controlled cargo release of hollow mesoporous raspberry-like colloids (HMRCs), which are assembled by utilising host-guest complexation of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) are described. CB[8] is employed as a supramolecular linker to `stick' the viologen functionalised paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles onto an azobenzene functionalised hollow mesoporous silica core. The formed HMRCs are photoresponsive and can be reversibly disassembled upon light irradiation, endowing them with an ability to release loaded cargo under photocontrol. While the assembled HMRCs retain cargo inside their cavity, disassembled particles with their iron oxide nanoparticle `caps' removed will release the loaded cargo through the mesoporous shell of the hollow silica colloids. A model system using a boronic acid derivative as the cargo in the HMRCs and Alizarin Red salt as a sensor for the released boronic acid is demonstrated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR01016D

  4. Neural prosthesis in the wake of nanotechnology: controlled growth of neurons using surface nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lee, J K; Baac, H; Song, S H; Jang, E; Lee, S D; Park, D; Kim, S J

    2006-01-01

    Neural prosthesis has been successfully applied to patients with motional or sensory disabilities for clinical purpose. To enhance the performance of the neural prosthetic device, the electrodes for the biosignal recording or electrical stimulation should be located in closer proximity to target neurons than they are now. Instead of revising the prior implanting surgery to improve the electrical contact of neurons, we propose a technique that can bring the neurons closer to the electrode sites. A new method is investigated that can control the direction of neural cell growth using surface nanostructures. We successfully guide the neurons to the position of the microelectrodes by providing a surface topographical cue presented by the surface nanostructure on a photoresponsive polymer material. Because the surface structure formed by laser holography is reversible and repeatable, the geometrical positioning of the neurons to microelectrodes can be adjusted by applying laser treatment during the surgery for the purpose of improving the performance of neural prosthetic device.

  5. Intrinsic determinants of optic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui-lin; Cho, Kin-sang; Guo, Chen-ying; Chew, Justin; Chen, Dong-feng; Yang, Liu

    2013-07-01

    To review the functions of these intracellular signals in their regulation of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon regeneration. Relevant articles published in English or Chinese from 1970 to present were selected from PubMed. Searches were made using the terms "intrinsic determinants, axon regeneration, RGC, optic nerve regeneration, and central nervous system axon regeneration." Articles studying the mechanisms controlling RGC and central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration were reviewed. Articles focusing on the intrinsic determinants of axon regeneration were selected. Like other CNS neurons of mammals, RGCs undergo a developmental loss in their ability to grow axons as they mature, which is a critical contributing factor to the failure of nerve regeneration and repair after injury. This growth failure can be attributed, at least in part, by the induction of molecular programs preventing cellular overgrowth and termination of axonal growth upon maturation. Key intracellular signals and transcription factors, including B cell lymphoma/leukemia 2, cyclic adenine monophosphate, mammalian target of rapamycin, and Krüppel-like transcription factors, have been identified to play central roles in this process. Intense effort and substantial progress have been made to identify the various intrinsic growth pathways that regulate RGC axon regeneration. More work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms of and the interrelationship between the actions of these factors and to successfully achieve regeneration and repair of the severed RGC axons.

  6. Intrinsically Disordered Energy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such ‘intrinsically disordered’ landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an -helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium.

  7. Intrinsically Disordered Energy Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such ‘intrinsically disordered’ landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an -helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium. PMID:25999294

  8. Development of the intrinsic and extrinsic innervation of the gut.

    PubMed

    Uesaka, Toshihiro; Young, Heather M; Pachnis, Vassilis; Enomoto, Hideki

    2016-09-15

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is innervated by intrinsic enteric neurons and by extrinsic efferent and afferent nerves. The enteric (intrinsic) nervous system (ENS) in most regions of the gut consists of two main ganglionated layers; myenteric and submucosal ganglia, containing numerous types of enteric neurons and glial cells. Axons arising from the ENS and from extrinsic neurons innervate most layers of the gut wall and regulate many gut functions. The majority of ENS cells are derived from vagal neural crest cells (NCCs), which proliferate, colonize the entire gut, and first populate the myenteric region. After gut colonization by vagal NCCs, the extrinsic nerve fibers reach the GI tract, and Schwann cell precursors (SCPs) enter the gut along the extrinsic nerves. Furthermore, a subpopulation of cells in myenteric ganglia undergoes a radial (inward) migration to form the submucosal plexus, and the intrinsic and extrinsic innervation to the mucosal region develops. Here, we focus on recent progress in understanding the developmental processes that occur after the gut is colonized by vagal ENS precursors, and provide an up-to-date overview of molecular mechanisms regulating the development of the intrinsic and extrinsic innervation of the GI tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Successful Implantation of Bioengineered, Intrinsically Innervated, Human Internal Anal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Shreya; Gilmont, Robert R.; Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Somara, Sita; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Bitar, Khalil N.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims To restore fecal continence, the weakened pressure of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) must be increased. We bioengineered intrinsically innervated human IAS, to emulate sphincteric physiology, in vitro. Methods We co-cultured human IAS circular smooth muscle with immortomouse fetal enteric neurons. We investigated the ability of bioengineered innervated human IAS, implanted in RAG1−/− mice, to undergo neovascularization and preserve the physiology of the constituent myogenic and neuronal components. Results The implanted IAS was neovascularized in vivo; numerous blood vessels were observed with no signs of inflammation or infection. Real-time force acquisition from implanted and pre-implant IAS showed distinct characteristics of IAS physiology. Features included the development of spontaneous myogenic basal tone; relaxation of 100% of basal tone in response to inhibitory neurotransmitter vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and direct electrical field stimulation of the intrinsic innervation; inhibition of nitrergic and VIPergic EFS-induced relaxation (by antagonizing nitric oxide synthesis or receptor interaction); contraction in response to cholinergic stimulation with acetylcholine; and intact electromechanical coupling (evidenced by direct response to potassium chloride). Implanted, intrinsically innervated bioengineered human IAS tissue preserved the integrity and physiology of myogenic and neuronal components. Conclusion Intrinsically innervated human IAS bioengineered tissue can be successfully implanted in mice. This approach might be used to treat patients with fecal incontinence. PMID:21463628

  10. INTRINSIC CURVATURE: A MARKER OF MILLIMETER-SCALE TANGENTIAL CORTICO-CORTICAL CONNECTIVITY?

    PubMed Central

    RONAN, LISA; PIENAAR, RUDOLPH; WILLIAMS, GUY; BULLMORE, ED; CROW, TIM J.; ROBERTS, NEIL; JONES, PETER B.; SUCKLING, JOHN; FLETCHER, PAUL C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we draw a link between cortical intrinsic curvature and the distributions of tangential connection lengths. We suggest that differential rates of surface expansion not only lead to intrinsic curvature of the cortical sheet, but also to differential inter-neuronal spacing. We propose that there follows a consequential change in the profile of neuronal connections: specifically an enhancement of the tendency towards proportionately more short connections. Thus, the degree of cortical intrinsic curvature may have implications for short-range connectivity. PMID:21956929

  11. Fabrication of a Graphene/ZnO based p-n junction device and its ultraviolet photoresponse properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young-Tae; Kang, Sung-Oong; Cheon, Ji-Ae; Song, Yoseb; Lee, Jong-Jin; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2017-09-01

    Graphene with a zero-bandgap energy is easily doped using a chemical dopant, and a shift upwards or downwards in the Fermi level is generated. Moreover, the integration of inorganic material into the doped graphene changes the physical and chemical properties of the material. For this purpose, we successfully fabricated a p-n junction device by depositing an n-typed ZnO layer on p-doped graphene and studied the ultraviolet (UV) photoresponse properties under a photocurrent (UV light on) and a dark current (UV light off). Two devices, lateral and vertical, were developed by alternating the thickness of the ZnO layer, and the photoresponse mechanisms were described on the basis of the contact potential difference.

  12. Photoresponse of CsPbBr3 and Cs4PbBr6 Perovskite Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Cha, Ji-Hyun; Han, Jae Hoon; Yin, Wenping; Park, Cheolwoo; Park, Yongmin; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Cho, Jeong Ho; Jung, Duk-Young

    2017-02-02

    High-quality and millimeter-sized perovskite single crystals of CsPbBr3 and Cs4PbBr6 were prepared in organic solvents and studied for correlation between photocurrent generation and photoluminescence (PL) emission. The CsPbBr3 crystals, which have a 3D perovskite structure, showed a highly sensitive photoresponse and poor PL signal. In contrast, Cs4PbBr6 crystals, which have a 0D perovskite structure, exhibited more than 1 order of magnitude higher PL intensity than CsPbBr3, which generated an ultralow photoresponse under illumination. Their contrasting optoelectrical characteristics were attributed to different exciton binding energies, induced by coordination geometry of the [PbBr6](4-) octahedron sublattices. This work correlated the local structures of lead in the primitive perovskite and its derivatives to PL spectra as well as photoconductivity.

  13. Charge transport and photoresponses in a single-stranded DNA/single-walled carbon nanotube composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wonseon; Lee, Eunmo; Kue Park, Jun; Eui Lee, Cheol

    2013-06-01

    Electrical conductivity and photoresponse measurements have been carried out on a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite film in comparison to those of a SWNT film. While the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of the pristine SWNT film was described well by the combined mechanism of a three-dimensional variable-range hopping and hopping conduction, that of the ssDNA/SWNT composite film followed a fluctuation-induced tunneling model. Besides, competition of photoexcited charge carrier generation and oxygen adsorption/photodesorption in the photoresponses of the films was observed and discussed in view of the role of the DNA wrapping. Thus, the biopolymer coating of the SWNTs is shown to play a significant role in modifying the charge dynamics of the composite system.

  14. Inhibitory control of correlated intrinsic variability in cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Carsen; Pachitariu, Marius; Steinmetz, Nicholas A; Okun, Michael; Bartho, Peter; Harris, Kenneth D; Sahani, Maneesh; Lesica, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Cortical networks exhibit intrinsic dynamics that drive coordinated, large-scale fluctuations across neuronal populations and create noise correlations that impact sensory coding. To investigate the network-level mechanisms that underlie these dynamics, we developed novel computational techniques to fit a deterministic spiking network model directly to multi-neuron recordings from different rodent species, sensory modalities, and behavioral states. The model generated correlated variability without external noise and accurately reproduced the diverse activity patterns in our recordings. Analysis of the model parameters suggested that differences in noise correlations across recordings were due primarily to differences in the strength of feedback inhibition. Further analysis of our recordings confirmed that putative inhibitory neurons were indeed more active during desynchronized cortical states with weak noise correlations. Our results demonstrate that network models with intrinsically-generated variability can accurately reproduce the activity patterns observed in multi-neuron recordings and suggest that inhibition modulates the interactions between intrinsic dynamics and sensory inputs to control the strength of noise correlations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19695.001 PMID:27926356

  15. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

    PubMed

    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  16. Expression of Novel Opsins and Intrinsic Light Responses in the Mammalian Retinal Ganglion Cell Line RGC-5. Presence of OPN5 in the Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Paula S.; Valdez, Diego J.; Acosta-Rodríguez, Victoria A.; Guido, Mario E.

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is known to contain three classes of photoreceptor cells: cones and rods responsible for vision, and intrinsically photoresponsive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) involved in diverse non-visual functions such as photic entrainment of daily rhythms and pupillary light responses. In this paper we investigated the potential intrinsic photoresponsiveness of the rat RGC line, RGC-5, by testing for the presence of visual and non-visual opsins and assessing expression of the immediate-early gene protein c-Fos and changes in intracellular Ca2+mobilization in response to brief light pulses. Cultured RGC-5 cells express a number of photopigment mRNAs such as retinal G protein coupled receptor (RGR), encephalopsin/panopsin (Opn3), neuropsin (Opn5) and cone opsin (Opn1mw) but not melanopsin (Opn4) or rhodopsin. Opn5 immunoreactivity was observed in RGC-5 cells and in the inner retina of rat, mainly localized in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Furthermore, white light pulses of different intensities and durations elicited changes both in intracellular Ca2+ levels and in the induction of c-Fos protein in RGC-5 cell cultures. The results demonstrate that RGC-5 cells expressing diverse putative functional photopigments display intrinsic photosensitivity which accounts for the photic induction of c-Fos protein and changes in intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. The presence of Opn5 in the GCL of the rat retina suggests the existence of a novel type of photoreceptor cell. PMID:22022612

  17. Gaussian Intrinsic Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mišta, Ladislav; Tatham, Richard

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a cryptographically motivated quantifier of entanglement in bipartite Gaussian systems called Gaussian intrinsic entanglement (GIE). The GIE is defined as the optimized mutual information of a Gaussian distribution of outcomes of measurements on parts of a system, conditioned on the outcomes of a measurement on a purifying subsystem. We show that GIE vanishes only on separable states and exhibits monotonicity under Gaussian local trace-preserving operations and classical communication. In the two-mode case, we compute GIE for all pure states as well as for several important classes of symmetric and asymmetric mixed states. Surprisingly, in all of these cases, GIE is equal to Gaussian Rényi-2 entanglement. As GIE is operationally associated with the secret-key agreement protocol and can be computed for several important classes of states, it offers a compromise between computable and physically meaningful entanglement quantifiers.

  18. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  19. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  20. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  1. Interfacial nanosphere lithography toward Ag₂S-Ag heterostructured nanobowl arrays with effective resistance switching and enhanced photoresponses.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Ye, Xiaozhou; Ma, Yurong; Qi, Limin

    2015-03-01

    Unique Ag2 S-Ag heterostructured nanobowl arrays consisting of Ag2 S nanonets lying on Ag nanobowl arrays are fabricated by two-step nanosphere lithography at the gas-liquid interface. These Ag2 S-Ag heterostructured nanobowl arrays exhibit effective resistance switching behaviors and enhanced photoresponses, showing potential application in both electric devices and photocatalysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Spectral anisotropy of a photoresponse from heterojunctions based on GaSe and InSe layered crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katerinchuk, V. N.; Kudrynskyi, Z. R.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.

    2014-03-01

    The object of investigation is photoresponse spectra taken from the cleaved end face of heterojunctions formed by GaSe and InSe anisotropic crystals. Spectra taken from the as-prepared and chemically processed faces of the heterojunctions are compared. A modified method of growing GaSe crystals with a virgin end face is suggested, and the surface of GaSe crystals thus grown is examined by atomic force microscopy.

  3. Transcriptional Profiling of Intrinsic PNS Factors in the Postnatal Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robin P.; Lerch-Haner, Jessica K.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Buchser, William J.; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) display a higher capacity to regenerate after injury than those in the central nervous system, suggesting cell specific transcriptional modules underlying axon growth and inhibition. We report a systems biology based search for PNS specific transcription factors (TFs). Messenger RNAs enriched in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons compared to cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) were identified using subtractive hybridization and DNA microarray approaches. Network and transcription factor binding site enrichment analyses were used to further identify TFs that may be differentially active. Combining these techniques, we identified 32 TFs likely to be enriched and/or active in the PNS. Twenty-five of these TFs were then tested for an ability to promote CNS neurite outgrowth in an overexpression screen. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that one representative TF, STAT3, is intrinsic to PNS neurons, and that constitutively active STAT3 is sufficient to promote CGN neurite outgrowth. PMID:20696251

  4. Transcriptional profiling of intrinsic PNS factors in the postnatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robin P; Lerch-Haner, Jessica K; Pardinas, Jose R; Buchser, William J; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) display a higher capacity to regenerate after injury than those in the central nervous system, suggesting cell specific transcriptional modules underlying axon growth and inhibition. We report a systems biology based search for PNS specific transcription factors (TFs). Messenger RNAs enriched in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons compared to cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) were identified using subtractive hybridization and DNA microarray approaches. Network and transcription factor binding site enrichment analyses were used to further identify TFs that may be differentially active. Combining these techniques, we identified 32 TFs likely to be enriched and/or active in the PNS. Twenty-five of these TFs were then tested for an ability to promote CNS neurite outgrowth in an overexpression screen. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that one representative TF, STAT3, is intrinsic to PNS neurons, and that constitutively active STAT3 is sufficient to promote CGN neurite outgrowth.

  5. Low expression of Kv7/M channels facilitates intrinsic and network bursting in the developing rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Safiulina, Victoria F; Zacchi, Paola; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Yaari, Yoel; Cherubini, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Early in development, network activity in the hippocampus is characterized by recurrent synchronous bursts, whose cellular correlates are giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). The propensity for generating GDPs is attributed to GABAergic synaptic transmission being depolarizing and excitatory in neonatal neurons. However, developmental regulation of intrinsic conductances may also influence GDPs generation. A likely candidate is the non-inactivating, low-threshold, muscarinic-sensitive K+ current (M current; Im), which down-regulates intrinsic bursting activity in adult hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Western blot analysis of homogenates of the CA3 hippocampal region showed that expression of the Kv7.2 subunit, one of the constituents of neuronal M channels, is weak in neonatal neurons, and markedly increases after the first postnatal week. Likewise, the density of Im was very low in neonatal CA3 pyramidal cells and increased later on. Spontaneously occurring intrinsic bursts in neonatal neurons were longer and more robust, and recurred more regularly, than in juvenile neurons. The Im blocker linopirdine only mildly affected intrinsic bursting in neonatal neurons, but strongly facilitated and regularized it in juvenile neurons. We conclude that the low expression of Kv7/M channels and the depolarizing action of GABA early after birth enhance intrinsic bursting and neuronal synchronization leading to generation of GDPs within the hippocampal network. PMID:18801845

  6. Ultrafast dual photoresponse of isolated biological chromophores: link to the photoinduced mode-specific non-adiabatic dynamics in proteins.

    PubMed

    Bochenkova, Anastasia V; Andersen, Lars H

    2013-01-01

    The anionic wild-type Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) chromophore defines an entire class of naturally occurring chromophores, which are based on the oxydized tyrosine side chain. The GFP chromophore exhibits an enriched photoinduced non-adiabatic dynamics in the multiple excited-state decay channels. Deactivation includes vibrational resonant photodetachment and internal conversion. Here, we provide detailed insight into the efficiency of different vibrational modes in promoting a selective photoresponse in the bare GFP chromophore anion. We introduce a general theoretical model that is capable of accounting for the alternative non-equivalent pathways in internal conversion, and we outline the factors, by which the photo-initiated response may be altered in this channel. The topography around the planar minimum in S1 and the two distinct types of the S1/S0 conical intersections obtained through high-level ab initio calculations provide direct support to the proposed model. There are mode-selective ways to control the photoresponse and to direct it towards a single excited-state decay channel. By tuning the excitation wavelength, the photoresponse may be directed towards the ultrafast non-statistical electron emission coupled with vibrational (de)coherence, whereas a vibrational pre-excitation in the ground state may lead to the ultrafast non-statistical internal conversion through a conical intersection. We also discuss the implication of our results to the photo-initiated non-adiabatic dynamics in the proteins.

  7. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  8. Binding of isolectin IB4 to neurons of the mouse enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Michelle; Zhang, Feng Lan; Jungnickel, Sebastian R; Furness, John B

    2006-01-01

    The plant lectin, IB4, binds to primary afferent neurons of dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, where it is selective for nociceptive neurons. In the enteric nervous system of the guinea-pig IB4 labels intrinsic primary afferent neurons, which are believed to have roles as nociceptors. Here we investigate whether IB4 binding is also a marker of intrinsic primary afferent neurons in the mouse. Neurons that bound IB4 were common in the enteric plexuses of the small intestine and colon. Labeled neurons were rare in the stomach, and absent from the esophagus and gallbladder. Binding was to the cell surface, initial parts of axons and to clumps in the cytoplasm. Similar binding occurred on small and medium sized neurons of dorsal root, nodose and trigeminal ganglia. In the enteric nervous system, IB4 revealed large round or oval (type II) neurons, type I neurons with prominent laminar dendrites and small neurons of myenteric ganglia. The type II neurons were immunoreactive for calretinin, and some type I neurons were immunoreactive for nitric oxide synthase. Most neurons in the submucosal ganglia bound IB4, and some of these were vasoactive intestinal peptide immunoreactive. Thus IB4 binds to specific subgroups of enteric neurons in the mouse. These include intrinsic primary afferent neurons, but other neurons, including secretomotor neurons, are labeled. The results suggest that IB4 is not a specific label for enteric nociceptive neurons.

  9. Qutrit teleportation under intrinsic decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarpour, Mojtaba; Naderi, Negar

    2016-08-01

    We study qutrit teleportation and its fidelity in the presence and absence of intrinsic decoherence through a qutrit channel. The channel consists of a Heisenberg chain with xyz interaction model and the intrinsic decoherence is implemented through the Milburn model. It is shown that while the fidelity diminishes due to intrinsic decoherence, it may be enhanced if the channel is initially in an entangled state. It is also observed that, for stronger intrinsic decoherence, the initial entanglement of the channel is more effective in enhancing of fidelity.

  10. Intrinsically mixed states: an appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetsche, Laura

    An "intrinsically mixed" state is a mixed state of a system that is (in a sense to be elaborated) 'orthogonal' to every pure state of that system. Although the presence of such states in the quantum theories of infinite systems is well known to those who work with such theories, intrinsically mixed states are virtually unheralded in the philosophical literature. Rob Clifton was thoroughly familiar with intrinsically mixed states. I aim here to introduce them to a wider audience-and to encourage that audience to cultivate their acquaintance by suggesting that intrinsically mixed states undermine assumptions framing standard discussions of the quantum measurement problem.

  11. Pharmacological Analysis of Intrinsic Neuronal Oscillations in rd10 Retina

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sonia; Haselier, Christine; Mataruga, Anja; Thumann, Gabriele; Walter, Peter; Müller, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In the widely used mouse model of retinal degeneration, rd1, the loss of photoreceptors leads to rhythmic electrical activity of around 10–16 Hz in the remaining retinal network. Recent studies suggest that this oscillation is formed within the electrically coupled network of AII amacrine cells and ON-bipolar cells. A second mouse model, rd10, displays a delayed onset and slower progression of degeneration, making this mouse strain a better model for human retinitis pigmentosa. In rd10, oscillations occur at a frequency of 3–7 Hz, raising the question whether oscillations have the same origin in the two mouse models. As rd10 is increasingly being used as a model to develop experimental therapies, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying the spontaneous rhythmic activity. To study the properties of oscillations in rd10 retina we combined multi electrode recordings with pharmacological manipulation of the retinal network. Oscillations were abolished by blockers for ionotropic glutamate receptors and gap junctions. Frequency and amplitude of oscillations were modulated strongly by blockers of inhibitory receptors and to a lesser extent by blockers of HCN channels. In summary, although we found certain differences in the pharmacological modulation of rhythmic activity in rd10 compared to rd1, the overall pattern looked similar. This suggests that the generation of rhythmic activity may underlie similar mechanisms in rd1 and rd10 retina. PMID:24918437

  12. Hybrid upconversion nanomaterials for optogenetic neuronal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shreyas; Liu, Jing-Jing; Pasquale, Nicholas; Lai, Jinping; McGowan, Heather; Pang, Zhiping P.; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2015-10-01

    Nanotechnology-based approaches offer the chemical control required to develop precision tools suitable for applications in neuroscience. We report a novel approach employing hybrid upconversion nanomaterials, combined with the photoresponsive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), to achieve near-infrared light (NIR)-mediated optogenetic control of neuronal activity. Current optogenetic methodologies rely on using visible light (e.g. 470 nm blue light), which tends to exhibit high scattering and low tissue penetration, to activate ChR2. In contrast, our approach enables the use of 980 nm NIR light, which addresses the short-comings of visible light as an excitation source. This was facilitated by embedding upconversion nanomaterials, which can convert NIR light to blue luminescence, into polymeric scaffolds. These hybrid nanomaterial scaffolds allowed for NIR-mediated neuronal stimulation, with comparable efficiency as that of 470 nm blue light. Our platform was optimized for NIR-mediated optogenetic control by balancing multiple physicochemical properties of the nanomaterial (e.g. size, morphology, structure, emission spectra, concentration), thus providing an early demonstration of rationally-designing nanomaterial-based strategies for advanced neural applications.Nanotechnology-based approaches offer the chemical control required to develop precision tools suitable for applications in neuroscience. We report a novel approach employing hybrid upconversion nanomaterials, combined with the photoresponsive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), to achieve near-infrared light (NIR)-mediated optogenetic control of neuronal activity. Current optogenetic methodologies rely on using visible light (e.g. 470 nm blue light), which tends to exhibit high scattering and low tissue penetration, to activate ChR2. In contrast, our approach enables the use of 980 nm NIR light, which addresses the short-comings of visible light as an excitation source. This was facilitated by

  13. Photoresponse of supramolecular self-assembled networks on graphene–diamond interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wieghold, Sarah; Li, Juan; Simon, Patrick; Krause, Maximilian; Avlasevich, Yuri; Li, Chen; Garrido, Jose A.; Heiz, Ueli; Samorì, Paolo; Müllen, Klaus; Esch, Friedrich; Barth, Johannes V.; Palma, Carlos-Andres

    2016-01-01

    Nature employs self-assembly to fabricate the most complex molecularly precise machinery known to man. Heteromolecular, two-dimensional self-assembled networks provide a route to spatially organize different building blocks relative to each other, enabling synthetic molecularly precise fabrication. Here we demonstrate optoelectronic function in a near-to-monolayer molecular architecture approaching atomically defined spatial disposition of all components. The active layer consists of a self-assembled terrylene-based dye, forming a bicomponent supramolecular network with melamine. The assembly at the graphene-diamond interface shows an absorption maximum at 740 nm whereby the photoresponse can be measured with a gallium counter electrode. We find photocurrents of 0.5 nA and open-circuit voltages of 270 mV employing 19 mW cm−2 irradiation intensities at 710 nm. With an ex situ calculated contact area of 9.9 × 102 μm2, an incident photon to current efficiency of 0.6% at 710 nm is estimated, opening up intriguing possibilities in bottom-up optoelectronic device fabrication with molecular resolution. PMID:26911248

  14. Photoresponsive Polysaccharide-Based Hydrogels with Tunable Mechanical Properties for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Giuseppe E; Carrion, Bita; Coleman, Rhima M; Ostrowski, Alexis D

    2016-06-15

    Photoresponsive hydrogels were obtained by coordination of alginate-acrylamide hybrid gels (AlgAam) with ferric ions. The photochemistry of Fe(III)-alginate was used to tune the chemical composition, mechanical properties, and microstructure of the materials upon visible light irradiation. The photochemical treatment also induced changes in the swelling properties and transport mechanism in the gels due to the changes in material composition and microstructure. The AlgAam gels were biocompatible and could easily be dried and rehydrated with no change in mechanical properties. These gels showed promise as scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering, where the photochemical treatment could be used to tune the properties of the material and ultimately change the growth and extracellular matrix production of chondrogenic cells. ATDC5 cells cultured on the hydrogels showed a greater than 2-fold increase in the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) in the gels irradiated for 90 min compared to the dark controls. Our method provides a simple photochemical tool to postsynthetically control and adjust the chemical and mechanical environment in these gels, as well as the pore microstructure and transport properties. By changing these properties, we could easily access different levels of performance of these materials as substrates for tissue engineering.

  15. n-ZnO/p-4H-SiC diode: Structural, electrical, and photoresponse characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Guziewicz, M. Jung, W.

    2015-09-07

    Epitaxial n-type ZnO film has been grown, on a commercial 5 μm thick p-type 4H-SiC(00.1) Al doped epilayer, by atomic layer deposition. A full width at half maximum of the ZnO 00.2 diffraction peak rocking curve of 0.34°{sup  }± 0.02° has been measured. Diodes formed on the n-ZnO/p-4H-SiC heterostructure show rectifying behavior with a forward to reverse current ratio at the level of 10{sup 9} at ±4 V, a leakage current density of ∼6 × 10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}, and a low ideality factor equal to 1.17 ± 0.04. In addition, the diodes exhibit selective photoresponse with a maximum at 367 nm, and with a current increase of ∼10{sup 3} under illuminations with respect to the dark value, which makes such devices prospective candidates for ultraviolet light sensors.

  16. Fast and broadband photoresponse of few-layer black phosphorus field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Buscema, Michele; Groenendijk, Dirk J; Blanter, Sofya I; Steele, Gary A; van der Zant, Herre S J; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2014-06-11

    Few-layer black phosphorus, a new elemental two-dimensional (2D) material recently isolated by mechanical exfoliation, is a high-mobility layered semiconductor with a direct bandgap that is predicted to strongly depend on the number of layers, from 0.35 eV (bulk) to 2.0 eV (single layer). Therefore, black phosphorus is an appealing candidate for tunable photodetection from the visible to the infrared part of the spectrum. We study the photoresponse of field-effect transistors (FETs) made of few-layer black phosphorus (3-8 nm thick), as a function of excitation wavelength, power, and frequency. In the dark state, the black phosphorus FETs can be tuned both in hole and electron doping regimes allowing for ambipolar operation. We measure mobilities in the order of 100 cm(2)/V s and a current ON/OFF ratio larger than 10(3). Upon illumination, the black phosphorus transistors show a response to excitation wavelengths from the visible region up to 940 nm and a rise time of about 1 ms, demonstrating broadband and fast detection. The responsivity reaches 4.8 mA/W, and it could be drastically enhanced by engineering a detector based on a PN junction. The ambipolar behavior coupled to the fast and broadband photodetection make few-layer black phosphorus a promising 2D material for photodetection across the visible and near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  17. Development of molecular photoswitch with very fast photoresponse based on asymmetrical bis-azospiropyran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourmohammadian, Farahnaz; Abdi, Ali Ashtiani

    2016-01-01

    To study the effects of an extended bis-azo conjugated bridge with two different photochemical functions on a molecule in photochromic responses, a novel asymmetrical bifunctional bis-azo spiropyran photochromic dye was designed and synthesized. The obtained photoresponses were compared with symmetrical bifunctional bis-azo spiropyran analogues, and relative mono-azo and simple spiropyrans. Colourimetric behaviour, luminescence, and switching kinetics of all the dyes were studied. The largest molar absorption coefficient in merocyanine form, quickest response to light, and highest fluorescence quantum yield of the spiropyran form with a superior ratio of emission intensities of spiropyran to merocyanine form were achieved for the asymmetric bis-azospiropyran. Solvatochromic effect was studied to observe the solvent effects on non-irradiation colouration of the photochromic dyes. Furthermore, The molecular energy levels for optimized geometries of the synthesized bis-azospiropyrans and their probable photochemical products were obtained at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory.

  18. Photoresponses of the purple nonsulfur bacteria Rhodospirillum centenum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Sackett, M J; Armitage, J P; Sherwood, E E; Pitta, T P

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the photoresponse of two purple nonsulfur bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodospirillum centenum, under defined conditions in a light beam propagating at 90 degrees to the optical axis of the microscope. This beam presented cells with a steep gradient of intensity perpendicular to the direction of propagation and a shallow gradient in the direction of light propagation. R. centenum, a species that reverses to change direction, accumulated in the light beam, as expected for a "scotophobic" response, while R. sphaeroides, which stops rather than reverses, accumulated outside the light beam. We also compared the behavior of liquid-grown R. centenum, which swims by using a single polar flagellum, to that of surface-grown R. centenum, which swarms over agar by using many lateral flagella and has been shown to move as colonies toward specific wavelengths of light. When suspended in liquid medium, both liquid- and surface-grown R. centenum showed similar responses to the light gradient. In all cases, free-swimming cells responded to the steep gradient of intensity but not to the shallow gradient, indicating they cannot sense the direction of light propagation but only its intensity. In a control experiment, the known phototactic alga Chlamydamonas reinhardtii was shown to swim in the direction of light propagation. PMID:9352928

  19. Synthesis of photoresponsive cholesterol-based azobenzene organogels: dependence on different spacer lengths

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yuchun; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    Summary A series of azobenzene–cholesterol organogel compounds (M 0 –M 12) with different spacers were designed and synthesized. The molecular structures were confirmed by 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The rapid and reversible photoresponsive properties of the compounds were investigated by UV–vis spectroscopy. Their thermal phase behaviors were studied by DSC. The length of the spacer plays a crucial role in the gelation. Compound M 6 is the only one that can gelate in ethanol, isopropanol and 1-butanol and the reversible gel–sol transitions are also investigated. To obtain visual insight into the microstructure of the gels, the typical structures of the xerogels were studied by SEM. Morphologies of the aggregates change from flower-like, network and rod with different sizes. By using IR and XRD characterization, it is found that intermolecular H-bonding, the solvents and van der Waals interaction are the main contributions to the specific superstructure. PMID:26199664

  20. Covalent tethering of photo-responsive superficial layers on hydrogel surfaces for photo-controlled release.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lie; Yao, Xi; Gu, Zhandong; Zheng, Kaikai; Zhao, Chuangqi; Lei, Wenwei; Rong, Qinfeng; Lin, Ling; Wang, Jiaobing; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Mingjie

    2017-03-01

    The diffusion and transport of substances between a hydrogel and its environment have received tremendous research interest, due to the wide range of applications of hydrogel materials in fields related to drug carriers and drug delivery vehicles. To date, much research has been done to tailor the diffusion and transport of substances through hydrogels, where most efforts were focused on tuning the 3D network properties of the hydrogel including loop size, hydrophobicity of building blocks and the stimuli-responsive properties of backbones. These conventional strategies, however, usually suffer from complicated fabrication procedures and result in a homogeneous increase in hydrophobicity of the hydrogel network, leading to low efficiency control over the diffusion of substances through the hydrogel. Herein, a facile strategy that can functionalize the surfaces of hydrogels, while keeping the interior network unchanged, was reported, and is realized by quaternization reaction confined to the hydrogel/oil interface. Owing to the introduction of the photo-responsive molecule IBSP as a modifier, the surface wettability of the resulting hydrogel can be controlled by light both in air and underwater environments. Consequently, the diffusion rate of a substance through this modified hydrogel can be regulated by light, which brings convenience to the controlled release of hydrogels and other hydrogel-related fields.

  1. Photoresponse and morphology of pentacene thin films modified by oxidized and reduced diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajewski, W.; Huth, M.; Buth, F.; Nickel, B.; Stutzmann, M.; Garrido, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Because of its large band gap and variety of stable surface terminations, diamond is a suitable material to study the optical and electronic properties of organic films. Optical absorption and photocurrent experiments with pentacene on hydrogen- and oxygen-termin