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Sample records for introducing trauma team

  1. Evaluation of a Pilot Project to Introduce Simulation-Based Team Training to Pediatric Surgery Trauma Room Care

    PubMed Central

    Heimberg, Ellen; Hoffmann, Florian; Heinzel, Oliver; Kirschner, Hans-Joachim; Heinrich, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Several studies in pediatric trauma care have demonstrated substantial deficits in both prehospital and emergency department management. Methods. In February 2015 the PAEDSIM collaborative conducted a one and a half day interdisciplinary, simulation based team-training course in a simulated pediatric emergency department. 14 physicians from the medical fields of pediatric surgery, pediatric intensive care and emergency medicine, and anesthesia participated, as well as four pediatric nurses. After a theoretical introduction and familiarization with the simulator, course attendees alternately participated in six simulation scenarios and debriefings. Each scenario incorporated elements of pediatric trauma management as well as Crew Resource Management (CRM) educational objectives. Participants completed anonymous pre- and postcourse questionnaires and rated the course itself as well as their own medical qualification and knowledge of CRM. Results. Participants found the course very realistic and selected scenarios highly relevant to their daily work. They reported a feeling of improved medical and nontechnical skills as well as no uncomfortable feeling during scenarios or debriefings. Conclusion. To our knowledge this pilot-project represents the first successful implementation of a simulation-based team-training course focused on pediatric trauma care in German-speaking countries with good acceptance. PMID:28286528

  2. The trauma team--a system of initial trauma care.

    PubMed Central

    Adedeji, O. A.; Driscoll, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Trauma remains the leading cause of death under the age of 35 years. England and Wales lost 252,000 working years from accidental deaths, including poison, in 1992. In this country, preventable deaths from trauma are inappropriately high. In many hospitals there are not enough personnel; in the majority, there are no recognisable trauma care systems, which can reduce preventable deaths to a minimum. The appropriateness of trauma centres for this country is being assessed in Stoke-on-Trent, and a report is due out later this year. Even if the recommendation is made to establish such centres, it is unlikely that many will be set up. Consequently most hospitals will have to rely on their own resources to set up and run a trauma team. This type of trauma care system is the subject of this article. PMID:8977939

  3. Trauma teams and time to early management during in situ trauma team training

    PubMed Central

    Härgestam, Maria; Lindkvist, Marie; Jacobsson, Maritha; Brulin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between the time taken to make a decision to go to surgery and gender, ethnicity, years in profession, experience of trauma team training, experience of structured trauma courses and trauma in the trauma team, as well as use of closed-loop communication and leadership styles during trauma team training. Design In situ trauma team training. The patient simulator was preprogrammed to represent a severely injured patient (injury severity score: 25) suffering from hypovolemia due to external trauma. Setting An emergency room in an urban Scandinavian level one trauma centre. Participants A total of 96 participants were divided into 16 trauma teams. Each team consisted of six team members: one surgeon/emergency physician (designated team leader), one anaesthesiologist, one registered nurse anaesthetist, one registered nurse from the emergency department, one enrolled nurse from the emergency department and one enrolled nurse from the operating theatre. Primary outcome HRs with CIs (95% CI) for the time taken to make a decision to go to surgery was computed from a Cox proportional hazards model. Results Three variables remained significant in the final model. Closed-loop communication initiated by the team leader increased the chance of a decision to go to surgery (HR: 3.88; CI 1.02 to 14.69). Only 8 of the 16 teams made the decision to go to surgery within the timeframe of the trauma team training. Conversely, call-outs and closed-loop communication initiated by the team members significantly decreased the chance of a decision to go to surgery, (HR: 0.82; CI 0.71 to 0.96, and HR: 0.23; CI 0.08 to 0.71, respectively). Conclusions Closed-loop communication initiated by the leader appears to be beneficial for teamwork. In contrast, a high number of call-outs and closed-loop communication initiated by team members might lead to a communication overload. PMID:26826152

  4. Returning to contingency: the forward trauma team.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Andrew; Dalal, S; Beales, L

    2016-12-01

    During Herrick 19, Main Operating Base Price Role 1 treatment facility saw one of the busiest periods of Role 1 trauma care within the British Afghanistan campaign. Within 5 months 73 trauma casualties were treated, 48 of whom were category A. This article shares the experiences of this Role 1 and its unusual context, and discusses the relevance with regard to future medical planning. The focus is on the human element; a fundamental of all military operations yet one that is often overlooked. We consider the team construct and the team members of Role 1 and suggest how this team and its leaders can be optimally prepared, supported and maintained, and then safely disassembled. We also consider how best this team can be placed within the battle group formation in order to provide the highest standard of care.

  5. Whats the story? Information needs of trauma teams.

    PubMed

    Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Burd, Randall S

    2008-11-06

    This paper reports on information needs of trauma teams based on an ethnographic study in an urban teaching hospital. We focus on questions posed by trauma team members during ten trauma events. We identify major categories of questions, as well as information seekers and providers. In addition to categories known from other critical care settings, we found categories unique to trauma settings. Based on these findings, we discuss implications for information technology support for trauma teams.

  6. Evaluating trauma team performance in a Level I trauma center: Validation of the trauma team communication assessment (TTCA-24).

    PubMed

    DeMoor, Stephanie; Abdel-Rehim, Shady; Olmsted, Richard; Myers, John G; Parker-Raley, Jessica

    2017-07-01

    Nontechnical skills (NTS), such as team communication, are well-recognized determinants of trauma team performance and good patient care. Measuring these competencies during trauma resuscitations is essential, yet few valid and reliable tools are available. We aimed to demonstrate that the Trauma Team Communication Assessment (TTCA-24) is a valid and reliable instrument that measures communication effectiveness during activations. Two tools with adequate psychometric strength (Trauma Nontechnical Skills Scale [T-NOTECHS], Team Emergency Assessment Measure [TEAM]) were identified during a systematic review of medical literature and compared with TTCA-24. Three coders used each tool to evaluate 35 stable and 35 unstable patient activations (defined according to Advanced Trauma Life Support criteria). Interrater reliability was calculated between coders using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to establish concurrent validity between TTCA-24 and the other two validated tools. Coders achieved an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.87 for stable patient activations and 0.78 for unstable activations scoring excellent on the interrater agreement guidelines. The median score for each assessment showed good team communication for all 70 videos (TEAM, 39.8 of 54; T-NOTECHS, 17.4 of 25; and TTCA-24, 87.4 of 96). A significant correlation between TTTC-24 and T-NOTECHS was revealed (p = 0.029), but no significant correlation between TTCA-24 and TEAM (p = 0.77). Team communication was rated slightly better across all assessments for stable versus unstable patient activations, but not statistically significant. TTCA-24 correlated with T-NOTECHS, an instrument measuring nontechnical skills for trauma teams, but not TEAM, a tool that assesses communication in generic emergency settings. TTCA-24 is a reliable and valid assessment that can be a useful adjunct when evaluating interpersonal and team communication during trauma

  7. Trauma team leaders' non-verbal communication: video registration during trauma team training.

    PubMed

    Härgestam, Maria; Hultin, Magnus; Brulin, Christine; Jacobsson, Maritha

    2016-03-25

    There is widespread consensus on the importance of safe and secure communication in healthcare, especially in trauma care where time is a limiting factor. Although non-verbal communication has an impact on communication between individuals, there is only limited knowledge of how trauma team leaders communicate. The purpose of this study was to investigate how trauma team members are positioned in the emergency room, and how leaders communicate in terms of gaze direction, vocal nuances, and gestures during trauma team training. Eighteen trauma teams were audio and video recorded during trauma team training in the emergency department of a hospital in northern Sweden. Quantitative content analysis was used to categorize the team members' positions and the leaders' non-verbal communication: gaze direction, vocal nuances, and gestures. The quantitative data were interpreted in relation to the specific context. Time sequences of the leaders' gaze direction, speech time, and gestures were identified separately and registered as time (seconds) and proportions (%) of the total training time. The team leaders who gained control over the most important area in the emergency room, the "inner circle", positioned themselves as heads over the team, using gaze direction, gestures, vocal nuances, and verbal commands that solidified their verbal message. Changes in position required both attention and collaboration. Leaders who spoke in a hesitant voice, or were silent, expressed ambiguity in their non-verbal communication: and other team members took over the leader's tasks. In teams where the leader had control over the inner circle, the members seemed to have an awareness of each other's roles and tasks, knowing when in time and where in space these tasks needed to be executed. Deviations in the leaders' communication increased the ambiguity in the communication, which had consequences for the teamwork. Communication cannot be taken for granted; it needs to be practiced

  8. Team composition and perceived roles of team members in the trauma bay.

    PubMed

    Speck, Rebecca M; Jones, Gabrielle; Barg, Frances K; McCunn, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    Perceptions of trauma team members and their roles may impact team performance, requiring intervention. Participant observation and semistructured interviews were performed with trauma team members: attendings, nurses, fellows, residents, and medical students. Some team members do not include nurses as members of the team. A greater proportion of male than female team leaders perceived their role as teacher or educator. Nurses, attendings, and fellows, provided parallel descriptions of good leaders, whereas medical students and residents stressed other qualities. Inconsistencies in trauma team role definition and membership should be addressed, toward the goal of improving team communication and patient outcomes.

  9. Contingent leadership and effectiveness of trauma resuscitation teams.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seokhwa; Faraj, Samer; Sims, Henry P

    2005-11-01

    This research investigated leadership and effectiveness of teams operating in a high-velocity environment, specifically trauma resuscitation teams. On the basis of the literature and their own ethnographic work, the authors proposed and tested a contingency model in which the influence of leadership on team effectiveness during trauma resuscitation differs according to the situation. Results indicated that empowering leadership was more effective when trauma severity was low and when team experience was high. Directive leadership was more effective when trauma severity was high or when the team was inexperienced. Findings also suggested that an empowering leader provided more learning opportunities than did a directive leader. The major contribution of this article is the linkage of leadership to team effectiveness, as moderated by relatively specific situational contingencies. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Immersion team training in a realistic environment improves team performance in trauma resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Siriratsivawong, Kris; Kang, Jeff; Riffenburgh, Robert; Hoang, Tuan N

    2016-09-01

    In the US military, it is common for health care teams to be formed ad hoc and expected to function cohesively as a unit. Poor team dynamics decreases the effectiveness of trauma care delivery. The US Navy Fleet Surgical Team Three has developed a simulation-based trauma initiative-the Shipboard Surgical Trauma Training (S2T2) Course-that emphasizes team dynamics to improve the delivery of trauma care to the severely injured patient. The S2T2 Course combines classroom didactics with hands-on simulation over a period of 6 days, culminating in a daylong, mass casualty scenario. Each resuscitation team was initially evaluated with a simulated trauma resuscitation scenario then retested on the same scenario after completing the course. A written exam was also administered individually both before and after the course. A survey was administered to assess the participants' perceived effectiveness of the course on overall team training. From the evaluation of 20 resuscitation teams made up of 123 medical personnel, there was a decrease in the mean time needed to perform the simulated trauma resuscitation, from a mean of 24.4 minutes to 13.5 minutes (P < .01), a decrease in the mean number of critical events missed, from 5.15 to 1.00 (P < .01), and a mean improvement of 41% in written test scores. More than 90% of participants rated the course as highly effective for improving team dynamics. A team-based trauma course with immersion in a realistic environment is an effective tool for improving team performance in trauma training. This approach has high potential to improve trauma care and patient outcomes. The benefits of this team-based course can be adapted to the civilian rural sector, where gaps have been identified in trauma care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Dental and General Trauma in Team Handball.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Mateja; Kühl, Sebastian; Šlaj, Martina; Connert, Thomas; Filippi, Andreas

    Handball has developed into a much faster and high-impact sport over the past few years because of rule changes. Fast sports with close body contact are especially prone to orofacial trauma. Handball belongs to a category of sports with medium risk for dental trauma. Even so, there is only little literature on this subject. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and the type of injuries, especially the occurrence of orofacial trauma, habits of wearing mouthguards, as well as degree of familiarity with the tooth rescue box. For this purpose, 77.1% (n=542/703) of all top athletes and coaches from the two highest Swiss leagues (National League A and National League B), namely 507 professional players and 35 coaches, were personally interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. 19.7% (n=100/507) of the players experienced dental trauma in their handball careers, with 40.8% (n=51/125) crown fractures being the most frequent by far. In spite of the relatively high risk of lip or dental trauma, only 5.7% (n=29/507) of the players wear mouthguards. The results of this study show that dental trauma is common among Swiss handball players. In spite of the high risk of dental trauma, the mouthguard as prevention is not adequately known, and correct procedure following dental trauma is rarely known at all.

  12. Team Size Impact on Assessment of Teamwork in Simulation-based Trauma Team Training

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yong-Su; Steinemann, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Non-technical skills (teamwork) assessment is used to improve competence during training for interprofessional trauma teams. We hypothesized non-technical skills assessment is less reliable for large size teams, and evaluated team size effects during teamwork training. Small-teams (n = 5; 5–7 members) and Large-teams (n = 6; 8–9 members) participated in three simulation-based trauma team training scenarios. Following each scenario, teamwork was scored by participating trauma attending physicians (TA), non-participating critical care trauma nurses (CRN), and two expert teamwork debriefers (E), using the Trauma Nontechnical Skills Assessment tool (T-NOTECHS). Large-team scores by TA and CRN were higher than E scores (P < .003); small-team scores did not differ by rater. Small-team inter-observer agreement was substantial (ICC = 0.60); large-team agreement was low (ICC = 0.29). E and TA scores showed no concordance, whereas E and CRN scores showed poor concordance for large teams (ICC = 0.41, r = 0.53, P = .02). By contrast, correlation between E and TA (ICC = 0.52, r = 0.80, P < .001) as well as E and CRN (ICC = 0.57, and r = 0.65, P < .01) for small teams was high. Team size should be considered in team-training design, and when using teamwork rating instruments such as T-NOTECHS for assessment of simulated or actual trauma teams. Modified rating scales and enhanced training for raters of large groups versus small groups may be warranted. PMID:25414806

  13. Team size impact on assessment of teamwork in simulation-based trauma team training.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yong-Su; Steinemann, Susan; Berg, Benjamin W

    2014-11-01

    Non-technical skills (teamwork) assessment is used to improve competence during training for interprofessional trauma teams. We hypothesized non-technical skills assessment is less reliable for large size teams, and evaluated team size effects during teamwork training. Small-teams (n = 5; 5-7 members) and Large-teams (n = 6; 8-9 members) participated in three simulation-based trauma team training scenarios. Following each scenario, teamwork was scored by participating trauma attending physicians (TA), non-participating critical care trauma nurses (CRN), and two expert teamwork debriefers (E), using the Trauma Nontechnical Skills Assessment tool (T-NOTECHS). Large-team scores by TA and CRN were higher than E scores (P < .003); small-team scores did not differ by rater. Small-team inter-observer agreement was substantial (ICC = 0.60); large-team agreement was low (ICC = 0.29). E and TA scores showed no concordance, whereas E and CRN scores showed poor concordance for large teams (ICC = 0.41, r = 0.53, P = .02). By contrast, correlation between E and TA (ICC = 0.52, r = 0.80, P < .001) as well as E and CRN (ICC = 0.57, and r = 0.65, P < .01) for small teams was high. Team size should be considered in team-training design, and when using teamwork rating instruments such as T-NOTECHS for assessment of simulated or actual trauma teams. Modified rating scales and enhanced training for raters of large groups versus small groups may be warranted.

  14. Communication in interdisciplinary teams: exploring closed-loop communication during in situ trauma team training

    PubMed Central

    Härgestam, Maria; Lindkvist, Marie; Brulin, Christine; Jacobsson, Maritha; Hultin, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Investigate the use of call-out (CO) and closed-loop communication (CLC) during a simulated emergency situation, and its relation to profession, age, gender, ethnicity, years in profession, educational experience, work experience and leadership style. Design Exploratory study. Setting In situ simulator-based interdisciplinary team training using trauma cases at an emergency department. Participants The result was based on 16 trauma teams with a total of 96 participants. Each team consisted of two physicians, two registered nurses and two enrolled nurses, identical to a standard trauma team. Results The results in this study showed that the use of CO and CLC in trauma teams was limited, with an average of 20 CO and 2.8 CLC/team. Previous participation in trauma team training did not increase the frequency of use of CLC while ≥2 structured trauma courses correlated with increased use of CLC (risk ratio (RR) 3.17, CI 1.22 to 8.24). All professions in the trauma team were observed to initiate and terminate CLC (except for the enrolled nurse from the operation theatre). The frequency of team members’ use of CLC increased significantly with an egalitarian leadership style (RR 1.14, CI 1.04 to 1.26). Conclusions This study showed that despite focus on the importance of communication in terms of CO and CLC, the difficulty in achieving safe and reliable verbal communication within the interdisciplinary team remained. This finding indicates the need for validated training models combined with further implementation studies. PMID:24148213

  15. The Trauma Response Team: a Community Intervention for Gang Violence.

    PubMed

    Jennings-Bey, Timothy; Lane, Sandra D; Rubinstein, Robert A; Bergen-Cico, Dessa; Haygood-El, Arnett; Hudson, Helen; Sanchez, Shaundel; Fowler, Frank L

    2015-10-01

    While violent crime has decreased in many cities in the USA, gang-related violence remains a serious problem in impoverished inner city neighborhoods. In Syracuse, New York, gang-related murders and gun shots have topped other New York state cities. Residents of the high-murder neighborhoods suffer trauma similar to those living in civil conflict zones. The Trauma Response Team was established in 2010, in collaboration with the Police Department, health care institutions, and emergency response teams and with the research support of Syracuse University faculty. Since its inception, gang-related homicides and gun shots have decreased in the most severely affected census tracts.

  16. Flexible knowledge repertoires: communication by leaders in trauma teams

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In emergency situations, it is important for the trauma team to efficiently communicate their observations and assessments. One common communication strategy is “closed-loop communication”, which can be described as a transmission model in which feedback is of great importance. The role of the leader is to create a shared goal in order to achieve consensus in the work for the safety of the patient. The purpose of this study was to analyze how formal leaders communicate knowledge, create consensus, and position themselves in relation to others in the team. Methods Sixteen trauma teams were audio- and video-recorded during high fidelity training in an emergency department. Each team consisted of six members: one surgeon or emergency physician (the designated team leader), one anaesthesiologist, one nurse anaesthetist, one enrolled nurse from the theatre ward, one registered nurse and one enrolled nurse from the emergency department (ED). The communication was transcribed and analyzed, inspired by discourse psychology and Strauss’ concept of “negotiated order”. The data were organized and coded in NVivo 9. Results The findings suggest that leaders use coercive, educational, discussing and negotiating strategies to work things through. The leaders in this study used different repertoires to convey their knowledge to the team, in order to create a common goal of the priorities of the work. Changes in repertoires were dependent on the urgency of the situation and the interaction between team members. When using these repertoires, the leaders positioned themselves in different ways, either on an authoritarian or a more egalitarian level. Conclusion This study indicates that communication in trauma teams is complex and consists of more than just transferring messages quickly. It also concerns what the leaders express, and even more importantly, how they speak to and involve other team members. PMID:22747848

  17. Intraosseous access in trauma by air medical retrieval teams.

    PubMed

    Sheils, Mark; Ross, Mark; Eatough, Noel; Caputo, Nicholas D

    2014-01-01

    Trauma accounts for a significant portion of overall mortality globally. Hemorrhage is the second major cause of mortality in the prehospital environment. Air medical retrieval services throughout the world have been developed to help improve the outcomes of patients suffering from a broad range of medical conditions, including trauma. These services often utilize intraosseous (IO) devices as an alternative means for access of both medically ill and traumatically injured patients in austere environments. However, studies have suggested that IO access cannot reach acceptable rates for massive transfusion. We review the subject to find the answer of whether IO access should be performed by air medical teams in the prehospital setting, or would central venous (CVC) access be more appropriate? We decided to assess the literature for capacity of IO access to meet resuscitation requirements in the prehospital management of trauma. We also decided to compare the insertion and complication characteristics of IO and CVC access.

  18. Teamwork education improves trauma team performance in undergraduate health professional students.

    PubMed

    Baker, Valerie O'Toole; Cuzzola, Ronald; Knox, Carolyn; Liotta, Cynthia; Cornfield, Charles S; Tarkowski, Robert D; Masters, Carolynn; McCarthy, Michael; Sturdivant, Suzanne; Carlson, Jestin N

    2015-01-01

    Effective trauma resuscitation requires efficient and coordinated care from a team of providers; however, providers are rarely instructed on how to be effective members of trauma teams. Team-based learning using Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS) has been shown to improve team dynamics among practicing professionals, including physicians and nurses. The impact of TeamSTEPPS on students being trained in trauma management in an undergraduate health professional program is currently unknown. We sought to determine the impact of TeamSTEPPS on team dynamics among undergraduate students being trained in trauma resuscitation. We enrolled teams of undergraduate health professional students from four programs: nursing, physician assistant, radiologic science, and respiratory care. After completing an online training on trauma resuscitation principles, the participants completed a trauma resuscitation scenario. The participants then received teamwork training using TeamSTEPPS and completed a second trauma resuscitation scenario identical to the first. All resuscitations were recorded and scored offline by two blinded research assistants using both the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) and Trauma Team Performance Observation Tool (TPOT) scoring systems. Pre-test and post-test TEAM and TPOT scores were compared. We enrolled a total of 48 students in 12 teams. Team leadership, situational monitoring, and overall communication improved with TeamSTEPPS training (P=0.04, P=0.02, and P=0.03, respectively), as assessed by the TPOT scoring system. TeamSTEPPS also improved the team's ability to prioritize tasks and work together to complete tasks in a rapid manner (P<0.01 and P=0.02, respectively) as measured by TEAM. Incorporating TeamSTEPPS into trauma team education leads to improved TEAM and TPOT scores among undergraduate health professionals.

  19. Teamwork education improves trauma team performance in undergraduate health professional students

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Valerie O’Toole; Cuzzola, Ronald; Knox, Carolyn; Liotta, Cynthia; Cornfield, Charles S.; Tarkowski, Robert D.; Masters, Carolynn; McCarthy, Michael; Sturdivant, Suzanne; Carlson, Jestin N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Effective trauma resuscitation requires efficient and coordinated care from a team of providers; however, providers are rarely instructed on how to be effective members of trauma teams. Team-based learning using Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS) has been shown to improve team dynamics among practicing professionals, including physicians and nurses. The impact of TeamSTEPPS on students being trained in trauma management in an undergraduate health professional program is currently unknown. We sought to determine the impact of TeamSTEPPS on team dynamics among undergraduate students being trained in trauma resuscitation. Methods: We enrolled teams of undergraduate health professional students from four programs: nursing, physician assistant, radiologic science, and respiratory care. After completing an online training on trauma resuscitation principles, the participants completed a trauma resuscitation scenario. The participants then received teamwork training using TeamSTEPPS and completed a second trauma resuscitation scenario identical to the first. All resuscitations were recorded and scored offline by two blinded research assistants using both the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) and Trauma Team Performance Observation Tool (TPOT) scoring systems. Pre-test and post-test TEAM and TPOT scores were compared. Results: We enrolled a total of 48 students in 12 teams. Team leadership, situational monitoring, and overall communication improved with TeamSTEPPS training (P=0.04, P=0.02, and P=0.03, respectively), as assessed by the TPOT scoring system. TeamSTEPPS also improved the team’s ability to prioritize tasks and work together to complete tasks in a rapid manner (P<0.01 and P=0.02, respectively) as measured by TEAM. Conclusions: Incorporating TeamSTEPPS into trauma team education leads to improved TEAM and TPOT scores among undergraduate health professionals. PMID:26101404

  20. ROLE CONFUSION AND SELF ASSESSMENT IN INTERPROFESSIONAL TRAUMA TEAMS

    PubMed Central

    Steinemann, Susan; Kurosawa, Gene; Wei, Alexander; Ho, Nina; Lim, Eunjung; Suares, Gregory; Bhatt, Ajay; Berg, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Trauma care requires coordinating an interprofessional team, with formative feedback on teamwork skills. We hypothesized nurses and surgeons have different perceptions regarding roles during resuscitation; that nurses’ teamwork self-assessment differs from experts’, and that video debriefing might improve accuracy of self-assessment. Methods Trauma nurses and surgeons were surveyed regarding resuscitation responsibilities. Subsequently, nurses joined interprofessional teams in simulated trauma resuscitations. Following each resuscitation, nurses and teamwork experts independently scored teamwork (T-NOTECHS). After video debriefing, nurses repeated T-NOTECHS self-assessment. Results Nurses and surgeons assumed significantly more responsibility by their own profession for 71% of resuscitation tasks. Nurses’ overall T-NOTECHS ratings were slightly higher than experts’. This was evident in all T-NOTECHS subdomains except “leadership,” but despite statistical significance the difference was small and clinically irrelevant. Video debriefing did not improve the accuracy of self-assessment. Conclusions Nurses and physicians demonstrated discordant perceptions of responsibilities. Nurses’ self-assessment of teamwork was statistically, but not clinically significantly, higher than experts’ in all domains except physician leadership. PMID:26801092

  1. Trauma VAP SWAT team: a rapid response to infection prevention.

    PubMed

    Laux, Lori; Dysert, Karen; Kiely, Sharon; Weimerskirch, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) has been a challenge within many healthcare organizations. The initial efforts for VAP prevention focused on compliance with "ventilator bundles." VAP rates initially improved with implementation of the bundles but then reached a plateau. The trauma surgical intensive care unit (ICU) was interested in investigating measures to further improve the prevention of VAP after bundle implementation. A multidisciplinary team was formed to investigate innovative strategies to prevent VAP. The group identified their initial focus as head of bed (HOB) elevation intervention within and outside of the ICU through HOB audits and a transport checklist. Through these efforts, the VAP rate within the trauma surgical ICU dropped to the lowest level in 4 years.

  2. Changes in rural trauma prehospital times following the Rural Trauma Team Development Course training.

    PubMed

    Malekpour, Mahdi; Neuhaus, Nina; Martin, David; Widom, Kenneth; Rapp, Megan; Leonard, Diane; Baro, Susan; Dove, James; Hunsinger, Marie; Blansfield, Joseph; Shabahang, Mohsen; Torres, Denise; Wild, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    The majority of the US population live in urban areas, yet more than half of all trauma deaths occur in rural areas. The Rural Trauma Team Development Course (RTTDC) is developed to improve the outcomes of rural trauma and we aimed to study its effect on patient transfer. Trauma referrals 2 years before the RTTDC training were compared with referrals 2 years after the course. Of the 276 studied patients, 97 were referred before the RTTDC training and 179 patients were referred after the course. Transfer acceptance time was significantly shorter after the RTTDC training (139.2 ± 87.1 vs 110 ± 66.3 min, P = .003). The overall transfer time was also significantly reduced following the RTTDC training (257.4 ± 110.8 vs 219.2 ± 86.5 min, P = .002). Patients receiving pretransfer imaging had a significantly higher transfer time both before and after RTTDC training (all Ps < .01). Mortality was nearly halved (6.2% vs 3.4%) after the RTTDC training. The RTTDC training was associated with reduced transfer acceptance time and reduced transfer time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. General Surgeons and trauma. A questionnaire survey of General Surgeons training in ATLS and involvement in the trauma team.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Adam; Williams, James; Butcher, William; Ryan, James

    2003-07-01

    To determine the level of training of General Surgeons in the UK in the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course and their involvement with hospital trauma teams. Postal questionnaire sent to General Surgical Consultants and Higher Surgical Trainees (HSTs). 58% of General Surgeons who responded had attended ATLS, but only 30% of those who had been Consultants for more than 10 years. Eighty-seven percent considered the course 'essential' or 'some value'. Sixty-one percent of hospitals represented had a trauma team. A Consultant General Surgeon was a member of the team in 50% and the General Surgical HST in 82%. ATLS has been widely accepted by General Surgical Trainees and recently appointed Consultants. The trauma team approach to resuscitation has yet to become fully established in the UK and there is limited input from Consultant General Surgeons.

  4. Definition of hemodynamic stability in blunt trauma patients: a systematic review and assessment amongst Dutch trauma team members.

    PubMed

    Loggers, S A I; Koedam, T W A; Giannakopoulos, G F; Vandewalle, E; Erwteman, M; Zuidema, W P

    2016-11-30

    Trauma is a great contributor to mortality worldwide. One of the challenges in trauma care is early identification and management of bleeding. The circulatory status of blunt trauma patients in the emergency room is evaluated using hemodynamic (HD) parameters. However, there is no consensus on which parameters to use. In this study, we evaluate the used terms and definitions in the literature for HD stability and compare those to the opinion of Dutch trauma team members. A systematic review was performed to collect the definitions used for HD stability. Studies describing the assessment and/or treatment of blunt trauma patients in the emergency room were included. In addition, an online survey was conducted amongst Dutch trauma team members. Out of a total of 222, 67 articles were found to be eligible for inclusion. HD stability was defined in 70% of these articles. The most used parameters were systolic blood pressure and heart rate. Besides the variety of parameters, a broad range of corresponding cut-off points is noted. Despite some common ground, high inter- and intra-variability is seen for the physicians that are part of the Dutch trauma teams. All authors acknowledge HD stability as the most important factor in the assessment and management of blunt trauma patients. There is, however, no consensus in the literature as well as none-to-fair consensus amongst Dutch trauma team members in the definition of HD stability. A trauma team ready to co-operate with consensus-based opinions together with a valid scoring system is in our opinion the best method to assess and treat seriously injured trauma patients.

  5. Characteristics of Team-Based Organization Introduced to Academic Libraries in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Hye-Young

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to analyze characteristics of a team-based organization introduced lately to many academic libraries in South Korea. The major areas of exploration included the introduction of the team approach, team empowerment, leadership of team leaders, open communication, and the director's commitment. The study used a survey design…

  6. The effect of introducing a Trauma Network on patient flow, hospital finances and trainee operating.

    PubMed

    Hipps, Daniel; Jameson, Simon; Murty, An; Gregory, Rob; Large, David; Gregson, Jackie; Refaie, Ramsay; Reed, Mike

    2015-02-01

    In April 2012 the National Health Service in England introduced the Trauma Network system with the aim of improving the quality of trauma care. In this study we wished to determine how the introduction of the Trauma network has affected patient flow, hospital finances and orthopaedic trauma training across our region. The overall pattern of trauma distribution was not greatly affected, reflecting the relative rarity of major trauma in the UK. A small decrease in the total number of operations performed by trainees was noted in our region. Trainees at units designated as Major Trauma Centres gained slightly more operative experience in trauma procedures overall, and specifically in those associated with high energy, such as long bone nail insertion and external fixation procedures. However, there have been no significant changes in this pattern since the introduction of the Trauma Networks. Falling operative numbers presents a challenge for delivering high quality training within a surgical training programme, and each case should be seen as a vital educational opportunity. Best practice tariff targets for trauma were delivered for 99% of cases at our MTCs. Future audit and review to analyse the evolving role of the MTCs is desirable.

  7. The Role of Communication During Trauma Activations: Investigating the Need for Team and Leader Communication Training.

    PubMed

    Raley, Jessica; Meenakshi, Rani; Dent, Daniel; Willis, Ross; Lawson, Karla; Duzinski, Sarah

    Fatal errors due to miscommunication among members of trauma teams are 2 to 4 times more likely to occur than in other medical teams, yet most trauma team members do not receive communication effectiveness training. A needs assessment was conducted to examine trauma team members' miscommunication experiences and research scientists' evaluations of live trauma activations. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that communication training is necessary and highlight specific team communication competencies that trauma teams should learn to improve communication during activations. Data were collected in 2 phases. Phase 1 required participants to complete a series of surveys. Phase 2 included live observations and assessments of pediatric trauma activations using the assessment of pediatric resuscitation team assessments (APRC-TA) and assessment of pediatric resuscitation leader assessments (APRC-LA). Data were collected at a southwestern pediatric hospital. Trauma team members and leaders completed surveys at a meeting and were observed while conducting activations in the trauma bay. Trained research scientists and clinical staff used the APRC-TA and APRC-LA to measure trauma teams' medical performance and communication effectiveness. The sample included 29 healthcare providers who regularly participate in trauma activations. Additionally, 12 live trauma activations were assessed monday to friday from 8am to 5pm. Team members indicated that communication training should focus on offering assistance, delegating duties, accepting feedback, and controlling emotional expressions. Communication scores were not significantly different from medical performance scores. None of the teams were coded as effective medical performance and ineffective team communication and only 1 team was labeled as ineffective leader communication and effective medical performance. Communication training may be necessary for trauma teams and offer a deeper understanding of the communication

  8. Simulated Trauma and Resuscitation Team Training course-evolution of a multidisciplinary trauma crisis resource management simulation course.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Lawrence M; Brindley, Peter; Paton-Gay, John Damian; Engels, Paul T; Park, Jason; Vergis, Ashley; Widder, Sandy

    2016-07-01

    We previously reported on a pilot trauma multidisciplinary crisis resource course titled S.T.A.R.T.T. (Simulated Trauma and Resuscitative Team Training). Here, we study the course's evolution. Satisfaction was evaluated by postcourse survey. Trauma teams were evaluated using the Ottawa global rating scale and an Advanced Trauma Life Support primary survey checklist. Eleven "trauma teams," consisting of physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists, each completed 4 crisis simulations over 3 courses. Satisfaction remained high among participants with overall mean satisfaction being 4.39 on a 5-point Likert scale. As participants progressed through scenarios, improvements in global rating scale scores were seen between the 1st and 4th (29.8 vs 36.1 of 42, P = .022), 2nd and 3rd (28.2 vs 34.6, P = .017), and 2nd and 4th (28.2 vs 36.1, P = .003) scenarios. There were no differences in Advanced Trauma Life Support checklist with mean scores for each scenario ranging 11.3 to 13.2 of 17. The evolved Simulated Trauma and Resuscitative Team Training curriculum has maintained high participant satisfaction and is associated with improvement in team crisis resource management skills over the duration of the course. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intubated Trauma Patients Do Not Require Full Trauma Team Activation when Effectively Triaged.

    PubMed

    Harbrecht, Brian G; Franklin, Glen A; Smith, Jason W; Benns, Matthew V; Miller, Keith R; Nash, Nicholas A; Bozeman, Matthew C; Coleman, Royce; O'Brien, Dan; Richardson, J David

    2016-04-01

    Full trauma team activation in evaluating injured patients is based on triage criteria and associated with significant costs and resources that should be focused on patients who truly need them. Overtriage leads to inefficient care, particularly when resources are finite, and it diverts care from other vital areas. Although shock and gunshot wounds to the abdomen are accepted indicators for full trauma activation, intubation as the sole criterion is controversial. We evaluated our experience to assess if intubation alone merited the highest level of trauma activation. All trauma patients from 2012 to 2013 were assessed for level of activation, injury characteristics, presence of intubation, and outcomes. Of 5,881 patients, 646 (11%) were level 1 (full) and 2,823 (48%) were level 2 (partial) activations. Level 1 patients were younger (40 ± 17 vs 45 ± 20 years), had more penetrating injuries (42% vs 9%), and had higher mortality (26% vs 8%)(p < 0.001). Intubated level 2 patients (n = 513), compared with intubated level 1 patients (n = 320), had higher systolic blood pressure (133 ± 44 vs 90 ± 58 mmHg), lower Injury Severity Score (21 ± 13 vs 25 ± 16), more falls (25% vs 3%), fewer penetrating injuries (11% vs 23%), and lower mortality (31% vs 48%)(p < 0.01). Fewer intubated level patients went directly to the operating room from the emergency department (ED)(16% vs 33%), and most who did had a craniotomy (63% vs 13%). Only 3% of intubated level 2 patients underwent laparotomy compared with 20% of intubated level 1 patients (p < 0.001). The ED lengths of stay before obtaining a head CT (47 ± 26 vs 48 ± 31 minutes) and craniotomy (109 ± 61 vs 102 ± 46 minutes) were similar. Deaths in intubated level 2 patients were primarily from fatal brain injuries. When appropriately triaged, selected intubated trauma patients do not require full trauma activation to receive timely, efficient care. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc

  10. Training forward surgical teams for deployment: the US Army Trauma Training Center.

    PubMed

    Valdiri, Linda A; Andrews-Arce, Virginia E; Seery, Jason M

    2015-04-01

    Since the late 1980s, the US Army has been deploying forward surgical teams to the most intense areas of conflict to care for personnel injured in combat. The forward surgical team is a 20-person medical team that is highly mobile, extremely agile, and has relatively little need of outside support to perform its surgical mission. In order to perform this mission, however, team training and trauma training are required. The large majority of these teams do not routinely train together to provide patient care, and that training currently takes place at the US Army Trauma Training Center (ATTC). The training staff of the ATTC is a specially selected 10-person team made up of active duty personnel from the Army Medical Department assigned to the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital Ryder Trauma Center in Miami, Florida. The ATTC team of instructors trains as many as 11 forward surgical teams in 2-week rotations per year so that the teams are ready to perform their mission in a deployed setting. Since the first forward surgical team was trained at the ATTC in January 2002, more than 112 forward surgical teams and other similar-sized Department of Defense forward resuscitative and surgical units have rotated through trauma training at the Ryder Trauma Center in preparation for deployment overseas.

  11. [Training for real: simulation, team-training and communication to improve trauma management].

    PubMed

    Happel, Oliver; Papenfuss, Tim; Kranke, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The focus on the role of non-technical skills such as communication, dynamic decision making, situational awareness and teamwork in emergency medicine has gained importance over the past few years. Especially during time-critical and complex treatment of severely injured patients in a multidisciplinary and interprofessional trauma-team these factors play an important role for patient-safety and process optimization and are a key factor influencing the perceived quality of a given scenario by the team members. Thus, apart from medical expertise and technical excellence of single actors within a trauma team, non-technical skills need to be incorporated in trainings for trauma management. For the improvement of non-technical skills, particularly team communication and teamwork, a simulator-based training represents a valuable tool. The technical performance of portable manikin-based simulators has improved tremendously during the last decade, which facilitates realistic and true-to-life multidisciplinary team-training in trauma management.

  12. Introducing a Short Measure of Shared Servant Leadership Impacting Team Performance through Team Behavioral Integration.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Milton; Van Dierendonck, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The research reported in this paper was designed to study the influence of shared servant leadership on team performance through the mediating effect of team behavioral integration, while validating a new short measure of shared servant leadership. A round-robin approach was used to collect data in two similar studies. Study 1 included 244 undergraduate students in 61 teams following an intense HRM business simulation of 2 weeks. The following year, study 2 included 288 students in 72 teams involved in the same simulation. The most important findings were that (1) shared servant leadership was a strong determinant of team behavioral integration, (2) information exchange worked as the main mediating process between shared servant leadership and team performance, and (3) the essence of servant leadership can be captured on the key dimensions of empowerment, humility, stewardship and accountability, allowing for a new promising shortened four-dimensional measure of shared servant leadership.

  13. Introducing a Short Measure of Shared Servant Leadership Impacting Team Performance through Team Behavioral Integration

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Milton; Van Dierendonck, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The research reported in this paper was designed to study the influence of shared servant leadership on team performance through the mediating effect of team behavioral integration, while validating a new short measure of shared servant leadership. A round-robin approach was used to collect data in two similar studies. Study 1 included 244 undergraduate students in 61 teams following an intense HRM business simulation of 2 weeks. The following year, study 2 included 288 students in 72 teams involved in the same simulation. The most important findings were that (1) shared servant leadership was a strong determinant of team behavioral integration, (2) information exchange worked as the main mediating process between shared servant leadership and team performance, and (3) the essence of servant leadership can be captured on the key dimensions of empowerment, humility, stewardship and accountability, allowing for a new promising shortened four-dimensional measure of shared servant leadership. PMID:26779104

  14. Mental practice: a simple tool to enhance team-based trauma resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lorello, Gianni R; Hicks, Christopher M; Ahmed, Sana-Ara; Unger, Zoe; Chandra, Deven; Hayter, Megan A

    2016-03-01

    Effective trauma resuscitation requires the coordinated efforts of an interdisciplinary team. Mental practice (MP) is defined as the mental rehearsal of activity in the absence of gross muscular movements and has been demonstrated to enhance acquiring technical and procedural skills. The role of MP to promote nontechnical, team-based skills for trauma has yet to be investigated. We randomized anaesthesiology, emergency medicine, and surgery residents to two-member teams randomly assigned to either an MP or control group. The MP group engaged in 20 minutes of MP, and the control group received 20 minutes of Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) training. All teams then participated in a high-fidelity simulated adult trauma resuscitation and received debriefing on communication, leadership, and teamwork. Two blinded raters independently scored video recordings of the simulated resuscitations using the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS), a validated team-based behavioural rating scale. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to assess for between-group differences. Seventy-eight residents provided informed written consent and were recruited. The MP group outperformed the control group with significant effect on teamwork behaviour as assessed using the MHPTS: r=0.67, p<0.01. MP leads to improvement in team-based skills compared to traditional simulation-based trauma instruction. We feel that MP may be a useful and inexpensive tool for improving nontechnical skills instruction effectiveness for team-based trauma care.

  15. Norwegian trauma team leaders - training and experience: A national point prevalence study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The treatment of trauma victims is a complex multi-professional task in a stressful environment. We previously found that trauma team members perceive leadership as the most important human factor. The aim of the present study was to assess the experience and education of Norwegian trauma team leaders, and allow them to describe their perceived educational needs. Methods We conducted an anonymous descriptive study using a point prevalence methodology based on written questionnaires. All 45 hospitals in Norway receiving severely injured trauma victims were contacted on a randomly selected weeknight during November 2009. Team leaders were asked to specify what trauma related training programs they had participated in, how much experience they had, and what further training they wished, if any. Results Response rate was 82%. Slightly more than half of the team leaders were residents. The median working experience as a surgeon among team leaders was 7.5 years. Sixty-eight percent had participated in multi-professional training in non-technical skills, while 54% had passed the advanced trauma life support(ATLS) course. Fifty-one percent were trained in damage control surgery. A median of one course per team leader was needed to comply with the new proposed national standards. Team leaders considered training in damage control surgery the most needed educational objective. Conclusions Level of experience among team leaders was highly variable and their educational background insufficient according to international and proposed national standards. Proposed national standards should be urgently implemented to ensure equal access to high quality trauma care. PMID:21975088

  16. The effect of a nurse team leader on communication and leadership in major trauma resuscitations.

    PubMed

    Clements, Alana; Curtis, Kate; Horvat, Leanne; Shaban, Ramon Z

    2015-01-01

    Effective assessment and resuscitation of trauma patients requires an organised, multidisciplinary team. Literature evaluating leadership roles of nurses in trauma resuscitation and their effect on team performance is scarce. To assess the effect of allocating the most senior nurse as team leader of trauma patient assessment and resuscitation on communication, documentation and perceptions of leadership within an Australian emergency department. The study design was a pre-post-test survey of emergency nursing staff (working at resuscitation room level) perceptions of leadership, communication, and documentation before and after the implementation of a nurse leader role. Patient records were audited focussing on initial resuscitation assessment, treatment, and nursing clinical entry. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Communication trended towards improvement. All (100%) respondents post-test stated they had a good to excellent understanding of their role, compared to 93.2% pre-study. A decrease (58.1-12.5%) in 'intimidating personality' as a negative aspect of communication. Nursing leadership had a 6.7% increase in the proportion of those who reported nursing leadership to be good to excellent. Accuracy of clinical documentation improved (P = 0.025). Trauma nurse team leaders improve some aspects of communication and leadership. Development of trauma nurse leaders should be encouraged within trauma team training programmes. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Teamwork skills, shared mental models, and performance in simulated trauma teams: an independent group design

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-technical skills are seen as an important contributor to reducing adverse events and improving medical management in healthcare teams. Previous research on the effectiveness of teams has suggested that shared mental models facilitate coordination and team performance. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether demonstrated teamwork skills and behaviour indicating shared mental models would be associated with observed improved medical management in trauma team simulations. Methods Revised versions of the 'Anesthetists' Non-Technical Skills Behavioural marker system' and 'Anti-Air Teamwork Observation Measure' were field tested in moment-to-moment observation of 27 trauma team simulations in Norwegian hospitals. Independent subject matter experts rated medical management in the teams. An independent group design was used to explore differences in teamwork skills between higher-performing and lower-performing teams. Results Specific teamwork skills and behavioural markers were associated with indicators of good team performance. Higher and lower-performing teams differed in information exchange, supporting behaviour and communication, with higher performing teams showing more effective information exchange and communication, and less supporting behaviours. Behavioural markers of shared mental models predicted effective medical management better than teamwork skills. Conclusions The present study replicates and extends previous research by providing new empirical evidence of the significance of specific teamwork skills and a shared mental model for the effective medical management of trauma teams. In addition, the study underlines the generic nature of teamwork skills by demonstrating their transferability from different clinical simulations like the anaesthesia environment to trauma care, as well as the potential usefulness of behavioural frequency analysis in future research on non-technical skills. PMID:20807420

  18. Leadership is the essential non-technical skill in the trauma team--results of a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hjortdahl, Magnus; Ringen, Amund H; Naess, Anne-Cathrine; Wisborg, Torben

    2009-09-26

    Trauma is the leading cause of death for young people in Norway. Studies indicate that several of these deaths are avoidable if the patient receives correct initial treatment. The trauma team is responsible for initial hospital treatment of traumatized patients, and team members have previously reported that non-technical skills as communication, leadership and cooperation are the major challenges. Better team function could improve patient outcome. The aim of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of which non-technical skills are important to members of the trauma team during initial examination and treatment of trauma patients. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted at four different hospitals of various sizes and with different trauma load. At each hospital a nurse, an anaesthesiologist and a team leader (surgeon) were interviewed. The conversations were transcribed and analyzed using systematic text condensation according to the principles of Giorgi's phenomenological analysis as modified by Malterud. Leadership was perceived as an essential component in trauma management. The ideal leader should be an experienced surgeon, have extensive knowledge of trauma care, communicate clearly and radiate confidence. Team leaders were reported to have little trauma experience, and the team leaders interviewed requested more guidance and supervision. The need for better training of trauma teams and especially team leaders requires further investigation and action.

  19. Efficacy of simulation-based trauma team training of non-technical skills. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gjeraa, K; Møller, T P; Østergaard, D

    2014-08-01

    Trauma resuscitation is a complex situation, and most organisations have multi-professional trauma teams. Non-technical skills are challenged during trauma resuscitation, and they play an important role in the prevention of critical incidents. Simulation-based training of these is recommended. Our research question was: Does simulation-based trauma team training of non-technical skills have effect on reaction, learning, behaviour or patient outcome? The authors searched PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library and found 13 studies eligible for analysis. We described and compared the educational interventions and the evaluations of effect according to the four Kirkpatrick levels: reaction, learning (knowledge, skills, attitudes), behaviour (in a clinical setting) and patient outcome. No studies were randomised, controlled and blinded, resulting in a moderate to high risk of bias. The multi-professional trauma teams had positive reactions to simulation-based training of non-technical skills. Knowledge and skills improved in all studies evaluating the effect on learning. Three studies found improvements in team performance (behaviour) in the clinical setting. One of these found difficulties in maintaining these skills. Two studies evaluated on patient outcome, of which none showed improvements in mortality, complication rate or duration of hospitalisation. A significant effect on learning was found after simulation-based training of the multi-professional trauma team in non-technical skills. Three studies demonstrated significantly increased clinical team performance. No effect on patient outcome was found. All studies had a moderate to high risk of bias. More comprehensive randomised studies are needed to evaluate the effect on patient outcome. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A crew resource management program tailored to trauma resuscitation improves team behavior and communication.

    PubMed

    Hughes, K Michael; Benenson, Ronald S; Krichten, Amy E; Clancy, Keith D; Ryan, James Patrick; Hammond, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    Crew Resource Management (CRM) is a team-building communication process first implemented in the aviation industry to improve safety. It has been used in health care, particularly in surgical and intensive care settings, to improve team dynamics and reduce errors. We adapted a CRM process for implementation in the trauma resuscitation area. An interdisciplinary steering committee developed our CRM process to include a didactic classroom program based on a preimplementation survey of our trauma team members. Implementation with new cultural and process expectations followed. The Human Factors Attitude Survey and Communication and Teamwork Skills assessment tool were used to design, evaluate, and validate our CRM program. The initial trauma communication survey was completed by 160 team members (49% response). Twenty-five trauma resuscitations were observed and scored using Communication and Teamwork Skills. Areas of concern were identified and 324 staff completed our 3-hour CRM course during a 3-month period. After CRM training, 132 communication surveys and 38 Communication and Teamwork Skills observations were completed. In the post-CRM survey, respondents indicated improvement in accuracy of field to medical command information (p = 0.029); accuracy of emergency department medical command information to the resuscitation area (p = 0.002); and team leader identity, communication of plan, and role assignment (p = 0.001). After CRM training, staff were more likely to speak up when patient safety was a concern (p = 0.002). Crew Resource Management in the trauma resuscitation area enhances team dynamics, communication, and, ostensibly, patient safety. Philosophy and culture of CRM should be compulsory components of trauma programs and in resuscitation of injured patients. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. TEAM: A Low-Cost Alternative to ATLS for Providing Trauma Care Teaching in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Kurdin, Anton; Caines, Andrew; Boone, Darrell; Furey, Andrew

    2017-08-23

    Trauma resuscitation protocols have unified the care of trauma patients and significantly improved outcomes. However, the success of the Advanced Trauma Life Support course is difficult to reproduce in developing countries due to set-up costs, limitations of resources, and variations of practice. The objective of this study is to assess the Trauma Evaluation and Management (TEAM) course as a low-cost alternative for trauma resuscitation teaching in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC). As part of the Team Broken Earth initiative, TEAM course was provided to the health care professionals in Haiti. At its conclusion, participants were asked to complete a survey evaluating the course. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed to evaluate the perception of the course. The course was provided in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. A total of 80 health care professionals participated in the course. Response was obtained from 69 participants, which comprised of 32 physicians, 10 Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT), 22 nurses, and 5 medical trainees. The course was well received by physicians, nurses, and EMT with an average score of 90.6%. Question analysis revealed a lower satisfaction of physicians for the course manual and teaching materials, and information related to decisions for transfer of patients. EMT consistently felt that the course was not tailored to their learning and practice needs. Written feedback demonstrated several areas of weaknesses including need for improvements in translations, hands-on practice, and educational materials. Overall, the TEAM course was well received. Analysis demonstrated a need for adjustments specific to LMIC including a focus on prehospital assessment, increased nursing responsibilities, and unavailability of specialist's referrals. Team Broken Earth intends to take these findings into consideration and continue to provide the TEAM course to other LMIC. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by

  2. Education, exposure and experience of prehospital teams as quality indicators in regional trauma systems.

    PubMed

    Van Der Eng, Dorien M; van Beeck, Eduard F; Hoogervorst, Elizabeth M; Bierens, Joost J L M

    2016-08-01

    Indicators to measure the quality of trauma care may be instrumental in benchmarking and improving trauma systems. This retrospective, observational study investigated whether data on three indicators for competencies of Dutch trauma teams (i.e. education, exposure, experience; agreed upon during a prior Delphi procedure) can be retrieved from existing registrations. The validity and distinctive power of these indicators were explored by analysing available data in four regions. Data of all polytrauma patients treated by the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services were collected retrospectively over a 1-year period. During the Delphi procedure, a polytrauma patient was defined as one with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 9 or less or a Paediatric Coma Scale of 9 or less, together with a Revised Trauma Score of 10 or less. Information on education, exposure and experience of the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services physician and nurse were registered for each patient contact. Data on 442 polytrauma patients could be retrieved. Of these, according to the Delphi consensus, 220 were treated by a fully competent team (i.e. both the physician and the nurse fulfilled the three indicators for competency) and 22 patients were treated by a team not fulfilling all three indicators for competency. Across the four regions, patients were treated by teams with significant differences in competencies (P=0.002). The quality indicators of education, exposure and experience of prehospital physicians and nurses can be measured reliably, have a high level of usability and have distinctive power.

  3. Exposing Compassion Fatigue and Burnout Syndrome in a Trauma Team: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gina M; Harshbarger, Jenni L; Ahlers-Schmidt, Carolyn R; Lippoldt, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Compassion fatigue (CF) and burnout syndrome (BOS) are identified in trauma, emergency, and critical care nursing practices. The purpose of this qualitative study was to measure CF and BOS in a trauma team and allow them to share perceptions of related stress triggers and coping strategies. Surveys to measure CF and BOS and a focus group allowed a trauma team (12 practitioners) to share perceptions of related stress triggers and coping strategies. More than half scored at risk for CF and BOS. Stress triggers were described as situation (abuse, age of patient) versus injury-related. Personal coping mechanisms were most often reported. Both CF and BOS can be assessed with a simple survey tool. Strategies for developing a program culturally sensitive to CF and BOS are provided.

  4. Improving theatre efficiency and utilisation through early identification of trauma patients and enhanced communication between teams.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Simon; Saithna, Adnan; Bethune, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Surgical departments are increasingly put under pressure to improve services, cut waiting lists, increase efficiency and save money. At a district general hospital in the west-midlands we approached the challenge of improving efficiency and optimising the services available in our orthopaedic theatres. Data was collected on: anaesthetic start times, operation start and finish times, and reasons for delay in our trauma theatre over a period from October 2014 to January 2015. During this period a change was implemented to improve the start time of the first operation of each day in the trauma theatre. Through adaptation of a method developed by Javed S et al, a patient was pre-selected by the on-call team and given the name the "golden patient" the day before they were due to be operated upon. This nominated patient would then be fixed at the start of the trauma theatre list the following day. The list would only then change if a "life or limb threatening" case was admitted overnight. The on-call team would prioritise that this patient was optimised for theatre and the theatre staff would ensure the surgical instruments were prepared. A PDSA cycle method was used, collecting data on 80 orthopaedic trauma cases during the period, and demonstrated a 59 minute (95% CI 45-72) improvement in start times from 10:49 AM to 9:50 AM with a p-value of 0.00024 with the intervention of early allocation of the first patient on the trauma list. A relatively simple intervention tool designed to improve communication within and between health-care teams can have a significant impact on the efficiency of a complex environment such as a trauma theatre.

  5. Improving theatre efficiency and utilisation through early identification of trauma patients and enhanced communication between teams

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Simon; Saithna, Adnan; Bethune, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Surgical departments are increasingly put under pressure to improve services, cut waiting lists, increase efficiency and save money. At a district general hospital in the west-midlands we approached the challenge of improving efficiency and optimising the services available in our orthopaedic theatres. Data was collected on: anaesthetic start times, operation start and finish times, and reasons for delay in our trauma theatre over a period from October 2014 to January 2015. During this period a change was implemented to improve the start time of the first operation of each day in the trauma theatre. Through adaptation of a method developed by Javed S et al, a patient was pre-selected by the on-call team and given the name the “golden patient” the day before they were due to be operated upon. This nominated patient would then be fixed at the start of the trauma theatre list the following day. The list would only then change if a “life or limb threatening” case was admitted overnight. The on-call team would prioritise that this patient was optimised for theatre and the theatre staff would ensure the surgical instruments were prepared. A PDSA cycle method was used, collecting data on 80 orthopaedic trauma cases during the period, and demonstrated a 59 minute (95% CI 45-72) improvement in start times from 10:49 AM to 9:50 AM with a p-value of 0.00024 with the intervention of early allocation of the first patient on the trauma list. A relatively simple intervention tool designed to improve communication within and between health-care teams can have a significant impact on the efficiency of a complex environment such as a trauma theatre. PMID:26734340

  6. Enhanced care team response to incidents involving major trauma at night: are helicopters the answer?

    PubMed

    McQueen, Carl; Nutbeam, Tim; Crombie, Nick; Lecky, Fiona; Lawrence, Thomas; Hathaway, Karen; Wheaton, Steve

    2015-07-01

    Challenges exist in how to deliver enhanced care to patients suffering severe injury in geographically remote areas within regionalised trauma networks at night. The physician led Enhanced Care Teams (ECTs) in the West Midlands region of England do not currently utilise helicopters to respond to incidents at night. This study describes this remote trauma workload at night within the regional network in terms of incident location; injury profile and patient care needs and discusses various solutions to the delivery of ECTs to such incidents, including the need for helicopter based platforms. We present a retrospective analysis of incidents involving Major Trauma occurring in the West Midlands Regional Trauma Network in England over a one year period (1st April 2012 until the 31st March 2013). Anonymised patient records from the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN) for patients that had been conveyed to hospital by ambulance/air ambulance were cross-referenced with the West Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (WMAS) Computer Assisted Dispatch (CAD) archive for the same period. Data were abstracted from the combined dataset relating to injury severity (ISS/ICU admission/death at scene or as inpatient); ECT resource activations/scene attendances; incident location and the need for enhanced level care. A total of 603 incidents involving Major Trauma were identified during night time hours. Enhanced Care Team resources attended scene in 167 cases (27.7%). Of the incidents not attended by an ECT 179 (41.1%) were due to falls and 91 (20.9%) involved a 'Road Traffic Collision'. A total of 36 incidents (6.0% of total at night) occurred in locations identified as being greater than 45min by road from the nearest major trauma centre. In these cases 13 patients had enhanced care needs that could not be addressed at scene by the attending ambulance service personnel. There is limited evidence to support the need for night HEMS operations in the West Midlands

  7. Teamwork in the trauma room evaluation of a multimodal team training program

    PubMed Central

    Peckler, Bradley; Prewett, Matthew S; Campbell, Tabitha; Brannick, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Poor teamwork leads to preventable medical errors, and thus negatively impacts medical care. One way to improve teamwork is training. A multimodality team training program was designed to impact the attitudes and behavior of first-year residents who will encounter medical situations in the trauma room. The training program included low-fidelity role plays, lectures, and high-fidelity simulation with feedback. Materials and Methods: The training program was a one-day workshop that was conducted twice, once for each of the two groups over two days at the beginning of the academic year in July. A total of 41 first-year interns (10 Emergency Medicine and 31 Surgery) were recruited for participation. Participants completed a Situational judgment test (SJT) on trauma teamwork before training. The training began with a low-fidelity simulation that served as an icebreaker to team concepts. Subsequently, a lecture with discussion provided key points regarding teamwork in the trauma room. A high-fidelity simulation then allowed participation in one of four trauma room scenarios with medical expert debriefing. The course concluded with a course summary and an assessment of participant attitudes regarding training along with a second administration of SJT. Results: Participant reactions to the training were positive overall. Results of SJT showed a positive effect for team training in three of the four possible comparisons. Conclusion: The program was well received by the residents. Results suggest that a comprehensive training approach using role play, lecture, and simulation can positively affect behavioral choices for teamwork in the trauma room. PMID:22416150

  8. Preventing secondary complications in trauma patients with implementation of a multidisciplinary mobilization team.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Cynthia Ball

    2015-01-01

    Management of the trauma patient is complex. Immobility or bed rest has detrimental effects on multiple body systems. Early mobilization, especially in the multi-injured patient, can be challenging requiring a multidisciplinary team effort. Health care team members' and patient's understanding and perceptions of bed rest greatly influence successful early mobilization. Integrating a multidisciplinary mobility program in the acute care setting can decrease secondary complications and hospital length of stay ultimately improving patient outcomes. Using the strategy for translating research into evidence based practice by incorporating the 4 "Es" of Engage, Educate, Execute, and Evaluate will assist in creating a culture of mobility.

  9. Recent Advances in Forward Surgical Team Training at the U.S. Army Trauma Training Department.

    PubMed

    Allen, Casey J; Straker, Richard J; Murray, Clark R; Hannay, William M; Hanna, Mena M; Meizoso, Jonathan P; Manning, Ronald J; Schulman, Carl I; Seery, Jason M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2016-06-01

    U.S. Army Forward Surgical Teams (FSTs) are elite, multidisciplinary units that are highly mobile, and rapidly deployable. The mission of the FST is to provide resuscitative and damage control surgery for stabilization of life-threatening injuries in austere environments. The Army Trauma Training Center began in 2001 at the University of Miami Ryder Trauma Center under the direction of COL T. E. Knuth, MC USA (Ret.), as a multimodality combination of lectures, laboratory exercises, and clinical experiences that provided the only predeployment mass casualty and clinical trauma training center for all FSTs. Each of the subsequent five directors has restructured the training based on dynamic feedback from trainees, current military needs, and on the rapid advances in combat casualty care. We have highlighted these evolutionary changes at the Army Trauma Training Center in previous reviews. Under the current director, LTC J. M. Seery, MC USA, there are new team-building exercises, mobile learning modules and simulators, and other alternative methods in the mass casualty exercise. This report summarizes the latest updates to the state of the art training since the last review. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. Risk assessment in mental health: introducing a traffic light system in a community mental health team.

    PubMed

    Croucher, S; Williamson, Graham R

    2013-01-01

    To reports a study in which action research approach was utilised to introduce a new system of risk assessment, based on traffic lights, into a community mental health team. Risk management is a serious concern in community mental healthcare where there is less direct, real-time supervision of clients than in other settings, and because inadequate management of risk can have fatal consequences when service users are a risk to themselves and/or others. An action research design was undertaken, using three phases of Look, Think and Act. Data were collected between January and March of 2012. In the action research phases, qualitative data were collected in focus groups with the team's multi-disciplinary mental health professionals. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically, which involved agreement of themes and interpretations by two researchers. The Look, Think and Act phases guided the development of the project; team members worked collaboratively on the traffic light system, implemented and evaluated it. Themes were constructed that were discussed across the focus groups. These themes were: Ease of use; Risk identification and management; Legal status; Different teams' views of risk; Post-implementation evaluation. Action research has been used to implement change in mental health risk management. Others internationally would benefit from considering a Traffic Light System, and in using action research to implement it.

  11. Model for Team Training Using the Advanced Trauma Operative Management Course: Pilot Study Analysis.

    PubMed

    Perkins, R Serene; Lehner, Kathryn A; Armstrong, Randy; Gardiner, Stuart K; Karmy-Jones, Riyad C; Izenberg, Seth D; Long, William B; Wackym, P Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Education and training of surgeons has traditionally focused on the development of individual knowledge, technical skills, and decision making. Team training with the surgeon's operating room staff has not been prioritized in existing educational paradigms, particularly in trauma surgery. We aimed to determine whether a pilot curriculum for surgical technicians and nurses, based on the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Operative Management (ATOM) course, would improve staff knowledge if conducted in a team-training environment. Between December 2012 and December 2014, 22 surgical technicians and nurses participated in a curriculum complementary to the ATOM course, consisting of 8 individual 8-hour training sessions designed by and conducted at our institution. Didactic and practical sessions included educational content, hands-on instruction, and alternating role play during 5 system-specific injury scenarios in a simulated operating room environment. A pre- and postcourse examination was administered to participants to assess for improvements in team members' didactic knowledge. Course participants displayed a significant improvement in didactic knowledge after working in a team setting with trauma surgeons during the ATOM course, with a 9-point improvement on the postcourse examination (83%-92%, p = 0.0008). Most participants (90.5%) completing postcourse surveys reported being "highly satisfied" with course content and quality after working in our simulated team-training setting. Team training is critical to improving the knowledge base of surgical technicians and nurses in the trauma operative setting. Improved communication, efficiency, appropriate equipment use, and staff awareness are the desired outcomes when shifting the paradigm from individual to surgical team training so that improved patient outcomes, decreased risk, and cost savings can be achieved. Determine whether a pilot curriculum for surgical technicians and nurses, based on the

  12. [Use of trauma triage teams at the cafe fire in Volendam].

    PubMed

    Boxma, H; Dokter, J; Welvaart, W N

    2001-12-01

    For large-scale accidents, and for specific categories of wounds there is, in addition to the extramural assistance provided by helicopter teams and mobile medical teams, a need for secondary triage so that patients can be transferred as quickly as possible and the use of limited treatment capacity for specific injuries (such as serious burns) is optimised. After the cafe fire in Volendam, 203 patients were admitted to 27 hospitals. In almost all of these cases it concerned burns, often complicated by inhalation injury. Burns triage teams selected in the second instance patients with 30-80% surface burns who required artificial respiration, for admission to one of the burn centres in the Netherlands, Belgium or Aachen (Germany). The mortality under 75 patients with burns and an inhalation trauma who underwent a planned curative treatment was just 5.3%. Trauma triage teams should be officially recognised within the chain of the project 'Medical assistance in accidents and disasters' (Dutch acronym: GHOR) so that together with the uniform guidelines for the treatment of specific injuries that are present in casualty departments (for example the 'emergency management of severe burns (ESMB) protocol', a protocol for the care of patients with serious burns) the quality of care can be improved.

  13. CLASSIFICATION AND TEAM RESPONSE TO NON-ROUTINE EVENTS OCCURRING DURING PEDIATRIC TRAUMA RESUSCITATION

    PubMed Central

    Webman, Rachel; Fritzeen, Jennifer; Yang, JaeWon; Ye, Grace F.; Mullan, Paul C.; Qureshi, Faisal G.; Parker, Sarah H.; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Errors directly causing serious harm are rare during pediatric trauma resuscitation, limiting the use of adverse outcome analysis for performance improvement in this setting. Errors not causing harm due to mitigation or chance may have similar causation and are more frequent than those causing adverse outcomes. Analyzing these error types is an alternative to adverse outcome analysis. The purpose of this study was to identify errors of any type during pediatric trauma resuscitation and evaluate team responses to their occurrence. Methods Errors identified using video analysis were classified as errors of omission or commission, and selection errors using input from trauma experts. The responses to error types and error frequency based on patient and event features were compared. Results Thirty-nine resuscitations were reviewed, identifying 337 errors (range 2–26 per resuscitation). The most common errors were related to cervical spine stabilization (n=93, 27.6%). Errors of omission (n=135) and commission (n=106) were more common than errors of selection (n=96). Although 35.9% of all errors were acknowledged and compensation occurred after 43.6%, no response (acknowledgement or compensation) was observed after 51.3% of errors. Errors of omission and commission were more often acknowledged (40.7% and 39.6% vs. 25.0%, p=0.03 and p=0.04, respectively) and compensated for (50.4% and 47.2% vs. 29.2%, p=0.004 and p=0.01, respectively) than selection errors. Response differences between errors of omission and commission were not observed. The number of errors and the number of high-risk errors that occurred did not differ based on patient or event features. Conclusions Errors are common during pediatric trauma resuscitation. Teams did not respond to most errors, although differences in team response were observed between error types. Determining causation of errors may be an approach for identifying latent safety threats contributing to adverse outcomes during

  14. Performance improvement through best practice team management: human factors in complex trauma.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Simon; Arul, G S; Pugh, H E J

    2014-06-01

    Human factors or non-technical skills are now commonplace in the medical literature, having taken the lead from the airline and nuclear industries and more recently Formula One motor racing. They have been suggested as playing a vital role in the success of the trauma teams in recent conflicts. This article outlines the background to human factors, referring to early papers and reports and also outlines high profile cases that highlight their importance. We then describe the importance of human factors in the deployed setting and some of the lessons that have been learnt from current conflicts.

  15. The role of trauma team leaders in missed injuries: does specialty matter?

    PubMed

    Leeper, W Robert; Leeper, Terrence John; Vogt, Kelly Nancy; Charyk-Stewart, Tanya; Gray, Daryl Kenneth; Parry, Neil Geordie

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies have identified missed injuries as a common and potentially preventable occurrence in trauma care. Several patient- and injury-related variables have been identified, which predict for missed injuries; however, differences in rate and severity of missed injuries between surgeon and nonsurgeon trauma team leaders (TTLs) have not previously been reported. A retrospective review was conducted on a random sample of 10% of all trauma patients (Injury Severity Score [ISS] > 12) from 1999 to 2009 at a Canadian Level I trauma center. Missed injuries were defined as those identified greater than 24 hours after presentation and were independently adjudicated by two reviewers. TTLs were identified as either surgeons or nonsurgeons. Of our total trauma population of 2,956 patients, 300 charts were randomly pulled for detailed review. Missed injuries occurred in 46 patients (15%). Most common missed injuries were fractures (n = 32, 70%) and thoracic injuries (n = 23, 50%). The majority of missed injuries resulted in minor morbidity with only 5 (11%) requiring operative intervention. On univariate analysis, higher ISS (p < 0.01), higher maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (MAIS) score of the thorax (p < 0.01), and nonsurgeon TTL status were predictive of missed injuries (p = 0.02). Multivariable logistic regression revealed that, after adjustment for age, ISS, and severe head injuries, the presence of a nonsurgeon TTL was associated with an increased odds of missed injury (odds ratio, 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-4.20). Missed injuries occurred in 15% of patients. A unique finding was the increased odds of missed injury with nonsurgeon TTLs. Further research should be undertaken to explore this relationship, elucidate potential causes, and propose interventions to narrow this discrepancy between TTL provider types. Therapeutic study, level IV. Prognostic and epidemiologic study, level III.

  16. Effect of introducing the mucosal atomization device for fentanyl use in out-of-hospital pediatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Daniel P; Schafer, Luke C; Stevens, Andrew C; Weinstein, Elizabeth; Miramonti, Charles M; Kozak, Mary Ann

    2013-10-01

    Pain associated with pediatric trauma is often under-assessed and under-treated in the out-of-hospital setting. Administering an opioid such as fentanyl via the intranasal route is a safe and efficacious alternative to traditional routes of analgesic delivery and could potentially improve pain management in pediatric trauma patients. The study sought to examine the effect of introducing the mucosal atomization device (MAD) on analgesia administration as an alternative to intravenous fentanyl delivery in pediatric trauma patients. The hypothesis for the study is that the introduction of the MAD would increase the administration of fentanyl in pediatric trauma patients. The research utilized a 2-group design (pre-MAD and post-MAD) to study 946 pediatric trauma patients (age <16) transported by a large, urban EMS agency to one of eight hospitals in Marion County, which is located in Indianapolis Indiana. Two emergency medicine physicians independently determined whether the patient met criteria for pain medication receipt and a third reviewer resolved any disagreements. A comparison of the rates of fentanyl administration in both groups was then conducted. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of fentanyl administration between the pre-MAD (30.4%) and post-MAD groups (37.8%) (P = .238). A subgroup analysis showed that age and mechanism of injury were stronger predictors of fentanyl administration. Contrary to the hypothesis, the addition of the MAD device did not increase fentanyl administration rates in pediatric trauma patients. Future research is needed to address the barriers to analgesia administration in pediatric trauma patients.

  17. Introducing questionnaire technique to interface with multi-instrument teams for science operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, F.; de la Fuente, S.

    2014-08-01

    BepiColombo is an interdisciplinary ESA mission to explore the planet Mercury in cooperation with JAXA. The mission consists of two separate orbiters: ESA's Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and JAXA's Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which are dedicated to the detailed study of the planet and its magnetosphere. The MPO scientific payload comprises eleven instruments packages covering different disciplines developed by several European teams. This paper describes the questionnaire technique followed by the Science Ground Segment (SGS) to get feedback from each individual instrument team about important issues for the SGS systems engineering, which support the SGS development and operations. The conclusions of the questionnaire process allowed the optimization of the Science Ground Segment development processes and resources by answering the real expectations from the instrument teams, the definition of the interfaces between the SGS and each individual team and a science operations and data handling and archiving concepts compatible with their needs.

  18. Team Problem-Solving Strategies: Introducing Students to Industry Practices. A Peer-Reviewed Article.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes a teaching method involving problem-solving techniques used by project teams in industry that have been tailored for use in an introductory engineering technology course. Provides step-by-step guidelines for each component. (JOW)

  19. A pilot study to evaluate the utility of live training (LIVEX) in the operational preparedness of UK military trauma teams.

    PubMed

    Smith, J E; Withnall, R D J; Rickard, R F; Lamb, D; Sitch, A; Hodgetts, T J

    2016-12-01

    With the end of UK military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, it is essential that peacetime training of Defence Medical Services (DMS) trauma teams ensures appropriate future preparedness. A new model of pre-deployment training involves placement of formed military trauma teams into civilian trauma centres. This study evaluates the benefit of 'live training during an exercise period' (LIVEX) for DMS trauma teams. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey of participants was conducted. Quantitative data were collected prior to the start and on the final day. Written reports were collected from the coordinators. Thematic analysis was used to identify emergent themes in a supplementary, qualitative analysis. Each team comprised 13 personnel and results should be interpreted with knowledge of this small sample size. The response rate for both the pre-LIVEX and post-LIVEX questionnaire was 100%. By the end of the week, 89% of participants (n=23) stated LIVEX was an 'appropriate or very appropriate' way of preparing for an operational role compared with 40% (n=9) before the exercise (p<0.01). However, completing LIVEX made no difference to participants' personal perception of their own operational preparedness. Thematic analysis suggested greater training benefit for more junior members of the team; from Regulars and Reservists training together; and from two-way exchange of information between DMS and National Health Service medical staffs. Completing LIVEX made no statistically significant difference to participants' personal perception of their own operational preparedness, but the perception of LIVEX as an appropriate training platform improved significantly after conducting the training exercise. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Integrating technical and non-technical skills coaching in an acute trauma surgery team training: Is it too much?

    PubMed

    Alken, Alexander; Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Weenk, Mariska; Yauw, Simon; Fluit, Cornelia; van Goor, Harry

    2017-08-25

    Research on effective integration of technical and non-technical skills in surgery team training is sparse. In a previous study we found that surgical teachers predominantly coached on technical and hardly on non-technical skills during the Definitive Surgical and Anesthetic Trauma Care (DSATC) integrated acute trauma surgery team training. This study aims to investigate whether the priming of teachers could increase the amount of non-technical skills coaching during such a training. Coaching activities of 12 surgical teachers were recorded on audio and video. Six teachers were primed on non-technical skills coaching prior to the training. Six others received no priming and served as controls. Blind observers reviewed the recordings of 2 training scenario's and scored whether the observed behaviors were directed on technical or non-technical skills. We compared the frequency of the non-technical skills coaching between the primed and the non-primed teachers and analyzed for differences according to the trainees' level of experience. Surgical teachers coached trainees during the highly realistic DSATC integrated acute trauma surgery team training. Trainees performed damage control surgery in operating teams on anesthetized porcine models during 6 training scenario's. Twelve experienced surgical teachers participated in this study. Coaching on non-technical skills was limited to about 5%. The primed teachers did not coach more often on non-technical skills than the non-primed teachers. We found no differences in the frequency of non-technical skills coaching based on the trainees' level of experience. Priming experienced surgical teachers does not increase the coaching on non-technical skills. The current DSATC acute trauma surgery team training seems too complex for integrating training on technical and non-technical skills. Patient care, Practice based learning and improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of the Rural Trauma Team Development Course for Educating Nurses and Other Health Care Providers at Rural Community Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Thein Hlaing; Hollister, Lisa; Scheumann, Christopher; Konger, Jennifer; Opoku, Dazar

    2016-01-01

    The study evaluates (1) health care provider perception of the Rural Trauma Team Development Course (RTTDC); (2) improvement in acute trauma emergency care knowledge; and (3) early transfer of trauma patients from rural emergency departments (EDs) to a verified trauma center. A 1-day, 8-hour RTTDC was given to 101 nurses and other health care providers from nine rural community hospitals from 2011 to 2013. RTTDC participants completed questionnaires to address objectives (1) and (2). ED and trauma registry data were queried to achieve objective (3) for assessing reduction in ED time (EDT), from patient arrival to decision to transfer and ED length of stay (LOS). The RTTDC was positively perceived by health care providers (96.3% of them completed the program). Significant improvement in 13 of the 19 knowledge items was observed in nurses. Education intervention was an independent predictor in reducing EDT by 28 minutes and 95% confidence interval (CI) [-57, -0.1] at 6 months post-RTTDC, and 29 minutes and 95% CI [-53, -6] at 12 months post-RTTDC. Similar results were observed with ED LOS. The RTTDC is well-perceived as an education program. It improves acute trauma emergency care knowledge in rural health care providers. It promotes early transfer of severely injured patients to a higher level of care.

  2. The right team at the right time - Multidisciplinary approach to multi-trauma patient with orthopedic injuries.

    PubMed

    Bach, John A; Leskovan, John J; Scharschmidt, Thomas; Boulger, Creagh; Papadimos, Thomas J; Russell, Sarah; Bahner, David P; Stawicki, Stanislaw P A

    2017-01-01

    Integrated, multidisciplinary team approach to the multiply injured patient can help optimize care, minimize morbidity, and reduce mortality. It also provides a framework for accelerated postinjury rehabilitation course. The characteristics and potential benefits of this approach, including team dynamics and interactions, are discussed in this brief review. Emphasis is placed on synergies provided by specialty teams working together in the framework of care coordination, timing of surgical and nonsurgical interventions, and injury/physiologic considerations. Bach JA, Leskovan JJ, Scharschmidt T, Boulger C, Papadimos TJ, Russell S, Bahner DP, Stawicki SPA. Multidisciplinary approach to multi-trauma patient with orthopedic injuries: the right team at the right time. OPUS 12 Scientist 2012;6(1):6-10.

  3. The right team at the right time – Multidisciplinary approach to multi-trauma patient with orthopedic injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bach, John A.; Leskovan, John J.; Scharschmidt, Thomas; Boulger, Creagh; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Russell, Sarah; Bahner, David P.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Integrated, multidisciplinary team approach to the multiply injured patient can help optimize care, minimize morbidity, and reduce mortality. It also provides a framework for accelerated postinjury rehabilitation course. The characteristics and potential benefits of this approach, including team dynamics and interactions, are discussed in this brief review. Emphasis is placed on synergies provided by specialty teams working together in the framework of care coordination, timing of surgical and nonsurgical interventions, and injury/physiologic considerations. Republished with permission from: Bach JA, Leskovan JJ, Scharschmidt T, Boulger C, Papadimos TJ, Russell S, Bahner DP, Stawicki SPA. Multidisciplinary approach to multi-trauma patient with orthopedic injuries: the right team at the right time. OPUS 12 Scientist 2012;6(1):6-10. PMID:28382257

  4. Physiologically focused triage criteria improve utilization of pediatric surgeon-directed trauma teams and reduce costs.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kaushik; Rimer, Mariann; McConnell, Michael D; Miller, Richard S; Morrow, Stephen E

    2010-06-01

    Pediatric surgeon-directed trauma teams (STTs) provide lifesaving treatment but at a high cost. We used physiologically based criteria to improve STT utilization. We reviewed 152 consecutive STT activations at one center, comparing standard and physiologically focused criteria and 24-hour hospital costs/charges for overtriaged patients vs level 2 (emergency department managed) blunt trauma patients matched for age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and necessity for operation. Our cohort (73.0% male; 86.8% blunt; median age, 8.0 [interquartile range, 4.0-14.0] years) had 10 deaths (6.6%) and 18 (11.8%) emergent operations. Twenty-nine patients met neither standard nor physiologic criteria (group 1), 25 met standard but not physiologic criteria (overtriaged, group 2), and 98 met physiologic criteria (group 3). Group 3 had higher median ISS (19.0 [10.0-33.0] vs 10.0 [4.0-17.0] and 5.5 [5.0-16.75] for groups 1 and 2, P = .001), more intensive care unit admissions (67.2% vs 31.0% and 52.0%, P = .001), longer hospitalization (5.0 [3.0-9.25] days vs 3.0 [1.0-5.0] and 4.0 [2.0-5.0] days, P = .002), and all patients who died or required emergent operation (P < .001). Physiologic criteria maintained 100% sensitivity but improved specificity (49.2% vs 23.0%). Overtriaged patients (n = 18) had 78.2% higher charges ($4700; 95% confidence interval, 13.3%-180.1%; P = .013) and 53.4% higher costs ($800; 95% confidence interval, 1.8%-131.2%; P = .041) than level 2 patients (n = 259) after adjusting for age, ISS, and need for operation, largely because of computed tomography and emergency department charges (66% of overtriaged charges). Physiologic STT activation criteria would have saved 25 activations, $20,000 in costs, and $120,000 in charges annually without compromising patient safety. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Introducing peer worker roles into UK mental health service teams: a qualitative analysis of the organisational benefits and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The provision of peer support as a component of mental health care, including the employment of Peer Workers (consumer-providers) by mental health service organisations, is increasingly common internationally. Peer support is strongly advocated as a strategy in a number of UK health and social care policies. Approaches to employing Peer Workers are proliferating. There is evidence to suggest that Peer Worker-based interventions reduce psychiatric inpatient admission and increase service user (consumer) empowerment. In this paper we seek to address a gap in the empirical literature in understanding the organisational challenges and benefits of introducing Peer Worker roles into mental health service teams. Methods We report the secondary analysis of qualitative interview data from service users, Peer Workers, non-peer staff and managers of three innovative interventions in a study about mental health self-care. Relevant data was extracted from interviews with 41 participants and subjected to analysis using Grounded Theory techniques. Organisational research literature on role adoption framed the analysis. Results Peer Workers were highly valued by mental health teams and service users. Non-peer team members and managers worked hard to introduce Peer Workers into teams. Our cases were projects in development and there was learning from the evolutionary process: in the absence of formal recruitment processes for Peer Workers, differences in expectations of the Peer Worker role can emerge at the selection stage; flexible working arrangements for Peer Workers can have the unintended effect of perpetuating hierarchies within teams; the maintenance of protective practice boundaries through supervision and training can militate against the emergence of a distinctive body of peer practice; lack of consensus around what constitutes peer practice can result in feelings for Peer Workers of inequality, disempowerment, uncertainty about identity and of being under

  6. Perceived performance and impact of a non-physician-led interprofessional team in a trauma clinic setting.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Julia; Bellon, Johanna E; Stevans, Joel; Forsythe, Raquel M; Reynolds, Benjamin R; James, A Everette

    2017-01-01

    Faced with the challenge of meeting the wide degree of post-discharge needs in their trauma population, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) developed a non-physician-led interprofessional team to provide follow-up care at its UPMC Falk Trauma Clinic. We assessed this model of care using a survey to gauge team member perceptions of this model, and used clinic visit documentation to apply a novel approach to assessing how this model improves the care received by clinic patients. The high level of perceived team performance and cohesion suggests that this model has been successful thus far from a provider perspective. Patients are seen most frequently by audiologists, while approximately half of physical therapy and speech language therapy consults generate a new therapy referral, which is interpreted as a potential change in the patient's care trajectory. The broader message of this analysis is that a collaborative, non-hierarchical team model incorporating rehabilitative specialists, who often operate independently of one another, can be successful in this setting, where patients appear to have a strong and previously under-attended need for rehabilitative intervention.

  7. Impact of ATLS guidelines, trauma team introduction, and 24-hour mortality due to severe trauma in a busy, metropolitan Italian hospital: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Magnone, Stefano; Allegri, Andrea; Belotti, Eugenia; Castelli, Claudio Carlo; Ceresoli, Marco; Coccolini, Federico; Manfredi, Roberto; Merli, Cecilia; Palamara, Fabrizio; Piazzalunga, Dario; Valetti, Tino Martino; Ansaloni, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines are widely accepted for use in initial management of trauma patients. The application of ATLS guidelines and introduction of management by means of trauma team (TT) both took place in April 2011. The aim of the present study was to evaluate related effects on mortality in the shock room (SR) and at 24 hours after admission. Data were retrieved by administrative software based on patient admission for trauma of at least 48 hours. Study period was from April 2011 to December 2012, and control period was from January 2007 to March 2011. All admitted patients were identified by first diagnosis (ICD 9-CM), excluding traumatic brain injuries, and only patients admitted to the general intensive care, general surgery, and orthopedics units were included. The control group (CG) included 198 patients; the study group (SG) included 141. Differences were determined in patient age, which was mean 45.2 years (SD: 19.2) in the CG and mean 49.3 years (SD±18.3) in the SG (p=0.03). Differences were not found regarding gender, length of hospital stay, or Injury Severity Score (ISS). Among the patients who died, no differences were found in terms of systolic blood pressure, metabolic acidosis, or packed red blood cell consumption. Mortality was significantly higher in the CG, compared to the SG (14.1% vs 7.1%, respectively; p=0.033; confidence interval [CI]: 0.21-0.95). Mortality in the shock room was significantly lower in the SG, compared to the CG (0.7% vs 7.1%, respectively; p=0.002; CI: 0.004-0.592). The introduction of ATLS guidelines and TT had a positive impact on mortality in the first 24 hours, both in the SR and after admission.

  8. Establishing a standard for assessing the appropriateness of trauma team activation: a retrospective evaluation of two outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Silvia; Franklin, Katherine L; Jowett, Helen E; King, Sebastian K; Oakley, Ed; Palmer, Cameron S

    2015-09-01

    Trauma team activation (TTA) is a well-recognised standard of care to provide rapid stabilisation of patients with time-critical, life-threatening injuries. TTA is associated with a substantial use of valuable hospital resources that may adversely impact upon the care of other patients if not carefully balanced. This study aimed to determine which of the two outcome measures would be a better standard for assessing the appropriateness of TTA at a paediatric centre: retrospective major trauma classification as defined within our state, and the use of emergency department high-level resources as recently published by Falcone et al (Falcone Interventions; FI). Trauma registry data and patients' charts between February 2011 and June 2013 were reviewed. Over-triage and under-triage rates for TTA, using both major trauma and FIs as outcome measures, were compared. Totally, 280 patients received TTA, 243 met major trauma definition and 102 received one or more FIs. The rates of over-triage and under-triage were 39.7% (95% CI 35.0 to 44.6%) and 30.5% (95% CI 26.2 to 35.2%), when the major trauma definition was used as the outcome measure, and 67.5% (95% CI 62.2 to 72.5%) and 10.8% (95% CI 7.9 to 14.8%) when FI was used. Only 17.1% (95% CI 11.4% to 24.7%) of the under-triaged patients using the major trauma definition received one or more FIs. Assessment of TTA appropriateness varied significantly based on the outcome measure used. FIs better reflected the use of acute-care TTA-related resources compared with the major trauma definition, and it should be used as the gold standard to prospectively assess and refine TTA criteria. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Shock index, pediatric age-adjusted (SIPA) is more accurate than age-adjusted hypotension for trauma team activation.

    PubMed

    Acker, Shannon N; Bredbeck, Brooke; Partrick, David A; Kulungowski, Ann M; Barnett, Carlton C; Bensard, Denis D

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrated previously that shock index, pediatric age-adjusted identifies severely injured children accurately after blunt trauma. We hypothesized that an increased shock index, pediatric age-adjusted would identify more accurately injured children requiring the highest trauma team activation than age-adjusted hypotension. We reviewed all children age 4-16 admitted after blunt trauma with an injury severity score ≥15 from January 2007-June 2013. Criteria used as indicators of need for activation of the trauma team included blood transfusion, emergency operation, or endotracheal intubation within 24 hours of admission. Shock index, pediatric age-adjusted represents maximum normal shock index based on age. Cutoffs included shock index >1.22 (ages 4-6), >1.0 (7-12), and >0.9 (13-16). Age-adjusted cutoffs for hypotension were as follows: systolic blood pressure <90 (ages 4-6), systolic blood pressure <100 (7-16). A total of 559 children were included; 21% underwent operation, 37% endotracheal intubation, and 14% transfusion. Hypotension alone predicted poorly the need for operation (13%), endotracheal intubation (17%), or transfusion (22%). Operation (30%), endotracheal intubation (40%), and blood transfusion (53%) were more likely in children with an increased shock index, pediatric age-adjusted; 25 children required all three interventions, 3 (12%) were hypotensive at presentation, 15 (60%) had an increased shock index, pediatric age-adjusted (P < .001). An increased shock index, pediatric age-adjusted is superior to age-adjusted hypotension to identify injured children likely to require emergency operation, endotracheal intubation, or early blood transfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effective teamwork in trauma management.

    PubMed

    Frakes, Patricia; Neely, Iain; Tudoe, Robert

    2009-12-01

    The emergency department (ED) education team at the Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, has developed a process to promote effective teamwork in major trauma management. To introduce this process to ED staff, the team developed a multiprofessional education and training programme. This article describes the development process, explains how and why it was undertaken, and provides details of the education and training programme. It also highlights the challenges met by the education team during implementation.

  11. The association of mobile medical team involvement on on-scene times and mortality in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sema; Overwater, Eline; Saltzherr, Teun Peter; Jin, P H Ping Fung Kon; van Exter, Pieternel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan S K; Goslings, J Carel

    2010-09-01

    Mobile medical teams (MMTs) provide specialized care on-scene with the purpose to improve outcome. However, this additional care could prolong the on-scene time (OST), which is related to mortality. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of MMT involvement on the mortality rate and on the OST, in a Dutch consecutive cohort of Level I trauma patients. All patients who required presentation in the trauma resuscitation room in an urban Level I trauma center were included in this prospective study during the period of November 2005 till November 2007. For data collection, we used both pre- and in-hospital registration systems. Outcome measures were 30-day mortality and OST. In total, 1,054 patients were analyzed. In 172 (16%) patients, the MMT was involved. Mortality was significantly higher in the MMT group compared with patients treated without MMT involvement; 9.9% versus 2.7%, respectively (p < 0.001). Significantly higher Injury Severity Scores, intervention rates, and a significantly lower Triage Revised Trauma Score were found in patients treated by MMT. After adjustment for patient and injury characteristics, no association could be found between MMT involvement and higher mortality (95% CI, 0.581-3.979; p = 0.394). In patients with severe traumatic brain injury (GCS score ≤ 8) in whom a MMT was involved, the mortality was 25.5%, compared with 32.7% in those without MMT involvement (p = 0.442). The mean OST was prolonged (2.7 minutes) when MMT was involved (26.1 vs. 23.4 minutes; p = 0.003). In this study, OSTs were long compared with PHTLS recommendations. MMT involvement slightly prolonged the OST. Trauma patients with MMT involvement had a high mortality, but after correction for patient and injury characteristics, the mortality rate did not significantly differ from patients without MMT involvement.

  12. Including fall prevention for older adults in your trauma injury prevention program--introducing Farewell to Falls.

    PubMed

    Corman, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    With data showing that more than 50% of visits to our trauma center for older adults 65 years and older are due to falls, injury prevention programs in trauma centers should be paying more attention to the area of fall prevention for older adults. Farewell to Falls, a free, home-based program of Stanford Hospital and Clinic's trauma service, utilizes a multifaceted approach to help reduce falls. In addition to improving the lives of seniors, the program fulfills a community benefit goal and provides strong hospital marketing opportunities. This program is a benefit to hospitals and the older adults they serve.

  13. Multidisciplinary trauma team care in Kandahar, Afghanistan: current injury patterns and care practices.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Andrew; Pelletier, Pierre; Mamczak, Christiaan; Benfield, Rodd; Elster, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Multidisciplinary trauma care systems have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Medical care in support of the global war on terror has provided opportunities to refine these systems. We report on the multidisciplinary trauma care system at the Role III Hospital at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. We reviewed the Joint Trauma System Registry, Kandahar database from 1 October 2009 to 31 December 2010 and extracted data regarding patient demographics, clinical variables and outcomes. We also queried the operating room records from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. In the study period of 1 October 2009 to 31 December 2010, 2599 patients presented to the trauma bay, with the most common source of injury being from Improvised Explosive Device (IED) blasts (915), followed by gunshot wounds (GSW) (327). Importantly, 19 patients with triple amputations as a result of injuries from IEDs were seen. 127 patients were massively transfused. The in-hospital mortality was 4.45%. From 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2010, 4106.24 operating room hours were logged to complete 1914 patient cases. The mean number of procedures per case in 2009 was 1.27, compared to 3.11 in 2010. Multinational, multidisciplinary care is required for the large number of severely injured patients seen at Kandahar Airfield. Multidisciplinary trauma care in Kandahar is effective and can be readily employed in combat hospitals in Afghanistan and serve as a model for civilian centres. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Cohesion and Trauma: An Examination of a Collegiate Women's Volleyball Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Teresa B.; Meyer, Barbara B.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of Adventure Based Counseling (i.e., a low-element challenge program) on the cohesion of a collegiate women's volleyball team. Results suggest postintervention improvements in team cohesion. The support created in the challenge experience also transferred to the players helping one another to grieve the untimely…

  15. Cohesion and Trauma: An Examination of a Collegiate Women's Volleyball Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Teresa B.; Meyer, Barbara B.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of Adventure Based Counseling (i.e., a low-element challenge program) on the cohesion of a collegiate women's volleyball team. Results suggest postintervention improvements in team cohesion. The support created in the challenge experience also transferred to the players helping one another to grieve the untimely…

  16. Trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain and spine injury (TBI/TSI) is a leading cause of death and lifelong disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain, skull, and spine, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and variance in trauma mechanisms result in a wide range of age-specific traumas and patterns of brain and spine injuries. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head and spine injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI/TSI, which enhances sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, will guide therapy, and may give important information about the prognosis. The purposes of this chapter are to: (1) discuss the unique epidemiology, mechanisms, and characteristics of TBI/TSI in children; (2) review the anatomic and functional imaging techniques that can be used to study common and rare pediatric TBI/TSI and their complications; (3) comprehensively review frequent primary and secondary brain injuries; and (4) to give a short overview of two special types of pediatric TBI/TSI: birth-related and nonaccidental injuries.

  17. TEAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document presents materials covering the television campaign against drunk driving called "TEAM" (Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management). It is noted that TEAM's purpose is to promote effective alcohol management in public facilities and other establishments that serve alcoholic beverages. TEAM sponsors are listed, including…

  18. From the combat medic to the forward surgical team: the Madigan model for improving trauma readiness of brigade combat teams fighting the Global War on Terror.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Vance Y; Miller, Joseph P; Koeller, Craig A; Gibson, Steven O; Azarow, Kenneth S; Myers, Jerome B; Beekley, Alec C; Sebesta, James A; Christensen, Jon B; Rush, Robert M

    2007-03-01

    Medics assigned to combat units have a notable paucity of trauma experience. Our goal was to provide intense trauma refresher training for the conventional combat medic to better prepare them for combat casualty care in the War on Terror. Our Tactical Combat Casualty Care Course (TC3) consisted of the following five phases: (1) One and one-half-day didactic session; (2) Half-day simulation portion with interactive human surgical simulators for anatomical correlation of procedures and team building; (3) Half-day of case presentations and triage scenarios from Iraq/Afghanistan and associated skills stations; (4) Half-day live tissue lab where procedures were performed on live anesthetized animals in a controlled environment; and (5) One-day field phase where live anesthetized animals and surgical simulators were combined in a real-time, field-training event to simulate realistic combat injuries, evacuation problems, and mass casualty scenarios. Data collection consisted of surveys, pre- and posttests, and after-action comments. A total of 1317 personnel participated in TC3 from October 2003 through May 2005. Over the overlapping study period from December 2004 to April 2005, 327 soldiers participated in the formal five-phase course. Three hundred four (94%) students were combat medics who were preparing for combat operations in Iraq or Afghanistan. Of those completing the training, 97% indicated their confidence and ability to treat combat casualties were markedly improved. Moreover, of those 140 medics who took the course and deployed to Iraq for 1 year, 99% indicated that the principles taught in the TC3 course helped with battlefield management of injured casualties during their deployment. The hybrid training model is an effective method for training medical personnel to deal with modern battle injuries. This course increases the knowledge and confidence of combat medics deploying and fighting the Global War on Terrorism.

  19. Third-party reimbursement for nurse practitioners' services on trauma teams: working through a maze of issues.

    PubMed

    Buppert, Carolyn

    2005-01-01

    Third-party payers reimburse for physician services performed by nurse practitioners, if the services are within the scope of practice of a nurse practitioner and the payers' rules are followed. However, some hospitals and trauma services have been reluctant to bill the services of nurse practitioners they employ or to hire nurse practitioners, because the rules are complex, vary from payer to payer, can be difficult to find, and because operations are not always set up so that nurse practitioners' services are bundled in ways which conform to the rules. Medicare has developed detailed rules on billing nurse practitioners' services, but neither Medicaid nor commercial payers necessarily follow Medicare's rules. The situation is further complicated by wide variations in state law governing nurse practitioner scope of practice and requirements for physician collaboration. Despite all of these variables, it may be worth the time and effort to sort out the requirements for utilizing nurse practitioners and billing for their services, considering the limitations on residents' hours, the data on quality of nurse practitioners' clinical services and the potential for generating revenue. This article describes the legal and business issues, provides the general rules for billing nurse practitioners' services, and provides a plan for obtaining third-party payment for nurse practitioners' services on trauma teams.

  20. Computer-Based 3D Simulation: A Study of Communication Practices in a Trauma Team Performing Patient Examination and Diagnostic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krange, Ingeborg; Moen, Anne; Ludvigsen, Sten

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic work in trauma teams is critical for the patient's condition and for the possibility of survival. It is a difficult situation to train due to the inherently unpredictable and time-critical practice when an injured patient presents in the Emergency Room (ER). Different types of simulations have been developed for specialized training of…

  1. Study protocol for a framework analysis using video review to identify latent safety threats: trauma resuscitation using in situ simulation team training (TRUST)

    PubMed Central

    Petrosoniak, Andrew; Pinkney, Sonia; Hicks, Christopher; White, Kari; Almeida, Ana Paula Siquiera Silva; Campbell, Douglas; McGowan, Melissa; Gray, Alice; Trbovich, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Errors in trauma resuscitation are common and have been attributed to breakdowns in the coordination of system elements (eg, tools/technology, physical environment and layout, individual skills/knowledge, team interaction). These breakdowns are triggered by unique circumstances and may go unrecognised by trauma team members or hospital administrators; they can be described as latent safety threats (LSTs). Retrospective approaches to identifying LSTs (ie, after they occur) are likely to be incomplete and prone to bias. To date, prospective studies have not used video review as the primary mechanism to identify any and all LSTs in trauma resuscitation. Methods and analysis A series of 12 unannounced in situ simulations (ISS) will be conducted to prospectively identify LSTs at a level 1 Canadian trauma centre (over 800 dedicated trauma team activations annually). 4 scenarios have already been designed as part of this protocol based on 5 recurring themes found in the hospital's mortality and morbidity process. The actual trauma team will be activated to participate in the study. Each simulation will be audio/video recorded from 4 different camera angles and transcribed to conduct a framework analysis. Video reviewers will code the videos deductively based on a priori themes of LSTs identified from the literature, and/or inductively based on the events occurring in the simulation. LSTs will be prioritised to target interventions in future work. Ethics and dissemination Institutional research ethics approval has been acquired (SMH REB #15-046). Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant conferences. Findings will also be presented to key institutional stakeholders to inform mitigation strategies for improved patient safety. PMID:27821600

  2. Does restraint status in motor vehicle crash with rollover predict the need for trauma team presence on arrival? An ATOMAC study.

    PubMed

    Recicar, John; Barczyk, Amanda; Duzinski, Sarah; Lawson, Karla A; Garcia, Nilda M; Letton, Robert; Raines, Alexander R; Eubanks, James W; Azarakhsh, Nima; Grimes, Sandra; Notrica, David M; Garcia-Fillon, Pamela; Alder, Adam; Greenwell, Cynthia; Megison, Stephen; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Luo, Chunqiao; Maxson, Robert Todd

    2016-02-01

    Restraint status has not been combined with mechanistic criteria for trauma team activation. This study aims to assess the relationship between motor vehicle crash rollover (MVC-R) mechanism with and without proper restraint and need for trauma team activation. Patients <16years old involved in an MVC-R between November 2007 and November 2012 at 6 Level 1 pediatric trauma centers were included. Restraint status, the need for transfusion or intervention in the emergency department (ED), hospital and intensive care length of stay and mortality were assessed. Of 690 cases reviewed, 48% were improperly restrained. Improperly restrained children were more likely to require intubation (OR 10.24; 95% CI 2.42 to 91.69), receive blood in the ED (OR 4.06; 95% CI 1.43 to 14.17) and require intensive care (ICU) (OR; 3.11; 95% CI 1.96 to 4.93) than the properly restrained group. The improperly restrained group had a longer hospital length of stay (p<0.001), and a higher mortality (3.4% vs. 0.8%; OR 4.09; 95% CI 1.07 to 23.02) than the properly restrained group. Unrestrained children in MVC-R had higher injury severity and were significantly more likely to need urgent interventions compared to properly restrained children. This supports a modification to include restraint status with the rollover criterion for trauma team activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abusive head trauma and accidental head injury: a 20-year comparative study of referrals to a hospital child protection team

    PubMed Central

    John, Simon; Vincent, Andrea L; Reed, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe children referred for suspected abusive head trauma (AHT) to a hospital child protection team in Auckland, New Zealand. Methods Comparative review of demographics, histories, injuries, investigations and diagnostic outcomes for referrals under 15 years old from 1991 to 2010. Results Records were available for 345 children. Referrals increased markedly (88 in the first decade, 257 in the second), but the diagnostic ratio was stable: AHT 60%, accidental or natural 29% and uncertain cause 11%. The probability of AHT was similar regardless of socio-economic status or ethnicity. In children under 2 years old with accidental head injuries (75/255, 29%) or AHT (180/255, 71%), characteristics of particular interest for AHT included no history of trauma (88/98, 90%), no evidence of impact to the head (84/93, 90%), complex skull fractures with intracranial injury (22/28, 79%), subdural haemorrhage (160/179, 89%) and hypoxic ischaemic injury (38/39, 97%). In children over 2 years old, these characteristics did not differ significantly between children with accidental head injuries (21/47, 45%) and AHT (26/47, 55%). The mortality of AHT was higher in children over 2 years old (10/26, 38%) than under 2 years (19/180, 11%). Conclusions The striking increase in referrals for AHT probably represents increasing incidence. The decision to refer a hospitalised child with a head injury for assessment for possible AHT should not be influenced by socio-economic status or ethnicity. Children over 2 years old hospitalised for AHT are usually injured by mechanisms involving impact and should be considered at high risk of death. PMID:26130384

  4. Abusive head trauma and accidental head injury: a 20-year comparative study of referrals to a hospital child protection team.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick; John, Simon; Vincent, Andrea L; Reed, Peter

    2015-12-01

    To describe children referred for suspected abusive head trauma (AHT) to a hospital child protection team in Auckland, New Zealand. Comparative review of demographics, histories, injuries, investigations and diagnostic outcomes for referrals under 15 years old from 1991 to 2010. Records were available for 345 children. Referrals increased markedly (88 in the first decade, 257 in the second), but the diagnostic ratio was stable: AHT 60%, accidental or natural 29% and uncertain cause 11%. The probability of AHT was similar regardless of socio-economic status or ethnicity. In children under 2 years old with accidental head injuries (75/255, 29%) or AHT (180/255, 71%), characteristics of particular interest for AHT included no history of trauma (88/98, 90%), no evidence of impact to the head (84/93, 90%), complex skull fractures with intracranial injury (22/28, 79%), subdural haemorrhage (160/179, 89%) and hypoxic ischaemic injury (38/39, 97%). In children over 2 years old, these characteristics did not differ significantly between children with accidental head injuries (21/47, 45%) and AHT (26/47, 55%). The mortality of AHT was higher in children over 2 years old (10/26, 38%) than under 2 years (19/180, 11%). The striking increase in referrals for AHT probably represents increasing incidence. The decision to refer a hospitalised child with a head injury for assessment for possible AHT should not be influenced by socio-economic status or ethnicity. Children over 2 years old hospitalised for AHT are usually injured by mechanisms involving impact and should be considered at high risk of death. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. From risk for trauma to unintentional injury risk: falls--a concept analysis. Nursing Diagnosis Extension and Classification Research Team.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, D P; Crowell, C M

    1999-01-01

    Concept analysis of the nursing diagnosis risk for trauma. To examine the nursing diagnosis risk for trauma and to specify the risk factors for falling. Research and informational articles on falling, and NANDA Nursing Diagnoses: Definitions and Classification, 1999-2000. Replace the current nursing diagnosis risk for trauma with the more specific nursing diagnosis unintentional injury risk: falls. The other risks included in risk for trauma (e.g., burns) also will need to be developed.

  6. Protocol of the DENIM study: a Delphi-procedure on the identification of trauma patients in need of care by physician-staffed Mobile Medical Teams in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Annelieke Maria Karien; Geeraedts, Leo Maria George; Giannakopoulos, Georgios Fredericus; Terra, Maartje; Christiaans, Herman Martinus Timotheus; Mokkink, Lidwine Brigitta; Bloemers, Frank Willem

    2015-02-08

    In The Netherlands, standard prehospital trauma care is provided by emergency medical services and can be supplemented with advanced trauma care by Mobile Medical Teams. Due to observed over and undertriage in the dispatch of the Mobile Medical Team for major trauma patients, the accuracy of the dispatch criteria has been disputed. In order to obtain recommendations to invigorate the dispatch criteria, this study aimed at reaching consensus in expert opinion on the question; which acute trauma patient is in need of care by a Mobile Medical Team? In this paper we describe the protocol of the DENIM study (a Delphi-procedure on the identification of prehospital trauma patients in need of care by Mobile Medical Teams). A national three round digital Delphi study will be conducted to reach consensus. Literature was explored for relevant topics. After agreement on the themes of interest, the steering committee will construct questions for the first round. In total, 120 panellists with the following backgrounds; Mobile Medical Team physicians and nurses, trauma surgeons, ambulance nurses, emergency medical operators will be invited to participate. Group opinion will be fed back between each round that follows, allowing the panellists to revise their previous opinions and so, converge towards group consensus. Successful prehospital treatment of trauma patients greatly depends on the autonomous decisions made by the different professionals along the chain of prehospital trauma care. Trauma patients in need of care by the Mobile Medical Team need to be identified by those professionals in order to invigorate deployment criteria and improve trauma care. The Delphi technique is used because it allows for group consensus to be reached in a systematic and anonymous fashion amongst experts in the field of trauma care. The anonymous nature of the Delphi allows all experts to state their opinion whilst eliminating the bias of dominant and/or hierarchical individuals on group

  7. The tortuous journey of introducing the nurse practitioner as a new member of the healthcare team: a meta-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Andregård, Anna-Carin; Jangland, Eva

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the obstacles to and the opportunities for achieving optimal interprofessional team collaboration with the introduction of the nurse practitioner (NP). A team approach can contribute importantly to sustainable and safe patient care, and NPs have been added to the healthcare team in many countries. Following the international trend towards the development of the acute care NP, the role has recently been initiated in surgical care in Sweden. The introduction of an advanced nursing role into existing organisations raises questions about how the role will be developed and what its effects will be on collaboration between the different professions. We conducted a systematic review of qualitative studies using the meta-ethnographic approach developed by Noblit and Hare. Literature in the field of nursing was searched on PubMed and CINAHL, and empirical qualitative studies from outpatient and inpatient care in seven countries were included. The studies were appraised according to national guidelines and templates and were analysed and synthesised according to the meta-ethnographic approach. A total of 26 studies were included in the synthesis. The analysis revealed four themes: (i) a threat to professional boundaries, (ii) a resource for the team, (iii) the quest for autonomy and control, and (iv) necessary properties of a developing interprofessional collaboration. Based on these themes, the synthesis was created and presented as a metaphorical journey. The implementation of a new nursing role in a traditional healthcare team is a complex process influenced by many factors and can be described as "a tortuous journey towards a partially unknown destination". The synthesised obstacles and opportunities drawn from international studies may help healthcare organisations and new NPs prepare for, and optimise, the implementation of a new nursing role.

  8. A predeployment trauma team training course creates confidence in teamwork and clinical skills: a post-Afghanistan deployment validation study of Canadian Forces healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Thomas; Hennecke, Peter; Garraway, Naisan Robert; Evans, David C; Hameed, Morad; Simons, Richard K; Doucet, Jay; Hansen, Daniel; Annand, Siobhan; Bell, Nathaniel; Brown, D Ross

    2011-11-01

    The 10-day Intensive Trauma Team Training Course (ITTTC) was developed by the Canadian Forces (CFs) to teach teamwork and clinical trauma skills to military healthcare personnel before deploying to Afghanistan. This article attempts to validate the impact of the ITTTC by surveying participants postdeployment. A survey consisting of Likert-type multiple-choice questions was created and sent to all previous ITTTC participants. The survey asked respondents to rate their confidence in applying teamwork skills and clinical skills learned in the ITTTC. It explored the relevancy of objectives and participants' prior familiarity with the objectives. The impact of different training modalities was also surveyed. The survey showed that on average 84.29% of participants were "confident" or "very confident" in applying teamwork skills to their subsequent clinical experience and 52.10% were "confident" or "very confident" in applying clinical knowledge and skills. On average 43.74% of participants were "familiar" or "very familiar" with the clinical topics before the course, indicating the importance of training these skills. Participants found that clinical shadowing was significantly less valuable in training clinical skills than either animal laboratory experience or experience in human patient simulators; 68.57% respondents thought that ITTTC was "important" or "very important" in their training. The ITTTC created lasting self-reported confidence in CFs healthcare personnel surveyed upon return from Afghanistan. This validates the importance of the course for the training of CFs healthcare personnel and supports the value of team training in other areas of trauma and medicine.

  9. Improve performance in trauma care.

    PubMed

    Spath, P

    2001-05-01

    Many states have adopted trauma program legislation that includes a statewide trauma registry and performance evaluation activities. Hospitals participating in the trauma network are required to support the statewide activities through submission of data about the trauma patients they treat. By analyzing the quality of care provided to trauma patients, the trauma team members work to improve their services. Consulting editor Patrice Spath, RHIT, provides in-depth advice on how to measure and improve performance in trauma care.

  10. Pilot study: introducing a quality assurance process for a team-centered approach involving nonphysician providers in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kielar, Ania Z; Ritchie, Heather; McInnes, Matthew D; O'Sullivan, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce 3 new quality initiatives in radiology that engage various members of the department including radiologists, residents, technologists, and booking clerks. These pilot programs provide work-related learning opportunities in semiautomated, easy-to-use, email-based, standardized forms that are used to identify cases where imaging could have been performed in a more optimal way (either due to technical reasons or a different protocol could have been chosen). In the case of the Kudos quality initiative program (QUIP), this is used to provide positive feedback to an individual in the department for a job well done. Since inception in January 2012 to September 2013, we reviewed Technical QUIPs, protocols under questions (PUQ), and Kudos QUIPs. These were collated through receipt of standardized emails for each category. A total of 62 Kudos QUIPs, 8 Technical QUIPs, and 58 PUQs were received in the abdominal and pelvic imaging division since inception. Though still a relatively new pilot programs, PUQs and Technical QUIPs have afforded technologists and booking clerks opportunities to become engaged in improving patient care as well as learning from their own performance gaps. Future standardization of received data for each modality still needs to be established as well as an action plan to implement long-term changes. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving the quality of handover by addressing handover culture and introducing a new, multi-disciplinary, team-based handover meeting.

    PubMed

    Walton, Henry; Munro, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Handover is a "major preventable cause of patient harm"[1] and this project aims to improve the quality of night handover within a teaching hospitals general medicine department, resulting in the safe transfer of patient care to the night team. Quality of handover was assessed both qualitatively, via structured qualitative interviews with trainees and a baseline survey assessing doctor's opinions of night handover, and quantitatively through the collection of a data set during regular observation of night handover. The initial intervention instituted a new handover meeting with a set time and new location and invited the night nurse practitioner to attend. A prompt card, standardised documentation, defined leadership, and an attendance register were also introduced. Successive PDSA cycles introduced technology to the intervention, enabled the nurse night practitioners to actually attend and re-branded the prompt card as an agenda. Results show a sustained reduction in length of handover from 70 minutes (n=7) to 34 minutes (n=13) post-intervention as well as a reduction in the number of distractions occurring during each handover from a mean of 14 to a mean of 8.5. An improved quality of handover was also demonstrated with an overall increase in the percentage of task handovers containing hospital number, an admitting diagnosis, comorbidities and a time allocated for the task to be performed of at least 10%. When trainees were surveyed post-implementation they unanimously identified the new handover system as safer than the previous handover process (n=30). This project demonstrates that replacing an ad-hoc system of handover with a multi-disciplinary, team based approach to handover improves handover quality. In addition it provides a useful guide to introducing a new handover meeting to a department and contains useful lessons on how to combat cultural barriers to change within a department.

  12. The incidence of fever in US Critical Care Air Transport Team combat trauma patients evacuated from the theater between March 2009 and March 2010.

    PubMed

    Minnick, Joanne M; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Stanton, Marietta; Lairet, Julio R; King, James; Torres, Pedro; Aden, James; Ramirez, Rosemarie

    2013-11-01

    Most critically ill injured patients are transported out of the theater by Critical Care Air Transport Teams (CCATTs). Fever after trauma is correlated with surgical complications and infection. The purposes of this study are to identify the incidence of elevated temperature in patients managed in the CCATT environment and to describe the complications reported and the treatments used in these patients. We performed a retrospective review of available records of trauma patients from the combat theater between March 1, 2009, and March 31, 2010, who were transported by the US Air Force CCATT and had an incidence of hyperthermia. We then divided the cohort into 2 groups, patients transported with an elevation in temperature greater than 100.4°F and patients with no documented elevation in temperature. We used a standardized, secure electronic data collection form to abstract the outcomes. Descriptive data collected included injury type, temperature, use of a mechanical ventilator, cooling treatment modalities, antipyretics, intravenous fluid administration, and use of blood products. We also evaluated the incidence of complications during the transport in patients who had a recorded elevation in temperature greater than 100.4°F. A total of 248 trauma patients met the inclusion criteria, and 101 trauma patients (40%) had fever. The mean age was 28 years, and 98% of patients were men. The mechanism of injury was an explosion in 156 patients (63%), blunt injury in 11 (4%), and penetrating injury in 45 (18%), whereas other trauma-related injuries accounted for 36 patients (15%). Of the patients, 209 (84%) had battle-related injuries and 39 (16%) had non-battle-related injuries. Traumatic brain injury was found in 24 patients (24%) with an incidence of elevated temperature. The mean temperature was 101.6°F (range, 100.5°F-103.9°F). After evaluation of therapies and treatments, 80 trauma patients (51%) were intubated on a mechanical ventilator (P < .001). Of the trauma

  13. [Surgeons' hope: expanding the professional role of co-medical staff and introducing the nurse practitioner/physician assistant and team approach to the healthcare system].

    PubMed

    Maehara, Tadaaki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Tominaga, Ryuji; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2010-07-01

    The healthcare system surrounding surgeons is collapsing due to Japan's policy of limiting health expenditure, market fundamentalism, shortage of healthcare providers, unfavorable working environment for surgeons, increasing risk of malpractice suits, and decreasing number of those who desire to pursue the surgery specialty. In the USA, nonphysician and mid-level clinicians such as nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) have been working since the 1960s, and the team approach to medicine which benefits patients is functioning well. One strategy to avoid the collapse of the Japanese surgical healthcare system is introducing the NP/PA system. The division of labor in medicine can provide high-quality, safe healthcare and increase the confidence of the public by contributing to: reduced postoperative complications; increased patient satisfaction; decreased length of postoperative hospital stay: and economic benefits. We have requested that the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare establish a Japanese NP/PA system to care for patients more efficiently perioperatively. The ministry has decided to launch a trial profession called "tokutei (specifically qualified) nurse" in February 2010. These nurses will be trained and educated at the Master's degree level and allowed to practice several predetermined skill sets under physician supervision. We hope that all healthcare providers will assist in transforming the tokutei nurse system into a Japanese NP/PA system.

  14. Introducing RFID technology in dynamic and time-critical medical settings: requirements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Parlak, Siddika; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S

    2012-10-01

    We describe the process of introducing RFID technology in the trauma bay of a trauma center to support fast-paced and complex teamwork during resuscitation. We analyzed trauma resuscitation tasks, photographs of medical tools, and videos of simulated resuscitations to gain insight into resuscitation tasks, work practices and procedures. Based on these data, we discuss strategies for placing RFID tags on medical tools and for placing antennas in the environment for optimal tracking and activity recognition. Results from our preliminary RFID deployment in the trauma bay show the feasibility of our approach for tracking tools and for recognizing trauma team activities. We conclude by discussing implications for and challenges to introducing RFID technology in other similar settings characterized by dynamic and collocated collaboration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Severity and pattern of injuries caused by the traditional Swiss team sport ‘Hornussen’: first retrospective study at a level I trauma centre in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Waterkamp, Volkmar; Ricklin, Meret; Schaller, Benoît; Katsoulis, Konstantinos; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis

    2016-01-01

    Background This article addresses typical injury patterns related to the traditional Swiss team sport of Hornussen. A small plastic disk is struck with a special elastic racket and then intercepted in the field. Severe injuries have occasionally been reported. We present a systematic review of all cases of Hornussen injuries treated in the University Hospital of Bern from 2000 to 2014. Methods To assess the frequency, type and outcome of Hornussen injuries, we performed a database search of all inpatient and outpatient cases related to Hornussen and that were admitted to and/or treated in Bern University Hospital from 2000 to 2014. Results A total of 28 such patients could be identified. Apart from 1 woman injured as a bystander and treated as an outpatient, all patients were male and active players. Typical injury patterns comprised midfacial fractures and severe ocular traumata, very often in combination. Almost all of these patients had to be hospitalised due to the severity of the trauma suffered and underwent surgery. 1 patient had to be admitted to the intensive care unit prior to the operation. Conclusions Eye and face injuries caused by Hornussen can be devastating. This resembles the potential risk of other bat-and-ball sports, such as cricket and baseball. Apart from the economic loss due to treatment costs and sick leave, these injuries can be disabling for life. It should therefore be mandatory for all players to wear protective gear, as is already the case for Hornussen players born in 1984 or later. PMID:27900183

  16. Successful implementation of a family and patient activated rapid response team in an adult level 1 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Gerdik, Cynthia; Vallish, Roberta O; Miles, Kelly; Godwin, Steven A; Wludyka, Peter S; Panni, Moeen K

    2010-12-01

    When cardiac arrests occur in hospitalized patients, delays in treatment are associated with lower survival and poorer outcomes. Patients often show a physiological deterioration hours before cardiac or pulmonary arrest. As a result, many hospitals have implemented a rapid response team (RRT) as part of their involvement in the 100,000 Lives Campaign sponsored by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. In conjunction with the University Health System Consortium (UHC) Patient- and Family-Centered Care Implementation Collaborative, Shands Jacksonville Medical Center (SJMC) launched a pilot RRT program in October 2006 followed by campus-wide implementation in July 2007. The program was enhanced to allow patient and family activation of the RRT in October 2007. A review of the first 2 years of data indicates that the SJMC RRT received 25 patient or family activated calls. Forty-eight percent of the calls were initiated by a family member and 52% by the actual patient. Reasons for the calls have varied but the most frequent reason identified by the patient or family member was "something just doesn't feel right" with the patient. Other leading reasons for calls were similar to criteria that are used by staff-initiated calls, such as shortness of breath and pain issues. This is one of the first initiations of a family activated component of the RRT in an adult hospital that has led to improvements in outcomes such as reduction in mortality rates and non-ICU codes, without an overload of false positive calls. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Trauma system development.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, R A; Lockey, D J

    2013-01-01

    The word 'trauma' describes the disease entity resulting from physical injury. Trauma is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and deaths due to injury look set to increase. As early as the 1970s, it became evident that centralisation of resources and expertise could reduce the mortality rate from serious injury and that organisation of trauma care delivery into formal systems could improve outcome further. Internationally, trauma systems have evolved in various forms, with widespread reports of mortality and functional outcome benefits when major trauma management is delivered in this way. The management of major trauma in England is currently undergoing significant change. The London Trauma System began operating in April 2010 and others throughout England became operational this year. Similar systems exist internationally and continue to be developed. Anaesthetists have been and continue to be involved with all levels of trauma care delivery, from the provision of pre-hospital trauma and retrieval teams, through to chronic pain management and rehabilitation of patients back into society. This review examines the international development of major trauma care delivery and the components of a modern trauma system.

  18. Team Learning in Teacher Teams: Team Entitativity as a Bridge between Teams-in-Theory and Teams-in-Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vangrieken, Katrien; Dochy, Filip; Raes, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate team learning in the context of teacher teams in higher vocational education. As teacher teams often do not meet all criteria included in theoretical team definitions, the construct "team entitativity" was introduced. Defined as the degree to which a group of individuals possesses the quality of being a…

  19. Team Learning in Teacher Teams: Team Entitativity as a Bridge between Teams-in-Theory and Teams-in-Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vangrieken, Katrien; Dochy, Filip; Raes, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate team learning in the context of teacher teams in higher vocational education. As teacher teams often do not meet all criteria included in theoretical team definitions, the construct "team entitativity" was introduced. Defined as the degree to which a group of individuals possesses the quality of being a…

  20. [Outbreak of dermatophytosis in a high-level French judo team: prospective study 2006/2011. Efficacy of a therapeutic protocol introduced in 2004/2005].

    PubMed

    Lagier, L; Machet, L; Poisson, D-M; Estève, E

    2012-11-01

    Outbreaks of dermatophytosis have been reported more and more frequently in combat sports such as wrestling and judo. Such outbreaks are difficult to treat due to the involvement of numerous actors and structures. The main aim of our study was to determine whether the use of a standardized treatment in a high-level judo team could successfully reduce the outbreak. Our secondary objectives were to study the topography of lesions and ascertain whether consultations for suspected dermatophytosis were significantly more frequent during the 4 weeks following a judo training course. We conducted a prospective follow-up study from October 2004 to the end of June 2005 (series 1) and then from September 2006 to June 2011 (series 2) during which all new suspected cases of dermatophytosis in a judoka from Pôle France Orléans were examined at the Orléans Dermatology Department. For each consultation, we prepared a map of lesions and mycological samples, and patients received standardized treatment. We compared the two series and a considerable decrease was noted in dermatophytosis outbreaks after the introduction of these measures. The mean number of visits per training season was 97 for series 1 and 21.6 per training season for series 2. The mean numbers of episodes of cutaneous lesions clinically active per training season were 74 for series 1 and 16.8 for series 2. Lesions were localized mainly on the forearms, face and neck (40% for series 1 and 73% for series 2). "Waves" of visits (at least two visits per week) occurred significantly more frequently (68%) during the 4 weeks following a training period than during the rest of the year. Standardized management of this outbreak reduced the number of infectious episodes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Adopting Team Contracts to Initiate Team Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcellino, Patricia Ann

    2008-01-01

    Creighton, Harris and Coleman (2005) suggest that educational leadership instructors introduce aspiring administrators to a sound knowledge base. Currently, engaging in teams is recommended for high performance and problem-solving. Bolton (1999) recommends that instructors coach teams so teaming skills are improved. But, oftentimes, there are team…

  2. Adopting Team Contracts to Initiate Team Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcellino, Patricia Ann

    2008-01-01

    Creighton, Harris and Coleman (2005) suggest that educational leadership instructors introduce aspiring administrators to a sound knowledge base. Currently, engaging in teams is recommended for high performance and problem-solving. Bolton (1999) recommends that instructors coach teams so teaming skills are improved. But, oftentimes, there are team…

  3. A novel trauma model: naturally occurring canine trauma.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kelly E; Sharp, Claire R; Adams, Cynthia R; Beilman, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    In human trauma patients, most deaths result from hemorrhage and brain injury, whereas late deaths, although rare, are the result of multiple organ failure and sepsis. A variety of experimental animal models have been developed to investigate the pathophysiology of traumatic injury and evaluate novel interventions. Similar to other experimental models, these trauma models cannot recapitulate conditions of naturally occurring trauma, and therefore therapeutic interventions based on these models are often ineffective. Pet dogs with naturally occurring traumatic injury represent a promising translational model for human trauma that could be used to assess novel therapies. The purpose of this article was to review the naturally occurring canine trauma literature to highlight the similarities between canine and human trauma. The American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Veterinary Committee on Trauma has initiated the establishment of a national network of veterinary trauma centers to enhance uniform delivery of care to canine trauma patients. In addition, the Spontaneous Trauma in Animals Team, a multidisciplinary, multicenter group of researchers has created a clinical research infrastructure for carrying out large-scale clinical trials in canine trauma patients. Moving forward, these national resources can be utilized to facilitate multicenter prospective studies of canine trauma to evaluate therapies and interventions that have shown promise in experimental animal models, thus closing the critical gap in the translation of knowledge from experimental models to humans and increasing the likelihood of success in phases 1 and 2 human clinical trials.

  4. The spleen not taken: Differences in management and outcomes of blunt splenic injuries in teenagers cared for by adult and pediatric trauma teams in a single institution.

    PubMed

    OʼConnor, Sean C; Doud, Andrea N; Sieren, Leah M; Miller, Preston R; Zeller, Kristen A

    2017-09-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt splenic injury, initially touted for the care of pediatric patients, has become the standard of care for stable trauma patients of all ages. In our institution, trauma patients younger than 16 years are managed by the pediatric surgery service and patients 16 years or older are managed by the adult trauma service. Angioembolization is routinely used for adults with blunt splenic injury but rarely used for pediatric patients. A retrospective chart review was performed to determine if more liberal use of angioembolization increases the success rate of NOM of blunt splenic injury in adolescents. Using our institutional trauma registry, we performed a retrospective chart review of 13- to 18-year-olds admitted with blunt splenic injury from 2007 to 2015. One hundred thirty-three patients were identified; 59 were 13- to 15-year-olds and cared for by the Pediatric Trauma service, whereas 74 were 16- to 18-year-olds and cared for by the Adult Trauma service. The cohorts were compared with respect to imaging performed, grade of injury, Injury Severity Score, presence of active extravasation or pseudoaneurysm, interventions performed, blood transfused, intensive care unit days, length of stay, complications, and 30-day mortality rates. There were no significant differences in Injury Severity Score, incidence of active extravasation or pseudoaneurysm identified on computed tomography, or grade of injury between the two cohorts. More patients underwent angioembolization in the "adult" group (p = 0.001) with no difference in the success rate of NOM (p = 0.117). The overall failure rate of NOM of high-grade injuries was only 4.1%. Failure of NOM in high-grade injuries is rare; as a result, the number needed to treat with prophylactic angioembolization would be around 37 patients, resulting in undue risk to many patients with no therapeutic benefit. No improvement in failure rate was seen with aggressive angioembolization, though a larger

  5. The Incidence of Fever in US Critical Care Air Transport Team Combat Trauma Patients Evacuated from the Theater between March 2009 and March 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Trauma patients with fever Total IED 70 56 126 GSW 20 16 36 Rocket 18 7 25 Other 17 9 26 Fall 8 2 10 MVC 6 8 14 Shrapnel 4 1 5 Helicopter crash 3 1 4 Crush...1 9 10 Total 147 101 248 GSW, Gunshot wound; MVC , motor vehicle collision. RESEARCH/Minnick et al e104 JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY NURSING VOLUME 39 • ISSUE

  6. [Pediatric multiple trauma].

    PubMed

    Auner, B; Marzi, I

    2014-05-01

    Multiple trauma in children is rare so that even large trauma centers will only treat a small number of cases. Nevertheless, accidents are the most common cause of death in childhood whereby the causes are mostly traffic accidents and falls. Head trauma is the most common form of injury and the degree of severity is mostly decisive for the prognosis. Knowledge on possible causes of injury and injury patterns as well as consideration of anatomical and physiological characteristics are of great importance for treatment. The differences compared to adults are greater the younger the child is. Decompression and stopping bleeding are the main priorities before surgical fracture stabilization. The treatment of a severely injured child should be carried out by an interdisciplinary team in an approved trauma center with expertise in pediatrics. An inadequate primary assessment involves a high risk of early mortality. On the other hand children have a better prognosis than adults with comparable injuries.

  7. Pediatric trauma: preparation and management.

    PubMed

    Brown, R C; Ioli, J G; Ferlise, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Trauma causes more than 50% of the deaths in children. The leading cause of pediatric injury is motor vehicle accidents involving children as passengers, pedestrians, or bicycle riders. 2. Trauma is always unexpected; therefore, the most vital aspect of any trauma system is that the system itself never be caught unprepared. Anticipation and preparation are the best first-line defenses against traumatic injury. 3. Because of a child's smaller size, vital organs are in close proximity to one another; multiple organ injuries are common. 4. The team who responds to a pediatric trauma should include nurses and physicians trained in principles of pediatric resuscitation.

  8. [The radiologist physician in major trauma evaluation].

    PubMed

    Motta-Ramírez, Gaspar Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Trauma is the most common cause of death in young adults. A multidisciplinary trauma team consists of at least a surgical team, an anesthesiology team, radiologic team, and an emergency department team. Recognize the integration of multidisciplinary medical team in managing the trauma patient and which must include the radiologist physician responsible for the institutional approach to the systematization of the trauma patient regarding any radiological and imaging study with emphasis on the FAST (del inglés, Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma)/USTA, Whole body computed tomography. Ultrasound is a cross-sectional method available for use in patients with major trauma. Whole-body multidetector computed tomography became the imaging modality of choice in the late 1990s. In patients with major trauma, examination FAST often is the initial imaging examination, extended to extraabdominal regions. Patients who have multitrauma from blunt mechanisms often require multiple diagnostic examinations, including Computed Tomography imaging of the torso as well as abdominopelvic Computed Tomography angiography. Multiphasic Whole-body trauma imaging is feasible, helps detect clinically relevant vascular injuries, and results in diagnostic image quality in the majority of patients. Computed Tomography has gained importance in the early diagnostic phase of trauma care in the emergency room. With a single continuous acquisition, whole-body computed tomography angiography is able to demonstrate all potentially injured organs, as well as vascular and bone structures, from the circle of Willis to the symphysis pubis.

  9. The trauma report nurse: a trauma triage process improvement project.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Lisa; Fahje, Carol; Immermann, Carol; Elsbernd, Terri

    2014-09-01

    Accurate trauma triage is imperative to facilitate appropriate resource mobilization for severely injured trauma patients. A critical window of opportunity exists to prevent secondary injury or death. Timely assessment with a multidisciplinary trauma team is essential to facilitate rapid diagnosis and treatment. However, consistent and accurate trauma triage proved daunting at our institution, resulting in instances of undertriage. A process improvement strategy aimed at improving trauma triage accuracy was implemented. An innovative role, the trauma report nurse (TRN), was created and became the trauma nurse expert. The TRN was responsible for assigning a trauma triage level to all incoming adult and pediatric trauma patients. In parallel, improvements were made to the prehospital report format, increasing standardization and clarifying hand-off verbiage. Undertriage rates dropped from 14% to 4.8%. Qualitative data demonstrated acceptance and support of the TRN role among physicians, nurses and nursing and ancillary staff. Designating trauma triage to an ED registered nurse proved to reduce undertriage rates. By providing staff education, infrastructure improvements, and leadership support, the role continues to thrive, resulting in improved care for severely injured trauma patients. Copyright © 2014 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The medical orthopaedic trauma service: an innovative multidisciplinary team model that decreases in-hospital complications in patients with hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Dy, Christopher J; Dossous, Paul-Michel; Ton, Quang V; Hollenberg, James P; Lorich, Dean G; Lane, Joseph M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the influence of a multidisciplinary model of care on the incidence of postoperative complications after a hip fracture. Retrospective cohort series. Level I trauma center. Three hundred six patients with pertrochanteric femur fracture (OTA classification: 31-B1, 31-B2, 31-B3, 31-A1, 31-A2, 31-B3, 32-A1, and 32-A2). A multidisciplinary, collaborative model of perioperative care: the Medical Orthopaedic Trauma Service (MOTS). Incidence of in-patient complications, length of in-patient hospitalization, readmission rate after hospital discharge, and postdischarge mortality at 90 days and 1 year. Although there was no change in length of hospitalization, there was a significantly decreased overall incidence of in-patient complications and a decreased incidences of new-onset urinary tract infection and arrhythmias in the MOTS cohort. These differences persisted after controlling for age, comorbidity, gender, ethnicity, type of fracture, and number of days from admission to surgery with a logistic regression model. Subgroup analysis of patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification of 1 or 2 revealed a significantly decreased 90 day readmission rate with the MOTS model, but this did not persist in a regression model (P = 0.07). A multidisciplinary, collaborative model of care for patients with hip fractures decreases the incidence of postoperative in-patient complications and may influence hospital readmission rates. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. Elite Teams Get the Job Done.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labich, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    Looks at highly successful, noncorporate teams--U.S. Navy SEALs; the Dallas Cowboys; the Tokyo String Quartet; the University of North Carolina women's soccer team; the Massachusetts General Hospital emergency-trauma team; Boots and Coots, hellfighters; and the Childress NASCAR racing team--and discusses the secrets of their success. (JOW)

  12. Team coordination dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jamie C; Amazeen, Polemnia G; Cooke, Nancy J

    2010-07-01

    Team coordination consists of both the dynamics of team member interaction and the environmental dynamics to which a team is subjected. Focusing on dynamics, an approach is developed that contrasts with traditional aggregate-static concepts of team coordination as characterized by the shared mental model approach. A team coordination order parameter was developed to capture momentary fluctuations in coordination. Team coordination was observed in three-person uninhabited air vehicle teams across two experimental sessions. The dynamics of the order parameter were observed under changes of a team familiarity control parameter. Team members returned for the second session to either the same (Intact) or different (Mixed) team. 'Roadblock' perturbations, or novel changes in the task environment, were introduced in order to probe the stability of team coordination. Nonlinear dynamic methods revealed differences that a traditional approach did not: Intact and Mixed team coordination dynamics looked very different; Mixed teams were more stable than Intact teams and explored the space of solutions without the need for correction. Stability was positively correlated with the number of roadblock perturbations that were overcome successfully. The novel and non-intuitive contribution of a dynamical analysis was that Mixed teams, who did not have a long history working together, were more adaptive. Team coordination dynamics carries new implications for traditional problems such as training adaptive teams.

  13. Introducing "Excel"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Sidney

    2006-01-01

    In this brief article, the author instructs teachers on how to produce an interactive spreadsheet from scratch in about 20 minutes and en route equip themselves and their students, with handy "Excel" skills. The aim is to introduce the basics of "Excel," plus some fun bits, speedily and with a purpose; producing something that is useful in its own…

  14. Introducing Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, MA.

    The booklet outlines and presents examples of basic economics concepts. Objectives are to help elementary and secondary teachers introduce economic concepts in the classroom and to help teachers grasp some of the fundamentals of economics. The document is divided into seven sections. Each section presents concepts, offers three supporting…

  15. [Team and team work].

    PubMed

    Richer, E

    1990-01-01

    The coordinator draws conclusions on the symposium day devoted to the teams. After defining "team" he gives several thoughts on the team's work its advantages and its difficulties. During this day the teams talked about their questions and their certainties in the various fields of their work. They also discussed their hard ships and their need of psychological support which the hospital departments do not have the means to satisfy.

  16. Prehospital anaesthesia performed by physician/critical care paramedic teams in a major trauma network in the UK: a 12 month review of practice.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Carl; Crombie, Nicholas; Hulme, Jonathan; Cormack, Stef; Hussain, Nageena; Ludwig, Frank; Wheaton, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In the West Midlands region of the UK, delivery of pre-hospital care has been remodelled through introduction of a 24 h Medical Emergency Response Incident Team (MERIT). Teams including physicians and critical care paramedics (CCP) are deployed to incidents on land-based and helicopter-based platforms. Clinical practice, including delivery of rapid sequence induction of anaesthesia (RSI), is underpinned by standard operating procedures (SOP). This study describes the first 12 months experience of prehospital RSI in the MERIT scheme in the West Midlands. Retrospective review of the MERIT clinical database for the 12 months following the launch of the scheme. Data was collected relating to the number of RSIs performed; indication for RSI; number of intubation attempts; grade of view on laryngoscopy and the base speciality/grade of the operator performing intubation. MERIT teams were activated 1619 times, attending scene in 1029 cases. RSI was performed 142 times (13.80% of scene attendances). There was one recorded case of failure to intubate requiring insertion of a supraglottic airway device (0.70%). In over a third of RSI cases, CCPs performed laryngoscopy and intubation (n=53, 37.32%). Proficiency of obtaining Grade I view at laryngoscopy was similar for physicians (74.70%) and CCPs (77.36%). Intubation was successful at the first attempt in over 90% of cases. This study demonstrates that operation within a system that provides high levels of exposure, underpinned by comprehensive and robust training and governance frameworks, promotes levels of performance in successful prehospital RSI regardless of base speciality or profession. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Ear trauma.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Kylee; Fralich, Laura; Stevenson, J Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Understanding basic ear anatomy and function allows an examiner to quickly and accurately identify at-risk structures in patients with head and ear trauma. External ear trauma (ie, hematoma or laceration) should be promptly treated with appropriate injury-specific techniques. Tympanic membrane injuries have multiple mechanisms and can often be conservatively treated. Temporal bone fractures are a common cause of ear trauma and can be life threatening. Facial nerve injuries and hearing loss can occur in ear trauma.

  18. The utility of Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) clinical shock grading in assessment of trauma.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Luke D; Roncal, Sue; Leonard, Elizabeth; Stack, Amanda; Dinh, Michael M; Byrne, Christopher M; Petchell, Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    Acute haemorrhage is a major contributor to trauma related morbidity and mortality. Quantifying blood loss acutely and accurately is a difficult task and no currently accepted standard exists. We introduce a simple shock grading tool incorporating vital signs, fluid response and estimated blood loss to describe shock grade during the primary survey based on the original Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) classification. We performed a prospective cohort study of all trauma patients admitted to our emergency room over a 1-year period to evaluate the utility of this tool for emergency physicians to detect significant haemorrhage in the trauma patient. Shock grades were prospectively assigned to patients by the trauma team as part of the primary survey, and followed up to assess for outcomes. The primary outcome was a composite endpoint of clinical, radiological and operative findings consistent with significant haemorrhage. Data were analysed using linear and logistic regression to assess predictive ability and receiver operator characteristic curve to assess overall diagnostic accuracy. The overall sensitivity of the shock grading tool was 83%. The diagnostic accuracy based on area under receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.86. There was also a significant association between increasing shock grade and both injury severity score (β coefficient 7.0, p<0.001, 95% CI 6.2 to 7.8) and the presence of significant haemorrhage (OR 5.1, p<0.001, 95% CI 3.6 to 7.3). We conclude that a simple ATLS based clinical tool that objectively categorises haemorrhagic shock is a useful part of the primary survey of the trauma patient, although a larger study with higher statistical power is required to evaluate this conclusion further. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. [Sports and genitourinary traumas].

    PubMed

    Sacco, E; Marangi, F; Pinto, F; D'Addessi, A; Racioppi, M; Gulino, G; Volpe, A; Gardi, M; Bassi, P F

    2010-01-01

    Statistical data referring to sports-related traumas of the urinary tract are quite scarce; nevertheless, it is possible to draw general data on the relationship between sports and urological traumas. Literature review of peer-reviewed articles published by May 2009. Urological traumas account for about 10% of all traumas, and about 13% of them is sports-related. Genitourinary traumas are among the most common cause of abdominal injuries in sports. Blunt injuries are more common than penetrating ones and renal injuries are by far the most common, followed by testicular injuries; ureters, bladder and penis injuries are much more infrequent. Considering chronic microtraumas, injuries of bulbar urethra are also common in sports that involve riding. Overall, the incidence of genitourinary trauma due to sports is low. Renal traumas in sports injuries usually consist of grade I-II lesions and usually do not require surgical treatment. Cycling is the sporting activity most commonly associated with genitourinary injuries, followed by winter sports, horse riding and contact/collision sports. Literature data suggest that significant injuries are rare also in athletes with only one testicle or kidney. General preventive measures against sport-related injuries, along with the use of protective cups for male external genitalia, are generally sufficient to reduce the incidence of urogenital trauma. Overall, studies show that urogenital injuries are uncommon in team and individual sports, and that most of them are low-grade injuries. Participation in sports that involve the potential for contact or collision needs to be carefully assessed in the athletes with only one testicle or kidney, even though urogenital injuries should not preclude sports participation to an appropriately informed and counseled patient. Further research is needed to acquire more knowledge on genitourinary injuries according to age, sports type and technical skill.

  20. Systemic trauma.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering.

  1. Trauma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Haywood L

    2009-07-01

    Acute traumatic injury during pregnancy is a significant contributor to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the United States. Motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of injury-related maternal death, followed by violence and assault. Lack of seat belts or other restraints increases the risks of both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends proper seat belt use by all pregnant women and screening for domestic abuse. Maternal injury and death from physical abuse is prevalent, and in some communities, homicide is a major cause of pregnancy-associated maternal death. Blunt trauma most often occurs as a result of motor vehicle accidents, whereas penetrating trauma results from gunshots or stabbings. Blunt trauma to the abdomen increases the risk for placental abruption, and direct fetal injury is more likely with penetrating trauma. Management strategies in acute maternal trauma must focus on a thorough assessment of the mother. A coordinated team effort that includes the obstetrician is essential to ensure optimal maternal and fetal outcomes. Imaging studies should not be delayed because of concerns of fetal radiation exposure, because the risk is minimal with usual imaging procedures, especially in mid-to-late pregnancy. The obstetrician should serve in a consultative role if nonobstetric surgical care is required and must also be prepared to intervene on behalf of the mother and the fetus if trauma care is compromised by the pregnancy. Perimortem cesarean delivery should be considered early in the resuscitation of a pregnant trauma victim, especially when fetal viability is a concern. Once the mother is stabilized in the emergency setting, she should be transported for appropriate maternal and fetal observation until both mother and fetus are clear of danger. It is essential that the clinician and staff maintain thorough and accurate documentation and recording of the chronology of

  2. Team Participation in Environmental Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrave, A. J.

    1969-01-01

    Describes experiments on the nutrition of weevils suitable for student teams, each team replicating the same experiment or experiments. Gives step by step experimental procedures and useful background information on weevils. Designed to introduce students to teamwork in science. (EB)

  3. Does Size and Location of the Vital Signs Monitor Matter? A Study of Two Trauma Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S.

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of an observational study in which we compared how the size and location of the vital signs monitor impact teamwork at two trauma centers. Our observations focused on three factors: information exchange, situational awareness, and ergonomic issues. We found that the smaller display was difficult to view and required more team communication and workarounds, such as periodic verbal reports. The larger and closer display, although accessible to more team members, did not uniformly improve team’s situational awareness because vital signals were not verbalized and the monitor was often ignored. We suggest introducing multiple larger and closer displays, while keeping the practice of periodic verbal reporting. PMID:21347070

  4. Finnish Trauma Audit 2004: current state of trauma management in Finnish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Handolin, L; Leppäniemi, A; Vihtonen, K; Lakovaara, M; Lindahl, J

    2006-07-01

    There is great variation in the organisation of trauma care in European countries. The state of trauma care in Finnish hospitals has not been appropriately reviewed in the past. The aim of the present study conducted by the Finnish Trauma Association (FTA) was to assess the number of Finnish hospitals admitting severe trauma patients, and to evaluate the organisation and training of trauma care in those hospitals. In 2004, a telephone survey to all the Finnish hospitals was conducted, and information on the number of severe trauma patients treated per month, the organisation of acute trauma care, and the existence of multidisciplinary trauma care training was collected. Thirty-six Finnish hospitals admitted trauma patients. The range of estimated number of severely injured trauma patients treated in individual hospitals per month varied from 0.5 to 12, resulting in an estimated number of 1000-1300 patients with severe trauma treated in Finland every year (19-25/100.000 inhabitants). About 20% of the hospitals had a trauma team, and 25% had a systematic trauma education program. Only one hospital had established multidisciplinary and systematic trauma team training. The case load of severe trauma patients is low in most Finnish hospitals making it difficult to obtain and maintain sufficient experience. Too many hospitals admit too few patients, and only a few hospitals have been working on updating their trauma management protocols and education. There is an obvious need for leadership, discussion, legislation and initiatives by the professional organisations and the government to establish a modern trauma system in Finland.

  5. Childhood Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falasca, Tony; Caulfield, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes some classic causes of trauma and symptoms that can result when a child has been traumatized. Lists several factors that effect the degree to which a child is affected by trauma. Categories a wide range of behaviors displayed by the victims into three groups: affect, memories, and behaviors. Discusses various considerations when…

  6. Childhood Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falasca, Tony; Caulfield, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes some classic causes of trauma and symptoms that can result when a child has been traumatized. Lists several factors that effect the degree to which a child is affected by trauma. Categories a wide range of behaviors displayed by the victims into three groups: affect, memories, and behaviors. Discusses various considerations when…

  7. Men and Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment ... Overview Types of Trauma Trauma Basics Disaster and Terrorism Military Trauma Violence & other Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview ...

  8. Common Reactions After Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment ... Overview Types of Trauma Trauma Basics Disaster and Terrorism Military Trauma Violence & other Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview ...

  9. Reaching Out: Team AETHER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-01-01

    Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Daytona Beach Campus Lunabotics Team took the opportunity to share the love of space, engineering and technology through the educational outreach portion of the competition. Through visits to elementary schools and high schools, and through support of science fairs and robotics competitions, younger generations were introduced to space, engineering and robotics. This report documents the outreach activities of team Aether.

  10. [Facial trauma and multiple trauma].

    PubMed

    Corre, Pierre; Arzul, Ludovic; Khonsari, Roman Hossein; Mercier, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    The human face contains the sense organs and is responsible for essential functions: swallowing, chewing, speech, breathing and communication. It is also and most importantly the seat of a person's identity. Multiple trauma adds a life-threatening dimension to the physical and psychological impact of a facial trauma.

  11. Trauma, narcissism and the two attractors in trauma.

    PubMed

    Gerzi, Shmuel

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, the author sets out to distinguish anew between two concepts that have become sorely entangled--'trauma' and 'narcissism'. Defining 'narcissism' in terms of an interaction between the selfobject and the self that maintains a protective shield, and 'trauma' as attacks on this protective shield, perpetrated by bad objects, he introduces two attractors present in trauma--'the hole attractor' and the structure enveloping it, 'the narcissistic envelope'. The hole attractor pulls the trauma patient, like a 'black hole', into a realm of emotional void, of hole object transference, devoid of memories and where often in an analyst's countertransference there are no reverberations of the trauma patient's experience. In the narcissistic envelope, on the other hand, motion, the life and death drive and fragments of memory do survive. Based on the author's own clinical experience with Holocaust survivors, and on secondary sources, the paper concludes with some clinical implications that take the two attractors into account.

  12. The patient safety culture as perceived by staff at two different emergency departments before and after introducing a flow-oriented working model with team triage and lean principles: a repeated cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Burström, Lena; Letterstål, Anna; Engström, Marie-Louise; Berglund, Anders; Enlund, Mats

    2014-07-09

    Patient safety is of the utmost importance in health care. The patient safety culture in an institution has great impact on patient safety. To enhance patient safety and to design strategies to reduce medical injuries, there is a current focus on measuring the patient safety culture. The aim of the present study was to describe the patient safety culture in an ED at two different hospitals before and after a Quality improvement (QI) project that was aimed to enhance patient safety. A repeated cross-sectional design, using the Hospital Survey On Patient Safety Culture questionnaire before and after a quality improvement project in two emergency departments at a county hospital and a university hospital. The questionnaire was developed to obtain a better understanding of the patient safety culture of an entire hospital or of specific departments. The Swedish version has 51 questions and 15 dimensions. At the county hospital, a difference between baseline and follow-up was observed in three dimensions. For two of these dimensions, Team-work within hospital and Communication openness, a higher score was measured at the follow-up. At the university hospital, a higher score was measured at follow-up for the two dimensions Team-work across hospital units and Team-work within hospital. The result showed changes in the self-estimated patient safety culture, mainly regarding team-work and communication openness. Most of the improvements at follow-up were seen by physicians, and mainly at the county hospital.

  13. Management of Pediatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Injury is still the number 1 killer of children ages 1 to 18 years in the United States (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/children.htm). Children who sustain injuries with resulting disabilities incur significant costs not only for their health care but also for productivity lost to the economy. The families of children who survive childhood injury with disability face years of emotional and financial hardship, along with a significant societal burden. The entire process of managing childhood injury is enormously complex and varies by region. Only the comprehensive cooperation of a broadly diverse trauma team will have a significant effect on improving the care of injured children.

  14. Enabling Team Learning in Healthcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boak, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a study of learning processes within 35 healthcare therapy teams that took action to improve their services. The published research on team learning is introduced, and the paper suggests it is an activity that has similarities with action research and with those forms of action learning where teams address collective…

  15. Enabling Team Learning in Healthcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boak, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a study of learning processes within 35 healthcare therapy teams that took action to improve their services. The published research on team learning is introduced, and the paper suggests it is an activity that has similarities with action research and with those forms of action learning where teams address collective…

  16. Team Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, David C.

    1963-01-01

    A study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of principals in structuring teaching teams; to assess background and personality characteristics appearing essential to successful individual and team performance; and to select personality factor scores which would predict individual and team success. Subjects were 31 teaching teams (99…

  17. A proposed algorithm for multimodal liver trauma management from a surgical trauma audit in a western European trauma center.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, S; Sibilio, A; Coniglio, C; Bianchi, E; Biscardi, A; Villani, S; Gordini, G; Tugnoli, G

    2014-11-01

    Management of liver trauma is challenging and may vary widely given the heterogeneity of liver injuries' anatomical configuration, the hemodynamic status, the settings and resources available. Perhaps the use of non-operative management (NOM) may have potential drawbacks and the role of damage control surgery (DCS) and angioembolization represents a major evolving concept.1 Most severe liver trauma in polytrauma patients accounts for a significant morbidity and mortality. Major liver trauma with extensive parenchymal injury and uncontrollable bleeding is therefore a challenge for the trauma team. However a safe and effective surgical hemostasis and a carefully planned multidisciplinary approach can improve the outcome of severe liver trauma. The technique of perihepatic packing, according to DCS approach, is often required to achieve fast, early and effective control of hemorrhage in the highest grades of liver trauma and in unstable patients. A systematic and standardized technique of perihepatic packing may contribute to improve hemostatic efficacy and overall outcomes if wisely combined in a stepwise "sandwich" multimodal approach. DCS philosophy evolved alongside with damage control resuscitation (DCR) in the management of trauma patients, requiring close interaction between surgery and resuscitation. Therefore, as a result of a combined surgical and critical care clinical audit activity in our western European trauma center, a practical algorithm for multimodal sequential management of liver trauma has been developed based on a historical cohort of 253 liver trauma patients and subsequently validated on a prospective cohort of 135 patients in the period 2010-2013.

  18. Acceptability and implementation of debriefings after trauma resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gina M; Hervey, Ashley M; Basham-Saif, Angela; Parsons, Deanna; Acuna, David L; Lippoldt, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Postresuscitation debriefings allow team members to reflect on performance and discuss areas for improvement. Pre-/postsurveys of trauma team members (physicians, mid-level practitioners, technicians, pharmacists, and nurses) were administered to evaluate the acceptability of debriefings and self-perceptions after multidisciplinary trauma resuscitations. After a 3-month trial period, improvements were observed in perceptions of psychological and patient safety, role on team, team communication, and acceptability of the debriefing initiative. Regrouping for a debriefing requires organizational change, which may be more easily assimilated if team members recognize the potential for process improvement and feel confident about success.

  19. Telematics in acute trauma care.

    PubMed

    Juhra, C; Vordemvenne, T; Hartensuer, R; Uckert, F; Raschke, M J

    2009-01-01

    Each year, 20,000 people in Germany die because of a traffic accident. Altogether, yearly productivity loss caused by these injuries is estimated to be around 5 billion Euros. International and national studies revealed the trauma center level of the primary hospital as the major predictor for trauma related mortality. In 2006 the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU) called its members to form regionally based networks for the exchange of data among hospitals engaged in trauma care. In April 2008 the north-west region of Germany with 49 hospitals, three hospitals in the Netherlands, and local emergency services founded the "TraumaNetwork NorthWest (TNNW). The major goals of the TNNW are: 1) to shorten the time between accident and admission to the appropriate hospital, 2) to create effective means of communication, and 3) to implement common pre- and in-hospital standards for trauma care. Since the needed application software is not commercially available, a team of computer and medical specialists has been formed for its development. Once the software is in place, a pre- and post-analysis will be performed to study the consequences of the application on transportation time and injury-related mortality within the region. The project is recognized as a pilot project by the DGU and if it is successful is meant to be adapted across Germany.

  20. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  1. The application of human engineering interventions reduces ventilator-associated pneumonia in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cachecho, Riad; Dobkin, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) increases mortality and length of stay and escalates the cost of care. Our institution embarked on a project to eradicate VAP. We compared the outcome of trauma patients admitted in period 1 (P1) (January 2005 to December 2006) and period 2 (P2) (January 2006 to December 2009). Team building, culture change, and the ventilator bundle were introduced and modified during P1 and were fully implemented in P2. Outcome data were calculated for both periods. The Center for Disease Control VAP definition was used. The VAP rate was calculated as VAP/1,000 ventilator days. Chi-square and t test statistics were used as appropriate. Data were considered statistically significant if p ≤ 0.05. In total, 299 trauma patients were admitted in P1 and 655 in P2. The two groups were identical in age, Injury Severity Score, mortality, and non-VAP. There was a trend toward a shorter length of stay in P2 (p = 0.06). The days on ventilator was significantly shorter in P2 compared with P1 (p = 0.05). The VAP rate dropped significantly from 7.9/1,000 in P1 to 1.0/1,000 in P2 (p = 0.04). The Appropriate Care Measure score increased from 45% in early P1 to 91% in late P2 (p = 0.0001). The application of the VAP bundle, a checklist, and the multidisciplinary team approach resulted in significant improvement of VAP in all trauma patients admitted to the shock trauma unit and to the decrease in days on ventilator in the trauma patients. This intervention did not affect mortality or the rate of non-VAP in the trauma patients. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  2. Tailbone trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slippery surfaces, such as around a swimming pool. Dress in shoes with good tread or slip-resistant ... D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Tailbone Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  3. Team Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, David

    1999-01-01

    Explains how a team cleaning approach can be cost-effective and efficient means of school maintenance. Assigning staffing responsibilities and work schedules are addressed and the advantages of using a team system are explained. (GR)

  4. Teamwork training improves the clinical care of trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Capella, Jeannette; Smith, Stephen; Philp, Allan; Putnam, Tyler; Gilbert, Carol; Fry, William; Harvey, Ellen; Wright, Andi; Henderson, Krista; Baker, David; Ranson, Sonya; Remine, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    We investigated these questions: Does formal team training improve team behaviors in the trauma resuscitation bay? If yes, then does improved teamwork lead to more efficiency in the trauma bay and/or improved clinical outcomes? This intervention study used a pretraining/posttraining design. The intervention was TeamSTEPPS augmented by simulation. The evaluation instrument, which was the Trauma Team Performance Observation Tool (TPOT), was used by trained evaluators to assess teams' performance during trauma resuscitations. From November 2008 to February 2009, a convenience sample (n = 33) of trauma resuscitations was evaluated. From February to April 2009, team training was conducted. From May to July 2009, another sample (n = 40) of resuscitations were evaluated. Clinical data were gathered from our trauma registry. The clinical parameters included time from arrival to computed tomography (CT) scanner, arrival to intubation, arrival to operating room, arrival to Focused Assessment Sonography in Trauma (FAST) examination, time in emergency department (ED), hospital length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit LOS, complications, and mortality. Comparing pretraining and posttraining resuscitations, we calculated means, standard deviations, and p values for teamwork ratings and clinical parameters, and we determined significance using the independent samples t-test. Level I Trauma Center. The trauma team included surgery residents, faculty, and nurses. Our trauma team showed significant improvement in all teamwork domain ratings and overall ratings from pretraining to posttraining-leadership (2.87-3.46, p = 0.003), situation monitoring (3.30-3.91, p = 0.009), mutual support (3.40-3.96, p = 0.004), communication (2.90-3.46, p = 0.001), and overall (3.12-3.70, p < 0.001). The times from arrival to the CT scanner (26.4-22.1 minutes, p = 0.005), endotracheal intubation (10.1-6.6 minutes, p = 0.49) and the operating room (130.1-94.5 minutes, p = 0.021) were decreased

  5. Team Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John

    Chapter 5 of a volume on school leadership, this chapter reviews the literature to define and explain management teams and to describe several successful management team arrangements. The author begins by noting that team management has recently enjoyed a resurgence as a response to collective negotiations, but beyond this function can have value…

  6. Trauma-Informed Care in the Massachusetts Child Trauma Project.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jessica Dym; Barto, Beth; Griffin, Jessica L; Fraser, Jenifer Goldman; Hodgdon, Hilary; Bodian, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    Child maltreatment is a serious public health concern, and its detrimental effects can be compounded by traumatic experiences associated with the child welfare (CW) system. Trauma-informed care (TIC) is a promising strategy for addressing traumatized children's needs, but research on the impact of TIC in CW is limited. This study examines initial findings of the Massachusetts Child Trauma Project, a statewide TIC initiative in the CW system and mental health network. After 1 year of implementation, Trauma-Informed Leadership Teams in CW offices emerged as key structures for TIC systems integration, and mental health providers' participation in evidence-based treatment (EBT) learning collaboratives was linked to improvements in trauma-informed individual and agency practices. After approximately 6 months of EBT treatment, children had fewer posttraumatic symptoms and behavior problems compared to baseline. Barriers to TIC that emerged included scarce resources for trauma-related work in the CW agency and few mental providers providing EBTs to young children. Future research might explore variations in TIC across service system components as well as the potential for differential effects across EBT models disseminated through TIC. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Budassi, S A

    1978-09-01

    For any patient with obvious or suspected chest trauma, one must first assure an adequate airway and adequate ventilation. One should never hesitate to administer oxygen to a victim with a chest injury. The nurse should be concerned with adequate circulation--this may mean the administration of intravenous fluids, specifically volume expanders, via large-bore cannulae. Any obvious open chest wound should be sealed, and any fractures should be splinted. These patients should be rapidly transported to the nearest Emergency Department capable of handling this type of injury. The majority of patients who arrive in the Emergency Department following blunt or penetrating trauma should be considered to be in critical condition until proven otherwise. On presentation, it is essential to recognize those signs, symptoms, and laboratory values that identify the patient's condition as life-threatening. Simple recognition of these signs and symptoms and early appropriate intervention may alter an otherwise fatal outcome.

  8. Dentoalveolar trauma.

    PubMed

    Olynik, Christopher R; Gray, Austin; Sinada, Ghassan G

    2013-10-01

    Dentoalveolar injuries are an important and common component of craniomaxillofacial trauma. The dentition serves as a vertical buttress of the face and fractures to this area may result in malalignment of facial subunits. Furthermore, the dentition is succedaneous with 3 phases-primary dentition, mixed dentition, and permanent dentition-mandating different treatment protocols. This article is written for nondental providers to diagnose and treat dentoalveolar injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Imaging techniques in modern trauma diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Eichler, K; Marzi, I; Wutzler, S; Zacharowski, K; Frellessen, C

    2017-08-17

    Modern trauma room management requires interdisciplinary teamwork and synchronous communication between a team of anaesthesists, surgeons and radiologists. As the length of stay in the trauma room influences morbidity and mortality of a severely injured person, optimizing time is one of the main targets. With the direct involvement of modern imaging techniques the injuries caused by trauma should be detected within a very short period of time in order to enable a priority-orientated treatment. Radiology influences structure and process quality, management and development of trauma room algorithms regarding the use of imaging techniques. For the individual case interventional therapy methods can be added. Based on current data and on the Frankfurt experience the current diagnostic concepts of trauma diagnostics are presented.

  10. [Imaging techniques in modern trauma diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Eichler, K; Marzi, I; Wutzler, S; Zacharowski, K; Frellessen, C

    2017-05-01

    Modern trauma room management requires interdisciplinary teamwork and synchronous communication between a team of anaesthesists, surgeons and radiologists. As the length of stay in the trauma room influences morbidity and mortality of a severely injured person, optimizing time is one of the main targets. With the direct involvement of modern imaging techniques the injuries caused by trauma should be detected within a very short period of time in order to enable a priority-orientated treatment. Radiology influences structure and process quality, management and development of trauma room algorithms regarding the use of imaging techniques. For the individual case interventional therapy methods can be added. Based on current data and on the Frankfurt experience the current diagnostic concepts of trauma diagnostics are presented.

  11. [Imaging techniques in modern trauma diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Eichler, K; Marzi, I; Wutzler, S; Zacharowski, K; Frellessen, C

    2017-09-21

    Modern trauma room management requires interdisciplinary teamwork and synchronous communication between a team of anaesthesists, surgeons and radiologists. As the length of stay in the trauma room influences morbidity and mortality of a severely injured person, optimizing time is one of the main targets. With the direct involvement of modern imaging techniques the injuries caused by trauma should be detected within a very short period of time in order to enable a priority-orientated treatment. Radiology influences structure and process quality, management and development of trauma room algorithms regarding the use of imaging techniques. For the individual case interventional therapy methods can be added. Based on current data and on the Frankfurt experience the current diagnostic concepts of trauma diagnostics are presented.

  12. Vascular Radiology in Trauma: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Anthony A.

    2004-03-15

    It's been 30 years since an endovascular technique to control traumatic hemorrhage was first described. Despite major technical advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic technology, and a great deal of experience since then, endovascular techniques are rarely considered as part of frontline management for vascular trauma. This review considers the literature and calls for better planning and implementation of diagnostic and image=guided therapeutic facilities. Endovascular techniques should be an essential part of vascular trauma management along with endovascular specialists, partners in trauma teams.

  13. Trauma advanced practice nurses: implementing the role.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kathleen D; Molitor-Kirsch, Shirley; Elgart, Heidi; Ruffolo, Daria C; Sicoutris, Corinna; Meredith, Denise

    2004-01-01

    The need for advanced practice nurses (APN) has expanded over the past several decades as a result of the changing healthcare environment. Increased patient acuity and decreased resident work hours have lead to a need for additional clinical expertise at the bedside. APNs are becoming an integral part of the acute care delivery team in many trauma programs and intensive care units. To date little has been published regarding the role of the APN in Trauma Centers. This article outlines the wide variety of responsibilities and services provided by a select group of nurse practitioners who work in trauma centers throughout the United States.

  14. Preparing Global Trauma Nurses for Leadership Roles in Global Trauma Systems.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Sol Angelica; Lang, Richard W; Falcon, Lisa; Garces-King, Jasmine; Willard, Suzanne; Peck, Gregory L

    Trauma leads to 5.7 million annual deaths globally, accounting for 25%-33% of global unintentional deaths and 90% of the global trauma burden in low- and middle-income countries. The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery and the World Health Organization assert that emergent and essential surgical capacity building and trauma system improvement are essential to address the global burden of trauma. In response, the Rutgers Global Surgery program, the School of Nursing and Medicine, and the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital faculty collaborated in the first Interprofessional Models in Global Injury Care and Education Symposium in June 2016. This 2-week symposium combined lectures, high-fidelity simulation, small group workshops, site visits to Level I trauma centers, and a 1-day training course from the Panamerican Trauma Society. The aim was to introduce global trauma nurses to trauma leadership and trauma system development. After completing the symposium, 10 nurses from China, Colombia, Kenya, Puerto Rico, and Uruguay were surveyed. Overall, 88.8% of participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the program and 100% stated being very satisfied with trauma lectures. Symposia, such as that developed and offered by Rutgers University, prepare nurses to address trauma within system-based care and facilitate trauma nursing leadership in their respective countries.

  15. Team Development of Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyoung

    2004-01-01

    Advanced technologies, globalization, the competitiveness of business, flexible working practices, and other rapid changes in the nature of work have all led to the booming of "virtual teams." This paper will provide an overview of virtual teams, including a description of their emergence, a definition and typology of the term "virtual team," an…

  16. A novel prospective approach to evaluate trauma recidivism: the concept of the past trauma history.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Andrew M; Como, John J; Greene, Gregory; Laskey, Sara L; Claridge, Jeffrey A

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and burden of trauma recidivism at a regional Level 1 trauma center by incorporating the concept of the past trauma history (PTHx) into the general trauma history. All trauma patients who met prehospital trauma criteria and activated the trauma team during a 13-month period were asked about their PTHx, that is, their history of injury in the previous 5 years. A recidivist presented more than once for separate severe injuries. Recurrent recidivists presented multiple times during the study period. Of the 4,971 trauma activations during the study period, 1,246 (25.2%) were identified as recidivists. Recidivists were 75% male, 62% white, 36% unemployed, 26% uninsured, and 90% unmarried. The recidivism rate among admitted patients was 23.4% compared with 29.3% in those discharged from the emergency department. The highest recidivism rates were noted in patients who reported alcohol or illegal drug use on the day of injury and in victims of interpersonal violence (IPV), defined as those who sustained gunshot wounds, stab wounds, or assaults, Those involved in IPV were more likely to have been involved in IPV at the previous trauma than those with other trauma mechanisms. Key risk factors for recidivism among all patients were male sex and single marital status. Seventy-three patients (1.5%) were recurrent recidivists, representing 157 unique encounters. This is the highest trauma recidivism rate reported on a large population of all consecutive trauma activations at a regional Level 1 trauma center. These data illustrate the tremendous burden of recidivism in the modern era, more than previously recognized. Efforts specifically targeting those involved in IPV may reduce recidivism rates. Incorporating the concept of the PTHx into the general history of the trauma patient is feasible and provides valuable information to the provider. Prognostic study, level II.

  17. Waiting for surgery after orthopaedic trauma.

    PubMed

    Beringer, Antonia; Hagan, Liz; Goodman, Hannah

    2009-04-01

    Nursing staff on a paediatric surgical ward were concerned about delays experienced by children waiting to go to theatre following orthopaedic trauma, and their families. A facilitated action research approach was used which involved describing the issue, gathering information from a range of sources and introducing changes to the process of care. A flowchart was developed to clarify the stages and the staff involved in admitting a child with orthopaedic trauma for surgery. A white board was introduced to record information on 'trauma' patients. A facilitated action research process offers a flexible and accessible way for staff to develop a range of transferable research and change management skills.

  18. Lightweight Trauma Module - LTM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Current patient movement items (PMI) supporting the military's Critical Care Air Transport Team (CCATT) mission as well as the Crew Health Care System for space (CHeCS) have significant limitations: size, weight, battery duration, and dated clinical technology. The LTM is a small, 20 lb., system integrating diagnostic and therapeutic clinical capabilities along with onboard data management, communication services and automated care algorithms to meet new Aeromedical Evacuation requirements. The Lightweight Trauma Module is an Impact Instrumentation, Inc. project with strong Industry, DoD, NASA, and Academia partnerships aimed at developing the next generation of smart and rugged critical care tools for hazardous environments ranging from the battlefield to space exploration. The LTM is a combination ventilator/critical care monitor/therapeutic system with integrated automatic control systems. Additional capabilities are provided with small external modules.

  19. Teams, Communities and Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krainer, Konrad

    2003-01-01

    Sketches the background of the issue "Teams, Communities and Networks", reflects the increasing importance of its theme, and introduces four contributions that include two research papers, one paper dedicated to "Teacher Education Around the World", and a book review. (Author/KHR)

  20. Team cohesiveness, team size and team performance in team-based learning teams.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Britta M; Haidet, Paul; Borges, Nicole J; Carchedi, Lisa R; Roman, Brenda J B; Townsend, Mark H; Butler, Agata P; Swanson, David B; Anderson, Michael P; Levine, Ruth E

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among variables associated with teams in team-based learning (TBL) settings and team outcomes. We administered the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Psychiatry Subject Test first to individuals and then to teams of Year three students at four medical schools that used TBL in their psychiatry core clerkships. Team cohesion was analysed using the Team Performance Scale (TPS). Bivariate correlation and linear regression analysis were used to analyse the relationships among team-level variables (mean individual TPS scores for each team, mean individual NBME scores of teams, team size, rotation and gender make-up) and team NBME test scores. A hierarchical linear model was used to test the effects of individual TPS and individual NBME test scores within each team, as well as the effects of the team-level variables of team size, team rotation and gender on team NBME test scores. Individual NBME test and TPS scores were nested within teams and treated as subsampling units. Individual NBME test scores and individual TPS scores were positively and statistically significantly (p < 0.01) associated with team NBME test scores, when team rotation, team size and gender make-up were controlled for. Higher team NBME test scores were associated with teams rotating later in the year and larger teams (p < 0.01). Gender make-up was not significantly associated. The results of an NBME Psychiatry Subject Test administered to TBL teams at four medical schools suggest that larger teams on later rotations score higher on a team NBME test. Individual NBME test scores and team cohesion were positively and significantly associated with team NBME test scores. These results suggest the need for additional studies focusing on team outcomes, team cohesion, team size, rotation and other factors as they relate to the effective and efficient performance of TBL teams in health science education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. International trauma teleconference: evaluating trauma care and facilitating quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Parra, Michael W; Castillo, Roberto C; Rodas, Edgar B; Suarez-Becerra, Jose M; Puentes-Manosalva, Fabian E; Wendt, Luke M

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation, development, and implementation of trauma systems in Latin America are challenging undertakings as no model is currently in place that can be easily replicated throughout the region. The use of teleconferencing has been essential in overcoming other challenges in the medical field and improving medical care. This article describes the use of international videoconferencing in the field of trauma and critical care as a tool to evaluate differences in care based on local resources, as well as facilitating quality improvement and system development in Latin America. In February 2009, the International Trauma and Critical Care Improvement Project was created and held monthly teleconferences between U.S. trauma surgeons and Latin American general surgeons, emergency physicians, and intensivists. In-depth discussions and prospective evaluations of each case presented were conducted by all participants based on resources available. Care rendered was divided in four stages: (1) pre-hospital setting, (2) emergency room or trauma room, (3) operating room, and (4) subsequent postoperative care. Furthermore, the participating institutions completed an electronic survey of trauma resources based on World Health Organization/International Association for Trauma and Surgical Intensive Care guidelines. During a 17-month period, 15 cases in total were presented from a Level I and a Level II U.S. hospital (n=3) and five Latin American hospitals (n=12). Presentations followed the Advanced Trauma Life Support sequence in all U.S. cases but in only 3 of the 12 Latin American cases. The following deficiencies were observed in cases presented from Latin America: pre-hospital communication was nonexistent in all cases; pre-hospital services were absent in 60% of cases presented; lack of trauma team structure was evident in the emergency departments; during the initial evaluation and resuscitation, the Advanced Trauma Life Support protocol was followed one time and the Clinical

  2. Comparison of quality control for trauma management between Western and Eastern European trauma center.

    PubMed

    Calderale, Stefano Massimiliano; Sandru, Raluca; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone; Beuran, Mircea; Ribaldi, Sergio; Coletti, Massimo; Gambale, Giorgio; Paun, Sorin; Russo, Livio; Baldoni, Franco

    2008-11-19

    Quality control of trauma care is essential to define the effectiveness of trauma center and trauma system. To identify the troublesome issues of the system is the first step for validation of the focused customized solutions. This is a comparative study of two level I trauma centers in Italy and Romania and it has been designed to give an overview of the entire trauma care program adopted in these two countries. This study was aimed to use the results as the basis for recommending and planning changes in the two trauma systems for a better trauma care. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 182 major trauma patients treated in the two hospitals included in the study, between January and June 2002. Every case was analyzed according to the recommended minimal audit filters for trauma quality assurance by The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACSCOT). Satisfactory yields have been reached in both centers for the management of head and abdominal trauma, airway management, Emergency Department length of stay and early diagnosis and treatment. The main significant differences between the two centers were in the patients' transfers, the leadership of trauma team and the patients' outcome. The main concerns have been in the surgical treatment of fractures, the outcome and the lacking of documentation. The analyzed hospitals are classified as Level I trauma center and are within the group of the highest quality level centers in their own countries. Nevertheless, both of them experience major lacks and for few audit filters do not reach the mmum standard requirements of ACS Audit Filters. The differences between the western and the eastern European center were slight. The parameters not reaching the minimum requirements are probably occurring even more often in suburban settings.

  3. Yea, Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinn, Fauneil J.; Weir, Sybil B.

    1984-01-01

    Four problems in higher education are identified: hardening curriculum, graying faculty, shrinking budget, and disappearing students. Team teaching is suggested as one solution. A conceptual framework for types of team teaching is presented and practical suggestions to those who want to work within that framework are provided. (Author/MLW)

  4. Yea, Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinn, Fauneil J.; Weir, Sybil B.

    1984-01-01

    Four problems in higher education are identified: hardening curriculum, graying faculty, shrinking budget, and disappearing students. Team teaching is suggested as one solution. A conceptual framework for types of team teaching is presented and practical suggestions to those who want to work within that framework are provided. (Author/MLW)

  5. Team Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Recounts one Montessori teacher's experience team teaching in a secondary Montessori classroom. Illustrates how a conflict over decision making with a co-teacher helped to create better relationships with students in the classroom and better communication on the teaching team. Contends that resolving issues of conflict between teachers is vital…

  6. Team Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Experience shows that teamwork produces powerful results. Working in a team environment, however, presents its own set of challenges. This handbook provides U.S. Department of Education managers and employees with guidance to develop high-performing teams. Based on input from agency employees throughout the country, the handbook was designed to…

  7. Self-Harm and Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment ... Overview Types of Trauma Trauma Basics Disaster and Terrorism Military Trauma Violence & other Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview ...

  8. Teamwork improvement in emergency trauma departments

    PubMed Central

    Khademian, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Tabei, Seyed Ziaadin; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Abbasi, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interprofessional teamwork is considered as the key to improve the quality of patient management in critical settings such as trauma emergency departments, but it is not fully conceptualized in these areas to guide practice. The aim of this article is to explore interprofessional teamwork and its improvement strategies in trauma emergency departments. Materials and Methods: Participants of this qualitative study consisted of 11 nurses and 6 supervisors recruited from the emergency departments of a newly established trauma center using purposive sampling. Data were generated using two focus group and six in-depth individual interviews, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Interprofessional teamwork attributes and improvement strategies were emerged in three main themes related to team, context, and goal. These were categorized as the effective presence of team members, role definition in team framework, managerial and physical context, effective patient management, and overcoming competing goals Conclusions: Interprofessional teamwork in trauma emergency departments is explained as interdependence of team, context, and goal; so, it may be improved by strengthening these themes. The findings also provide a basis to evaluate, teach, and do research on teamwork. PMID:24403932

  9. Trauma registrar training: integrating registry functions into the trauma program--Part 2.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, S

    1999-01-01

    Effective health-information management is heavily reliant upon the data-collection process of the health care program. This is also true in trauma-care systems, where healthcare providers have come to rely on timely access to complete and accurate information to support many critical functions of a trauma program. The process by which data are collected and analyzed deserves constant attention and reassessment. Data obtained in reports and analyses are only as accurate as the data abstraction and validation processes allow. The University of Pennsylvania Health System Trauma Network recognizes this, and as a result, developed this training and orientation guideline. This guideline supports the importance of the registry role in the overall trauma program, but most importantly, it fosters and supports a team approach to data collection, which in our experience has allowed us to develop and maintain trauma registry databases which provides valid, useful and current information for all.

  10. The changing perspectives of trauma care. The Sinkler Memorial Lecture.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    Trauma and the management of injuries have changed considerably over the past century. A sound understanding of the factors that generate injuries and sophisticated systems that can be accessed immediately are now in place in most of the United States. The concept of a team approach to the management of multiple system injuries using specialists from all disciplines has resulted in the reduction of morbidity and mortality. Although many of the challenges of managing the trauma patient have been overcome, there are still a number of exciting areas that lend themselves to ongoing research. These changing perspectives allow for many exciting challenges for the trauma team. PMID:1507246

  11. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  12. Virtuoso teams.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Bill; Boynton, Andy

    2005-01-01

    Managing a traditional team seems pretty straightforward: Gather up whoever's available, give them time and space to do their jobs, and make sure they all play nicely together. But these teams produce results that are often as unremarkable as the teams themselves. When big change and high performance are required, a virtuoso team is far more likely to deliver outstanding and innovative results. Virtuoso teams are fundamentally different from the garden-variety work groups that most organizations form to pursue more modest goals. They comprise the top experts in their particular fields, are specially convened for ambitious projects, work with frenetic rhythm, and emanate a discernible energy. Not surprisingly, however, the superstars who make up these teams are renowned for being elitist, temperamental, egocentric, and difficult to work with. As a result, many managers fear that if they force such people to interact on a high-stakes project, the group just might implode. In this article, Bill Fischer and Andy Boynton put the inner workings of highly successful virtuoso teams on full display through three examples: the creative group behind West Side Story, the team of writers for Sid Caesar's 1950s-era television hit Your Show of Shows, and the high-powered technologists who averted an investor-relations crisis for Norsk Hydro, the Norwegian energy giant. Each of these teams accomplished enormous goals and changed their businesses, their customers, even their industries. And they did so by breaking all the conventional rules of collaboration--from the way they recruited the best members to the way they enforced their unusual processes, and from the high expectations they held to the exceptional results they produced.

  13. Late-presenting complications after splenic trauma.

    PubMed

    Freiwald, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1970s, the management of blunt splenic trauma has evolved from almost exclusive surgical management to selective use of nonsurgical management in hemodynamically stable patients. Understanding of the spleen's immunologic importance in protection against overwhelming postsplenectomy infection led to development first of surgical techniques for splenic salvage and later to protocols for nonsurgical management of adults with blunt splenic injury. The evolution of nonsurgical management has resulted in new patterns of postsplenic trauma complications.This article describes a pancreatic pseudocyst, one of several described delayed complications of nonsurgical management of blunt splenic trauma. Along with missed splenic injury and delayed rupture, the development of a splenic pseudocyst represents challenges for any multidisciplinary team involved in trauma care. Detection and management of these complications is discussed, as is postsplenectomy vaccination and return to activity.

  14. Virtual Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geber, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    Virtual work teams scattered around the globe are becoming a feature of corporate workplaces. Although most people prefer face-to-face meetings and interactions, reality often requires telecommuting. (JOW)

  15. Aerobraking Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Group and team photos of Langely's Aerobraking teams. These photo's were taken right after the 75 day aerobraking phase. People in the photographs include: Paul V. Tartabini, Mary Kae Lockwood, Richard W. Powell, Eric M. Queen, Bob Tolson, Alicia Dwyer, Jill Hanna, Michelle Munk, Zack Q. Chavis, dick Wilmoth, Naru Takashima, Ruth Amundsen, John Aguirre, Allison Roberts, Loreyna Young, Charles W. Davis, John Dec, Joe Gasbarre, Scott Striepe, Paul Escalera and G. M. Keating.

  16. Creativity and Creative Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodynamic design community and specifically the work environment at the NASA Langley Research Center. To explore ways to introduce knowledge and creativity into the research and design environment at NASA Langley Research Center a creative design activity was executed within the context of a national product development activity. The success of the creative design team activity gave rise to a need to communicate the experience in a straightforward and managed approach. As a result the concept of creative potential its formulated and assessed with a survey of a small portion of the aeronautics research staff at NASA Langley Research Center. The final section of the paper provides recommendations for future creative organizations and work environments.

  17. Interdisciplinary Teams for High Schools. Fastback 416.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spies, Paul

    A learning team comprises two or more teachers of any two or more subject areas who seek to create a small, cohesive learning community. Interdisciplinary learning teams are vehicles that can empower school community members. This first part of this handbook introduces the learning team concept, discusses issues to consider in implementing…

  18. Team Building: A Structured Learning Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Peter; Voehl, Frank

    This book is a learner's manual for a course on how to develop empowered teams for higher education management, how to function effectively as a team member, and how to objectively evaluate one's impact on the team. Taking a hands-on approach to learning about quality, the course introduces quality principles, asks students to apply these in a…

  19. Learning about teams by participating in teams.

    PubMed

    Magrane, Diane; Khan, Omar; Pigeon, Yvette; Leadley, Jennifer; Grigsby, R Kevin

    2010-08-01

    As the work of academic health centers becomes increasingly oriented toward teams and collaboration, professional development in effective team skills becomes increasingly important. The authors sought to determine whether a transdisciplinary program for enhancing teamwork was effective in educating individual team members to translate lessons into productive outcomes of their own institutions' teams. Between 2006 and 2008, the authors used the Learning in Teams model of collaborative team development to design and implement two applications of a national professional development program for members of academic organizations' teams. The purpose of the program was to foster individual skill development in collaborative teamwork. Using pre/post surveys to determine changes in team functioning over the course of the program, the authors evaluated participants' perceptions of the effectiveness of their professional development programs' learning teams and of their home institutions' teams. They analyzed narrative reports of participants' institutional teams' progress for elements including team task management, member dynamics, and institutional outcomes. Pre/post self-assessments of team performance and participants' progress reports on their home teams revealed enhancement of team skills, including clarifying team charge, exploring team purpose, and evaluating team process. Program participants improved their team skills and enhanced productivity of their institutions' teams. The Learning in Teams model can support individual team skills development, enhance institutional team performance in academic health centers, and provide a basis for research in team skills development and team process improvement. It can be adapted to various programs to enhance skills in teamwork.

  20. The Genesis of a Trauma Performance Improvement Plan.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Kristopher

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to assist the trauma medical and program director with developing a performance improvement and patients safety plan (PIPS), which is a required component of a successful trauma verification process by the American College of Surgeons. This article will review trauma quality standards and will describe in detail the required elements of a successful trauma center's performance improvement plan including a written comprehensive plan that outlines the mission and vision of the PIPS Program, authority of the PIPS Program, PIPS Program Committee reporting structure to the other hospital committees, list of required PIPS multidisciplinary team members, the operational components of the utilized data management system (trauma registry), list of indicators/audit filters, levels of review, peer determinations, corrective action plan with implementation, event resolution, and reevaluation. Strategies to develop a successful trauma performance improvement plan are presented.

  1. Team Learning and Team Composition in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Olaf; Van Linge, Roland; Van Petegem, Peter; Elseviers, Monique; Denekens, Joke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore team learning activities in nursing teams and to test the effect of team composition on team learning to extend conceptually an initial model of team learning and to examine empirically a new model of ambidextrous team learning in nursing. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative research utilising exploratory…

  2. Team Learning and Team Composition in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Olaf; Van Linge, Roland; Van Petegem, Peter; Elseviers, Monique; Denekens, Joke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore team learning activities in nursing teams and to test the effect of team composition on team learning to extend conceptually an initial model of team learning and to examine empirically a new model of ambidextrous team learning in nursing. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative research utilising exploratory…

  3. Quality charters or quality members? A control theory perspective on team charters and team performance.

    PubMed

    Courtright, Stephen H; McCormick, Brian W; Mistry, Sal; Wang, Jiexin

    2017-10-01

    Though prevalent in practice, team charters have only recently received scholarly attention. However, most of this work has been relatively devoid of theory, and consequently, key questions about why and under what conditions team charter quality affects team performance remain unanswered. To address these gaps, we draw on macro organizational control theory to propose that team charter quality serves as a team-level "behavior" control mechanism that builds task cohesion through a structured exercise. We then juxtapose team charter quality with an "input" team control mechanism that influences the emergence of task cohesion more organically: team conscientiousness. Given their redundant effects on task cohesion, we propose that the effects of team charter quality and team conscientiousness on team performance (through task cohesion) are substitutive such that team charter quality primarily impacts team performance for teams that are low (vs. high) on conscientiousness. We test and find support for our hypotheses in a sample of 239 undergraduate self-managing project teams. Our study contributes to the groups and teams literature in the following ways: first, relative to previous studies, we take a more theory-driven approach toward understanding team charters, and in doing so, uncover when and why team charter quality impacts team performance; second, we integrate two normally disparate perspectives on team effectiveness (team development and team selection) to offer a broader perspective on how teams are "built"; and third, we introduce team charter quality as a performance-enhancing mechanism for teams lower on conscientiousness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The invisible trauma patient: emergency department discharges.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William; Kauder, Donald R; Dabrowski, G Paul; Gracias, Vicente; Gupta, Rajan; Pryor, John P; Braslow, Benjamin M; Kim, Patrick; Wiebe, Douglas J

    2005-04-01

    As the malpractice and financial environment has changed, injured patients evaluated by the trauma team and discharged from the emergency department (ED) are now commonplace. The evaluation, care, and disposition of this population has become a significant workload component but is not reported to accrediting organizations and is relatively invisible to hospital administrators. Our objective was to quantify and begin to qualify the evolving picture of the trauma ED discharge population as a work component of trauma service function in an urban, Level I trauma center with an aeromedical program. Trauma registry (contacts, mechanism, transport, injuries, and disposition) and hospital databases (ED closure, occupancy rates) were queried for a 5-year period (1999-2003). Trend analysis provided statistical comparisons for questions of interest. During the 5-year study period, the total number of trauma contacts rose by 18.1% (2,220 in 1999 vs. 2,622 in 2003; trend p < 0.05). This increase in total contacts was not a manifestation of an increase in admissions (1,672 in 1999 vs. 1,544 in 2003) but rather a reflection of a marked increase in patients seen primarily by the trauma team and discharged from the ED (473 in 1999 vs. 1,000 in 2003; trend p < 0.05). These ED discharge patients were increasingly transported by helicopter (12.3% in 1999 vs. 29.2% in 2003; trend p < 0.05) and less frequently from urban areas (57.1% in 1999 vs. 48.1% in 2003; trend p < 0.05) over the course of the study period. Average injury severity of this group increased over the study period (Injury Severity Score of 2.7 +/- 0.1 in 1999 vs. 3.3 +/- 0.1 in 2003; trend p < 0.05). ED length of stay for this group increased 19.8% over the study period (trend p < 0.05), averaging nearly 5 hours in 2003. The total number, relative percentage, and injury severity of patients evaluated by the trauma team and discharged from the ED has significantly increased over the last 5 years, representing nearly 5

  5. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families.

  6. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families.

  7. Team Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begg, Roddy

    2005-01-01

    A personal reminiscence of the events surrounding the establishment of Tertiary Education and Management (TEAM), the journal of the European Association for Institutional Research EAIR, the European Higher Education Society--and its development over its first decade, by the founding Editor, at the time of his retirement from the post.

  8. Team building

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, C.

    1993-04-01

    Power plants are particularly complicated projects with abundant opportunities for disputes. Efforts are beginning in the power industry to change the way the industry does business. Key elements of a comprehensive team-building approach include partnering, constructability, use of incentives, and the disputes review board.

  9. Secondary reconstruction of maxillofacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime; Van Sickels, Joseph E

    2017-08-01

    Craniomaxillofacial trauma is one of the most complex clinical conditions in contemporary maxillofacial surgery. Vital structures and possible functional and esthetic sequelae are important considerations following this type of trauma and intervention. Despite the best efforts of the primary surgery, there are a group of patients that will have poor outcomes requiring secondary reconstruction to restore form and function. The purpose of this study is to review current concepts on secondary reconstruction to the maxillofacial complex. The evaluation of a posttraumatic patient for a secondary reconstruction must include an assessment of the different subunits of the upper face, middle face, and lower face. Virtual surgical planning and surgical guides represent the most important innovations in secondary reconstruction over the past few years. Intraoperative navigational surgery/computed-assisted navigation is used in complex cases. Facial asymmetry can be corrected or significantly improved by segmentation of the computerized tomography dataset and mirroring of the unaffected side by means of virtual surgical planning. Navigational surgery/computed-assisted navigation allows for a more precise surgical correction when secondary reconstruction involves the replacement of extensive anatomical areas. The use of technology can result in custom-made replacements and prebent plates, which are more stable and resistant to fracture because of metal fatigue. Careful perioperative evaluation is the key to positive outcomes of secondary reconstruction after trauma. The advent of technological tools has played a capital role in helping the surgical team perform a given treatment plan in a more precise and predictable manner.

  10. Coordination and collaboration of violent trauma care.

    PubMed

    King, C A

    1994-10-01

    The STC has the luxury of an all RN staff, capable of functioning in any of the surgical specialities. The PTN is a specialitist at being a generalist to provide care to a critically injured population. The role of the PTN is multifaceted and varied; it can be best described as functioning as a multidisciplinary coordinator and case manager in meeting the demands of the violent trauma patient. The patient often enters the OR severely injured, intubated, and incapable of self-protection or determination. The most important function of perioperative nursing is that of patient advocate. No other member of the trauma team is as focal to the patient's safety and comfort as the nurse. Passage from the scene of violent trauma to the OR requires dynamic assessment skills, critical thinking, and organizational capabilities. As long as interpersonal altercation results in intentional trauma, there will be a need for perioperative trauma nurses with the committement and expertise to mend the wounds of violent trauma victims.

  11. Introduced Pine Sawfly

    Treesearch

    Louis F. Wilson

    1966-01-01

    The introduced pine, sawfly (Diprion similis (Hartig)) in North America was first discovered in 1914 in a nursery in New Haven, Conn. This insect might have been introduced in the cocoon stage on nursery stock or packing material from Holland. Since its arrival, it has advanced steadily westward, reaching Pennsylvania before 1920 and Ontario by 1931. The present range...

  12. Ocular trauma in otolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Govett, G S; Amedee, R G

    1992-05-01

    Otolaryngologists are commonly called upon to emergently evaluate blunt trauma to the facial skeleton. These injuries are occasionally associated with serious trauma to the orbital contents. This manuscript reviews these orbital injuries by considering the pertinent eye anatomy and the extensive examination usually performed by an ophthalmologist. Anterior and posterior segment injuries along with specific trauma to the optic nerve will also be discussed.

  13. Trauma Facts for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers facts which can help educators deal with children undergoing trauma. These include: (1) One out of every 4 children attending school has been exposed to a traumatic event that can affect learning and/or behavior; (2) Trauma can impact school performance; (3) Trauma can impair learning; (4) Traumatized children may experience…

  14. Helping Youth Overcome Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jamie C.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of trauma can roll on unchecked like a spirit of death. In its path are strewn its once vibrant victims. Human bonds are rent asunder by the disgrace of trauma. These are the youngsters who have been verbally bashed, physically battered, sexually assaulted, and spiritually exploited. Other traumas of childhood neglect include: (1)…

  15. TEAM Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Landrieu, Mary L. [D-LA

    2012-05-22

    05/22/2012 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship. (text of measure as introduced: CR S3425-3426) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Introducing Current Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Tiffany

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the study was a continuation of the 'technology push' activities that the Technology Transfer Team conducts at this time. It was my responsibility to research current technologies at Langley Research Center and find a commercial market for these technologies in the private industry. After locating a market for the technologies, a mailing package was put together which informed the companies of the benefits of NASA Langley's technologies. The mailing package included articles written about the technology, patent material, abstracts from technical papers, and one-pagers which were used at the Technology Opportunities Showcase (TOPS) exhibitions. The companies were encouraged to consult key team members for further information on the technologies.

  17. Norwegian trauma care: a national cross-sectional survey of all hospitals involved in the management of major trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Uleberg, Oddvar; Vinjevoll, Ole-Petter; Kristiansen, Thomas; Klepstad, Pål

    2014-11-12

    Approximately 10% of the Norwegian population is injured every year, with injuries ranging from minor injuries treated by general practitioners to major and complex injuries requiring specialist in-hospital care. There is a lack of knowledge concerning the caseload of potentially severely injured patients in Norwegian hospitals. Aim of the study was to describe the current status of the Norwegian trauma system by identifying the number and the distribution of contributing hospitals and the caseload of potentially severely injured trauma patients within these hospitals. A cross-sectional survey with a structured questionnaire was sent in the summer of 2012 to all Norwegian hospitals that receive trauma patients. These were defined by number of trauma team activations in the included hospitals. A literature review was performed to assess over time the development of hospitals receiving trauma patients. Forty-one hospitals responded and were included in the study. In 2011, four trauma centres and 37 acute care hospitals received a total of 6,570 trauma patients. Trauma centres received 2,175 (33%) patients and other hospitals received 4,395 (67%) patients. There were significant regional differences between health care regions in the distribution of trauma patients between trauma centres and acute care hospitals. More than half (52.5%) of the hospitals received fewer than 100 patients annually. The national rate of hospital admission via trauma teams was 13 per 10,000 inhabitants. There was a 37% (from 65 to 41) reduction in the number of hospitals receiving trauma patients between 1988 and 2011. In 2011, hospital acute trauma care in Norway was delivered by four trauma centres and 37 acute care hospitals. Many hospitals still receive a small number of potentially severely injured patients and only a few hospitals have an electronic trauma registry. Future development of the Norwegian trauma system needs to address the challenge posed by a scattered population and

  18. Pharmacist's impact on acute pain management during trauma resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kayla; Hall, A Brad; Keriazes, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    The timely administration of analgesics is crucial to the comprehensive management of trauma patients. When an emergency department (ED) pharmacist participates in trauma resuscitation, the pharmacist acts as a medication resource for trauma team members and facilitates the timely administration of analgesics. This study measured the impact of a pharmacist on time to first analgesic dose administered during trauma resuscitation. All adult (>18 years) patients who presented to this level II trauma center via activation of the trauma response system between January 1, 2009, and May 31, 2013, were screened for eligibility. For inclusion, patients must have received intravenous fentanyl, morphine, or hydromorphone in the trauma bay. The time to medication administration was defined as the elapsed time from ED arrival to administration of first analgesic. There were 1328 trauma response system activations during the study period; of which 340 patients were included. The most common analgesic administered was fentanyl (62% in both groups). When a pharmacist was participating, the mean time to first analgesic administered was decreased (17 vs 21 minutes; P = .03). Among the 78% of patients with documented pain scores, the overall mean reduction in pain scores from ED arrival to ED discharge was similar between the 2 groups. There was a 2.4 point reduction with a pharmacist versus 2.7 without a pharmacist, using a 0 to 10 numeric pain rating scale. The participation of a clinical pharmacist during trauma resuscitation significantly decreased the time to first analgesic administration in trauma patients. The results of this study supplement the literature supporting the integration of clinical ED pharmacists on trauma teams.

  19. Interprofessional teamwork in the trauma setting: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 70 to 80% of healthcare errors are due to poor team communication and understanding. High-risk environments such as the trauma setting (which covers a broad spectrum of departments in acute services) are where the majority of these errors occur. Despite the emphasis on interprofessional collaborative practice and patient safety, interprofessional teamworking in the trauma setting has received little attention. This paper presents the findings of a scoping review designed to identify the extent and nature of this literature in this setting. The MEDLINE (via OVID, using keywords and MeSH in OVID), and PubMed (via NCBI using MeSH), and CINAHL databases were searched from January 2000 to April 2013 for results of interprofessional teamworking in the trauma setting. A hand search was conducted by reviewing the reference lists of relevant articles. In total, 24 published articles were identified for inclusion in the review. Studies could be categorized into three main areas, and within each area were a number of themes: 1) descriptions of the organization of trauma teams (themes included interaction between team members, and leadership); 2) descriptions of team composition and structure (themes included maintaining team stability and core team members); and 3) evaluation of team work interventions (themes included activities in practice and activities in the classroom setting). Descriptive studies highlighted the fluid nature of team processes, the shared mental models, and the need for teamwork and communication. Evaluative studies placed a greater emphasis on specialized roles and individual tasks and activities. This reflects a multiprofessional as opposed to an interprofessional model of teamwork. Some of the characteristics of high-performing interprofessional teams described in this review are also evident in effective teams in the community rehabilitation and intermediate care setting. These characteristics may well be pertinent to other settings

  20. Introducing medlineplus.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Introducing medlineplus.gov Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Discover a world of FREE medical resources: medlineplus.gov Your gateway to the ...

  1. Early management of ballistic hand trauma.

    PubMed

    Eardley, W G P; Stewart, M P M

    2010-02-01

    Complex hand wounds are an unfortunate consequence of conflict. Increased battlefield survival rates have resulted in an evolving range of ballistic hand trauma encountered by deployed surgical teams, requiring increased knowledge and understanding of these injuries. In the civilian setting, the combined threats of gun crime and acts of terrorism warrant appreciation for such injury among all surgeons. Surgeons often have to relearn the management of ballistic hand trauma and other aspects of war surgery under difficult circumstances because the experiences of their predecessors may be forgotten. Current evidence regarding these injuries is scarce. Ballistic hand trauma is rarely isolated. The demand on surgical resources from combat injury is significant, and it is imperative that a phased strategy be followed in this setting. Minimal, accurate débridement and decompression with early stability are crucial. Delayed primary closure and an awareness of future reconstructive options are fundamental.

  2. Aorta Balloon Occlusion in Trauma: Three Cases Demonstrating Multidisciplinary Approach Already on Patient’s Arrival to the Emergency Room

    SciTech Connect

    Hörer, Tal M.; Hebron, Dan; Swaid, Forat; Korin, Alexander; Galili, Offer; Alfici, Ricardo; Kessel, Boris

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTo describe the usage of aortic balloon occlusion (ABO), based on a multidisciplinary approach in severe trauma patients, emphasizing the role of the interventional radiologist in primary trauma care.MethodsWe briefly discuss the relevant literature, the technical aspects of ABO in trauma, and a multidisciplinary approach to the bleeding trauma patient. We describe three severely injured trauma patients for whom ABO was part of initial trauma management.ResultsThree severely injured multi-trauma patients were treated by ABO as a bridge to surgery and embolization. The procedures were performed by an interventional radiologist in the early stages of trauma management.ConclusionsThe interventional radiologist and the multidisciplinary team approach can be activated already on severe trauma patient arrival. ABO usage and other endovascular methods are becoming more widely spread, and can be used early in trauma management, without delay, thus justifying the early activation of this multidisciplinary approach.

  3. Developing psychological services following facial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury-Peters, Deba; Dain, Vicky

    2016-01-01

    Adults presenting to oral and maxillofacial surgery services are at high risk of psychological morbidity. Research by the Institute of Psychotrauma and the centre for oral and maxillofacial surgery trauma clinic at the Royal London hospital (2015) demonstrated nearly 40% of patients met diagnostic criteria for either depression, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, alcohol misuse, or substance misuse, or were presenting with facial appearance distress. Most facial injury patients were not receiving mental health assessment or treatment, and the maxillofacial team did not have direct access to psychological services. Based on these research findings, an innovative one-year pilot psychology service was designed and implemented within the facial trauma clinic. The project addressed this need by offering collaborative medical and psychological care for all facial injury patients. The project provided brief screening, assessment, and early psychological intervention. The medical team were trained to better recognise and respond to psychological distress. PMID:27493750

  4. Trauma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Kenneth L; Goetzl, Laura

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this article was to review the existing standards of practice regarding trauma which occurs during pregnancy. The design of this study was to review the available data from the surgical and obstetrical literature regarding trauma during pregnancy. The design was also to incorporate the contemporary recommendations from the trauma resuscitation courses relating to trauma during pregnancy. Trauma occurs in 5% of pregnancies. A fetus is not considered to be viable until week 25. Motor vehicle accidents account for more than 50% of all trauma during pregnancy, with 82% of fetal deaths occurring during these automobile accidents. With life threatening trauma a 50% fetal loss rate exists. As anatomy, physiology, and even laboratory findings change during pregnancy, the clinician must consider both patients, the mother and fetus. Following blunt trauma abruption of the placenta is the more common cause of fetus loss. Anterior abdominal penetrating trauma almost never fails to injury the uterus and fetus in the last half of pregnancy. Preventive strategies exist in the areas of social violence, automobile restraints and use of alcohol and drugs by the mother. Perimortem caesarian section is rarely successful. Trauma during pregnancy is uncommon, but with increasing trauma severity leads to increased fetal loss. Preventive strategies exist and when admitted monitoring standards should be followed.

  5. Successful Incorporation of Performance Based Payments for Trauma Center Readiness Costs into the Georgia Trauma System.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Dennis W; Nicholas, Jeffrey M; Dente, Christopher J; Johns, Tracy J; Garlow, Laura E; Solomon, Gina; Abston, Dena; Ferdinand, Colville H

    2017-09-01

    As quality and outcomes have moved to the fore front of medicine in this era of healthcare reform, a state trauma system Performance Based Payments (PBP) program has been incorporated into trauma center readiness funding. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a PBP on trauma center revenue. From 2010 to 2016, a percentage of readiness costs funding to trauma centers was placed in a PBP and withheld until the PBP criteria were completed. To introduce the concept, only three performance criteria and 10 per cent of readiness costs funding were tied to PBP in 2010. The PBP has evolved over the last several years to now include specific criteria by level of designation with an increase to 50 per cent of readiness costs funding being tied to PBP criteria. Final PBP distribution to trauma centers was based on the number of performance criteria completed. During 2016, the PBP criteria for Level I and II trauma centers included participation in official state meetings/conference calls, required attendance to American College of Surgeons state chapter meetings, Trauma Quality Improvement Program, registry reports, and surgeon participation in Peer Review Committee and trauma alert response times. Over the seven-year study period, $36,261,469 was available for readiness funds with $11,534,512 eligible for the PBP. Only $636,383 (6%) was withheld from trauma centers. A performance-based program was successfully incorporated into trauma center readiness funding, supporting state performance measures without adversely affecting the trauma center revenue. Future PBP criteria may be aligned to designation standards and clinical quality performance metrics.

  6. Citation classics in trauma.

    PubMed

    Ollerton, Joanne Emma; Sugrue, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The evolution of trauma may be analyzed by review of articles most frequently cited by scientific articles worldwide. This study identified the "trauma classics" by reviewing the most-cited articles ever published in The Journal of Trauma. The Science Citation Index of the Institute for Scientific Information was searched for the 50 most-cited articles in The Journal of Trauma. Of the 12,672 articles published since 1961, 80 were cited over 100 times and 17 over 200 times. The most-cited article was by Baker, a hallmark publication on injury scoring published in 1974. Feeding postinjury, bacterial translocation, and multiple organ failure were common themes. Overall, 32% involved gastrointestinal topics and 18% involved injury scoring, with institutions in the United States publishing 80% of the articles. This study identified the trauma classics from the last 42 years of The Journal of Trauma. Citation analysis has recognized limitations but gives a fascinating insight into the evolution of trauma care.

  7. An Introduction to Team Risk Management. (Version 1.0)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    Team Risk Management defines the organizational structure and operational activities for managing risks throughout all phases of the life- cycle of a...program are participating team members. Through the adoption of team risk management , the government and contractor are provided with processes...introduces the team risk management approach for managing risks within a software-dependent development program.

  8. TEAM Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Landrieu, Mary L. [D-LA

    2012-05-22

    Senate - 05/22/2012 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Developing and organizing a trauma system and mass casualty management: some useful observations from the israeli trauma model.

    PubMed

    Borgohain, B; Khonglah, T

    2013-01-01

    A trauma system is a chain of arrangements and preparedness to provide quality response to injured from the site of injury to the appropriate hospital for the full range of care. Israel has a unique trauma system developed from the experience gained in peace and in war. The system is designed to fit the state's current health system, which is different from the European and American systems. An effective trauma system may potentially manage mass casualty incidence better. The aim of this paper is to discuss learning points to develop a trauma system based on the Israeli trauma model. After participating in a course on developing a trauma system organized by a top Israeli trauma center, a literature search on the topic on the Internet was done using relevant key words like trauma system and disaster management in Israel using the Google search engine in the pubmed, open access journals and websites of trauma organizations. Israel has a unique trauma system of organizing and managing an emergency event, characterized by a central national organization responsible for management, coordination and ongoing quality control. Because of its unique geopolitical situation, the armed forces has a significant role in the system. Investing adequate resources on continuous education, manpower training, motivation, team-work and creation of public volunteers through advocacy is important for capacity building to develop a trauma system. Wisdom, motivation and pragmatism of the Israeli model may be useful to streamline work in skeletal trauma services of developing countries having fewer resources to bring consistency and acceptable standards in trauma care.

  10. Developing and Organizing a Trauma System and Mass Casualty Management: Some Useful Observations from the Israeli Trauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Borgohain, B; Khonglah, T

    2013-01-01

    A trauma system is a chain of arrangements and preparedness to provide quality response to injured from the site of injury to the appropriate hospital for the full range of care. Israel has a unique trauma system developed from the experience gained in peace and in war. The system is designed to fit the state's current health system, which is different from the European and American systems. An effective trauma system may potentially manage mass casualty incidence better. The aim of this paper is to discuss learning points to develop a trauma system based on the Israeli trauma model. After participating in a course on developing a trauma system organized by a top Israeli trauma center, a literature search on the topic on the Internet was done using relevant key words like trauma system and disaster management in Israel using the Google search engine in the pubmed, open access journals and websites of trauma organizations. Israel has a unique trauma system of organizing and managing an emergency event, characterized by a central national organization responsible for management, coordination and ongoing quality control. Because of its unique geopolitical situation, the armed forces has a significant role in the system. Investing adequate resources on continuous education, manpower training, motivation, team-work and creation of public volunteers through advocacy is important for capacity building to develop a trauma system. Wisdom, motivation and pragmatism of the Israeli model may be useful to streamline work in skeletal trauma services of developing countries having fewer resources to bring consistency and acceptable standards in trauma care. PMID:23634336

  11. Implementation team activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, F.

    2002-12-01

    The implementation Team (IT) is a body reporting to the SCSB,. It has been assigned the task of preparing and harmonising policy, standards and specification proposals for evaluation, qualification and quality control, thus enabling a coherent and cost-effective ESCC Specification System for the procurement of EEE space components. Among the 10 recommendations issued by the SCAHC, 7 have been studied under the auspices of the Implementation Team. Its main activities have been the updating and modernising of the ESA/SCC system in order to meet user needs and to be compatible with market trends. In particular it updated the technical aspects of generic specifications for the different component families and introduced the QML concept into the SCC system. It has also studied and discussed other topics such as procurement standards, a reliability system, mutual recognition, databases and the preferred parts list. A summary of the progress made in all these fields will be presented below.

  12. Asteroid team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to support asteroid research and the operation of an Asteroid Team within the Earth and Space Sciences Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Asteroid Team carries out original research on asteroids in order to discover, better characterize and define asteroid properties. This information is needed for the planning and design of NASA asteroid flyby and rendezvous missions. The asteroid Team also provides scientific and technical advice to NASA and JPL on asteroid related programs. Work on asteroid classification continued and the discovery of two Earth-approaching M asteroids was published. In the asteroid photometry program researchers obtained N or Q photometry for more than 50 asteroids, including the two M-earth-crossers. Compositional analysis of infrared spectra (0.8 to 2.6 micrometer) of asteroids is continuing. Over the next year the work on asteroid classification and composition will continue with the analysis of the 60 reduced infrared spectra which we now have at hand. The radiometry program will continue with the reduction of the N and Q bandpass data for the 57 asteroids in order to obtain albedos and diameters. This year the emphasis will shift to IRAS follow-up observations; which includes objects not observed by IRAS and objects with poor or peculiar IRAS data. As in previous year, we plan to give top priority to any opportunities for observing near-Earth asteroids and the support (through radiometric lightcurve observations from the IRTF) of any stellar occultations by asteroids for which occultation observation expeditions are fielded. Support of preparing of IRAS data for publication and of D. Matson for his participation in the NASA Planetary Astronomy Management and Operations Working Group will continue.

  13. Introducing the Blues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of the blues and presents a list of resources that are designed to introduce the blues, both as a feeling and as an influential part of American music and culture. Includes picture books and nonfiction for young readers, nonfiction for older readers, Web sites, and compact disks. (LRW)

  14. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  15. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  16. The team role test: development and validation of a team role knowledge situational judgment test.

    PubMed

    Mumford, Troy V; Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Morgeson, Frederick P; Campion, Michael A

    2008-03-01

    The main objectives in this research were to introduce the concept of team role knowledge and to investigate its potential usefulness for team member selection. In Study 1, the authors developed a situational judgment test, called the Team Role Test, to measure knowledge of 10 roles relevant to the team context. The criterion-related validity of this measure was examined in 2 additional studies. In a sample of academic project teams (N = 93), team role knowledge predicted team member role performance (r = .34). Role knowledge also provided incremental validity beyond mental ability and the Big Five personality factors in the prediction of role performance. The results of Study 2 revealed that the predictive validity of role knowledge generalizes to team members in a work setting (N = 82, r = .30). The implications of the results for selection in team environments are discussed. Copyright 2008 APA

  17. ATLS® and damage control in spine trauma

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Oliver I; Gahr, Ralf H; Gosse, Andreas; Heyde, Christoph E

    2009-01-01

    Substantial inflammatory disturbances following major trauma have been found throughout the posttraumatic course of polytraumatized patients, which was confirmed in experimental models of trauma and in vitro settings. As a consequence, the principle of damage control surgery (DCS) has developed over the last two decades and has been successfully introduced in the treatment of severely injured patients. The aim of damage control surgery and orthopaedics (DCO) is to limit additional iatrogenic trauma in the vulnerable phase following major injury. Considering traumatic brain and acute lung injury, implants for quick stabilization like external fixators as well as decided surgical approaches with minimized potential for additional surgery-related impairment of the patient's immunologic state have been developed and used widely. It is obvious, that a similar approach should be undertaken in the case of spinal trauma in the polytraumatized patient. Yet, few data on damage control spine surgery are published to so far, controlled trials are missing and spinal injury is addressed only secondarily in the broadly used ATLS® polytrauma algorithm. This article reviews the literature on spine trauma assessment and treatment in the polytrauma setting, gives hints on how to assess the spine trauma patient regarding to the ATLS® protocol and recommendations on therapeutic strategies in spinal injury in the polytraumatized patient. PMID:19257904

  18. Cammp Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evertt, Shonn F.; Collins, Michael; Hahn, William

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Configuration Analysis Modeling and Mass Properties (CAMMP) Team is presenting a demo of certain CAMMP capabilities at a Booz Allen Hamilton conference in San Antonio. The team will be showing pictures of low fidelity, simplified ISS models, but no dimensions or technical data. The presentation will include a brief description of the contract and task, description and picture of the Topology, description of Generic Ground Rules and Constraints (GGR&C), description of Stage Analysis with constraints applied, and wrap up with description of other tasks such as Special Studies, Cable Routing, etc. The models include conceptual Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Lander images and animations created for promotional purposes, which are based entirely on public domain conceptual images from public NASA web sites and publicly available magazine articles and are not based on any actual designs, measurements, or 3D models. Conceptual Mars rover and lander are completely conceptual and are not based on any NASA designs or data. The demonstration includes High Fidelity Computer Aided Design (CAD) models of ISS provided by the ISS 3D CAD Team which will be used in a visual display to demonstrate the capabilities of the Teamcenter Visualization software. The demonstration will include 3D views of the CAD models including random measurements that will be taken to demonstrate the measurement tool. A 3D PDF file will be demonstrated of the Blue Book fidelity assembly complete model with no vehicles attached. The 3D zoom and rotation will be displayed as well as random measurements from the measurement tool. The External Configuration Analysis and Tracking Tool (ExCATT) Microsoft Access Database will be demonstrated to show its capabilities to organize and track hardware on ISS. The data included will be part numbers, serial numbers, historical, current, and future locations, of external hardware components on station. It includes dates of

  19. Team Tune-Up: Examining Team Transcripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Staff Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a worksheet that can be used to examine documentation of team meetings in light of goals the team has established. Materials for this worksheet include copies of team transcripts, yellow and pink highlighters, and pencils. Directions for examining team transcripts are presented.

  20. Team Tune-Up: Examining Team Transcripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Staff Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a worksheet that can be used to examine documentation of team meetings in light of goals the team has established. Materials for this worksheet include copies of team transcripts, yellow and pink highlighters, and pencils. Directions for examining team transcripts are presented.

  1. About Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 15K ...

  2. Trauma Education and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Sidwell, Richard; Matar, Maher M; Sakran, Joseph V

    2017-10-01

    Trauma education and injury prevention are essential components of a robust trauma program. Educational programs address specific knowledge gaps and provide focused and structured learning. Advanced Trauma Life Support is the most well-known. Each offering seems to be valid, although it has been difficult to prove improved patient care outcomes owing specifically to any of them. Injury prevention offers the best opportunity to limit death and disability owing to trauma. Injury prevention initiatives have paid tremendous dividends in reducing the mortality rates for motor vehicle crashes. Modern injury prevention efforts focus on reducing distracted driver rates and increasing helmet use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Peer-Led Team Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cracolice, Mark S.; Deming, John C.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) model as an alternative to traditional cooperative learning. Discusses the difficulties of PLTL based curriculum which include finding the peer leaders, selecting the right materials for implementation, and training techniques for peer leaders. (YDS)

  4. Introduced Terrestrial Species Richness

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all introduced mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and butterflies in the Middle-Atlantic region. These data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons. The data are species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  5. Introduced Terrestrial Species Richness

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all introduced fish in the Middle-Atlantic region. These data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons. The data are species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  6. Teaching Engineering Students Team Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levi, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

  7. Teaching Engineering Students Team Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levi, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

  8. How to Preempt Team Conflict.

    PubMed

    Toegel, Ginka; Barsoux, Jean-Louis

    2016-06-01

    Team conflict can add value or destroy it. Good conflict fosters respectful debate and yields mutually agreed-upon solutions that are often far superior to those first offered. Bad conflict occurs when team members simply can't get past their differences, killing productivity and stifling innovation. Destructive conflict typically stems not from differences of opinion but from a perceived incompatibility between the way certain team members think and act. The conventional approach to working through such conflict is to respond to clashes as they arise. But this approach routinely fails because it allows frustrations to build for too long, making it difficult to reset negative impressions and restore trust. In their research on team dynamics and experience working with executive teams, Toegel and Barsoux have found a proactive approach to be much more effective. In this article, they introduce a methodology that focuses on how people look, act, speak, think, and feel. Team leaders facilitate five conversations--one focused on each category--before the team gets under way, to build a shared understanding of the process, rather than the content, of work and lay the foundation for effective collaboration.

  9. [Trauma and chronic pain: echoes and amplifications of physical and emotional suffering].

    PubMed

    Noci, Carlo Delli; Berna, Chantal

    2015-06-24

    Chronic pain often presents following a traumatic event, or alternatively, patients attribute pain to a trauma, whether this link is established or not. The psychological impact of trauma can significantly complicate the treatment of chronic pain. This article aims to review the known interactions between trauma and chronic pain. Following this review, it discusses therapeutic avenues suited to these complex situations, underlining the specific contributions of the different members of a multidisciplinary team.

  10. Maximizing efficiency on trauma surgeon rounds.

    PubMed

    Ramaniuk, Aliaksandr; Dickson, Barbara J; Mahoney, Sean; O'Mara, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Rounding by trauma surgeons is a complex multidisciplinary team-based process in the inpatient setting. Implementation of lean methodology aims to increase understanding of the value stream and eliminate nonvalue-added (NVA) components. We hypothesized that analysis of trauma rounds with education and intervention would improve surgeon efficacy. Level 1 trauma center with 4300 admissions per year. Average non-intensive care unit census was 55. Five full-time attending trauma surgeons were evaluated. Value-added (VA) and NVA components of rounding were identified. The components of each patient interaction during daily rounds were documented. Summary data were presented to the surgeons. An action plan of improvement was provided at group and individual interventions. Change plans were presented to the multidisciplinary team. Data were recollected 6 mo after intervention. The percent of interactions with NVA components decreased (16.0% to 10.7%, P = 0.0001). There was no change between the two periods in time of evaluation of individual patients (4.0 and 3.5 min, P = 0.43). Overall time to complete rounds did not change. There was a reduction in the number of interactions containing NVA components (odds ratio = 2.5). The trauma surgeons were able to reduce the NVA components of rounds. We did not see a decrease in rounding time or individual patient time. This implies that surgeons were able to reinvest freed time into patient care, or that the NVA components were somehow not increasing process time. Direct intervention for isolated improvements can be effective in the rounding process, and efforts should be focused upon improving the value of time spent rather than reducing time invested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving ATLS performance in simulated pediatric trauma resuscitation using a checklist.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Samantha E; Carter, Elizabeth A; Waterhouse, Lauren J; Fritzeen, Jennifer; Kelleher, Deirdre C; Oʼconnell, Karen J; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Baker, Kelley M; Nelson, Erik; Werner, Nicole E; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A; Burd, Randall S

    2014-04-01

    To develop a checklist for use during pediatric trauma resuscitation and test its effectiveness during simulated resuscitations. Checklists have been used to support a wide range of complex medical activities and have effectively reduced errors and improved outcomes in different medical settings. Checklists have not been evaluated in the domain of trauma resuscitation. A focus group of trauma specialists was organized to develop a checklist for pediatric trauma resuscitation. This checklist was then tested in simulated trauma resuscitations to evaluate its impact on team performance. Resuscitations conducted with and without the checklist were compared using the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) performance score, designed to measure adherence to ATLS protocol, and surveys of team members' subjective workload. The focus group generated a checklist with 56 items divided into 5 sections corresponding to different phases of trauma resuscitation. In simulation testing, the total ATLS performance score was 4.9 points higher with a checklist than without (P < 0.001), with most of this difference related to improvement in performance of the secondary survey (+3.3 points, P < 0.001). Overall, workload scores were not affected by the addition of the checklist. Implementing a checklist during simulated pediatric trauma resuscitation improves adherence to the ATLS protocol without increasing the workload of trauma team members.

  12. Medical admission of elderly trauma patients with isolated injuries.

    PubMed

    Self, Michael; Mangram, Alicia; Dunn, Ernest

    2007-09-01

    We sought to evaluate the outcomes of trauma patients admitted to medical services rather than to the general trauma team, particularly those elderly patients with isolated injuries of a specialty nature. Over the 2-year retrospective study period, 3017 trauma patients were admitted. The trauma service directed care in 2740 (90.8%) of this group versus the 277 (9.2%) admitted to medical services (MS). The patients in each group were then classified according to age younger than 55 years or older than 55 years (elderly). Of the 277 patients admitted to the MS, 177 (63.8%) were elderly compared with only 13 per cent of the trauma service group. Smaller proportions (16.9%) of the elderly medical patients were admitted to the intensive care unit as compared with the trauma group (22.1%). There was a higher morbidity rate, 41.9 per cent, in the trauma service group as compared with the MS group, 20 per cent. No patients on the MS underwent a laparotomy for intraabdominal injuries nor were there any missed injuries of a general surgical nature. Allowing elderly trauma patients with isolated specialty injuries to be managed by the MS is not associated with increased morbidity or mortality.

  13. Transforming a clinical clerkship with team learning.

    PubMed

    Levine, Ruth E; O'Boyle, Michael; Haidet, Paul; Lynn, David J; Stone, Michael M; Wolf, Dwight V; Paniagua, Freddy A

    2004-01-01

    Team learning, an innovative educational method combining interactive small group learning with expert-based content delivery, was introduced into our psychiatry clerkship in 2002. The main goal was to increase classroom engagement and improve educational outcomes. Eight of 16 lectures were replaced with team learning activities, including prerequisite readings, readiness assurance tests, and application exercises. Data on students' performance and educational experiences were compared before and after curricular change. Following implementation of team learning, students performed significantly better on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) psychiatry subject test and scored higher on attitudes about working in teams. Students perceived team learning activities to be more engaging, effective, and enjoyable than conventional didactics. Incorporating team learning into the psychiatry clerkship was associated with improved student performance and increased student engagement and satisfaction. Team learning is a promising educational strategy that may prove useful in other clerkships.

  14. Children and Facial Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... up after Facial trauma: A prospective study. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1997: 117:72-75 Kim MK, Buchman ... trauma in children: An urban hospital’s experience. Otolaryngoly–Head Neck Surgery 2000: 123: 439-43 Patient Health Home ...

  15. Thromboprophylaxis for trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Luis Manuel Barrera; Perel, Pablo; Ker, Katharine; Cirocchi, Roberto; Farinella, Eriberto; Morales, Carlos Hernando

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of thromboprophylaxis in trauma patients on mortality and incidence of DVT and PE. To compare the effects of different thromboprophylaxis interventions and their relative effects according to the type of trauma. PMID:25267908

  16. Treating childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Terr, Lenore C

    2013-01-01

    This review begins with the question "What is childhood trauma?" Diagnosis is discussed next, and then the article focuses on treatment, using 3 basic principles-abreaction, context, and correction. Treatment modalities and complications are discussed, with case vignettes presented throughout to illustrate. Suggestions are provided for the psychiatrist to manage countertransference as trauma therapy proceeds.

  17. Advances in forefoot trauma.

    PubMed

    Clements, J Randolph; Schopf, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Forefoot traumas, particularly involving the metatarsals, are commonly occurring injuries. There have been several advances in management of these injuries. These advances include updates in operative technique, internal fixation options, plating constructs, and external fixation. In addition, the advances of soft tissue management have improved outcomes. This article outlines these injuries and provides an update on techniques, principles, and understanding of managing forefoot trauma.

  18. Ultrasound in trauma.

    PubMed

    Rippey, James C R; Royse, Alistair G

    2009-09-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound is well suited for use in the emergency setting for assessment of the trauma patient. Currently, portable ultrasound machines with high-resolution imaging capability allow trauma patients to be imaged in the pre-hospital setting, emergency departments and operating theatres. In major trauma, ultrasound is used to diagnose life-threatening conditions and to prioritise and guide appropriate interventions. Assessment of the basic haemodynamic state is a very important part of ultrasound use in trauma, but is discussed in more detail elsewhere. Focussed assessment with sonography for Trauma (FAST) rapidly assesses for haemoperitoneum and haemopericardium, and the Extended FAST examination (EFAST) explores for haemothorax, pneumothorax and intravascular filling status. In regional trauma, ultrasound can be used to detect fractures, many vascular injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, testicular injuries and can assess foetal viability in pregnant trauma patients. Ultrasound can also be used at the bedside to guide procedures in trauma, including nerve blocks and vascular access. Importantly, these examinations are being performed by the treating physician in real time, allowing for immediate changes to management of the patient. Controversy remains in determining the best training to ensure competence in this user-dependent imaging modality.

  19. The use of trauma interprofessional simulated education (TIPSE) to enhance role awareness in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed

    Brown, Craig William; Howard, Morag; Morse, Jerry

    2016-05-01

    Interprofessional simulation-based education (IPSE) is common in medicine and nursing curricula, however, less evident in diagnostic radiography. Previous work suggests graduate radiographers are unprepared in terms of trauma knowledge and experience. A trauma IPSE programme as a joint venture between two universities was developed. Our aim was to explore the views of radiography, nursing, and medical students regarding preparedness for trauma practice. Second-year radiography (n = 39), nursing (n = 10), and medical (n = 5) students were invited to participate in trauma simulations. Pre- and post-scenario questionnaires were completed and quantitative analysis undertaken. Prior to IPSE, the majority of students were unprepared to manage trauma. Post-scenario felt significantly more prepared to undertake their role in the team and had better understanding of their and other professions' roles in trauma (P < 0.01). IPSE is an effective means of preparing undergraduate students in understanding both their and other professional's roles within the trauma team.

  20. Trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D; Gonzalez, Luis S

    2014-08-01

    Coagulopathy is the inability of blood to coagulate normally; in trauma patients, it is a multifactorial and complex process. Seriously injured trauma patients experience coagulopathies during the acute injury phase. Risk factors for trauma-induced coagulopathy include hypothermia, metabolic acidosis, hypoperfusion, hemodilution, and fluid replacement. In addition to the coagulopathy induced by trauma, many patients may also be taking medications that interfere with hemostasis. Therefore, medication-induced coagulopathy also is a concern. Traditional laboratory-based methods of assessing coagulation are being supported or even replaced by point-of-care tests. The evidence-based management of trauma-induced coagulopathy should address hypothermia, fluid resuscitation, blood components administration, and, if needed, medications to reverse identified coagulation disorders. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  1. Trauma: the seductive hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Steven

    2003-01-01

    In much of contemporary culture, "trauma" signifies not so much terrible experience as a particular context for understanding and responding to a terrible experience. In therapy, in the media, and in international interventions, the traumatized are seen not simply as people who suffer and so are deserving of concern and aid; they are seen also as people who suffer for us, who are given special dispensation. They are treated with awe if they tell a certain kind of trauma story, and are ignored or vilified if they tell another. Trauma has become not simply a story of pain and its treatment, but a host of sub-stories involving the commodification of altruism, the justification of violence and revenge, the entry point into "true experience," and the place where voyeurism and witnessing intersect. Trauma is today the stuff not only of suffering but of fantasy. Historically, trauma theory and treatment have shown a tension, exemplified in the writings of Freud and Janet, between those who view trauma as formative and those who view it as exceptional. The latter view, that trauma confers exceptional status deserving of special privilege, has gained ground in recent years and has helped to shape the way charitable dollars are distributed, how the traumatized are presented in the media, how governments justify and carry out international responses to trauma, and how therapists attend to their traumatized patients. This response to trauma reflects an underlying, unarticulated belief system derived from narcissism; indeed, trauma has increasingly become the venue, in society and in treatment, where narcissism is permitted to prevail.

  2. An artificial system for selecting the optimal surgical team.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Nahid; Mahvash, Mohsen; Zenati, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an intelligent system to optimize a team composition based on the team's historical outcomes and apply this system to compose a surgical team. The system relies on a record of the procedures performed in the past. The optimal team composition is the one with the lowest probability of unfavorable outcome. We use the theory of probability and the inclusion exclusion principle to model the probability of team outcome for a given composition. A probability value is assigned to each person of database and the probability of a team composition is calculated from them. The model allows to determine the probability of all possible team compositions even if there is no recoded procedure for some team compositions. From an analytical perspective, assembling an optimal team is equivalent to minimizing the overlap of team members who have a recurring tendency to be involved with procedures of unfavorable results. A conceptual example shows the accuracy of the proposed system on obtaining the optimal team.

  3. [Quality of initial trauma care in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Ibáñez Pradas, Vicente; Pérez Montejano, Rut

    2017-04-18

    Trauma care in Spain is not provided in specific centres, which means that health professionals have limited contact to trauma patients. After the setting up of a training program in paediatric trauma, the aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the initial care provided to these patients before they were admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of a third level hospital (trauma centre), as an indirect measurement of the increase in the number of health professionals trained in trauma. Two cohorts of PICU admissions were reviewed, the first one during the four years immediately before the training courses started (Group 1, period 2001-2004), and the second one during the 4 years (Group 2, period 2012-2015) after nearly 500 professionals were trained. A record was made of the injury mechanism, attending professional, Glasgow coma score (GCS), and paediatric trauma score (PTS). Initial care quality was assessed using five indicators: use of cervical collar, vascular access, orotracheal intubation if GCS ≤ 8, gastric decompression if PTS≤8, and number of actions carried out from the initial four recommended (neck control, provide oxygen, get vascular access, provide IV fluids). Compliance was compared between the 2 periods. A P<.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 218 patient records were analysed, 105 in Group 1, and 113 in Group 2. The groups showed differences both in injury mechanism and in initial care team. A shift in injury mechanism pattern was observed, with a decrease in car accidents (28% vs 6%; P<.0001). Patients attended to in low complexity hospitals increased from 29.4% to 51.9% (P=.008), and their severity decreased when assessed using the GCS ≤ 8 (29.8% vs 13.5%; P=.004), or PTS≤8 (48.5% vs 29.7%; P=.005). As regards quality indicators, only the use of neck collar improved its compliance (17.3% to 32.7%; P=.01). Patients who received no action in the initial care remained unchanged (19% vs 11%%; P=.15

  4. The pregnant trauma patient in the intensive care unit: collaborative care to ensure safety and prevent injury.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Mary Ellen Burke

    2008-01-01

    The pregnant woman who has experienced trauma will need to be transferred to an appropriate setting once she is stabilized. Nursing has evolved into many specialty areas with specific sets of skills developed to care for women in these areas. The trauma team and the intensive care unit team will most likely be uncomfortable with the pregnant woman. The perinatal team may be uncomfortable with the injuries or illness that brought the woman to the trauma unit. Together the combined knowledge of all teams can provide for safe care of the woman and fetus and prevent injury occurring to them. Collaborative care is part of the overall plan of care, which follows a formal plan already established by the leadership teams of the 2 units. The purpose of this article is to review collaborative care in the intensive care unit and to provide an overview of the nursing skill sets necessary to care for the pregnant trauma woman.

  5. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. We searched the PubMed database using the keywords "leadership" and then either "trauma" or "resuscitation" as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching followed by simulations. Although programs

  6. Introducing the CTA concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, B. S.; Actis, M.; Aghajani, T.; Agnetta, G.; Aguilar, J.; Aharonian, F.; Ajello, M.; Akhperjanian, A.; Alcubierre, M.; Aleksić, J.; Alfaro, R.; Aliu, E.; Allafort, A. J.; Allan, D.; Allekotte, I.; Amato, E.; Anderson, J.; Angüner, E. O.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Aravantinos, A.; Arlen, T.; Armstrong, T.; Arnaldi, H.; Arrabito, L.; Asano, K.; Ashton, T.; Asorey, H. G.; Awane, Y.; Baba, H.; Babic, A.; Baby, N.; Bähr, J.; Bais, A.; Baixeras, C.; Bajtlik, S.; Balbo, M.; Balis, D.; Balkowski, C.; Bamba, A.; Bandiera, R.; Barber, A.; Barbier, C.; Barceló, M.; Barnacka, A.; Barnstedt, J.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Basili, A.; Basso, S.; Bastieri, D.; Bauer, C.; Baushev, A.; Becerra, J.; Becherini, Y.; Bechtol, K. C.; Becker Tjus, J.; Beckmann, V.; Bednarek, W.; Behera, B.; Belluso, M.; Benbow, W.; Berdugo, J.; Berger, K.; Bernard, F.; Bernardino, T.; Bernlöhr, K.; Bhat, N.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Biland, A.; Billotta, S.; Bird, T.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Bitossi, M.; Blake, S.; Blanch Bigas, O.; Blasi, P.; Bobkov, A.; Boccone, V.; Boettcher, M.; Bogacz, L.; Bogart, J.; Bogdan, M.; Boisson, C.; Boix Gargallo, J.; Bolmont, J.; Bonanno, G.; Bonardi, A.; Bonev, T.; Bonifacio, P.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borgland, A.; Borkowski, J.; Bose, R.; Botner, O.; Bottani, A.; Bouchet, L.; Bourgeat, M.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouvier, A.; Brau-Nogué, S.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Briggs, M.; Bringmann, T.; Brook, P.; Brun, P.; Brunetti, L.; Buanes, T.; Buckley, J.; Buehler, R.; Bugaev, V.; Bulgarelli, A.; Bulik, T.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Byrum, K.; Cailles, M.; Cameron, R.; Camprecios, J.; Canestrari, R.; Cantu, S.; Capalbi, M.; Caraveo, P.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carr, J.; Carton, P.-H.; Casanova, S.; Casiraghi, M.; Catalano, O.; Cavazzani, S.; Cazaux, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chabanne, E.; Chadwick, P.; Champion, C.; Chen, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiappetti, L.; Chikawa, M.; Chitnis, V. R.; Chollet, F.; Chudoba, J.; Cieślar, M.; Cillis, A.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colin, P.; Colome, J.; Colonges, S.; Compin, M.; Conconi, P.; Conforti, V.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Contreras, J. L.; Coppi, P.; Corona, P.; Corti, D.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Costantini, H.; Cotter, G.; Courty, B.; Couturier, S.; Covino, S.; Crimi, G.; Criswell, S. J.; Croston, J.; Cusumano, G.; Dafonseca, M.; Dale, O.; Daniel, M.; Darling, J.; Davids, I.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caprio, V.; De Frondat, F.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; de la Calle, I.; De La Vega, G. A.; de los Reyes Lopez, R.; De Lotto, B.; De Luca, A.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Naurois, M.; de Oliveira, Y.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; de Souza, V.; Decerprit, G.; Decock, G.; Deil, C.; Delagnes, E.; Deleglise, G.; Delgado, C.; Della Volpe, D.; Demange, P.; Depaola, G.; Dettlaff, A.; Di Paola, A.; Di Pierro, F.; Díaz, C.; Dick, J.; Dickherber, R.; Dickinson, H.; Diez-Blanco, V.; Digel, S.; Dimitrov, D.; Disset, G.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Doert, M.; Dohmke, M.; Domainko, W.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donat, A.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Dournaux, J.-L.; Drake, G.; Dravins, D.; Drury, L.; Dubois, F.; Dubois, R.; Dubus, G.; Dufour, C.; Dumas, D.; Dumm, J.; Durand, D.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Ebr, J.; Edy, E.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Einecke, S.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Elles, S.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Engelhaupt, D.; Enomoto, R.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Errando, M.; Etchegoyen, A.; Evans, P.; Falcone, A.; Fantinel, D.; Farakos, K.; Farnier, C.; Fasola, G.; Favill, B.; Fede, E.; Federici, S.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Ferenc, D.; Ferrando, P.; Fesquet, M.; Fiasson, A.; Fillin-Martino, E.; Fink, D.; Finley, C.; Finley, J. P.; Fiorini, M.; Firpo Curcoll, R.; Flores, H.; Florin, D.; Focke, W.; Föhr, C.; Fokitis, E.; Font, L.; Fontaine, G.; Fornasa, M.; Förster, A.; Fortson, L.; Fouque, N.; Franckowiak, A.; Fransson, C.; Fraser, G.; Frei, R.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Fresnillo, L.; Fruck, C.; Fujita, Y.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fukui, Y.; Funk, S.; Gäbele, W.; Gabici, S.; Gabriele, R.; Gadola, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gallant, Y.; Gámez-García, J.; García, B.; Garcia López, R.; Gardiol, D.; Garrido, D.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaug, M.; Gaweda, J.; Gebremedhin, L.; Geffroy, N.; Gerard, L.; Ghedina, A.; Ghigo, M.; Giannakaki, E.; Gianotti, F.; Giarrusso, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Gika, V.; Giommi, P.; Girard, N.; Giro, E.; Giuliani, A.; Glanzman, T.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Godinovic, N.; Golev, V.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gómez-Ortega, J.; Gonzalez, M. M.; González, A.; González, F.; González Muñoz, A.; Gothe, K. S.; Gougerot, M.; Graciani, R.; Grandi, P.; Grañena, F.; Granot, J.; Grasseau, G.; Gredig, R.; Green, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grégoire, T.; Grimm, O.; Grube, J.; Grudzinska, M.; Gruev, V.; Grünewald, S.; Grygorczuk, J.; Guarino, V.; Gunji, S.; Gyuk, G.; Hadasch, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a new observatory for very high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. CTA has ambitions science goals, for which it is necessary to achieve full-sky coverage, to improve the sensitivity by about an order of magnitude, to span about four decades of energy, from a few tens of GeV to above 100 TeV with enhanced angular and energy resolutions over existing VHE gamma-ray observatories. An international collaboration has formed with more than 1000 members from 27 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and North and South America. In 2010 the CTA Consortium completed a Design Study and started a three-year Preparatory Phase which leads to production readiness of CTA in 2014. In this paper we introduce the science goals and the concept of CTA, and provide an overview of the project.

  7. The Effect of Availability of Manpower on Trauma Resuscitation Times in a Tertiary Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Nathaniel Xin Ern; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Singaram, Kanageswari; Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background For trauma patients, delays to assessment, resuscitation, and definitive care affect outcomes. We studied the effects of resuscitation area occupancy and trauma team size on trauma team resuscitation speed in an observational study at a tertiary academic institution in Singapore. Methods From January 2014 to January 2015, resuscitation videos of trauma team activated patients with an Injury Severity Score of 9 or more were extracted for review within 14 days by independent reviewers. Exclusion criteria were patients dead on arrival, inter-hospital transfers, and up-triaged patients. Data captured included manpower availability (trauma team size and resuscitation area occupancy), assessment (airway, breathing, circulation, logroll), interventions (vascular access, imaging), and process-of-care time intervals (time to assessment/intervention/adjuncts, time to imaging, and total time in the emergency department). Clinical data were obtained by chart review and from the trauma registry. Results Videos of 70 patients were reviewed over a 13-month period. The median time spent in the emergency department was 154.9 minutes (IQR 130.7–207.5) and the median resuscitation team size was 7, with larger team sizes correlating with faster process-of-care time intervals: time to airway assessment (p = 0.08) and time to disposition (p = 0.04). The mean resuscitation area occupancy rate (RAOR) was 1.89±2.49, and the RAOR was positively correlated with time spent in the emergency department (p = 0.009). Conclusion Our results suggest that adequate staffing for trauma teams and resuscitation room occupancy are correlated with faster trauma resuscitation and reduced time spent in the emergency department. PMID:27136299

  8. The Effect of Availability of Manpower on Trauma Resuscitation Times in a Tertiary Academic Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tan, Timothy Xin Zhong; Quek, Nathaniel Xin Ern; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Singaram, Kanageswari; Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Wong, Ting Hway

    2016-01-01

    For trauma patients, delays to assessment, resuscitation, and definitive care affect outcomes. We studied the effects of resuscitation area occupancy and trauma team size on trauma team resuscitation speed in an observational study at a tertiary academic institution in Singapore. From January 2014 to January 2015, resuscitation videos of trauma team activated patients with an Injury Severity Score of 9 or more were extracted for review within 14 days by independent reviewers. Exclusion criteria were patients dead on arrival, inter-hospital transfers, and up-triaged patients. Data captured included manpower availability (trauma team size and resuscitation area occupancy), assessment (airway, breathing, circulation, logroll), interventions (vascular access, imaging), and process-of-care time intervals (time to assessment/intervention/adjuncts, time to imaging, and total time in the emergency department). Clinical data were obtained by chart review and from the trauma registry. Videos of 70 patients were reviewed over a 13-month period. The median time spent in the emergency department was 154.9 minutes (IQR 130.7-207.5) and the median resuscitation team size was 7, with larger team sizes correlating with faster process-of-care time intervals: time to airway assessment (p = 0.08) and time to disposition (p = 0.04). The mean resuscitation area occupancy rate (RAOR) was 1.89±2.49, and the RAOR was positively correlated with time spent in the emergency department (p = 0.009). Our results suggest that adequate staffing for trauma teams and resuscitation room occupancy are correlated with faster trauma resuscitation and reduced time spent in the emergency department.

  9. Changing teams/changing families.

    PubMed

    de Shazer, S; Molnar, A

    1984-12-01

    A therapist's view of the nature of change and the processes of changing directly influences what the therapist does clinically. This essay describes how we have moved our clinical practice closer to our epistemological premises about the processes of change. For us, one key element in initiating the processes of therapeutic change is the introduction of randomness into the system. In our view, the system under consideration is the family-system plus the therapist (team)-system, and the random can be introduced anywhere in that suprasystem. Therefore, changing the therapy team can promote changing the family's problematic pattern.

  10. Trauma systems and early management of severe injuries in Scandinavia: review of the current state.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Thomas; Søreide, Kjetil; Ringdal, Kjetil G; Rehn, Marius; Krüger, Andreas J; Reite, Andreas; Meling, Terje; Naess, Pål Aksel; Lossius, Hans Morten

    2010-05-01

    Scandinavian countries face common challenges in trauma care. It has been suggested that Scandinavian trauma system development is immature compared to that of other regions. We wanted to assess the current status of Scandinavian trauma management and system development. An extensive search of the Medline/Pubmed, EMBASE and SweMed+ databases was conducted. Wide coverage was prioritized over systematic search strategies. Scandinavian publications from the last decade pertaining to trauma epidemiology, trauma systems and early trauma management were included. The incidence of severe injury ranged from 30 to 52 per 100,000 inhabitants annually, with about 90% due to blunt trauma. Parts of Scandinavia are sparsely populated with long pre-hospital distances. In accordance with other European countries, pre-hospital physicians are widely employed and studies indicate that this practice imparts a survival benefit to trauma patients. More than 200 Scandinavian hospitals receive injured patients, increasingly via multidisciplinary trauma teams. Challenges remain concerning pre-hospital identification of the severely injured. Improved triage allows for a better match between patient needs and the level of resources available. Trauma management is threatened by the increasing sub-specialisation of professions and institutions. Scandinavian research is leading the development of team- and simulation-based trauma training. Several pan-Scandinavian efforts have facilitated research and provided guidelines for clinical management. Scandinavian trauma research is characterised by an active collaboration across countries. The current challenges require a focus on the role of traumatology within an increasingly fragmented health care system. Regional networks of predictable and accountable pre- and in-hospital resources are needed for efficient trauma systems. Successful development requires both novel research and scientific assessment of imported principles of trauma care. (c

  11. Employability Development Teams: Team Member Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Mary L.; Lewis, Meharry H.

    1972-01-01

    The authors point out that team roles are designed to be complementary, but much of the frustration that develops among team members is due to lack of role definition and too much overlapping of responsibility. (Author)

  12. Pattern of ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M M; Mohiuddin, A A; Akhanda, A H; Hossain, M I; Islam, M F; Akonjee, A R; Ali, M

    2011-07-01

    This prospective observational study was conducted in the department of Ophthalmology Mymensingh Medical College Hospital during the period of November, 2009 to October, 2010. Two hundred & fifty (250) patients of both sexes and all ages with ocular trauma were selected randomly for this study. A detailed history of patients, duration of trauma, relation of trauma with work, visual status prior to injury, any surgery prior to injury & patients were alcoholic or not were taken. Male patients were 190(76%) and female patients were 60(24%). Majority of patients were 11-20 years group (39.2%). Most of patients (40%) attended into hospital within 60 hours of ocular trauma. Accidental occupational trauma were more common (51.2%) and assault injury were less common (12.8%). Greater number of ocular trauma was caused by sharp objects (59.2%) and less number of ocular trauma was caused by chemical injuries (2.4%). Open globe injuries were more common (62%) than closed globe injury (38%). Visual acuity on admission between 6/60 to PL comprises highest number (64%) and also on discharge between 6/60 to PL comprises highest number of cases (50%). Most of the patients came from poor socioeconomic group (60%).

  13. ['Advanced trauma life support' in Netherlands].

    PubMed

    van Vugt, A B

    2000-10-28

    Introduction of the principles of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) in the management of accident victims has been in progress in the Netherlands since 1995. The main ATLS principles are that the aid giver treats the most dangerous disorder first and does no further damage. After assessment and, if necessary, treatment of the airways, the respiration, the circulation and any craniocerebral injury, an exploratory examination is carried out. Physicians receive theoretical and practical instructions in this form of management during an intensive two-day course, counselled by a coordinating organization in the USA. Most of those attending are interns in general surgery, traumatology and orthopaedics, gatekeeper doctors of emergency rooms and army medical officers. The standardized way of thinking improves the communication and understanding between the various disciplines involved in trauma care, in part because there exist comparable programmes for ambulance care and emergency care. Other measures improving the quality of trauma care are regionalization of the trauma care, medical helicopter teams and evaluation of the effects of ATLS as an operating procedure.

  14. Oesophageal trauma: incidence, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Triggiani, E; Belsey, R

    1977-01-01

    The clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and surgical treatment of 110 cases of oesophageal trauma, admitted under the care of one surgical team between 1949 and 1973, are reviewed. The importance of early diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach in the management of a potentially lethal situation are stressed. In our opinion, spontaneous rupture of the oesophagus, instrumental perforation, open and closed traumatic lesions, and postoperative anastomotic leaks are, as far as diagnosis and management are concerned, different aspects of the same desperate surgical problem. Oesophageal trauma is accompanied by a high morbidity and mortality rate if diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Perforations of the cervical oesophagus may be treated conservatively. Intrathoracic perforations demand an aggressive surgical appraoch; only exteriorisation followed by reconstruction at a later date offers a reasonable chance to save the life of the patient and ultimately restore continuity. PMID:882938

  15. Video recording trauma resuscitations: an effective teaching technique.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, D B; Shackford, S R; Fridland, P H; Mackersie, R C; Hansbrough, J F; Wachtel, T L; Fortune, J B

    1988-04-01

    Since the initial hour after injury is the most crucial time for trauma patients, resuscitation technique is of vital importance. Standardized courses for first-hour management (ATLAS) have been widely accepted. A teaching format based upon video recording of every resuscitation has been developed. Tapes are reviewed by the staff and by the individuals involved in a particular resuscitation. In a weekly resuscitation review conference, actual footage is presented to the trauma team members, specific aspects of a resuscitation are critiqued, and supplemental didactic information is presented. Legal problems have been avoided by making the review and conference a part of the quality assurance process. Patient anonymity is preserved by positioning the video camera at the foot of the resuscitation bed. Tapes are erased after each conference. Video recording allows analysis of: 1) priorities during the resuscitation; 2) cognitive integration of the workup by the team leader; 3) physical integration of the workup by the team leader; 4) team member adherence to assigned responsibilities, resuscitation time, errors or breaks in technique; and 5) behavior change over time. In 3 1/2 years, more than 2,500 resuscitations have been recorded. Over a 3-month period, average resuscitation time to definitive care decreased for age- and injury severity-matched patient groups cared for by one team. Resuscitations have become more efficient and adherence to assigned responsibilities better. Weekly review of resuscitation contributes to improved technique and trauma care.

  16. Evaluation of leadership skills during the simulation education course for the initial management of blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Schott, Eric; Brautigam, Robert T; Smola, Jacqueline; Burns, Karyl J

    2012-04-01

    Leadership skills of senior residents, trauma fellows, and a nurse practitioner were assessed during simulation training for the initial management of blunt trauma. This was a pilot, observational study, that in addition to skill development and assessment also sought to determine the need for a dedicated leadership training course for surgical residents. The study evaluated the leadership skills and adherence to Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines of the team leaders during simulation training. The team leaders' performances on criteria regarding prearrival planning, critical actions based on ATLS, injury identification, patient management, and communication were evaluated for each of five blunt-trauma scenarios. Although there was a statistically significant increase in leadership skills for performing ATLS critical actions, P < 0.05, there were 10 adverse events. A structured simulation program dedicated to developing skills for team leadership willbe a worthwhile endeavor at our institution.

  17. Three decades (1978-2008) of Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) practice revised and evidence revisited.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil

    2008-12-18

    The Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) Program was developed to teach doctors one safe, reliable method to assess and initially manage the trauma patient. The ATLS principles represents an organized approach for evaluation and management of seriously injured patients and offers a foundation of common knowledge for all members of the trauma team. After 3 decades of teaching (1978-2008) of ATLS worldwide one should intuitively perceive that the evidence for the effect of ATLS teaching on the improved management of the injured patient be well established. This editorial addresses aspects of trauma education with needs for further development of better evidence of best practice.

  18. Compliance to advanced trauma life support protocols in adult trauma patients in the acute setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols provide a common approach for trauma resuscitations. This was a quality review assessing compliance with ATLS protocols at a Level I trauma center; specifically whether the presence or absence of a trauma team leader (TTL) influenced adherence. Methods This retrospective study was conducted on adult major trauma patients with acute injuries over a one-year period in a Level I Canadian trauma center. Data were collected from the Alberta Trauma Registry, and adherence to ATLS protocols was determined by chart review. Results The study identified 508 patients with a mean Injury Severity Score of 24.5 (SD 10.7), mean age 39.7 (SD 17.6), 73.8% were male and 91.9% were involved in blunt trauma. The overall compliance rate was 81.8% for primary survey and 75% for secondary survey. The TTL group compared to non-TTL group was more likely to complete the primary survey (90.9% vs. 81.8%, p = 0.003), and the secondary survey (100% vs. 75%, p = 0.004). The TTL group was more likely than the non-TTL group to complete the following tasks: insertion of two large bore IVs (68.2% vs. 57.7%, p = 0.014), digital rectal exam (64.6% vs. 54.7%, p = 0.023), and head to toe exam (77% vs. 67.1%, p = 0.013). Mean times from emergency department arrival to diagnostic imaging were also significantly shorter in the TTL group compared to the non-TTL group, including times to pelvis xray (mean 68min vs. 107min, p = 0.007), CT chest (mean 133min vs. 172min, p = 0.005), and CT abdomen and pelvis (mean 136min vs. 173min, p = 0.013). Readmission rates were not significantly different between the TTL and non-TTL groups (3.5% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.642). Conclusions While many studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of trauma systems on outcomes, few have explored the direct influence of the TTL on ATLS compliance. This study demonstrated that TTL involvement during resuscitations was associated with improved

  19. Nuances in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Kenefake, Mary Ella; Swarm, Matthew; Walthall, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric trauma evaluation mimics adult stabilization in that it is best accomplished with a focused and systematic approach. Attention to developmental differences, anatomic and physiologic nuances, and patterns of injury equip emergency physicians to stabilize and manage pediatric injury.

  20. Trauma program development.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    The development of a strong trauma program is clearly one of the most important facets of successful business development. Several recent publications have demonstrated that well run trauma services can generate significant profits for both the hospital and the surgeons involved. There are many aspects to this task that require constant attention and insight. Top notch patient care, efficiency, and cost-effective resource utilization are all important components that must be addressed while providing adequate physician compensation within the bounds of hospital financial constraints and the encompassing legal issues. Each situation is different but many of the components are universal. This chapter addresses all aspects of trauma program development to provide the graduating fellow with the tools to create a new trauma program or improve an existing program in order to provide the best patient care while optimizing financial reward and improving care efficiency.

  1. Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The article summarizes a series of articles concerning acquired cerebral trauma. Reviewed are technological advances, treatment, assessment, potential innovative therapies, long-term outcome, family impact of chronic brain injury, and prevention. (DB)

  2. Trauma-Informed Schools.

    PubMed

    Wiest-Stevenson, Courtney; Lee, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Violence has impacted every aspect of daily life. These tragedies have shocked the world. This has resulted in school communities being fractured. Additionally, The National Survey of Children Exposed to Violence found that 60% of the children surveyed have been exposed to some form of trauma, either in or out of school. Traumatology research has shown most people respond to a wide range of traumatic events in similar ways. The common responses include traumatic responses, posttraumatic stress responses, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article the authors outline the impact of trauma on children within school systems; discuss the mental health services schools are providing; present a trauma-informed school model; identifies tools which can be utilized in schools; and provide resources needed for a trauma-informed school, along with additional tools and resources. The authors discuss future recommendations for the community and schools as traumatic events continue to grow and impact a large number of children.

  3. Communication technology in trauma centers: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Kim, Young-Ju; Gardner, Sharyn D; Faraj, Samer; MacKenzie, Colin F

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between information and communication technology (ICT) and trauma work coordination has long been recognized. The purpose of the study was to investigate the type and frequency of use of various ICTs to activate and organize trauma teams in level I/II trauma centers. In a cross-sectional survey, questionnaires were mailed to trauma directors and clinicians in 457 trauma centers in the United States. Responses were received from 254 directors and 767 clinicians. Communication with pre-hospital care providers was conducted predominantly via shortwave radio (67.3%). The primary communication methods used to reach trauma surgeons were manual (56.7%) and computerized group page (36.6%). Computerized group page (53.7%) and regular telephone (49.8%) were cited as the most advantageous devices; e-mail (52.3%) and dry erase whiteboard (52.1%) were selected as the least advantageous. Attending surgeons preferred less overhead paging and more cellular phone communication than did emergency medicine physicians and nurses. Cellular phones have become an important part of hospital-field communication. In high-volume trauma centers, there is a need for more accurate methods of communicating with field personnel and among hospital care providers.

  4. Exploring the "Lone Wolf" Phenomenon in Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Terri Feldman; Dixon, Andrea L.; Gassenheimer, Jule B.

    2005-01-01

    The proliferation of projects using student teams has motivated researchers to examine factors that affect both team process and outcomes. This research introduces an individual difference variable found in the business environment that has not been examined in a classroom context. The lone wolf appears to play a role in how teams function and…

  5. Exploring the "Lone Wolf" Phenomenon in Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Terri Feldman; Dixon, Andrea L.; Gassenheimer, Jule B.

    2005-01-01

    The proliferation of projects using student teams has motivated researchers to examine factors that affect both team process and outcomes. This research introduces an individual difference variable found in the business environment that has not been examined in a classroom context. The lone wolf appears to play a role in how teams function and…

  6. Linear abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Danto, L A; Wolfman, E F

    1976-03-01

    Three cases of blunt abdominal trauma are presented to exemplify the mechanism of trauma and the problems of diagnosis associated with any linear blow to the abdomen. The mechanisms of visceral injury are reviewed, and special attention is directed to the abdominal wall injury that can be present in these patients. This injury has special implications in directing the operative approach and repair. An unusual aortic occlusion is described which is peculiar to this type of injury.

  7. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    PubMed

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  8. Human-robot teaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Terrance M.; Protzman, William J.; Samples, Brian

    2005-05-01

    This presentation will provide program information, goals and objectives of the Technology for Human-Robot Interactions in Soldier-Robot Teaming (HRI) Army Technology Objective (ATO). The intent of this program is to develop and demonstrate an intelligent scaleable interface for mounted and dismounted control of ground and air unmanned systems. Currently in the Army there are unique interfaces developed by engineers for each unmanned system fielded. This saddles the soldier with a training burden to learn specific interface operations prior to controlling the robot. By providing a consistent look and feel across various sized controlling devices, the training burden is reduced as well as the soldier's cognitive workload. Additionally, task analysis will be performed to identify workload barriers and bottlenecks, and intelligent agents will be developed and applied to reduce and/or automate the higher workload tasks. Lastly, this program will develop adaptive automation techniques to intelligently shed or introduce tasks at the appropriate time to the soldier to maintain optimal situational awareness and maximize the performance of the soldier-robot team.

  9. Variability in CT imaging of blunt trauma among ED physicians, surgical residents, and trauma surgeons.

    PubMed

    James, Melissa K; Lee, Shi-Wen; Minneman, Jennifer A; Moore, Maureen D; Klein, Taylor R; Robitsek, R Jonathan; Barie, Phillip S; Schubl, Sebastian D

    2017-06-01

    Trauma triage decisions can be influenced by both knowledge and experience. Consequently, there may be substantial variability in computed tomography (CT) scans desired by emergency medicine physicians, surgical chief residents, and attending trauma surgeons. We quantified this difference and studied the effects of each group's decisions on missed injuries, cost, and radiation exposure. All blunt trauma activations at an urban level 1 trauma center were studied over a 6-mo period. Three months into the study, a pan-scan protocol was introduced. Prior to CT imaging, providers separately completed a survey that asked which CT scans were desired for each patient. Based on the completed surveys, hypothetical missed injuries, radiation exposure, and cost were determined. The variability in the number of CT scans desired by each of the three providers and the resulting cost and radiation exposure were not statistically significant. Substantial variability was predominantly seen in the indications for the desired scans, with the difference between proportions ranging from 3.1%-68.7%. Agreement among the three providers was highest for head and c-spine scans (80%-100%) and lowest for maxillary face (57%-80%) and chest scans (52%-74%). Overall, the missed injury rate was similar for all the providers; chief residents missed significantly more major injuries than trauma attendings during the pan-scan period (P = 0.03). Trauma training and level of training did not have a substantial effect on radiological decisions during the initial trauma assessment. This study sheds light on the growing uniformity among providers with regard to medical decision-making in the initial work-up of trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Eye TVR: Eye Trauma and Visual Restoration Team

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    array and a percutaneous zero insertion force (ZIF) connector is implemented with the 10-mm-long monolithic cable on the same wafer . The key wafer ...processing steps are shown in Figure 7. The three-mask fabrication steps are needed to produce seven µECoG devices on a 4-inch wafer . After...microfabrication the arrays were released from the wafer . Two representative arrays are shown in Figure 8. Figure 6. Design of the micro

  11. Understanding Teamwork in Trauma Resuscitation through Analysis of Team Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarcevic, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of human errors in complex work settings can lead to important insights into the workspace design. This type of analysis is particularly relevant to safety-critical, socio-technical systems that are highly dynamic, stressful and time-constrained, and where failures can result in catastrophic societal, economic or environmental…

  12. Understanding Teamwork in Trauma Resuscitation through Analysis of Team Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarcevic, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of human errors in complex work settings can lead to important insights into the workspace design. This type of analysis is particularly relevant to safety-critical, socio-technical systems that are highly dynamic, stressful and time-constrained, and where failures can result in catastrophic societal, economic or environmental…

  13. Eye TVR: Eye Trauma and Visual Restoration Team

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    nerve fiber layer. b. Millimeter wave stimulation for functional retinal diagnostics. 2. Visual Prosthesis and Biomaterials — to develop materials... prosthesis or drug delivery systems. Tasks: a. Active sensor for mobility aid to blind. b. An advanced neural interface system for a cortical...visual prosthesis . BODY Task 1a: Spectral contrast for the diagnosis of early damage to the retinal nerve fiber layer (a) (b) (c) (d) Fig. 1 Calibrated

  14. Hypothermia in trauma.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Samuel Edwin

    2013-12-01

    Hypovolaemic shock that results through traumatically inflicted haemorrhage can have disastrous consequences for the victim. Initially the body can compensate for lost circulating volume, but as haemorrhage continues compensatory mechanisms fail and the patient's condition worsens significantly. Hypovolaemia results in the lethal triad, a combination of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy, three factors that are interlinked and serve to worsen each other. The lethal triad is a form of vicious cycle, which unless broken will result in death. This report will focus on the role of hypothermia (a third of the lethal triad) in trauma, examining literature to assess how prehospital temperature control can impact on the trauma patient. Spontaneous hypothermia following trauma has severely deleterious consequences for the trauma victim; however, both active warming of patients and clinically induced hypothermia can produce particularly positive results and improve patient outcome. Possible coagulopathic side effects of clinically induced hypothermia may be corrected with topical haemostatic agents, with the benefits of an extended golden hour given by clinically induced hypothermia far outweighing these risks. Active warming of patients, to prevent spontaneous trauma induced hypothermia, is currently the only viable method currently available to improve patient outcome. This method is easy to implement requiring simple protocols and contributes significantly to interrupting the lethal triad. However, the future of trauma care appears to lie with clinically induced therapeutic hypothermia. This new treatment provides optimism that in the future the number of deaths resulting from catastrophic haemorrhaging may be significantly lessened.

  15. Noninvasive ventilation in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Karcz, Marcin K; Papadakos, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Trauma patients are a diverse population with heterogeneous needs for ventilatory support. This requirement depends mainly on the severity of their ventilatory dysfunction, degree of deterioration in gaseous exchange, any associated injuries, and the individual feasibility of potentially using a noninvasive ventilation approach. Noninvasive ventilation may reduce the need to intubate patients with trauma-related hypoxemia. It is well-known that these patients are at increased risk to develop hypoxemic respiratory failure which may or may not be associated with hypercapnia. Hypoxemia in these patients is due to ventilation perfusion mismatching and right to left shunt because of lung contusion, atelectasis, an inability to clear secretions as well as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax, all of which are common in trauma patients. Noninvasive ventilation has been tried in these patients in order to avoid the complications related to endotracheal intubation, mainly ventilator-associated pneumonia. The potential usefulness of noninvasive ventilation in the ventilatory management of trauma patients, though reported in various studies, has not been sufficiently investigated on a large scale. According to the British Thoracic Society guidelines, the indications and efficacy of noninvasive ventilation treatment in respiratory distress induced by trauma have thus far been inconsistent and merely received a low grade recommendation. In this review paper, we analyse and compare the results of various studies in which noninvasive ventilation was applied and discuss the role and efficacy of this ventilator modality in trauma. PMID:25685722

  16. Video conferencing versus telephone calls for team work across hospitals: a qualitative study on simulated emergencies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Teamwork is important for patient care and outcome in emergencies. In rural areas, efficient communication between rural hospitals and regional trauma centers optimise decisions and treatment of trauma patients. Little is known on potentials and effects of virtual team to team cooperation between rural and regional trauma teams. Methods We adapted a video conferencing (VC) system to the work process between multidisciplinary teams responsible for trauma as well as medical emergencies between one rural and one regional (university) hospital. We studied how the teams cooperated during simulated critical scenarios, and compared VC with standard telephone communication. We used qualitative observations and interviews to evaluate results. Results The team members found VC to be a useful tool during emergencies and for building "virtual emergency teams" across distant hospitals. Visual communication combined with visual patient information is superior to information gained during ordinary telephone calls, but VC may also cause interruptions in the local teamwork. Conclusion VC can improve clinical cooperation and decision processes in virtual teams during critical patient care. Such team interaction requires thoughtful organisation, training, and new rules for communication. PMID:19943978

  17. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. Methods We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching

  18. [Abusive head trauma: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Grana, M; Nazar, M; de Luca, S; Casalini, E; Eyheremendy, E

    2015-01-01

    The abusive head trauma is a form of child abuse. The most frequent injuries are intracranial lesions, such as subdural hematoma, as well as retinal hemorrhages, usually without other external injuries. Due to its complexity, this problem requires a multidisciplinary medical team, where the role of the radiologist is important, since there are multiple diagnostic methods that are complementary in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Blunt ocular trauma secondary to "war games".

    PubMed

    Mamalis, N; Monson, M C; Farnsworth, S T; White, G L

    1990-11-01

    "War games" are gaining popularity in the western United States. These recreational contests involve members of one team attempting to shoot their opponents with high-velocity dye or paint pellets fired from air guns. Unfortunately, serious eye injuries occur when participants do not use protective eye wear. We report a case of severe blunt ocular trauma resulting in a hyphema, choroidal rupture, and retinal and vitreal hemorrhage secondary to a paint pellet striking an unprotected eye. This injury resulted in a significant visual defect in this patient.

  20. Burn Teams and Burn Centers: The Importance of a Comprehensive Team Approach to Burn Care

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M.; Mecott-Rivera, Gabriel A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Herndon, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Advances in burn care have been colossal, but while extra work is needed, it is clear that the organized effort of burn teams can continue making improvements in survival rates and quality of life possible for patients. Burn patients are unique, representing the most severe model of trauma,33 and hence this necessitates treatment in the best facilities available for that endeavor. Burn centers have developed to meet these intricate needs but can only function productively and most efficiently through well organized, multifaceted, patient-centered teams in areas of clinical care and research. PMID:19793550

  1. Speeding Up Team Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmondson, Amy; Bohmer, Richard; Pisano, Gary

    2001-01-01

    A study of 16 cardiac surgery teams looked at how the teams adapted to new ways of working. The challenge of team management is to implement new processes as quickly as possible. Steps for creating a learning team include selecting a mix of skills and expertise, framing the challenge, and creating an environment of psychological safety. (JOW)

  2. The Discipline of Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzenbach, Jon R.; Smith, Douglas K.

    1993-01-01

    Teams share commitment, translate purpose into performance goals, and have members be accountable with and to their teammates. Types of teams are those that recommend, make or do things, and run things. The distinction between teams and other working groups is performance: an effective team is worth more than the sum of its parts. (SK)

  3. TeamXchange: A Team Project Experience Involving Virtual Teams and Fluid Team Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dineen, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    TeamXchange, an online team-based exercise, is described. TeamXchange is consistent with the collaborative model of learning and provides a means of fostering enhanced student learning and engagement through collaboration in virtual teams experiencing periodic membership changes. It was administered in an undergraduate Organizational Behavior…

  4. Speeding Up Team Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmondson, Amy; Bohmer, Richard; Pisano, Gary

    2001-01-01

    A study of 16 cardiac surgery teams looked at how the teams adapted to new ways of working. The challenge of team management is to implement new processes as quickly as possible. Steps for creating a learning team include selecting a mix of skills and expertise, framing the challenge, and creating an environment of psychological safety. (JOW)

  5. Instructional Design Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, Judith A.; Collins, Keith

    1974-01-01

    An instructional design team, composed of experts in nursing, education, and media production, is used at the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing, Madison, to produce instructional units for a new curriculum. The authors summarize steps of team/faculty communications, team methodology, and factors influencing the team's effectiveness. (EA)

  6. Student Team Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    Three Student Team Learning techniques have been extensively researched and found to significantly increase student learning. In Student Teams Achievement Divisions (STAD), teams are made up of high, average, and low performing students of both genders and different racial and ethnic backgrounds. Team members study worksheets, work problems in…

  7. TeamXchange: A Team Project Experience Involving Virtual Teams and Fluid Team Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dineen, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    TeamXchange, an online team-based exercise, is described. TeamXchange is consistent with the collaborative model of learning and provides a means of fostering enhanced student learning and engagement through collaboration in virtual teams experiencing periodic membership changes. It was administered in an undergraduate Organizational Behavior…

  8. Sports Teams Extend Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traditional high school athletic teams, Unified Sports teams are designed to immerse students with intellectual disabilities in a facet of school culture that has largely eluded them. Nationwide, more than 2,000 schools in 42 states have the teams, where the ideal is for about half the athletes on each team to be students with intellectual…

  9. Sports Teams Extend Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traditional high school athletic teams, Unified Sports teams are designed to immerse students with intellectual disabilities in a facet of school culture that has largely eluded them. Nationwide, more than 2,000 schools in 42 states have the teams, where the ideal is for about half the athletes on each team to be students with intellectual…

  10. Micro Team Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Burton E.

    A micro team teaching project was designed to give student teachers an increased responsibility for planning, executing, and evaluating an instructional program; to provide classroom teachers who had not previously taught in a teaching team with the opportunity to learn about the dynamics of team teaching through organizing teams of their own; to…

  11. Assessing Team Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Susan; Rottier, Jerry

    Interdisciplinary middle school level teams capitalize on the idea that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Administrators and team members can maximize the advantages of teamwork using team assessments to increase the benefits for students, teachers, and the school environment. Assessing team performance can lead to high performing…

  12. Toxicological screening in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Carrigan, T; Field, H; Illingworth, R; Gaffney, P; Hamer, D

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To determine the prevalence and patterns of alcohol and drug use in patients with major trauma. Methods—Consecutive trauma patient enrolment, 24 hours a day, was envisaged with anonymised patient data on gender, age band, and mechanism of injury collected. The study group had surplus plasma quantitatively analysed for ethanol concentration, and urine samples were initially screened, via immunoassay, for opiates, cannabinoids, amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cocaine, and methadone. Confirmation and specification of individual positive results was then performed using thin layer or gas-liquid chromatography. Drugs of treatment given in the resuscitation room, if subsequently detected in the urine samples, were excluded from the final results. Results—There were 116 eligible trauma patients assessed and treated in the resuscitation room over a six month period, of which 93 (80%) were enrolled. Altogether 27% of this trauma population had plasma ethanol concentrations greater than 80 mg/dl. There was a significantly higher prevalence of alcohol intoxication in the group not involved in a road traffic accident (RTA) compared with the group who were involved in a RTA. Initial screening of urine for drugs revealed a prevalence of 51%. After 12 exclusions due to iatrogenic administration of opiates, the final confirmed prevalence was 35% in this trauma population. The individual drug prevalence was 13% for cannabinoids, 11% for codeine, 8% for morphine, 6% for amphetamine, 6% for benzodiazepines, 3% for cocaine, 1% for dihydrocodeine, and 1% for methadone. Conclusions—There is a notable prevalence of drug and alcohol use in this British accident and emergency trauma population. A significantly higher prevalence for alcohol intoxication was found in the non-RTA group compared with the RTA group. The patterns of drug usage detected reflect local influences and less cocaine use is seen compared with American studies. The association between alcohol, drugs

  13. [Thoracic drainage in trauma emergencies].

    PubMed

    Bergaminelli, C; De Angelis, P; Gauthier, P; Salzano, A; Vecchio, G

    1999-10-01

    A group of 191 cases of emergency tube thoracostomy for acute trauma reviewed retrospectively from March 1993 to March 1998 is reported. Of this group 169 were men and 22 were women. Their ages ranged from 16 to 73 years. The causes were as follows: 89 cases (46%) road accident; 33 cases (17%) accidental trauma; 33 cases (17%) someone else violence (assault, gunshot or stab wound); 15 cases (8%) work accident; 11 cases (6%) domestic accident and 5 cases (3%) iatrogenic trauma. In 32 patients a diagnosis of pneumothorax was made (2 tension, 11 for penetrating chest injuries, 19 after blunt trauma). In 2 cases of tension pneumothorax and in 3 cases of open pneumothorax a chest tube (24-28 Fr) in the third space in the mid-clavicular line was introduced. In the other patients it was decided to place a chest tube in the mid-axillary line in the fifth intercostal space to drain pneumothorax. Only in 7 cases suction was necessary. Fifty-four hemothorax (3 bilateral) were treated in 11 cases using thoracentesis, while the remaining cases were treated using the insertion of multiple drainage holes in the intercostal space (fifth in the mid-axillary line directed inferiorly and posteriorly). One hundred and three were the cases of hemopneumothorax: 24 of them received 2 chest tubes, the first (20-26 Fr) apically in the second intercostal space in the mid-clavicular line, the second (32-38 Fr) in the fifth intercostal space in the mid-axillary line. All the other cases were treated using a single thoracostomy. In 14 cases suction was applied. Two cases of chylothorax resolved by a large tube positioned in the chest (fifth intercostal space in the mid-axillary line) with a constant negative pressure were also observed. Duration of tube drainage ranged from 4 and 18 days, with an average of 11 days. Five infections of thoracostomy site and 1 empyema resolved by rethoracotomy were observed. Moreover, there were 3 complications: 2 subcutaneous placements and 1 little laceration

  14. Team Leader Structuring for Team Effectiveness and Team Learning in Command-and-Control Teams.

    PubMed

    van der Haar, Selma; Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke; Euwe, Eline; Segers, Mien

    2017-04-01

    Due to their crucial and highly consequential task, it is of utmost importance to understand the levers leading to effectiveness of multidisciplinary emergency management command-and-control (EMCC) teams. We argue that the formal EMCC team leader needs to initiate structure in the team meetings to support organizing the work as well as facilitate team learning, especially the team learning process of constructive conflict. In a sample of 17 EMCC teams performing a realistic EMCC exercise, including one or two team meetings (28 in sum), we coded the team leader's verbal structuring behaviors (1,704 events), rated constructive conflict by external experts, and rated team effectiveness by field experts. Results show that leaders of effective teams use structuring behaviors more often (except asking procedural questions) but decreasingly over time. They support constructive conflict by clarifying and by making summaries that conclude in a command or decision in a decreasing frequency over time.

  15. Team Leader Structuring for Team Effectiveness and Team Learning in Command-and-Control Teams

    PubMed Central

    van der Haar, Selma; Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke; Euwe, Eline; Segers, Mien

    2017-01-01

    Due to their crucial and highly consequential task, it is of utmost importance to understand the levers leading to effectiveness of multidisciplinary emergency management command-and-control (EMCC) teams. We argue that the formal EMCC team leader needs to initiate structure in the team meetings to support organizing the work as well as facilitate team learning, especially the team learning process of constructive conflict. In a sample of 17 EMCC teams performing a realistic EMCC exercise, including one or two team meetings (28 in sum), we coded the team leader’s verbal structuring behaviors (1,704 events), rated constructive conflict by external experts, and rated team effectiveness by field experts. Results show that leaders of effective teams use structuring behaviors more often (except asking procedural questions) but decreasingly over time. They support constructive conflict by clarifying and by making summaries that conclude in a command or decision in a decreasing frequency over time. PMID:28490856

  16. Current concepts in simulation-based trauma education.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Robert A; Ali, Jameel

    2008-11-01

    The use of simulation-based technology in trauma education has focused on providing a safe and effective alternative to the more traditional methods that are used to teach technical skills and critical concepts in trauma resuscitation. Trauma team training using simulation-based technology is also being used to develop skills in leadership, team-information sharing, communication, and decision-making. The integration of simulators into medical student curriculum, residency training, and continuing medical education has been strongly recommended by the American College of Surgeons as an innovative means of enhancing patient safety, reducing medical errors, and performing a systematic evaluation of various competencies. Advanced human patient simulators are increasingly being used in trauma as an evaluation tool to assess clinical performance and to teach and reinforce essential knowledge, skills, and abilities. A number of specialty simulators in trauma and critical care have also been designed to meet these educational objectives. Ongoing educational research is still needed to validate long-term retention of knowledge and skills, provide reliable methods to evaluate teaching effectiveness and performance, and to demonstrate improvement in patient safety and overall quality of care.

  17. The discipline of teams.

    PubMed

    Katzenbach, J R; Smith, D K

    1993-01-01

    Groups don't become teams because that is what someone calls them. Nor do teamwork values by themselves ensure team performance. So what is a team? How can managers know when the team option makes sense and what they can do to ensure team success? In this article, drawn from their recent book The Wisdom of Teams, McKinsey partners Jon Katzenbach and Douglas Smith answer these questions and outline the discipline that makes a real team. The essence of a team is shared commitment. Without it, groups perform as individuals; with it, they become a powerful unit of collective performance. The best teams invest a tremendous amount of time shaping a purpose that they can own. The best teams also translate their purpose into specific performance goals. And members of successful teams pitch in and become accountable with and to their teammates. The fundamental distinction between teams and other forms of working groups turns on performance. A working group relies on the individual contributions of its members for group performance. But a team strives for something greater than its members could achieve individually. In short, an effective team is always worth more than the sum of its parts. Katzenbach and Smith identify three basic types of teams: teams that recommend things--task forces or project groups; teams that make or do things--manufacturing, operations, or marketing groups; and teams that run things--groups that oversee some significant functional activity. For managers, the key is knowing where in the organization real teams should be encouraged. Team potential exists anywhere hierarchy or organizational boundaries inhibit good performance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Developing Your Dream Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatlin, Kenda

    2005-01-01

    Almost anyone has held various roles on a team, be it a family unit, sports team, or a project-oriented team. As an educator, one must make a conscious decision to build and invest in a team. Gathering the best team possible will help one achieve one's goals. This article explores some of the key reasons why it is important to focus on the team…

  19. Current status and future options for trauma and emergency surgery in Europe.

    PubMed

    Leppaniemi, Ari

    2008-01-01

    Currently, there is great variation in the way trauma and non-trauma emergency surgery is organized in Europe. Trauma system development based on orthopedic trauma surgery seems to be more advanced in the central European countries and less developed in Scandinavia, The Baltic States, United Kingdom and the Mediterranean countries. Specific training for trauma surgery correlates with higher level of trauma system development. Multiple common features in the management of a surgical emergency, whether caused by injury or acute disease process, would favor the integration of these two disciplines into a single organizational and educational entity based on regionalization of emergency surgical services and general surgery-based education aiming for multidisciplinary team leadership and decision making skills, and surgical competence in acute life- and limb-saving surgery.

  20. Male genital trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-07-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references.

  1. Ultrasonography in ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Dastevska-Djosevska, Emilija

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a non-invasive, simple and effective diagnostic method which enables visualization and evaluation of intraocular injury degree in cloudy eye media. The basic aim of this investigation was to find out the frequency of various types of ocular injuries using ultrasonography and to make an analysis of their frequency in relation to gender and age. This retrospective study included 182 patients hospitalized at the Clinic of Ophthalmology in Skopje due to mechanical eye trauma. The patients underwent ultrasonography on the Alcon Ultrascan Imagining System apparatus and Sonomed EZ Scan AB 5500+. B scan technique was used primarily, while the A scan had a positive and correlative role. Ocular trauma was more present in males (85.2%) compared to females (14.8%). 49.5% of the patients had open, and 50.5% had closed globe injuries. The most represented age group in ocular injuries was the age ranged from 51 to 60 years. There was no significant difference between the type of mechanical injury and the age (Chi-Squares=5.52 p=0.47895025). Ultrasonography showed that the most frequent pathologic result, both in open and closed globe injuries, was vitreous hemorrhage. Ultrasonography has an irreplaceable role in the clinical evaluation and management of ocular trauma. It showed that the most frequent finding in ocular trauma was vitreous haemorrhage, and the male gender was more frequently exposed to ocular trauma.

  2. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions.

  3. What is the impact of multidisciplinary team simulation training on team performance and efficiency of patient care? An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Margaret; Curtis, Kate; McCloughen, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    In hospital emergencies require a structured team approach to facilitate simultaneous input into immediate resuscitation, stabilisation and prioritisation of care. Efforts to improve teamwork in the health care context include multidisciplinary simulation-based resuscitation team training, yet there is limited evidence demonstrating the value of these programmes.(1) We aimed to determine the current state of knowledge about the key components and impacts of multidisciplinary simulation-based resuscitation team training by conducting an integrative review of the literature. A systematic search using electronic (three databases) and hand searching methods for primary research published between 1980 and 2014 was undertaken; followed by a rigorous screening and quality appraisal process. The included articles were assessed for similarities and differences; the content was grouped and synthesised to form three main categories of findings. Eleven primary research articles representing a variety of simulation-based resuscitation team training were included. Five studies involved trauma teams; two described resuscitation teams in the context of intensive care and operating theatres and one focused on the anaesthetic team. Simulation is an effective method to train resuscitation teams in the management of crisis scenarios and has the potential to improve team performance in the areas of communication, teamwork and leadership. Team training improves the performance of the resuscitation team in simulated emergency scenarios. However, the transferability of educational outcomes to the clinical setting needs to be more clearly demonstrated. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Trauma quiz. Terribly troublesome, trauma teeth.

    PubMed

    Feiglin, B

    1998-08-01

    Unfortunately, we come across many traumatised teeth during our practising career. Some of these traumatic injuries are rather simple to treat whereas others provide us with a real challenge. It is absolutely essential that the diagnosis of the injury be known before any treatment is attempted. When it comes to trauma, however, defining the exact form of treatment can often be very difficult. In this paper I will discuss some of the cases that I have managed and leave it up to YOU to decide whether my treatment has been correct, incorrect or whether there is some other form of treatment that we have at our disposal that could have been attempted.

  5. A comparison of paper documentation to electronic documentation for trauma resuscitations at a level I pediatric trauma center.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Carla; Wurster, Lee Ann; Groner, Jonathan; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Hendren, Valerie; Nuss, Kathy; Haley, Kathy; Gerberick, Julie; Malehorn, Beth; Covert, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Although the electronic medical record reduces errors and improves patient safety, most emergency departments continue to use paper documentation for trauma resuscitations. The purpose of this study was to compare the completeness of paper documentation with that of electronic documentation for trauma resuscitations. The setting was a level I pediatric trauma center where 100% electronic documentation was achieved in August 2012. A random sample of trauma resuscitations documented by paper (n=200) was compared with a random sample of trauma resuscitations documented electronically (n=200) to identify the presence or absence of the documentation of 11 key data elements for each trauma resuscitation. The electronic documentation more frequently captured 5 data elements: time of team activation (100% vs 85%, P<.00), primary assessment (94% vs 88%, P<.036), arrival time of attending physician (98% vs 93.5%, P<.026), intravenous fluid volume in the emergency department (94% vs 88%, P<.036), and disposition (100% vs 89.5%, P<.00). The paper documentation more often recorded one data element: volume of intravenous fluids administered prior to arrival (92.5% vs 100%, P<.00). No statistical difference in documentation rates was found for 5 data elements: vital signs, treatment by emergency medical personnel, arrival time in the emergency department, and level of trauma alert activation. Electronic documentation produced superior records of pediatric trauma resuscitations compared with paper documentation. Because the electronic medical record improves patient safety, it should be adopted as the standard documentation method for all trauma resuscitations. Copyright © 2015 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Indicators: Wetland Vegetation (Introduced Species)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduced plants are indicators of the ecological integrity of waters and evidence of increased human-caused disturbance in the watershed. Introduced species that cause economic or environmental harm, or harm to human health, are called invasive species.

  7. Trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Susen, S

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhage is the leading cause of death in trauma patients who arrive alive at hospital. This type of hemorrhage has a "coagulopathic" component, specific to major trauma and associated with poor outcomes. Over the last decade, a better understanding of this trauma-induced coagulopathy lead to a new therapeutic approach requiring earlier and more aggressive management. This hemostatic resuscitation includes early activation of massive transfusion protocols with: 1) immediate delivery of blood packs with high ratios for RBC units: fresh frozen plasma: platelet-concentrates; 2) antifibrinolytics; 3) substitution of coagulation factors. However, early identification of coagulopathic patients requiring aggressive hemostatic resuscitation remains challenging, with an increasing role of point of care devices for hemostatic diagnosis and monitoring. Efforts have to be focused on the early diagnosis of coagulopathy for immediate delivery of blood products and coagulation factors to the right, accurately screened patients through pre-established protocols within the golden hour. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  8. Mucormycosis in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cocanour, C S; Miller-Crotchett, P; Reed, R L; Johnson, P C; Fischer, R P

    1992-01-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare but often fatal infection in trauma patients. We retrospectively reviewed a 9-year experience with mucormycosis among injured patients. Eleven patients had biopsy- or culture-proven mucormycosis. Nine patients were victims of blunt trauma, two patients had burns measuring greater than 50% TBSA. No patient was at increased risk because of underlying disease or immunosuppression prior to injury. All 11 patients had open wounds on admission. Four patients died of mucormycosis. All nonsurvivors had phycomycotic gangrenous cellulitis of the head, the trunk, or both. In contrast, survivors had involvement of only the extremities. Because of underlying disease, contaminating wounds, antibiotic use, or immunocompromise secondary to shock and sepsis, trauma patients are at risk of developing mucormycosis. To successfully treat mucormycosis, diagnosis must be prompt and accompanied by aggressive debridement and parenteral administration of amphotericin B.

  9. Transfusion practices in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, V Trichur; Cattamanchi, Srihari

    2014-01-01

    Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury. PMID:25535424

  10. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  11. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will this in some way impair their responding to current or ongoing trauma? The paper addresses practical strategies for implementing one evidence-based treatment, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with ongoing traumas. Collaboration with local therapists and families participating in TF-CBT community and international programs elucidated effective strategies for applying TF-CBT with these youth. These strategies included: 1) enhancing safety early in treatment; 2) effectively engaging parents who experience personal ongoing trauma; and 3) during the trauma narrative and processing component focusing on a) increasing parental awareness and acceptance of the extent of the youths’ ongoing trauma experiences; b) addressing youths’ maladaptive cognitions about ongoing traumas; and c) helping youth differentiate between real danger and generalized trauma reminders. Case examples illustrate how to use these strategies in diverse clinical situations. Through these strategies TF-CBT clinicians can effectively improve outcomes for youth experiencing ongoing traumas. PMID:21855140

  12. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  13. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  14. Coagulopathy of Trauma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell J; Christie, S Ariane

    2017-01-01

    Coagulopathy is common after injury and develops independently from iatrogenic, hypothermic, and dilutional causes. Despite considerable research on the topic over the past decade, trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) continues to portend poor outcomes, including decreased survival. We review the current evidence regarding the diagnosis and mechanisms underlying trauma induced coagulopathy and summarize the debates regarding optimal management strategy including product resuscitation, potential pharmacologic adjuncts, and targeted approaches to hemostasis. Throughout, we will identify areas of continued investigation and controversy in the understanding and management of TIC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chest Wall Trauma.

    PubMed

    Majercik, Sarah; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2017-05-01

    Chest wall trauma is common, and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of trauma patients. Early identification of major chest wall and concomitant intrathoracic injuries is critical. Generalized management of multiple rib fractures and flail chest consists of adequate pain control (including locoregional modalities); management of pulmonary dysfunction by invasive and noninvasive means; and, in some cases, surgical fixation. Multiple studies have shown that patients with flail chest have substantial benefit (decreased ventilator and intensive care unit days, improved pulmonary function, and improved long-term functional outcome) when they undergo surgery compared with nonoperative management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

  17. Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

  18. Team training/simulation.

    PubMed

    Clark, Erin A S; Fisher, Janet; Arafeh, Julia; Druzin, Maurice

    2010-03-01

    Obstetrical emergencies require the rapid formation of a team with clear communication, strong leadership, and appropriate decision-making to ensure a positive patient outcome. Obstetric teams can improve their emergency response capability and efficiency through team and simulation training. Postpartum hemorrhage is an ideal model for team and simulation training, as postpartum hemorrhage requires a multidisciplinary team with the capability to produce a protocol-driven, rapid response. This article provides an overview of team and simulation training and focuses on applications within obstetrics, particularly preparation for postpartum hemorrhage.

  19. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  20. Paediatric and adolescent horse-related injuries: does the mechanism of injury justify a trauma response?

    PubMed

    Craven, John A

    2008-08-01

    To identify the frequency, variety and disposition of horse-related injury presentations to the ED and to use this information to evaluate the existing institutional trauma team activation criteria following horse-related injuries. A retrospective case analysis was performed of all horse-related injury presentations to the ED of Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, Australia, in the 5 year period between January 1999 and December 2003. A total of 186 children presented with horse-related injuries during the 5 year study period. The median age of injury was 9 years (range 1-17 years), with 81% of presentations female and 60% of patients hospitalized. The mechanism of injury was divided into four groups: 148 falls (79%), 28 kicks (15%), 7 tramples (4%) and 5 bites (3%). There was one death. Seven presentations rated an Injury Severity Score >15, with full trauma team activation occurring for two of these presentations. Although horse-related injury presentations are uncommon, severe injuries do occur. Patients presenting with severe horse-related injuries do not always activate a full trauma team response based on current trauma team activation criteria. These severe injury presentations are supported by a limited trauma team response, which activates on the mechanism of injury. The effectiveness of this as a contingency system needs to be evaluated.

  1. ATLS adherence in the transfer of rural trauma patients to a level I facility.

    PubMed

    McCrum, Marta L; McKee, Jessica; Lai, Michael; Staples, John; Switzer, Noah; Widder, Sandy L

    2013-09-01

    Injury sustained in rural areas has been shown to carry higher mortality rates than trauma in urban settings. This disparity is partially attributed to increased distance from definitive care and underscores the importance of proper primary trauma management prior to transfer to a trauma facility. The purpose of this study was to assess Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guideline adherence in the management of adult trauma patients transferred from rural hospitals to a level I facility. We performed a retrospective analysis of all adult major trauma patients transferred ≥50km from an outlying hospital to a level I trauma centre from 2007 through 2009. Transfer practices were evaluated using ATLS guidelines. 646 patients were analyzed. Mean age was 40.5years and 94% sustained blunt injuries with a median Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 22. Median transport distance was 253km. Among all patients, there were notable deficiencies (<80% adherence) in 8 of 11 ATLS recommended interventions, including patient rewarming (8% adherence), chest tube insertion (53%), adequate IV access (53%), and motor/sensory exam (72%). Patients with higher ISS scores, and those transferred by air were more likely to receive ATLS recommended interventions. Key aspects of ATLS resuscitation guidelines are frequently missed during transfer of trauma patients from the periphery to level I trauma centres. Comprehensive quality improvement initiatives, including targeted education, telemedicine and trauma team training programmes could improve quality of care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Geriatric assessment teams.

    PubMed

    Campbell, L J; Cole, K D

    1987-02-01

    In geriatric care, a form of teamwork is the recommended modality because of the complex biopsychosocial needs of the patient. The goal of geriatric assessment programs is to establish an intensive assessment of older adults which requires the competencies of several coordinated disciplines. Not only do teams have the capacity to assess patients in much greater depth but also patients share different information with different providers. The composition of the team is dictated by the needs of the patient population in accordance with resources available. Next, one must identify a method of team practice in order for interactions to take place. The method of functioning determines what kind of team it is, ranging from independent functioning with minimal formal interfacing to interdependent activity interspersed with formal and informal interactions. In initiating a geriatric assessment program, one needs to determine which tasks demand interdisciplinary collaboration, which require interdisciplinary consultation, and which can be performed using a matrix or extended team model. In this model, the core team is supplemented by other disciplines as determined by the team, predicated on patient problems. Teams can profit from training, which can help with choosing an appropriate model, establishing a manual of procedure, and managing interactive issues and problems. This can occur early in the team's formation, or when a team takes on new members. The minimal level of team development would include establishing program goals, delineating professional responsibilities and roles, and implementing a system for exchanging and documenting information about patient plans. Saving input to share only in team meeting is inefficient, so health care teams need to recognize the importance of informal interchanges. It is still a matter of conjecture about what team works best with which patients under what circumstances or conditions. Multiple randomized clinical trials with teams

  3. C-STARS Baltimore Simulation Center Military Trauma Training Program: Training for High Performance Trauma Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-19

    belly and covered with dressing, medic reports no LOC, pain 8/10. Patient was complaining of being thirsty and given water via canteen. Antibiotics ...shoveling snow and the pain continued. He is moderately obese , does not exercise, uses EtOH frequently and has a 35-year hx of tobacco use...cessation of exercise • Pt. is moderately obese , (Ht.=68”, Wt.=250 lb), and has not been tested for diabetes • Pt. reports a history of tobacco use, (1

  4. [Interdisciplinary treatment of severely injured patients in the trauma resuscitation room].

    PubMed

    Wurmb, Thomas; Müller, Thorben; Jansen, Hendrik; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Roewer, Norbert; Kühne, Christian A

    2010-06-01

    The trauma resuscitation room in emergency departments is an important link between preclinical treatment and clinical management of patients with multiple trauma. For the trauma team (Trauma Surgery, Anaesthesiology, Radiology) to respond adequately, a high degree of training and standardisation is required. With arrival of the patient, the trauma team starts with priority orientated resuscitation. After life-threatening problems have been resolved, the diagnostic work is started with plain films of the chest and the pelvis and FAST. Additional plain films are made depending on further suspected injuries. Reassessment of the patient is done and necessary emergency interventions are performed before the patient is transferred to the radiology department for organ focused computed tomography. CT has gained importance in the early diagnostic phase of trauma care. The development of Multislice Helical Computed Tomography (MSCT) has led to substantial refinement in the diagnostic work-up. For many institutions it has become an essential part of the imaging of the traumatized patient. Delayed and insufficient medical interventions have a high impact on negative patient outcome. Anticipating and dealing with critical situations might reduce preventable errors in the treatment process and can be achieved by implementation of an algorithm-based structured workflow. In that context some elements of quality management are well established in clinical practice. In the presented paper we describe the effort that needs to be done to provide optimal care for multiple trauma patients after admission to a designed trauma centre.

  5. Developing process guidelines for trauma care in the Netherlands for severely injured patients: results from a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In organised trauma systems the process of care is the key to quality. Nevertheless, the optimal process of trauma care remains unclear due to lack of or inconclusive evidence. Because monitoring and improving the performance of a trauma system is complex, this study aimed to develop consensus-based process guidelines for trauma care in the Netherlands for severely injured patients. Methods A five-round Delphi study was conducted with 141 participants that represent all professions involved in trauma care. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to evaluate whether consensus extended across all professions and to detect possible bias. Results Consensus was reached on 21 guidelines within 4 categories: timeliness, actions, competent teams and interdisciplinary process. Timeliness guidelines set specific critical limits and definitions for 10 time intervals in the time period from an emergency call until the patient leaves the trauma room. Action guidelines reflect aspects of appropriate care and strongly rely on the international Advanced Trauma Life Support principles. Competence guidelines include flow charts to assess the competence of prehospital and emergency department teams. Essential to competent teams are education and experience of all team members. The interdisciplinary process guideline focuses on cooperation, communication and feedback within and between all professions involved. Consensus was extended across all professions and no bias was detected. Conclusions In this Delphi study, a large expert panel agreed on a set of guidelines describing the optimal process of care for severely injured trauma patients in the Netherlands. In addition to time intervals and appropriate actions, these guidelines emphasise the importance of team competence and interdisciplinary processes in trauma care. The guidelines can be seen as a description of a best practice and a new field standard in the Netherlands. The next step is to implement the guidelines and

  6. Structured Sensory Trauma Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, William; Kuban, Caelan

    2010-01-01

    This article features the National Institute of Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC), a program that has demonstrated via field testing, exploratory research, time series studies, and evidence-based research studies that its Structured Sensory Intervention for Traumatized Children, Adolescents, and Parents (SITCAP[R]) produces statistically…

  7. Laparoscopy in Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, Selman; Dorr, Katrin

    2010-02-01

    The decision in favor of surgery or nonoperative conservative treatment in blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma requires a precise diagnosis that is not always possible with imaging techniques, whereby there is great danger that an injury to the diaphragm or intestines may be overlooked. To avoid such oversights, indications for exploratory laparotomy have traditionally been generous, to the extent that up to 41% of exploratory laparotomies turn out to be nontherapeutic and could be, or could have been, avoided with laparoscopy. A diagnostic laparoscopy with therapeutic option should only be attempted in stable patients. Three trocars are usually used and the abdomen is explored systematically, beginning with the right upper quadrant and continuing clockwise. Hollow viscus injuries and injuries to the diaphragm and mesentery can be detected and sutured laparoscopically. Injuries to parenchymal organs are not a primary focus of laparoscopy, but with a laparoscopic approach, they usually no longer bleed in stable patients and can be sealed with tissue adhesive and collagen tamponade to prevent re-bleeding. The routine use of laparoscopy can achieve a sensitivity of 90-100% in abdominal trauma. This can reduce the number of unnecessary laparotomies and the related morbidity. Laparoscopy can be performed safely and effectively in stable patients with abdominal trauma. The most important advantages are reduction of the nontherapeutic laparotomy rate, morbidity, shortening of hospitalization, and cost-effectiveness. In the future, new developments in and the miniaturization of equipment can be expected to increase the use of minimally invasive techniques in abdominal trauma cases.

  8. Early Childhood Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  9. Ultrasound in cardiac trauma.

    PubMed

    Saranteas, Theodosios; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Mandila, Christina; Poularas, John; Panou, Fotios

    2017-04-01

    In the perioperative period, the emergency department or the intensive care unit accurate assessment of variable chest pain requires meticulous knowledge, diagnostic skills, and suitable usage of various diagnostic modalities. In addition, in polytrauma patients, cardiac injury including aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, and pericardial effusion should be immediately revealed and treated. In these patients, arrhythmias, mainly tachycardia, cardiac murmurs, or hypotension must alert physicians to suspect cardiovascular trauma, which would potentially be life threatening. Ultrasound of the heart using transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography are valuable diagnostic tools that can be used interchangeably in conjunction with other modalities such as the electrocardiogram and computed tomography for the diagnosis of cardiovascular abnormalities in trauma patients. Although ultrasound of the heart is often underused in the setting of trauma, it does have the advantages of being easily accessible, noninvasive, and rapid bedside assessment tool. This review article aims to analyze the potential cardiac injuries in trauma patients, and to provide an elaborate description of the role of echocardiography for their accurate diagnosis.

  10. Structured Sensory Trauma Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, William; Kuban, Caelan

    2010-01-01

    This article features the National Institute of Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC), a program that has demonstrated via field testing, exploratory research, time series studies, and evidence-based research studies that its Structured Sensory Intervention for Traumatized Children, Adolescents, and Parents (SITCAP[R]) produces statistically…

  11. Obesity in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Witt, Cordelie E; Arbabi, Saman; Nathens, Avery B; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-04-01

    The implications of childhood obesity on pediatric trauma outcomes are not clearly established. Anthropomorphic data were recently added to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Datasets, enabling a large, multicenter evaluation of the effect of obesity on pediatric trauma patients. Children ages 2 to 19years who required hospitalization for traumatic injury were identified in the 2013-2014 NTDB Research Datasets. Age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI) were calculated. Outcomes included injury patterns, operative procedures, complications, and hospital utilization parameters. Data from 149,817 pediatric patients were analyzed; higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly more extremity injuries, and fewer injuries to the head, abdomen, thorax and spine (p values <0.001). On multivariable analysis, higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly increased likelihood of death, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus and pneumonia; although there was no difference in risk of overall complications. Obese children also had significantly longer lengths of stay and more frequent ventilator requirement. Among children admitted after trauma, increased BMI percentile is associated with increased risk of death and potentially preventable complications. These findings suggest that obese children may require different management than nonobese counterparts to prevent complications. Level III; prognosis study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Early Childhood Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  13. Tiger Team audits

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, G.T.

    1992-03-01

    This paper will address the purpose, scope, and approach of the Department of Energy Tiger Team Assessments. It will use the Tiger Team Assessment experience of Sandia National Laboratories at Albuquerque, New Mexico, as illustration.

  14. Tiger Team audits

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will address the purpose, scope, and approach of the Department of Energy Tiger Team Assessments. It will use the Tiger Team Assessment experience of Sandia National Laboratories at Albuquerque, New Mexico, as illustration.

  15. Radiation Oncology Treatment Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients to be advocates. View more information Treatment Team Quick Links Meet the Treatment Team Radiation Oncologist ... as medical oncologists and surgeons to maximize radiation’s effectiveness. Radiation oncologists are the only physicians with the ...

  16. Childhood trauma levels in individuals attending adult mental health services: An evaluation of clinical records and structured measurement of childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Amy; Byrne, Fintan; Wota, Anna Paulina; Nisar, Zafar; Ofuafor, Thomas; Murray, Ivan; Byrne, Charles; Hallahan, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Despite an increased awareness regarding the prevalence and impact of childhood trauma, especially childhood sexual abuse (CSA), few studies examine the clinical reporting of such childhood experiences. This study compared the prevalence of childhood trauma recorded in individual's clinical notes to those ascertained with a structured validated questionnaire, examined which forms of childhood trauma were less likely to be reported to the treating mental health team and established which demographic or clinical factors were associated with reporting of childhood trauma. The prevalence of childhood trauma was ascertained using both the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and a lifetime retrospective clinical note review in 129 individuals attending a general adult mental health service. Individuals were evaluated for the presence of mental health disorders, impulsivity, symptom severity and disability. Using the CTQ, childhood trauma was noted in 77% of individuals and recorded in 38% of individual's clinical notes (p<0.001). The greatest differences between CTQ reporting and clinical note documentation were noted for emotional neglect (62% versus 13.2%), physical neglect (48.1% versus 5.4%) and CSA (24.8% versus 8.5%). Childhood trauma was associated with increased psychopathology and greater symptom severity, and was particularly prevalent for individuals with personality disorders. This study demonstrated high rates of childhood trauma amongst adults attending a general adult mental health service. Furthermore, we demonstrated high rates of either non-enquiry from mental health professionals and/or high rates of non-documentation of childhood trauma by mental health professionals. Given the disparity between reporting of childhood trauma in clinical notes and findings with the CTQ, the use of a standardised questionnaire for the assessment of childhood trauma should be considered when performing a comprehensive mental health history.

  17. Team Evolution and Maturation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    Ifor NGFS and ASW teams. These efforts have provided an unparalleled set of observations concerning the nature of training-induced changes in team...Variations in TRAEX/SELEX performance scores across teams or over time provide indications of gross changes in the nature of training or of the...of effective communication behaviors increased significantly more for the "posted" teams curing the Last phase of training. There were insufficient

  18. The 20-minute team--a critical case study from the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Johan M; Carlström, Eric D

    2008-08-01

    In this article, the difference between team and group is tested empirically. The research question posed is How are teams formed? Three theoretical concepts that distinguish groups from teams are presented: sequentiality, parallelism and synchronicity. The presumption is that groups cooperate sequentially and teams synchronously, while parallel cooperation is a transition between group and team. To answer the question, a longitudinal case study has been made of a trauma team at a university hospital. Data have been collected through interviews and direct observations. Altogether the work of the trauma team has been studied for a period of 5 years (2002-2006). The results indicate that two factors are of central importance for the creation of a team. The first is related to its management and the other to the forms of cooperation. To allow for a team to act rapidly and to reduce friction between different members, clear leadership is required. The studied team developed cooperation with synchronous elements but never attained a level that corresponds to idealized conceptions of teams. This is used as a basis for challenging ideas that teams are harmonious and free from conflicts and that cooperation takes place without friction.

  19. Who Owns Your Team?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisen, Kathy; Love, Phyllis

    1988-01-01

    Feelings of team ownership promote team cohesiveness which yields better performance. Coaches should implement strategies that encourage team members to share with the coach responsibility for morale, skill-building, play improvement, and decision making. Maturity level of athletes influences the degree of ownership allowed. Strategies for…

  20. A Genuine TEAM Player

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Qualtech Systems, Inc. developed a complete software system with capabilities of multisignal modeling, diagnostic analysis, run-time diagnostic operations, and intelligent interactive reasoners. Commercially available as the TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System) tool set, the software can be used to reveal unanticipated system failures. The TEAMS software package is broken down into four companion tools: TEAMS-RT, TEAMATE, TEAMS-KB, and TEAMS-RDS. TEAMS-RT identifies good, bad, and suspect components in the system in real-time. It reports system health results from onboard tests, and detects and isolates failures within the system, allowing for rapid fault isolation. TEAMATE takes over from where TEAMS-RT left off by intelligently guiding the maintenance technician through the troubleshooting procedure, repair actions, and operational checkout. TEAMS-KB serves as a model management and collection tool. TEAMS-RDS (TEAMS-Remote Diagnostic Server) has the ability to continuously assess a system and isolate any failure in that system or its components, in real time. RDS incorporates TEAMS-RT, TEAMATE, and TEAMS-KB in a large-scale server architecture capable of providing advanced diagnostic and maintenance functions over a network, such as the Internet, with a web browser user interface.

  1. The "A" Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Larry D.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The Academic Team (A Team) program at Plano (Texas) Senior High School provides academic enrichment for talented students in grades 9-12. Outstanding A Team students are recognized with trophies and scholarships. The school district and the high school have found the program an excellent means of encouraging academic achievement. (MCG)

  2. Leadership of Creative Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined leadership in 16 research and 16 nonresearch teams in various manufacturing, aerospace, and health services companies. It concluded that research team leaders need to be able to fulfill a public relations or boundary management role. Engineering research teams, however, showed leadership patterns suggesting different needs for…

  3. Team Building [in HRD].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These five papers are from a symposium that was facilitated by Susan Dougherty at the 1995 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD). "The Relationship between Productivity and Work Team Autonomy and Team Process Effectiveness" (Candice L. Phelan) reports that correlation analysis of results of a study of 21 work teams revealed…

  4. The "A" Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Larry D.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The Academic Team (A Team) program at Plano (Texas) Senior High School provides academic enrichment for talented students in grades 9-12. Outstanding A Team students are recognized with trophies and scholarships. The school district and the high school have found the program an excellent means of encouraging academic achievement. (MCG)

  5. Effective Team Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Male, Mary

    1991-01-01

    The Student Study Team (SST) is described as a California intervention model that encourages effective multidisciplinary team participation. The development, training, operation, and evaluation of such teams are discussed, and implementation recommendations are offered. The article includes a flow chart of the SST process, a meeting competency…

  6. Quality Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, Lori Jo

    1995-01-01

    A growing number of schools and districts are considering using teams to handle all types of decision making and advisory activities. The term "teams" can be applied to a wide spectrum of groups with various purposes or powers. This bulletin was designed to assist those who want to create efficient, successful teams. It provides…

  7. To Become a Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standley, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of team-building in organizations looks at the essential components of trust, common purpose, supportive internal and external environments, and cohesion. Barriers to team development, such as internal competition or communication problems, and the role of the team leader are also discussed. A student campus organization is used for…

  8. Tracking dynamic team activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tambe, M.

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  9. Introducing the World of Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    The author relates how his realization that students react to lessons positively if they are made to feel like part of a team. The teacher decided to a start a company within his classroom, "hiring" managers, camera operators, and designers to help him start the venture. Students were challenged to apply for a job by submitting an application, a…

  10. ATLS: a foundation for trauma training.

    PubMed

    Bell, R M; Krantz, B E; Weigelt, J A

    1999-08-01

    The Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course is sponsored by the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. This course was developed to provide a consistent method of care for the resuscitation and evaluation of the injured patient. The ATLS course provides an easily remembered method for evaluating and treating the victim of a traumatic event. It also provides a scaffold for evaluation, treatment, education, and quality improvement of our ability to provide quality medical care to our patients. This article chronicles the past, present, and future of ATLS. The process of revising the ATLS course is reviewed. The changes recently introduced in the sixth edition of the ATLS course are highlighted. The worldwide growth of ATLS is acknowledged. The strength of this educational course remains the commitment to our primary goal of optimal care for the injured patient.

  11. AERL Baseball Team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1943-10-21

    The NACA’s Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory’s baseball team photographed with director Raymond Sharp. The Exchange, which operated the non-profit cafeteria, sponsored several sports teams that participated in local leagues. The laboratory also had several intramural sports leagues. The baseball team, seen here in 1943, was suspended shortly thereafter as many of its members entered the military during World War II. The team was reconstituted after the war and became somewhat successful in the Class A Westlake League. After winning the championship in 1949 and 1950, the team was placed in the more advanced Middleberg League where they struggled.

  12. Using a Checklist to Improve Family Communication in Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Bradley M; Nolan, Tracy L; Brown, Cecil E; Vogel, Robert L; Flowers, Kristin A; Ashley, Dennis W; Nakayama, Don K

    2016-01-01

    Modern concepts of patient-centered care emphasize effective communication with patients and families, an essential requirement in acute trauma settings. We hypothesized that using a checklist to guide the initial family conversation would improve the family's perception of the interaction. Institutional Review Board-approved, prospective pre/post study involving families of trauma patients admitted to our Level I trauma center for >24 hours. In the control group, families received information according to existing practices. In the study group, residents gave patient information to a first-degree family member using a checklist that guided the interaction. The checklist included a physician introduction, patient condition, list of known injuries, admission unit or intensive care unit, any consultants involved, plans for additional studies or operations, and opportunity for family to ask questions. An 11-item survey was administered 24 to 48 hours after admission to each group that evaluated the trauma team's communication in the areas of physician introduction, patient condition, ongoing treatment, and family perception of the interaction. Responses were on a Likert scale and analyzed using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. There were 130 patients in each group. The study group had significantly (P < 0.05) better responses in 8 of 11 items surveyed: physician spoke to family, physician introduction, understanding of their relative's injuries, admitting unit, consultants involved, urgent surgical procedures required, ongoing diagnostic studies, and understanding of the treatment plan. In conclusion, using a checklist improves the perception of the initial communication between the trauma team and family members of trauma patients, especially their understanding of the treatment plan.

  13. Blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Adegboye, V O; Ladipo, J K; Brimmo, I A; Adebo, A O

    2002-12-01

    A retrospective study was conducted at the cardiothoracic surgical unit of the University College Hospital, Ibadan on all consecutive, blunt chest injury patients treated between May 1975 and April 1999. The period of study was divided into 2 periods: May 1975-April 1987, May 1987-April 1999. The aim was to determine the pattern of injury, the management and complications of the injury among the treated. Blunt chest trauma patients were 69% (1331 patients) of all chest injury patients (1928 patients) treated. Mean age for the 2 periods was 38.3 +/- 15 years and 56.4 +/- 6.2 years, the male:female ratio was 4:1 and 2:1 respectively. The incidence of blunt chest trauma tripled in the second period. Blunt chest trauma was classified as involving bony chest wall or without the involvement of bony chest wall. Majority of the blunt chest injuries were minor chest wall injuries (68%, 905 patients), 7.6% (101 patients) had major but stable chest wall injuries, 10.8% (144 patients) had flail chest injuries. Thoracic injuries without fractures of bony chest wall occurred in 181 patients (13.6%). Seven hundred and eighty-seven patients (59.1%) had associated extra-thoracic injuries, in 426 patients (54.1%) two or more extra-thoracic systems were involved. While orthopaedic injury was the most frequent extra-thoracic injury (69.5%) associated with blunt chest trauma, craniospinal injury (31.9%) was more common injury among the patients with severe or life threatening chest trauma. The most common extra-thoracic operation was laparotomy (221 patients). Nine hundred and seventy patients (72.9%) had either closed thoracostomy drainage or clinical observation, 361 patients (27.1%) had major thoracic surgical intervention (emergent in 134 patients, late in 227 patients). Most of the severe lung contusion that needed ventilatory care (85 patients) featured among patients with bony chest wall injury, 15 were without chest wall injury. Majority of patients 63.2% (835 patients) had no

  14. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes.

  15. Advanced airway management is necessary in prehospital trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Lockey, D J; Healey, B; Crewdson, K; Chalk, G; Weaver, A E; Davies, G E

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of airway compromise in trauma patients is a priority. Basic airway management is provided by all emergency personnel, but the requirement for on-scene advanced airway management is controversial. We attempted to establish the demand for on-scene advanced airway interventions. Trauma patients managed with standard UK paramedic airway interventions were assessed to determine whether airway compromise had been effectively treated or whether more advanced airway management was required. A prospective observational study was conducted to identify trauma patients requiring prehospital advanced airway management attended by a doctor-paramedic team. The team assessed and documented airway compromise on arrival, interventions performed before and after their arrival, and their impact on airway compromise. Four hundred and seventy-two patients required advanced airway intervention and received 925 airway interventions by ground-based paramedics. Two hundred and sixty-nine patients (57%) still had airway compromise on arrival of the enhanced care team; no oxygen had been administered to 52 patients (11%). There were 45 attempted intubations by ground paramedics with a 64% success rate and 11% unrecognized oesophageal intubation rate. Doctor-paramedic teams delivering prehospital anaesthesia achieved definitive airway management for all patients. A significant proportion of severely injured trauma patients required advanced airway interventions to effectively treat airway compromise. Standard ambulance service interventions were only effective for a proportion of patients, but might not have always been applied appropriately. Complications of advanced airway management occurred in both provider groups, but failed intubation and unrecognized oesophageal intubation were a particular problem in the paramedic intubation group. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  16. Challenges When Introducing Electronic Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuikka, Matti; Kitola, Markus; Laakso, Mikko-Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Time pressures often necessitate the use of more efficient exam tools, such as electronic exams (e-exams), instead of traditional paper exams. However, teachers may face challenges when introducing e-exams in a higher education context. This paper describes what kinds of challenges teachers may face when introducing e-exams, based on experiences…

  17. Challenges When Introducing Electronic Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuikka, Matti; Kitola, Markus; Laakso, Mikko-Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Time pressures often necessitate the use of more efficient exam tools, such as electronic exams (e-exams), instead of traditional paper exams. However, teachers may face challenges when introducing e-exams in a higher education context. This paper describes what kinds of challenges teachers may face when introducing e-exams, based on experiences…

  18. How Should We Introduce Integration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressoud, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Teaching the concept of integration differs depending on which of four perspectives is used to introduce the topic. Presents a method based on the historical development of the use of integration that introduces integral as antiderivative. Discusses examples of differential equations used in the development and ways to connect this to the other…

  19. Needle Thoracotomy in Trauma.

    PubMed

    Rottenstreich, Misgav; Fay, Shmuel; Gendler, Sami; Klein, Yoram; Arkovitz, Marc; Rottenstreich, Amihai

    2015-12-01

    Tension pneumothorax is one of the leading causes of preventable death in trauma patients. Needle thoracotomy (NT) is the currently accepted first-line intervention but has not been well validated. In this review, we have critically discussed the evidence for NT procedure, re-examined the recommendations by the Advanced Trauma Life Support organization and investigated the safest and most effective way of NT. The current evidence to support the use of NT is limited. However, when used, it should be applied in the 2nd intercostal space at midclavicular line using a catheter length of at least 4.5 cm. Alternative measures should be studied for better prehospital management of tension pneumothorax.

  20. A Tribute to William B. Long, Jr., and William B. Long, III: A Celebration of Their Revolutionary Contributions to Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F

    2005-01-01

    academic career. His dreams for having a comprehensive trauma system in the Pacific Northwest are described in detail so that it an be replicated in our nation and our world.Dr. Long became the Trauma Medical Director for Emanuel Hospital in the Fall of 1983. He began building Emanuel's trauma program by establishing an infrastructure that would support technically advanced ways of restoring life and function. His trauma center consisted of the following components: trauma registry, trauma resuscitation nurse program, direct to operating room policy with unstable trauma patients, anesthesia as part of the trauma resuscitation team, massive transfusion protocol, mobile surgical transport team, outreach to rural communities, recruitment of specialists with interest in trauma care, development of a new trauma physical facility, and the Physician Assistant educational program.

  1. Team Cognition in Experienced Command-and-Control Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Duran, Jasmine L.; Taylor, Amanda R.

    2007-01-01

    Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members…

  2. Team Cognition in Experienced Command-and-Control Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Duran, Jasmine L.; Taylor, Amanda R.

    2007-01-01

    Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members…

  3. Implementation and Evaluation of a Team Simulation Training Program.

    PubMed

    Rice, Yvonne; DeLetter, Mary; Fryman, Lisa; Parrish, Evelyn; Velotta, Cathie; Talley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Care of the trauma patient requires a well-coordinated intensive effort during the golden hour to optimize survival. We hypothesized that this program would improve knowledge, satisfaction, self-confidence, and simulated team performance. A pre-, post-test design with N = 7 BSN nurses, 21 years of age, less than 2 years of intensive care unit and nursing experience. Trauma intensive care unit, single-center academic Level 1 trauma center. Improvement was shown in perception of team structure (paired t test 13.71-12.57; p = .0001) and communication (paired t test 14.85-12.14; p = .009). Improvement was shown in observed situation monitoring (paired t test 17.42-25.28; p = .000), mutual support (paired t test 12.57-18.57; p = .000), and communication (paired t test 15.42-25.00; p = .001). A decrease was shown in attitudes of mutual support (paired t test 25.85-19.71; p = .04) and communication (paired t test 26.14-23.00; p = .001). Mean satisfaction scores were 21.5 of a possible 25 points. Mean self-confidence scores were 38.83 out of a possible 40 points. Simulation-based team training improved teamwork attitudes, perceptions, and performance. Team communication demonstrated significant improvement in 2 of the 3 instruments. Most participants agreed or strongly agreed that they were satisfied with simulation and had gained self-confidence.

  4. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link between substance abuse and traumatic experiences. Teens with cooccurring substance use disorders (SUDs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant functional and psychosocial impairment. Common neurobiological foundations point to the reinforcing cycle of trauma symptoms, substance withdrawal, and substance use. Treatment of teens with these issues should include a systemic and integrated approach to both the SUD and the PTSD.

  5. Calcinosis cutis following trauma.

    PubMed

    Larralde, Margarita; Giachetti, Ana; Cáceres, María Rodríguez; Rodríguez, Marcela; Casas, José

    2005-01-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy who developed dystrophic calcinosis cutis that occurred following trauma. Multiple abrasions were observed in the inguinal folds after a soccer game. Subsequently, multiple papules with soft centers and white particles appeared in the same area. A biopsy specimen showed calcinosis cutis with transepidermal elimination of calcium. The causes of the underlying tissue damage associated with dystrophic calcinosis are discussed.

  6. Endovascular Therapy in Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-23

    Vascular Surgery . J Vasc Surg. 2011;53:187–92. 12. Piffaretti G, Benedetto F, Menegolo M, et al. Outcomes of end- ovascular repair for blunt thoracic...techniques to manage various forms: vascular injury, bleeding, and shock; including injury patterns in which an endovascular approach is established...and scenarios in which it is nascent and evolving. Keywords Vascular trauma · Endovascular repair · Catheter-based approach · Endovascular balloon

  7. Thromboembolic Complications Following Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    intracranial hemorrhage following hypertension and ischemia due to hypoperfusion during shock. Cerebrovas- cular injury is only one mechanism, and a...artery injury with delayed onset of neurologic symptoms have also been reported, although few large series have been published.23 Kuehne and...into the study, and it again fails to represent the total trauma popu- lation. For example, skull fractures, intracranial injuries, and extremity

  8. Trauma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bremer, C; Cassata, L

    1986-12-01

    The pregnant woman is exposed to the same risks as the non-pregnant woman for sustaining a traumatic injury, but because of the multiple physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy, the assessment and treatment of such patients must be adapted accordingly. This article discusses these normal physiologic changes, their effect on response to trauma, and the comprehensive care of the patient using the nursing process.

  9. Introducing students to clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Jacqueline; O'Dell, Cindy

    2015-11-01

    It is more than a decade since the UK Central Council for Nursing Midwifery and Health Visiting said that engaging with clinical audit is 'the business of every registered practitioner', yet there appears to be little evidence that nursing has embraced the process. To address this issue, Northampton General Hospital and the University of Northampton implemented a pilot project in which two third-year adult nursing students worked on a 'real life' audit. Supported by the hospital's audit department, and supervised by academic tutors with the relevant experience, the students worked on a pressure-ulcer care audit for their final year dissertation. This article describes the process undertaken by the hospital audit team and the university academic team to develop the pilot project and support the students. Based on the positive evaluations, the university has extended the project to a second phase, incorporating two new partner organisations.

  10. Mobile in Situ Simulation as a Tool for Evaluation and Improvement of Trauma Treatment in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Amiel, Imri; Simon, Daniel; Merin, Ofer; Ziv, Amitai

    2016-01-01

    Medical simulation is an increasingly recognized tool for teaching, coaching, training, and examining practitioners in the medical field. For many years, simulation has been used to improve trauma care and teamwork. Despite technological advances in trauma simulators, including better means of mobilization and control, most reported simulation-based trauma training has been conducted inside simulation centers, and the practice of mobile simulation in hospitals' trauma rooms has not been investigated fully. The emergency department personnel from a second-level trauma center in Israel were evaluated. Divided into randomly formed trauma teams, they were reviewed twice using in situ mobile simulation training at the hospital's trauma bay. In all, 4 simulations were held before and 4 simulations were held after a structured learning intervention. The intervention included a 1-day simulation-based training conducted at the Israel Center for Medical Simulation (MSR), which included video-based debriefing facilitated by the hospital's 4 trauma team leaders who completed a 2-day simulation-based instructors' course before the start of the study. The instructors were also trained on performance rating and thus were responsible for the assessment of their respective teams in real time as well as through reviewing of the recorded videos; thus enabling a comparison of the performances in the mobile simulation exercise before and after the educational intervention. The internal reliability of the experts' evaluation calculated in the Cronbach α model was found to be 0.786. Statistically significant improvement was observed in 4 of 10 parameters, among which were teamwork (29.64%) and communication (24.48%) (p = 0.00005). The mobile in situ simulation-based training demonstrated efficacy both as an assessment tool for trauma teams' function and an educational intervention when coupled with in vitro simulation-based training, resulting in a significant improvement of the teams

  11. Disseminated intravascular coagulation or acute coagulopathy of trauma shock early after trauma? An observational study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pär I; Sørensen, Anne Marie; Perner, Anders; Welling, Karen Lise; Wanscher, Michael; Larsen, Claus F; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2011-01-01

    It is debated whether early trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) in severely injured patients reflects disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) with a fibrinolytic phenotype, acute coagulopathy of trauma shock (ACoTS) or yet other entities. This study investigated the prevalence of overt DIC and ACoTS in trauma patients and characterized these conditions based on their biomarker profiles. An observational study was carried out at a single Level I Trauma Center. Eighty adult trauma patients (≥18 years) who met criteria for full trauma team activation and had an arterial cannula inserted were included. Blood was sampled a median of 68 minutes (IQR 48 to 88) post-injury. Data on demography, biochemistry, injury severity score (ISS) and mortality were recorded. Plasma/serum was analyzed for biomarkers reflecting tissue/endothelial cell/glycocalyx damage (histone-complexed DNA fragments, Annexin V, thrombomodulin, syndecan-1), coagulation activation/inhibition (prothrombinfragment 1+2, thrombin/antithrombin-complexes, antithrombin, protein C, activated protein C, endothelial protein C receptor, protein S, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, vWF), factor consumption (fibrinogen, FXIII), fibrinolysis (D-dimer, tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and inflammation (interleukin (IL)-6, terminal complement complex (sC5b-9)). Comparison of patients stratified according to the presence or absence of overt DIC (International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH) criteria) or ACoTS (activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and/or international normalized ratio (INR) above normal reference). No patients had overt DIC whereas 15% had ACoTS. ACoTS patients had higher ISS, transfusion requirements and mortality (all P < 0.01) and a biomarker profile suggestive of enhanced tissue, endothelial cell and glycocalyx damage and consumption coagulopathy with low protein C, antithrombin, fibrinogen and FXIII levels, hyperfibrinolysis and

  12. Disseminated intravascular coagulation or acute coagulopathy of trauma shock early after trauma? An observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It is debated whether early trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) in severely injured patients reflects disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) with a fibrinolytic phenotype, acute coagulopathy of trauma shock (ACoTS) or yet other entities. This study investigated the prevalence of overt DIC and ACoTS in trauma patients and characterized these conditions based on their biomarker profiles. Methods An observational study was carried out at a single Level I Trauma Center. Eighty adult trauma patients (≥18 years) who met criteria for full trauma team activation and had an arterial cannula inserted were included. Blood was sampled a median of 68 minutes (IQR 48 to 88) post-injury. Data on demography, biochemistry, injury severity score (ISS) and mortality were recorded. Plasma/serum was analyzed for biomarkers reflecting tissue/endothelial cell/glycocalyx damage (histone-complexed DNA fragments, Annexin V, thrombomodulin, syndecan-1), coagulation activation/inhibition (prothrombinfragment 1+2, thrombin/antithrombin-complexes, antithrombin, protein C, activated protein C, endothelial protein C receptor, protein S, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, vWF), factor consumption (fibrinogen, FXIII), fibrinolysis (D-dimer, tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and inflammation (interleukin (IL)-6, terminal complement complex (sC5b-9)). Comparison of patients stratified according to the presence or absence of overt DIC (International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH) criteria) or ACoTS (activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and/or international normalized ratio (INR) above normal reference). Results No patients had overt DIC whereas 15% had ACoTS. ACoTS patients had higher ISS, transfusion requirements and mortality (all P < 0.01) and a biomarker profile suggestive of enhanced tissue, endothelial cell and glycocalyx damage and consumption coagulopathy with low protein C, antithrombin, fibrinogen and FXIII levels

  13. Cervical spine trauma

    PubMed Central

    Torretti, Joel A; Sengupta, Dilip K

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spine trauma is a common problem with a wide range of severity from minor ligamentous injury to frank osteo-ligamentous instability with spinal cord injury. The emergent evaluation of patients at risk relies on standardized clinical and radiographic protocols to identify injuries; elucidate associated pathology; classify injuries; and predict instability, treatment and outcomes. The unique anatomy of each region of the cervical spine demands a review of each segment individually. This article examines both upper cervical spine injuries, as well as subaxial spine trauma. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the broad topic of cervical spine trauma with reference to the classic literature, as well as to summarize all recently available literature on each topic. Identification of References for Inclusion: A Pubmed and Ovid search was performed for each topic in the review to identify recently published articles relevant to the review. In addition prior reviews and classic references were evaluated individually for inclusion of classic papers, classifications and previously unidentified references. PMID:21139776

  14. Imaging of laryngeal trauma.

    PubMed

    Becker, Minerva; Leuchter, Igor; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Dulguerov, Pavel; Varoquaux, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    External laryngeal trauma is a rare but potentially life-threatening situation in the acutely injured patient. Trauma mechanism and magnitude, maximum focus of the applied force, and patient related factors, such as age and ossification of the laryngeal cartilages influence the spectrum of observed injuries. Their correct diagnosis and prompt management are paramount in order to avoid patient death or long-term impairment of breathing, swallowing and speaking. The current review provides a comprehensive approach to the radiologic interpretation of imaging studies performed in patients with suspected laryngeal injury. It describes the key anatomic structures that are relevant in laryngeal trauma and discusses the clinical role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute emergency situation. The added value of two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (2D MPR), three-dimensional volume rendering (3D VR) and virtual endoscopy (VE) for the non-invasive evaluation of laryngeal injuries and for treatment planning is discussed. The clinical presentation, biomechanics of injury, diagnostic pitfalls and pearls, common and uncommon findings are reviewed with emphasis of fracture patterns, involvement of laryngeal joints, intra- and extralaryngeal soft tissue injuries, and complications seen in the acute emergency situation. The radiologic appearance of common and less common long-term sequelae, as well as treatment options are equally addressed. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Rethinking historical trauma.

    PubMed

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Gone, Joseph P; Moses, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have seen the rise of historical trauma as a construct to describe the impact of colonization, cultural suppression, and historical oppression of Indigenous peoples in North America (e.g., Native Americans in the United States, Aboriginal peoples in Canada). The discourses of psychiatry and psychology contribute to the conflation of disparate forms of violence by emphasizing presumptively universal aspects of trauma response. Many proponents of this construct have made explicit analogies to the Holocaust as a way to understand the transgenerational effects of genocide. However, the social, cultural, and psychological contexts of the Holocaust and of post-colonial Indigenous "survivance" differ in many striking ways. Indeed, the comparison suggests that the persistent suffering of Indigenous peoples in the Americas reflects not so much past trauma as ongoing structural violence. The comparative study of genocide and other forms of massive, organized violence can do much to illuminate both common mechanisms and distinctive features, and trace the looping effects from political processes to individual experience and back again. The ethics and pragmatics of individual and collective healing, restitution, resilience, and recovery can be understood in terms of the self-vindicating loops between politics, structural violence, public discourse, and embodied experience. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. Emergency treatment of dentoalveolar trauma: essential tips for treating active patients.

    PubMed

    Honsik, Kenneth A

    2004-09-01

    Dentoalveolar trauma in sports is common. One third of dental injuries in the United States occur in sports-related activities, so team physicians should be able to recognize and properly treat dental injuries on the field. Tooth fracture, luxation, avulsion, and socket injury are the main types of dentoalveolar trauma. In many cases, other maxillofacial trauma can be associated with dental injuries, so physicians who examine these patients should be aware of additional associated injuries. Tooth injury is often preventable with the appropriate use of properly fitted mouth guards. Physicians should be familiar with different types and be able to suggest the correct mouth guard for a given activity.

  17. Tooth embedded in lower lip following dentoalveolar trauma: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Antonio Azoubel; Santos, Thiago Santana; Carvalho de Melo, Allen Ulisses; Ribiero, Cyntia Ferreira; Goncalves, Suzane Rodrigues Jacinto; de Mello Rode, Sigmar

    2012-01-01

    One of the most frequent consequences of trauma to the maxillofacial region is damage to teeth and supporting structures. Such damage can occur either in isolation or in conjunction with other fractures and soft tissue lacerations. In emergency situations, the harm caused to teeth could go unnoticed during the clinical examination, depending on the nature and complexity of the trauma and the primary care team's awareness of orofacial injuries. Fractured incisors often cause lacerations to the soft tissues at the time of trauma. During the diagnosis, particular care must be taken when such a fracture is associated with a soft tissue injury.

  18. Implications for studying team cognition and team performance in network-centric warfare paradigms.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Gerald P; Banderet, Louis E

    2007-05-01

    Network-centric warfare's (NCW) information-rich systems involving sophisticated sensors, tracking systems, smart weapons, and enhanced digital communications threaten to overload combatants with voluminous amounts of data. It is unclear whether warfighters will perceive such extensive data as actionable information to which they will respond accurately in a timely enough manner. Members of small teams in command and control centers, operating in crew-served vehicles, or simply "grunting it out" as ground-pounding infantrymen, may be disparately separated by space, but will communicate and be connected by electronic linkages, e.g., radio, text messages, situation displays, or global positioning data. However, team members will also have to remember shared mental models of tasks at hand, pay attention to and share common situation awareness in complex operational environments, perform team cognition and team coordination, and integrate both lower and higher cognitive processes with those of team behaviors. Such exceptional capabilities are required more now than ever before; such capabilities today are far from assured. After two workshops to establish performance metrics for assessing cognitive performance of military personnel in NCW, this preface introduces five manuscripts addressing team cognition and team performance from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. The authors of this preface question if NCW, and perhaps the politico-social ramifications of modern warfare, have already outstripped behavioral scientists' approach to researching team cognition and team performance-expertise that is so crucially needed for combatants on the rapidly changing 21st-century battlegrounds.

  19. Exploring the provision of hospital trauma care for road traffic injury victims in Iran: a qualitative approach.

    PubMed

    Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Johansson, Eva; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Hasselberg, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Identifying factors affecting the provision of trauma care is essential for improving the quality of care for road traffic injury (RTI) victims. The study aimed to explore the perceptions and experiences of trauma care among injured patients and health professionals to identify factors influencing an effective trauma care delivery at emergency departments (EDs) in Iran. The study was conducted with a grounded theory approach. The study participants consisted of 15 health professionals and 20 injured patients. The data were collected via semi-structured interviews and were analyzed using constant comparative analysis method. Lack of a systematic approach to providing trauma care at EDs emerged as the core category. The leading factors in the development of the core category were unclear national policies and poor organization of care at the ED. Other major factors were contextual factors in the environment of the hospitals such as inappropriate structure and unsupportive environment and also factors specific to the context of Iran such as a rapid increase in the number of traumas. Professionals reacted to the prevailing conditions in ways that contributed to an ineffective trauma care, even though strategies employed by Emergency Medicine Physicians (EMPs) improved the quality of trauma care locally. Building a national trauma system, using available professional resources especially EMPs, and implementing low cost and evidence-based improvements such as establishing trauma teams and trauma training for staff working at the EDs on a regular basis is necessary in order to improve delivery of trauma care at the hospitals.

  20. Introducing Chemical Formulae and Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Chris; Rowell, Jack

    1979-01-01

    Discusses when the writing of chemical formula and equations can be introduced in the school science curriculum. Also presents ways in which formulae and equations learning can be aided and some examples for balancing and interpreting equations. (HM)

  1. Scheduling of advanced practice providers at Level 1 trauma centers.

    PubMed

    Myers, Robert A; Parikh, Pratik J; Ekeh, Akpofure Peter; Denlinger, Elizabeth; McCarthy, Mary C

    2014-07-01

    Advanced practice providers (APPs) are essential to the provision of trauma care services, particularly in the wake of residency hour restrictions. Demand for these APPs fluctuates with cyclic patient arrivals; however, most trauma teams continue to staff APPs in a linear fashion. Failure to plan for variable arrivals may contribute to excessive patient wait times and emergency department overcrowding. This study used both qualitative and quantitative approaches to evaluate the impact of APP scheduling on patient wait time and to find schedules minimizing delays in reaching the needed care at the right time. A retrospective observation of the availability of APPs and the flow of 2,249 trauma patients at a Level 1 trauma center, using both visual overlays and computer modeling, allowed us to evaluate the baseline condition, two what-if schedules, and two model-generated schedules minimizing patient time without any additional APP hours. A visual overlay of APP staffing on 2010 patient arrivals indicated substantial times of mismatch. Trauma managers considered adding an APP during weekday evenings that would have resulted in a 14.8% increase in APP hours and yielded a 27% reduction in patient wait times according to our model. An alternate schedule was developed and implemented in 2012 with a 10.5% increase in APP hours and yielding a 73% reduction in wait times. We also delineated two schedule options with 57% and 78% reductions in wait time and no increase in APP work hours. Evaluating alternate shift times and assignments using visual overlays and computer modeling can provide APP staffing solutions with up to 78% reduction in trauma patient wait time without additional APP labor. Knowing that care at the right time is crucial to arriving patients, making sure APP staffing is synchronized with arriving patients is something trauma center managers cannot ignore. Care management study, level IV.

  2. Team Teaching at Upper Arlington School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Annette R.

    1968-01-01

    Team teaching has been used for 4 years in the 10th-grade English classes at Upper Arlington High School near Columbus, Ohio. Units are prepared, presented, and evaluated by teachers working together voluntarily. A 6-day American literature unit introducing Romanticism has been particularly successful. The contrasts between Neoclassicism and…

  3. Childhood trauma and compulsive buying.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Chang, Joy; Jewell, Bryan; Rock, Rachel

    2013-02-01

    Childhood trauma has been empirically associated with various types of self-regulatory difficulties in adulthood. However, according to the extant literature, no study has examined relationships between various types of childhood trauma and compulsive buying behavior in adulthood. Using a self-report survey methodology in a cross-sectional consecutive sample of 370 obstetrics/gynecology patients, we examined five types of childhood trauma before the age of 12 years (i.e. witnessing violence, physical neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse) in relationship to compulsive buying as assessed by the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS). All forms of trauma demonstrated statistically significant correlations with the CBS. Using a linear regression analysis, both witnessing violence and emotional abuse significantly contributed to CBS scores. Further analyses indicated that race did not moderate the relationship between childhood trauma and compulsive buying. Findings indicate that various forms of childhood trauma are correlated with compulsive buying behavior, particularly witnessing violence and emotional abuse.

  4. Managing multicultural teams.

    PubMed

    Brett, Jeanne; Behfar, Kristin; Kern, Mary C

    2006-11-01

    Multicultural teams offer a number of advantages to international firms, including deep knowledge of different product markets, culturally sensitive customer service, and 24-hour work rotations. But those advantages may be outweighed by problems stemming from cultural differences, which can seriously impair the effectiveness of a team or even bring itto a stalemate. How can managers best cope with culture-based challenges? The authors conducted in-depth interviews with managers and members of multicultural teams from all over the world. Drawing on their extensive research on dispute resolution and teamwork and those interviews, they identify four problem categories that can create barriers to a team's success: direct versus indirect communication, trouble with accents and fluency, differing attitudes toward hierarchy and authority, and conflicting norms for decision making. If a manager--or a team member--can pinpoint the root cause of the problem, he or she is likelier to select an appropriate strategy for solving it. The most successful teams and managers, the authors found, dealt with multicultural challenges in one of four ways: adaptation (acknowledging cultural gaps openly and working around them), structural intervention (changing the shape or makeup of the team), managerial intervention (setting norms early or bringing in a higher-level manager), and exit (removing a team member when other options have failed). Which strategy is best depends on the particular circumstances--and each has potential complications. In general, though, managers who intervene early and set norms; teams and managers who try to engage everyone on the team; and teams that can see challenges as stemming from culture, not personality, succeed in solving culture-based problems with good humor and creativity. They are the likeliest to harvest the benefits inherent in multicultural teams.

  5. Trauma surgery: discipline in crisis.

    PubMed

    Green, Steven M

    2009-02-01

    Throughout the past quarter century, there have been slow but dramatic changes in the nature and practice of trauma surgery, and this field increasingly faces potent economic, logistic, political, and workforce challenges. Patients and emergency physicians have much to lose by this budding crisis in our partner discipline. This article reviews the specific issues confronting trauma surgery, their historical context, and the potential directions available to this discipline. Implications of these issues for emergency physicians and for trauma care overall are discussed.

  6. Trauma and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Joana; Varela, Ana; Medina, José Luís

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system may be the target of different types of trauma with varied consequences. The present article discusses trauma of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, adrenal glands, gonads, and pancreas. In addition to changes in circulating hormone levels due to direct injury to these structures, there may be an endocrine response in the context of the stress caused by the trauma. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. The coronary heart team.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Bobby; Puskas, John D; Bhatt, Deepak L; Verma, Subodh

    2017-09-01

    The concept of a Coronary Heart Team has generated increased interest, including support from major practice guidelines. Here, we review the rationale and the published experience of Coronary Heart Teams. A Coronary Heart Team should be led by both cardiology and cardiac surgery with a shared decision-making approach. The team should incorporate data from anatomic and clinical risk prediction models to offer individualized care. Most teams focus on management of complex patients and those with indications for both coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous coronary intervention. The potential benefits of a Coronary Heart Team include balanced decision-making, greater adherence to evidence-based practice guidelines, as well as promoting greater collegiality and exchange of knowledge between specialties. Single-center series have demonstrated consistency in decision-making by Coronary Heart Teams but prospective data demonstrating improved patient outcomes and/or cost effectiveness are necessary. The concept of a Coronary Heart Team is gaining traction for patients with complex coronary artery disease. There is a growing literature in support of Coronary Heart Teams but comparative and prospective data demonstrating improved patient outcomes are needed.

  8. Leading teams that thrive.

    PubMed

    Karre, Idahlynn

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore pathways and develop specific knowledge and skills for leading teams that thrive. Here we will discuss current research findings and specific strategies you can use to create stronger more engaged work teams. Recent research findings in leadership from the Gallup Organization and Vital Smarts provide the framework for this discussion. When team members have clear expectations and role clarity, are engaged in conversations that matter, and have knowledge and skill to participate mindfully in crucial conversations, teams thrive.

  9. ATLS(R) and damage control in spine trauma.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver I; Gahr, Ralf H; Gosse, Andreas; Heyde, Christoph E

    2009-03-03

    Substantial inflammatory disturbances following major trauma have been found throughout the posttraumatic course of polytraumatized patients, which was confirmed in experimental models of trauma and in vitro settings. As a consequence, the principle of damage control surgery (DCS) has developed over the last two decades and has been successfully introduced in the treatment of severely injured patients. The aim of damage control surgery and orthopaedics (DCO) is to limit additional iatrogenic trauma in the vulnerable phase following major injury. Considering traumatic brain and acute lung injury, implants for quick stabilization like external fixators as well as decided surgical approaches with minimized potential for additional surgery-related impairment of the patient's immunologic state have been developed and used widely. It is obvious, that a similar approach should be undertaken in the case of spinal trauma in the polytraumatized patient. Yet, few data on damage control spine surgery are published to so far, controlled trials are missing and spinal injury is addressed only secondarily in the broadly used ATLS(R) polytrauma algorithm. This article reviews the literature on spine trauma assessment and treatment in the polytrauma setting, gives hints on how to assess the spine trauma patient regarding to the ATLS(R) protocol and recommendations on therapeutic strategies in spinal injury in the polytraumatized patient.

  10. State of nutrition support teams.

    PubMed

    DeLegge, Mark Henry; Kelly, Andrea True; Kelley, Andrea True

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients is relatively high (up to 55%) despite breakthroughs in nutrition support therapies. These patients have increased morbidity and mortality, extended hospital stays, and care that is associated with higher costs. These patients are often poorly managed due to inadequate nutrition assessment and poor medical knowledge and practice in the field of nutrition. Nutrition support teams (NSTs) are interdisciplinary support teams with specialty training in nutrition that are often comprised of physicians, dietitians, nurses, and pharmacists. Their role includes nutrition assessment, determination of nutrition needs, recommendations for appropriate nutrition therapy, and management of nutrition support therapy. Studies have demonstrated significant improvements in patient nutrition status and improved clinical outcomes as well as reductions in costs when patients were appropriately managed by a multispecialty NST vs individual caregivers. Despite this, there has been steady decline in the number of formal NST in recent years (65% of hospitals in 1995 to 42% in 2008) as hospitals and other healthcare organizations look for ways to cut costs. Given the importance of nutrition status on clinical outcomes and overall healthcare costs, a number of institutions have introduced and sustained strong nutrition training and support programs and teams, demonstrating both clinical and economic benefit. The benefits of NST, training and implementation strategies, and tips for justifying these clinically and economically beneficial groups to healthcare organizations and governing bodies are discussed in this review.

  11. Supporting Information Use and Retention of Pre-Hospital Information during Trauma Resuscitation: A Qualitative Study of Pre-Hospital Communications and Information Needs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhan; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Burd, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-hospital communication is a critical first step towards ensuring efficient management of critically injured patients during trauma resuscitation. Information about incoming patients received from the field and en route serves a critical role in helping emergency medical teams prepare for patient care. Despite many efforts, inefficiencies persist. In this paper, we examine the pre-hospital communications between pre-hospital and hospital providers, including the types of information transferred during en-route calls, as well as the information needs of trauma teams. Our findings show that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) teams report a great deal of information from the field, most of which match the needs of trauma teams. We discuss design implications for a computerized system to support the use and retention of pre-hospital information during trauma resuscitation. PMID:24551428

  12. Exsanguination in trauma: A review of diagnostics and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Geeraedts, L M G; Kaasjager, H A H; van Vugt, A B; Frölke, J P M

    2009-01-01

    Trauma patients with haemorrhagic shock who only transiently respond or do not respond to fluid therapy and/or the administration of blood products have exsanguinating injuries. Recognising shock due to (exsanguinating) haemorrhage in trauma is about constructing a synthesis of trauma mechanism, injuries, vital signs and the therapeutic response of the patient. The aim of prehospital care of bleeding trauma patients is to deliver the patient to a facility for definitive care within the shortest amount of time by rapid transport and minimise therapy to what is necessary to maintain adequate vital signs. Rapid decisions have to be made using regional trauma triage protocols that have incorporated patient condition, transport times and the level of care than can be performed by the prehospital care providers and the receiving hospitals. The treatment of bleeding patients is aimed at two major goals: stopping the bleeding and restoration of the blood volume. Fluid resuscitation should allow for preservation of vital functions without increasing the risk for further (re)bleeding. To prevent further deterioration and subsequent exsanguinations 'permissive hypotension' may be the goal to achieve. Within the hospital, a sound trauma team activation system, including the logistic procedure as well as activation criteria, is essential for a fast and adequate response. After determination of haemorrhagic shock, all efforts have to be directed to stop the bleeding in order to prevent exsanguinations. A simultaneous effort is made to restore blood volume and correct coagulation. Reversal of coagulopathy with pharmacotherapeutic interventions may be a promising concept to limit blood loss after trauma. Abdominal ultrasound has replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage for detection of haemoperitoneum. With the development of sliding-gantry based computer tomography diagnostic systems, rapid evaluation by CT-scanning of the trauma patient is possible during resuscitation. The concept

  13. Team Building: A Structured Learning Approach. Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Peter; Voehl, Frank

    This publication is an instructor's manual to a course on developing empowered management teams for higher education, teamworking skills, and team role evaluation skills. The course itself takes a hands-on approach to learning about quality, introduces continuous quality improvement principles, asks students to apply these in a structured…

  14. "The Fly on the Wall" Reflecting Team Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prest, Layne E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Adapts reflecting team concept, a practical application of constructivist ideas, for use in group supervision. Evolving model includes a focus on the unique "fly on the wall" perspective of the reflecting team. Trainees are introduced to a multiverse of new ideas and perspectives in a context which integrates some of the most challenging…

  15. Building Action Research Teams: A Case of Struggles and Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Fengning

    2009-01-01

    Teaching teams can hold the promise of being an ideal vehicle in which collaborative action research is conducted. This case documents the mixed results of a team leader's efforts to improve teaching and introduce inquiry-based professional development through action research in a community college. This case paints a realistic and…

  16. "They're the Bosses": Feedback in Team Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Cally; Green, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Team supervision of PhDs is increasingly the norm in Australian and UK universities; while this model brings many improvements on the traditional one-on-one research supervision, it also introduces new complexities. In particular, many students find the diversity of opinions expressed in teams to be confusing. Such diversity in supervisor feedback…

  17. Team Performance in the Army Acquisition Program Office

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    6 A. INTRODUCTION ................ ................. 6 B. PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND THE IMPORTANCE OF TEAMS 6 C. MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS OF THE TEAM... INTRODUCTION This literature review will introduce the concept of project management and the management functions that are integral to its operation. It also... Introduction , 1993, p. 11) This structure consists of program management offices that manage the development and acquisition of a specific system. For

  18. "The Fly on the Wall" Reflecting Team Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prest, Layne E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Adapts reflecting team concept, a practical application of constructivist ideas, for use in group supervision. Evolving model includes a focus on the unique "fly on the wall" perspective of the reflecting team. Trainees are introduced to a multiverse of new ideas and perspectives in a context which integrates some of the most challenging…

  19. Continuous Team Assessment to Improve Student Engagement and Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposto, Alexis S.; Weaver, Debbi

    2011-01-01

    A strategy of continuous team assessment over three years, comprising of a series of tests and a major project, was introduced into scheduled tutorial classes in an attempt to improve flagging attendance and low student motivation. The assessment tasks were designed to be undertaken in teams of two students, with ongoing feedback as an integral…

  20. "They're the Bosses": Feedback in Team Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Cally; Green, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Team supervision of PhDs is increasingly the norm in Australian and UK universities; while this model brings many improvements on the traditional one-on-one research supervision, it also introduces new complexities. In particular, many students find the diversity of opinions expressed in teams to be confusing. Such diversity in supervisor feedback…

  1. Parameters for Successful Management of Cross Cultural Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullett, Evelyn; Sixl-Daniell, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Virtual teams are a common phenomenon in organizations today. Universities are no exception to this trend and, in response, are offering class rooms without boundaries by introducing online programs which allow individuals from all walks of life and diverse geographical locations to come together. Cross-cultural virtual teams, collaborating with…

  2. Redesigning Collegiate Leadership: Teams and Teamwork in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensimon, Estela Mara; Neumann, Anna

    This report examines the usefulness of leadership teams in higher education based on study results involving 15 institutions of higher education located throughout the United States. In chapters 1 and 2 the concept of the "leadership team" is introduced by means of: (1) a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of teamwork; and (2) a…

  3. Teaching Teams about Teamwork: Preparation, Practice, and Performance Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph

    2009-01-01

    Focusing on preparation, practice, and performance review to teach teams about teamwork provides a well-supported and effective methodology that both enhances students' collaborative skills and contributes to an effective team project experience. Preparation includes aspects of coaching to introduce and explain effective group processes. After…

  4. “It takes a village” to raise research productivity: Impact of a Trauma Interdisciplinary Group for Research (TIGR) at an urban, Level 1 trauma center

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Regina S.; Ferdinand, Colville H.B.; Hawkins, Michael L.; Holsten, Steven B.; Dong, Yanbin; Zhu, Haidong

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few interdisciplinary research groups include basic scientists, pharmacists, therapists, nutritionists, lab technicians, as well as trauma patients and families, in addition to clinicians. Increasing interprofessional diversity within scientific teams working to improve trauma care is a goal of national organizations and federal funding agencies like the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This paper describes the design, implementation, and outcomes of a Trauma Interdisciplinary Group for Research (TIGR) at a Level 1 trauma center as it relates to increasing research productivity, with specific examples excerpted from an on-going NIH-funded study. METHODS We utilized a pre-test/post-test design with objectives aimed at measuring increases in research productivity following a targeted intervention. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis was used to develop the intervention which included research skill-building activities, accomplished by adding multidisciplinary investigators to an existing NIH-funded project. The NIH project aimed to test the hypothesis that accelerated biologic aging from chronic stress increases baseline inflammation and reduces inflammatory response to trauma (projected N=150). Pre/Post-TIGR data related to participant screening, recruitment, consent, and research processes were compared. Research productivity was measured through abstracts, publications, and investigator-initiated projects. RESULTS Research products increased from N =12 to N=42; (~ 400%). Research proposals for federal funding increased from N=0 to N=3, with success rate of 66%. Participant screenings for the NIH-funded study increased from N=40 to N=313. Consents increased from N=14 to N=70. Lab service fees were reduced from $300/participant to $5/participant. CONCLUSIONS Adding diversity to our scientific team via TIGR was exponentially successful in 1) improving research productivity, 2) reducing research costs, and 3) increasing

  5. "It takes a village" to raise research productivity: impact of a Trauma Interdisciplinary Group for Research at an urban, Level 1 trauma center.

    PubMed

    NeSmith, Elizabeth G; Medeiros, Regina S; Ferdinand, Colville H B; Hawkins, Michael L; Holsten, Steven B; Zhu, Haidong; Dong, Yanbin

    2013-07-01

    Few interdisciplinary research groups include basic scientists, pharmacists, therapists, nutritionists, laboratory technicians, as well as trauma patients and families, in addition to clinicians. Increasing interprofessional diversity within scientific teams working to improve trauma care is a goal of national organizations and federal funding agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This article describes the design, implementation, and outcomes of a Trauma Interdisciplinary Group for Research (TIGR) at a Level 1 trauma center as it relates to increasing research productivity, with specific examples excerpted from an ongoing NIH-funded study. We used a pretest/posttest design with objectives aimed at measuring increases in research productivity following a targeted intervention. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis was used to develop the intervention, which included research skill-building activities, accomplished by adding multidisciplinary investigators to an existing NIH-funded project. The NIH project aimed to test the hypothesis that accelerated biologic aging from chronic stress increases baseline inflammation and reduces inflammatory response to trauma (projected n = 150). Pre-TIGR/post-TIGR data related to participant screening, recruitment, consent, and research processes were compared. Research productivity was measured through abstracts, publications, and investigator-initiated projects. Research products increased from 12 to 42 (approximately 400%). Research proposals for federal funding increased from 0 to 3, with success rate of 66%. Participant screenings for the NIH-funded study increased from 40 to 313. Consents increased from 14 to 70. Laboratory service fees were reduced from $300 per participant to $5 per participant. Adding diversity to our scientific team via TIGR was exponentially successful in (1) improving research productivity, (2) reducing research costs, and (3) increasing research

  6. "It takes a village" to raise research productivity: Impact of a Trauma Interdisciplinary Group for Research (TIGR) at an urban, Level 1 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Nesmith, Elizabeth G; Medeiros, Regina S; Ferdinand, Colville H B; Hawkins, Michael L; Holsten, Steven B; Dong, Yanbin; Zhu, Haidong

    2013-07-01

    Few interdisciplinary research groups include basic scientists, pharmacists, therapists, nutritionists, lab technicians, as well as trauma patients and families, in addition to clinicians. Increasing interprofessional diversity within scientific teams working to improve trauma care is a goal of national organizations and federal funding agencies like the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This paper describes the design, implementation, and outcomes of a Trauma Interdisciplinary Group for Research (TIGR) at a Level 1 trauma center as it relates to increasing research productivity, with specific examples excerpted from an on-going NIH-funded study. We utilized a pre-test/post-test design with objectives aimed at measuring increases in research productivity following a targeted intervention. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis was used to develop the intervention which included research skill-building activities, accomplished by adding multidisciplinary investigators to an existing NIH-funded project. The NIH project aimed to test the hypothesis that accelerated biologic aging from chronic stress increases baseline inflammation and reduces inflammatory response to trauma (projected N=150). Pre/Post-TIGR data related to participant screening, recruitment, consent, and research processes were compared. Research productivity was measured through abstracts, publications, and investigator-initiated projects. Research products increased from N =12 to N=42; (~ 400%). Research proposals for federal funding increased from N=0 to N=3, with success rate of 66%. Participant screenings for the NIH-funded study increased from N=40 to N=313. Consents increased from N=14 to N=70. Lab service fees were reduced from $300/participant to $5/participant. Adding diversity to our scientific team via TIGR was exponentially successful in 1) improving research productivity, 2) reducing research costs, and 3) increasing research products and mentoring activities

  7. Pediatric Trauma: Management From an Austere Prospective.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joycelynn; Linklater, Derek R; Johnston, James; Donham, Benjamin

    Pediatric trauma represents a notable proportion of casualties encountered by Combat medics, physician assistants, and physicians while in the deployed setting. Most of these resuscitation teams receive limited pediatric- specific training and suffer subsequent emotional stress due the perceived high-stakes nature of caring for gravely wounded children. Even when children survive long enough to arrive at combat support hospitals, there remain high risks for morbidity and mortality for many of them. There are numerous reports of the epidemiological characteristics of these pediatric patients, the common mechanisms of injury, the hospital lengths of stay, and calls for pediatric-specific equipment and specialist presence in-theatre. There is scant literature, however, on child-specific battlefield resuscitation and training for initial providers, and we believe that, with appropriately tailored pediatric resuscitation education and training strategies, there is some potential for a reduction in the morbidity and mortality associated with childhood combat injury. 2017.

  8. Training forward surgical teams: do military-civilian collaborations work?

    PubMed

    Schulman, Carl I; Graygo, Jill; Wilson, Katherine; Robinson, Donald B; Garcia, George; Augenstein, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The US Army and the Ryder Trauma Center (Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida) teamed up to provide a training environment (ie, the Army Trauma Training Center) in which forward surgical teams can attend to gain critical teamwork and trauma technical skills to prepare for deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. The purpose of this study was to gather trainee reactions to the military-civilian collaboration provided at ATTC after deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. Survey respondents were 135 US Army personnel (an approximately 50% response rate) who participated in the ATTC 2-week team training program between January 2005 and June 2007. The survey asked questions pertaining to their experience in the resuscitation unit and patient contact at the trauma center. Over 90% of participants agreed or strongly agreed that training in the resuscitation area was beneficial. A majority of participants also agreed or strongly agreed that the patient contact experience was sufficient (78.5%), was a good learning opportunity (90%), and that the experience was a good opportunity to apply what they had learned in their classroom training (over 80%). Areas of suggested improvement included the importance of clarifying roles between the ATTC trainees and the Ryder Trauma Center residents and interns. Trainees would have preferred an extension of the training as a whole, as they felt it was rushed in order to fit all training opportunities into the 2 weeks that they were in Miami. Finally, trainees noted the lack of injuries admitted to the trauma center which replicate injuries caused by blasts (ie, improvised explosive devices). The results of our efforts indicate that military-civilian collaborations do in fact work and are beneficial to both military and civilian medical providers. The opportunity to perform as a team in their respective roles, to respond to a variety of actual trauma patients, and access to civilian medical providers were beneficial. As mentioned, such

  9. Acute brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, GT

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem. PMID:26688392

  10. Penetrating thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Renata; Baisden, Clinton E; Harker, Lori; Calhoon, John H

    2008-01-01

    The initial approach to penetrating thoracic trauma is directed towards the pathophysiologic syndrome upon presentation. Most patients are successfully treated with drainage tubes. The unstable patient may necessitate thoracotomy at the emergency room to drain cardiac tamponade, provide cardiac massage and control bleeding. The guidelines for this procedure are reviewed. Need for further work-up of potential injuries to other mediastinal organs is frequently screened by computerized tomography. Surgery might still be needed, on a less emergent basis, in order to repair injuries to the trachea/esophagus, retained hemothorax, or to rule out diaphragmatic injury. Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures may be used in specific situations.

  11. Radiology of skeletal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    This 1000-page book contains over 1700 illustrations, is presented in two volumes and subdivided into 23 chapters. After brief chapters of Introduction and General Anatomy, a section on Skeletal Biomechanics is presented. The Epidemiology of Fractures chapter examines, among other things, the effects of age on the frequency and distribution of fractures. In the chapter on Classifications of Fractures, the author describes the character of traumatic forces such as angulating, torsional, avulsive, and compressive, and then relates these to the resultant fracture configurations. The Fracture Treatment chapter presents an overview of treatment principles. Other chapters deal with specific problems in pediatric trauma, fracture healing and nonhealing, and fracture complications.

  12. Acute brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Martin, G T

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem.

  13. Rural Trauma: Is Trauma Designation Associated with Better Hospital Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Stephen M.; Zimmerman, Frederick J.; Sharar, Sam R.; Baker, Margaret W.; Martin, Diane P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: While trauma designation has been associated with lower risk of death in large urban settings, relatively little attention has been given to this issue in small rural hospitals. Purpose: To examine factors related to in-hospital mortality and delayed transfer in small rural hospitals with and without trauma designation. Methods: Analysis…

  14. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth with Complex Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive…

  15. Trauma-focused CBT for youth with complex trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with complex trauma. Methods TF-CBT treatment phases are described and modifications of timing, proportionality and application are described for youth with complex trauma. Practical applications include a) dedicating proportionally more of the model to the TF-CBT coping skills phase; b) implementing the TF-CBT Safety component early and often as needed throughout treatment; c) titrating gradual exposure more slowly as needed by individual youth; d) incorporating unifying trauma themes throughout treatment; and e) when indicated, extending the TF-CBT treatment consolidation and closure phase to include traumatic grief components and to generalize ongoing safety and trust. Results Recent data from youth with complex trauma support the use of the above TF-CBT strategies to successfully treat these youth. Conclusions The above practical strategies can be incorporated into TF-CBT to effectively treat youth with complex trauma. Practice implications Practical strategies include providing a longer coping skills phase which incorporates safety and appropriate gradual exposure; including relevant unifying themes; and allowing for an adequate treatment closure phase to enhance ongoing trust and safety. Through these strategies therapists can successfully apply TF-CBT for youth with complex trauma. PMID:22749612

  16. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth with Complex Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive…

  17. Rural Trauma: Is Trauma Designation Associated with Better Hospital Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Stephen M.; Zimmerman, Frederick J.; Sharar, Sam R.; Baker, Margaret W.; Martin, Diane P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: While trauma designation has been associated with lower risk of death in large urban settings, relatively little attention has been given to this issue in small rural hospitals. Purpose: To examine factors related to in-hospital mortality and delayed transfer in small rural hospitals with and without trauma designation. Methods: Analysis…

  18. [Secondary lymphedema--the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach].

    PubMed

    Heldenberg, Eitan; Bass, Arie

    2013-03-01

    Secondary lymphedema is the most common type of lymphedema. Malignancy, mainly breast carcinoma, is the main cause of upper extremity lymphedema, while groin dissection, irradiation and trauma are the cause of lower extremity lymphedema. Early recognition of the pathology followed by early referral to a vascular surgeon, leading a multidisciplinary team, who takes care of those patients, can prevent a miserable Life from these patients. Lifelong commitment of the patients, prolonged financial support of the health insurance supplier, as well as team work of the group taking care of the patient, is the only way to help these patients.

  19. Advantages of Team Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, John

    1973-01-01

    Describes a high school biology program which successfully utilizes team teaching. Outlines the advantages of team teaching and how it is used in the large group lecture-discussion situation, with small groups in the laboratory and on field trips. (JR)

  20. Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelsen, Larry K.; Sweet, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL), when properly implemented, includes many, if not all, of the common elements of evidence-based best practices. To explain this, a brief overview of TBL is presented. The authors examine the relationship between the best practices of evidence-based teaching and the principles that constitute team-based learning. (Contains…

  1. Work-team implementation.

    PubMed

    Reiste, K K; Hubrich, A

    1996-02-01

    The authors describe the implementation of the Work-Team Concept at the Frigidaire plans in Jefferson, Iowa. By forming teams, plant staff have made significant improvements in worker safety, product quality, customer service, cost-effectiveness, and overall employee well-being.

  2. Team Modelling: Literature Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    characteristics, and these characteristics impact on important processes like team effectiveness , member selection, leader preparation, and...evidence that task complexity impacts on team performance. For instance, a meta-analysis by Bowers et al. (2000) found a significant moderating effect ...Comparisons of the model predictions and experimental data revealed four cognitive biases: recency effects , anchoring to prior knowledge, not discounting

  3. Making Science Teams Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    2004-01-01

    Science teachers, likely have more experience with students working together than teachers in any other subject area due to teaming students for hands-on activities. While the importance of teamwork is emphasized in the National Science Education Standards, getting teams to actually work-meaning getting students to share equally in the academic…

  4. TEAM Electron Microscope Animation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The TEAM Electron Microscope, a device that enables atomic-scale imaging in 3-D, has a rotating stage that can hold and position samples inside electron microscopes with unprecedented stability, position-control accuracy, and range of motion.The TEAM Stage makes one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes even better, and enables previously impossible experiments.

  5. Interactive Team Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team…

  6. Team Based Work. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on team-based work in human resource development (HRD). "Toward Transformational Learning in Organizations: Effects of Model-II Governing Variables on Perceived Learning in Teams" (Blair K. Carruth) summarizes a study that indicated that, regardless of which Model-II variable (valid…

  7. Making Science Teams Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    2004-01-01

    Science teachers, likely have more experience with students working together than teachers in any other subject area due to teaming students for hands-on activities. While the importance of teamwork is emphasized in the National Science Education Standards, getting teams to actually work-meaning getting students to share equally in the academic…

  8. Comprehensive Developmental Team Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pokorni, Judith

    The handbook explains the concept and operation of the Comprehensive Developmental Team (CDT) in screening, evaluating and planning for children with special needs in Head Start Programs. Considered are the following aspects of the CDT program: establishing a team (composed of such members as health coordinator, Head Start Director,…

  9. Interactive Team Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team…

  10. ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-17

    KEN COOPER, TEAM LEAD OF MSFC’S ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM, WITH NICKEL ALLOY 718 PARTS FABRICATED USING THE M1 SELECTIVE LASER MELTING SYSTEM. THE M1 MACHINE IS DEDICATED TO BUILDING QUALIFICATION SAMPLES AND HARDWARE DEMONSTRATORS FOR THE RS25 ENGINE PROJECT.

  11. Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelsen, Larry K.; Sweet, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL), when properly implemented, includes many, if not all, of the common elements of evidence-based best practices. To explain this, a brief overview of TBL is presented. The authors examine the relationship between the best practices of evidence-based teaching and the principles that constitute team-based learning. (Contains…

  12. Realisation of Strategic Leadership in Leadership Teams' Work as Experienced by the Leadership Team Members of Basic Education Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahtero, Tapio Juhani; Kuusilehto-Awale, Lea

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a quantitative research into how the leadership team members of 49 basic education schools in the city of Vantaa, Finland, experienced the realisation of strategic leadership in their leadership teams' work. The data were collected by a survey of 24 statements, rated on a five-point Likert scale, and analysed with the…

  13. Realisation of Strategic Leadership in Leadership Teams' Work as Experienced by the Leadership Team Members of Basic Education Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahtero, Tapio Juhani; Kuusilehto-Awale, Lea

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a quantitative research into how the leadership team members of 49 basic education schools in the city of Vantaa, Finland, experienced the realisation of strategic leadership in their leadership teams' work. The data were collected by a survey of 24 statements, rated on a five-point Likert scale, and analysed with the…

  14. Evaluation of a new Transmural Trauma Care Model (TTCM) for the rehabilitation of trauma patients: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Wiertsema, Suzanne H; van Dongen, Johanna M; Geleijn, Edwin; Schothorst, Maaike; Bloemers, Frank W; de Groot, Vincent; Ostelo, Raymond W J G

    2017-01-31

    Improved organization of trauma care in the acute phase has reduced mortality of trauma patients. However, there has been limited attention for the optimal organization of post-clinical rehabilitation of trauma patients. Therefore we developed a Transmural Trauma Care Model (TTCM). This TTCM consists of four equally important components: 1) intake and follow up consultations by a multidisciplinary team consisting of trauma surgeon and hospital based trauma physical therapist, 2) coordination and individual goal setting for each patient by this team, 3) primary care physical therapy by specialized physical therapists organized in a network and 4) E-health support for transmural communication and treatment according to protocols. The aim of the current study is to assess the cost-effectiveness of the TTCM. Patients will be recruited from the outpatient clinic for trauma patients of the VU University Medical Center (VUmc) if they have at least one fracture and were discharged home. A controlled-before-and-after study design will be used to compare the TTCM with regular care. Measurements will take place after the first outpatient clinical visit and after 3, 6 and 9 months. Prior to the implementation of the TTCM, 200 patients (50 patients per time point) will be included in the control group. After implementation 100 patients will be included in the intervention group and prospectively followed. Between-group comparisons will be made separately for each time point. In addition, the recovery pattern of patients in the intervention group will be studied using longitudinal data analysis methods. Effectiveness will be evaluated in terms of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), pain, functional status, patient satisfaction, and perceived recovery. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed from a societal perspective, meaning that all costs related to the TTCM will be taken into account including intervention, health care, absenteeism, presenteeism and unpaid productivity

  15. Measuring Team Learning Behaviours through Observing Verbal Team Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raes, Elisabeth; Boon, Anne; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore, as an answer to the observed lack of knowledge about actual team learning behaviours, the characteristics of the actual observed basic team learning behaviours and facilitating team learning behaviours more in-depth of three project teams. Over time, team learning in an organisational context has been…

  16. The Problems Facing Multidisciplinary Teams: As Perceived by Team Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the problems team members perceive to exist on multidisciplinary teams. Results indicated the two major areas of concern for urban, multidisciplinary team members were: too constrictive a set of team roles and goals, and teams functioning under extensive pressure with minimal support. (Author)

  17. Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

  18. Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours in Response Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boon, Anne; Raes, Elisabeth; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Teams, teamwork and team learning have been the subject of many research studies over the last decades. This article aims at investigating and confirming the Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours (TLB&B) model within a very specific population, i.e. police and firemen teams. Within this context, the paper asks whether the team's…

  19. Team Psychological Safety and Team Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauwelier, Peter; Ribière, Vincent M.; Bennet, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if the concept of team psychological safety, a key driver of team learning and originally studied in the West, can be applied in teams from different national cultures. The model originally validated for teams in the West is applied to teams in Thailand to evaluate its validity, and the views team…

  20. Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours in Response Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boon, Anne; Raes, Elisabeth; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Teams, teamwork and team learning have been the subject of many research studies over the last decades. This article aims at investigating and confirming the Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours (TLB&B) model within a very specific population, i.e. police and firemen teams. Within this context, the paper asks whether the team's…

  1. Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

  2. Measuring Team Learning Behaviours through Observing Verbal Team Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raes, Elisabeth; Boon, Anne; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore, as an answer to the observed lack of knowledge about actual team learning behaviours, the characteristics of the actual observed basic team learning behaviours and facilitating team learning behaviours more in-depth of three project teams. Over time, team learning in an organisational context has been…

  3. Leading Teams of Leaders: What Helps Team Member Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Monica; Young, Lissa; Weiner, Jennie; Wlodarczyk, Steven

    2010-01-01

    School districts are moving toward a new form of management in which superintendents need to form and nurture leadership teams. A study of 25 such teams in Connecticut suggests that a team's effectiveness is maximized when the team members are coached by other team members, not the superintendent, and when they are coached on task-related…

  4. Leading Teams of Leaders: What Helps Team Member Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Monica; Young, Lissa; Weiner, Jennie; Wlodarczyk, Steven

    2010-01-01

    School districts are moving toward a new form of management in which superintendents need to form and nurture leadership teams. A study of 25 such teams in Connecticut suggests that a team's effectiveness is maximized when the team members are coached by other team members, not the superintendent, and when they are coached on task-related…

  5. Team Psychological Safety and Team Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauwelier, Peter; Ribière, Vincent M.; Bennet, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if the concept of team psychological safety, a key driver of team learning and originally studied in the West, can be applied in teams from different national cultures. The model originally validated for teams in the West is applied to teams in Thailand to evaluate its validity, and the views team…

  6. [Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS): An interdisciplinary training in preclinical trauma care].

    PubMed

    Wölfl, C G; Bouillon, B; Lackner, C K; Wentzensen, A; Gliwitzky, B; Gross, B; Brokmann, J; Hauer, T

    2008-09-01

    There is clinical evidence that standardized management of trauma patients in the emergency department improves outcome. Standardized prehospital management has been established for stroke patients and those suffering acute coronary syndrome. Prehospital treatment of trauma patients differs quite significantly from one system to another. The data from the German Trauma Registry show that the average time from accident until arrival in the emergency department is 72 min. This needs improvement. PHTLS is a training course that teaches a systematic approach to the trauma patient in the preclinical setting. The aim is to rapidly and accurately assess the patient's physiologic status, treat according to priorities, and decide whether the patient is critical and needs rapid rescue and transport. Above all, it is important for caregivers to prevent secondary injury, to realize the relevance of timing in the initial treatment, and to assure a high standard of care. PHTLS provides the participant with knowledge, skills, and necessary behaviors. The course is open to persons in all specialties involved in the initial management of severely injured patients. The German Board of Emergency Technicians e.V. inaugurated the course concept in cooperation with the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) and the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and is authorized to organize PHTLS courses in Germany. PHTLS teaches a standardized and established approach to the trauma patient in the emergency department. It has been established in 36 countries and the content is reviewed regularly to consider new scientific evidence. Healthcare personnel in Germany have the chance to participate in this international standard of care and to introduce their own experiences into the review process.

  7. Citations and Team Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2017-02-01

    I explore whether small or large teams produce the most important astronomical results, on average, using citation counts as our metric. I present evidence that citation counts indicate the importance of papers. For the 1343 papers published in A&A, ApJ, and MNRAS in 2012 January-February, I considered 4.5 years worth of citations. In each journal, there are larger citation counts for papers from large teams than from small teams by a factor of about 2. To check whether the results from 2012 were unusual, I collected data from 2013 for A&A and found it to be the same as that for 2012. Could the preponderance of papers by large teams be due to self-citations (i.e., citing and cited papers sharing one or more authors)? To answer this, I looked at 136 papers with one to 266 authors and discovered a linear relation that ranges from a 12.7% self-citation rate for single-author papers to a 45.9% self-citation rate for papers with 100 authors. Correcting for these factors is not enough to explain the predominance of the papers with large teams. Then I computed citations per author. While large teams average more citations than small ones by a factor of 2, individuals on small teams average more citations than individuals on large teams by a factor of 6. The papers by large teams often have far more data, but those by small teams tend to discuss basic physical processes.

  8. [Cervical spine trauma].

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, U; Hellen, P

    2016-08-01

    In the emergency department 65 % of spinal injuries and 2-5 % of blunt force injuries involve the cervical spine. Of these injuries approximately 50 % involve C5 and/or C6 and 30 % involve C2. Older patients tend to have higher spinal injuries and younger patients tend to have lower injuries. The anatomical and development-related characteristics of the pediatric spine as well as degenerative and comorbid pathological changes of the spine in the elderly can make the radiological evaluation of spinal injuries difficult with respect to possible trauma sequelae in young and old patients. Two different North American studies have investigated clinical criteria to rule out cervical spine injuries with sufficient certainty and without using imaging. Imaging of cervical trauma should be performed when injuries cannot be clinically excluded according to evidence-based criteria. Degenerative changes and anatomical differences have to be taken into account in the evaluation of imaging of elderly and pediatric patients.

  9. A Four-Phase Model of Transdisciplinary Team-Based Research: Goals, Team Processes, and Strategies.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kara L; Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke; Stokols, Daniel; Morgan, Glen; Gehlert, Sarah

    2012-12-01

    The complexity of social and public health challenges has led to burgeoning interest and investments in cross-disciplinary team-based research, and particularly in transdisciplinary (TD) team-based research. TD research aims to integrate and ultimately extend beyond discipline-specific concepts, approaches, and methods to accelerate innovations and progress toward solving complex real-world problems. While TD research offers the promise of novel, wide-reaching and important discoveries, it also introduces unique challenges. In particular, today's investigators are generally trained in unidisciplinary approaches, and may have little training in, or exposure to, the scientific skills and team processes necessary to collaborate successfully in teams of colleagues from widely disparate disciplines and fields. Yet these skills are essential to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of TD team-based research. In the current article we propose a model of TD team-based research that includes four relatively distinct phases: development, conceptualization, implementation, and translation. Drawing on the science of team science (SciTS) field, as well as the findings from previous research on group dynamics and organizational behavior, we identify key scientific goals and team processes that occur in each phase and across multiple phases. We then provide real-world exemplars for each phase that highlight strategies for successfully meeting the goals and engaging in the team processes that are hallmarks of that phase. We conclude by discussing the relevance of the model for TD team-based research initiatives, funding to support these initiatives, and future empirical research that aims to better understand the processes and outcomes of TD team-based research.

  10. Introducing Group Theory through Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    The central ideas of postcalculus mathematics courses offered in college are difficult to introduce in middle and secondary schools, especially through the engineering and sciences examples traditionally used in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry textbooks. However, certain concepts in music theory can be used to expose students to interesting…

  11. Introduce XBRL to Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkern, Sheree M.; Morgan, Mark I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper informs business instructors and educators about XBRL (Extensible Business Reporting Language) so that they can introduce it to their students and expand their students' understanding of how it relates to the accounting profession. Even though the financial community has entered a new age with this standardized reporting language, many…

  12. Introducing Ethics Using Structured Controversies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wareham, David; Elefsiniotis, Takis P.; Elms, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a method of introducing ethics to a second-year class of civil engineering students. The method, known as a "structured controversy", takes the form of a workshop where the students assume the identity of stakeholders having an interest in a proposed development in an environmentally sensitive region. The instructor…

  13. Introducing Literature of the Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Elizabeth

    This paper discusses a thematic approach to introduce high school or college students to fiction that deals with minority groups. The author discusses how this thematic arrangement of novels may be a useful method for organizing a study of minority groups as represented in major works of American fiction. She discusses the initiation motif as a…

  14. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  15. Five Perspectives for Introducing Hemingway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillinghast, B. S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that the works of Ernest Hemingway can introduce young readers to (1) an intense expression of the joy of life, (2) heroic models, (3) original use of language, (4) a sharp sense of time and place, and (5) literature that can be understood at many levels. (MM)

  16. Introducing Ethics Using Structured Controversies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wareham, David; Elefsiniotis, Takis P.; Elms, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a method of introducing ethics to a second-year class of civil engineering students. The method, known as a "structured controversy", takes the form of a workshop where the students assume the identity of stakeholders having an interest in a proposed development in an environmentally sensitive region. The instructor…

  17. An Exercise to Introduce Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seier, Edith; Liu, Yali

    2013-01-01

    In introductory statistics courses, the concept of power is usually presented in the context of testing hypotheses about the population mean. We instead propose an exercise that uses a binomial probability table to introduce the idea of power in the context of testing a population proportion. (Contains 2 tables, and 2 figures.)

  18. Introducing Group Theory through Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    The central ideas of postcalculus mathematics courses offered in college are difficult to introduce in middle and secondary schools, especially through the engineering and sciences examples traditionally used in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry textbooks. However, certain concepts in music theory can be used to expose students to interesting…

  19. Prompting Strategies for Introducing Opera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how to introduce opera to students through the use of prompting strategies. Explains that these strategies encourage active participation by students and help to improve listening skills. Focuses on prompting strategies, such as matching characters to songs, identifying, and sequencing songs. (CMK)

  20. Introducing Positive Psychology to SLA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIntyre, Peter D.; Mercer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Positive psychology is a rapidly expanding subfield in psychology that has important implications for the field of second language acquisition (SLA). This paper introduces positive psychology to the study of language by describing its key tenets. The potential contributions of positive psychology are contextualized with reference to prior work,…

  1. An Exercise to Introduce Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seier, Edith; Liu, Yali

    2013-01-01

    In introductory statistics courses, the concept of power is usually presented in the context of testing hypotheses about the population mean. We instead propose an exercise that uses a binomial probability table to introduce the idea of power in the context of testing a population proportion. (Contains 2 tables, and 2 figures.)

  2. Five Perspectives for Introducing Hemingway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillinghast, B. S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that the works of Ernest Hemingway can introduce young readers to (1) an intense expression of the joy of life, (2) heroic models, (3) original use of language, (4) a sharp sense of time and place, and (5) literature that can be understood at many levels. (MM)

  3. Initial assessment and management of pediatric trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    McFadyen, J Grant; Ramaiah, Ramesh; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2012-01-01

    Injury is the leading cause of death and disability in children. Each year, almost one in six children in the United States require emergency department (ED) care for the treatment of injuries, and more than 10,000 children die from injuries. Severely injured children need to be transported to a facility that is staffed 24/7 by personnel experienced in the management of children, and that has all the appropriate equipment to diagnose and manage injuries in children. Anatomical, physiological, and emotional differences between adults and children mean that children are not just scaled-down adults. Facilities receiving injured children need to be child and family friendly, in order to minimize the psychological impact of injury on the child and their family/carers. Early recognition and treatment of life-threatening airway obstruction, inadequate breathing, and intra-abdominal and intra-cranial hemorrhage significantly increases survival rate after major trauma. The initial assessment and management of the injured child follows the same ATLS® sequence as adults: primary survey and resuscitation, followed by secondary survey. A well-organized trauma team has a leader who designates roles to team members and facilitates clear, unambiguous communication between team members. The team leader stands where he/she can observe the entire team and monitor the “bigger picture.” Working together as a cohesive team, the members perform the primary survey in just a few minutes. Life-threatening conditions are dealt with as soon as they are identified. Necessary imaging studies are obtained early. Constant reassessment ensures that any deterioration in the child's condition is picked up immediately. The secondary survey identifies other injuries, such as intra-abdominal injuries and long-bone fractures, which can result in significant hemorrhage. The relief of pain is an important part of the treatment of an injured child. PMID:23181205

  4. Clinical management of abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guo-en; Luo, Tian-hang; DU, Cheng-hui; Bi, Jian-wei; Xue, Xu-chao; Wei, Guo; Weng, Zhao-zhang; Ma, Li-ye; Hua, Ji-de

    2008-08-01

    To improve the prognosis of patients with abdominal trauma. Between January 1993 and December 2005, 415 patients were enrolled in this research. The patients consisted of 347 males and 68 females with mean age of 36 years (ranging from 3-82 years). All abdominal traumas consisted of closed traumas (360 cases, 86.7%) and open traumas (55 cases, 13.3%). A total of 407 cases (98.1%) were fully recovered from trauma and the other 8 cases (1.9%) died of multiple injuries. The mean injury severity score (ISS) of all patients was 22 while the mean ISS of the patients who died in hospital was 42. Postoperative complications were seen in 9 patients such as infection of incisional wounds (6 cases), pancreatic fistula (2 cases) and intestinal fistula (1 case). All these postoperative complications were cured by the conservative treatment. Careful case history inquisition and physical examination are the basic methods to diagnose abdominal trauma. Focused abdominal ultrasonography is always the initial imaging examination because it is non-invasive and can be performed repeatedly with high accuracy. The doctors should consider the severity of local injuries and the general status of patients during the assessment of abdominal trauma. The principle of treatment is to save lives at first, then to cure the injuries. Unnecessary laparotomy should be avoided to reduce additional surgical trauma.

  5. Coagulopathy after severe pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Christiaans, Sarah C; Duhachek-Stapelman, Amy L; Russell, Robert T; Lisco, Steven J; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Pittet, Jean-François

    2014-06-01

    Trauma remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States among children aged 1 to 21 years. The most common cause of lethality in pediatric trauma is traumatic brain injury. Early coagulopathy has been commonly observed after severe trauma and is usually associated with severe hemorrhage and/or traumatic brain injury. In contrast to adult patients, massive bleeding is less common after pediatric trauma. The classical drivers of trauma-induced coagulopathy include hypothermia, acidosis, hemodilution, and consumption of coagulation factors secondary to local activation of the coagulation system after severe traumatic injury. Furthermore, there is also recent evidence for a distinct mechanism of trauma-induced coagulopathy that involves the activation of the anticoagulant protein C pathway. Whether this new mechanism of posttraumatic coagulopathy plays a role in children is still unknown. The goal of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the incidence and potential mechanisms of coagulopathy after pediatric trauma and the role of rapid diagnostic tests for early identification of coagulopathy. Finally, we discuss different options for treating coagulopathy after severe pediatric trauma.

  6. Sexual Trauma, Spirituality, and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krejci, Mark J.; Thompson, Kevin M.; Simonich, Heather; Crosby, Ross D.; Donaldson, Mary Ann; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the association between spirituality and psychopathology in a group of sexual abuse victims and controls with a focus on whether spirituality moderated the association between sexual trauma and psychopathology. Seventy-one sexual trauma victims were compared to 25 control subjects on spiritual well-being, the Eating Disorder…

  7. Occlusal trauma--periodontal concerns.

    PubMed

    Hallmon, W W

    2001-10-01

    While there is evidence that suggests that occlusal trauma is a risk factor for periodontal destruction, there is no evidence that indicates that occlusal trauma will initiate periodontal destruction. Effective plaque control and compliance with periodontal maintenance recommendations are key and essential factors necessary to assure successful treatment and control of periodontal disease.

  8. Sexual Trauma, Spirituality, and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krejci, Mark J.; Thompson, Kevin M.; Simonich, Heather; Crosby, Ross D.; Donaldson, Mary Ann; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the association between spirituality and psychopathology in a group of sexual abuse victims and controls with a focus on whether spirituality moderated the association between sexual trauma and psychopathology. Seventy-one sexual trauma victims were compared to 25 control subjects on spiritual well-being, the Eating Disorder…

  9. Evolving trauma and orthopedics training in the UK.

    PubMed

    Inaparthy, Praveen K; Sayana, Murali K; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The ever-growing population of the UK has resulted in increasing demands on its healthcare service. Changes have been introduced in the UK medical training system to avoid loss of training time and make it more focused and productive. Modernizing medical careers (MMC) was introduced in 2005. This promised to reduce the training period for a safe trauma specialist, in trauma and orthopedics, to 10 years. At around the same time, the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) was introduced to reduce the working hours for junior doctors in training, to improve patient safety and also work-life balance of junior doctors. Introduction of the assessment tools from Orthopedic Competency assessment project (OCAP) will help tailor the training according to the needs of the trainee. The aim of this article is to review the changes in the UK orthopedic surgical training over the past two decades. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Maximizing reimbursement from trauma response fees (UB-92: 68X) - lessons learned from a hospital comparison.

    PubMed

    Fortune, John B; Wohltmann, Christopher; Margold, Brenda; Callahan, Charles D; Sutyak, John

    2005-03-01

    The trauma response fee (UB-92:68x) recently has been approved, to be used by hospitals to cover expenses resulting from continuous trauma team availability. These charges may be made by designated trauma centers for all defined trauma patients when notification has been received before arrival (eligible pt). This study compares two trauma centers' performance in collecting this fee help define methodologies that can enhance reimbursement. Our trauma system uses two hospitals (A and B) that are designated as the Level I trauma center for the region on alternate years. This allows hospital performance comparisons with relatively consistent patient demographics, injury severity, and payer mix. Data were collected for a one-year period beginning on January 1, 2003 and included charges, collections, and payer source for the trauma response fee. This time frame allowed the comparison of two six-month sequential periods at each trauma center. Out of a total of 871 trauma patients, 625 were eligible for the trauma response fee (72%): hospital A = 65% and hospital B = 77%. Total trauma response fee charges for both centers were 1,111,882 dollars with collections of 319,684 dollars (28.8%). The following payer sources contributed to the collections: Indemnity insurance (77.4%), Managed Care (22.1%), Medicare (0.3%), and Medicaid (0.2%). No collections were obtained from any self-pay patient. Eligible patients were charged a trauma response fee much less frequently in Hospital A than B (29.35% versus 95.2%) but revenue / charge ratios were equivalent at both hospitals (0.32 versus 0.28). These differences resulted in markedly enhanced revenue for each eligible patient in Hospital B compared with A (735 dollars versus 174 dollars) Enhanced collection by hospital B was a result of a higher charge, compulsive billing of all eligible patients, and emphasis on pre-admission designation of trauma patients. Effective billing and collection process related to trauma response fees

  11. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services.

  12. [The TraumaRegister DGU® as the basis of medical quality management. Ten years experience of a national trauma centre exemplified by emergency room treatment].

    PubMed

    Helm, M; Bitzl, A; Klinger, S; Lefering, R; Lampl, L; Kulla, M

    2013-07-01

    The trauma register of the German Society of Trauma Surgery (TraumaRegister DGU®/TR-DGU) has been proven to be a valuable tool for external assessment of quality in the treatment of patients with major trauma. This publication shows for the first time how the quality of trauma treatment in a level I trauma centre could be improved over a period of almost ten years with the help of continuous quality management, i.e. recognizing a problem, developing a solution and evaluating its effect. Tracer parameters and indicators of quality are presented in four periods over a total study period from 1st January 1989 to 31st March 2007. The division into four periods is due to major changes in the trauma treatment algorithms or structural changes in the trauma room. The results are displayed for all patients treated in the trauma room and for those patients with an injury severity score (ISS)≥16. Over all four periods a total number of n=2,239 patients were admitted to the trauma room. Based on the results of the trauma register a number of changes were made, not only structural changes, such as the introduction of point-of-care diagnostics, initially conventional X-ray, then digital X-ray and finally multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning in the trauma room but also changes in the way personnel participating in the trauma treatment are trained. Advanced trauma life support (ATLS®) has become the standard training for doctors and prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS®) for nurses. Time efficient treatment algorithms were introduced. All measures led to changes in several parameters which are chosen as indicators for good treatment quality. It was for instance possible to reduce the average total trauma treatment time for patients with an ISS≥16 from initially 90.9±48.6 min to 37.4±18.  min in the final study period. The external quality management performed by the TR-DGU has proved to be a constant source of inspiration. The effects of the changes made can

  13. A Guide to Improving Skills of Teachers in: (a) Team Building, (b) Team Operations, (c) Team Planning, (d) Team Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goddu, Roland

    This guide is a product of two teams of teachers who worked together to develop teaming techniques for open space schools. The purpose of the guide is to outline suggested steps to follow as various team teaching possibilities are implemented. The guide is organized in the following sections: (1) team building, (2) team operations, (3) team…

  14. Teams without Roles: Empowering Teams for Greater Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrimmon, Mitch

    1995-01-01

    Criticizes Belbin's team role theory on the basis that roles are appropriate only in static organizations. Argues that most teams have no set roles and members interchange them. Suggests that all team members be trained to manage teamwork effectively. (SK)

  15. Trauma patient outcome after the Prehospital Trauma Life Support program.

    PubMed

    Ali, J; Adam, R U; Gana, T J; Williams, J I

    1997-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated a significant improvement in trauma patient outcome after the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program in Trinidad and Tobago. In January of 1992, a Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program was also instituted. This study assessed trauma patient outcome after the PHTLS program. Morbidity (length of stay and degree of disability), mortality, injury severity score, mechanism of injury, age, and sex among all adult trauma patients transported by ambulance to the major trauma hospital were assessed between July of 1990 to December of 1991 (pre-PHTLS, n = 332) and January of 1994 to June of 1995 (post-PHTLS, n = 350). Age, sex distribution, percentage blunt injury, and injury severity score were similar for both groups. Mortality pre-PHTLS (15.7%) was greater than post-PHTLS (10.6%). Length of stay and disability were statistically significantly decreased post-PHTLS. Age, injury severity score, and mechanism of injury were positively correlated with mortality in both periods. The previously reported post-ATLS mortality was similar to the pre-PHTLS mortality. Post-PHTLS mortality and morbidity were significantly decreased, suggesting a positive impact of the PHTLS program on trauma patient outcome.

  16. Building the team for team science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Read, Emily K.; O'Rourke, M.; Hong, G. S.; Hanson, P. C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Crowley, S.; Brewer, C. A.; Weathers, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to effectively exchange information and develop trusting, collaborative relationships across disciplinary boundaries is essential for 21st century scientists charged with solving complex and large-scale societal and environmental challenges, yet these communication skills are rarely taught. Here, we describe an adaptable training program designed to increase the capacity of scientists to engage in information exchange and relationship development in team science settings. A pilot of the program, developed by a leader in ecological network science, the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON), indicates that the training program resulted in improvement in early career scientists’ confidence in team-based network science collaborations within and outside of the program. Fellows in the program navigated human-network challenges, expanded communication skills, and improved their ability to build professional relationships, all in the context of producing collaborative scientific outcomes. Here, we describe the rationale for key communication training elements and provide evidence that such training is effective in building essential team science skills.

  17. On championship TEAMS.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel B

    2016-02-01

    Championship teams tap the strengths of the individuals working toward a common goal. Surgery is a team sport, which seeks to provide the very best patient care. For surgeons we seek to cure disease, alleviate suffering, and train the next generation of surgeons. When at our best, we build teamwork with a winning attitude, trust, respect, and love. Together there are no limits to what championship teams can achieve with passion, dedicated practice, mutual respect, and a little luck. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Family Presence During Trauma Resuscitation: Family Members' Attitudes, Behaviors, and Experiences.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Karen; Fritzeen, Jennifer; Guzzetta, Cathie E; Clark, Angela P; Lloyd, Christina; Scott, Shari H; Aldridge, Michael D; Kreling, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    The paradigm is shifting from separating family members from their children during resuscitation to one of patient- and family-centered care. However, widespread acceptance is still lacking. To measure attitudes, behaviors, and experiences of family members of pediatric patients during the resuscitation phase of trauma care, including family members who were present and those who were not. An observational mixed-methods study using structured interviews and focus groups was conducted at 3 level 1 pediatric trauma centers. Family members of children who met trauma team activation criteria (N = 126; 99 present, 27 not present) were interviewed; 25 also participated in focus groups. Mean attitude scores indicated a positive attitude about being present during the resuscitation phase of trauma care (3.65; SD, 0.37) or wanting to be present (3.2; SD, 0.60). Families present reported providing emotional support (94%) for their child and health care information (92%) to the medical team. Being present allowed them to advocate for their child, understand their child's condition, and provide comfort. Families in both groups felt strongly that the choice was their right but was contingent upon their bedside behavior. Study findings demonstrated compelling family benefits for presence during pediatric trauma care. This study is one of the first to report on family members who were not present. The practice of family presence should be made a priority at pediatric trauma centers. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  19. Introducing Actions into Qualitative Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    include the effects of actions to form action-augmented envisionments . The action-augmented envisionment incorporates both the effects of an agent’s...procedure generation than any previous representation . This paper defines action- augmented envisionments and an algorithm for directly computing...Moving actions into the physics . The next section introduces a new representation, the action-augmented envisionment (or .fie), which inte- grates the

  20. Teams make it work: how team work engagement mediates between social resources and performance in teams.

    PubMed

    Torrente, Pedro; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2012-02-01

    In this study we analyze the mediating role of team work engagement between team social resources (i.e., supportive team climate, coordination, teamwork), and team performance (i.e., in-role and extra-role performance) as predicted by the Job Demands-Resources Model. Aggregated data of 533 employees nested within 62 teams and 13 organizations were used, whereas team performance was assessed by supervisor ratings. Structural equation modeling revealed that, as expected, team work engagement plays a mediating role between social resources perceived at the team level and team performance as assessed by the supervisor.

  1. Making Teamwork Work: Team Knowledge for Team Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Guchait, Priyanko; Lei, Puiwa; Tews, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of two types of team knowledge on team effectiveness. The study assessed the impact of taskwork knowledge and teamwork knowledge on team satisfaction and performance. A longitudinal study was conducted with 27 service-management teams involving 178 students in a real-life restaurant setting. Teamwork knowledge was found to impact both team outcomes. Furthermore, team learning behavior was found to mediate the relationships between teamwork knowledge and team outcomes. Educators and managers should therefore ensure these types of knowledge are developed in teams along with learning behavior for maximum effectiveness.

  2. Pause...Before Rushing In: Examining Motivations to Help in Trauma Impacted Communities Internationally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streets, Barbara Faye; Nicolas, Guerda; Wolford, Karen

    2015-01-01

    International service learning courses, cultural immersion projects, and international disaster response teams have provided valuable aid, services, supplies and programs to trauma-impacted communities across the globe. Many colleges and universities support global learning and the creation of global citizens, and this ethic is reflected in many…

  3. Closed-Loop Communication Improves Task Completion in Pediatric Trauma Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    El-Shafy, Ibrahim Abd; Delgado, Jennifer; Akerman, Meredith; Bullaro, Francesca; Christopherson, Nathan A M; Prince, Jose M

    2017-08-02

    Pediatric trauma care requires effective and clear communication in a time-sensitive manner amongst a variety of disciplines. Programs such as Crew Resource Management in aviation have been developed to systematically prevent errors. Similarly, teamSTEPPS has been promoted in healthcare with a strong focus on communication. We aim to evaluate the ability of closed-loop communication to improve time-to-task completion in pediatric trauma activations. All pediatric trauma activations from January to September, 2016 at an American College of Surgeons verified level I pediatric trauma center were video recorded and included in the study. Two independent reviewers identified and classified all verbal orders issued by the trauma team leader for order audibility, directed responsibility, check-back, and time-to-task-completion. The impact of pre-notification and level of activation on time-to-task-completion was also evaluated. All analyses were performed using SAS® version 9.4(SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). In total, 89 trauma activation videos were reviewed, with 387 verbal orders identified. Of those, 126(32.6%) were directed, 372(96.1%) audible, and 101(26.1%) closed-loop. On average each order required 3.85 minutes to be completed. There was a significant reduction in time-to-task-completion when closed-loop communication was utilized (p < 0.0001). Orders with closed-loop communication were completed 3.6 times sooner as compared to orders with an open-loop [HR = 3.6 (95% CI: 2.5, 5.3)]. There was not a significant difference in time-to-task-completion with respect to pre-notification by emergency service providers (p < 0.6100). [HR = 1.1 (95% CI: 0.9, 1.3)]. There was also not a significant difference in time-to-task-completion with respect to level of trauma team activation (p < 0.2229). [HR = 1.3 (95% CI: 0.8, 2.1)]. While closed-loop communication prevents medical errors, our study highlights the potential to increase the speed and efficiency with which tasks are

  4. Predicting significant torso trauma.

    PubMed

    Nirula, Ram; Talmor, Daniel; Brasel, Karen

    2005-07-01

    Identification of motor vehicle crash (MVC) characteristics associated with thoracoabdominal injury would advance the development of automatic crash notification systems (ACNS) by improving triage and response times. Our objective was to determine the relationships between MVC characteristics and thoracoabdominal trauma to develop a torso injury probability model. Drivers involved in crashes from 1993 to 2001 within the National Automotive Sampling System were reviewed. Relationships between torso injury and MVC characteristics were assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the model to current ACNS models. There were a total of 56,466 drivers. Age, ejection, braking, avoidance, velocity, restraints, passenger-side impact, rollover, and vehicle weight and type were associated with injury (p < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (83.9) was significantly greater than current ACNS models. We have developed a thoracoabdominal injury probability model that may improve patient triage when used with ACNS.

  5. CT in aortic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1983-06-01

    A diagnosis of aortic transection was made at computed tomography (CT) in four of 10 patients with acute multiple trauma suspected of having thoracic aortic injuries. There were no false-negative or false-positive examinations. The CT findings of an injured aorta were (1) false aneurysm, (2) linear lucency within the opacified aortic lumen caused by the torn edge of the aortic wall, (3) marginal irregularity of the opacified aortic lumen, (4) periaortic or intramural aortic hematoma, and (5) dissection. The extent of associated mediastinal hemorrhage and the amount of blood in the pleural space were not useful as indicators of aortic injury. Similarly, shift of the trachea and esophagus or absence thereof was found in patients with or without aortic tear.

  6. Orthopedic trauma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Pratik; Suk, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Trauma sustained during pregnancy can trigger uncertainty and anxiety for patient and orthopedic surgeon alike. In particular, orthopedic-related injuries raise concerns about preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care. In this article, we review common concerns about radiation exposure, leukemia, pain management, anticoagulation, and anesthesia. One finding is that radiation risk is minimal when obtaining x-rays for operative planning, provided that the cumulative dose is within 5 rad. We also address safety concerns about patient positioning and staff radiation exposure. In addition, we found that most anesthetics used in pregnancy are category C (ie, safe). Perioperative opioid use for pain management is recommended with little risk. Regarding anticoagulation, low-molecular-weight heparin and fondaparinux are the safest choices. Last, pregnancy is not a contraindication to operative management of pelvic and acetabular fractures.

  7. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on.

  8. Trauma and religiousness.

    PubMed

    Gostečnik, Christian; Repič Slavič, Tanja; Lukek, Saša Poljak; Cvetek, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Victims of traumatic events who experience re-traumatization often develop a highly ambivalent relationship to God and all religiosity as extremely conflictual. On the one hand, they may choose to blame God for not having protected them, for having left them to feel so alone, for having been indifferent to them or they may even turn their wrath upon God, as the source of cruelty. Often though, the traumas experienced by individuals prompt them to turn to God and religion in search of help. This gives reason for the need of new and up-to-date research that can help elucidate why some people choose to seek help in religion and others turn away from it.

  9. Tournament water skiing trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, S N; Roberts, P M

    1996-01-01

    Tournament water skiing is an increasingly popular and internationally successful sport in Great Britain, despite the climate. The kinematics and injury patterns of the three disciplines will be unfamiliar to most clinicians and are described, with estimation of the stresses. Advances in equipment over the last 15 years have reduced the risk of severe injury in the tricks event, while high speed impacts are responsible for the majority of trauma in slalom and jump. There is a surprisingly high incidence of injury to the lumbar spine during the high impact jump event. Comparison with findings in other sports suggests that the spine may be damaged by overuse, particularly before skeletal maturity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8799590

  10. Systematizing cultural awareness: Toward a model for modification of trauma therapy and an application in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Welkin, Leyla; Candansayar, Selçuk; Dönmez, Aslihan

    2015-12-01

    A cross-cultural team including a U.S.-trained clinical cross-cultural psychologist and two Turkish psychiatrists conducted research on a set of five trauma treatment psychotherapy groups for adult women survivors of sexual abuse in Ankara, Turkey. Based upon observational comparisons between trauma treatment groups in U.S. and Turkish settings, the team developed an approach to assist in adaptation of treatment methods from one cultural setting to another. This is a preliminary effort to develop a conceptual tool to focus the attention of therapists on salient dimensions of culture that may influence the psychotherapy process. This article describes six possible dimensions: (a) relational/individual self; (b) situationalism/universalism; (c) high/low power differential; (cc) high/low gender differential; (d) internal/external control; (e) emotional expressivity/containment; and (f) short-term/long-term time orientation. Comparative cultural examples from trauma psychotherapy group field notes illustrate the use of the tool.

  11. [Emergency room management of multiple trauma : ATLS® and S3 guidelines].

    PubMed

    Bouillon, B; Probst, C; Maegele, M; Wafaisade, A; Helm, P; Mutschler, M; Brockamp, T; Shafizadeh, S; Paffrath, T

    2013-09-01

    Trauma management in the emergency room is an important part of the treatment chain of the severely injured. Important decisions with respect to diagnostics and treatment must be made under time pressure. Successful trauma management in the emergency room requires a hospital tailored treatment protocol. This written protocol needs consent from all participating disciplines and must be known by all members of the resuscitation team. The ATLS® and the recently published clinical practice guidelines on multiple trauma can be of help in order to establish or update such protocols. In order to continuously evaluate and improve performance in the emergency room local quality circles are needed that truly follow that aim. Important factors are reliability of agreement between the different disciplines and continuous communication of results to the team members. In order to be successful such quality circles need people that care.

  12. How to Collaborate through Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Teachers are spending more of their time and making more decisions within teams. Effective teacher-based teams provide academic and behavioral support for students as well as professional development for teachers. Learn how the best teams function.

  13. How to Collaborate through Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Teachers are spending more of their time and making more decisions within teams. Effective teacher-based teams provide academic and behavioral support for students as well as professional development for teachers. Learn how the best teams function.

  14. Penetrating neck traumas

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarski, Jacek; Brzeziński, Daniel; Cieślik-Wolski, Bartosz; Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study Aim of the study is to present our own experiences in the treatment of people suffering from penetrating neck traumas. Material and methods In the years 1996-2012, 10 patients with penetrating neck traumas were treated, including 3 women and 7 men. The patients’ age ranged from 16 to 55 (the average age being 40.7 years). In 9 cases the wound was caused by cutting or stabbing, while in one case it was inflicted by a gunshot. In 8 patients it was a single cut wound, while one patient suffered from 34 stab wounds to the neck, chest and stomach. Two cut wounds resulted from a suicide attempt. The remaining injuries were the result of a crime. Results All patients underwent immediate surgery, which involved revision of the neck wounds in 8 cases, one longitudinal sternotomy and one left-sided thoracotomy. The indications for surgery included increased subcutaneous emphysema in 5 patients, bleeding from the wound in 3 patients, and mediastinal hematoma in 2 patients. The damage assessed intraoperatively included tracheal damage in 6 patients, damage to carotid vessels in 3 patients, larynx in 2 patients, thoracic vessels in 2 patients, oesophagus in 1 patient and thyroid gland in 1 patient. In 9 patients, the treatment yielded positive results. The patient with a gunshot wound died during the surgery due to massive bleeding from the aorta. Conclusions In patients with penetrating neck wounds, early and rapid diagnostics allows one to determine the indications for surgery and prevent serious fatal complications. PMID:26336390

  15. JPL web team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) WEB Team activities were reported for activities which were directed toward identifying and attacking areas in the growth of dendritic web ribbon, to complement the program at Westinghouse Electric Corp.

  16. PPB | Study Team

    Cancer.gov

    The Pleuropulmonary Blastoma (PPB) DICER1 Syndrome Study team is made up of researchers from the National Cancer Institute, Children¹s National Medical Center, the International Pleuropulmonary Blastoma Registry, and Washington University in St. Louis.

  17. ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-16

    ZACK JONES AND JIM LYDON OF MSFC’S ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM, WITH MSFC’S M2 SELECTIVE LASER MELTING SYSTEM. THE M2 IS CURRENTLY DEDICATED TO ADVANCED COPPER MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE LOW COST UPPER STAGE PROGRAM.

  18. Environmental Response Team

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This website will serve as a resource directory of the Environmental Response Team's roles and capabilities as well as list contacts for each discipline to provide information to EPA personnel and the public.

  19. Regional Response Teams

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There are thirteen in the U.S., each representing a geographic region (including the Caribbean and the Pacific Basin). Composed of representatives from field offices of the agencies that make up the National Response Team, and state representatives.

  20. EAU Guidelines on Urethral Trauma.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Djakovic, Nenad; Plas, Eugen; Mor, Yoram; Santucci, Richard A; Serafetinidis, Efraim; Turkeri, Levent N; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2010-05-01

    These guidelines were prepared on behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU) to assist urologists in the management of traumatic urethral injuries. To determine the optimal evaluation and management of urethral injuries by review of the world's literature on the subject. A working group of experts on Urological Trauma was convened to review and summarize the literature concerning the diagnosis and treatment of genitourinary trauma, including urethral trauma. The Urological Trauma guidelines have been based on a review of the literature identified using on-line searches of MEDLINE and other source documents published before 2009. A critical assessment of the findings was made, not involving a formal appraisal of the data. There were few high-powered, randomized, controlled trials in this area and considerable available data was provided by retrospective studies. The Working Group recognizes this limitation. The full text of these guidelines is available through the EAU Central Office and the EAU website (www.uroweb.org). This article comprises the abridged version of a section of the Urological Trauma guidelines. Updated and critically reviewed Guidelines on Urethral Trauma are presented. The aim of these guidelines is to provide support to the practicing urologist since urethral injuries carry substantial morbidity. The diversity of urethral injuries, associated injuries, the timing and availability of treatment options as well as their relative rarity contribute to the controversies in the management of urethral trauma. Copyright © 2010 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.