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Sample records for intron-flanking pcr primer

  1. ConservedPrimers 2.0: A high-throughput pipeline for comparative genome referenced intron-flanking PCR primer design and its application in wheat SNP discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In some genomic applications it is necessary to design large numbers of PCR primers in exons flanking one or several introns on the basis of orthologous gene sequences in related species. The primer pairs designed by this target gene approach are called "intron-flanking primers" or because they ar...

  2. ConservedPrimers 2.0: a high-throughput pipeline for comparative genome referenced intron-flanking PCR primer design and its application in wheat SNP discovery.

    PubMed

    You, Frank M; Huo, Naxin; Gu, Yong Q; Lazo, Gerard R; Dvorak, Jan; Anderson, Olin D

    2009-10-13

    In some genomic applications it is necessary to design large numbers of PCR primers in exons flanking one or several introns on the basis of orthologous gene sequences in related species. The primer pairs designed by this target gene approach are called "intron-flanking primers" or because they are located in exonic sequences which are usually conserved between related species, "conserved primers". They are useful for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and marker development, especially in species, such as wheat, for which a large number of ESTs are available but for which genome sequences and intron/exon boundaries are not available. To date, no suitable high-throughput tool is available for this purpose. We have developed, the ConservedPrimers 2.0 pipeline, for designing intron-flanking primers for large-scale SNP discovery and marker development, and demonstrated its utility in wheat. This tool uses non-redundant wheat EST sequences, such as wheat contigs and singleton ESTs, and related genomic sequences, such as those of rice, as inputs. It aligns the ESTs to the genomic sequences to identify unique colinear exon blocks and predicts intron lengths. Intron-flanking primers are then designed based on the intron/exon information using the Primer3 core program or BatchPrimer3. Finally, a tab-delimited file containing intron-flanking primer pair sequences and their primer properties is generated for primer ordering and their PCR applications. Using this tool, 1,922 bin-mapped wheat ESTs (31.8% of the 6,045 in total) were found to have unique colinear exon blocks suitable for primer design and 1,821 primer pairs were designed from these single- or low-copy genes for PCR amplification and SNP discovery. With these primers and subsequently designed genome-specific primers, a total of 1,527 loci were found to contain one or more genome-specific SNPs. The ConservedPrimers 2.0 pipeline for designing intron-flanking primers was developed and its

  3. BatchPrimer3: a high throughput web application for PCR and sequencing primer design.

    PubMed

    You, Frank M; Huo, Naxin; Gu, Yong Qiang; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Ma, Yaqin; Hane, Dave; Lazo, Gerard R; Dvorak, Jan; Anderson, Olin D

    2008-05-29

    Microsatellite (simple sequence repeat - SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are two types of important genetic markers useful in genetic mapping and genotyping. Often, large-scale genomic research projects require high-throughput computer-assisted primer design. Numerous such web-based or standard-alone programs for PCR primer design are available but vary in quality and functionality. In particular, most programs lack batch primer design capability. Such a high-throughput software tool for designing SSR flanking primers and SNP genotyping primers is increasingly demanded. A new web primer design program, BatchPrimer3, is developed based on Primer3. BatchPrimer3 adopted the Primer3 core program as a major primer design engine to choose the best primer pairs. A new score-based primer picking module is incorporated into BatchPrimer3 and used to pick position-restricted primers. BatchPrimer3 v1.0 implements several types of primer designs including generic primers, SSR primers together with SSR detection, and SNP genotyping primers (including single-base extension primers, allele-specific primers, and tetra-primers for tetra-primer ARMS PCR), as well as DNA sequencing primers. DNA sequences in FASTA format can be batch read into the program. The basic information of input sequences, as a reference of parameter setting of primer design, can be obtained by pre-analysis of sequences. The input sequences can be pre-processed and masked to exclude and/or include specific regions, or set targets for different primer design purposes as in Primer3Web and primer3Plus. A tab-delimited or Excel-formatted primer output also greatly facilitates the subsequent primer-ordering process. Thousands of primers, including wheat conserved intron-flanking primers, wheat genome-specific SNP genotyping primers, and Brachypodium SSR flanking primers in several genome projects have been designed using the program and validated in several laboratories. BatchPrimer3 is a

  4. Explanatory chapter: PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is intended as a guide on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design (for information on PCR, see General PCR and Explanatory Chapter: Troubleshooting PCR). In the next section, general guidelines will be provided, followed by a discussion on primer design for specific applications. A list of recommended software tools is shown at the end. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CODEHOP PCR and CODEHOP PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Staheli, Jeannette P; Boyce, Richard; Kovarik, Dina; Rose, Timothy M

    2011-01-01

    While PCR primer design for the amplification of known sequences is usually quite straightforward, the design, and successful application of primers aimed at the detection of as yet unknown genes is often not. The search for genes that are presumed to be distantly related to a known gene sequence, such as homologous genes in different species, paralogs in the same genome, or novel pathogens in diverse hosts, often turns into the proverbial search for the needle in the haystack. PCR-based methods commonly used to address this issue involve the use of either consensus primers or degenerate primers, both of which have significant shortcomings regarding sensitivity and specificity. We have developed a novel primer design approach that diminishes these shortcomings and instead takes advantage of the strengths of both consensus and degenerate primer designs, by combining the two concepts into a Consensus-Degenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primer (CODEHOP) approach. CODEHOP PCR primers contain a relatively short degenerate 3' core and a 5' nondegenerate clamp. The 3' degenerate core consists of a pool of primers containing all possible codons for a 3-4 aminoacid motif that is highly conserved in multiply aligned sequences from known members of a protein family. Each primer in the pool also contains a single 5' nondegenerate nucleotide sequence derived from a codon consensus across the aligned aminoacid sequences flanking the conserved motif. During the initial PCR amplification cycles, the degenerate core is responsible for specific binding to sequences encoding the conserved aminoacid motif. The longer consensus clamp region serves to stabilize the primer and allows the participation of all primers in the pool in the efficient amplification of products during later PCR cycles. We have developed an interactive web site and algorithm (iCODEHOP) for designing CODEHOP PCR primers from multiply aligned protein sequences, which is freely available online. Here, we describe the

  6. Multiplexed Primer Prediction for PCR

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-23

    MPP predicts sets of multiplex-compatible primers for Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), finding a near minimal set of primers such that at least one amplicon will be generated from every target sequence in the input file. The code finds highly conserved oligos that are suitable as primers, according to user-specified desired primer characteristics such as length, melting temperature, and amplicon length. The primers are predicted not to form unwanted dimer or hairpin structures. The target sequences used as input can be diverse, since no multiple sequence alighment is required. The code is scalable, taking up to tens of thousands of sequences as input, and works, for example, to find a "universal primer set" for all viral genomes provided as a single input file. The code generates a periodic check-point file, thus in the event of premature execution termination, the application can be restarted from the last check-point file.

  7. Primer design versus PCR bias in methylation independent PCR amplifications.

    PubMed

    Wojdacz, Tomasz K; Borgbo, Tanni; Hansen, Lise Lotte

    2009-05-16

    Many protocols in methylation studies utilize one primer set to generate a PCR product from bisulfite modified template regardless of its methylation status (methylation independent amplification MIP). However, proportional amplification of methylated and unmethylated alleles is hard to achieve due to PCR bias favoring amplification of unmethylated relatively GC poor sequence. Two primer design systems have been proposed to overcome PCR bias in methylation independent amplifications. The first advises against including any CpG dinucleoteides into the primer sequence (CpG-free primers) and the second, recently published by us, is based on inclusion of a limited number of CpG sites into the primer sequence. Here we used the Methylation Sensitive High Resolution Melting (MS-HRM) technology to investigate the ability of primers designed according to both of the above mentioned primer design systems to proportionally amplify methylated and unmethylated templates. Ten "CpG-free" primer pairs and twenty primers containing limited number of CpGs were tested. In reconstruction experiments the "CpG-free" primers showed primer specific sensitivity and allowed us to detect methylation levels in the range from 5 to 50%. Whereas while using primers containing limited number of CpG sites we were able to consistently detect 1-0.1% methylation levels and effectively control PCR amplification bias. In conclusion, the primers with limited number of CpG sites are able to effectively reverse PCR bias and therefore detect methylated templates with significantly higher sensitivity than CpG free primers.

  8. PCR hot-start using duplex primers.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deming; Shen, Hanxi; Huang, Yanping; Mi, Huaifeng

    2004-02-01

    A new technique of PCR hot-start using duplex primers has been developed which can decrease the undesirable products arising throughout PCR amplification thereby giving better results than a manual hot-start method.

  9. In silico PCR primer designing and validation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Chordia, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an enzymatic reaction whose efficiency and sensitivity largely depend on the efficiency of the primers that are used for the amplification of a concerned gene/DNA fragment. Selective amplification of nucleic acid molecules initially present in minute quantities provides a powerful tool for analyzing nucleic acids. In silico method helps in designing primers. There are various programs available for PCR primer design. Here we described designing of primers using web-based tools like "Primer3" and "Web Primer". For designing the primer, DNA template sequence is required that can be taken from any of the available sequence databases, e.g., RefSeq database. The in silico validation can be carried out using BLAST tool and Gene Runner software, which check their efficiency and specificity. Thereafter, the primers designed in silico can be validated in the wet lab. After that, these validated primers can be synthesized for use in the amplification of concerned gene/DNA fragment.

  10. A thermodynamic approach to PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Mann, Tobias; Humbert, Richard; Dorschner, Michael; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Noble, William Stafford

    2009-07-01

    We developed a primer design method, Pythia, in which state of the art DNA binding affinity computations are directly integrated into the primer design process. We use chemical reaction equilibrium analysis to integrate multiple binding energy calculations into a conservative measure of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) efficiency, and a precomputed index on genomic sequences to evaluate primer specificity. We show that Pythia can design primers with success rates comparable with those of current methods, but yields much higher coverage in difficult genomic regions. For example, in RepeatMasked sequences in the human genome, Pythia achieved a median coverage of 89% as compared with a median coverage of 51% for Primer3. For parameter settings yielding sensitivities of 81%, our method has a recall of 97%, compared with the Primer3 recall of 48%. Because our primer design approach is based on the chemistry of DNA interactions, it has fewer and more physically meaningful parameters than current methods, and is therefore easier to adjust to specific experimental requirements. Our software is freely available at http://pythia.sourceforge.net.

  11. Specific PCR product primer design using memetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Cheng, Yu-Huei; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2009-01-01

    To provide feasible primer sets for performing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiment, many primer design methods have been proposed. However, the majority of these methods require a relatively long time to obtain an optimal solution since large quantities of template DNA need to be analyzed. Furthermore, the designed primer sets usually do not provide a specific PCR product size. In recent years, evolutionary computation has been applied to PCR primer design and yielded promising results. In this article, a memetic algorithm (MA) is proposed to solve primer design problems associated with providing a specific product size for PCR experiments. The MA is compared with a genetic algorithm (GA) using an accuracy formula to estimate the quality of the primer design and test the running time. Overall, 50 accession nucleotide sequences were sampled for the comparison of the accuracy of the GA and MA for primer design. Five hundred runs of the GA and MA primer design were performed with PCR product lengths of 150-300 bps and 500-800 bps, and two different methods of calculating T(m) for each accession nucleotide sequence were tested. A comparison of the accuracy results for the GA and MA primer design showed that the MA primer design yielded better results than the GA primer design. The results further indicate that the proposed method finds optimal or near-optimal primer sets and effective PCR products in a dry dock experiment. Related materials are available online at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/ma-pd/.

  12. MPprimer: a program for reliable multiplex PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiyong; Qu, Wubin; Wang, Wen; Lu, Yiming; Wu, Yonghong; Li, Zhifeng; Hang, Xingyi; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Chenggang

    2010-03-18

    Multiplex PCR, defined as the simultaneous amplification of multiple regions of a DNA template or multiple DNA templates using more than one primer set (comprising a forward primer and a reverse primer) in one tube, has been widely used in diagnostic applications of clinical and environmental microbiology studies. However, primer design for multiplex PCR is still a challenging problem and several factors need to be considered. These problems include mis-priming due to nonspecific binding to non-target DNA templates, primer dimerization, and the inability to separate and purify DNA amplicons with similar electrophoretic mobility. A program named MPprimer was developed to help users for reliable multiplex PCR primer design. It employs the widely used primer design program Primer3 and the primer specificity evaluation program MFEprimer to design and evaluate the candidate primers based on genomic or transcript DNA database, followed by careful examination to avoid primer dimerization. The graph-expanding algorithm derived from the greedy algorithm was used to determine the optimal primer set combinations (PSCs) for multiplex PCR assay. In addition, MPprimer provides a virtual electrophotogram to help users choose the best PSC. The experimental validation from 2x to 5x plex PCR demonstrates the reliability of MPprimer. As another example, MPprimer is able to design the multiplex PCR primers for DMD (dystrophin gene which caused Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy), which has 79 exons, for 20x, 20x, 20x, 14x, and 5x plex PCR reactions in five tubes to detect underlying exon deletions. MPprimer is a valuable tool for designing specific, non-dimerizing primer set combinations with constrained amplicons size for multiplex PCR assays.

  13. PrimerMapper: high throughput primer design and graphical assembly for PCR and SNP detection.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2016-02-08

    Primer design represents a widely employed gambit in diverse molecular applications including PCR, sequencing, and probe hybridization. Variations of PCR, including primer walking, allele-specific PCR, and nested PCR provide specialized validation and detection protocols for molecular analyses that often require screening large numbers of DNA fragments. In these cases, automated sequence retrieval and processing become important features, and furthermore, a graphic that provides the user with a visual guide to the distribution of designed primers across targets is most helpful in quickly ascertaining primer coverage. To this end, I describe here, PrimerMapper, which provides a comprehensive graphical user interface that designs robust primers from any number of inputted sequences while providing the user with both, graphical maps of primer distribution for each inputted sequence, and also a global assembled map of all inputted sequences with designed primers. PrimerMapper also enables the visualization of graphical maps within a browser and allows the user to draw new primers directly onto the webpage. Other features of PrimerMapper include allele-specific design features for SNP genotyping, a remote BLAST window to NCBI databases, and remote sequence retrieval from GenBank and dbSNP. PrimerMapper is hosted at GitHub and freely available without restriction.

  14. PrimerMapper: high throughput primer design and graphical assembly for PCR and SNP detection

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Damien M.

    2016-01-01

    Primer design represents a widely employed gambit in diverse molecular applications including PCR, sequencing, and probe hybridization. Variations of PCR, including primer walking, allele-specific PCR, and nested PCR provide specialized validation and detection protocols for molecular analyses that often require screening large numbers of DNA fragments. In these cases, automated sequence retrieval and processing become important features, and furthermore, a graphic that provides the user with a visual guide to the distribution of designed primers across targets is most helpful in quickly ascertaining primer coverage. To this end, I describe here, PrimerMapper, which provides a comprehensive graphical user interface that designs robust primers from any number of inputted sequences while providing the user with both, graphical maps of primer distribution for each inputted sequence, and also a global assembled map of all inputted sequences with designed primers. PrimerMapper also enables the visualization of graphical maps within a browser and allows the user to draw new primers directly onto the webpage. Other features of PrimerMapper include allele-specific design features for SNP genotyping, a remote BLAST window to NCBI databases, and remote sequence retrieval from GenBank and dbSNP. PrimerMapper is hosted at GitHub and freely available without restriction. PMID:26853558

  15. Primer design using Primer Express® for SYBR Green-based quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amarjeet; Pandey, Girdhar K

    2015-01-01

    To quantitate the gene expression, real-time RT-PCR or quantitative PCR (qPCR) is one of the most sensitive, reliable, and commonly used methods in molecular biology. The reliability and success of a real-time PCR assay depend on the optimal experiment design. Primers are the most important constituents of real-time PCR experiments such as in SYBR Green-based detection assays. Designing of an appropriate and specific primer pair is extremely crucial for correct estimation of transcript abundance of any gene in a given sample. Here, we are presenting a quick, easy, and reliable method for designing target-specific primers using Primer Express(®) software for real-time PCR (qPCR) experiments.

  16. Multiplexing Short Primers for Viral Family PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Hiddessen, A L; Hara, C A; Williams, P L; Wagner, M; Colston, B W

    2008-06-26

    We describe a Multiplex Primer Prediction (MPP) algorithm to build multiplex compatible primer sets for large, diverse, and unalignable sets of target sequences. The MPP algorithm is scalable to larger target sets than other available software, and it does not require a multiple sequence alignment. We applied it to questions in viral detection, and demonstrated that there are no universally conserved priming sequences among viruses and that it could require an unfeasibly large number of primers ({approx}3700 18-mers or {approx}2000 10-mers) to generate amplicons from all sequenced viruses. We then designed primer sets separately for each viral family, and for several diverse species such as foot-and-mouth disease virus, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase segments of influenza A virus, Norwalk virus, and HIV-1.

  17. A new PCR method: one primer amplification of PCR-CTPP products.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guang; Mitsuda, Yoko; Ezaki, Takayuki; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2012-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers (PCR-CTPP) is a convenient method for genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms, saving time, and costs. It uses four primers for PCR; F1 and R1 for one allele, and F2 and R2 for the other allele, by which three different sizes of DNA are amplified; between F1 and R1, between F2 and R2, and between F1 and R2. To date, we have applied PCR-CTPP successfully for genotyping more than 60 polymorphisms. However, it is not rare that PCR does not produce balanced amplification of allele specific bands. Accordingly, the method was modified by attaching a common sequence at the 5' end of two-pair primers and adding another primer with the common sequence in PCR, in total five different primers in a tube for PCR. The modification allowed one primer amplification for the products of initial PCR with confronting two-pair primers, named as one primer amplification of PCR-CTPP products (OPA-CTPP). This article demonstrates an example for an A/G polymorphism of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) Gln192Arg (rs662). PCR-CTPP failed clear genotyping for the polymorphism, while OPA-CTPP successfully produced PCR products corresponding to the allele. The present example indicated that the OPA-CTPP would be useful in the case that PCR-CTPP failed to produce balanced PCR products specific to each allele.

  18. CEMAsuite: open source degenerate PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Lane, Courtney E; Hulgan, Daniel; O'Quinn, Kelly; Benton, Michael G

    2015-11-15

    The codon-equivalent multiple alignment suite begins conservational analysis for polymerase chain reaction primer design at the protein level, allowing the user to design consensus primers capable of detecting homologous coding sequences even when low-to-moderate sequence information is available. This package also condenses the wealth of information associated with multiple sequence alignments and presents them in an intuitive manner, allowing the user to quickly and effectively address degenerate primer design considerations. https://sourceforge.net/projects/cemasuite/. benton@lsu.edu or cemasuite@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. PCR Amplicon Prediction from Multiplex Degenerate Primer and Probe Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S. N.

    2013-08-08

    Assessing primer specificity and predicting both desired and off-target amplification products is an essential step for robust PCR assay design. Code is described to predict potential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons in a large sequence database such as NCBI nt from either singleplex or a large multiplexed set of primers, allowing degenerate primer and probe bases, with target mismatch annotates amplicons with gene information automatically downloaded from NCBI, and optionally it can predict whether there are also TaqMan/Luminex probe matches within predicted amplicons.

  20. VizPrimer: a web server for visualized PCR primer design based on known gene structure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Qu, Wubin; Lu, Yiming; Zhang, Yanchun; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Dongsheng; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Chenggang

    2011-12-15

    The visualization of gene structure plays an important role in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design, especially for eukaryotic genes with a number of splice variants that users need to distinguish between via PCR. Here, we describe a visualized web server for primer design named VizPrimer. It utilizes the new information technology (IT) tools, HTML5 to display gene structure and JavaScript to interact with the users. In VizPrimer, the users can focus their attention on the gene structure and primer design strategy, without wasting time calculating the exon positions of splice variants or manually configuring complicated parameters. In addition, VizPrimer is also suitable for the design of PCR primers for amplifying open reading frames and detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). VizPrimer is freely available at http://biocompute.bmi.ac.cn/CZlab/VizPrimer/. The web server supported browsers: Chrome (≥5.0), Firefox (≥3.0), Safari (≥4.0) and Opera (≥10.0). zhangcg@bmi.ac.cn; yangyi528@vip.sina.com.

  1. Rapid and simple method of qPCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a powerful tool for analysis and quantification of gene expression. It is advantageous compared to traditional gel-based method of PCR, as gene expression can be visualized "real-time" using a computer. In qPCR, a reporter dye system is used which intercalates with DNA's region of interest and detects DNA amplification. Some of the popular reporter systems used in qPCR are the following: Molecular Beacon(®), SYBR Green(®), and Taqman(®). However, success of qPCR depends on the optimal primers used. Some of the considerations for primer design are the following: GC content, primer self-dimer, or secondary structure formation. Freely available software could be used for ideal qPCR primer design. Here we have shown how to use some freely available web-based software programs (such as Primerquest(®), Unafold(®), and Beacon designer(®)) to design qPCR primers.

  2. PRISE (PRImer SElector): software for designing sequence-selective PCR primers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qi; Ruegger, Paul; Bent, Elizabeth; Chrobak, Marek; Borneman, James

    2008-03-01

    This report presents PRImer Selector (PRISE), a new software package that implements several features that improve and streamline the design of sequence-selective PCR primers. The PRISE design process involves two main steps. In the first step, target and non-target DNA sequences are identified. In the second step, primers are designed to amplify target (but not non-target) sequences. One important feature of PRISE is that it automates the task of placing primer-template mismatches at the 3' end of the primers - a property that is crucial for sequence selectivity. Once a list of candidate primers has been produced, sorting tools in PRISE speed up the selection process by allowing a user to sort the primers by properties such as amplicon length, GC content and sequence selectivity. PRISE can be used to design primers with a range of specificities, targeting individual sequences as well as diverse assemblages of genes. PRISE also allows user-defined primers to be analyzed, enabling their properties to be examined in relation to target and non-target sequences. The utility of PRISE was demonstrated by using it to design sequence-selective PCR primers for an rRNA gene from the fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia.

  3. MultiPLX: automatic grouping and evaluation of PCR primers.

    PubMed

    Kaplinski, Lauris; Andreson, Reidar; Puurand, Tarmo; Remm, Maido

    2005-04-15

    MultiPLX is a new program for automatic grouping of PCR primers. It can use many different parameters to estimate the compatibility of primers, such as primer-primer interactions, primer-product interactions, difference in melting temperatures, difference in product length and the risk of generating alternative products from the template. A unique feature of the MultiPLX is the ability to perform automatic grouping of large number (thousands) of primer pairs. Binaries for Windows, Linux and Solaris are available from http://bioinfo.ebc.ee/download/. A graphical version with limited capabilities can be used through a web interface at http://bioinfo.ebc.ee/multiplx/. The source code of the program is available on request for academic users. maido.remm@ut.ee.

  4. Homolog-specific PCR primer design for profiling splice variants.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Gyan Prakash; Hanumappa, Mamatha; Kushwaha, Garima; Nguyen, Henry T; Xu, Dong

    2011-05-01

    To study functional diversity of proteins encoded from a single gene, it is important to distinguish the expression levels among the alternatively spliced variants. A variant-specific primer pair is required to amplify each alternatively spliced variant individually. For this purpose, we developed a new feature, homolog-specific primer design (HSPD), in our high-throughput primer and probe design software tool, PRIMEGENS-v2. The algorithm uses a de novo approach to design primers without any prior information of splice variants or close homologs for an input query sequence. It not only designs primer pairs but also finds potential isoforms and homologs of the input sequence. Efficiency of this algorithm was tested for several gene families in soybean. A total of 187 primer pairs were tested under five different abiotic stress conditions with three replications at three time points. Results indicate a high success rate of primer design. Some primer pairs designed were able to amplify all splice variants of a gene. Furthermore, by utilizing combinations within the same multiplex pool, we were able to uniquely amplify a specific variant or duplicate gene. Our method can also be used to design PCR primers to specifically amplify homologs in the same gene family. PRIMEGENS-v2 is available at: http://primegens.org.

  5. DPPrimer – A Degenerate PCR Primer Design Tool

    PubMed Central

    Gahoi, Shachi; Arya, L; Anil, Rai; Marla, ss

    2013-01-01

    Designed degenerate primers unlike conventional primers are superior in matching and amplification of large number of genes, from related gene families. DPPrimer tool was designed to predict primers for PCR amplification of homologous gene from related or diverse plant species. The key features of this tool include platform independence and user friendliness in primer design. Embedded features such as search for functional domains, similarity score selection and phylogebetic tree further enhance the user friendliness of DPPrimer tool. Performance of DPPrimer tool was evaluated by successful PCR amplification of ADP-glucose phosphorylase genes from wheat, barley and rice. Availability DPPrimer is freely accessible at http://202.141.12.147/DGEN_tool/index.html PMID:24307773

  6. MultiPLX: automatic grouping and evaluation of PCR primers.

    PubMed

    Kaplinski, Lauris; Remm, Maido

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe MultiPLX-a tool for automatic grouping of PCR primers for multiplexed PCR. Both generic working principle and step-by-step practical procedures with examples are presented. MultiPLX performs grouping by calculating many important interaction levels between the different primer pairs and then distributes primer pairs to groups, so that the strength of unwanted interactions is kept below user-defined compatibility level. In addition, it can be used to select optimal primer pairs for multiplexing from list of candidates. MultiPLX can be downloaded from http://bioinfo.ut.ee/download/. Graphical Web-based interface to most functions of MultiPLX is available at http://bioinfo.ut.ee/multiplx/.

  7. MultiPLX: automatic grouping and evaluation of PCR primers.

    PubMed

    Kaplinski, Lauris; Remm, Maido

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we describe MultiPLX-a tool for automatic grouping of PCR primers for multiplexed PCR. Both generic working principle and step-by-step practical procedures with examples are presented. MultiPLX performs grouping by calculating many important interaction levels between the different primer pairs and then distributes primer pairs to groups so that the strength of unwanted interactions is kept below user-defined compatibility level. In addition it can be used to select optimal primer pairs for multiplexing from list of candidates. MultiPLX can be downloaded from http://bioinfo.ut.ee/?page_id=167. Graphical web-based interface to most functions of MultiPLX is available at http://bioinfo.ut.ee/multiplx/.

  8. Universal PCR primers for detection of phytopathogenic Agrobacterium strains.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, J H; Moore, L W; Ream, W; Manulis, S

    1995-01-01

    Two PCR primer pairs, based on the virD2 and ipt genes, detected a wide variety of pathogenic Agrobacterium strains. The endonuclease domain of VirD2 protein, which cleaves transferred DNA (T-DNA) border sequences, is highly conserved; primer oligonucleotides specific for the endonuclease portion of virD2 detected all pathogenic strains of Agrobacterium tested. PCR primers corresponding to conserved sequences in ipt, the T-DNA-borne cytokinin synthesis gene, detected only Agrobacterium tumefaciens and distinguished it from Agrobacterium rhizogenes. The virD2 and ipt primer pairs did not interfere with each other when included in the same PCR amplification, and this permitted simultaneous detection of both genes in a single reaction. One nonpathogenic Agrobacterium radiobacter strain contained virD2 but not ipt; we speculate that this strain arose from a pathogenic progenitor through a deletion in the T-DNA. The virD2 primer pair appears to be universal for all pathogenic Agrobacterium species; used together, the primer sets reported here should allow unambiguous identification of Ti plasmid DNA in bacteria isolated from soil and plants. PMID:7487020

  9. Primer design for PCR reactions in forensic biology.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a popular method to copy DNA in vitro. Its invention revolutionized fields ranging from clinical medicine to anthropology, molecular biology, and forensic biology. The method employs one of many available heat-stable DNA polymerases in a reaction that is repeated many times in situ. The DNA polymerase reads a template DNA strand and using the components of the reaction mix, catalyzes the addition of free 2'-deoxynucleotide triphosphate nitrogenous bases to short segment of DNA that forms a complement with the template via Watson-Crick base pairing. This short segment of DNA is referred to as a PCR primer and it is essential to the success of the reaction. The most widely used application of PCR in forensic labs is the amplification of short tandem repeat (STR) loci used in DNA typing. The STRs are routinely evaluated in concert with 16 or more reactions, a multiplex, run in one test tube simultaneously. In a multiplex, it is essential that the primers work specifically and accurately on the intended reactions without hindering the other reactions. The primers, which are very specific, also can be used to probe single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a DNA sequence of interest by single base extension. Primers are often designed using one of many available automated software packages. Here the process of manually designing PCR primers for forensic biology using no-cost software is described.

  10. PCR Primers for Metazoan Mitochondrial 12S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Kweskin, Matthew; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessment of the biodiversity of communities of small organisms is most readily done using PCR-based analysis of environmental samples consisting of mixtures of individuals. Known as metagenetics, this approach has transformed understanding of microbial communities and is beginning to be applied to metazoans as well. Unlike microbial studies, where analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence is standard, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In this study we designed a set of PCR primers for the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequence based on 64 complete mitochondrial genomes and then tested their efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of the 64 complete mitochondrial genome sequences representing all metazoan classes available in GenBank were downloaded using the NCBI Taxonomy Browser. Alignment of sequences was performed for the excised mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences, and conserved regions were identified for all 64 mitochondrial genomes. These regions were used to design a primer pair that flanks a more variable region in the gene. Then all of the complete metazoan mitochondrial genomes available in NCBI's Organelle Genome Resources database were used to determine the percentage of taxa that would likely be amplified using these primers. Results suggest that these primers will amplify target sequences for many metazoans. Conclusions/Significance Newly designed 12S ribosomal DNA primers have considerable potential for metazoan metagenetic analysis because of their ability to amplify sequences from many metazoans. PMID:22536450

  11. STITCHER 2.0: primer design for overlapping PCR applications

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Damien M.; Uriagereka-Herburger, Isabel; Bode, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Overlapping polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used by researchers in very diverse fields that enables the user to ‘stitch’ individual pieces of DNA together. Previously, we have reported a web based tool called STITCHER that provides a platform for researchers to automate the design of primers for overlapping PCR applications. Here we present STITCHER 2.0, which represents a substantial update to STITCHER. STITCHER 2.0 is a newly designed web tool that automates the design of primers for overlapping PCR. Unlike STITCHER, STITCHER 2.0 considers diverse algorithmic parameters, and returns multiple result files that include a facility for the user to draw their own primers as well as comprehensive visual guides to the user’s input, output, and designed primers. These result files provide greater control and insight during experimental design and troubleshooting. STITCHER 2.0 is freely available to all users without signup or login requirements and can be accessed at the following webpage: www.ohalloranlab.net/STITCHER2.html. PMID:28358011

  12. STITCHER 2.0: primer design for overlapping PCR applications.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M; Uriagereka-Herburger, Isabel; Bode, Katrin

    2017-03-30

    Overlapping polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used by researchers in very diverse fields that enables the user to 'stitch' individual pieces of DNA together. Previously, we have reported a web based tool called STITCHER that provides a platform for researchers to automate the design of primers for overlapping PCR applications. Here we present STITCHER 2.0, which represents a substantial update to STITCHER. STITCHER 2.0 is a newly designed web tool that automates the design of primers for overlapping PCR. Unlike STITCHER, STITCHER 2.0 considers diverse algorithmic parameters, and returns multiple result files that include a facility for the user to draw their own primers as well as comprehensive visual guides to the user's input, output, and designed primers. These result files provide greater control and insight during experimental design and troubleshooting. STITCHER 2.0 is freely available to all users without signup or login requirements and can be accessed at the following webpage: www.ohalloranlab.net/STITCHER2.html.

  13. Real-time PCR (qPCR) primer design using free online software.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most commonly used fluorescent chemistries are SYBR® Green dyes and TaqMan®, Molecular Beacon or Scorpion probes. SYBR® Green is very simple to use and cost efficient. As SYBR® Green dye binds to any double-stranded DNA product, its success depends greatly on proper primer design. Many types of online primer design software are available, which can be used free of charge to design desirable SYBR® Green-based qPCR primers. This laboratory exercise is intended for those who have a fundamental background in PCR. It addresses the basic fluorescent chemistries of real-time PCR, the basic rules and pitfalls of primer design, and provides a step-by-step protocol for designing SYBR® Green-based primers with free, online software. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. PrimerSuite: A High-Throughput Web-Based Primer Design Program for Multiplex Bisulfite PCR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jennifer; Johnston, Andrew; Berichon, Philippe; Ru, Ke-Lin; Korbie, Darren; Trau, Matt

    2017-01-24

    The analysis of DNA methylation at CpG dinucleotides has become a major research focus due to its regulatory role in numerous biological processes, but the requisite need for assays which amplify bisulfite-converted DNA represents a major bottleneck due to the unique design constraints imposed on bisulfite-PCR primers. Moreover, a review of the literature indicated no available software solutions which accommodated both high-throughput primer design, support for multiplex amplification assays, and primer-dimer prediction. In response, the tri-modular software package PrimerSuite was developed to support bisulfite multiplex PCR applications. This software was constructed to (i) design bisulfite primers against multiple regions simultaneously (PrimerSuite), (ii) screen for primer-primer dimerizing artefacts (PrimerDimer), and (iii) support multiplex PCR assays (PrimerPlex). Moreover, a major focus in the development of this software package was the emphasis on extensive empirical validation, and over 1300 unique primer pairs have been successfully designed and screened, with over 94% of them producing amplicons of the expected size, and an average mapping efficiency of 93% when screened using bisulfite multiplex resequencing. The potential use of the software in other bisulfite-based applications such as methylation-specific PCR is under consideration for future updates. This resource is freely available for use at PrimerSuite website (www.primer-suite.com).

  15. PrimerSuite: A High-Throughput Web-Based Primer Design Program for Multiplex Bisulfite PCR

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jennifer; Johnston, Andrew; Berichon, Philippe; Ru, Ke-lin; Korbie, Darren; Trau, Matt

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of DNA methylation at CpG dinucleotides has become a major research focus due to its regulatory role in numerous biological processes, but the requisite need for assays which amplify bisulfite-converted DNA represents a major bottleneck due to the unique design constraints imposed on bisulfite-PCR primers. Moreover, a review of the literature indicated no available software solutions which accommodated both high-throughput primer design, support for multiplex amplification assays, and primer-dimer prediction. In response, the tri-modular software package PrimerSuite was developed to support bisulfite multiplex PCR applications. This software was constructed to (i) design bisulfite primers against multiple regions simultaneously (PrimerSuite), (ii) screen for primer-primer dimerizing artefacts (PrimerDimer), and (iii) support multiplex PCR assays (PrimerPlex). Moreover, a major focus in the development of this software package was the emphasis on extensive empirical validation, and over 1300 unique primer pairs have been successfully designed and screened, with over 94% of them producing amplicons of the expected size, and an average mapping efficiency of 93% when screened using bisulfite multiplex resequencing. The potential use of the software in other bisulfite-based applications such as methylation-specific PCR is under consideration for future updates. This resource is freely available for use at PrimerSuite website (www.primer-suite.com). PMID:28117430

  16. BatchPrimer3: A high throughput web application for PCR and sequencing primer design

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new web primer design program, BatchPrimer3, is developed based on Primer3. BatchPrimer3 adopted the Primer3 core program as a major primer design engine to choose the best primer pairs. A new score-based primer picking module is incorporated into BatchPrimer3 and used to pick position-restricte...

  17. RExPrimer: an integrated primer designing tool increases PCR effectiveness by avoiding 3' SNP-in-primer and mis-priming from structural variation.

    PubMed

    Piriyapongsa, Jittima; Ngamphiw, Chumpol; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Wangkumhang, Pongsakorn; Suwannasri, Payiarat; Ruangrit, Uttapong; Agavatpanitch, Gallissara; Tongsima, Sissades

    2009-12-03

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is very useful in many areas of molecular biology research. It is commonly observed that PCR success is critically dependent on design of an effective primer pair. Current tools for primer design do not adequately address the problem of PCR failure due to mis-priming on target-related sequences and structural variations in the genome. We have developed an integrated graphical web-based application for primer design, called RExPrimer, which was written in Python language. The software uses Primer3 as the primer designing core algorithm. Locally stored sequence information and genomic variant information were hosted on MySQLv5.0 and were incorporated into RExPrimer. RExPrimer provides many functionalities for improved PCR primer design. Several databases, namely annotated human SNP databases, insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphisms database, pseudogene database, and structural genomic variation databases were integrated into RExPrimer, enabling an effective without-leaving-the-website validation of the resulting primers. By incorporating these databases, the primers reported by RExPrimer avoid mis-priming to related sequences (e.g. pseudogene, segmental duplication) as well as possible PCR failure because of structural polymorphisms (SNP, indel, and copy number variation (CNV)). To prevent mismatching caused by unexpected SNPs in the designed primers, in particular the 3' end (SNP-in-Primer), several SNP databases covering the broad range of population-specific SNP information are utilized to report SNPs present in the primer sequences. Population-specific SNP information also helps customize primer design for a specific population. Furthermore, RExPrimer offers a graphical user-friendly interface through the use of scalable vector graphic image that intuitively presents resulting primers along with the corresponding gene structure. In this study, we demonstrated the program effectiveness in successfully generating primers for strong

  18. Design of primers and probes for quantitative real-time PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Rodríguez, Mar; Córdoba, Juan J; Andrade, María J

    2015-01-01

    Design of primers and probes is one of the most crucial factors affecting the success and quality of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analyses, since an accurate and reliable quantification depends on using efficient primers and probes. Design of primers and probes should meet several criteria to find potential primers and probes for specific qPCR assays. The formation of primer-dimers and other non-specific products should be avoided or reduced. This factor is especially important when designing primers for SYBR(®) Green protocols but also in designing probes to ensure specificity of the developed qPCR protocol. To design primers and probes for qPCR, multiple software programs and websites are available being numerous of them free. These tools often consider the default requirements for primers and probes, although new research advances in primer and probe design should be progressively added to different algorithm programs. After a proper design, a precise validation of the primers and probes is necessary. Specific consideration should be taken into account when designing primers and probes for multiplex qPCR and reverse transcription qPCR (RT-qPCR). This chapter provides guidelines for the design of suitable primers and probes and their subsequent validation through the development of singlex qPCR, multiplex qPCR, and RT-qPCR protocols.

  19. COMplementary Primer ASymmetric PCR (COMPAS-PCR) Applied to the Identification of Salmo salar, Salmo trutta and Their Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Avoiding complementarity between primers when designing a PCR assay constitutes a central rule strongly anchored in the mind of the molecular scientist. 3’-complementarity will extend the primers during PCR elongation using one another as template, consequently disabling further possible involvement in traditional target amplification. However, a 5’-complementarity will leave the primers unchanged during PCR cycles, albeit sequestered to one another, therefore also suppressing target amplification. We show that 5’-complementarity between primers may be exploited in a new PCR method called COMplementary-Primer-Asymmetric (COMPAS)-PCR, using asymmetric primer concentrations to achieve target PCR amplification. Moreover, such a design may paradoxically reduce spurious non-target amplification by actively sequestering the limiting primer. The general principles were demonstrated using 5S rDNA direct repeats as target sequences to design a species-specific assay for identifying Salmo salar and Salmo trutta using almost fully complementary primers overlapping the same target sequence. Specificity was enhanced by using 3’-penultimate point mutations and the assay was further developed to enable identification of S. salar x S. trutta hybrids by High Resolution Melt analysis in a 35 min one-tube assay. This small paradigm shift, using highly complementary primers for PCR, should help develop robust assays that previously would not be considered. PMID:27783658

  20. COMplementary Primer ASymmetric PCR (COMPAS-PCR) Applied to the Identification of Salmo salar, Salmo trutta and Their Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Anglès d'Auriac, Marc B

    2016-01-01

    Avoiding complementarity between primers when designing a PCR assay constitutes a central rule strongly anchored in the mind of the molecular scientist. 3'-complementarity will extend the primers during PCR elongation using one another as template, consequently disabling further possible involvement in traditional target amplification. However, a 5'-complementarity will leave the primers unchanged during PCR cycles, albeit sequestered to one another, therefore also suppressing target amplification. We show that 5'-complementarity between primers may be exploited in a new PCR method called COMplementary-Primer-Asymmetric (COMPAS)-PCR, using asymmetric primer concentrations to achieve target PCR amplification. Moreover, such a design may paradoxically reduce spurious non-target amplification by actively sequestering the limiting primer. The general principles were demonstrated using 5S rDNA direct repeats as target sequences to design a species-specific assay for identifying Salmo salar and Salmo trutta using almost fully complementary primers overlapping the same target sequence. Specificity was enhanced by using 3'-penultimate point mutations and the assay was further developed to enable identification of S. salar x S. trutta hybrids by High Resolution Melt analysis in a 35 min one-tube assay. This small paradigm shift, using highly complementary primers for PCR, should help develop robust assays that previously would not be considered.

  1. Modified tetra-primer ARMS PCR as a single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping tool.

    PubMed

    Mesrian Tanha, Hamzeh; Mojtabavi Naeini, Marjan; Rahgozar, Soheila; Rasa, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi; Vallian, Sadeq

    2015-03-01

    Genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been applied in various genetic contexts. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is reported as a prominent assay for SNP genotyping. However, there were published data that may question the reliability of this method on some occasions, in addition to a laborious and time-consuming procedure of the optimization step. In the current study, a new SNP genotyping method named modified tetra-primer ARMS (MTPA) PCR was developed based on tetra-primer ARMS PCR. The modified method has two improvements in its instruction, including equalization of outer primer and inner primer strength by additional mismatch in outer primers, and consideration of equal annealing temperature of specific fragments more than melting temperature of primers. Advantageously, a new computer software was provided for designing primers based on novel concepts. The usual tetra-primer ARMS PCR has a laborious process for optimization. In nonoptimal PCR programs, identification of the accurate genotype was found to be very difficult. However, in MTPA PCR, equalization of the amplicons and primer strength leads to increasing specificity and convenience of genotyping, which was validated by sequencing. In the MTPA PCR technique, a new mismatch at -2 positions of outer primers and equal annealing temperature improve the genotyping procedure. Together, the introduced method could be suggested as a powerful tool for genotyping single-nucleotide mutations and polymorphisms.

  2. RNase H-dependent PCR (rhPCR): improved specificity and single nucleotide polymorphism detection using blocked cleavable primers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly used to detect the presence of nucleic acid sequences both in research and diagnostic settings. While high specificity is often achieved, biological requirements sometimes necessitate that primers are placed in suboptimal locations which lead to problems with the formation of primer dimers and/or misamplification of homologous sequences. Results Pyrococcus abyssi (P.a.) RNase H2 was used to enable PCR to be performed using blocked primers containing a single ribonucleotide residue which are activated via cleavage by the enzyme (rhPCR). Cleavage occurs 5'-to the RNA base following primer hybridization to the target DNA. The requirement of the primer to first hybridize with the target sequence to gain activity eliminates the formation of primer-dimers and greatly reduces misamplification of closely related sequences. Mismatches near the scissile linkage decrease the efficiency of cleavage by RNase H2, further increasing the specificity of the assay. When applied to the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rhPCR was found to be far more sensitive than standard allele-specific PCR. In general, the best discrimination occurs when the mismatch is placed at the RNA:DNA base pair. Conclusion rhPCR eliminates the formation of primer dimers and markedly improves the specificity of PCR with respect to off-target amplification. These advantages of the assay should find utility in challenging qPCR applications such as genotyping, high level multiplex assays and rare allele detection. PMID:21831278

  3. Development of a Universal Intimin Antiserum and PCR Primers

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Miranda; Knutton, Stuart; Caprioli, Alfredo; Huter, Veronika; Zanial, Mazlina; Dougan, Gordon; Frankel, Gad

    1999-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) constitute a significant risk to human health worldwide. A hallmark of both pathogens is their ability to produce characteristic attaching-and-effacing (A/E) lesions in intestinal epithelial cells. Genes encoding A/E lesion formation map to a chromosomal pathogenicity island termed the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Intimin, an LEE-encoded bacterial adhesion molecule, mediates the intimate bacterium-host cell interaction characteristic of A/E lesions. On the basis of characterization of the C-terminal 280-amino-acid cell binding domain of intimin (Int280661–939), four distinct Int280 types (types α, β, γ, and δ) have been identified. Importantly, Int280α and Int280β antisera specifically recognized their respective intimin types. Using a conserved region of the intimin molecule (Int388–667) and primers synthesized to generate the recombinant Int388–667, we have now generated universal intimin antiserum and PCR primers that are reactive with the different intimin types expressed by both human and animal A/E lesion-forming strains. Use of immunogold electron microscopy to visualize intimin on the surfaces of EPEC and EHEC strains revealed, in general, a uniform distribution on the bacterial cell surface. However, a filamentous staining pattern was observed with a few strains expressing intimin γ. Cloning of the intimin eae gene from one such strain (strain ICC57) into strain CVD206, an EPEC strain which harbors a null deletion in eae, produced a uniform intimin staining pattern indicating that, if the filamentous staining pattern defines a filamentous form of intimin γ, it is dependent upon the genetic background of the strain and is not a feature of the intimin molecule. PMID:10565891

  4. FUNGAL-SPECIFIC PCR PRIMERS DEVELOPED FOR ANALYSIS OF THE ITS REGION OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background The Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of fungal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) are highly variable sequences of great importance in distinguishing fungal species by PCR analysis. Previously published PCR primers available for amplifying these sequences from environmenta...

  5. FUNGAL-SPECIFIC PCR PRIMERS DEVELOPED FOR ANALYSIS OF THE ITS REGION OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background The Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of fungal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) are highly variable sequences of great importance in distinguishing fungal species by PCR analysis. Previously published PCR primers available for amplifying these sequences from environmenta...

  6. Multi-primer target PCR for rapid identification of bovine DRB3 alleles.

    PubMed

    Ledwidge, S A; Mallard, B A; Gibson, J P; Jansen, G B; Jiang, Z H

    2001-08-01

    Multi-primer target polymerase chain reaction (MPT-PCR) is a rapid method for the identification of specific BoLA-DRB3 alleles. In a single PCR reaction, the presence of two alleles associated with increased risk, DRB3.2*23 (DRB3*2701-2703, 2705-2707) and decreased risk, DRB3.2*16 (DRB3*1501, 1502), of mastitis in Canadian Holstein can be detected. Two outer primers amplify exon 2 of DRB3. Simultaneously, two inner, allele-specific primers amplify individual alleles. Initially, 40 cows previously typed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) were genotyped using the multi-primer approach. An additional 30 cows were first genotyped by multi-primer target PCR, then by PCR-RFLP. All animals were correctly identified and there were no false positives. This technique can readily be modified to identify other BoLA alleles of interest.

  7. Quantitative PCR measurements of the effects of introducing inosines into primers provides guidelines for improved degenerate primer design.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Linda; Gibbs, Mark J; Rodoni, Brendan C

    2008-11-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used to detect groups of viruses with the use of group-specific degenerate primers. Inosine residues are sometimes used in the primers to match variable positions within the complementary target sequences, but there is little data on their effects on cDNA synthesis and amplification. A quantitative reverse-transcription PCR was used to measure the rate of amplification with primers containing inosine residues substituted at different positions and in increasing numbers. Experiments were conducted using standard quantities of cloned DNA copied from Potato virus Y genomic RNA and RNA (cRNA) transcribed from the cloned DNA. Single inosine residues had no affect on the amplification rate in the forward primer, except at one position close to the 3' terminus. Conversely, single inosine residues significantly reduced the amplification rate when placed at three out of four positions in the reverse primer. Four or five inosine substitutions could be tolerated with some decline in rates, but amplification often failed from cRNA templates with primers containing larger numbers of inosines. Greater declines in the rate of amplification were observed with RNA templates, suggesting that reverse transcription suffers more than PCR amplification when inosine is included in the reverse primer.

  8. Development and evaluation of new primers for PCR-based identification of Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanbin; Liu, Dali; Wang, Yiwei; Zhu, Cailian; Liang, Jingping; Shu, Rong

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the 16S rRNA. The new primer set, Pi-192 and Pi-468, increased the accuracy of PCR-based P. intermedia identification and could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as epidemiological studies on periodontal disease.

  9. Single-primer PCR correction: a strategy for false-positive exclusion.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Wang, P W; Yao, D; Wang, Y P; Yan, W; Guan, S C

    2011-02-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology plays an important role in molecular biology research, but false-positive and nonspecific PCR amplification have plagued many researchers. Currently, research on the optimization of the PCR system focuses on double-primer-based PCR products. This research has shown that PCR amplification based on single-primer binding to the DNA template is an important contributing factor to obtaining false-positive results, fragment impurity, and nonspecific fragment amplification, when the PCR conditions are highly restricted during PCR-based target gene cloning, detection of transgenic plants, simple-sequence repeat marker-assisted selection, and mRNA differential display. Here, we compared single- and double-primer amplification and proposed "single-primer PCR correction"; improvements in PCR that eliminate interference caused by single-primer-based nonspecific PCR amplification were demonstrated and the precision and success rates of experiments were increased. Although for some kinds of experiments, the improvement effect of single-primer PCR correction was variable, the precision and success rate could be elevated at 12-50% in our experiment by this way.

  10. Oligonucleotide primers for PCR amplification of coelomate introns.

    PubMed

    Jarman, Simon N; Ward, Robert D; Elliott, Nicholas G

    2002-09-01

    Abstract Seven novel oligonucleotide primer pairs for polymerase chain reaction amplification of introns from nuclear genes in coelomates were designed and tested. Each pair bound to adjacent exons that are separated by a single intron in most coelomate species. The primer sets amplified introns in species as widely separated by the course of evolution as oysters (Mollusca: Protostoma) and salmon (Chordata: Deuterostoma). Each primer set was tested on a further 6 coelomate species and found to amplify introns in most cases. These primer sets may therefore be useful tools for developing nuclear DNA markers in diverse coelomate species for studies of population genetics, phylogenetics, or genome mapping.

  11. Hypervariable spacer regions are good sites for developing specific PCR-RFLP markers and PCR primers for screening actinorhizal symbionts.

    PubMed

    Varehese, Rajani; Chauhan, Vineeta S; Misra, Arvind K

    2003-06-01

    While the ribosomal RNA like highly conserved genes are good molecular chronometers for establishing phylogenetic relationships, they can also be useful in securing the amplification of adjoining hyper-variable regions. These regions can then be used for developing specific PCR primers or PCR-RFL profiles to be used as molecular markers. We report here the use of ITS region of rrn operon of Frankia for developing PCR-RFL profiles capable of discriminating between closely related frankiae. We have also made use of the ITS1 region of the nuclear rrn operon of Alnus nepalensis (D Don) for designing a PCR primer for specific amplification of nuclear DNA of this tree.

  12. Automated degenerate PCR primer design for high-throughput sequencing improves efficiency of viral sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Kelvin; Shrivastava, Susmita; Brownley, Anushka; Katzel, Dan; Bera, Jayati; Nguyen, Anh Thu; Thovarai, Vishal; Halpin, Rebecca; Stockwell, Timothy B

    2012-11-06

    In a high-throughput environment, to PCR amplify and sequence a large set of viral isolates from populations that are potentially heterogeneous and continuously evolving, the use of degenerate PCR primers is an important strategy. Degenerate primers allow for the PCR amplification of a wider range of viral isolates with only one set of pre-mixed primers, thus increasing amplification success rates and minimizing the necessity for genome finishing activities. To successfully select a large set of degenerate PCR primers necessary to tile across an entire viral genome and maximize their success, this process is best performed computationally. We have developed a fully automated degenerate PCR primer design system that plays a key role in the J. Craig Venter Institute's (JCVI) high-throughput viral sequencing pipeline. A consensus viral genome, or a set of consensus segment sequences in the case of a segmented virus, is specified using IUPAC ambiguity codes in the consensus template sequence to represent the allelic diversity of the target population. PCR primer pairs are then selected computationally to produce a minimal amplicon set capable of tiling across the full length of the specified target region. As part of the tiling process, primer pairs are computationally screened to meet the criteria for successful PCR with one of two described amplification protocols. The actual sequencing success rates for designed primers for measles virus, mumps virus, human parainfluenza virus 1 and 3, human respiratory syncytial virus A and B and human metapneumovirus are described, where >90% of designed primer pairs were able to consistently successfully amplify >75% of the isolates. Augmenting our previously developed and published JCVI Primer Design Pipeline, we achieved similarly high sequencing success rates with only minor software modifications. The recommended methodology for the construction of the consensus sequence that encapsulates the allelic variation of the targeted

  13. Biofunctionalization of Polyoxometalates with DNA Primers, Their Use in the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Electrochemical Detection of PCR Products.

    PubMed

    Debela, Ahmed M; Ortiz, Mayreli; Beni, Valerio; Thorimbert, Serge; Lesage, Denis; Cole, Richard B; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Hasenknopf, Bernold

    2015-12-01

    The bioconjugation of polyoxometalates (POMs), which are inorganic metal oxido clusters, to DNA strands to obtain functional labeled DNA primers and their potential use in electrochemical detection have been investigated. Activated monooxoacylated polyoxotungstates [SiW11 O39 {Sn(CH2 )2 CO}](8-) and [P2 W17 O61 {Sn(CH2 )2 CO}](6-) have been used to link to a 5'-NH2 terminated 21-mer DNA forward primer through amide coupling. The functionalized primer was characterized by using a battery of techniques, including electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, as well as IR and Raman spectroscopy. The functionality of the POM-labeled primers was demonstrated through hybridization with a surface-immobilized probe. Finally, the labeled primers were successfully used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR products were characterized by using electrophoresis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. STITCHER: A web resource for high-throughput design of primers for overlapping PCR applications.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2015-06-01

    Overlapping PCR is routinely used in a wide number of molecular applications. These include stitching PCR fragments together, generating fluorescent transcriptional and translational fusions, inserting mutations, making deletions, and PCR cloning. Overlapping PCR is also used for genotyping by traditional PCR techniques and in detection experiments using techniques such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). STITCHER is a web tool providing a central resource for researchers conducting all types of overlapping PCR experiments with an intuitive interface for automated primer design that's fast, easy to use, and freely available online (http://ohalloranlab.net/STITCHER.html). STITCHER can handle both single sequence and multi-sequence input, and specific features facilitate numerous other PCR applications, including assembly PCR, adapter PCR, and primer walking. Field PCR, and in particular, LAMP, offers promise as an on site tool for pathogen detection in underdeveloped areas, and STITCHER includes off-target detection features for pathogens commonly targeted using LAMP technology.

  15. A tool for design of primers for microRNA-specific quantitative RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small but biologically important RNA molecules. Although different methods can be used for quantification of microRNAs, quantitative PCR is regarded as the reference that is used to validate other methods. Several commercial qPCR assays are available but they often come at a high price and the sequences of the primers are not disclosed. An alternative to commercial assays is to manually design primers but this work is tedious and, hence, not practical for the design of primers for a larger number of targets. Results I have developed the software miRprimer for automatic design of primers for the method miR-specific RT-qPCR, which is one of the best performing microRNA qPCR methods available. The algorithm is based on an implementation of the previously published rules for manual design of miR-specific primers with the additional feature of evaluating the propensity of formation of secondary structures and primer dimers. Testing of the primers showed that 76 out of 79 primers (96%) worked for quantification of microRNAs by miR-specific RT-qPCR of mammalian RNA samples. This success rate corresponds to the success rate of manual primer design. Furthermore, primers designed by this method have been distributed to several labs and used successfully in published studies. Conclusions The software miRprimer is an automatic and easy method for design of functional primers for miR-specific RT-qPCR. The application is available as stand-alone software that will work on the MS Windows platform and in a developer version written in the Ruby programming language. PMID:24472427

  16. A tool for design of primers for microRNA-specific quantitative RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Busk, Peter K

    2014-01-28

    MicroRNAs are small but biologically important RNA molecules. Although different methods can be used for quantification of microRNAs, quantitative PCR is regarded as the reference that is used to validate other methods. Several commercial qPCR assays are available but they often come at a high price and the sequences of the primers are not disclosed. An alternative to commercial assays is to manually design primers but this work is tedious and, hence, not practical for the design of primers for a larger number of targets. I have developed the software miRprimer for automatic design of primers for the method miR-specific RT-qPCR, which is one of the best performing microRNA qPCR methods available. The algorithm is based on an implementation of the previously published rules for manual design of miR-specific primers with the additional feature of evaluating the propensity of formation of secondary structures and primer dimers. Testing of the primers showed that 76 out of 79 primers (96%) worked for quantification of microRNAs by miR-specific RT-qPCR of mammalian RNA samples. This success rate corresponds to the success rate of manual primer design. Furthermore, primers designed by this method have been distributed to several labs and used successfully in published studies. The software miRprimer is an automatic and easy method for design of functional primers for miR-specific RT-qPCR. The application is available as stand-alone software that will work on the MS Windows platform and in a developer version written in the Ruby programming language.

  17. A primer design strategy for PCR amplification of GC-rich DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Yan; Li, Qiang; Yu, Yan-Hong; Zhong, Mei; Yang, Lei; Wu, Qing-Hong; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Luo, Shen-Qiu

    2011-06-01

    To establish a primer design method for amplification of GC-rich DNA sequences. A group of 15 pairs of primers with higher T(m) (>79.7°C) and lower level ΔT(m) (<1°C) were designed to amplify GC-rich sequences (66.0%-84.0%). The statistical analysis of primer parameters and GC content of PCR products was performed and compared with literatures. Other control experiments were conducted using shortened primers for GC-rich PCR amplifications in this study, and the statistical analysis of shortened primer parameters and GC content of PCR products was performed compared with primers not shortened. A group of 26 pairs of primers were designed to test the applicability of this primer designing strategy in amplifications of non-GC-rich sequences (35.2%-53.5%). All the DNA sequences in this study were successfully amplified. Statistical analyses show that the T(m) and ΔT(m) were the main factors influencing amplifications. This primer designing strategy offered a perfect tool for amplification of GC-rich sequences. It proves that the secondary structures cannot be formed at higher annealing temperature conditions (>65°C), and we can overcome this difficulty easily by designing primers and using higher annealing temperature. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutagenic primer design for mismatch PCR-RFLP SNP genotyping using a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Cheng, Yu-Huei; Yang, Cheng-Huei; Chuang, Li-Yeh

    2012-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) is useful in small-scale basic research studies of complex genetic diseases that are associated with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Designing a feasible primer pair is an important work before performing PCR-RFLP for SNP genotyping. However, in many cases, restriction enzymes to discriminate the target SNP resulting in the primer design is not applicable. A mutagenic primer is introduced to solve this problem. GA-based Mismatch PCR-RFLP Primers Design (GAMPD) provides a method that uses a genetic algorithm to search for optimal mutagenic primers and available restriction enzymes from REBASE. In order to improve the efficiency of the proposed method, a mutagenic matrix is employed to judge whether a hypothetical mutagenic primer can discriminate the target SNP by digestion with available restriction enzymes. The available restriction enzymes for the target SNP are mined by the updated core of SNP-RFLPing. GAMPD has been used to simulate the SNPs in the human SLC6A4 gene under different parameter settings and compared with SNP Cutter for mismatch PCR-RFLP primer design. The in silico simulation of the proposed GAMPD program showed that it designs mismatch PCR-RFLP primers. The GAMPD program is implemented in JAVA and is freely available at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/gampd/.

  19. PCR Primers for identification of high sucrose Saccharum genotypes.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Vandana; Dhawan, Ashok K; Gupta, V K

    2010-01-01

    The progeny of a cross between high sucrose sugarcane clone S. officinarum 'Gungera' and a low sucrose clone S. spontaneum 'SES 603' resulted in interspecific hybrids that were named as ISH-1 to ISH-29 and graded on the basis of sucrose content. Hybrids ISH-1, ISH-5, ISH-17 and ISH-23 were selected as very high sucrose (65 to 100 mg/g tissue) genotypes, whereas ISH-10, ISH-11, ISH-12 and ISH-25 were very low sucrose (2 to 25 mg/g tissue) genotypes. DNA from leaves of both the parent clones, as also the progeny hybrids, was amplified using selected primers, in order to identify markers for sucrose content. Ten specific primers were examined: primers 'A' and 'B' that detect polymorphism in promoter region of sucrose synthase-2 gene; primers AI, SS and SPS that were designed on the basis of nucleotide sequences of genes for acid invertase, sucrose synthase and sucrose phosphate synthase enzymes, respectively and primers MSSCIR43, MSSCIRI, SMC226CG, SMC1039CG and SCB07 selected for relation to sucrose accumulation process. DNA products specific to low or high sucrose clones were identified. Primer 'A' and AI amplified DNA products of size 230 and 500 bp, respectively only in high sucrose genotypes ('Gungera', ISH-1, ISH-5, ISH-17 and ISH-23), while primer SMC226CG generated a DNA product of size 920 bp only in low sucrose genotypes ('SES 603', ISH-10, ISH-11, ISH-12 and ISH-25). Ten random decamer primers were also examined, but their products did not show relationship to sucrose content of genotypes.

  20. Novel primers and PCR protocols for the specific detection and quantification of Sphingobium suberifaciens in situ

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pathogen causing corky root on lettuce, Sphingobium suberifaciens, is recalcitrant to standard epidemiological methods. Primers were selected from 16S rDNA sequences useful for the specific detection and quantification of S. suberifaciens. Conventional (PCR) and quantitative (qPCR) PCR protocols...

  1. Guidelines for the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR technique development.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Ruan Felipe Vieira; de Oliveira, Camila Andréa

    2014-07-01

    The tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain (ARMS-PCR) reaction is a simple and economical method to genotype single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). It uses four primers in a single PCR and is followed just by gel electrophoresis. However, the optimization step can be very hardworking and time-consuming. Hence, we propose to demonstrate and discuss critical steps for its development, in a way to provide useful information. Two SNPs that provided different amplification conditions were selected. DNA extraction methods, annealing temperatures, PCR cycles protocols, reagents, and primers concentration were also analyzed. The use of tetra-primer ARMS-PCR could be impaired for SNPs in DNA regions rich in cytosine and guanine and for samples with DNA not purified. The melting temperature was considered the factor of greater interference. However, small changes in the reagents concentration significantly affect the PCR, especially MgCl2. Balancing the inner primers band is also a key step. So, in order to balance the inner primers band, intensity is important to observe which one has the weakest band and promote its band by increasing its concentration. The use of tetra-primer ARMS-PCR attends the expectations of modern genomic research and allows the study of SNPs in a fast, reliable, and low-cost way.

  2. Strategies to Improve Efficiency and Specificity of Degenerate Primers in PCR.

    PubMed

    Campos, Maria Jorge; Quesada, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    PCR with degenerate primers can be used to identify the coding sequence of an unknown protein or to detect a genetic variant within a gene family. These primers, which are complex mixtures of slightly different oligonucleotide sequences, can be optimized to increase the efficiency and/or specificity of PCR in the amplification of a sequence of interest by the introduction of mismatches with the target sequence and balancing their position toward the primers 5'- or 3'-ends. In this work, we explain in detail examples of rational design of primers in two different applications, including the use of specific determinants at the 3'-end, to: (1) improve PCR efficiency with coding sequences for members of a protein family by fully degeneration at a core box of conserved genetic information, with the reduction of degeneration at the 5'-end, and (2) optimize specificity of allelic discrimination of closely related orthologous by 5'-end degenerate primers.

  3. Novel computational methods for increasing PCR primer design effectiveness in directed sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kelvin; Brownley, Anushka; Stockwell, Timothy B; Beeson, Karen; McIntosh, Tina C; Busam, Dana; Ferriera, Steve; Murphy, Sean; Levy, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    Background Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used in directed sequencing for the discovery of novel polymorphisms. As the first step in PCR directed sequencing, effective PCR primer design is crucial for obtaining high-quality sequence data for target regions. Since current computational primer design tools are not fully tuned with stable underlying laboratory protocols, researchers may still be forced to iteratively optimize protocols for failed amplifications after the primers have been ordered. Furthermore, potentially identifiable factors which contribute to PCR failures have yet to be elucidated. This inefficient approach to primer design is further intensified in a high-throughput laboratory, where hundreds of genes may be targeted in one experiment. Results We have developed a fully integrated computational PCR primer design pipeline that plays a key role in our high-throughput directed sequencing pipeline. Investigators may specify target regions defined through a rich set of descriptors, such as Ensembl accessions and arbitrary genomic coordinates. Primer pairs are then selected computationally to produce a minimal amplicon set capable of tiling across the specified target regions. As part of the tiling process, primer pairs are computationally screened to meet the criteria for success with one of two PCR amplification protocols. In the process of improving our sequencing success rate, which currently exceeds 95% for exons, we have discovered novel and accurate computational methods capable of identifying primers that may lead to PCR failures. We reveal the laboratory protocols and their associated, empirically determined computational parameters, as well as describe the novel computational methods which may benefit others in future primer design research. Conclusion The high-throughput PCR primer design pipeline has been very successful in providing the basis for high-quality directed sequencing results and for minimizing costs associated with labor and

  4. MFEprimer-2.0: a fast thermodynamics-based program for checking PCR primer specificity.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wubin; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Yanchun; Lu, Yiming; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Dongsheng; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Chenggang

    2012-07-01

    Evaluating the specificity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers is an essential step in PCR primer design. The MFEprimer-2.0 server allows users to check primer specificity against genomic DNA and messenger RNA/complementary DNA sequence databases quickly and easily. MFEprimer-2.0 uses a k-mer index algorithm to accelerate the search process for primer binding sites and uses thermodynamics to evaluate binding stability between each primer and its DNA template. Several important characteristics, such as the sequence, melting temperature and size of each amplicon, either specific or non-specific, are reported on the results page. Based on these characteristics and the user-friendly output, users can readily draw conclusions about the specificity of PCR primers. Analyses for degenerate primers and multiple PCR primers are also supported in MFEprimer-2.0. In addition, the databases supported by MFEprimer-2.0 are comprehensive, and custom databases can also be supported on request. The MFEprimer-2.0 server does not require a login and is freely available at http://biocompute.bmi.ac.cn/CZlab/MFEprimer-2.0. More over, the MFEprimer-2.0 command-line version and local server version are open source and can be downloaded at https://github.com/quwubin/MFEprimer/wiki/Manual/.

  5. MRPrimerV: a database of PCR primers for RNA virus detection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyerin; Kang, NaNa; An, KyuHyeon; Kim, Doyun; Koo, JaeHyung; Kim, Min-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Many infectious diseases are caused by viral infections, and in particular by RNA viruses such as MERS, Ebola and Zika. To understand viral disease, detection and identification of these viruses are essential. Although PCR is widely used for rapid virus identification due to its low cost and high sensitivity and specificity, very few online database resources have compiled PCR primers for RNA viruses. To effectively detect viruses, the MRPrimerV database (http://MRPrimerV.com) contains 152 380 247 PCR primer pairs for detection of 1818 viruses, covering 7144 coding sequences (CDSs), representing 100% of the RNA viruses in the most up-to-date NCBI RefSeq database. Due to rigorous similarity testing against all human and viral sequences, every primer in MRPrimerV is highly target-specific. Because MRPrimerV ranks CDSs by the penalty scores of their best primer, users need only use the first primer pair for a single-phase PCR or the first two primer pairs for two-phase PCR. Moreover, MRPrimerV provides the list of genome neighbors that can be detected using each primer pair, covering 22 192 variants of 532 RefSeq RNA viruses. We believe that the public availability of MRPrimerV will facilitate viral metagenomics studies aimed at evaluating the variability of viruses, as well as other scientific tasks. PMID:27899620

  6. Noncontinuously binding loop-out primers for avoiding problematic DNA sequences in PCR and sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Kelli; Swensen, Jeffrey J; Procter, Melinda; Jama, Mohamed; Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney; Lewis, Tracey; Fong, Michael; Hubley, Lindsey; Schwarz, Monica; Ha, Youna; Paul, Eleri; Brulotte, Benjamin; Lyon, Elaine; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Mao, Rong; Pont-Kingdon, Genevieve; Best, D Hunter

    2014-09-01

    We present a method in which noncontinuously binding (loop-out) primers are used to exclude regions of DNA that typically interfere with PCR amplification and/or analysis by Sanger sequencing. Several scenarios were tested using this design principle, including M13-tagged PCR primers, non-M13-tagged PCR primers, and sequencing primers. With this technique, a single oligonucleotide is designed in two segments that flank, but do not include, a short region of problematic DNA sequence. During PCR amplification or sequencing, the problematic region is looped-out from the primer binding site, where it does not interfere with the reaction. Using this method, we successfully excluded regions of up to 46 nucleotides. Loop-out primers were longer than traditional primers (27 to 40 nucleotides) and had higher melting temperatures. This method allows the use of a standardized PCR protocol throughout an assay, keeps the number of PCRs to a minimum, reduces the chance for laboratory error, and, above all, does not interrupt the clinical laboratory workflow.

  7. Fungal-specific PCR primers developed for analysis of the ITS region of environmental DNA extracts

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kendall J; Rygiewicz, Paul T

    2005-01-01

    Background The Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of fungal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) are highly variable sequences of great importance in distinguishing fungal species by PCR analysis. Previously published PCR primers available for amplifying these sequences from environmental samples provide varying degrees of success at discriminating against plant DNA while maintaining a broad range of compatibility. Typically, it has been necessary to use multiple primer sets to accommodate the range of fungi under study, potentially creating artificial distinctions for fungal sequences that amplify with more than one primer set. Results Numerous sequences for PCR primers were tested to develop PCR assays with a wide range of fungal compatibility and high discrimination from plant DNA. A nested set of 4 primers was developed that reflected these criteria and performed well amplifying ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Primers in the 5.8S sequence were also developed that would permit separate amplifications of ITS1 and ITS2. A range of basidiomycete fruiting bodies and ascomycete cultures were analyzed with the nested set of primers and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) fingerprinting to demonstrate the specificity of the assay. Single ectomycorrhizal root tips were similarly analyzed. These primers have also been successfully applied to Quantitative PCR (QPCR), Length Heterogeneity PCR (LH-PCR) and Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of fungi. A set of wide-range plant-specific primers were developed at positions corresponding to one pair of the fungal primers. These were used to verify that the host plant DNA was not being amplified with the fungal primers. Conclusion These plant primers have been successfully applied to PCR-RFLP analyses of forest plant tissues from above- and below-ground samples and work well at distinguishing a selection of plants to the species level. The complete set of primers was developed with an emphasis on

  8. Design factors that influence PCR amplification success of cross-species primers among 1147 mammalian primer pairs

    PubMed Central

    Housley, Donna JE; Zalewski, Zachary A; Beckett, Stephanie E; Venta, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    important factors influencing the proportion of successful amplifications are the number of index species mismatches, GC-richness of the target amplimer, and the relatedness of the target species to the index species, at least under the single PCR condition used. The 1147 cross-species primer pairs can be used in a high throughput manner to generate data for studies on the genetics and genomics of non-sequenced mammalian genomes. PMID:17029642

  9. Design factors that influence PCR amplification success of cross-species primers among 1147 mammalian primer pairs.

    PubMed

    Housley, Donna J E; Zalewski, Zachary A; Beckett, Stephanie E; Venta, Patrick J

    2006-10-09

    proportion of successful amplifications are the number of index species mismatches, GC-richness of the target amplimer, and the relatedness of the target species to the index species, at least under the single PCR condition used. The 1147 cross-species primer pairs can be used in a high throughput manner to generate data for studies on the genetics and genomics of non-sequenced mammalian genomes.

  10. PrecisePrimer: an easy-to-use web server for designing PCR primers for DNA library cloning and DNA shuffling.

    PubMed

    Pauthenier, Cyrille; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2014-07-01

    PrecisePrimer is a web-based primer design software made to assist experimentalists in any repetitive primer design task such as preparing, cloning and shuffling DNA libraries. Unlike other popular primer design tools, it is conceived to generate primer libraries with popular PCR polymerase buffers proposed as pre-set options. PrecisePrimer is also meant to design primers in batches, such as for DNA libraries creation of DNA shuffling experiments and to have the simplest interface possible. It integrates the most up-to-date melting temperature algorithms validated with experimental data, and cross validated with other computational tools. We generated a library of primers for the extraction and cloning of 61 genes from yeast DNA genomic extract using default parameters. All primer pairs efficiently amplified their target without any optimization of the PCR conditions. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. PrecisePrimer: an easy-to-use web server for designing PCR primers for DNA library cloning and DNA shuffling

    PubMed Central

    Pauthenier, Cyrille; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    PrecisePrimer is a web-based primer design software made to assist experimentalists in any repetitive primer design task such as preparing, cloning and shuffling DNA libraries. Unlike other popular primer design tools, it is conceived to generate primer libraries with popular PCR polymerase buffers proposed as pre-set options. PrecisePrimer is also meant to design primers in batches, such as for DNA libraries creation of DNA shuffling experiments and to have the simplest interface possible. It integrates the most up-to-date melting temperature algorithms validated with experimental data, and cross validated with other computational tools. We generated a library of primers for the extraction and cloning of 61 genes from yeast DNA genomic extract using default parameters. All primer pairs efficiently amplified their target without any optimization of the PCR conditions. PMID:24829457

  12. Improved Efficiency and Robustness in qPCR and Multiplex End-Point PCR by Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid Modified Primers

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Uffe Vest; Mikkelsen, Nikolaj Dam; Lindqvist, Anja; Okkels, Limei Meng; Jøhnk, Nina; Lisby, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    We introduce quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers and multiplex end-point PCR primers modified by the addition of a single ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (o-TINA) molecule at the 5′-end. In qPCR, the 5′-o-TINA modified primers allow for a qPCR efficiency of 100% at significantly stressed reaction conditions, increasing the robustness of qPCR assays compared to unmodified primers. In samples spiked with genomic DNA, 5′-o-TINA modified primers improve the robustness by increased sensitivity and specificity compared to unmodified DNA primers. In unspiked samples, replacement of unmodified DNA primers with 5′-o-TINA modified primers permits an increased qPCR stringency. Compared to unmodified DNA primers, this allows for a qPCR efficiency of 100% at lowered primer concentrations and at increased annealing temperatures with unaltered cross-reactivity for primers with single nucleobase mismatches. In a previously published octaplex end-point PCR targeting diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, application of 5′-o-TINA modified primers allows for a further reduction (>45% or approximately one hour) in overall PCR program length, while sustaining the amplification and analytical sensitivity for all targets in crude bacterial lysates. For all crude bacterial lysates, 5′-o-TINA modified primers permit a substantial increase in PCR stringency in terms of lower primer concentrations and higher annealing temperatures for all eight targets. Additionally, crude bacterial lysates spiked with human genomic DNA show lesser formation of non-target amplicons implying increased robustness. Thus, 5′-o-TINA modified primers are advantageous in PCR assays, where one or more primer pairs are required to perform at stressed reaction conditions. PMID:22701644

  13. Improved efficiency and robustness in qPCR and multiplex end-point PCR by twisted intercalating nucleic acid modified primers.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uffe Vest; Mikkelsen, Nikolaj Dam; Lindqvist, Anja; Okkels, Limei Meng; Jøhnk, Nina; Lisby, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    We introduce quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers and multiplex end-point PCR primers modified by the addition of a single ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (o-TINA) molecule at the 5'-end. In qPCR, the 5'-o-TINA modified primers allow for a qPCR efficiency of 100% at significantly stressed reaction conditions, increasing the robustness of qPCR assays compared to unmodified primers. In samples spiked with genomic DNA, 5'-o-TINA modified primers improve the robustness by increased sensitivity and specificity compared to unmodified DNA primers. In unspiked samples, replacement of unmodified DNA primers with 5'-o-TINA modified primers permits an increased qPCR stringency. Compared to unmodified DNA primers, this allows for a qPCR efficiency of 100% at lowered primer concentrations and at increased annealing temperatures with unaltered cross-reactivity for primers with single nucleobase mismatches. In a previously published octaplex end-point PCR targeting diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, application of 5'-o-TINA modified primers allows for a further reduction (>45% or approximately one hour) in overall PCR program length, while sustaining the amplification and analytical sensitivity for all targets in crude bacterial lysates. For all crude bacterial lysates, 5'-o-TINA modified primers permit a substantial increase in PCR stringency in terms of lower primer concentrations and higher annealing temperatures for all eight targets. Additionally, crude bacterial lysates spiked with human genomic DNA show lesser formation of non-target amplicons implying increased robustness. Thus, 5'-o-TINA modified primers are advantageous in PCR assays, where one or more primer pairs are required to perform at stressed reaction conditions.

  14. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera, including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera. We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in molecular systematic studies of Lepidoptera, particularly at the intrafamilial level, and our new set of primers now provides a route to generating phylogenomic datasets using traditional methods.

  15. A simple ABO genotyping by PCR using sequence-specific primers with mismatched nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Taki, Takashi; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    In forensics, the specific ABO blood group is often determined by analyzing the ABO gene. Among various methods used, PCR employing sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) is simpler than other methods for ABO typing. When performing the PCR-SSP, the pseudo-positive signals often lead to errors in ABO typing. We introduced mismatched nucleotides at the second and the third positions from the 3'-end of the primers for the PCR-SSP method and examined whether reliable typing could be achieved by suppressing pseudo-positive signals. Genomic DNA was extracted from nail clippings of 27 volunteers, and the ABO gene was examined with PCR-SSP employing primers with and without mismatched nucleotides. The ABO blood group of the nail clippings was also analyzed serologically, and these results were compared with those obtained using PCR-SSP. When mismatched primers were employed for amplification, the results of the ABO typing matched with those obtained by the serological method. When primers without mismatched nucleotides were used for PCR-SSP, pseudo-positive signals were observed. Thus our method may be used for achieving more reliable ABO typing.

  16. Integrating PCR Theory and Bioinformatics into a Research-oriented Primer Design Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Allison R.

    2008-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a conceptually difficult technique that embodies many fundamental biological processes. Traditionally, students have struggled to analyze PCR results due to an incomplete understanding of the biological concepts (theory) of DNA replication and strand complementarity. Here we describe the design of a novel research-oriented exercise that prepares students to design DNA primers for PCR. Our exercise design includes broad and specific learning goals and assessments of student performance and perceptions. We developed this interactive Primer Design Exercise using the principles of scientific teaching to enhance student understanding of the theory behind PCR and provide practice in designing PCR primers to amplify DNA. In the end, the students were more poised to troubleshoot problems that arose in real experiments using PCR. In addition, students had the opportunity to utilize several bioinformatics tools to gain an increased understanding of primer quality, directionality, and specificity. In the course of this study many misconceptions about DNA replication during PCR and the need for primer specificity were identified and addressed. Students were receptive to the new materials and the majority achieved the learning goals. PMID:18316812

  17. Cloning flanking sequence by single-primer PCR in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Wang, Y P; Ren, S; Zhang, Z; Lu, S; Wang, P W

    2014-10-20

    The insertion position of exogenous genes in plant genomes is usually identified by adapter ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR), thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and restriction site extension PCR in transgenic plant research. However, these methods have various limitations, such as the complexity of designing primers and time-consuming and multiple-step procedures. The goal of this study was to establish an easier, more rapid, and more accurate method to clone flanking sequence using single-primer PCR in transgenic plants. Unknown flanking genome sequences in transgenic plants, including those in tobacco, soybean, rice, and maize, were cloned using the single-primer PCR method established in this study, with the Bar gene as the anchor gene. The primer 1 (P1), P2, and P3 PCRs obtained 4 sequences, and the completely correct flanking sequence of 508 bp that was obtained in the P3 PCR was verified by sequencing analysis. The single-primer PCR is more rapid and accurate than conventional methods, justifying its application widely in cloning flanking sequences in transgenic plants.

  18. Specific and sensitive quantitative RT-PCR of miRNAs with DNA primers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are important regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play an important role in many biological processes. Due to the important biological role it is of great interest to quantitatively determine their expression level in different biological settings. Results We describe a PCR method for quantification of microRNAs based on a single reverse transcription reaction for all microRNAs combined with real-time PCR with two, microRNA-specific DNA primers. Primer annealing temperatures were optimized by adding a DNA tail to the primers and could be designed with a success rate of 94%. The method was able to quantify synthetic templates over eight orders of magnitude and readily discriminated between microRNAs with single nucleotide differences. Importantly, PCR with DNA primers yielded significantly higher amplification efficiencies of biological samples than a similar method based on locked nucleic acids-spiked primers, which is in agreement with the observation that locked nucleic acid interferes with efficient amplification of short templates. The higher amplification efficiency of DNA primers translates into higher sensitivity and precision in microRNA quantification. Conclusions MiR-specific quantitative RT-PCR with DNA primers is a highly specific, sensitive and accurate method for microRNA quantification. PMID:21702990

  19. Design of primer pairs for species-specific diagnosis of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum chagasi using PCR.

    PubMed

    da Silveira Neto, Osvaldo José; Duarte, Sabrina Castilho; da Costa, Hérika Xavier; Linhares, Guido Fontgalland Coelho

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate new primers for species-specific detection of L. infantum chagasi using PCR. Two combinations of primer pairs were established with the aim of obtaining specific amplification products from the L. infantum chagasi 18S rRNA gene. The combinations of the primer pairs and the respective sizes of the PCR products, based on the U422465 GenBank reference sequence of L. infantum chagasi, were: LCS1/LCS3 (259 bp) and LCS2/LCS3 (820 bp). It was concluded that the new PCR assays optimized using the primer pairs LCS1/LCS3 and LCS2/LCS3 were effective for specific detection of L. infantum chagasi, with analytical sensitivity to detect 1 pg/µL of DNA.

  20. PRISE2: software for designing sequence-selective PCR primers and probes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Yang, Jiue-in; Chrobak, Marek; Borneman, James

    2014-09-25

    PRISE2 is a new software tool for designing sequence-selective PCR primers and probes. To achieve high level of selectivity, PRISE2 allows the user to specify a collection of target sequences that the primers are supposed to amplify, as well as non-target sequences that should not be amplified. The program emphasizes primer selectivity on the 3' end, which is crucial for selective amplification of conserved sequences such as rRNA genes. In PRISE2, users can specify desired properties of primers, including length, GC content, and others. They can interactively manipulate the list of candidate primers, to choose primer pairs that are best suited for their needs. A similar process is used to add probes to selected primer pairs. More advanced features include, for example, the capability to define a custom mismatch penalty function. PRISE2 is equipped with a graphical, user-friendly interface, and it runs on Windows, Macintosh or Linux machines. PRISE2 has been tested on two very similar strains of the fungus Dactylella oviparasitica, and it was able to create highly selective primers and probes for each of them, demonstrating the ability to create useful sequence-selective assays. PRISE2 is a user-friendly, interactive software package that can be used to design high-quality selective primers for PCR experiments. In addition to choosing primers, users have an option to add a probe to any selected primer pair, enabling design of Taqman and other primer-probe based assays. PRISE2 can also be used to design probes for FISH and other hybridization-based assays.

  1. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have become more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers to amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for…

  2. PCR Conditions for 16S Primers for Analysis of Microbes in the Colon of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, H.; Tuero, A. D.; Bacardí, D.; Palenzuela, D. O.; Aguilera, A.; Silva, J. A.; Estrada, R.; Gell, O.; Suárez, J.; Ancizar, J.; Brown, E.; Colarte, A. B.; Castro, J.; Novoa, L. I.

    2016-01-01

    The study of the composition of the intestinal flora is important to the health of the host, playing a key role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and the evolution of the immune system. For these studies, various universal primers of the 16S rDNA gene are used in microbial taxonomy. Here, we report an evaluation of 5 universal primers to explore the presence of microbial DNA in colon biopsies preserved in RNAlater solution. The DNA extracted was used for the amplification of PCR products containing the variable (V) regions of the microbial 16S rDNA gene. The PCR products were studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and DNA sequence, whose percent of homology with microbial sequences reported in GenBank was verified using bioinformatics tools. The presence of microbes in the colon of rats was quantified by the quantitative PCR (qPCR) technique. We obtained microbial DNA from rat, useful for PCR analysis with the universal primers for the bacteria 16S rDNA. The sequences of PCR products obtained from a colon biopsy of the animal showed homology with the classes bacilli (Lactobacillus spp) and proteobacteria, normally represented in the colon of rats. The proposed methodology allowed the attainment of DNA of bacteria with the quality and integrity for use in qPCR, sequencing, and PCR-RFLP analysis. The selected universal primers provided knowledge of the abundance of microorganisms and the formation of a preliminary test of bacterial diversity in rat colon biopsies. PMID:27382362

  3. A Web-Based Adaptive Tutor to Teach PCR Primer Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Seters, Janneke R.; Wellink, Joan; Tramper, Johannes; Goedhart, Martin J.; Ossevoort, Miriam A.

    2012-01-01

    When students have varying prior knowledge, personalized instruction is desirable. One way to personalize instruction is by using adaptive e-learning to offer training of varying complexity. In this study, we developed a web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design: the PCR Tutor. We used part of the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (the…

  4. A Web-Based Adaptive Tutor to Teach PCR Primer Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Seters, Janneke R.; Wellink, Joan; Tramper, Johannes; Goedhart, Martin J.; Ossevoort, Miriam A.

    2012-01-01

    When students have varying prior knowledge, personalized instruction is desirable. One way to personalize instruction is by using adaptive e-learning to offer training of varying complexity. In this study, we developed a web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design: the PCR Tutor. We used part of the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (the…

  5. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have become more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers to amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for…

  6. A Novel Universal Primer-Multiplex-PCR Method with Sequencing Gel Electrophoresis Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kunlun; Zhang, Nan; Yuan, Yanfang; Shang, Ying; Luo, Yunbo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a novel universal primer-multiplex-PCR (UP-M-PCR) method adding a universal primer (UP) in the multiplex PCR reaction system was described. A universal adapter was designed in the 5′-end of each specific primer pairs which matched with the specific DNA sequences for each template and also used as the universal primer (UP). PCR products were analyzed on sequencing gel electrophoresis (SGE) which had the advantage of exhibiting extraordinary resolution. This method overcame the disadvantages rooted deeply in conventional multiplex PCR such as complex manipulation, lower sensitivity, self-inhibition and amplification disparity resulting from different primers, and it got a high specificity and had a low detection limit of 0.1 ng for single kind of crops when screening the presence of genetically modified (GM) crops in mixture samples. The novel developed multiplex PCR assay with sequencing gel electrophoresis analysis will be useful in many fields, such as verifying the GM status of a sample irrespective of the crop and GM trait and so on. PMID:22272223

  7. Multiplex PCR based on a universal biotinylated primer to generate templates for pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyao; Liu, Yunlong; Duan, Wenbang; Ye, Hui; Wu, Haiping; Li, Jinheng; Zhou, Guohua

    2014-06-01

    Pyrosequencing is a powerful tool widely used in genetic analysis, however template preparation prior to pyrosequencing is still costly and time-consuming. To achieve an inexpensive and labor-saving template preparation for pyrosequencing, we have successfully developed a single-tube multiplex PCR including a pre-amplification and a universal amplification. In the process of pre-amplification, a low concentration of target-specific primers tagged with universal ends introduced universal priming regions into amplicons. In the process of universal amplification, a high concentration of universal primers was used for yielding amplicons with various SNPs of interest. As only a universal biotinylated primer and one step of single-stranded DNA preparation were required for typing multiple SNPs located on different sequences, pyrosequencing-based genotyping became time-saving, labor-saving, sample-saving, and cost-saving. By a simple optimization of multiplex PCR condition, only a 4-plex and a 3-plex PCR were required for typing 7 SNPs related to tamoxifen metabolism. Further study showed that pyrosequencing coupled with an improved multiplex PCR protocol allowed around 30% decrease of either typing cost or typing labor. Considering the biotinylated primer and the optimized condition of the multiplex PCR are independent of SNP locus, it is easy to use the same condition and the identical biotinylated primer for typing other SNPs. The preliminary typing results of the 7 SNPs in 11 samples demonstrated that multiplex PCR-based pyrosequencing could be promising in personalized medicine at a low cost.

  8. A Tale of Tails: Dissecting the Enhancing Effect of Tailed Primers in Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbussche, Frank; Mathijs, Elisabeth; Lefebvre, David; De Clercq, Kris; Van Borm, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Non-specific tail sequences are often added to the 5’-terminus of primers to improve the robustness and overall performance of diagnostic assays. Despite the widespread use of tailed primers, the underlying working mechanism is not well understood. To address this problem, we conducted a detailed in vitro and in silico analysis of the enhancing effect of primer tailing on 2 well-established foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) RT-qPCR assays using an FMDV reference panel. Tailing of the panFMDV-5UTR primers mainly affected the shape of the amplification curves. Modelling of the raw fluorescence data suggested a reduction of the amplification efficiency due to the accumulation of inhibitors. In depth analysis of PCR products indeed revealed the rapid accumulation of forward-primer derived artefacts. More importantly, tailing of the forward primer delayed artefacts formation and concomitantly restored the sigmoidal shape of the amplification curves. Our analysis also showed that primer tailing can alter utilisation patterns of degenerate primers and increase the number of primer variants that are able to participate in the reaction. The impact of tailed primers was less pronounced in the panFMDV-3D assay with only 5 out of 50 isolates showing a clear shift in Cq values. Sequence analysis of the target region of these 5 isolates revealed several mutations in the inter-primer region that extend an existing hairpin structure immediately downstream of the forward primer binding site. Stabilisation of the forward primer with either a tail sequence or cationic spermine units restored the sensitivity of the assay, which suggests that the enhancing effect in the panFMDV-3D assay is due to a more efficient extension of the forward primer. ur results show that primer tailing can alter amplification through various mechanisms that are determined by both the assay and target region. These findings expand our understanding of primer tailing and should enable a more targeted and

  9. 5'-degenerate 3'-dideoxy-terminated competitors of PCR primers increase specificity of amplification.

    PubMed

    Atamas, S P; Luzina, I G; Handwerger, B S; White, B

    1998-03-01

    Amplification of a product in PCR with specific primers may be viewed as an artificial Darwinian-type "selection of the fittest". In other selective systems, such as general evolution, immune system and probably brain cortex, the stringency of selection is not absolute but rather degenerate, with selection of many highly fit units, not limited, however, to only the fittest. In PCR also, annealing of the primers is not absolutely specific. The subsequent amplification frequently leads to amplification of not only the desired product but also to less-specific sequences. Using theoretical analysis of the degenerate mode of selection, we predict theoretically and prove experimentally that 5'-degenerate, 3'-dideoxy-terminated competitors of PCR primers can be used to dramatically improve the specificity of PCR amplification without affecting the quantitation of the final specific product.

  10. Identification of putative sequence specific PCR primers for detection of the toxigenic fungal species Stachybotrys chartarum.

    PubMed

    Haugland, R A; Heckman, J L

    1998-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a c 936 bp segment of the nuclear rRNA gene operon was determined for the toxigenic fungal species Stachybotrys chartarum and for other species of Stachybotrys and the related genus Memnoniella. This information was used to infer the phylogenetic relationships of these organisms and to search for sequence specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for S. chartarum in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Searches for candidate primers were performed both by computer using the commercially available Oligo(R) v5.0 primer analysis software package and by manual inspection of the aligned sequences. Primers identified in both types of searches were evaluated for their specificities using a priming efficiency analysis algorithm available in the Oligo(R) 5.0 software. The automated computer searches were unsuccessful in finding S. chartarum-specific primers but did identify a group-specific reverse primer (designated as StacR4) for a phylogenetically related cluster of species that included S. chartarum. Manual searches led to the identification of a reverse primer (designated as StacR3) that was predicted to be specific for only S. chartarum and one other species of Stachybotrys. Experimental PCR analyses using these primers in conjunction with a universal forward primer indicated that the computer-generated amplification efficiency predictions were correct in most instances. A notable exception was the finding that StacR3 was specific only for S. chartarum. The relative merits of different PCR strategies for the detection of S. chartarum employing either one or both of the primers identified in this study are discussed.

  11. A Comprehensive Evaluation of PCR Primers to Amplify the nifH Gene of Nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Gaby, John Christian; Buckley, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    The nifH gene is the most widely sequenced marker gene used to identify nitrogen-fixing Bacteria and Archaea. Numerous PCR primers have been designed to amplify nifH, but a comprehensive evaluation of nifH PCR primers has not been performed. We performed an in silico analysis of the specificity and coverage of 51 universal and 35 group-specific nifH primers by using an aligned database of 23,847 nifH sequences. We found that there are 15 universal nifH primers that target 90% or more of nitrogen fixers, but that there are also 23 nifH primers that target less than 50% of nifH sequences. The nifH primers we evaluated vary in their phylogenetic bias and their ability to recover sequences from commonly sampled environments. In addition, many of these primers will amplify genes that do not mediate nitrogen fixation, and thus it would be advisable for researchers to screen their sequencing results for the presence of non-target genes before analysis. Universal primers that performed well in silico were tested empirically with soil samples and with genomic DNA from a phylogenetically diverse set of nitrogen-fixing strains. This analysis will be of great utility to those engaged in molecular analysis of nifH genes from isolates and environmental samples. PMID:22848735

  12. GETPrime: a gene- or transcript-specific primer database for quantitative real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Gubelmann, Carine; Gattiker, Alexandre; Massouras, Andreas; Hens, Korneel; David, Fabrice; Decouttere, Frederik; Rougemont, Jacques; Deplancke, Bart

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of genes in humans and other organisms undergo alternative splicing, yet the biological function of splice variants is still very poorly understood in large part because of the lack of simple tools that can map the expression profiles and patterns of these variants with high sensitivity. High-throughput quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is an ideal technique to accurately quantify nucleic acid sequences including splice variants. However, currently available primer design programs do not distinguish between splice variants and also differ substantially in overall quality, functionality or throughput mode. Here, we present GETPrime, a primer database supported by a novel platform that uniquely combines and automates several features critical for optimal qPCR primer design. These include the consideration of all gene splice variants to enable either gene-specific (covering the majority of splice variants) or transcript-specific (covering one splice variant) expression profiling, primer specificity validation, automated best primer pair selection according to strict criteria and graphical visualization of the latter primer pairs within their genomic context. GETPrime primers have been extensively validated experimentally, demonstrating high transcript specificity in complex samples. Thus, the free-access, user-friendly GETPrime database allows fast primer retrieval and visualization for genes or groups of genes of most common model organisms, and is available at http://updepla1srv1.epfl.ch/getprime/. Database URL: http://deplanckelab.epfl.ch. PMID:21917859

  13. Allele dropout caused by a non-primer-site SNV affecting PCR amplification--a call for next-generation primer design algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ching-wan; Mak, Chloe Miu

    2013-06-05

    PCR-based technology is indispensable for genetic diagnosis. On the other hand, allele dropout is one significant cause of genotyping errors. Most allele dropout mechanisms are related to annealing failure caused by single nucleotide variant (SNV) situated inside the primer sequences. Here, we demonstrate a novel allele dropout mechanism caused by a non-primer-binding-site SNV. We demonstrate that the apparent homozygosity of NM_000137.1(FAH):c.1035_1037del was caused by allele dropout. The non-primer-binding-site SNV causes a strong secondary hairpin structure formation of the PCR products and leads to amplification failure. SNV check of the primer sequences per se during primer design is not adequate to avoid allele dropout. The next-generation primer design software should analyze the secondary structure of primers and template sequence taking SNV in both sequences into account in order to avoid genotyping errors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Indexed PCR Primers Induce Template-Specific Bias in Large-Scale DNA Sequencing Studies.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, James L; Kelly, Ryan P; Lowell, Natalie C; Port, Jesse A

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing is rapidly emerging as an efficient way to quantify biodiversity at all levels, from genetic variation and expression to ecological community assemblage. However, the number of reads produced per sequencing run far exceeds the number required per sample for many applications, compelling researchers to sequence multiple samples per run in order to maximize efficiency. For studies that include a PCR step, this can be accomplished using primers that include an index sequence allowing sample origin to be determined after sequencing. The use of indexed primers assumes they behave no differently than standard primers; however, we found that indexed primers cause substantial template sequence-specific bias, resulting in radically different profiles of the same environmental sample. Likely the outcome of differential amplification efficiency due to primer-template mismatch, two indexed primer sets spuriously change the inferred sequence abundance from the same DNA extraction by up to 77.1%. We demonstrate that a double PCR approach alleviates these effects in applications where indexed primers are necessary.

  15. Nano-magnetic primer based electrochemiluminescence-polymerase chain reaction (NMPE-PCR) assay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da

    2012-01-15

    Here we have developed a novel nano-magnetic primer based electrochemiluminescence-polymerase chain reaction (NMPE-PCR) strategy for detection of genome. The key idea of this method is integrating the two in situ processes: PCR on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and magnetic beads based ECL readout platform, to avoid some laborious manual operations and achieve rapid yet sensitive detection. At first, the approach employs a pair of functional primers for amplification: one is tris-(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (TBR) labeled primer; the other one is nano-magnetic primer which is prepared by attaching the primer to the surfaces of MNPs. With the presence of DNA analyte and PCR mixture, the TBR labeled products are directly loaded and enriched on the surface of MNPs during PCR cycling. Then the MNPs-TBR complexes can be analyzed by a magnetic ECL platform without any post-modification or post-incubation. Finally, we used Listeria monocytogenes as the target to examine these desirable properties of this assay, reaching a detection limit of 500 fg/μL for genome in 1 h. The proposed study has provided the evidence as a proof-of-concept, thus having potential for development of automatic mode for detection of specific gene.

  16. Vectorette PCR isolation of microsatellite repeat sequences using anchored dinucleotide repeat primers.

    PubMed Central

    Lench, N J; Norris, A; Bailey, A; Booth, A; Markham, A F

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a vectorette PCR approach to provide an improved method for isolation of microsatellite repeats. The modified procedure relies on PCR amplification using a vectorette-specific primer in combination with one of a panel of anchored dinucleotide repeat primers. The target DNA to be screened for microsatellite sequences can be from YAC, P1, cosmid, bacteriophage or plasmid clones. We have used this technique to isolate novel, polymorphic microsatellite repeats from clones containing the amelogenin gene (AMGX) located on human chromosome Xp22.3. PMID:8668553

  17. Universal primers for fluorescent labelling of PCR fragments--an efficient and cost-effective approach to genotyping by fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Blacket, M J; Robin, C; Good, R T; Lee, S F; Miller, A D

    2012-05-01

    Directly labelling locus-specific primers for microsatellite analysis is expensive and a common limitation to small-budget molecular ecology projects. More cost-effective end-labelling of PCR products can be achieved through a three primer PCR approach, involving a fluorescently labelled universal primer in combination with modified locus-specific primers with 5' universal primer sequence tails. This technique has been widely used but has been limited largely due to a lack of available universal primers suitable for co-amplifying large numbers of size overlapping loci and without requiring locus-specific PCR conditions to be modified. In this study, we report a suite of four high-performance universal primers that can be employed in a three primer PCR approach for efficient and cost-effective fluorescent end-labelling of PCR fragments. Amplification efficiency is maximized owing to high universal primer Tm values (approximately 60+ °C) that enhance primer versatility and enable higher annealing temperatures to be employed compared with commonly used universal primers such as M13. We demonstrate that these universal primers can be combined with multiple fluorophores to co-amplify multiple loci efficiently via multiplex PCR. This method provides a level of multiplexing and PCR efficiency similar to microsatellite fluorescent detection assays using directly labelled primers while dramatically reducing project costs. Primer performance is tested using several alternative PCR strategies that involve both single and multiple fluorophores in single and multiplex PCR across a wide range of taxa. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Real-Time PCR (qPCR) Primer Design Using Free Online Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most…

  19. Real-Time PCR (qPCR) Primer Design Using Free Online Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most…

  20. Advances in multiplex PCR: balancing primer efficiencies and improving detection success

    PubMed Central

    Sint, Daniela; Raso, Lorna; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    1. Multiplex PCR is a valuable tool in many biological studies but it is a multifaceted procedure that has to be planned and optimised thoroughly to achieve robust and meaningful results. In particular, primer concentrations have to be adjusted to assure an even amplification of all targeted DNA fragments. Until now, total DNA extracts were used for balancing primer efficiencies; however, the applicability for comparisons between taxa or different multiple-copy genes was limited owing to the unknown number of template molecules present per total DNA. 2. Based on a multiplex system developed to track trophic interactions in high Alpine arthropods, we demonstrate a fast and easy way of generating standardised DNA templates. These were then used to balance the amplification success for the different targets and to subsequently determine the sensitivity of each primer pair in the multiplex PCR. 3. In the current multiplex assay, this approach led to an even amplification success for all seven targeted DNA fragments. Using this balanced multiplex PCR, methodological bias owing to variation in primer efficiency will be avoided when analysing field-derived samples. 4. The approach outlined here allows comparing multiplex PCR sensitivity, independent of the investigated species, genome size or the targeted genes. The application of standardised DNA templates not only makes it possible to optimise primer efficiency within a given multiplex PCR, but it also offers to adjust and/or to compare the sensitivity between different assays. Along with other factors that influence the success of multiplex reactions, and which we discuss here in relation to the presented detection system, the adoption of this approach will allow for direct comparison of multiplex PCR data between systems and studies, enhancing the utility of this assay type. PMID:23549328

  1. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W.; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera, including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera. We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in molecular systematic studies of Lepidoptera, particularly at the intrafamilial level, and our new set of primers now provides a route to generating phylogenomic datasets using traditional methods. PMID:27408580

  2. Comprehensive detection of phototrophic sulfur bacteria using PCR primers that target reverse dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yumi; Purdy, Kevin J; Oakley, Brian B; Kondo, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    A new set of primers for the detection of phototrophic sulfur bacteria in natural environments is described. The primers target the α-subunit of the reverse dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA). PCR-amplification resulted in products of the expected size from all the phototrophic strains tested, including purple sulfur and green sulfur bacteria. Seventy-nine clones obtained from environmental DNA using the primers were sequenced and all found to be closely related to the dsrA of purple sulfur bacteria and green sulfur bacteria. This newly developed PCR assay targeting dsrA is rapid and simple for the detection of phototrophic sulfur bacteria in situ and superior to the use of culture-dependent techniques.

  3. Comparison of nine PCR primer sets designed to detect Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii in maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt of maize, is a major quarantine pest in maize seed. Verifying freedom from P. stewartii remains a significant hurdle in exporting corn seed from the U.S. Several PCR primer sets have been developed and suggested as bein...

  4. Position-dependent effects of locked nucleic acid (LNA) on DNA sequencing and PCR primers

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Joshua D.; Fiala, Dean; Samala, Meinrado F.; Kahn, Jason D.; Peterson, Raymond J.

    2006-01-01

    Genomes are becoming heavily annotated with important features. Analysis of these features often employs oligonucleotides that hybridize at defined locations. When the defined location lies in a poor sequence context, traditional design strategies may fail. Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) can enhance oligonucleotide affinity and specificity. Though LNA has been used in many applications, formal design rules are still being defined. To further this effort we have investigated the effect of LNA on the performance of sequencing and PCR primers in AT-rich regions, where short primers yield poor sequencing reads or PCR yields. LNA was used in three positional patterns: near the 5′ end (LNA-5′), near the 3′ end (LNA-3′) and distributed throughout (LNA-Even). Quantitative measures of sequencing read length (Phred Q30 count) and real-time PCR signal (cycle threshold, CT) were characterized using two-way ANOVA. LNA-5′ increased the average Phred Q30 score by 60% and it was never observed to decrease performance. LNA-5′ generated cycle thresholds in quantitative PCR that were comparable to high-yielding conventional primers. In contrast, LNA-3′ and LNA-Even did not improve read lengths or CT. ANOVA demonstrated the statistical significance of these results and identified significant interaction between the positional design rule and primer sequence. PMID:17071964

  5. A plastome primer set for comprehensive quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis of Zea mays: a starter primer set for other Poaceae species

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Richard M; Dunn, Sade N; Cahoon, A Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Background Quantitative Real Time RT-PCR (q2(RT)PCR) is a maturing technique which gives researchers the ability to quantify and compare very small amounts of nucleic acids. Primer design and optimization is an essential yet time consuming aspect of using q2(RT)PCR. In this paper we describe the design and empirical optimization of primers to amplify and quantify plastid RNAs from Zea mays that are robust enough to use with other closely related species. Results Primers were designed and successfully optimized for 57 of the 104 reported genes in the maize plastome plus two nuclear genes. All 59 primer pairs produced single amplicons after end-point reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) as visualized on agarose gels and subsequently verified by q2(RT)PCR. Primer pairs were divided into several categories based on the optimization requirements or the uniqueness of the target gene. An in silico test suggested the majority of the primer sets should work with other members of the Poaceae family. An in vitro test of the primer set on two unsequenced species (Panicum virgatum and Miscanthus sinensis) supported this assumption by successfully producing single amplicons for each primer pair. Conclusion Due to the highly conserved chloroplast genome in plant families it is possible to utilize primer pairs designed against one genomic sequence to detect the presence and abundance of plastid genes or transcripts from genomes that have yet to be sequenced. Analysis of steady state transcription of vital system genes is a necessary requirement to comprehensively elucidate gene expression in any organism. The primer pairs reported in this paper were designed for q2(RT)PCR of maize chloroplast genes but should be useful for other members of the Poaceae family. Both in silico and in vitro data are presented to support this assumption. PMID:18518993

  6. Comparison of different PCR primers on detecting arbuscular mycorrhizal communities inside plant roots.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shengjing; Shi, Guoxi; Mao, Lin; Pan, Jianbin; An, Lizhe; Liu, Yongjun; Feng, Huyuan

    2015-07-04

    Communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonizing roots have been increasingly investigated by molecular approaches with AMF-specific PCR primers. However, it is difficult to compare the species diversity and species compositions of AMF communities across various studies due to the PCR primers used differently, and also little is known if significant difference of community compositions is characterized by different primers. We aim to compare the difference of efficiency of four primers for AMF. We chose four commonly used AMF-specific primer combinations (NS31-AM1, AMLl-AML2, NS31-AML2 and SSUmCf-LSUmBr), and used 18S rDNA clone libraries to describe the AMF diversity and community. Our results showed that the specificity and coverage varied among the tested primers, different primer combinations would yield distinct patterns of species diversity and composition of AMF community. SSUmCf-LSUmBr had the best specificity and coverage in amplifying AMF sequences, followed by NS31-AML2 and NS31-AM1, and AML1-AML2 showed the lowest specificity towards AMF sequences. SSUmCf-LSUmBr is not the optimal primer pair for AMF community study in current stage due to limited reference sequences and large DNA size. As an alternative, NS31-AML2 is more suitable in AMF community study, because its target rDNA region could well match the increasingly used virtual taxonomy database (http://maarjam. botany.ut.ee) and also its suitable DNA size could be efficiently used in high-throughput sequencing.

  7. MRPrimer: a MapReduce-based method for the thorough design of valid and ranked primers for PCR.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyerin; Kang, NaNa; Chon, Kang-Wook; Kim, Seonho; Lee, NaHye; Koo, JaeHyung; Kim, Min-Soo

    2015-11-16

    Primer design is a fundamental technique that is widely used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although many methods have been proposed for primer design, they require a great deal of manual effort to generate feasible and valid primers, including homology tests on off-target sequences using BLAST-like tools. That approach is inconvenient for many target sequences of quantitative PCR (qPCR) due to considering the same stringent and allele-invariant constraints. To address this issue, we propose an entirely new method called MRPrimer that can design all feasible and valid primer pairs existing in a DNA database at once, while simultaneously checking a multitude of filtering constraints and validating primer specificity. Furthermore, MRPrimer suggests the best primer pair for each target sequence, based on a ranking method. Through qPCR analysis using 343 primer pairs and the corresponding sequencing and comparative analyses, we showed that the primer pairs designed by MRPrimer are very stable and effective for qPCR. In addition, MRPrimer is computationally efficient and scalable and therefore useful for quickly constructing an entire collection of feasible and valid primers for frequently updated databases like RefSeq. Furthermore, we suggest that MRPrimer can be utilized conveniently for experiments requiring primer design, especially real-time qPCR. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. MRPrimer: a MapReduce-based method for the thorough design of valid and ranked primers for PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyerin; Kang, NaNa; Chon, Kang-Wook; Kim, Seonho; Lee, NaHye; Koo, JaeHyung; Kim, Min-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Primer design is a fundamental technique that is widely used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although many methods have been proposed for primer design, they require a great deal of manual effort to generate feasible and valid primers, including homology tests on off-target sequences using BLAST-like tools. That approach is inconvenient for many target sequences of quantitative PCR (qPCR) due to considering the same stringent and allele-invariant constraints. To address this issue, we propose an entirely new method called MRPrimer that can design all feasible and valid primer pairs existing in a DNA database at once, while simultaneously checking a multitude of filtering constraints and validating primer specificity. Furthermore, MRPrimer suggests the best primer pair for each target sequence, based on a ranking method. Through qPCR analysis using 343 primer pairs and the corresponding sequencing and comparative analyses, we showed that the primer pairs designed by MRPrimer are very stable and effective for qPCR. In addition, MRPrimer is computationally efficient and scalable and therefore useful for quickly constructing an entire collection of feasible and valid primers for frequently updated databases like RefSeq. Furthermore, we suggest that MRPrimer can be utilized conveniently for experiments requiring primer design, especially real-time qPCR. PMID:26109350

  9. Revealing the Diversity and Quantity of Peritrich Ciliates in Environmental Samples Using Specific Primer-based PCR and Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xihan; Gong, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Peritrichs are a diverse, ecologically important ciliate group usually with a complex life cycle. To date, the community of the peritrichs has been investigated by using morphology-based methods such as living observation and silver staining. Here we show a molecular approach for characterizing the diversity and quantity of free-living peritrichs in environmental samples. We newly designed four peritrich-specific primers targeting 18S rRNA genes that allow clone library construction, screening and analysis. A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay was developed to quantify peritrichs in environmental samples by using rDNA copy number as an indicator. DNA extracted from four water samples of contrasting environmental gradients was analysed. The results showed that the peritrich community was differentiated among these samples, and that the diversity decreased with the increase of water salinity. The qPCR results are consistent with the library sequence analysis in terms of quantity variations from sample to sample. The development of peritrich-specific primers, for the first time, for conventional PCR and qPCR assays, provides useful molecular tools for revealing the diversity and quantity of peritrich ciliates in environmental samples. Also, our study illustrates the potential of these molecular tools to ecological studies of other ciliate groups in diverse environments. PMID:23100023

  10. primers4clades: a web server that uses phylogenetic trees to design lineage-specific PCR primers for metagenomic and diversity studies.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Sachman-Ruiz, Bernardo; Figueroa-Palacios, Iraís; Vinuesa, Pablo

    2009-07-01

    Primers4clades is an easy-to-use web server that implements a fully automatic PCR primer design pipeline for cross-species amplification of novel sequences from metagenomic DNA, or from uncharacterized organisms, belonging to user-specified phylogenetic clades or taxa. The server takes a set of non-aligned protein coding genes, with or without introns, aligns them and computes a neighbor-joining tree, which is displayed on screen for easy selection of species or sequence clusters to design lineage-specific PCR primers. Primers4clades implements an extended CODEHOP primer design strategy based on both DNA and protein multiple sequence alignments. It evaluates several thermodynamic properties of the oligonucleotide pairs, and computes the phylogenetic information content of the predicted amplicon sets from Shimodaira-Hasegawa-like branch support values of maximum likelihood phylogenies. A non-redundant set of primer formulations is returned, ranked according to their thermodynamic properties. An amplicon distribution map provides a convenient overview of the coverage of the target locus. Altogether these features greatly help the user in making an informed choice between alternative primer pair formulations. Primers4clades is available at two mirror sites: http://maya.ccg.unam.mx/primers4clades/and http://floresta.eead.csic.es/primers4clades/. Three demo data sets and a comprehensive documentation/tutorial page are provided for easy testing of the server's capabilities and interface.

  11. PCR Primers for Metazoan Nuclear 18S and 28S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Metagenetic analyses, which amplify and sequence target marker DNA regions from environmental samples, are increasingly employed to assess the biodiversity of communities of small organisms. Using this approach, our understanding of microbial diversity has expanded greatly. In contrast, only a few studies using this approach to characterize metazoan diversity have been reported, despite the fact that many metazoan species are small and difficult to identify or are undescribed. One of the reasons for this discrepancy is the availability of universal primers for the target taxa. In microbial studies, analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA is standard. In contrast, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In the present study, we have designed primers that amplify the nuclear 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA sequences of most metazoan species with the goal of providing effective approaches for metagenetic analyses of metazoan diversity in environmental samples, with a particular emphasis on marine biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Conserved regions suitable for designing PCR primers were identified using 14,503 and 1,072 metazoan sequences of the nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA regions, respectively. The sequence similarity of both these newly designed and the previously reported primers to the target regions of these primers were compared for each phylum to determine the expected amplification efficacy. The nucleotide diversity of the flanking regions of the primers was also estimated for genera or higher taxonomic groups of 11 phyla to determine the variable regions within the genes. Conclusions/Significance The identified nuclear ribosomal DNA primers (five primer pairs for 18S and eleven for 28S) and the results of the nucleotide diversity analyses provide options for primer combinations for metazoan metagenetic analyses. Additionally, advantages and disadvantages of not only the 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA, but also other marker regions as targets

  12. Edesign: Primer and Enhanced Internal Probe Design Tool for Quantitative PCR Experiments and Genotyping Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Naoko; Delobel, Diane; Hanami, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Usui, Kengo; Harbers, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Analytical PCR experiments preferably use internal probes for monitoring the amplification reaction and specific detection of the amplicon. Such internal probes have to be designed in close context with the amplification primers, and may require additional considerations for the detection of genetic variations. Here we describe Edesign, a new online and stand-alone tool for designing sets of PCR primers together with an internal probe for conducting quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and genotypic experiments. Edesign can be used for selecting standard DNA oligonucleotides like for instance TaqMan probes, but has been further extended with new functions and enhanced design features for Eprobes. Eprobes, with their single thiazole orange-labelled nucleotide, allow for highly sensitive genotypic assays because of their higher DNA binding affinity as compared to standard DNA oligonucleotides. Using new thermodynamic parameters, Edesign considers unique features of Eprobes during primer and probe design for establishing qPCR experiments and genotyping by melting curve analysis. Additional functions in Edesign allow probe design for effective discrimination between wild-type sequences and genetic variations either using standard DNA oligonucleotides or Eprobes. Edesign can be freely accessed online at http://www.dnaform.com/edesign2/, and the source code is available for download. PMID:26863543

  13. Edesign: Primer and Enhanced Internal Probe Design Tool for Quantitative PCR Experiments and Genotyping Assays.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasumasa; Soma, Takahiro; Kasahara, Naoko; Delobel, Diane; Hanami, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Usui, Kengo; Harbers, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Analytical PCR experiments preferably use internal probes for monitoring the amplification reaction and specific detection of the amplicon. Such internal probes have to be designed in close context with the amplification primers, and may require additional considerations for the detection of genetic variations. Here we describe Edesign, a new online and stand-alone tool for designing sets of PCR primers together with an internal probe for conducting quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and genotypic experiments. Edesign can be used for selecting standard DNA oligonucleotides like for instance TaqMan probes, but has been further extended with new functions and enhanced design features for Eprobes. Eprobes, with their single thiazole orange-labelled nucleotide, allow for highly sensitive genotypic assays because of their higher DNA binding affinity as compared to standard DNA oligonucleotides. Using new thermodynamic parameters, Edesign considers unique features of Eprobes during primer and probe design for establishing qPCR experiments and genotyping by melting curve analysis. Additional functions in Edesign allow probe design for effective discrimination between wild-type sequences and genetic variations either using standard DNA oligonucleotides or Eprobes. Edesign can be freely accessed online at http://www.dnaform.com/edesign2/, and the source code is available for download.

  14. Development of SCAR Primers for PCR Assay to Detect Diplodia seriata

    PubMed Central

    Martín, M. T.; Cuesta, M. J.; Martín, L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop primer pairs for Diplodia seriata identification, one of the most common fungal species associated with grapevine decline in Castilla y León (Spain). Genetic variability of selected isolates of D. seriata was estimated. A molecular marker was generated from a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fragment. PCR products of around 1200 bp were obtained with OPE20 primer. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The sequences were compared and a fragment of 1207 bp was used to design primer pairs. Two primer pairs were selected (DS3.8 S3-DS3.8 R6 and DS3.8 S3-DS3.8 R4) that amplified a single DNA product of 634 bp and 233 bp, respectively, with D. seriata isolates. No amplification was obtained for any of the 57 isolates of other species. The designed SCAR primer pairs allowed a rapid detection of D. seriata, and were able to detect 0.1 pg of the target DNA. Detection was specific and sensitive for D. seriata. The established protocols detected these fungi in naturally infected grapevines after DNA purification. Diplodia seriata was detectable without DNA purification and isolation in 62.5% to 75% of reactions. The detection of this pathogen in wood samples has great potential for use in pathogen-free certification schemes. PMID:27437468

  15. Specific primers for PCR amplification of the ITS1 (ribosomal DNA) of Trypanosoma lewisi.

    PubMed

    Desquesnes, Marc; Marc, Desquesnes; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Ketsarin, Kamyingkird; Yangtara, Sarawut; Sarawut, Yangtara; Milocco, Cristina; Cristina, Milocco; Ravel, Sophie; Sophie, Ravel; Wang, Ming-Hui; Ming-Hui, Wang; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhao-Rong, Lun; Morand, Serge; Serge, Morand; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Sathaporn, Jittapalapong

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma lewisi is a mild or non-pathogenic parasite of the sub-genus Herpetosoma transmitted by fleas to rats. In a previous study we described pan-trypanosome specific primers TRYP1 which amplify the ITS1 of ribosomal DNA by hybridizing in highly conserved regions of 18S and 5.8S genes. These primers proved to be useful for detecting T. lewisi DNA in laboratory rats, but a recent large scale survey in wild rodents demonstrated a lack of specificity. In the present study, we designed and evaluated mono-specific primers LEW1S and LEW1R, for the detection and identification of T. lewisi by a single-step PCR. These primers were designed inside the highly variable region of the ITS1 sequence of T. lewisi ribosomal DNA. The product size of 220 bp is specific to T. lewisi. The sensitivity limit was estimated between 0.055 and 0.55 pg of DNA per reaction, equivalent to 1-10 organisms per reaction. All the PCR products obtained from 6 different T. lewisi isolates were more than 98% similar with each other and similar to the sequences of T. lewisi already published in Genbank. All DNA of 7 T. lewisi stocks from China gave the specific 220 bp product. We showed that LEW1S and LEW1R primers enabled sensitive detection and identification of T. lewisi infection in laboratory and wild rats. This assay is recommended for monitoring T. lewisi infections in rat colonies or for studying infections in the wild fauna. An absence of cross reaction with human DNA means that these primers can be used to investigate atypical trypanosome infections in humans. Given the risk of T. lewisi infection in human, we believe that these primers will be beneficial for public health diagnosis and rodents investigation programmes.

  16. In Silico PCR Tools for a Fast Primer, Probe, and Advanced Searching.

    PubMed

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Muterko, Alexandr; Shamekova, Malika; Zhambakin, Kabyl

    2017-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is fundamental to molecular biology and is the most important practical molecular technique for the research laboratory. The principle of this technique has been further used and applied in plenty of other simple or complex nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAAT). In parallel to laboratory "wet bench" experiments for nucleic acid amplification technologies, in silico or virtual (bioinformatics) approaches have been developed, among which in silico PCR analysis. In silico NAAT analysis is a useful and efficient complementary method to ensure the specificity of primers or probes for an extensive range of PCR applications from homology gene discovery, molecular diagnosis, DNA fingerprinting, and repeat searching. Predicting sensitivity and specificity of primers and probes requires a search to determine whether they match a database with an optimal number of mismatches, similarity, and stability. In the development of in silico bioinformatics tools for nucleic acid amplification technologies, the prospects for the development of new NAAT or similar approaches should be taken into account, including forward-looking and comprehensive analysis that is not limited to only one PCR technique variant. The software FastPCR and the online Java web tool are integrated tools for in silico PCR of linear and circular DNA, multiple primer or probe searches in large or small databases and for advanced search. These tools are suitable for processing of batch files that are essential for automation when working with large amounts of data. The FastPCR software is available for download at http://primerdigital.com/fastpcr.html and the online Java version at http://primerdigital.com/tools/pcr.html .

  17. QuantPrime--a flexible tool for reliable high-throughput primer design for quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Samuel; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2008-11-01

    Medium- to large-scale expression profiling using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays are becoming increasingly important in genomics research. A major bottleneck in experiment preparation is the design of specific primer pairs, where researchers have to make several informed choices, often outside their area of expertise. Using currently available primer design tools, several interactive decisions have to be made, resulting in lengthy design processes with varying qualities of the assays. Here we present QuantPrime, an intuitive and user-friendly, fully automated tool for primer pair design in small- to large-scale qPCR analyses. QuantPrime can be used online through the internet http://www.quantprime.de/ or on a local computer after download; it offers design and specificity checking with highly customizable parameters and is ready to use with many publicly available transcriptomes of important higher eukaryotic model organisms and plant crops (currently 295 species in total), while benefiting from exon-intron border and alternative splice variant information in available genome annotations. Experimental results with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the crop Hordeum vulgare and the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii show success rates of designed primer pairs exceeding 96%. QuantPrime constitutes a flexible, fully automated web application for reliable primer design for use in larger qPCR experiments, as proven by experimental data. The flexible framework is also open for simple use in other quantification applications, such as hydrolyzation probe design for qPCR and oligonucleotide probe design for quantitative in situ hybridization. Future suggestions made by users can be easily implemented, thus allowing QuantPrime to be developed into a broad-range platform for the design of RNA expression assays.

  18. [Primers design and optimization of PCR and nested-PCR assays for the specific detection of Tritrichomonas foetus].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Paula Rogério; Da Silva, Andréa Caetano; Gambarini, Maria Lúcia; Linhares, Guido Fontgalland C

    2008-01-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a pathogenic protozoan that causes a venereal disease in cattle known as bovine genital tricomonosis. In spite of the efficacy to recognize the target genomic DNA, the protocols so far developed for the diagnosis of this organism by PCR promote some inespecific amplifications or they are unable to discriminate T. foetus against other species within the genus. The objective of this study was to assess and optimize PCR and nested-PCR assays for the specific diagnosis of T. foetus, using novel primers selected from the alignment of sequences of the genes 18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, 28S rRNA and of the internal transcribed spacers of the rDNA (ITS1 and ITS2). A pair of primers was constructed for the genus-specific amplification of a 648 bp fragment and two others to amplify T. foetus species-specific fragments of 343 and 429 bp. No cross amplification was observed against Bos taurus genomic DNA neither against the DNA of usual bovine genital pathogens. Both, single and nested-PCR assays, presented analytical sensitivity to detect at least two T. foetus organisms.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O12 outbreak studied by arbitrary primer PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Elaichouni, A; Verschraegen, G; Claeys, G; Devleeschouwer, M; Godard, C; Vaneechoutte, M

    1994-01-01

    A total of 16 colonizing and infecting ofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains and two strains isolated from ventilation equipment fluids, all with similar colonial morphologies and with minor but distinct susceptibility differences, were suspected of belonging to a single outbreak and were studied by arbitrary primer (AP) PCR. Thirteen nonrelated strains were included to evaluate the discriminatory capacity of the technique. AP PCR fingerprinting was compared with serotyping, phage typing, and antibiotic susceptibility testing. AP PCR was performed independently with three different primers. The different AP PCR typing systems yielded almost identical patterns for the epidemic strains and enabled us to differentiate most of the nonrelated strains from each other and from the outbreak strains. The combination of AP PCR typing and the phenotyping techniques that we used enabled us to conclude that an outbreak was occurring. In general, the typeability of AP PCR was greater than those of phage typing and serotyping, while the discriminatory powers of the three methods were comparable. Images PMID:8195376

  20. Retrieval of glycoside hydrolase family 9 cellulase genes from environmental DNA by metagenomic gene specific multi-primer PCR.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaolong; Yin, Xiaopu; Pei, Xiaolin; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Ao; Li, Yan; Gong, Weibo; Wang, Qiuyan

    2012-05-01

    A new method, termed metagenomic gene specific multi-primer PCR (MGSM-PCR), is presented that uses multiple gene specific primers derived from an isolated gene from a constructed metagenomic library rather than degenerate primers designed based on a known enzyme family. The utility of MGSM-PCR was shown by applying it to search for homologues of the glycoside hydrolase family 9 cellulase in metagenomic DNA. The success of the multiplex PCR was verified by visualizing products on an agarose gel following gel electrophoresis. A total of 127 homologous genes were amplified with combinatorial multi-primer reactions from 34 soil DNA samples. Multiple alignments revealed extensive sequence diversity among these captured sequences with sequence identity varying from 26 to 99.7%. These results indicated that significantly diverse homologous genes were indeed readily accessible when using multiple metagenomic gene specific primers.

  1. Low-stringency PCR with diagnostically useful primers for identification of Leptospira serovars.

    PubMed Central

    de Caballero, O L; Dias Neto, E; Koury, M C; Romanha, A J; Simpson, A J

    1994-01-01

    Primers proposed for the diagnosis of the pathogenic spirochete Leptospira spp. (C. Gravekamp, H. V. D. Kemp, M. Franzen, D. Carrington, G.J. Schoone, G.J.J.M. Van Eys, C. O. R. Everard, R.A. Hartskeel, and W.J. Terpstra, J. Gen. Microbiol. 139:1691-1700, 1993) have been found to produce complex serovar-specific patterns under low-stringency PCR conditions. Such patterns obtained by low-stringency PCR, which maintain the specific band as an internal control, offer, an approach to the standardized identification of Leptospira serovars in clinical laboratories. Images PMID:8051272

  2. Genomic fingerprinting using arbitrarily primed PCR and a matrix of pairwise combinations of primers.

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, J; McClelland, M

    1991-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genomic fingerprints generated by arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) can distinguish between slightly divergent strains of any organism. Single oligodeoxyribonucleotide (oligo) primers have been used to generate such fingerprints, with the same primer being present at the 5' end of both strands for every PCR product. We used three arbitrary oligos, individually and in pairs, to generate six different genomic fingerprints of the same mouse genomic DNAs. Fewer than half of the products in genomic fingerprints generated using the oligos in pairs were the same as those produced by AP-PCR using one of the three oligos alone. Thus, a few oligos could be used in a very large number of single and pairwise combinations, each producing a distinct AP-PCR fingerprint with the potential to identify new polymorphisms. For example, 50 oligos can be used in a matrix of pairwise combinations to produce 2,500 fingerprints, in which at least half the data can be expected to be unique to each pair. We demonstrate this principle by using two oligos, alone and together, to generate three sets of fingerprints and map thirteen polymorphisms in the C57BL/6J x DBA/2J set of recombinant inbred mice. Images PMID:1923811

  3. [Molecular identification of Mentha haplocalyx and Mentha spicata with specific primers multi-PCR system].

    PubMed

    Cao, Liang; Qin, Shuang-shuang; Yuan, Yuan; Zhu, Xiao-qi

    2014-01-01

    To screen specific SNPs loci of Mentha haplocalyx and Mentha spicata,and then specific primers were designed to identify the two species and their mixture rapidly. PsbA-trnH sequences of Mentha haplocalyx and Mentha spicata were obtained by PCR product sequencing and downloading from GenBank. SNPs in the psbA-trnH sequences of Mentha haplocalyx and Mentha spicata were found by ClustulW program and Bioedit software. Primers for authentication of the two species were designed according to the SNP loci, and PCR reaction system was optimized to identify the original plants. Multi-PCR reaction system was constructed. The 181 bp identification band for Mentha haplocalyx or(and) 288 bp identification band for Mentha spicata could be produced by a single PCR reaction,which showed good identification ability to the two species. The multi-PCR reaction system can be applied to identify Mentha haplocalyx and Mentha spicata as well as their mixture.

  4. The effect of multiple primer-template mismatches on quantitative PCR accuracy and development of a multi-primer set assay for accurate quantification of pcrA gene sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Ledeker, Brett M; De Long, Susan K

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is a critical tool for quantifying the abundance of specific organisms and the level or expression of target genes in medically and environmentally relevant systems. However, often the power of this tool has been limited because primer-template mismatches, due to sequence variations of targeted genes, can lead to inaccuracies in measured gene quantities, detection failures, and spurious conclusions. Currently available primer design guidelines for qPCR were developed for pure culture applications, and available primer design strategies for mixed cultures were developed for detection rather than accurate quantification. Furthermore, past studies examining the impact of mismatches have focused only on single mismatches while instances of multiple mismatches are common. There are currently no appropriate solutions to overcome the challenges posed by sequence variations. Here, we report results that provide a comprehensive, quantitative understanding of the impact of multiple primer-template mismatches on qPCR accuracy and demonstrate a multi-primer set approach to accurately quantify a model gene pcrA (encoding perchlorate reductase) that has substantial sequence variation. Results showed that for multiple mismatches (up to 3 mismatches) in primer regions where mismatches were previously considered tolerable (middle and 5' end), quantification accuracies could be as low as ~0.1%. Furthermore, tests were run using a published pcrA primer set with mixtures of genomic DNA from strains known to harbor the target gene, and for some mixtures quantification accuracy was as low as ~0.8% or was non-detect. To overcome these limitations, a multiple primer set assay including minimal degeneracies was developed for pcrA genes. This assay resulted in nearly 100% accurate detection for all mixed microbial communities tested. The multi-primer set approach demonstrated herein can be broadly applied to other genes with known sequences. Copyright © 2013

  5. Sensitive, microliter PCR with consensus degenerate primers for Epstein Barr virus amplification

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyudam; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Conrardy, Christina; Landers, James P.; Tong, Suxiang; Forest, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive identification of the etiology of viral diseases is key to implementing appropriate prevention and treatment. The gold standard for virus identification is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a technique that allows for highly specific and sensitive detection of pathogens by exponentially amplifying a specific region of DNA from as little as a single copy through thermocycling a biochemical cocktail. Today, molecular biology laboratories use commercial instruments that operate in 0.5–2 h/analysis using reaction volumes of 5–50 μL contained within polymer tubes or chambers. Towards reducing this volume and maintaining performance, we present a semi-quantitative, systematic experimental study of how PCR yield is affected by tube/chamber substrate, surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA:V), and passivation methods. We perform PCR experiments using traditional PCR tubes as well as using disposable polymer microchips with 1 μL reaction volumes thermocycled using water baths. We report the first oil encapsulation microfluidic PCR method without fluid flow and its application to the first microfluidic amplification of Epstein Barr virus using consensus degenerate primers, a powerful and broad PCR method to screen for both known and novel members of a viral family. The limit of detection is measured as 140 starting copies of DNA from a starting concentration of 3×105 copies/mL, regarded as an accepted sensitivity threshold for diagnostic purposes, and reaction specificity was improved as compared to conventional methods. Also notable, these experiments were conducted with conventional reagent concentrations, rather than commonly spiked enzyme and/or template mixtures. This experimental study of the effects of substrate, SA:V, and passivation, together with sensitive and specific microfluidic PCR with consensus degenerate primers represent advances towards lower cost and higher throughput pathogen screening. PMID:23080522

  6. Design and evaluation of PCR primers for denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of plant parasitic and fungivorous nematode communities.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Atsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    A PCR-DGGE primer pair, Tyl2F-Tyl4R, specific to plant parasitic and fungivorous nematodes was designed based on the 18S rRNA gene. The results of community analysis using the primers showed that they are specific to the order Tylenchida. This primer pair detected species belonging to Tylenchida with high sensitivity and high resolution. The number of detected species of plant parasitic and fungivorous nematodes and their band intensity were much improved compared with PCR-DGGE analysis using the SSU18A-SSU9R primer, which is commonly used for nematode community analysis. It was confirmed that using a group-specific primer was effective for nematode community analysis with PCR-DGGE.

  7. Species-specific PCR primers for the rapid identification of yeasts of the genus Zygosaccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Muir, Alastair; Stratford, Malcolm; Wheals, Alan

    2011-06-01

    Species-specific primer pairs that produce a single band of known product size have been developed for members of the Zygosaccharomyces clade including Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Zygosaccharomyces bisporus, Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis, Zygosaccharomyces lentus, Zygosaccharomyces machadoi, Zygosaccharomyces mellis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. An existing primer pair for the provisional new species Zygosaccharomyces pseudorouxii has been confirmed as specific. The HIS3 gene, encoding imidazole-glycerolphosphate dehydratase, was used as the target gene. This housekeeping gene evolves slowly and is thus well conserved among different isolates, but shows a significant number of base pair changes between even closely related species, sufficient for species-specific primer design. The primers were tested on type and wild strains of the genus Zygosaccharomyces and on members of the Saccharomycetaceae. Sequencing of the D1/D2 region of rDNA was used to confirm the identification of all nonculture collection isolates. This approach used extracted genomic DNA, but in practice, it can be used efficiently with a rapid colony PCR protocol. The method also successfully detected known and new hybrid strains of Z. rouxii and Z. pseudorouxii. The method is rapid, robust and inexpensive. It requires little expertise by the user and is thus useful for preliminary, large-scale screens.

  8. Triplex PCR using new primers for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rahumatullah, Anizah; Khoo, Boon Yin; Noordin, Rahmah

    2012-06-01

    Molecular methods are used increasingly for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii infection. This study developed a rapid, sensitive, and specific conventional triplex PCR for the detection of the B1 gene and ITS1 region of T. gondii using newly designed primers and an internal control based on the Vibrio cholerae HemM gene. The annealing temperature and concentrations of the primers, MgCl(2), and dNTPs were optimized. Two sets of primers (set 1 and 2) were tested, which contained different segments of the T. gondii B1 gene, 529 repeat region and ITS1 region. A series of sensitivity tests were performed using parasite DNA, whole parasites, and spiked human body fluids. Specificity tests were performed using DNA from common protozoa and bacteria. The newly developed assay based on set 2 primers was found to be specific and sensitive. The test was capable of detecting as little as 10 pg T. gondii DNA, 10(4) tachyzoites in spiked body fluids, and T. gondii DNA in the organ tissues of experimentally infected mice. The assay developed in this study will be useful for the laboratory detection of T. gondii infection.

  9. [Development of a universal primers PCR-coupled liquid bead array to detect biothreat bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wen, Hai-yan; Wang, Jing; Liu, Heng-chuan; Sun, Xiao-hong; Yang, Yu; Hu, Kong-xin; Shan, Lin-jun

    2009-10-01

    To develop a fast, high-throughput screening method with suspension array technique for simultaneous detection of biothreat bacteria. 16 S rDNA universal primers for Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Brucella spp.and Burkholderia pseudomallei were selected to amplify corresponding regions and the genus-specific or species-specific probes were designed. After amplification of chromosomal DNA by 16 S rDNA primers 341A and 519B, the PCR products were detected by suspension array technique. The sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility and detection power were also analyzed. After PCR amplification by 16 S rDNA primers and specific probe hybridization, the target microorganisms could be identified at genus level, cross reaction was recognized in the same genus. The detection sensitivity of the assay was 1.5 pg/microl (Burkholderia pseudomallei), 20 pg/microl (Brucella spp.), 7 pg/microl (Bacillus anthracis), 0.1 pg/microl (Francisella tularensis), and 1.1 pg/microl (Yersinia pestis), respectively. The coefficient of variation for 15 test of different probes was ranged from 5.18% to 17.88%, it showed good reproducibility. The assay could correctly identify Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis strains in simulated white powder samples. The suspension array technique could be served as an opening screening method for biothreat bacteria rapid detection.

  10. Detection of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni by PCR using primers based on DNA sequences related to the hrp genes.

    PubMed

    Park, So Yeon; Lee, Young Sun; Koh, Young Jin; Hur, Jae-Sun; Jung, Jae Sung

    2010-10-01

    Efficient control of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni, the causal agent of bacterial spot on stone fruit, requires a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool. A PCR detection method that utilizes primers to target the hrp gene cluster region was developed in this study. The nucleotide sequence of the PCR product amplified with primers specific for the hrp region of the xanthomonads and genomic DNA of X. arboricola pv. pruni was determined, and the sequence was aligned with that of X. campestris pv. campestris, which was obtained from the GenBank database. On the basis of the sequence of the amplified hrp region, a PCR primer set of XapF/R specific to X. arboricola pv. pruni was designed. This primer set yielded a 243-bp product from the genomic DNA of X. aboricola pv. pruni strains, but no products from other 21 strains of Xanthomonas or from two epiphytic bacterial species. Southern blot hybridization with the probe derived from the PCR product with the primer set and X. aboricola pv. pruni DNA confirmed the PCR results. The Xap primer system was successfully applied to detect the pathogen from infected peach fruits. When it was applied in field samples, the primer set was proved as a reliable diagnostic tool for specific detection of X. aboricola pv. pruni from peach orchards.

  11. Partial molecular cloning of the JHK retrovirus using gammaretrovirus consensus PCR primers

    PubMed Central

    Halligan, Brian D; Sun, Hai-Yuan; Kushnaryov, Vladimir M; Grossberg, Sidney E

    2013-01-01

    The JHK virus (JHKV) was previously described as a type C retrovirus that has some distinctive ultrastructural features and replicates constitutively in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, JHK-3. In order to facilitate the cloning of sequences from JHKV, a series of partially degenerate consensus retroviral PCR primers were created by a data-driven design approach based on an alignment of 14 diverse gammaretroviral genomes. These primers were used in the PCR amplification of purified JHK virion cDNA, and ana lysis of the resulting amplified sequence indicates that the JHKV is in the murine leukemia virus (MLV) family. The JHK sequence is nearly identical to the corresponding region of the Bxv-1 endogenous mouse retrovirus (GenBank accession AC115959) and distinct from XMRV. JHKV gag-specific amplification was demonstrated with nucleic acids from uncultivated, frozen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the index patient, but not in PBMCs from nine healthy blood donors. Unlike earlier reports, in which MLV-like sequences were identified in human source material, which may have been due to murine contamination, budding retrovirions were demonstrated repeatedly by electron microscopy in uncultivated lymphocytes of the index patient that were morphologically identical in their development to the virions in the JHK-3 cells, and immunological evidence was obtained that the index patient produced IgG antibodies that bound to the budding viral particles in patient PBMCs and in the JHK-3 cells. These data indicate that the patient had been infected by JHKV, lending significance to the demonstration of JHKV amplicons in nucleic acids of the patient’s PBMCs. In future studies, the PCR primer sets described herein may expand the detection of an amplifiable subset of viruses related to MLV. PMID:24159361

  12. A novel photoinduced electron transfer (PET) primer technique for rapid real-time PCR detection of Cryptosporidium spp

    SciTech Connect

    Jothikumar, N. Hill, Vincent R.

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Uses a single-labeled fluorescent primer for real-time PCR. •The detection sensitivity of PET PCR was comparable to TaqMan PCR. •Melt curve analysis can be performed to confirm target amplicon production. •Conventional PCR primers can be converted to PET PCR primers. -- Abstract: We report the development of a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide primer that can be used to monitor real-time PCR. The primer has two parts, the 3′-end of the primer is complimentary to the target and a universal 17-mer stem loop at the 5′-end forms a hairpin structure. A fluorescent dye is attached to 5′-end of either the forward or reverse primer. The presence of guanosine residues at the first and second position of the 3′ dangling end effectively quenches the fluorescence due to the photo electron transfer (PET) mechanism. During the synthesis of nucleic acid, the hairpin structure is linearized and the fluorescence of the incorporated primer increases several-fold due to release of the fluorescently labeled tail and the absence of guanosine quenching. As amplicons are synthesized during nucleic acid amplification, the fluorescence increase in the reaction mixture can be measured with commercially available real-time PCR instruments. In addition, a melting procedure can be performed to denature the double-stranded amplicons, thereby generating fluorescence peaks that can differentiate primer dimers and other non-specific amplicons if formed during the reaction. We demonstrated the application of PET-PCR for the rapid detection and quantification of Cryptosporidium parvum DNA. Comparison with a previously published TaqMan® assay demonstrated that the two real-time PCR assays exhibited similar sensitivity for a dynamic range of detection of 6000–0.6 oocysts per reaction. PET PCR primers are simple to design and less-expensive than dual-labeled probe PCR methods, and should be of interest for use by laboratories operating in resource

  13. Use of degenerate primers and touchdown PCR to amplify a halogenase gene fragment from Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230.

    PubMed

    Piraee, M; Vining, Leo C

    2002-07-01

    Consensus amino acid sequences of FADH(2)-dependent bacterial halogenases were used to design PCR primers amplifying a halogenase gene fragment from the chloramphenicol producer Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230. The sequence-specific degenerate primers (MPF1 and MPR2) were used with a touchdown PCR procedure in the first PCR-assisted cloning of a halogenase gene fragment. In the region of the 290-bp PCR product containing the reverse primer, the deduced amino acid sequence exhibited characteristics of a beta-alpha-beta fold present in FAD-binding sites of certain monooxygenases. When used to probe Southern blots of restriction-enzyme-digested DNA, the [alpha-(32)P]dCTP-labeled PCR product hybridized specifically with DNA fragments from genomic DNA of S. venezuelae ISP5230. Primers MPF1 and MPR2 also allowed amplification by PCR of approximately 290-bp DNA fragments from several other streptomycetes. The fragments from Streptomyces aureofaciens NRRL2209 and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) showed sequence identity with halogenase genes from these species. Thus, the PCR primers are of potential value for amplification and subsequent isolation of actinomycete halogenase genes.

  14. An improved DNA marker technique for genetic characterization using RAMP-PCR with high-GC primers.

    PubMed

    Wei, C L; Cheng, J L; Khan, M A; Yang, L Q; Imani, S; Chen, H C; Fu, J J

    2016-09-16

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) is a widely used molecular marker technique. As traditional RAPD has poor reproducibility and productivity, we previously developed an improved RAPD method (termed RAMP-PCR), which increased the reproducibility, number of bands, and efficiency of studies on polymorphism. To further develop the efficiency of this method, we used high-GC content primers for improved RAMP-PCR with DNA samples from Lonicera japonica. Comparison of amplification profiles obtained by standard RAPD primers with those obtained by regular PCR and RAMP-PCR, and high-GC primers with regular PCR and RAMP-PCR showed that the average number of bands and polymorphisms per primer gradually and significantly increased (from 6.4 to 15.0 and from 4.6 to 10.2, respectively). Cluster dendrograms showed similar results, indicating that this new method is consistent and reproducible. A total of 22 samples from different species, including plants, animals, and humans, were used for RAMP-PCR with high-GC primers. Multiple bands were successfully amplified from all samples, demonstrating that this method is a reliable technique with consistent results and may be of general interest in studies on different genera and species. We developed highly effective DNA markers, which can provide a more effective and potentially valuable approach than traditional RAPD for the genetic identification of various organisms, particularly of medicinal plants.

  15. Evaluation of primers and PCR performance on HPV DNA screening in normal and low grade abnormal cervical cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongkot, Arkom; Pientong, Chamsai; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Thinkhamrop, Jadsada; Yuenyao, Pissamai; Sriamporn, Supannee

    2007-01-01

    High risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are associated with increased risk of normal cervical cells developing to dysplasia and cervical carcinoma. Therefore, HR-HPV DNA testing can predict an endpoint of cervical carcinogenesis that is earlier than the development of cervical abnormalities. Not only the sensitivity of methods but also the amount of HPV DNA are very important and might be parameters to distinguish HPV detection. In this study, we evaluated the effects of primer sets and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performance with low viral load samples with normal cervical cytology (140 samples) and mild dysplasia (140 samples) using two consensus primers MY09/MY11 and GP5+/6+. The PCR was performed with single and nested PCR. Positive samples with both primer sets were then HPV genotyped by dot blot hybridization. Results showed higher sensitivity of single PCR using primer GP5+/GP6+ than primer MY09/MY11. HPV DNA was detected in 15% (21 of 140)and 20.7% (29 of 140) of normal cervical samples, respectively. For mild dysplasia samples, HPV DNA was detected in 37.1% (52 of 140) with MY09/MY11 and 50% (70 of 140) using GP5+/GP6+. In normal cervical samples, the positivity rate was increased to 38.5% (54 of 140) by nested PCR using primer GP5+/6+, but only 2 mild dysplasia samples that were negative by single GP5+/6+ were positive by auto-nested PCR. These results suggested that, in low viral load samples, the sensitivity of HPV DNA detection depends not only on primer sets but also PCR performance. HPV 16 was the most common in mild dysplasia samples (20.8%), whereas HPV type 58 was found in 11.1%. This study suggested that nested PCR might be necessary for HPV DNA detection in cervical samples of women participating in cervical cancer screening.

  16. Barcoding the kingdom Plantae: new PCR primers for ITS regions of plants with improved universality and specificity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Xu, Chao; Lei, Li; Li, Changhao; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Shiliang

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA is one of the most commonly used DNA markers in plant phylogenetic and DNA barcoding analyses, and it has been recommended as a core plant DNA barcode. Despite this popularity, the universality and specificity of PCR primers for the ITS region are not satisfactory, resulting in amplification and sequencing difficulties. By thoroughly surveying and analysing the 18S, 5.8S and 26S sequences of Plantae and Fungi from GenBank, we designed new universal and plant-specific PCR primers for amplifying the whole ITS region and a part of it (ITS1 or ITS2) of plants. In silico analyses of the new and the existing ITS primers based on these highly representative data sets indicated that (i) the newly designed universal primers are suitable for over 95% of plants in most groups; and (ii) the plant-specific primers are suitable for over 85% of plants in most groups without amplification of fungi. A total of 335 samples from 219 angiosperm families, 11 gymnosperm families, 24 fern and lycophyte families, 16 moss families and 17 fungus families were used to test the performances of these primers. In vitro PCR produced similar results to those from the in silico analyses. Our new primer pairs gave PCR improvements up to 30% compared with common-used ones. The new universal ITS primers will find wide application in both plant and fungal biology, and the new plant-specific ITS primers will, by eliminating PCR amplification of nonplant templates, significantly improve the quality of ITS sequence information collections in plant molecular systematics and DNA barcoding.

  17. PCR differentiation of commercial yeast strains using intron splice site primers.

    PubMed Central

    de Barros Lopes, M; Soden, A; Henschke, P A; Langridge, P

    1996-01-01

    The increased use of pure starter cultures in the wine industry has made it necessary to develop a rapid and simple identification system for yeast strains. A method based upon the PCR using oligonucleotide primers that are complementary to intron splice sites has been developed. Since most introns are not essential for gene function, introns have evolved with minimal constraint. By targeting these highly variable sequences, the PCR has proved to be very effective in uncovering polymorphisms in commercial yeast strains. The speed of the method and the ability to analyze many samples in a single day permit the monitoring of specific yeast strains during fermentations. Furthermore, the simplicity of the technique, which does not require the isolation of DNA, makes it accessible to industrial laboratories that have limited molecular expertise and resources. PMID:8953723

  18. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening PCR adapted to locally emerging variants-Evaluation of novel SCCmec primers.

    PubMed

    Herma, Miriam; Petersdorf, Sabine; Henrich, Birgit

    2017-06-01

    Infections with multi-resistant bacteria, such as Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), represent a world-wide health-care problem. The original MRSA Screening TaqMan PCR was based on the detection of the SCCmec-orfX-junction as described by the group of Huletsky in 2004. In the recent years, this assay increasingly failed to detect new MRSA variants in swab specimens. In this work, we analyzed the usefulness of 17 additional SCCmec primers to increase PCR sensitivity by testing 290 collected samples with negative PCR results and positive MRSA culture in a retrospective analysis, and 380 samples of the daily routine diagnostics. Sequencing of the PCR products revealed that locally new MRSA variants became detectable by nine of these forward primers. Four primers were solely responsible for the detection of 85.4% (117/123) of the PCR products: F13 (n=76), F11 (n=6), F14 (n=15) and F25 (n=8). These four primers were integrated in the Screening PCR and the novel primer collection was validated by testing 71 MRSA isolates, which covered SCCmec types I to VI, 50 MSSA isolates and 100 swab specimens. The sensitivity of MRSA Screening PCR increased from 93% to 98.6% without affecting the detection of the common MRSA strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the PCR products suggests that the adapted MRSA Screening PCR is able to detect SCCmec types I-X, including CA- and LA-MRSA variants by the SCCmec primers F11 and F25. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of Different Primers for Detection of Brucella by Using PCR Method

    PubMed Central

    Moulana, Zahra; Roushan, Mohammad Reza Hasanjani; Marashi, Seyed Mahmoud Amin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonosis and a significant cause of loss of health in humans and animals. Traditionally, classic diagnosis is carried out by isolation of Brucella, which is time-consuming, technically challenging and potentially dangerous. The aim of this study was to expand a molecular test that would be used for the develop detection of Brucella in a single reaction with high sensitivity and specificity, by targeting IS711element. Methods This study was carried out from 2015 to 2016 at the Ayatolla Rohani hospital in Babol, Iran. The present study was designed to develop PCR assay, based on IS711 gene for rapid diagnosis of Brucella spp. and immediate detection of Brucella, with high sensitivity and specificity. Four pairs of oligo-nucleotide primers with sizes of 547, 403, 291 and 127bp respectively, were planned to exclusively amplify the targeted genes of Brucella species. Results Our results show that, five PCR primers set up, would be helpful in amplifying the DNAs from the genus Brucella with high specificity and sensitivity so it can be 12 fg, for Brucella species to provide a valuable tool for diagnosis. Conclusion This method can be more useful than serological and biochemical tests and in addition, this reduces the number of required tests more rapidly and economically. PMID:28070255

  20. Development of primers and probes for detection of citrus "Candidatus Liberibacter species" by real-time PCR

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening is the most threatening bacterial disease of Citrus spp. Three uncultured Candidatus Liberibacter spp. are usually detected by conventional PCR or real-time PCR using species specific primers and probes based on the 16S rRNA gene. Recent molecular analy...

  1. Comparative assessment of 5' A/T-rich overhang sequences with optimal and sub-optimal primers to increase PCR yields and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Arif, M; Ochoa-Corona, F M

    2013-09-01

    Efficient PCR amplifications require precisely designed and optimized oligonucleotide primers, components, and cycling conditions. Despite recent software development and reaction improvement, primer design can still be enhanced. The aims of this research are to understand (1) the effect on PCR efficiency and DNA yields of primer thermodynamics parameters, and (2) the incorporation of 5' A/T-rich overhanging sequences (flaps) during primer design. Two primer sets, one optimal (ΔG = 0) and one sub-optimal (ΔG = 0.9), were designed using web interface software Primer3, BLASTn, and mFold to target a movement protein gene of Tobacco mosaic virus. The optimal primer set amplifies a product of 195 bp and supports higher PCR sensitivity and yields compared to the sub-optimal primer set, which amplifies a product of 192 bp. Greater fluorescence was obtained using optimal primers compared to that with sub-optimal primers. Primers designed with sub-optimal thermodynamics can be substantially improved by adding 5' flaps. Results indicate that even if the performance of some primers can be improved substantially by 5' flap addition, not all primers will be similarly improved. Optimal 5' flap sequences are dependent on the primer sequences, and alter the primer's T m value. The manipulation of this feature may enhance primer's efficiency to increase the PCR sensitivity and DNA yield.

  2. Validation and Application of a PCR Primer Set to Quantify Fungal Communities in the Soil Environment by Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré, Nicolas; Christen, Richard; Dequiedt, Samuel; Mougel, Christophe; Lelièvre, Mélanie; Jolivet, Claudy; Shahbazkia, Hamid Reza; Guillou, Laure; Arrouays, Dominique; Ranjard, Lionel

    2011-01-01

    Fungi constitute an important group in soil biological diversity and functioning. However, characterization and knowledge of fungal communities is hampered because few primer sets are available to quantify fungal abundance by real-time quantitative PCR (real-time Q-PCR). The aim in this study was to quantify fungal abundance in soils by incorporating, into a real-time Q-PCR using the SYBRGreen® method, a primer set already used to study the genetic structure of soil fungal communities. To satisfy the real-time Q-PCR requirements to enhance the accuracy and reproducibility of the detection technique, this study focused on the 18S rRNA gene conserved regions. These regions are little affected by length polymorphism and may provide sufficiently small targets, a crucial criterion for enhancing accuracy and reproducibility of the detection technique. An in silico analysis of 33 primer sets targeting the 18S rRNA gene was performed to select the primer set with the best potential for real-time Q-PCR: short amplicon length; good fungal specificity and coverage. The best consensus between specificity, coverage and amplicon length among the 33 sets tested was the primer set FR1 / FF390. This in silico analysis of the specificity of FR1 / FF390 also provided additional information to the previously published analysis on this primer set. The specificity of the primer set FR1 / FF390 for Fungi was validated in vitro by cloning - sequencing the amplicons obtained from a real time Q-PCR assay performed on five independent soil samples. This assay was also used to evaluate the sensitivity and reproducibility of the method. Finally, fungal abundance in samples from 24 soils with contrasting physico-chemical and environmental characteristics was examined and ranked to determine the importance of soil texture, organic carbon content, C∶N ratio and land use in determining fungal abundance in soils. PMID:21931659

  3. Use of Chimeric DNA-RNA Primers in Quantitative PCR for Detection of Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Ofer; Baneth, Gad; Eyal, Osnat; Inbar, Jacob; Harrus, Shimon

    2009-01-01

    To overcome the problem of nonspecific by-products in quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, we constructed DNA-RNA chimeric primers and evaluated their use in the detection and quantification of the Ehrlichia canis 16S rRNA, Babesia canis Hsp70, and canine β-actin genes. Several RNA bases were incorporated into specific positions in the DNA primers, while no RNA stretches were allowed. qPCR reactions were carried out without preamplification steps. This resulted in decreased formation of undesirable by-products and a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. PMID:19633128

  4. Fusion primer and nested integrated PCR (FPNI-PCR): a new high-efficiency strategy for rapid chromosome walking or flanking sequence cloning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The advent of genomics-based technologies has revolutionized many fields of biological enquiry. However, chromosome walking or flanking sequence cloning is still a necessary and important procedure to determining gene structure. Such methods are used to identify T-DNA insertion sites and so are especially relevant for organisms where large T-DNA insertion libraries have been created, such as rice and Arabidopsis. The currently available methods for flanking sequence cloning, including the popular TAIL-PCR technique, are relatively laborious and slow. Results Here, we report a simple and effective fusion primer and nested integrated PCR method (FPNI-PCR) for the identification and cloning of unknown genomic regions flanked known sequences. In brief, a set of universal primers was designed that consisted of various 15-16 base arbitrary degenerate oligonucleotides. These arbitrary degenerate primers were fused to the 3' end of an adaptor oligonucleotide which provided a known sequence without degenerate nucleotides, thereby forming the fusion primers (FPs). These fusion primers are employed in the first step of an integrated nested PCR strategy which defines the overall FPNI-PCR protocol. In order to demonstrate the efficacy of this novel strategy, we have successfully used it to isolate multiple genomic sequences namely, 21 orthologs of genes in various species of Rosaceace, 4 MYB genes of Rosa rugosa, 3 promoters of transcription factors of Petunia hybrida, and 4 flanking sequences of T-DNA insertion sites in transgenic tobacco lines and 6 specific genes from sequenced genome of rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusions The successful amplification of target products through FPNI-PCR verified that this novel strategy is an effective, low cost and simple procedure. Furthermore, FPNI-PCR represents a more sensitive, rapid and accurate technique than the established TAIL-PCR and hiTAIL-PCR procedures. PMID:22093809

  5. A Novel Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization for Improved Mutagenic Primer Design in Mismatch PCR-RFLP SNP Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for complex genetic diseases are genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in small-scale basic research studies. It is an essential work to design feasible PCR-RFLP primer pair and find out available restriction enzymes to recognize the target SNP for PCR experiments. However, many SNPs are incapable of performing PCR-RFLP makes SNP genotyping become unpractical. A genetic algorithm (GA) had been proposed for designing mutagenic primer and get available restriction enzymes, but it gives an unrefined solution in mutagenic primers. In order to improve the mutagenic primer design, we propose TLBOMPD (TLBO-based Mutagenic Primer Design) a novel computational intelligence-based method that uses the notion of "teaching and learning" to search for more feasible mutagenic primers and provide the latest available restriction enzymes. The original Wallace's formula for the calculation of melting temperature is maintained, and more accurate calculation formulas of GC-based melting temperature and thermodynamic melting temperature are introduced into the proposed method. Mutagenic matrix is also reserved to increase the efficiency of judging a hypothetical mutagenic primer if involve available restriction enzymes for recognizing the target SNP. Furthermore, the core of SNP-RFLPing version 2 is used to enhance the mining work for restriction enzymes based on the latest REBASE. Twenty-five SNPs with mismatch PCR-RFLP screened from 288 SNPs in human SLC6A4 gene are used to appraise the TLBOMPD. Also, the computational results are compared with those of the GAMPD. In the future, the usage of the mutagenic primers in the wet lab needs to been validated carefully to increase the reliability of the method. The TLBOMPD is implemented in JAVA and it is freely available at http://tlbompd.googlecode.com/.

  6. Development of strain-specific PCR primers for quantitative detection of Bacillus mesentericus strain TO-A in human feces.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki; Seo, Genichiro; Benno, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Strain-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for detection of Bacillus mesentericus strain TO-A (BM TO-A) were developed. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used to produce potential strain-specific markers. A 991-bp RAPD marker found to be strain-specific was sequenced, and two primer pairs specific to BM TO-A were constructed based on this sequence. In addition, we explored a more specific DNA region using inverse PCR, and designed a strain-specific primer set for use in real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). These primer pairs were tested against 25 Bacillus subtilis strains and were found to be strain-specific. After examination of the detection limit and linearity of detection of BM TO-A in feces, the qPCR method and strain-specific primers were used to quantify BM TO-A in the feces of healthy volunteers who had ingested 3×10(8) colony forming unit (CFU) of BM TO-A per day in tablets. During the administration period, BM TO-A was detected in the feces of all 24 subjects, and the average number of BM TO-A detected using the culture method and qPCR was about 10(4.8) and 10(5.8) cells per gram of feces, respectively. Using the qPCR method, BM TO-A was detected in the feces of half of the subjects 3 d after withdrawal, and was detected in the feces of only one subject 1 week after withdrawal. These results suggest that the qPCR method using BM TO-A strain-specific primers is useful for the quantitative detection of this strain in feces.

  7. A novel photoinduced electron transfer (PET) primer technique for rapid real-time PCR detection of Cryptosporidium spp.

    PubMed

    Jothikumar, N; Hill, Vincent R

    2013-06-28

    We report the development of a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide primer that can be used to monitor real-time PCR. The primer has two parts, the 3'-end of the primer is complimentary to the target and a universal 17-mer stem loop at the 5'-end forms a hairpin structure. A fluorescent dye is attached to 5'-end of either the forward or reverse primer. The presence of guanosine residues at the first and second position of the 3' dangling end effectively quenches the fluorescence due to the photo electron transfer (PET) mechanism. During the synthesis of nucleic acid, the hairpin structure is linearized and the fluorescence of the incorporated primer increases several-fold due to release of the fluorescently labeled tail and the absence of guanosine quenching. As amplicons are synthesized during nucleic acid amplification, the fluorescence increase in the reaction mixture can be measured with commercially available real-time PCR instruments. In addition, a melting procedure can be performed to denature the double-stranded amplicons, thereby generating fluorescence peaks that can differentiate primer dimers and other non-specific amplicons if formed during the reaction. We demonstrated the application of PET-PCR for the rapid detection and quantification of Cryptosporidium parvum DNA. Comparison with a previously published TaqMan® assay demonstrated that the two real-time PCR assays exhibited similar sensitivity for a dynamic range of detection of 6000-0.6 oocysts per reaction. PET PCR primers are simple to design and less-expensive than dual-labeled probe PCR methods, and should be of interest for use by laboratories operating in resource-limited environments. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. LSSP-PCR of Trypanosoma cruzi: how the single primer sequence affects the kDNA signature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low-stringency single specific primer PCR (LSSP-PCR) is a highly sensitive and discriminating technique that has been extensively used to genetically characterize Trypanosoma cruzi populations in the presence of large amounts of host DNA. To ensure high sensitivity, in most T. cruzi studies, the variable regions of the naturally amplified kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircles were targeted, and this method translated the intraspecific polymorphisms of these molecules into specific and reproducible kDNA signatures. Although the LSSP-PCR technique is reproducible under strict assay conditions, the complex banding pattern generated can be significantly altered by even a single-base change in the target DNA. Our survey of the literature identified eight different primers with similar, if not identical, names that have been used for kDNA amplification and LSSP-PCR of T. cruzi. Although different primer sequences were used in these studies, many of the authors cited the same reference report to justify their primer choice. We wondered whether these changes in the primer sequence could affect also the parasite LSSP-PCR profiles. Findings To answer this question we compared the kDNA signatures obtained from three different and extensively studied T. cruzi populations with the eight primers found in the literature. Our results clearly demonstrate that even minimal modifications in the oligonucleotide sequences, especially in the 3′ or 5′ end, can significantly change the kDNA signature of a T. cruzi strain. Conclusions These results highlight the necessity of careful preservation of primer nomenclature and sequence when reproducing an LSSP-PCR work to avoid confusion and allow comparison of results among different laboratories. PMID:23639061

  9. New PCR primers targeting hydrazine synthase and cytochrome c biogenesis proteins in anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhichao; Chen, Jing; Meng, Han; Dvornyk, Volodymyr; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2017-02-01

    PCR primers targeting genes encoding the two proteins of anammox bacteria, hydrazine synthase and cytochrome c biogenesis protein, were designed and tested in this study. Three different ecotypes of samples, namely ocean sediments, coastal wetland sediments, and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) samples, were used to assess the primer efficiency and the community structures of anammox bacteria retrieved by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the functional genes. Abundances of hzsB gene of anammox bacteria in South China Sea (SCS) samples were significantly correlated with 16S rRNA gene by qPCR method. And hzsB and hzsC gene primer pair hzsB364f-hzsB640r and hzsC745f-hzsC862r in combination with anammox bacterial 16S rRNA gene primers were recommended for quantifying anammox bacteria. Congruent with 16S rRNA gene-based community study, functional gene hzsB could also delineate the coastal-ocean distributing pattern, and seawater depth was positively associated with the diversity and abundance of anammox bacteria from shallow- to deep-sea. Both hzsC and ccsA genes could differentiate marine samples between deep and shallow groups of the Scalindua sp. clades. As for WWTP samples, non-Scalindua anammox bacteria reflected by hzsB, hzsC, ccsA, and ccsB gene-based libraries showed a similar distribution pattern with that by 16S rRNA gene. NH4(+) and NH4(+)/Σ(NO3(-) + NO2(-)) positively correlated with anammox bacteria gene diversity, but organic matter contents correlated negatively with anammox bacteria gene diversity in SCS. Salinity was positively associated with diversity indices of hzsC and ccsB gene-harboring anammox bacteria communities and could potentially differentiate the distribution patterns between shallow- and deep-sea sediment samples. SCS surface sediments harbored considerably diverse community of Scalindua. A new Mai Po clade representing coastal estuary wetland anammox bacteria group based on 16S rRNA gene phylogeny is proposed. Existence of anammox

  10. PCR bias associated with conserved primer binding sites, used to determine genotype diversity within Citrus tristeza virus populations.

    PubMed

    Read, David Alan; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2016-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is present in almost all of the major citrus production areas where it continues to reduce the profitability of citriculture. The accurate characterisation of CTV populations, which are usually made up of a number of disparate strains, requires the use of robust PCR protocols. Mismatches between primers and their corresponding binding sites may introduce primer-associated bias during amplification. The primer-associated bias of four sets of CTV specific primers, targeting the A and F regions and the p33 and p23 genes, were evaluated. This was done through the amplification of defined templates followed by their characterisation using the sequencing of multiple clones, as well as Illumina next generation sequencing. High levels of bias were found to be associated with the primer pairs targeting the A and F regions. The p33 gene primers were found to be biased against two genotypes and suggestions for preventing this apparent bias are discussed. The primer pair targeting the conserved p23 gene was found to have very little associated bias. Primers should undergo rigorous screening before being used to characterize virus populations that are known to exhibit high levels of variation, especially within primer binding sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of Mycobacterium bovis in bovine clinical samples by PCR species-specific primers.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, R E; Garzón, D L; Mejía, G A; Monroy, W; Patarroyo, M E; Murillo, L A

    1999-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis is emerging as the most important disease affecting cattle. Furthermore, it results in a major public health problem when transmitted to humans. Due to its difficult and non-specific diagnosis, M. bovis has been declared to be one of the etiologic agents causing significant economic loss in the cattle industry. Our group evaluated a more rapid and specific method, based on a new polymerase chain reaction species-specific primers, which amplifies a 470-base pair fragment of the M. bovis genome. A total of 275 milk-producing cows were studied by intradermal tuberculin test (ITT) which gave 184 positive and 91 negative cases. From them, 50 animals were taken from a cattle ranch free of tuberculosis. Three different samples were collected from each animal (blood, nasal mucus, and milk). Positive results were obtained from 26 animals by PCR (11.4%), 1 by bacteriological culturing (0.4%) and 1 by bacilloscopy (0.4%). This finding suggests, as in previous reports, that ITT, normally used for bovine tuberculosis detection, has the inconvenience of having a broad range of specificity and sensitivity, and the PCR technique is a more specific and sensitive test to detect infection associated with M. bovis. Therefore, we propose this PCR assay as a useful tool in the epidemiological characterization of infected animals in areas considered to be at high risk of transmission. Images Figure 1. PMID:10369566

  12. General phytoplasma detection by a q-PCR method using mycoplasma primers.

    PubMed

    Satta, Eleonora; Nanni, Irene M; Contaldo, Nicoletta; Collina, Marina; Poveda, José B; Ramírez, Ana S; Bertaccini, Assunta

    2017-10-01

    Phytoplasmas and mycoplasmas are bacteria belonging to the class Mollicutes. In this study, a fine tuning of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) with a universal mycoplasma primer pair (GPO3F/MGSO) targeting the 16S rRNA gene was carried out on phytoplasmas. The dissociation curves of DNAs from Catharanthus roseus phytoplasma-infected micropropagated shoots and from phytoplasma field-infected plant samples showed a single peak at 82.5 °C (±0.5) specifically detecting phytoplasmas belonging to several ribosomal groups. Assay specificity was determined with DNA of selected bacteria: 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', Xylella fastidiosa, Ralstonia solanacearum and Clavibacter michiganensis. No amplification curves were observed with any of these tested bacteria except 'Ca. L. solanacearum' that was amplified with a melting temperature at 85 °C. Absolute quantification of phytoplasma titer was calculated using standard curves prepared from serial dilutions of plasmids containing the cloned fragment GPO3F/MGSO from European stone fruit yellows phytoplasma. Phytoplasma copy number ranged from 10(6) to 10(3) according with the sample. The sensitivity evaluated comparing plasmid serial dilutions resulted 10(-6) for conventional PCR and 10(-7) for qPCR. The latter method resulted therefore able to detect very low concentrations of phytoplasma in plant material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the nucleotide sequences of a DNA probe Pig27.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Hwang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Jae-Yoon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the P. intermedia-specific DNA probe. The P. intermedia-specific DNA probe was screened by inverted dot blot hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. The nucleotide sequences of the species-specific DNA probes were determined using a chain termination method. Southern blot analysis showed that the DNA probe, Pig27, detected only the genomic DNA of P. intermedia strains. PCR showed that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, had species-specificity for P. intermedia. The detection limits of the PCR primer sets were 0.4pg of the purified genomic DNA of P. intermedia ATCC 49046. These results suggest that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as in the development of a PCR kit in epidemiological studies related to periodontal diseases.

  14. A set of conserved PCR primers for the analysis of simple sequence repeat polymorphisms in chloroplast genomes of dicotyledonous angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Weising, K; Gardner, R C

    1999-02-01

    Short runs of mononucleotide repeats are present in chloroplast genomes of higher plants. In soybean, rice, and pine, PCR (polymerase chain reaction) with flanking primers has shown that the numbers of A or T residues in such repeats are variable among closely related taxa. Here we describe a set of primers for studying mononucleotide repeat variation in chloroplast DNA of angiosperms where database information is limited. A total of 39 (A)n and (T)n repeats (n > or = 10) were identified in the tobacco chloroplast genome, and DNA sequences encompassing these 39 regions were aligned with orthologous DNA sequences in the databases. Consensus primer pairs were constructed and used to amplify total genomic DNA from a hierarchical set of angiosperms. All 10 primer pairs generated PCR products from members of the Solanaceae, and 8 of the 10 were also functional in most other angiosperm species. Levels of interspecific polymorphism within the genera Nicotiana, Lycopersicon (both Solanaceae), and Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) proved to be high, while intraspecific variation in Nicotiana tabacum, Lycopersicon esculentum, and Actinidia chinensis was limited. Sequence analysis of PCR products from three primer pairs revealed variable numbers of A, G, and T residues in mononucleotide arrays as the major cause of polymorphism in Actinidia. Our results suggest that universal primers targeted to mononucleotide repeats may serve as general tools to study chloroplast variation in angiosperms.

  15. Exploration of Deinococcus-Thermus molecular diversity by novel group-specific PCR primers

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas; Bachar, Dipankar; Christen, Richard; Alain, Karine; Chapon, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    The deeply branching Deinococcus-Thermus lineage is recognized as one of the most extremophilic phylum of bacteria. In previous studies, the presence of Deinococcus-related bacteria in the hot arid Tunisian desert of Tataouine was demonstrated through combined molecular and culture-based approaches. Similarly, Thermus-related bacteria have been detected in Tunisian geothermal springs. The present work was conducted to explore the molecular diversity within the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum in these extreme environments. A set of specific primers was designed in silico on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, validated for the specific detection of reference strains, and used for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of metagenomic DNA retrieved from the Tataouine desert sand and Tunisian hot spring water samples. These analyses have revealed the presence of previously undescribed Deinococcus-Thermus bacterial sequences within these extreme environments. The primers designed in this study thus represent a powerful tool for the rapid detection of Deinococcus-Thermus in environmental samples and could also be applicable to clarify the biogeography of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum. PMID:23996915

  16. Environmental distribution of two widespread uncultured freshwater Euryarchaeota clades unveiled by specific primers and quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Ortiz, Claudia X; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative environmental distribution of two widely distributed uncultured freshwater Euryarchaeota with unknown functional role was explored by newly designed quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of clades Miscellaneous Euryarchaeota Group (MEG, containing the groups pMC2A384 and VALII/Eury4) and Deep-Sea Euryarchaeotal Groups (DSEG, targeting the cluster named VALIII containing the DHVE-3/DSEG, BC07-2A-27/DSEG-3 and DSEG-2 groups), respectively. The summer surface plankton of 28 lakes was analysed, and one additional dimictic deep alpine lake, Lake Redon, was temporally and vertically surveyed covering seasonal limnological variability. A trophic range between 0.2 and 5.2 μg l(-1) Chl a, and pH span from 3.8 to 9.5 was explored at altitudes between 632 and 2590 m above sea level. The primers showed to be highly selective with c. 85% coverage and 100% specificity. Only pH significantly explained the changes observed in gene abundances and environment. In Lake Redon, DSEG bloomed in deep stratified waters both in summer and early spring, and MEG at intermediate depths during the ice-cover period. Overall, MEG and DSEG showed a differential ecological distribution although correlational analyses indicated lack of coupling of both Euryarchaeota with phytoplankton (chlorophyll a). However, an intriguing positive and significant relationship was found between DSEG and putative ammonia oxidizing thaumarchaeota.

  17. Determination of ABO genotypes by real-time PCR using allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Muro, Tomonori; Fujihara, Junko; Imamura, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Kimura-Kataoka, Kaori; Toga, Tomoko; Iida, Reiko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Takeshita, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    ABO grouping of biological specimens is informative for identifying victims and narrowing down suspects. In Japan and elsewhere, ABO grouping as well as DNA profiling plays an essential role in crime investigations. In the present study, we developed a new method for ABO genotyping using allele-specific primers and real-time PCR. The method allows for the detection of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nucleotide positions 261, 796, and 803 in the ABO gene and the determination of six major ABO genotypes. This method required less than 2 h for accurate ABO genotyping using 2.0 ng of DNA. This method could be applicable for rapid and simple screening of forensic samples.

  18. Primer design for identifying economically important Liriomyza species (Diptera: Agromyzidae) by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigeo; Masuda, Toshio; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Konishi, Kazuhiko; Tokumaru, Susumu; Ueno, Keiichiro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Leafminer flies, especially, Liriomyza huidobrensis, Liriomyza sativae and Liriomyza trifolii, are quarantine species in many countries. Their morphological similarity makes identification difficult. To develop a rapid, reliable, sensitive and simple molecular identification method using multiplex PCR, we newly sequenced the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes of Liriomyza bryoniae, Liriomyza chinensis, L. huidobrensis, L. sativae, L. trifolii, Chromatomyia horticola and four parasitoid species. We aligned them with all the COI sequences of the leafminer flies found in the international DNA nucleotide sequence databases (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank). We then designed species-specific primers to allow us to differentiate between L. bryoniae, L. chinensis, L. huidobrensis, L. sativae, and L. trifolii.

  19. Evaluation of combined general primer-mediated PCR sequencing and type-specific PCR strategies for determination of human papillomavirus genotypes in cervical cell specimens.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Véronique; Mascaux, Corinne; Weyn, Christine; Bernis, Aurore; Celio, Nathalie; Lefèvre, Philippe; Kaufman, Leonard; Garbar, Christian

    2007-03-01

    A strategy combining human papillomavirus general primer (mainly the PGMY primers)-directed PCR sequencing and type-specific PCR is presented. DNA samples were first tested in general primer-mediated PCR. The amplified fragments of positive samples after ethidium bromide-stained DNA gel analysis were further sequenced, and corresponding DNA samples were further analyzed by PCR using type-specific primers for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18, 31, and 52. The comparison of the results of 157 samples analyzed by this strategy in parallel with the Hybrid Capture 2 tests and with the HPV INNO-LiPA (Innogenetics line probe assay) shows that this method is suitable for HPV detection and genotyping in cervical cell samples. Although the PCR sequencing method is as sensitive as the HPV INNO-LiPA for HPV detection, our method allows the identification of a broader range of HPV types. In contrast, the HPV INNO-LiPA was less time-consuming and better identified coinfections.

  20. Evaluation of Combined General Primer-Mediated PCR Sequencing and Type-Specific PCR Strategies for Determination of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Cervical Cell Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Véronique; Mascaux, Corinne; Weyn, Christine; Bernis, Aurore; Celio, Nathalie; Lefèvre, Philippe; Kaufman, Leonard; Garbar, Christian

    2007-01-01

    A strategy combining human papillomavirus general primer (mainly the PGMY primers)-directed PCR sequencing and type-specific PCR is presented. DNA samples were first tested in general primer-mediated PCR. The amplified fragments of positive samples after ethidium bromide-stained DNA gel analysis were further sequenced, and corresponding DNA samples were further analyzed by PCR using type-specific primers for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18, 31, and 52. The comparison of the results of 157 samples analyzed by this strategy in parallel with the Hybrid Capture 2 tests and with the HPV INNO-LiPA (Innogenetics line probe assay) shows that this method is suitable for HPV detection and genotyping in cervical cell samples. Although the PCR sequencing method is as sensitive as the HPV INNO-LiPA for HPV detection, our method allows the identification of a broader range of HPV types. In contrast, the HPV INNO-LiPA was less time-consuming and better identified coinfections. PMID:17229855

  1. Controlled hot start and improved specificity in carrying out PCR utilizing touch-up and loop incorporated primers (TULIPS).

    PubMed

    Ailenberg, M; Silverman, M

    2000-11-01

    The PCR technique often yields nonspecific products. To overcome this problem, a simple, specific and efficient method was designed: touch-up and loop incorporated primers (TULIPS)-PCR. This approach utilizes loop primers (i.e., additional nontemplate 5' sequence that self-anneals to the 3' region and inhibits initiation of polymerization). Upon heating of the reaction, the primers melt, initiating hot start. The reaction also uses touch-up pre-cycling with gradual elevation in annealing temperatures to ensure correct pairing. The method has been validated with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) primers, and its general applicability is demonstrated by specific amplification of the human gelatinase A transgene from genomic DNA extracted from transgenic mice tails. The TULIPS-PCR protocol is a novel method. The self-annealing primers utilized in this method offer improved specificity and more robust synthesis compared with touch-down and manual hot start PCR. It is performed without the need to open, pause or add to the reaction mixture any nonrectant components, such as wax, antibody or nonspecific dsDNA.

  2. rDNA-targeted PCR primers and FISH probe in the detection of Ophiocordyceps sinensis hyphae and conidia.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Peng, Qingyun; Qi, Lili; Lei, Wei; Liu, Xin

    2010-11-01

    Ophiocordyceps sinensis (Berk.) Sung, Sung, Hywel-Jones & Spatafora (syn. Cordyceps sinensis) one of the entomopathogenic fungi, is a rare Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) found in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) methods are necessary to identify the mycelia or spores of O. sinensis from its habitat and to monitor its dispersal, colonization and infectivity. To develop both primers and probe specific to O. sinensis, ribosomal DNA (rDNA) amplified with universal primers from O. sinensis genomic DNA and seven closely related fungi were sequenced. According to these sequences, the upper and lower primers (OsT-F and OsT-R) were designed within internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) and ITS2 and flanked by universal primers ITS5 and ITS4, respectively. The designed primers were used for general PCR, touchdown PCR, or both together with the universal primers for nested-touchdown PCR. The results showed that only the extracted DNA of O. sinensis was specifically amplified. The sensitivity of nested-touchdown PCR with extracted DNA of O. sinensis is as low as 10(-14)g (10 fg) and at least 1000 times higher than the other PCR methods. In addition, Cy5-labeled probe (OsLSU) for cytoplasmic LSU rRNA was hybridized with the ascospores of O. sinensis. It showed a strong red fluorescence throughout the whole cell but did not cross-react with other entomopathogenic fungi. Taken together, these methods were useful for studying the biology and ecology of O. sinensis.

  3. [Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae(NG), Chlamydia trachomatis(CT) and Ureaplasma urealyticum(UU) by multiple primer PCR].

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Li, J; Chen, Y

    2000-04-01

    For the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae(NG), Chlamydia trachomat is(CT) and Ureaplasma urealyticum(UU) in urogenital infection in one specimen, multiple primer PCR was used in 156 sex transmitted disease patients, it was shown that in 156 specimens there were 40 NG positive and 31 CT positive and 27 UU positive, 10 NG + CT positive, 4 NG + UU positive, 3 CT + UU positive and 2 NG + CT + UU positive respectively. The results were in correspondence with each other. It is suggested that multiple primer PCR is a quick, sensitive, simple and specific technique which can be applied in clinical test.

  4. Comparison of primers for RAPD-PCR from environmental isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus albidus and Cryptococcus laurentii complex

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Pedroso, Reginaldo; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; da Costa, Karen Regina Carim; Candido, Regina Celia

    2012-01-01

    Various organisms have been characterized by molecular methods, including fungi of the genus Cryptococcus. The purposes of this study were: to determine the discriminatory potential of the RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) primers, the pattern of similarity of the Cryptococcus species, and discuss their useful application in epidemiological studies. We analyzed 10 isolates of each specie/group: C. albidus, C. laurentii complex, C. neoformans var. grubii, all from environmental source, and two ATCC strains, C. neoformans var. grubii ATCC 90112, and C. neoformans var. neoformans ATCC 28957 by RAPD-PCR using the primers CAV1, CAV2, ZAP19, ZAP20, OPB11 and SEQ6. The primers showed a good discriminatory power, revealing important differences between them and between species; the SEQ6 primer discriminated a larger number of isolates of three species. Isolates of C. laurentii showed greater genetic diversity than other species revealed by all six primers. Isolates of C. neoformans were more homogeneous. Only the primer CAV2 showed no amplification of DNA bands for C. albidus. It was concluded that the use of limited number of carefully selected primers allowed the discrimination of different isolates, and some primers (e.g., CAV2 for C. albidus) may not to be applied to some species. PMID:24031912

  5. Comparison of primers for RAPD-PCR from environmental isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus albidus and Cryptococcus laurentii complex.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Pedroso, Reginaldo; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; da Costa, Karen Regina Carim; Candido, Regina Celia

    2012-07-01

    Various organisms have been characterized by molecular methods, including fungi of the genus Cryptococcus. The purposes of this study were: to determine the discriminatory potential of the RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) primers, the pattern of similarity of the Cryptococcus species, and discuss their useful application in epidemiological studies. We analyzed 10 isolates of each specie/group: C. albidus, C. laurentii complex, C. neoformans var. grubii, all from environmental source, and two ATCC strains, C. neoformans var. grubii ATCC 90112, and C. neoformans var. neoformans ATCC 28957 by RAPD-PCR using the primers CAV1, CAV2, ZAP19, ZAP20, OPB11 and SEQ6. The primers showed a good discriminatory power, revealing important differences between them and between species; the SEQ6 primer discriminated a larger number of isolates of three species. Isolates of C. laurentii showed greater genetic diversity than other species revealed by all six primers. Isolates of C. neoformans were more homogeneous. Only the primer CAV2 showed no amplification of DNA bands for C. albidus. It was concluded that the use of limited number of carefully selected primers allowed the discrimination of different isolates, and some primers (e.g., CAV2 for C. albidus) may not to be applied to some species.

  6. Evaluation of new multiplex PCR primers for the identification ofPlasmodium species found in Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Stanis, Cheronie Shely; Song, Beng Kah; Chua, Tock Hing; Lau, Yee Ling; Jelip, Jenarun

    2016-01-05

    Malaria is a major public health problem, especially in the Southeast Asia region, caused by 5 species of Plasmodium (P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae, P. ovale, and P. knowlesi). The aim of this study was to compare parasite species identification methods using the new multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) against nested PCR and microscopy. Blood samples on filter papers were subject to conventional PCR methods using primers designed by us in multiplex PCR and previously designed primers of nested PCR. Both sets of results were compared with microscopic identification. Of the 129 samples identified as malaria-positive by microscopy, 15 samples were positive for P. falciparum, 14 for P. vivax, 6 for P. knowlesi, 72 for P. malariae, and 2 for mixed infection of P. falciparum/P. malariae. Both multiplex and nested PCR identified 12 P. falciparum single infections. For P. vivax, 9 were identified by multiplex and 12 by nested PCR. For 72 P. malariae cases, multiplex PCR identified 58 as P. knowlesi and 10 as P. malariae compared to nested PCR, which identified 59 as P. knowlesi and 7 as P. malariae. Multiplex PCR could be used as alternative molecular diagnosis for the identification of all Plasmodium species as it requires a shorter time to screen a large number of samples.

  7. Multiplex detection and genotyping of pathogenic bacteria on paper-based biosensor with a novel universal primer mediated asymmetric PCR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Liu, Hongxing; Liao, Yuhui; Wei, Jitao; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da

    2015-12-15

    Traditionary multiplex asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be applied to detect multiplex target organisms simultaneously, but complex optimizations of primer concentrations and staggered additions of primers are required to achieve equal amplification of multiplex genes. To overcome this shortcoming, we propose a novel method based on multiplex asymmetric PCR and paper-based nucleic acid diagnostics (PBNAD). In the asymmetric PCR, a universal primer was introduced to break the bottlenecks of low sensitivity and self-inhibition among different sets of primers. Amplification using the novel multiplex asymmetric PCR boosted the quantity of single-stranded amplicons, and the amplified products contained the same sequence at the 5' end. Therefore, only one gold nanoparticle-based signal probe was needed for the simultaneous detection of three genes using the PBNAD platform, and the detection signals could be observed with the naked eye. With this highly efficient, novel multiplex asymmetric PCR, as little as 1 pg/μL genomic DNA can be detected. This method can also be applied to genotyping for reliable epidemiological investigations. This proof-of-concept study highlights the potential of the PBNAD platform for cost- and labor-effective applications in the detection of pathogenic bacteria.

  8. A Unique Primer with an Inosine Chain at the 5'-Terminus Improves the Reliability of SNP Analysis Using the PCR-Amplified Product Length Polymorphism Method.

    PubMed

    Shojo, Hideki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Takahashi, Ryohei; Kakuda, Tsuneo; Adachi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-amplified product length polymorphism (PCR-APLP) is one of the most convenient and reliable methods for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This method is based on PCR, but uses allele-specific primers containing SNP sites at the 3'-terminus of each primer. To use this method at least two allele-specific primers and one "counter-primer", which serves as a common forward or reverse primer of the allele-specific primers, are required. The allele-specific primers have SNP sites at the 3'-terminus, and another primer should have a few non-complementary flaps at the 5'-terminus to detect SNPs by determining the difference of amplicon length by PCR and subsequent electrophoresis. A major disadvantage of the addition of a non-complementary flap is the non-specific annealing of the primer with non-complementary flaps. However, a design principle for avoiding this undesired annealing has not been fully established, therefore, it is often difficult to design effective APLP primers. Here, we report allele-specific primers with an inosine chain at the 5'-terminus for PCR-APLP analysis. This unique design improves the competitiveness of allele-specific primers and the reliability of SNP analysis when using the PCR-APLP method.

  9. Detection and Identification of Probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum Strains by Multiplex PCR Using RAPD-Derived Primers

    PubMed Central

    Galanis, Alex; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Tassou, Chrysoula C.; Chorianopoulos, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum 2035 and Lactobacillus plantarum ACA-DC 2640 are two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains that have been isolated from Feta cheese. Both display significant potential for the production of novel probiotic food products. The aim of the present study was the development of an accurate and efficient method for the molecular detection and identification of the above strains in a single reaction. A multiplex PCR assay was designed for each strain, based on specific primers derived from Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Sequenced Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR) analysis. The specificity of the assay was tested with a total of 23 different LAB strains, for L. plantarum 2035 and L. plantarum ACA-DC 2640. The multiplex PCR assay was also successfully applied for the detection of the above cultures in yogurt samples prepared in our lab. The proposed methodology may be applied for monitoring the presence of these strains in food products, thus evaluating their probiotic character. Moreover, our strategy may be adapted for other novel LAB strains with probiotic potential, thus providing a powerful tool for molecular discrimination that could be invaluable to the food industry. PMID:26506345

  10. Detection and Identification of Probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum Strains by Multiplex PCR Using RAPD-Derived Primers.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Alex; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Tassou, Chrysoula C; Chorianopoulos, Nikos

    2015-10-22

    Lactobacillus plantarum 2035 and Lactobacillus plantarum ACA-DC 2640 are two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains that have been isolated from Feta cheese. Both display significant potential for the production of novel probiotic food products. The aim of the present study was the development of an accurate and efficient method for the molecular detection and identification of the above strains in a single reaction. A multiplex PCR assay was designed for each strain, based on specific primers derived from Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Sequenced Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR) analysis. The specificity of the assay was tested with a total of 23 different LAB strains, for L. plantarum 2035 and L. plantarum ACA-DC 2640. The multiplex PCR assay was also successfully applied for the detection of the above cultures in yogurt samples prepared in our lab. The proposed methodology may be applied for monitoring the presence of these strains in food products, thus evaluating their probiotic character. Moreover, our strategy may be adapted for other novel LAB strains with probiotic potential, thus providing a powerful tool for molecular discrimination that could be invaluable to the food industry.

  11. PCR detection of human papillomavirus: comparison between MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+ primer systems.

    PubMed

    Qu, W; Jiang, G; Cruz, Y; Chang, C J; Ho, G Y; Klein, R S; Burk, R D

    1997-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an etiologic agent of cervical cancer and is the most common sexually transmitted disease in women. PCR amplification of HPV genomes is the most sensitive method for the detection of cervicovaginal HPV. We have compared the two most commonly used PCR primer sets, MY09/MY11 (MY-PCR) and GP5+/GP6+ (GP+-PCR), for the detection of HPV DNA in cervicovaginal lavage samples from 208 women. Oligonucleotide probes for 39 different HPV types were used. Both primer sets amplified a wide spectrum of HPV genotypes and detected similar overall prevalences of 45% (94 of 208) and 43% (89 of 208), respectively. The MY-PCR system detected 27 of 30 (90%) samples with multiple HPV types, whereas the GP+-PCR system detected 14 of 30 (47%) samples with multiple HPV types. Differences in the detection of HPV types 35, 53, and 61 were noted between the two primer systems. Serial dilution of plasmid templates indicated a 3-log decrease in the amplification of HPV type 35 by MY-PCR and HPV types 53 and 61 by GP+-PCR. These results indicate that although the MY-PCR and GP+-PCR identified nearly equivalent prevalences of HPV in a set of clinical samples, differences in the detection of specific types and infections with multiple types were found. Differences in the sensitivities and characteristics of the PCR systems for the detection of HPV within clinical samples should be considered when comparing data between studies and/or in designing new studies or clinical trials.

  12. Assessment of primer/template mismatch effects on real-time PCR amplification of target taxa for GMO quantification.

    PubMed

    Ghedira, Rim; Papazova, Nina; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Ruttink, Tom; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2009-10-28

    GMO quantification, based on real-time PCR, relies on the amplification of an event-specific transgene assay and a species-specific reference assay. The uniformity of the nucleotide sequences targeted by both assays across various transgenic varieties is an important prerequisite for correct quantification. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) frequently occur in the maize genome and might lead to nucleotide variation in regions used to design primers and probes for reference assays. Further, they may affect the annealing of the primer to the template and reduce the efficiency of DNA amplification. We assessed the effect of a minor DNA template modification, such as a single base pair mismatch in the primer attachment site, on real-time PCR quantification. A model system was used based on the introduction of artificial mismatches between the forward primer and the DNA template in the reference assay targeting the maize starch synthase (SSIIb) gene. The results show that the presence of a mismatch between the primer and the DNA template causes partial to complete failure of the amplification of the initial DNA template depending on the type and location of the nucleotide mismatch. With this study, we show that the presence of a primer/template mismatch affects the estimated total DNA quantity to a varying degree.

  13. DegePrime, a Program for Degenerate Primer Design for Broad-Taxonomic-Range PCR in Microbial Ecology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hugerth, Luisa W.; Wefer, Hugo A.; Lundin, Sverker; Jakobsson, Hedvig E.; Lindberg, Mathilda; Rodin, Sandra; Engstrand, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The taxonomic composition of a microbial community can be deduced by analyzing its rRNA gene content by, e.g., high-throughput DNA sequencing or DNA chips. Such methods typically are based on PCR amplification of rRNA gene sequences using broad-taxonomic-range PCR primers. In these analyses, the use of optimal primers is crucial for achieving an unbiased representation of community composition. Here, we present the computer program DegePrime that, for each position of a multiple sequence alignment, finds a degenerate oligomer of as high coverage as possible and outputs its coverage among taxonomic divisions. We show that our novel heuristic, which we call weighted randomized combination, performs better than previously described algorithms for solving the maximum coverage degenerate primer design problem. We previously used DegePrime to design a broad-taxonomic-range primer pair that targets the bacterial V3-V4 region (341F-805R) (D. P. Herlemann, M. Labrenz, K. Jurgens, S. Bertilsson, J. J. Waniek, and A. F. Andersson, ISME J. 5:1571–1579, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2011.41), and here we use the program to significantly increase the coverage of a primer pair (515F-806R) widely used for Illumina-based surveys of bacterial and archaeal diversity. By comparison with shotgun metagenomics, we show that the primers give an accurate representation of microbial diversity in natural samples. PMID:24928874

  14. DegePrime, a program for degenerate primer design for broad-taxonomic-range PCR in microbial ecology studies.

    PubMed

    Hugerth, Luisa W; Wefer, Hugo A; Lundin, Sverker; Jakobsson, Hedvig E; Lindberg, Mathilda; Rodin, Sandra; Engstrand, Lars; Andersson, Anders F

    2014-08-01

    The taxonomic composition of a microbial community can be deduced by analyzing its rRNA gene content by, e.g., high-throughput DNA sequencing or DNA chips. Such methods typically are based on PCR amplification of rRNA gene sequences using broad-taxonomic-range PCR primers. In these analyses, the use of optimal primers is crucial for achieving an unbiased representation of community composition. Here, we present the computer program DegePrime that, for each position of a multiple sequence alignment, finds a degenerate oligomer of as high coverage as possible and outputs its coverage among taxonomic divisions. We show that our novel heuristic, which we call weighted randomized combination, performs better than previously described algorithms for solving the maximum coverage degenerate primer design problem. We previously used DegePrime to design a broad-taxonomic-range primer pair that targets the bacterial V3-V4 region (341F-805R) (D. P. Herlemann, M. Labrenz, K. Jurgens, S. Bertilsson, J. J. Waniek, and A. F. Andersson, ISME J. 5:1571-1579, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2011.41), and here we use the program to significantly increase the coverage of a primer pair (515F-806R) widely used for Illumina-based surveys of bacterial and archaeal diversity. By comparison with shotgun metagenomics, we show that the primers give an accurate representation of microbial diversity in natural samples. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Design and Evaluation of PCR Primers for Analysis of Bacterial Populations in Wine by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Isabel; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda; Cocolin, Luca; Orr, Erica; Phister, Trevor; Marshall, Megan; VanderGheynst, Jean; Mills, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is routinely used to compare levels of diversity of microbial communities and to monitor population dynamics. While using PCR-DGGE to examine the bacteria in wine fermentations, we noted that several commonly used PCR primers for amplifying bacterial 16S rDNA also coamplified yeast, fungal, or plant DNA present in samples. Unfortunately, amplification of nonbacterial DNA can result in a masking of bacterial populations in DGGE profiles. To surmount this problem, we developed two new primer sets for specific amplification of bacterial 16S rDNA in wine fermentation samples without amplification of eukaryotic DNA. One primer set, termed WLAB1 and WLAB2, amplified lactic acid bacteria, while another, termed WBAC1 and WBAC2, amplified both lactic acid bacterial and acetic acid bacterial populations found in wine. Primer specificity and efficacy were examined with DNA isolated from numerous bacterial, yeast, and fungal species commonly found in wine and must samples. Importantly, both primer sets effectively distinguished bacterial species in wine containing mixtures of yeast and bacteria. PMID:14602643

  16. Influence of primer & probe chemistry and amplification target on reverse transcription digital PCR quantification of viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Van Heuverswyn, Fran; Karczmarczyk, Maria; Schimmel, Heinz; Trapmann, Stefanie; Emons, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    Compared to other PCR technologies, digital PCR is a potentially highly accurate approach for the quantification of nucleic acid fragments. This study describes the impact of four experimental factors, namely primer and probe chemistry, PCR amplification target, duplexing, and template type, on the measurement results obtained by reverse transcription digital PCR (RT-dPCR) of viral RNA using influenza A virus as a model. Along conventional dual labelled probes (DLP), alternative primer and probe chemistries, including Zip Nucleic Acids (ZNAs), Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs), and Scorpions(®), were compared with two RNA template types: i) total genomic RNA extracted from cell cultured influenza A and ii) a synthetically prepared RNA transcript (In vitro transcribed RNA). While apparently duplexing or a different PCR target choice did not have a significant influence on the estimated RNA copy numbers, the impact of the choice of primer and probe chemistry and template type differed significantly for some methods. The combined standard uncertainty of the dPCR analysis results has been assessed, taking into account both the repeatability and the intermediate precision of the procedure. Our data highlight the importance of dPCR method optimisation and the advantage of using a more sophisticated primer and probe chemistry, which turned out to be dependent on the template type. Considerations are provided with respect to the molecular diagnostics of viral RNA pathogens, and more specifically, for precise quantification of RNA, which is of tremendous importance for the development of RNA calibration materials and the qualification of these calibrants as certified reference materials.

  17. PCR-based identification of Erysiphe pulchra and Phyllactinia guttata from Cornus florida using ITS-specific primers

    Treesearch

    M. T. Mmbaga; N. B. Klopfenstein; M. -S. Kim; N. C. Mmbaga

    2004-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA and the intervening 5.8S rRNA gene for the powdery mildew fungi Erysiphe (sect. Microsphaera) pulchra and Phyllactinia guttata were amplified using standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols and the universal primer pairs, ITS1 and ITS4. PCR products for ITS were analysed by electrophoresis in a 1.5% agarose...

  18. Collecting in collections: a PCR strategy and primer set for DNA barcoding of decades-old dried museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Natural history museums are vastly underutilized as a source of material for DNA analysis because of perceptions about the limitations of DNA degradation in older specimens. Despite very few exceptions, most DNA barcoding projects, which aim to obtain sequence data from all species, generally use specimens collected specifically for that purpose, instead of the wealth of identified material in museums, constrained by the lack of suitable PCR methods. Any techniques that extend the utility of museum specimens for DNA analysis therefore are highly valuable. This study first tested the effects of specimen age and PCR amplicon size on PCR success rates in pinned insect specimens, then developed a PCR primer set and amplification strategy allowing greatly increased utilization of older museum specimens for DNA barcoding. PCR success rates compare favourably with the few published studies utilizing similar aged specimens, and this new strategy has the advantage of being easily automated for high-throughput laboratory workflows. The strategy uses hemi-nested, degenerate, M13-tailed PCR primers to amplify two overlapping amplicons, using two PCRs per amplicon (i.e. four PCRs per DNA sample). Initial PCR products are reamplified using an internal primer and a M13 primer. Together the two PCR amplicons yield 559 bp of the COI gene from Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Odonata and presumably also other insects. BARCODE standard-compliant data were recovered from 67% (56 of 84) of specimens up to 25 years old, and 51% (102 of 197) of specimens up to 55 years old. Given the time, cost and specialist expertise required for fieldwork and identification, 'collecting in collections' is a viable alternative allowing researchers to capitalize on the knowledge captured by curation work in decades past.

  19. Modified Proofreading PCR for Detection of Point Mutations, Insertions and Deletions Using a ddNTP-Blocked Primer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Weiming; Fan, Lujuan; Chen, Qianqian; Chen, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Sichao; Lan, Ke; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Chiyu

    2015-01-01

    The development of simple, accurate, rapid and cost-effective technologies for mutation detection is crucial to the early diagnosis and prevention of numerous genetic diseases, pharmacogenetics, and drug resistance. Proofreading PCR (PR-PCR) was developed for mutation detection in 1998 but is rarely applied due to its low efficiency in allele discrimination. Here we developed a modified PR-PCR method using a ddNTP-blocked primer and a mixture of DNA polymerases with and without the 3'-5' proofreading function. The ddNTP-blocked primer exhibited the best blocking efficiency to avoid nonspecific primer extension while the mixture of a tiny amount of high-fidelity DNA polymerase with a routine amount of Taq DNA polymerase provided the best discrimination and amplification effects. The modified PR-PCR method is quite capable of detecting various mutation types, including point mutations and insertions/deletions (indels), and allows discrimination amplification when the mismatch is located within the last eight nucleotides from the 3'-end of the ddNTP-blocked primer. The modified PR-PCR has a sensitivity of 1-5 × 102 copies and a selectivity of 5 × 10-5 mutant among 107 copies of wild-type DNA. It showed a 100% accuracy rate in the detection of P72R germ-line mutation in the TP53 gene among 60 clinical blood samples, and a high potential to detect rifampin-resistant mutations at low frequency in Mycobacterium tuberculosis using an adaptor and a fusion-blocked primer. These results suggest that the modified PR-PCR technique is effective in detection of various mutations or polymorphisms as a simple, sensitive and promising approach.

  20. Modified Proofreading PCR for Detection of Point Mutations, Insertions and Deletions Using a ddNTP-Blocked Primer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qianqian; Chen, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Sichao; Lan, Ke; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Chiyu

    2015-01-01

    The development of simple, accurate, rapid and cost-effective technologies for mutation detection is crucial to the early diagnosis and prevention of numerous genetic diseases, pharmacogenetics, and drug resistance. Proofreading PCR (PR-PCR) was developed for mutation detection in 1998 but is rarely applied due to its low efficiency in allele discrimination. Here we developed a modified PR-PCR method using a ddNTP-blocked primer and a mixture of DNA polymerases with and without the 3'-5' proofreading function. The ddNTP-blocked primer exhibited the best blocking efficiency to avoid nonspecific primer extension while the mixture of a tiny amount of high-fidelity DNA polymerase with a routine amount of Taq DNA polymerase provided the best discrimination and amplification effects. The modified PR-PCR method is quite capable of detecting various mutation types, including point mutations and insertions/deletions (indels), and allows discrimination amplification when the mismatch is located within the last eight nucleotides from the 3'-end of the ddNTP-blocked primer. The modified PR-PCR has a sensitivity of 1-5 × 102 copies and a selectivity of 5 × 10-5 mutant among 107 copies of wild-type DNA. It showed a 100% accuracy rate in the detection of P72R germ-line mutation in the TP53 gene among 60 clinical blood samples, and a high potential to detect rifampin-resistant mutations at low frequency in Mycobacterium tuberculosis using an adaptor and a fusion-blocked primer. These results suggest that the modified PR-PCR technique is effective in detection of various mutations or polymorphisms as a simple, sensitive and promising approach. PMID:25915410

  1. Multiplex PCR for detection of the Vibrio genus and five pathogenic Vibrio species with primer sets designed using comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Joong; Ryu, Ji-Oh; Lee, Shin-Young; Kim, Ei-Seul; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2015-10-26

    The genus Vibrio is clinically significant and major pathogenic Vibrio species causing human Vibrio infections are V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. alginolyticus and V. mimicus. In this study, we screened for novel genetic markers using comparative genomics and developed a Vibrio multiplex PCR for the reliable diagnosis of the Vibrio genus and the associated major pathogenic Vibrio species. A total of 30 Vibrio genome sequences were subjected to comparative genomics, and specific genes of the Vibrio genus and five major pathogenic Vibrio species were screened. The designed primer sets from the screened genes were evaluated by single PCR using DNAs from various Vibrio spp. and other non-Vibrio bacterial strains. A sextuplet multiplex PCR using six primer sets was developed to enable detection of the Vibrio genus and five pathogenic Vibrio species. The designed primer sets from the screened genes yielded specific diagnostic results for target the Vibrio genus and Vibrio species. The specificity of the developed multiplex PCR was confirmed with various Vibrio and non-Vibrio strains. This Vibrio multiplex PCR was evaluated using 117 Vibrio strains isolated from the south seashore areas in Korea and Vibrio isolates were identified as Vibrio spp., V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. alginolyticus, demonstrating the specificity and discriminative ability of the assay towards Vibrio species. This novel multiplex PCR method could provide reliable and informative identification of the Vibrio genus and major pathogenic Vibrio species in the food safety industry and in early clinical treatment, thereby protecting humans against Vibrio infection.

  2. Evaluation of multiplex PCR using MPB64 and IS6110 primers for rapid diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Lekhak, Sunil Prasad; Sharma, Laxmi; Rajbhandari, Reema; Rajbhandari, Pravesh; Shrestha, Resha; Pant, Basant

    2016-09-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is one of those most serious manifestations of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis and prompt diagnosis and treatment is required for better clinical outcome. It is difficult to diagnose due to lack of rapid, sensitive, and specific tests. Newer methods, which are easy and reliable, are required to diagnose TBM at an early stage. Thus our aim was to evaluate the Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, using primers directed against the insertion sequence IS6110 and MPB64 gene for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), for rapid diagnosis of TBM patients. 102 CSF samples were analyzed from patients suspected with TBM along with a control group of 10 patients having other neurological disorders. CSF sediments were analyzed individually for M. tuberculosis DNA by Multiplex PCR using two set of primers targeting insertion sequence IS6110 and gene MBp64, which is very specific for MTBC. Out of 37 patients diagnosed with TBM clinically, MPB64 PCR was positive in 22, IS6110 PCR was positive in 28, both PCR using Multiplex were positive in 34 and Microscopy was positive in one. Thus Sensitivity of MPB64 PCR, IS6110 PCR, Multiplex PCR and Microscopy were found to be 62.3%, 75.4%, 91.8% and 2.7% respectively. In non TBM group PCR was negative in all cases hence, the specificity was 100%. Multiplex PCR system using primers targeting IS6110 and MPB64, for the detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in CSF samples, has high sensitivity than any one of them alone, and could be used for the early detection of TBM in CSF samples.

  3. Evaluation of primer and probe mismatches in sensitivity of select RRT-PCR tests for avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The recent outbreak of pH1N1 in animals highlighted an imperfection of the matrix real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) that has become the primary screening test for avian and swine influenza viruses. Four mismatches in one primer resulted in an important loss of sens...

  4. Direct detection of Listeria monocytogenes in 25 milliliters of raw milk by a two-step PCR with nested primers.

    PubMed

    Herman, L M; De Block, J H; Moermans, R J

    1995-02-01

    A method for direct detection of Listeria monocytogenes in 25 ml of raw milk is presented. The detection limit can be situated between 10 and 5 CFU. The detection method is based on chemical extraction of the milk components and PCR amplification with two nested pairs of primers specific for Listeria monocytogenes.

  5. FastPCR: An in silico tool for fast primer and probe design and advanced sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Khassenov, Bekbolat; Ramankulov, Yerlan; Samuilova, Olga; Ivanov, Konstantin I

    2017-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of the most important laboratory techniques used in molecular biology, genetics and molecular diagnostics. The success of a PCR-based method largely depends on the correct nucleic acid sequence analysis in silico prior to a wet-bench experiment. Here, we report the development of an online Java-based software for virtual PCR on linear or circular DNA templates and multiple primer or probe search from large or small databases. Primer or probe sensitivity and specificity are predicted by searching a database to find sequences with an optimal number of mismatches, similarity and stability. The software determines primer location, orientation, efficiency of binding and calculates primer melting temperatures for standard and degenerate oligonucleotides. The software is suitable for batch file processing, which is essential for automation when working with large amounts of data. The online Java software is available for download at http://primerdigital.com/tools/pcr.html. Accession numbers for the sequences resulting from this study: EU140956 EU177767 EU867815 EU882730 FJ975775-FJ975780 HM481419 HM481420 KC686837-KC686839 KM262797. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Unique Primer with an Inosine Chain at the 5′-Terminus Improves the Reliability of SNP Analysis Using the PCR-Amplified Product Length Polymorphism Method

    PubMed Central

    Shojo, Hideki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Takahashi, Ryohei; Kakuda, Tsuneo; Adachi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-amplified product length polymorphism (PCR-APLP) is one of the most convenient and reliable methods for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This method is based on PCR, but uses allele-specific primers containing SNP sites at the 3′-terminus of each primer. To use this method at least two allele-specific primers and one “counter-primer”, which serves as a common forward or reverse primer of the allele-specific primers, are required. The allele-specific primers have SNP sites at the 3′-terminus, and another primer should have a few non-complementary flaps at the 5′-terminus to detect SNPs by determining the difference of amplicon length by PCR and subsequent electrophoresis. A major disadvantage of the addition of a non-complementary flap is the non-specific annealing of the primer with non-complementary flaps. However, a design principle for avoiding this undesired annealing has not been fully established, therefore, it is often difficult to design effective APLP primers. Here, we report allele-specific primers with an inosine chain at the 5′-terminus for PCR-APLP analysis. This unique design improves the competitiveness of allele-specific primers and the reliability of SNP analysis when using the PCR-APLP method. PMID:26381262

  7. Detection of Proteobacteria from the rumen by PCR using methanotroph-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, M; Ajisaka, N; Tajima, K; Kajikawa, H; Kurihara, M

    2002-01-01

    To detect Proteobacteria, including methanotrophs, from the rumen fluid and the bacteria inhabiting the rumen epithelium. Proteobacteria inhabiting the rumen were detected by PCR using methanotroph-specific primers. The detected Proteobacteria were divided into clusters A, B, and C in addition to one clone, which was distinct from the clusters and closely related to Nitrosomonas sp. The clusters A, B, and C were close to Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens, Enterobacter cloacae, and Actinobacillus minor, respectively. The clones obtained from the rumen fluid each belonged to cluster A or B. The clones obtained from the rumen epithelium belonged to cluster B or C or to Nitrosomonas sp. It has been assumed that the rumen fluid and the rumen epithelium host different populations of Proteobacteria. Moreover, detection of Nitrosomonas from the rumen epithelium would indicate the possibility that the bacterium oxidizes ammonia and methane on the rumen surface. These findings suggest that the rumen fluid and the epithelium support different microbial populations, which would play specific roles in rumen function. Future study should focus on the relationship between these communities and physiological functions in the rumen.

  8. Primers determine the sensitivity of PCR-mediated hepatitis B virus DNA detection and pretreatment of PCR mixture with 8-methoxypsoralen eliminates false-positive results.

    PubMed

    Keum, W K; Park, C E; Lee, J H; Khil, L Y; Kang, I; Kim, S S; Jung, J C; Oh, S M; Woo, H J; Lee, J H; Kim, Y C; Yoon, Y; Choi, J W; Ha, J

    1997-04-30

    Most methods for the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection largely depend on viral DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or radioimmunological assay of viral antigens or antibodies. The quality assurance program recently established in Europe reported that PCR-mediated HBV DNA detection methods used in many laboratories produced a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results. Thus, we attempted to improve the conditions of current PCR methods for detection of HBV DNA. In the present study, we applied a recently developed method of releasing HBV DNA from virion by NaOH treatment of patient serum. Using four different primer sets specific to the HBV core region, we found that the sensitivity of first-round PCR can be improved by more than two orders of magnitude depending on the primers. The second round of PCR using nested primers was sensitive enough to detect up to 10(-6) pg of the HBV DNA, which is equivalent to approximately 3 copies of the HBV genome. Among the approximately 800 HBV-infected patient sera investigated in our laboratory, more than 60% of the tested samples gave positive results in the first-round PCR. The rate of positive results obtained using our experimental conditions is very high in comparison with other reports. The reamplification of the first-round PCR reaction mixture with the nested primers produced practically 100% positive results. For diagnosis of HBV infection, we routinely used 1 microliter of patient serum, which was found to be optimum in our laboratory. Surprisingly, from 20% of our positive results, even serum diluted to 1/100 (0.01 microliter) produced a stronger signal than 1 microliter. This observation suggests that direct PCR amplification of HBV DNA released from serum by NaOH treatment has to be compensated by other DNA detection methods for correct quantitation. In order to eliminate the false positive signal resulting from the carry-over due to massive screening of a large number of

  9. Effective Natural PCR-RFLP Primer Design for SNP Genotyping Using Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization With Elite Strategy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Huei; Kuo, Che-Nan; Lai, Ching-Ming

    2016-10-01

    SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotyping is the determination of genetic variations of SNPs between members of a species. In many laboratories, PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism) is a usually used biotechnology for SNP genotyping, especially in small-scale basic research studies of complex genetic diseases. PCR-RFLP requires an available restriction enzyme at least for identify a target SNP and an effective primer pair conforms numerous constraints. However, the lots of restriction enzymes, tedious sequence and complicated constraints make the mining of available restriction enzymes and the design of effective primer pairs become a major challenge. In the study, we propose a novel and available CI (Computation Intelligence)-based method called TLBO (teaching-learning-based optimization) and introduce the elite strategy to design effective primer pairs. Three common melting temperature computations are available in the method. REHUNT (Restriction Enzymes HUNTing) is first combined with the method to mine available restriction enzymes. Robust in silico simulations for the GA (genetic algorithm), the PSO (particle swarm optimization), and the method for natural PCR-RFLP primer design in the SLC6A4 gene with two hundred and eighty-eight SNPs had been performed and compared. These methods had been implemented in JAVA and they are freely available at https://sites.google.com/site/yhcheng1981/tlbonpd-elite for users of academic and non-commercial interests.

  10. Mining of novel species-specific primers for PCR detection of Listeria monocytogenes based on genomic approach.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tingting; Chen, Qiming; Bie, Xiaomei; Lu, Fengxia; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes in contaminated food is considered as a serious health threat for consumers due to its high mortality rate. The objective of this study was to obtain novel species-specific target-genes and primers for the molecular detection of L. monocytogenes using a comparative genomic approach. By comparative analysis of L. monocytogenes and non-L. monocytogenes genome sequences in the GenBank database with BLAST program, 26 specific target sequences were used as candidates and the primers were designed for L. monocytogenes species-specificity verification by using PCR assay. Finally, the three genes LMOf2365_0970, LMOf2365_2721 and mpl were identified to have L. monocytogenes species-specificity and be unique as detection targets for diagnostic application. The species-specific primer Lm8 of gene LMOf2365_0970, Lm13 of gene LMOf2365_2721 and Lm20 of gene mpl showed better specificity and sensitivity than the primers described previously. The PCR detection limits of the three specific primer sets were 430, 43, 4.3 fg/μL for genomic DNA, and 5 × 10(3), 50, 5 cfu/mL for pure culture of L. monocytogenes. There was no interference in specificity of detecting L. monocytogenes by co-culture with other foodborne pathogens in high concentration. Moreover, after 6-8 h of enrichment, L. monocytogenes in the artificially contaminated milk samples at an inoculum dose of 38 cfu/10 mL milk could be detected successfully with the studied three primers. Therefore, the three specific genes and primers can be applied to establish a novel rapid and accurate method for detecting L. monocytogenes in food materials.

  11. PCR primers specific for the genus Tuber reveal the presence of several truffle species in a truffle-ground.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Elisa; Mello, Antonietta; Bonfante, Paola; Murat, Claude

    2009-08-01

    Truffles are hypogeous Ascomycete fungi belonging to the genus Tuber and forming fruiting bodies highly prized for their taste and aroma. The identification of the genus Tuber and its species is important to investigate their ecology and avoid fraud in the food market. As genus-specific primers are not available, the aims of this work were (1) to assess the usefulness of the beta-tubulin gene as a DNA barcoding region for designing Tuber genus-specific primers, (2) to test the primers on a range of fruiting bodies, representing a large part of truffle biodiversity and (3) to check their ecological usefulness, applying them to truffle-ground soil. The new primers designed on the beta-tubulin gene were specific to the Tuber genus in nested PCR. When applied to DNA from soils, they gave a positive signal for 23 of 32 soils. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the bands corresponded to Tuber and that at least five Tuber species were present in the truffle-ground. beta-tubulin was found to be a good barcoding region for designing Tuber genus-specific primers, detecting a high Tuber diversity in a natural environment. These primers will be useful for understanding truffle ecology and for practical needs in plantation management.

  12. An RT-PCR primer pair for the detection of Pospiviroid and its application in surveying ornamental plants for viroids.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Hidayet; Nie, Xianzhou; Singh, Rudra P

    2004-03-15

    A primer pair for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), based on the conserved sequences of the members of genus Pospiviroid was designed to yield a fragment of about 200 base pairs (bp). Since pospiviroids infect a large number of plants species and a few members of the genus Pospiviroid have been already detected in some ornamental plants, the primer pair was evaluated for its efficacy using ornamental plants. The method of return-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (R-PAGE) was used to determine the general presence of viroids in the test samples. Efficacy of the primer pair for members of genus Pospiviroid was demonstrated by the detection of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) and Tomato chlorotic dwarf viroid (TCDVd) in potato, Chrysanthemum stunt viroid and Iresine viroid in Verbena and Vinca species, and Citrus exocortis viroid in Impatiens species. Specificity of the primer pair became evident, where additional viroids were detected by R-PAGE in Coleus and Magilla species, but they were not amplified by the Pospiviroid primer. This primer pair would be of benefit in indexing ornamental plants in quarantine samples or in viroid-free certification schemes, irrespective of their actual identity.

  13. QuantPrime – a flexible tool for reliable high-throughput primer design for quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Arvidsson, Samuel; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Background Medium- to large-scale expression profiling using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays are becoming increasingly important in genomics research. A major bottleneck in experiment preparation is the design of specific primer pairs, where researchers have to make several informed choices, often outside their area of expertise. Using currently available primer design tools, several interactive decisions have to be made, resulting in lengthy design processes with varying qualities of the assays. Results Here we present QuantPrime, an intuitive and user-friendly, fully automated tool for primer pair design in small- to large-scale qPCR analyses. QuantPrime can be used online through the internet or on a local computer after download; it offers design and specificity checking with highly customizable parameters and is ready to use with many publicly available transcriptomes of important higher eukaryotic model organisms and plant crops (currently 295 species in total), while benefiting from exon-intron border and alternative splice variant information in available genome annotations. Experimental results with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the crop Hordeum vulgare and the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii show success rates of designed primer pairs exceeding 96%. Conclusion QuantPrime constitutes a flexible, fully automated web application for reliable primer design for use in larger qPCR experiments, as proven by experimental data. The flexible framework is also open for simple use in other quantification applications, such as hydrolyzation probe design for qPCR and oligonucleotide probe design for quantitative in situ hybridization. Future suggestions made by users can be easily implemented, thus allowing QuantPrime to be developed into a broad-range platform for the design of RNA expression assays. PMID:18976492

  14. Single-step PCR using (GACA)4 primer: utility for rapid identification of dermatophyte species and strains.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Atef S; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Aboulatta, Hassan N; el-Akhras, Atef I; Abbadi, Said H; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2008-08-01

    Dermatophytes are fungi that belong to three genera: Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton. Identification of dermatophyte species is essential for appropriate diagnosis and treatment of dermatophytosis. Routine identification depends on macroscopic and microscopic morphology, which is time-consuming and does not identify dermatophyte strains. In this study, two PCR-based methods were compared for their abilities to identify 21 dermatophyte isolates obtained from Egyptian patients to the species and strain levels. The first method employed a two-step method: PCR amplification, using ITS1 and ITS4 as primers, followed by restriction enzyme digestion using the endonuclease MvaI. The second method employed a one-step approach employing the repetitive oligonucleotide (GACA)(4) as a primer. Dermatophyte strains were also identified using a conventional culture method. Our results showed that the conventional culture method identified four species: Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton violaceum. Moreover, both PCR methods agreed with the diagnosis made using the conventional approach. Furthermore, ITS1/ITS4-based PCR provided no strain differentiation, while (GACA)(4)-based PCR identified different varieties among the T. mentagrophytes isolates. Taken together, our results suggest that (GACA)(4)-based PCR has utility as a simple and rapid method for identification of dermatophyte species as well as utility for differentiation of T. mentagrophytes variants.

  15. HLA-DRB and -DBQ typing by PCR amplification using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP): assessment after 1 year of routine use by three laboratories.

    PubMed

    Mercier, B; al Daccak, R; Samaan, A; David, F; Carta, A; Cracco, P; Raguenes, O; Dufosse, F; Ferec, C; Charron, D

    1994-04-01

    Using sequence-specific amplifications, a practical and fast technique for DRB and DQB typing has been developed. The primers are chosen in order to amplify groups of alleles corresponding to the same serological specificity. In a second step, precise allelic determination is obtained by studying the restriction fragment length polymorphism of the PCR products. The experience of three laboratories using this technique in the context of organ or bone marrow transplantation is reported.

  16. PCR Primers to Study the Diversity of Expressed Fungal Genes Encoding Lignocellulolytic Enzymes in Soils Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  17. Amplification of marine methanotrophic enrichment DNA with 16S rDNA PCR primers for type II alpha proteobacteria methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Rockne, Karl J; Strand, Stuart E

    2003-09-01

    Type II alpha proteobacteria methanotrophs are capable of a wide range of cometabolic transformations of chlorinated solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and this activity has been exploited in many terrestrial bioremediation systems. However, at present, all known obligately marine methanotrophic isolates are Type I gamma proteobacteria which do not have this activity to the extent of Type II methanotrophs. In previous work in our laboratory, determining the presence of Type II alpha proteobacteria methanotrophs in marine enrichment cultures that co-metabolized PAHs required a more sensitive assay. 16S rDNA PCR primers were designed based on oligonucleotide probes for serine pathway methanotrophs and serine pathway methylotrophs with an approximate amplification fragment size of 870 base pairs. Comparison of the primers using double primer BLAST searches in established nucleotide databases showed potential amplification with all Methylocystis and Methylosinus spp., as well as potential amplification with Methylocella palustrus. DNA from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, a Type II methanotroph, amplified with the primers with a fragment size of approximately 850 base pairs, whereas DNA extracted from Methylomonas methanica, a Type I methanotroph, did not. The primers were used to amplify DNA extracted from two marine methanotrophic enrichment cultures: a low nitrogen/low copper enrichment to select for Type II methanotrophs and a high nitrogen/high copper enrichment to select for Type I methanotrophs. Although DNA from both cultures amplified with the PCR primers, amplification was stronger in cultures that were specifically enriched for Type II methanotrophs, suggesting the presence of higher numbers of Type II methanotrophs. These results provide further evidence for the existence of Type II marine methanotrophs, suggesting the possibility of exploiting cometabolic activity in marine systems.

  18. Specific immunoassays for endocrine disruptor monitoring using recombinant antigens cloned by degenerated primer PCR.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Natalia; Carnevia, Daniel; Nande, Gonzalo; Rossotti, Martin; Miguez, María N; Last, Jerold A; Gonzalez-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2007-12-01

    Vitellogenin (VTG) and choriogenin (CHO) are valuable biomarkers of endocrine-disrupting compound (EDC) exposure in fish. Existing immunoassays are limited to a few species, which restricts their use for the analysis of local wildlife sentinels. Using C. facetum as a relevant South American model fish, this work presents a new strategy for the preparation of antibodies to VTG and CHO, with zero cross-reactivity with fish serum components. Recombinant fragments of Cichlasoma facetum VTG (280-mer) and CHO (223-mer) were prepared by degenerate primer RT-PCR and expression in E. coli. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies prepared with these antigens were used to develop rapid dotblot assays for VTG and CHO. Both the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies prepared with the recombinant antigens reacted against the native proteins adsorbed on to nitrocellulose allowing the set up of sensitive dotblot assays. The VTG assay was further validated with spiked samples and purified native VTG. Exposure experiments with several estrogenic compounds revealed the potential of C. facetum as a sensitive biomonitor that produced measurable responses at concentrations of 100 ng L(-1) of 17-beta-estradiol, 100 ng L(-1) of ethynylestradiol, and 6.6 microg L(-1) of nonylphenol. The approach described here may be applied to other native species to produce highly specific and sensitive rapid tests. It may be particularly advantageous for species that cannot be kept in captivity or when homogeneous purification of the immunizing proteins is particularly challenging. In conclusion, we present a novel approach to develop a strategy for the generation of immunoassay reagents for vitellogenin (VTG) and choriogenin (CHO), which will facilitate regional studies on the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on local wildlife.

  19. A novel PCR technique using Alu-specific primers to identify unknown flanking sequences from the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, M.; Poussin, K.; Brechot, C.; Paterlini, P.

    1995-09-20

    The rapid and reproducible identification of new cellular DNA sequences is difficult to achieve with the currently available procedures. Here we describe a novel approach based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer specific to the known sequence and another directed to a human Alu repeat. To avoid undesirable amplifications between Alu sequences, primers are constructed with dUTPs and destroyed by uracil DNA glycosylase treatment after 10 initial cycles of amplification. Only desirable fragments are then further amplified with specific primers to the known region and to a tag sequence introduced in the Alu-specific primer. Using this protocol, we have successfully indentified cellular sequences flanking integrated hepatitis B virus DNA from the human genome of three hepatoma tissues. The method enables a direct specific amplification without any ligation or nonspecific annealing steps as required by previous PCR-based protocols. This rapid and straightforward approach will be a powerful tool for the study of viral integration sites, but is also widely applicable to other studies of the human genome. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  20. GETPrime 2.0: gene- and transcript-specific qPCR primers for 13 species including polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    David, Fabrice P.A.; Rougemont, Jacques; Deplancke, Bart

    2017-01-01

    GETPrime (http://bbcftools.epfl.ch/getprime) is a database with a web frontend providing gene- and transcript-specific, pre-computed qPCR primer pairs. The primers have been optimized for genome-wide specificity and for allowing the selective amplification of one or several splice variants of most known genes. To ease selection, primers have also been ranked according to defined criteria such as genome-wide specificity (with BLAST), amplicon size, and isoform coverage. Here, we report a major upgrade (2.0) of the database: eight new species (yeast, chicken, macaque, chimpanzee, rat, platypus, pufferfish, and Anolis carolinensis) now complement the five already included in the previous version (human, mouse, zebrafish, fly, and worm). Furthermore, the genomic reference has been updated to Ensembl v81 (while keeping earlier versions for backward compatibility) as a result of re-designing the back-end database and automating the import of relevant sections of the Ensembl database in species-independent fashion. This also allowed us to map known polymorphisms to the primers (on average three per primer for human), with the aim of reducing experimental error when targeting specific strains or individuals. Another consequence is that the inclusion of future Ensembl releases and other species has now become a relatively straightforward task. PMID:28053161

  1. GETPrime 2.0: gene- and transcript-specific qPCR primers for 13 species including polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    David, Fabrice P A; Rougemont, Jacques; Deplancke, Bart

    2017-01-04

    GETPrime (http://bbcftools.epfl.ch/getprime) is a database with a web frontend providing gene- and transcript-specific, pre-computed qPCR primer pairs. The primers have been optimized for genome-wide specificity and for allowing the selective amplification of one or several splice variants of most known genes. To ease selection, primers have also been ranked according to defined criteria such as genome-wide specificity (with BLAST), amplicon size, and isoform coverage. Here, we report a major upgrade (2.0) of the database: eight new species (yeast, chicken, macaque, chimpanzee, rat, platypus, pufferfish, and Anolis carolinensis) now complement the five already included in the previous version (human, mouse, zebrafish, fly, and worm). Furthermore, the genomic reference has been updated to Ensembl v81 (while keeping earlier versions for backward compatibility) as a result of re-designing the back-end database and automating the import of relevant sections of the Ensembl database in species-independent fashion. This also allowed us to map known polymorphisms to the primers (on average three per primer for human), with the aim of reducing experimental error when targeting specific strains or individuals. Another consequence is that the inclusion of future Ensembl releases and other species has now become a relatively straightforward task. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Development of Specific Nested Oligonucleotide PCR Primers for the Streptococcus iniae 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Brian R.; Fuller, Jeffrey D.; de Azavedo, Joyce; Low, Donald E.; Bercovier, Herve; Frelier, Paul F.

    1998-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae is a cause of septicemia, meningoencephalitis, and death in farmed fish and of cellulitis in human beings. A set of nested oligonucleotide PCR primers that specifically amplified a 373-bp subunit from a variety of clinical isolates from farmed fish and human patients were constructed from a 524-bp consensus sequence of the S. iniae 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer. PMID:9705438

  3. Fast DNA-based identification of the black truffle Tuber melanosporum with direct PCR and species-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Bonito, Gregory

    2009-12-01

    Abstract A quick and sensitive DNA-based assay for identifying the black truffle species Tuber melanosporum is presented. Both direct PCR and species-specific primers are used to amplify a phylogenetically informative region of T. melanosporum rDNA. This method was successfully used to screen fresh and frozen T. melanosporum fruitbodies, and could be modified for the molecular detection of other truffle and mushroom species.

  4. Development of a dinoflagellate-oriented PCR primer set leads to detection of picoplanktonic dinoflagellates from Long Island Sound.

    PubMed

    Lin, Senjie; Zhang, Huan; Hou, Yubo; Miranda, Lilibeth; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2006-08-01

    We developed dinoflagellate-specific 18S rRNA gene primers. PCR amplification using these oligonucleotides for a picoplanktonic DNA sample from Long Island Sound yielded 24 clones, and all but one of these clones were dinoflagellates primarily belonging to undescribed and Amoebophrya-like lineages. These results highlight the need for a systematic investigation of picodinoflagellate diversity in both coastal and oceanic ecosystems.

  5. Development of a Dinoflagellate-Oriented PCR Primer Set Leads to Detection of Picoplanktonic Dinoflagellates from Long Island Sound†

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Senjie; Zhang, Huan; Hou, Yubo; Miranda, Lilibeth; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2006-01-01

    We developed dinoflagellate-specific 18S rRNA gene primers. PCR amplification using these oligonucleotides for a picoplanktonic DNA sample from Long Island Sound yielded 24 clones, and all but one of these clones were dinoflagellates primarily belonging to undescribed and Amoebophrya-like lineages. These results highlight the need for a systematic investigation of picodinoflagellate diversity in both coastal and oceanic ecosystems. PMID:16885319

  6. The use of real-time PCR and species-specific primers for the identification and monitoring of Paecilomyces lilacinus.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Simon D; Clark, Ian M; Pande, Sonal; Hirsch, Penny R; Kerry, Brian R

    2005-01-01

    The Paecilomyces lilacinus is the most widely tested fungus for the control of root-knot and cyst nematodes. The fungus has also been implicated in a number of human and animal infections, difficulties in diagnosis often result in misdiagnosis or delays in identification leading to a delay in treatment. Here, we report the development of species-specific primers for the identification of P. lilacinus based on sequence information from the ITS gene, and their use in identifying P. lilacinus isolates, including clinical isolates of the fungus. The primer set generated a single PCR fragment of 130 bp in length that was specific to P. lilacinus and was also used to detect the presence of P. lilacinus from soil, roots and nematode eggs. Real-time PCR primers and a TaqMan probe were also developed and provided quantitative data on the population size of the fungus in two field sites. PCR, bait and culture methods were combined to investigate the presence and abundance of the fungus from two field sites in the United Kingdom where potato cyst nematode populations were naturally declining, and results demonstrated the importance of using a combination of methods to investigate population size and activity of fungi.

  7. Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE)-PCR: Primer design criteria for high yields of specific single-stranded DNA and improved real-time detection

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Kenneth E.; Sanchez, J. Aquiles; Rice, John E.; Wangh, Lawrence J.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional asymmetric PCR uses conventional PCR primers at unequal concentrations to generate single-stranded DNA. This method, however, is difficult to optimize, often inefficient, and tends to promote nonspecific amplification. An alternative approach, Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE)-PCR, solves these problems by using primer pairs deliberately designed for use at unequal concentrations. The present report systematically examines the primer design parameters that affect the exponential and linear phases of LATE-PCR amplification. In particular, we investigated how altering the concentration-adjusted melting temperature (Tm) of the limiting primer (TmL) relative to that of the excess primer (TmX) affects both amplification efficiency and specificity during the exponential phase of LATE-PCR. The highest reaction efficiency and specificity were observed when TmL - TmX ≥ 5°C. We also investigated how altering TmX relative to the higher Tm of the double-stranded amplicon (TmA) affects the rate and extent of linear amplification. Excess primers with TmX closer to TmA yielded higher rates of linear amplification and stronger signals from a hybridization probe. These design criteria maximize the yield of specific single-stranded DNA products and make LATE-PCR more robust and easier to implement. The conclusions were validated by using primer pairs that amplify sequences within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene, mutations of which are responsible for cystic fibrosis. PMID:15937116

  8. Development of Catechol 2,3-Dioxygenase-Specific Primers for Monitoring Bioremediation by Competitive Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Mesarch, Matthew B.; Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Nies, Loring

    2000-01-01

    Benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenol, naphthalene, and biphenyl are among a group of compounds that have at least one reported pathway for biodegradation involving catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzymes. Thus, detection of the corresponding catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes can serve as a basis for identifying and quantifying bacteria that have these catabolic abilities. Primers that can successfully amplify a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene fragment from eight different bacteria are described. The identities of the amplicons were confirmed by hybridization with a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase probe. The detection limit was 102 to 103 gene copies, which was lowered to 100 to 101 gene copies by hybridization. Using the dioxygenase-specific primers, an increase in catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes was detected in petroleum-amended soils. The dioxygenase genes were enumerated by competitive quantitative PCR with a 163-bp competitor that was amplified using the same primers. Target and competitor sequences had identical amplification kinetics. Potential PCR inhibitors that could coextract with DNA, nonamplifying DNA, soil factors (humics), and soil pollutants (toluene) did not impact enumeration. Therefore, this technique can be used to accurately and reproducibly quantify catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes in complex environments such as petroleum-contaminated soil. Direct, non-cultivation-based molecular techniques for detecting and enumerating microbial pollutant-biodegrading genes in environmental samples are powerful tools for monitoring bioremediation and developing field evidence in support of natural attenuation. PMID:10653735

  9. A New Multiplex-PCR for Urinary Tract Pathogen Detection Using Primer Design Based on an Evolutionary Computation Method.

    PubMed

    García, Liliana Torcoroma; Cristancho, Laura Maritza; Vera, Erika Patricia; Begambre, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    This work describes a new strategy for optimal design of Multiplex-PCR primer sequences. The process is based on the Particle Swarm Optimization-Simplex algorithm (Mult-PSOS). Diverging from previous solutions centered on heuristic tools, the Mult-PSOS is selfconfigured because it does not require the definition of the algorithm's initial search parameters. The successful performance of this method was validated in vitro using Multiplex- PCR assays. For this validation, seven gene sequences of the most prevalent bacteria implicated in urinary tract infections were taken as DNA targets. The in vitro tests confirmed the good performance of the Mult-PSOS, with respect to infectious disease diagnosis, in the rapid and efficient selection of the optimal oligonucleotide sequences for Multiplex-PCRs. The predicted sequences allowed the adequate amplification of all amplicons in a single step (with the correct amount of DNA template and primers), reducing significantly the need for trial and error experiments. In addition, owing to its independence from the initial selection of the heuristic constants, the Mult-PSOS can be employed by non-expert users in computational techniques or in primer design problems.

  10. Conserved PCR primer set designing for closely-related species to complete mitochondrial genome sequencing using a sliding window-based PSO algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Ho, Chang-Hsuan; Chou, Yii-Cheng; Chuang, Li-Yeh

    2011-03-18

    Complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequencing is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. For long template sequencing, i.e., like the entire mtDNA, it is essential to design primers for Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplicons which are partly overlapping each other. The presented chromosome walking strategy provides the overlapping design to solve the problem for unreliable sequencing data at the 5' end and provides the effective sequencing. However, current algorithms and tools are mostly focused on the primer design for a local region in the genomic sequence. Accordingly, it is still challenging to provide the primer sets for the entire mtDNA. The purpose of this study is to develop an integrated primer design algorithm for entire mt genome in general, and for the common primer sets for closely-related species in particular. We introduce ClustalW to generate the multiple sequence alignment needed to find the conserved sequences in closely-related species. These conserved sequences are suitable for designing the common primers for the entire mtDNA. Using a heuristic algorithm particle swarm optimization (PSO), all the designed primers were computationally validated to fit the common primer design constraints, such as the melting temperature, primer length and GC content, PCR product length, secondary structure, specificity, and terminal limitation. The overlap requirement for PCR amplicons in the entire mtDNA is satisfied by defining the overlapping region with the sliding window technology. Finally, primer sets were designed within the overlapping region. The primer sets for the entire mtDNA sequences were successfully demonstrated in the example of two closely-related fish species. The pseudo code for the primer design algorithm is provided. In conclusion, it can be said that our proposed sliding window-based PSO algorithm provides the necessary primer sets for the entire mt genome amplification and

  11. Quantification of low-expressed mRNA using 5' LNA-containing real-time PCR primers

    SciTech Connect

    Malgoyre, A.; Banzet, S.; Mouret, C.; Bigard, A.X.; Peinnequin, A. . E-mail: andrepeinnequin@crssa.net

    2007-03-02

    Real-time RT-PCR is the most sensitive and accurate method for mRNA quantification. Using specific recombinant DNA as a template, real-time PCR allows accurate quantification within a 7-log range and increased sensitivity below 10 copies. However, when using RT-PCR to quantify mRNA in biological samples, a stochastic off-targeted amplification can occur. Classical adjustments of assay parameters have minimal effects on such amplification. This undesirable amplification appears mostly to be dependent on specific to non-specific target ratio rather than on the absolute quantity of the specific target. This drawback, which decreases assay reliability, mostly appears when quantifying low-expressed transcript in a whole organ. An original primer design using properties of LNA allows to block off-target amplification. 5'-LNA substitution strengthens 5'-hybridization. Consequently on-target hybridization is stabilized and the probability for the off-target to lead to amplification is decreased.

  12. easyPAC: A Tool for Fast Prediction, Testing and Reference Mapping of Degenerate PCR Primers from Alignments or Consensus Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, David

    2012-01-01

    The PCR-amplification of unknown homologous or paralogous genes generally relies on PCR primers predicted from multi sequence alignments. But increasing sequence divergence can induce the need to use degenerate primers which entails the problem of testing the characteristics, unwanted interactions and potential mispriming of degenerate primers. Here I introduce easyPAC, a new software for the prediction of degenerate primers from multi sequence alignments or single consensus sequences. As a major innovation, easyPAC allows to apply all customary primer test procedures to degenerate primer sequences including fast mapping to reference files. Thus, easyPAC simplifies and expedites the designing of specific degenerate primers enormously. Degenerate primers suggested by easyPAC were used in PCR amplification with subsequent de novo sequencing of TDRD1 exon 11 homologs from several representatives of the haplorrhine primate phylogeny. The results demonstrate the efficient performance of the suggested primers and therefore show that easyPAC can advance upcoming comparative genetic studies.

  13. An Alternative Suite of Universal Primers for Genotyping in Multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Cheng; Cui, Yu-Nan; Jing, Peng-Yu; Hong, Xiao-Yue

    2014-01-01

    The universal primer three-primer approach can dramatically reduce the cost when genotyping the microsatellites. One former research reported four universal primers that can be used in singleplex and multiplex genotyping. In this study, we proposed an alternative suite of universal primers with four dyes for genotyping 8–12 loci in one single run. This multiplex method was tested on Tetranychus truncatus. Published microsatellite loci of T. kanzawai, Frankliniella occidentalis and Nilaparvata lugens were modified as needed and also tested. The robustness of the method was confirmed by comparing with singleplex using multiple fluorophores and genotyping two populations of T. truncatus. This method showed lower signal strength than the singleplex three-primer system, but it was still sufficient to determine the fragment length. The cost of such a project can be reduced dramatically when many loci of different species are involved. In this way, laboratories performing population genetic analyses or studying several different species may benefit from the use of this cost-effective protocol. PMID:24658225

  14. MRPrimerW: a tool for rapid design of valid high-quality primers for multiple target qPCR experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyerin; Kang, NaNa; An, KyuHyeon; Koo, JaeHyung; Kim, Min-Soo

    2016-07-08

    Design of high-quality primers for multiple target sequences is essential for qPCR experiments, but is challenging due to the need to consider both homology tests on off-target sequences and the same stringent filtering constraints on the primers. Existing web servers for primer design have major drawbacks, including requiring the use of BLAST-like tools for homology tests, lack of support for ranking of primers, TaqMan probes and simultaneous design of primers against multiple targets. Due to the large-scale computational overhead, the few web servers supporting homology tests use heuristic approaches or perform homology tests within a limited scope. Here, we describe the MRPrimerW, which performs complete homology testing, supports batch design of primers for multi-target qPCR experiments, supports design of TaqMan probes and ranks the resulting primers to return the top-1 best primers to the user. To ensure high accuracy, we adopted the core algorithm of a previously reported MapReduce-based method, MRPrimer, but completely redesigned it to allow users to receive query results quickly in a web interface, without requiring a MapReduce cluster or a long computation. MRPrimerW provides primer design services and a complete set of 341 963 135 in silico validated primers covering 99% of human and mouse genes. Free access: http://MRPrimerW.com. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. MRPrimerW: a tool for rapid design of valid high-quality primers for multiple target qPCR experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyerin; Kang, NaNa; An, KyuHyeon; Koo, JaeHyung; Kim, Min-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Design of high-quality primers for multiple target sequences is essential for qPCR experiments, but is challenging due to the need to consider both homology tests on off-target sequences and the same stringent filtering constraints on the primers. Existing web servers for primer design have major drawbacks, including requiring the use of BLAST-like tools for homology tests, lack of support for ranking of primers, TaqMan probes and simultaneous design of primers against multiple targets. Due to the large-scale computational overhead, the few web servers supporting homology tests use heuristic approaches or perform homology tests within a limited scope. Here, we describe the MRPrimerW, which performs complete homology testing, supports batch design of primers for multi-target qPCR experiments, supports design of TaqMan probes and ranks the resulting primers to return the top-1 best primers to the user. To ensure high accuracy, we adopted the core algorithm of a previously reported MapReduce-based method, MRPrimer, but completely redesigned it to allow users to receive query results quickly in a web interface, without requiring a MapReduce cluster or a long computation. MRPrimerW provides primer design services and a complete set of 341 963 135 in silico validated primers covering 99% of human and mouse genes. Free access: http://MRPrimerW.com. PMID:27154272

  16. Blocking primers to enhance PCR amplification of rare sequences in mixed samples - a case study on prey DNA in Antarctic krill stomachs.

    PubMed

    Vestheim, Hege; Jarman, Simon N

    2008-07-20

    Identification of DNA sequence diversity is a powerful means for assessing the species present in environmental samples. The most common molecular strategies for estimating taxonomic composition depend upon PCR with universal primers that amplify an orthologous DNA region from a range of species. The diversity of sequences within a sample that can be detected by universal primers is often compromised by high concentrations of some DNA templates. If the DNA within the sample contains a small number of sequences in relatively high concentrations, then less concentrated sequences are often not amplified because the PCR favours the dominant DNA types. This is a particular problem in molecular diet studies, where predator DNA is often present in great excess of food-derived DNA. We have developed a strategy where a universal PCR simultaneously amplifies DNA from food items present in DNA purified from stomach samples, while the predator's own DNA is blocked from amplification by the addition of a modified predator-specific blocking primer. Three different types of modified primers were tested out; one annealing inhibiting primer overlapping with the 3' end of one of the universal primers, another annealing inhibiting primer also having an internal modification of five dI molecules making it a dual priming oligo, and a third elongation arrest primer located between the two universal primers. All blocking primers were modified with a C3 spacer. In artificial PCR mixtures, annealing inhibiting primers proved to be the most efficient ones and this method reduced predator amplicons to undetectable levels even when predator template was present in 1000 fold excess of the prey template. The prey template then showed strong PCR amplification where none was detectable without the addition of blocking primer. Our method was applied to identifying the winter food of one of the most abundant animals in the world, the Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. Dietary item DNA was PCR

  17. Development of an Alu-based, QSY 7-labeled primer PCR method for quantitation of human DNA in forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Janice A; Buel, Eric

    2003-03-01

    Determining the amount of human DNA extracted from a crime scene sample is an important step in DNA profiling. The forensic community relies almost entirely upon a technique (slot blot) to quantitate human DNA that is imprecise, time consuming, and labor intensive. This paper describes the development of a new technique based on PCR amplification of a repetitive Alu sequence. Specific primers were used to amplify a 124-bp fragment of Alu sequence; amplification was detected by SYBR Green I staining in a fluorescent plate reader. To reduce background in the plate reader assay, QSY-7 labeled primers were utilized. The assay was tested on animal DNAs, human blood spots, mock crime samples, and degraded DNA in comparison with the slot blot technique. The QSY Alu assay has a dynamic range of 10 ng to 10 pg, and is sensitive, specific, fast, quantitative, and comparable in cost to the slot blot assay.

  18. Molecular characterization of high plant species using PCR with primers designed from consensus branch point signal sequences.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Faqian; Jiang, Jing; Han, Zhuqiang; Zhong, Ruichun; He, Liangqiong; Zhuang, Weijian; Tang, Ronghua

    2011-06-01

    A novel method is introduced for producing molecular markers in plants using single 15- to 18-mer PCR primers designed from the short conserved consensus branch point signal sequences and standard agarose gel electrophoresis. This method was tested on cultivated peanut and verified to give good fingerprinting results in other plant species (mango, banana, and longan). These single primers, designed from relatively conserved branch point signal sequences within gene introns, should be universal across other plant species. The method is rapid, simple, and efficient, and it requires no sequence information of the plant genome of interest. It could be used in conjunction with, or as a substitute for, conventional RAPD or ISSR techniques for applications including genetic diversity analysis, phylogenetic tree construction, and quantitative trait locus mapping. This technique provides a new way to develop molecular markers for assessing genetic diversity of germplasm in diverse species based on conserved branch point signal sequences.

  19. Novel intein-containing DNA specific primers for rapid identification of Candida glabrata using Real-Time PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Satish; Ramesh, S

    2014-12-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human pathogen known to cause systemic and vaginal candidiasis. Rapid detection of Candida glabrata is indispensable for appropriate selection of antifungal drugs for chemotherapy. The study describes a unique intein-containing DNA fragment for specific detection of C. glabrata. The designed oligonucleotides detected C. glabrata (Ct mean: 24.75 ± 1.1 and Tm: 70.08 ± 0.23°C) in Real-Time PCR assays. The fluorescent signals were negative when the primers were tested for cross-species and cross-genera amplifications. In conclusion, our study recommends a novel primer set for developing a quick identification system which does not require laborious and time-consuming experimentations.

  20. PCR Detection of Salmonella enterica Serotype Montevideo in and on Raw Tomatoes Using Primers Derived from hilA

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jinru; Beuchat, Larry R.; Brackett, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonellae have been some of the most frequently reported etiological agents in fresh-produce-associated outbreaks of human infections in recent years. PCR assays using four innovative pairs of primers derived from hilA and sirA, positive regulators of Salmonella invasive genes, were developed to identify Salmonella enterica serotype Montevideo on and in tomatoes. Based on examination of 83 Salmonella strains and 22 non-Salmonella strains, we concluded that a pair of hilA primers detects Salmonella specifically. The detection limits of the PCR assay were 101 and 100 CFU/ml after enrichment at 37°C for 6 and 9 h, respectively. When the assay was validated by detecting S. enterica serotype Montevideo in and on artificially inoculated tomatoes, 102 and 101 CFU/g were detected, respectively, after enrichment for 6 h at 37°C. Our results suggest that the hilA-based PCR assay is sensitive and specific, and can be used for rapid detection of Salmonellae in or on fresh produce. PMID:11097898

  1. Synteny analysis provides a route to design genus-specific PCR primers for rapid identification of all Saccharomyces species.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Ben; Hulin, Michelle; Thorne-Wallis, James; Wheals, Alan

    2014-05-01

    The genus Saccharomyces comprises seven single-genome species (S. arboricola, S. cerevisiae, S. eubayanus, S. kudriavzevii, S. mikatae, S. paradoxus and S. uvarum) and two hybrid species - S. pastorianus (S. cerevisiae plus S. eubayanus) and S. bayanus (mostly S. uvarum plus S. eubayanus). Species-specific primers have already been developed for the identification of each of the single-genome species, and these primers can usually detect both genomes in hybrids. It would be advantageous if a single reaction could detect any member of the clade. We have investigated three potentially generic approaches to design genus-specific primers. Two methods that both use sequence alignment differences for primer design were only partly successful. A third method used synteny data to identify 136 target genes that are potentially present only in all species of the Saccharomyces clade. HSP30 (YCR021C) was fully successful; different primer pairs were developed with high G+C content for use at 63 °C. In < 3 h, using a robust colony-PCR followed by gel electrophoresis, the method can reliably detect any member of the genus. This novel approach still uses conventional sequence alignment mismatches but relies principally on the presence of the target gene only within the genus Saccharomyces. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TM7 detection in human microbiome: are PCR primers and FISH probes specific enough?

    PubMed Central

    Sizova, Maria V.; Doerfert, Sebastian N.; Gavrish, Ekaterina; Epstein, Slava S.

    2015-01-01

    TM7 appears important and omnipresent because it is repeatedly detected by molecular techniques in diverse environments. Here we report that most of primers and FISH probes thought to be TM7-specific do hybridize with multiple species from oral and vaginal cavity. This calls for re-examination of TM7 distribution and abundance. PMID:25957511

  3. Kinetic characterisation of primer mismatches in allele-specific PCR: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Eisenthal, Robert; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-12-20

    A novel method of estimating the kinetic parameters of Taq DNA polymerase during rapid cycle PCR is presented. A model was constructed using a simplified sigmoid function to represent substrate accumulation during PCR in combination with the general equation describing high substrate inhibition for Michaelis-Menten enzymes. The PCR progress curve was viewed as a series of independent reactions where initial rates were accurately measured for each cycle. Kinetic parameters were obtained for allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) amplification to examine the effect of mismatches on amplification. A high degree of correlation was obtained providing evidence of substrate inhibition as a major cause of the plateau phase that occurs in the later cycles of PCR.

  4. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) rapidly identified a critical missense mutation (P236T) of bovine ACADVL gene affecting growth traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sihuan; Dang, Yonglong; Zhang, Qingfeng; Qin, Qiaomei; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2015-04-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain (ACADVL), encoding ACADVL protein, targets the inner mitochondrial membrane where it catalyzes the first step of the mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway and plays an important role in body metabolism and oxidation of long chain fatty acid releasing energy. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) is an easy-to-operate, rapid, inexpensive, and exact method for SNP genotyping. Herein, T-ARMS-PCR was carried out to detect a critical missense mutation (AC_000176:g.2885C>A; Pro236Thr) within the ACADVL gene in 644 individuals from two cattle breeds. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the T-ARMS-PCR at this locus, the genotype of the sampled individuals was also identified by PCR-RFLP. The concordance between these two methods was 98.76%. Statistical analysis showed that the bovine ACADVL gene had a significant effect on chest width (P<0.05), chest depth (P<0.05), and hip width (P<0.05) in the Qinchuan breed. The cattle with AA genotype had superior growth traits compared to cattle with AC and/or CC genotypes. The "A" allele had positive effects on growth traits. Therefore, T-ARMS-PCR can replace PCR-RFLP for rapid genotyping of this mutation, which could be used as a DNA marker for selecting individuals with superior growth traits in the Qinchuan breed. These findings contribute to breeding and genetics in beef cattle industry.

  5. High-specificity single-tube multiplex genotyping using Ribo-PAP PCR, tag primers, alkali cleavage of RNA/DNA chimeras and MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Florence; Gelfand, David H; Gupta, Amar; Bodepudi, Veeraiah; Will, Stephen G; Bauer, Keith; Myers, Thomas W; Gut, Ivo G

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe a high-throughput, single-tube, allele-specific ribonucleotide analog pyrophosphorolysis-activated polymerization (ribo-PAP) PCR multiplex genotyping and resequencing method. An RNA/DNA chimeric PCR product is generated using genomic DNA as starting template, a panel of allele-selective 5'-tagged primers, a reverse primer, one nucleotide in the ribo-form (90-100%), the other nucleotides in the deoxy-form, a DNA polymerase capable of incorporating ribonucleotides, a suitable buffer and thermal cycling. The RNA/DNA chimeric PCR products are fragmented by treatment with alkali and analyzed by mass spectrometry. All allele-selective primers have a 5' repetitive motif where each repeat unit has a unique, distinct mass upon reverse copying and alkali fragmentation. The mass of the complement repeat fragment or flag identifies the primer or primers that were recruited in the ribo-PAP PCR. The method readily identifies homozygous and heterozygous positions in simplex or duplex ribo-PAP PCR. Many different tags can be analyzed simultaneously. The assay can genotype several SNPs in a single tube. It thus constitutes the simplest genotyping protocol with multiplex analysis. This novel genotyping and resequencing protocol was applied to different genomic loci: NOS1 and H19 in 30 individuals in simplex ribo-PAP PCR and at two SLCO1B1 loci in 95 individuals in duplex ribo-PAP PCR.

  6. Sequence-modified primers for the differential RT-PCR detection of Andean potato latent and Andean potato mild mosaic viruses in quarantine tests.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Renate; Ziebell, Heiko

    2014-05-01

    To enable the differential PCR detection of Andean potato latent virus (APLV) and Andean potato mild mosaic virus (APMMV) strains, sense primers were designed that correspond to regions directly upstream of the coat protein genes. Their differentiating power was increased by A->C or T->C replacements in their 3'-terminal parts. Together with the broad-specificity antisense primer EM3, primer AL-a-mod3C detected all APLV strains tested, but none of the APMMV strains. Primer AM-a-mod4C yielded PCR products with all APMMV preparations, but also with some APLV preparations. Sequence analysis revealed that this was not due to a lack of primer specificity, but to the sensitive detection of contaminating APMMV in some of our APLV preparations.

  7. Sex determination of early medieval individuals through nested PCR using a new primer set in the SRY gene.

    PubMed

    Luptáková, Lenka; Bábelová, Andrea; Omelka, Radoslav; Kolena, Branislav; Vondráková, Mária; Bauerová, Mária

    2011-04-15

    One of the first questions asked about excavated human skeletal remains is the sex. As the morphological sex determination is complicated in cases involving fragmentary bones and in skeletons from infants and children, the development of DNA-based techniques has led to improvements in sex determination. This study is focused on sex determination from ancient DNA obtained from 25 skeletons found in Middle Aged burials in western Slovakia. We performed separate amplifications of DXZ4 repetitive satellite sequences on the X chromosome, and SRY gene - testis determined factor on the Y chromosome, using nested PCR. Our results showed that DXZ4 was amplified in the case of 23 individuals. With newly designed internal and external primer sets for SRY detection with internal PCR products in lengths of 102 bp and 85 bp we succeeded in detecting the SRY locus in 9 samples. Finally, the gender was determined in 23 individuals (14 females and 9 males). In 20 samples, the gender was determined by morphological and molecular methods. Sex determination of 17 samples using nested PCR matched the morphological one, providing evidence of the authenticity and ancient origin of the PCR amplifications. The DXZ4/SRY nested PCR method represents a useful technique in sex determination of medieval human remains and it is a critical addition to anthropological studies.

  8. Integrating PCR Theory and Bioinformatics into a Research-oriented Primer Design Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Amber L.; Phillips, Allison R.

    2008-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a conceptually difficult technique that embodies many fundamental biological processes. Traditionally, students have struggled to analyze PCR results due to an incomplete understanding of the biological concepts (theory) of DNA replication and strand complementarity. Here we describe the design of a novel…

  9. Integrating PCR Theory and Bioinformatics into a Research-oriented Primer Design Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Amber L.; Phillips, Allison R.

    2008-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a conceptually difficult technique that embodies many fundamental biological processes. Traditionally, students have struggled to analyze PCR results due to an incomplete understanding of the biological concepts (theory) of DNA replication and strand complementarity. Here we describe the design of a novel…

  10. Data supporting the design and evaluation of a universal primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Valadan, Reza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alhosseini-Abyazani, Mahdyieh Naghavi; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) is a common housekeeping gene for sample normalization in the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). However, co-amplification of HPRT1 pseudogenes may affect accurate results obtained in qRT-PCR. We designed a primer pair (HPSF) for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR [1]. We showed specific amplification of HPRT1 mRNA in some common laboratory cell lines, including HeLa, NIH/3T3, CHO, BHK, COS-7 and VERO. This article provides data supporting the presence and location of HPRT1 pseudogenes within human and mouse genome, and the strategies used for designing primers that avoid the co-amplification of contaminating pseudogenes in qRT-PCR. In silico analysis of human genome showed three homologous sequences for HPRT1 on chromosomes 4, 5 and 11. The mRNA sequence of HPRT1 was aligned with the pseudogenes, and the primers were designed toward 5' end of HPRT1 mRNA that was only specific to HPRT1 mRNA not to the pseudogenes. The standard curve plot generated by HPSF primers showed the correlation coefficient of 0.999 and the reaction efficiency of 99.5%. Our findings suggest that HPSF primers can be recommended as a candidate primer pair for accurate and reproducible qRT-PCR assays.

  11. Data supporting the design and evaluation of a universal primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Valadan, Reza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alhosseini-Abyazani, Mahdyieh Naghavi; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) is a common housekeeping gene for sample normalization in the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). However, co-amplification of HPRT1 pseudogenes may affect accurate results obtained in qRT-PCR. We designed a primer pair (HPSF) for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR [1]. We showed specific amplification of HPRT1 mRNA in some common laboratory cell lines, including HeLa, NIH/3T3, CHO, BHK, COS-7 and VERO. This article provides data supporting the presence and location of HPRT1 pseudogenes within human and mouse genome, and the strategies used for designing primers that avoid the co-amplification of contaminating pseudogenes in qRT-PCR. In silico analysis of human genome showed three homologous sequences for HPRT1 on chromosomes 4, 5 and 11. The mRNA sequence of HPRT1 was aligned with the pseudogenes, and the primers were designed toward 5′ end of HPRT1 mRNA that was only specific to HPRT1 mRNA not to the pseudogenes. The standard curve plot generated by HPSF primers showed the correlation coefficient of 0.999 and the reaction efficiency of 99.5%. Our findings suggest that HPSF primers can be recommended as a candidate primer pair for accurate and reproducible qRT-PCR assays. PMID:26217821

  12. Opisthorchis viverrini and Haplorchis taichui: development of a multiplex PCR assay for their detection and differentiation using specific primers derived from HAT-RAPD.

    PubMed

    Wongsawad, Chalobol; Wongsawad, Pheravut

    2012-10-01

    Specific primers for the detection of Opisthorchis viverrini and Haplorchis taichui were investigated by using the HAT-RAPD PCR method. Fourteen arbitrary primers (Operon Technologies) were performed for the generation of polymorphic DNA profiles. The results showed that a 319 bp fragment generated from the OPA-04 primer was expected to be O. viverrini-specific while a 256 bp fragment generated from the OPP-11 primer was considered to be H. taichui-specific. Based on each sequence data, two pairs of specific primers were designed and sequences of each primer were as follows; H. taichui; Hapt_F5'-GGCCAACGCAATCGTCATCC-3'and Hapt_R1 5'-CTCTCGACCTCCTCTAGAAT-3' which yielded a 170 bp PCR product. For O. viverrini, OpV-1F: 5'-AATCGGGCTGCATATTGACCGAT-3' and OpV-1R: 5'-CGGTGTTGCTTATTTTGCAGACAA-3' which generated a 319 bp PCR product. These specific primers were tested for efficacy and specific detection for all parasites DNA samples. The results showed that 170 and 319 bp specific PCR products were generated as equivalent to positive result in H. taichui and O. viverrini, respectively by having no cross-reaction with any parasites tested. PCR conditions are recommended at 68°C annealing temperature and with 0.5 mM magnesium chloride (Mg Cl(2)). Additionally, specific primers developed in this study were effective to determine the presence of both parasites in fish and snail intermediate hosts, which the DNA of O. viverrini was artificially spiked since it is rarely found in northern Thailand. The H. taichui and O. viverrini-specific primers successfully developed in this study can be use for epidemiological monitoring, preventing management and control programs.

  13. Detection and Identification of Gastrointestinal Lactobacillus Species by Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Species-Specific PCR Primers

    PubMed Central

    Walter, J.; Tannock, G. W.; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A.; Rodtong, S.; Loach, D. M.; Munro, K.; Alatossava, T.

    2000-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of DNA fragments obtained by PCR amplification of the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was used to detect the presence of Lactobacillus species in the stomach contents of mice. Lactobacillus isolates cultured from human and porcine gastrointestinal samples were identified to the species level by using a combination of DGGE and species-specific PCR primers that targeted 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region or 16S rRNA gene sequences. The identifications obtained by this approach were confirmed by sequencing the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene and by a BLAST search of the GenBank database. PMID:10618239

  14. A specific test for transthyretin 122 (Val yields Ile), based on PCR-primer-introduced restriction analysis (PCR-PIRA): Confirmation of the gene frequency in blacks

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, D.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The variant transthyretin (TTR) allele, TTR (122 Val {yields} Ile), associated with cardiac amyloidosis in blacks, is caused by a G {yields} A transition which destroys a MaeIII site. This variant has previously been detected by PCR around codon 122, followed by MaeIII digestion, but this test is not specific: any of 12 mutations in the MaeIII recognition site, each of which yields a different amino acid change, would also destroy this site. A modification of PCR, termed PCR-primer-introduced restriction analysis, was used to introduce a new FokI site into the PCR products derived from the variant (122 Ile) but not wild-type (122 Val) allele. This test demonstrated that each of six previously identified MaeIII ({minus}) alleles had lost its MaeIII site because of a G {yields} A transition encoding TTR (122 Val {yields} Ile), confirming that the same TTR variant was present both in 4/177 healthy black individuals and as a homozygous variant in an individual with cardiac amyloidosis.

  15. Degenerate PCR primer design for the specific identification of rhinovirus C.

    PubMed

    Nam, Young Ran; Lee, Uk; Choi, Han Seok; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Nari; Jang, Yong Ju; Joo, Chul Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV)-A and -B is a common cause of upper respiratory tract infections. Recently, a third species, HRV-C, was categorized based on molecular typing studies. The results showed that the HRV-C genome had diverged from that of HRV-A and -B. Despite its late identification, increasing evidence suggests that HRV-C causes more severe pathogenic infections than HRV-A or -B; however, a large amount of epidemiological data is required to confirm this association in different clinical settings. Consequently, a simple and rapid method for identifying HRV-C is required to expedite such epidemiological studies. Here, two degenerate primer sets (HEV and HRVC) were designed based on bioinformatic analyses. The HEV set targeting the fifth IRES domain sequence within the 5'-UTR, which is highly conserved among enteroviruses, was designed to detect all enteroviruses, whereas the HRVC set, which targeted the VP2 coding region, was designed to detect HRV-C alone. Both primer sets were tested against a panel of standard enteroviruses and clinical lavage samples. HEV detected all enteroviruses tested whereas HRVC was specific for HRV-C. Although the primer design strategy was confirmed with a limited number of samples, extensive tests are required to be applied in clinical settings.

  16. Group-specific PCR primers for the phylum Acidobacteria designed based on the comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Cho, Jae-Chang

    2011-08-01

    We performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the phylum Acidobacteria and developed novel, group-specific PCR primers for Acidobacteria and its class-level subgroups. Acidobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences deposited in the RDP database were used to construct a local database then subsequently analyzed. A total of 556 phylotypes were observed and the majority of the phylotypes belonged to five major subgroups (subgroups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6), which comprised >80% of the acidobacterial sequences in the RDP database. Phylum-specific and subgroup-specific primers were designed from the consensus sequences of the phylotype sequences, and the specificities of the designed primers were evaluated both in silico and empirically for coverage and tolerance. The phylum-specific primer ACIDO, which was designed in this study, showed increased coverage for Acidobacteria, as compared to the previous phylum-specific primer 31F. However, the tolerance of the primer ACIDO for non-target sequences was slightly higher than that of the primer 31F. We also developed subgroup-specific PCR primers for the major subgroups of Acidobacteria, except for subgroup 4. Subgroup-specific primers S1, S2, and S3, which targeted subgroups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, showed high coverage for their target subgroups and low tolerance for non-target sequences. However, the primer S6 targeting subgroup 6 showed a lower specificity in its empirical evaluation than expected from the in silico results. The subgroup-specific primers, as well as the phylum-specific primer designed in this study, will be valuable tools in understanding the phylogenetic diversity and ecological niche of the phylum Acidobacteria and its subgroups.

  17. 16S ribosomal DNA-directed PCR primers for ruminal methanogens and identification of methanogens colonising young lambs.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Lucy C; Evans, Paul N; Naylor, Graham E; Morvan, Brieuc; Jarvis, Graeme N; Joblin, Keith N

    2004-10-01

    The population densities and identities of methanogens colonising new-born lambs in a grazing flock were determined from rumen samples collected at regular intervals after birth. Methanogen colonisation was found at the first sampling (1-3 days after birth) and population densities reached around 10(4) methanogens per gram at 1 week of age. Population densities increased in an exponential manner to a maximum of 10(8)-10(9) per gram at 3 weeks of age. To identify methanogens, PCR primers specific for each of the Archaea; a grouping of the orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales and Methanococcales; the order Methanobacteriales; the order Methanococcales; the order Methanosarcinales; the genus Methanobacterium; and the genus Methanobrevibacter were designed. Primer-pair specificities were confirmed in tests with target and non-target micro-organisms. PCR analysis of DNA extracts revealed that all the detectable ruminal methanogens belonged to the order Methanobacteriales, with no methanogens belonging to the Methanomicrobiales, the Methanosarcinales, or the Methanococcales being detected. In 3 lambs, the initial colonising methanogens were Methanobrevibacter spp. and in 2 lambs were a mixture of Methanobrevibacter and Methanobacterium spp. In the latter case, the initial colonising Methanobacterium spp. subsequently disappeared and were not detectable 12-19 days after birth. Seven weeks after birth, lambs contained only Methanobrevibacter spp. This study, the first to provide information on the identities of methanogens colonising pre-ruminants, suggests that the predominant methanogens found in the mature rumen establish very soon after birth and well before a functioning rumen develops.

  18. Development of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase-specific primers for monitoring bioremediation by competitive quantitative PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Mesarch, M.B.; Nakatsu, C.H.; Nies, L.

    2000-02-01

    Benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenol, naphthalene, and biphenyl are among a group of compounds that have at least one reported pathway for biodegradation involving catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzymes. Thus, detection of the corresponding catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes can serve as a basis for identifying and quantifying bacteria that have these catabolic abilities. Primes that can successfully amplify a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene fragment from eight different bacteria are described. The identities of the amplicons were confirmed by hybridization with a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase probe. The detection limit was 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} gene copies, which was lowered to 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 1} gene copies of hybridization. Using the dioxygenase-specific primers, an increase in catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes was detected in petroleum-amended soils. The dioxygenase genes were enumerated by competitive quantitative PCR and a 163-bp competitor that was amplified using the same primers. Target and competitor sequences had identical amplification kinetics. Potential PCR inhibitors that could coextract with DNA, nonamplifying DNA, soil factors (humics), and soil pollutants (toluene) did not impact enumeration. Therefore, this technique can be used to accurately and reproducibly quantify catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes in complex environments such as petroleum-contaminated soil. Direct, non-cultivation-based molecular techniques for detecting and enumerating microbial pollutant-biodegrading genes in environmental samples are powerful tools for monitoring bioremediation and developing field evidence in support of natural attenuation.

  19. New Design Strategy for Development of Specific Primer Sets for PCR-Based Detection of Chlorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae in Environmental Samples▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Valiente Moro, Claire; Crouzet, Olivier; Rasconi, Séréna; Thouvenot, Antoine; Coffe, Gérard; Batisson, Isabelle; Bohatier, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Studying aquatic microalgae is essential for monitoring biodiversity and water quality. We designed new sets of 18S rRNA PCR primers for Chlorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae by using the ARB software and implementing a virtual PCR program. The results of specificity analysis showed that most of the targeted algal families were identified and nontargeted organisms, such as fungi or ciliates, were excluded. These newly developed PCR primer sets were also able to amplify microalgal rRNA genes from environmental samples with accurate specificity. These tools could be of great interest for studying freshwater microalgal ecology and for developing bioindicators of the health status of aquatic environments. PMID:19592531

  20. New design strategy for development of specific primer sets for PCR-based detection of Chlorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Moro, Claire Valiente; Crouzet, Olivier; Rasconi, Séréna; Thouvenot, Antoine; Coffe, Gérard; Batisson, Isabelle; Bohatier, Jacques

    2009-09-01

    Studying aquatic microalgae is essential for monitoring biodiversity and water quality. We designed new sets of 18S rRNA PCR primers for Chlorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae by using the ARB software and implementing a virtual PCR program. The results of specificity analysis showed that most of the targeted algal families were identified and nontargeted organisms, such as fungi or ciliates, were excluded. These newly developed PCR primer sets were also able to amplify microalgal rRNA genes from environmental samples with accurate specificity. These tools could be of great interest for studying freshwater microalgal ecology and for developing bioindicators of the health status of aquatic environments.

  1. Evaluation of strain-specific primer sequences from an abortifacient strain of ovine Chlamydophila abortus (Chalmydia psittaci) for the detection of EAE by PCR.

    PubMed

    Creelan, J L; McCullough, S J

    2000-09-01

    Strain-specific primer sequences derived from the helicase gene of an ovine abortifacient strain (S26/3) of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci) were evaluated for the diagnosis of enzootic abortion in ewes (EAE) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). C abortus DNA was amplified from tissues submitted from ovine abortion cases using genus-specific and strain-specific primers in a standard thermal cycler. Amplification was followed by Southern blotting and hybridisation with a strain-specific probe. Real-time PCR was also evaluated using strain-specific primers in a microvolume fluorimeter-based thermal cycler (LightCycler). Detection using both PCR methods was compared with other diagnostic methods against the standard of McCoy cell culture isolation. In this paper we report the application of strain-specific PCR as a fast, sensitive, specific method for the detection of EAE.

  2. Detection of Stachybotrys chartarum using rRNA, tri5, and beta-tubulin primers and determining their relative copy number by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Black, Jonathan A; Dean, Timothy R; Foarde, Karin; Menetrez, Marc

    2008-07-01

    Highly conserved regions are attractive targets for detection and quantitation by PCR, but designing species-specific primer sets can be difficult. Ultimately, almost all primer sets are designed based upon literature searches in public domain databases, such as the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Prudence suggests that the researcher needs to evaluate as many sequences as available for designing species-specific PCR primers. In this report, we aligned 11, 9, and 16 DNA sequences entered for Stachybotrys spp. rRNA, tri5, and beta-tubulin regions, respectively. Although we were able to align and determine consensus primer sets for the 9 tri5 and the 16 beta-tubulin sequences, there was no consensus sequence that could be derived from alignment of the 11 rRNA sequences. However, by judicious clustering of the sequences that aligned well, we were able to design three sets of primers for the rRNA region of S. chartarum. The two primer sets for tri5 and beta-tubulin produced satisfactory PCR results for all four strains of S. chartarum used in this study whereas only one rRNA primer set of three produced similar satisfactory results. Ultimately, we were able to show that rRNA copy number is approximately 2-log greater than for tri5 and beta-tubulin in the four strains of S. chartarum tested.

  3. Detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum by PCR primer extension and lateral flow immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Moers, A P H A; Hallett, R L; Burrow, R; Schallig, H D F H; Sutherland, C J; van Amerongen, A

    2015-01-01

    The resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to some antimalarial drugs is linked to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Currently, there are no methods for the identification of resistant parasites that are sufficiently simple, cheap, and fast enough to be performed at point-of-care, i.e., in local hospitals where drugs are prescribed. Primer extension methods (PEXT) were developed to identify 4 SNPs in P. falciparum positioned at amino acids 86, 184, and 1246 of the P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (pfmdr1) and amino acid 76 of the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt). The PEXT products were visualized by a nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay (NALFIA) with carbon nanoparticles as the detection labels. PCR-PEXT-NALFIAs showed good correlation to the reference methods, quantitative PCR (qPCR) or direct amplicon sequence analysis, in an initial open-label evaluation with 17 field samples. The tests were further evaluated in a blind study design in a set of 150 patient isolates. High specificities of 98 to 100% were found for all 4 PCR-PEXT genotyping assays. The sensitivities ranged from 75% to 100% when all PEXT-positive tests were considered. A number of samples with a low parasite density were successfully characterized by the reference methods but failed to generate a result in the PCR-PEXT-NALFIA, particularly those samples with microscopy-negative subpatent infections. This proof-of principle study validates the use of PCR-PEXT-NALFIA for the detection of resistance-associated mutations in P. falciparum, particularly for microscopy-positive infections. Although it requires a standard thermal cycler, the procedure is cheap and rapid and thus a potentially valuable tool for point-of-care detection in developing countries.

  4. Detection of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum by PCR Primer Extension and Lateral Flow Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Moers, A. P. H. A.; Hallett, R. L.; Burrow, R.; Schallig, H. D. F. H.; Sutherland, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to some antimalarial drugs is linked to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Currently, there are no methods for the identification of resistant parasites that are sufficiently simple, cheap, and fast enough to be performed at point-of-care, i.e., in local hospitals where drugs are prescribed. Primer extension methods (PEXT) were developed to identify 4 SNPs in P. falciparum positioned at amino acids 86, 184, and 1246 of the P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (pfmdr1) and amino acid 76 of the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt). The PEXT products were visualized by a nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay (NALFIA) with carbon nanoparticles as the detection labels. PCR-PEXT-NALFIAs showed good correlation to the reference methods, quantitative PCR (qPCR) or direct amplicon sequence analysis, in an initial open-label evaluation with 17 field samples. The tests were further evaluated in a blind study design in a set of 150 patient isolates. High specificities of 98 to 100% were found for all 4 PCR-PEXT genotyping assays. The sensitivities ranged from 75% to 100% when all PEXT-positive tests were considered. A number of samples with a low parasite density were successfully characterized by the reference methods but failed to generate a result in the PCR-PEXT-NALFIA, particularly those samples with microscopy-negative subpatent infections. This proof-of principle study validates the use of PCR-PEXT-NALFIA for the detection of resistance-associated mutations in P. falciparum, particularly for microscopy-positive infections. Although it requires a standard thermal cycler, the procedure is cheap and rapid and thus a potentially valuable tool for point-of-care detection in developing countries. PMID:25367901

  5. Simultaneous identification and DNA barcoding of six Eimeria species infecting turkeys using PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Mian A; Shivaramaiah, Srichaitanya; Dorsey, Kristi Moore; Ogedengbe, Mosun E; El-Sherry, Shiem; Whale, Julia; Cobean, Julie; Barta, John R

    2015-05-01

    Species-specific PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus were generated that allow for the specific identification of the most common Eimeria species infecting turkeys (i.e., Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria gallopavonis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria innocua). PCR reaction chemistries were optimized with respect to divalent cation (MgCl2) and dNTP concentrations, as well as PCR cycling conditions (particularly anneal temperature for primers). Genomic DNA samples from single oocyst-derived lines of six Eimeria species were tested to establish specificity and sensitivity of these newly designed primer pairs. A mixed 60-ng total DNA sample containing 10 ng of each of the six Eimeria species was used as DNA template to demonstrate specific amplification of the correct product using each of the species-specific primer pairs. Ten nanograms of each of the five non-target Eimeria species was pooled to provide a non-target, control DNA sample suitable to test the specificity of each primer pair. The amplifications of the COI region with species-specific primer pairs from pooled samples yielded products of expected sizes (209 to 1,012 bp) and no amplification of non-target Eimeria sp. DNA was detected using the non-target, control DNA samples. These primer pairs specific for Eimeria spp. of turkeys did not amplify any of the seven Eimeria species infecting chickens. The newly developed PCR primers can be used as a diagnostic tool capable of specifically identifying six turkey Eimeria species; additionally, sequencing of the PCR amplification products yields sequence-based genotyping data suitable for identification and molecular phylogenetics.

  6. Hepatitis C Virus RNA Real-Time Quantitative RT-PCR Method Based on a New Primer Design Strategy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lida; Li, Wenli; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Rui; Lu, Tian; Hao, Mingju; Jia, Tingting; Sun, Yu; Lin, Guigao; Wang, Lunan; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Viral nucleic acids are unstable when improperly collected, handled, and stored, resulting in decreased sensitivity of currently available commercial quantitative nucleic acid testing kits. Using known unstable hepatitis C virus RNA, we developed a quantitative RT-PCR method based on a new primer design strategy to reduce the impact of nucleic acid instability on nucleic acid testing. The performance of the method was evaluated for linearity, limit of detection, precision, specificity, and agreement with commercial hepatitis C virus assays. Its clinical application was compared to that of two commercial kits--Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan (CAP/CTM) and Kehua. The quantitative RT-PCR method delivered a good performance, with a linearity of R(2) = 0.99, a total limit of detection (genotypes 1 to 6) of 42.6 IU/mL (95% CI, 32.84 to 67.76 IU/mL), a CV of 1.06% to 3.34%, a specificity of 100%, and a high concordance with the CAP/CTM assay (R(2) = 0.97), with a means ± SD value of -0.06 ± 1.96 log IU/mL (range, -0.38 to 0.25 log IU/mL). The method was superior to commercial assays in detecting unstable hepatitis C virus RNA (P < 0.05). This quantitative RT-PCR method can effectively eliminate the influence of RNA instability on nucleic acid testing. The principle of primer design strategy may be applied to the detection of other RNA or DNA viruses. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Further analysis of Del (D-elute) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with RHD gene-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Fukumori, Y; Hori, Y; Ohnoki, S; Nagao, N; Shibata, H; Okubo, Y; Yamaguchi, H

    1997-09-01

    Del (D-elute) in the Rh blood group system is a variant with very weak D antigen and no agglutination is found by the indirect antiglobulin test. This variant is characterized by the presence of anti-D eluate obtained after an adsorption-elution test using anti-D antibodies. We studied here the molecular genetic status of Del by using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). We screened 306 serologically apparent D-negative Japanese donors comprising 102 Del types for exons 7, 4 and 10 of the RHD gene. No PCR product was found in all 204 non-Del samples from the D-seronegative donors. However, PCR products were found in all 102 Del samples and all 70 D-seropositive samples tested by the three PCR methods for exons 7, 4 and 10 analysis. Del was found with CCee, CcEe and Ccee, but not with CCEe, CcEE, ccEE, ccEe or ccee phenotype. The incidences of Del in the samples with the serological phenotypes CCee, CcEe and Ccee were 80.0% (4/5), 68.2% (45/66) and 61.6% (53/86), respectively. The results provide evidence that Del samples have exons 4, 7 and 10 of an RHD gene present in some form. This is consistent with the evidence that D antigen is present on the cells although only detected by antibody adsorption and elution. The PCR-SSP method in the present study is useful to confirm Del among serologically apparent D-negative samples.

  8. Mitochondrial D-loop {open_quotes}signatures{close_quotes} produced by low-stringency single specific primer PCR constitute a simple comparative human identity test

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, G.; Vago, A.R.; Pena, S.D.J.

    1996-03-01

    We have developed a technique called {open_quotes}LSSP-PCR{close_quotes} (low-stringency single specific primer PCR) that detects single or multiple mutations in DNA. A purified DNA fragment is submitted to PCR by using a single primer specific for one of the extremities of the fragment, under conditions of very low stringency. The primer hybridizes specifically to its complementary extremity and nonspecifically to multiple sites within the fragment, in a sequence-dependent manner. A complex set of reaction products is thus created that, when separated by electrophoresis, constitutes a unique {open_quotes}gene signature.{close_quotes} We here report the application of LSSP-PCR to the detection of sequence variation in the control (D-loop) region of human mtDNA, which is known to differ significantly between unrelated individuals. We prepared human DNA samples from blood and amplified a 1,024-bp portion of the mtDNA control region, using primers L15996 and H408. The amplified mtDNA fragments were then reamplified under LSSP-PCR conditions by using L15996 or H408 as drivers to produce complex signatures that always differed between unrelated individuals and yet were highly reproducible. In contrast, all mother-child pairs tested were identical, as expected from the matrilineal inheritance of mtDNA. Thus, the use of LSSP-PCR to produce D-loop signatures constitutes a powerful new technique for mtDNA-based comparative identity testing. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Rapid diagnosis of common deletional α-thalassemia in the Chinese population by qPCR based on identical primer homologous fragments.

    PubMed

    Long, Ju

    2016-05-01

    In China, -(SEA), -α(3.7) and -α(4.2) are common deletional α-thalassemia alleles. Gap-PCR is the currently used detection method for these alleles, whose disadvantages include time-consuming procedure and increased potential for PCR product contamination. Therefore, this detection method needs to be improved. Based on identical-primer homologous fragments, a qPCR system was developed for deletional α-thalassemia genotyping, which was composed of a group of quantitatively-related primers and their corresponding probes plus two groups of qualitatively-related primers and their corresponding probes. In order to verify the accuracy of the qPCR system, known genotype samples and random samples are employed. The standard curve result demonstrated that designed primers and probes all yielded good amplification efficiency. In the tests of known genotype samples and random samples, sample detection results were consistent with verification results. In detecting αα, -(SEA), -α(3.7) and -α(4.2) alleles, deletional α-thalassemia alleles are accurately detected by this method. In addition, this method is provided with a wider detection range, greater speed and reduced PCR product contamination risk when compared with current common gap-PCR detection reagents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prey choice by carabid beetles feeding on an earthworm community analysed using species- and lineage-specific PCR primers.

    PubMed

    King, R Andrew; Vaughan, Ian P; Bell, James R; Bohan, David A; Symondson, William O C

    2010-04-01

    The carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius is a major natural enemy of pests, such as aphids and slugs in agricultural systems. Earthworms are a dominant non-pest component of the diet of P. melanarius which help sustain the beetles during periods when the pest population is low or absent. In this study we wanted to test whether this predator exercises prey choice among different earthworm species or ecological groups. High levels of genetic diversity within morphological species of earthworm necessitated the development of primers that were specific not just to species but lineages and sub-lineages within species as well. Gut samples from beetles were analysed using multiplex-PCR and fluorescent-labelled primers. Calibratory feeding trials were undertaken to calculate median detection times for prey DNA following ingestion. Extensive testing demonstrated that the primers were species-specific, that detection periods were negatively related to amplicon size and that meal size had a highly significant effect on detection periods. Monte Carlo simulations showed that, in general, worms were being predated in proportion to their densities in the field with little evidence of prey choice, other than probable avoidance of the larger, deep-living species. There was no evidence that epigeic species were being taken preferentially in comparison with endogeic species. There was also no evidence that defensive secretions by Allolobophora chlorotica reduced predation pressure on this species by P. melanarius. We concluded that any management system that increases earthworm densities generally, regardless of component species, is likely to be optimal for increasing numbers of this beneficial beetle predator.

  11. RT-PCR for detecting five distinct Tospovirus species using degenerate primers and dsRNA template.

    PubMed

    Okuda, M; Hanada, K

    2001-08-01

    RT-PCR procedures for detection of multiple species of tospovirus from plant tissues were investigated. Downstream primers were designated from the 3' untranslated sequences of the S RNA. An upstream primer was designated from the degenerated sequences of the nucleocapsid protein. Approximately 450 bp DNA fragments were detected when Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV)- or Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV)- infected tissues were examined. Approximately 350 bp DNA fragments were detected when Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV)- or Melon yellow spot virus (MYSV)-infected tissues were examined. Template RNA was extracted using CF 11 cellulose powder, and nonspecific amplification became unnoticeable when double-stranded RNA was used. The amplified fragments of WSMoV were differentiated from those of MYSV by AluI or TaqI digestion. The amplified fragments of TSWV were differentiated from those of INSV by DraI or HindIII digestion. An alstroemeria plant that was infected with an unidentified tospovirus was also examined, and a 350 bp fragment that was 97% identical to Iris yellow spot virus was detected. This method, therefore, detected at least five distinct Tospovirus species.

  12. Development of new PCR primers by comparative genomics for the detection of Helicobacter suis in gastric biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hidenori; Takahashi, Tetsufumi; Murayama, Somay Y; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kawakubo, Masatomo; Horiuchi, Kazuki; Ota, Hiroyoshi; Osaki, Takako; Kamiya, Shigeru; Smet, Annemieke; Flahou, Bram; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Takahashi, Shinichi; Nakamura, Shinichi; Nakamura, Masahiko

    2014-08-01

    Although the infection rate of Helicobacter suis is significantly lower than that of Helicobacter pylori, the H. suis infection is associated with a high rate of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. In addition, in vitro cultivation of H. suis remains difficult, and some H. suis-infected patients show negative results on the urea breath test (UBT). Female C57BL/6J mice were orally inoculated with mouse gastric mucosal homogenates containing H. suis strains TKY or SNTW101 isolated from a cynomolgus monkey or a patient suffering from nodular gastritis, respectively. The high-purity chromosomal DNA samples of H. suis strains TKY and SNTW101 were prepared from the infected mouse gastric mucosa. The SOLiD sequencing of two H. suis genomes enabled comparative genomics of 20 Helicobacter and 11 Campylobacter strains for the identification of the H. suis-specific nucleotide sequences. Oral inoculation with mouse gastric mucosal homogenates containing H. suis strains TKY and SNTW101 induced gastric MALT lymphoma and the formation of gastric lymphoid follicles, respectively, in C57BL/6J mice. Two conserved nucleotide sequences among six H. suis strains were identified and were used to design diagnostic PCR primers for the detection of H. suis. There was a strong association between the H. suis infection and gastric diseases in the C57BL/6 mouse model. PCR diagnosis using an H. suis-specific primer pair is a valuable method for detecting H. suis in gastric biopsy specimens. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Novel multiplex PCR assay using locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based universal primers for the simultaneous detection of five swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Song, Chang-Xu; Qiu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    A novel multiplex PCR assay using non-homologous oligonucleotides with locked nucleic acid (LNA) modifications as universal primers was developed and validated for the simultaneous detection of five swine viruses. The assay utilizes five virus-specific primer pairs modified at the 5' end through the addition of the universal primer sequence. In the reaction, small amounts of target templates with the 5' tail were generated and subsequently amplified through the extension of a LNA universal primer set. To validate the specificity of this assay, 27 viral target strains and 12 non-target pathogens were tested. The lower limit of detection of viral nucleic acids was 1.1-1.9 pg per reaction or 11-32 pg in a five-plex viral nucleic acid mixture. The LNA mPCR assay displayed higher analytical sensitivity and efficiency for the detection of plasmid standards compared with the conventional assay, which uses standard primers without the 5' tail. A total of 207 field samples were tested using both assays. The LNA mPCR assay provided numerically higher detection rates for all pathogens in independent samples. Moreover, the LNA mPCR assay had significantly higher detection rates in independent samples compared with the conventional assay.

  14. Agronomically important thrips: development of species-specific primers in multiplex PCR and microarray assay using internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences for identification.

    PubMed

    Yeh, W B; Tseng, M J; Chang, N T; Wu, S Y; Tsai, Y S

    2015-02-01

    Thrips, the sole vector of plant Tospovirus, are major pests of many agricultural crops throughout the world. Molecular approaches have been applied in recent decades to identify these minute and morphologically difficult to distinguish insects. In this study, sequences of internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of 15 agronomically important thrips, including several virus transmission species, have been analyzed in order to design species-specific primers for multiplex PCR and probes for microarray assay. That the ITS1 sequence distances within species were smaller than those among species suggests that the ITS1 fragment can be used for thrips species identification. The specificity and stability of these primers, combined with universal paired primers, were tested and verified in multiplex PCR. Using these specific primers as probes, microarray assay showed that PCR products of all thrips species hybridized consistently to their corresponding probes, though some signals were weak. We have demonstrated that multiplex PCR using specific primers based on ITS1 sequences is a simple, reliable, and cost-effective diagnostic tool for thrips species identification. Moreover, the DNA microarray assay is expected to extend into a reliable high-throughput screening tool for the vast numbers of thrips.

  15. Assessment of primers designed for the subspecies-specific discrimination among Babesia canis canis, Babesia canis vogeli and Babesia canis rossi by PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sabrina Castilho; Linhares, Guido Fontgalland Coelho; Romanowsky, Tatiana Nunes; da Silveira Neto, Osvaldo José; Borges, Ligia Miranda Ferreira

    2008-03-25

    Canine babesiosis is an infectious disease caused by either Babesia gibsoni or Babesia canis protozoans. The latter is also classified under three different phylogenetic groups, referred to as subspecies B. canis canis, B. canis vogeli and B. canis rossi. The objective of the present study was to validate and standardize a PCR assay to discriminate the organisms at the subspecies level. First, the reference sequences of the 18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA and 28S rRNA genes, including the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and 2 (ITS2) of the most common species and subspecies of the genus Babesia were retrieved from the GenBank database. Subspecies-specific primers (BAB3, BAB4 and BAB5) and one genus-specific primer were designed from the alignment of the sequences. The PCR assays were evaluated in three different combinations of primer pairs in order to assure complete specificity for each reaction. The results of the tests had demonstrated effectiveness of the novel primer pairs BAB1/BAB3, BAB1/BAB4 and BAB1/BAB5 for the amplification of the subspecies-specific target fragments of 746 bp (B. c. canis), 546 bp (B. c. vogeli) and 342 bp (B. c. rossi) by PCR. The original enzymatic amplification assays with novel primers reported in this paper were confirmed to be a reliable tool for the specific discrimination among B. canis subspecies by single-step PCR assays.

  16. Group-specific identification of polioviruses by PCR using primers containing mixed-base or deoxyinosine residue at positions of codon degeneracy.

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, D R; Nottay, B; Yang, C F; Yang, S J; Mulders, M N; Holloway, B P; Pallansch, M A; Kew, O M

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a method for differentiating polioviruses from nonpolio enteroviruses using PCR. A pair of panpoliovirus PCR primers were designed to match intervals encoding amino acid sequences within VP1 that are strongly conserved among polioviruses. The initiating primer hybridizes with codons of a 7-amino-acid sequence that has been found only in polioviruses; the second primer matches codons of a domain thought to interact with the cell receptor. The panpoliovirus PCR primers contain mixed-base and deoxyinosine residues to compensate for the high degeneracy of the targeted codons. All RNAs from 48 vaccine-related and 110 wild poliovirus isolates of all three serotypes served as efficient templates for amplification of 79-bp product. None of the genomic sequences of 49 nonpolio enterovirus reference strains were amplified under equivalent reaction conditions. Sensitivities of poliovirus detection were as low as 100 fg (equivalent to approximately 25,000 genomic copies or 25 to 250 PFU) when the amplified products were visualized by ethidium bromide fluorescence. These degenerate PCR primers should aid in the detection of all polioviruses, including those wild poliovirus isolates for which genotype-specific reagents are unavailable. PMID:8940436

  17. [Rapid detection of mutations related to Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance by using Hp-rPCR (hairpin primer- real time PCR) method].

    PubMed

    Kai, Masanori

    2014-03-01

    Rapid and simple detection method of drug resistance bacteria is required. In the present study, Hp-rPCR (hairpin primer-real time PCR) was applied to Mycobacterium leprae genes to detect mutations. Target sites of the method were as follows: first base and second base on 53rd codon and second base on 55th codon infolP1 gene for dapsone resistance, first base on 441st codon and 451st codon and second base on 456th and 458th codon in rpoB gene for rifampicin resistance, and first base on 89th codon and second base on 91st codon in gyrA gene for quinolone resistance which were common mutation sites in clinical reports. The total number of the target sites was 9. Mycobacterium leprae, Thai-53, Zensho-2 and Zensho-4 were used as reference bacteria in the present study and clear, reliable results were obtained. Double-blind study was conducted using 15 samples. The number of target sites was calculated as 135 in total by 9 sites in 15 samples. There was only one misreading in the blind samples and the sensitivity was more than 99%.

  18. Empirical testing of 16S rRNA gene PCR primer pairs reveals variance in target specificity and efficacy not suggested by in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sergio E; Holben, William E

    2009-05-01

    Phylogenetic and "fingerprinting" analyses of the 16S rRNA genes of prokaryotes have been a mainstay of microbial ecology during the last two decades. However, many methods and results from studies that rely on the 16S rRNA gene for detection and quantification of specific microbial taxa have seemingly received only cursory or even no validation. To directly examine the efficacy and specificity of 16S rRNA gene-based primers for phylum-, class-, and operational taxonomic unit-specific target amplification in quantitative PCR, we created a collection of primers based solely on an extensive soil bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library containing approximately 5,000 sequences from a single soil sample (i.e., a closed site-specific library was used to create PCR primers for use at this site). These primers were initially tested in silico prior to empirical testing by PCR amplification of known target sequences and of controls based on disparate phylogenetic groups. Although all primers were highly specific according to the in silico analysis, the empirical analyses clearly exhibited a high degree of nonspecificity for many of the phyla or classes, while other primers proved to be highly specific. These findings suggest that significant care must be taken when interpreting studies whose results were obtained with target specific primers that were not adequately validated, especially where population densities or dynamics have been inferred from the data. Further, we suggest that the reliability of quantification of specific target abundance using 16S rRNA-based quantitative PCR is case specific and must be determined through rigorous empirical testing rather than solely in silico.

  19. Comparison of the Performances of Five Primer Sets for the Detection and Quantification of Plasmodium in Anopheline Vectors by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeau, V.; Andolina, C.; Fustec, B.; Tuikue Ndam, N.; Brengues, C.; Herder, S.; Cerqueira, D.; Chareonviriyaphap, T.; Nosten, F.; Corbel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qrtPCR) has made a significant improvement for the detection of Plasmodium in anopheline vectors. A wide variety of primers has been used in different assays, mostly adapted from molecular diagnosis of malaria in human. However, such an adaptation can impact the sensitivity of the PCR. Therefore we compared the sensitivity of five primer sets with different molecular targets on blood stages, sporozoites and oocysts standards of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) and P. vivax (Pv). Dilution series of standard DNA were used to discriminate between methods at low concentrations of parasite and to generate standard curves suitable for the absolute quantification of Plasmodium sporozoites. Our results showed that the best primers to detect blood stages were not necessarily the best ones to detect sporozoites. Absolute detection threshold of our qrtPCR assay varied between 3.6 and 360 Pv sporozoites and between 6 and 600 Pf sporozoites per mosquito according to the primer set used in the reaction mix. In this paper, we discuss the general performance of each primer set and highlight the need to use efficient detection methods for transmission studies. PMID:27441839

  20. Comparison of the Performances of Five Primer Sets for the Detection and Quantification of Plasmodium in Anopheline Vectors by Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Chaumeau, V; Andolina, C; Fustec, B; Tuikue Ndam, N; Brengues, C; Herder, S; Cerqueira, D; Chareonviriyaphap, T; Nosten, F; Corbel, V

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qrtPCR) has made a significant improvement for the detection of Plasmodium in anopheline vectors. A wide variety of primers has been used in different assays, mostly adapted from molecular diagnosis of malaria in human. However, such an adaptation can impact the sensitivity of the PCR. Therefore we compared the sensitivity of five primer sets with different molecular targets on blood stages, sporozoites and oocysts standards of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) and P. vivax (Pv). Dilution series of standard DNA were used to discriminate between methods at low concentrations of parasite and to generate standard curves suitable for the absolute quantification of Plasmodium sporozoites. Our results showed that the best primers to detect blood stages were not necessarily the best ones to detect sporozoites. Absolute detection threshold of our qrtPCR assay varied between 3.6 and 360 Pv sporozoites and between 6 and 600 Pf sporozoites per mosquito according to the primer set used in the reaction mix. In this paper, we discuss the general performance of each primer set and highlight the need to use efficient detection methods for transmission studies.

  1. Species-specific ITS primers for the identification of Picoa juniperi and Picoa lefebvrei and using nested-PCR for detection of P. juniperi in planta.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Samad; Banihashemi, Zia

    2013-10-01

    Desert truffles, hypogeous Pezizales (Ascomycota), are difficult to identify due to evolutionary convergence of morphological characters among taxa that share a similar habitat and mode of spore dispersal. Also, during their symbiotic phase, these are barely distinguishable morphologically, and molecular probes are needed for their identification. We have developed a PCR-based method for the identification of Picoa juniperi and Picoa lefebvrei based on internal transcribed spacers of rDNA. Two PCR primers specific for P. lefebvrei (FLE/RLE) and two specific for P. juniperi (FJU/RJU) were designed. A collection of samples from different geographical areas representing diversity of these species were examined for unique regions of internal transcribed spacers 1, 2 and 5.8S gene of rDNA (ITS) compared to other closely related species. Annealing temperatures and extension times were optimized for each set of primers for maximum specificity and efficiency. They proved to be efficient to specifically detect the presence of P. juniperi and P. lefebvrei by PCR and neither set amplified purified DNA from other truffle species as well as some ascomycetous fungi. The partial small subunit of ribosomal DNA genes of P. juniperi were amplified with the genomic DNA extracted from Helianthemum ledifolium var. ledifolium roots by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the universal fungal primer pair ITS1/ITS4 and specific primer pair FTC/RTC, which was designed based on internal transcribed spacer 1, 2 and 5.8S gene of rDNA sequences of P juniperi. The nested-PCR was sensitive enough to re-amplify the direct-PCR product, resulting in a DNA fragment of 426 bp. The efficacy of nested-PCR showed that it could re-amplify the direct-PCR product and detect 200 fg genomic DNA.

  2. Highly specific and efficient primers for in-house multiplex PCR detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although sophisticated methodologies are available, the use of endpoint polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect 16S rDNA genes remains a good approach for estimating the incidence and prevalence of specific infections and for monitoring infections. Considering the importance of the early diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), the development of a sensitive and affordable method for identifying pathogens in clinical samples is needed. Highly specific and efficient primers for a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) system were designed in silico to detect the 16S rDNA genes of four bacteria that cause genital infections, and the PCR method was developed. Methods The Genosensor Probe Designer (GPD) (version 1.0a) software was initially used to design highly specific and efficient primers for in-house m-PCR. Single-locus PCR reactions were performed and standardised, and then primers for each locus in turn were added individually in subsequent amplifications until m-PCR was achieved. Amplicons of the expected size were obtained from each of the four bacterial gene fragments. Finally, the analytical specificity and limits of detection were tested. Results Because they did not amplify any product from non-STI tested species, the primers were specific. The detection limits for the Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum primer sets were 5.12 × 105, 3.9 × 103, 61.19 × 106 and 6.37 × 105 copies of a DNA template, respectively. Conclusions The methodology designed and standardised here could be applied satisfactorily for the simultaneous or individual detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum. This method is at least as efficient as other previously described methods; however, this method is more affordable for low-income countries. PMID:24997675

  3. Use of 16S rRNA Gene-Targeted Group-Specific Primers for Real-Time PCR Analysis of Predominant Bacteria in Mouse Feces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Wen; Chen, Mang-Kun; Yang, Bing-Ya; Huang, Xian-Jie; Zhang, Xue-Rui; He, Liang-Qiang; Zhang, Jing; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2015-10-01

    Mouse models are widely used for studying gastrointestinal (GI) tract-related diseases. It is necessary and important to develop a new set of primers to monitor the mouse gut microbiota. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-targeted group-specific primers for Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Deferribacteres, "Candidatus Saccharibacteria," Verrucomicrobia, Tenericutes, and Proteobacteria were designed and validated for quantification of the predominant bacterial species in mouse feces by real-time PCR. After confirmation of their accuracy and specificity by high-throughput sequencing technologies, these primers were applied to quantify the changes in the fecal samples from a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis mouse model. Our results showed that this approach efficiently predicted the occurrence of colitis, such as spontaneous chronic inflammatory bowel disease in transgenic mice. The set of primers developed in this study provides a simple and affordable method to monitor changes in the intestinal microbiota at the phylum level.

  4. Redesign of PCR primers for mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I for marine invertebrates and application in all-taxa biotic surveys.

    PubMed

    Geller, J; Meyer, C; Parker, M; Hawk, H

    2013-09-01

    DNA barcoding is a powerful tool for species detection, identification and discovery. Metazoan DNA barcoding is primarily based upon a specific region of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene that is PCR amplified by primers HCO2198 and LCO1490 ('Folmer primers') designed by Folmer et al. (Molecular Marine Biology and Biotechnology, 3, 1994, 294). Analysis of sequences published since 1994 has revealed mismatches in the Folmer primers to many metazoans. These sequences also show that an extremely high level of degeneracy would be necessary in updated Folmer primers to maintain broad taxonomic utility. In primers jgHCO2198 and jgLCO1490, we replaced most fully degenerated sites with inosine nucleotides that complement all four natural nucleotides and modified other sites to better match major marine invertebrate groups. The modified primers were used to amplify and sequence cytochrome c oxidase subunit I from 9105 specimens from Moorea, French Polynesia and San Francisco Bay, California, USA representing 23 phyla, 42 classes and 121 orders. The new primers, jgHCO2198 and jgLCO1490, are well suited for routine DNA barcoding, all-taxon surveys and metazoan metagenomics.

  5. Improvement in HLA-DQB typing by PCR-RFLP: introduction of a constant restriction site in one of the primers for digestion control.

    PubMed

    Mercier, B; Ferec, C; Dufosse, F; Huart, J J

    1992-08-01

    The PCR-RFLP method previously reported by Inoko is a powerful technique for HLA class II typing. The reliability of RFLP interpretation depends on complete digestion by restriction endonucleases using a modified primer with restriction sites as an internal digestion control. The use of restriction enzymes which recognize specific HLA DQB allelic variations makes HLA DQB genotyping possible.

  6. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRNA Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  7. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRna Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  8. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRna Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  9. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRNA Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  10. Genogroup I and II Noroviruses Detected in Stool Samples by Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Using Highly Degenerate Universal Primers

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Gary P.; Watson, Michael A.; Fankhauser, Rebecca L.; Monroe, Stephan S.

    2004-01-01

    Genogroup I noroviruses from five genetic clusters and genogroup II noroviruses from eight genetic clusters were detected in stool extracts using degenerate primers and single-tube, real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with SYBR Green detection. Two degenerate primer sets, designated MON 431-433 and MON 432-434, were designed from consensus sequences from the major clusters of norovirus based on the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase region of the norovirus genome. Viruses were extracted from stool samples within 20 min using a viral RNA extraction kit. Real-time RT-PCR for noroviruses generated semiquantitative results by means of the cycle threshold data and dilution endpoint standard curves. Presumptive product verification was achieved by evaluation of first-derivative melt graphs. Multiple clusters of noroviruses were identified simultaneously in a multiplex fashion by virtue of slight differences in melting temperature. The detection of 13 different genetic clusters suggests that the MON primers may serve as universal primers for most, if not all, of the noroviruses in a multiplex assay. Our technique provides a framework for broad application of real-time RT-PCR in clinical, environmental, and food testing laboratories for a wide range of noroviruses. PMID:15574915

  11. Establishment and Validation of a Non-Radioactive Method for In Vitro Transcription Assay Using Primer Extension and Quantitative Real Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Zhao, Shasha; Zhou, Ying; Wei, Yun; Deng, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Primer extension-dependent in vitro transcription assay is one of the most important approaches in the research field of gene transcription. However, conventional in vitro transcription assays incorporates radioactive isotopes that cause environmental and health concerns and restricts its scope of application. Here we report a novel non-radioactive method for in vitro transcription analysis by combining primer extension with quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). We show that the DNA template within the transcription system can be effectively eliminated to a very low level by our specially designed approach, and that the primers uniquely designed for primer extension and qPCR can specifically recognize the RNA transcripts. Quantitative PCR data demonstrate that the novel method has successfully been applied to in vitro transcription analyses using the adenovirus E4 and major late promoters. Furthermore, we show that the TFIIB recognition element inhibits transcription of TATA-less promoters using both conventional and nonradioactive in vitro transcription assays. Our method will benefit the laboratories that need to perform in vitro transcription but either lack of or choose to avoid radioactive facilities. PMID:26252791

  12. Simultaneous detection of virulence factors from a colony in diarrheagenic Escherichia coli by a multiplex PCR assay with Alexa Fluor-labeled primers.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Masaru; Shigemoto, Naoki; Oohara, Sachiko; Tanizawa, Yukie; Yamada, Hiroko; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Matsuo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Shinji

    2011-07-01

    We have developed simultaneous detection of eight genes associated with the five categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli by the multiplex PCR assay with Alexa Fluor-labeled primers. This assay can easily distinguish eight genes based on the size and color of amplified products without gel staining.

  13. The Choice of PCR Primers Has Great Impact on Assessments of Bacterial Community Diversity and Dynamics in a Wastewater Treatment Plant

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Nils Johan; Hermansson, Malte; Wilén, Britt-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Assessments of bacterial community diversity and dynamics are fundamental for the understanding of microbial ecology as well as biotechnological applications. We show that the choice of PCR primers has great impact on the results of analyses of diversity and dynamics using gene libraries and DNA fingerprinting. Two universal primer pairs targeting the 16S rRNA gene, 27F&1492R and 63F&M1387R, were compared and evaluated by analyzing the bacterial community in the activated sludge of a large-scale wastewater treatment plant. The two primer pairs targeted distinct parts of the bacterial community, none encompassing the other, both with similar richness. Had only one primer pair been used, very different conclusions had been drawn regarding dominant phylogenetic and putative functional groups. With 27F&1492R, Betaproteobacteria would have been determined to be the dominating taxa while 63F&M1387R would have described Alphaproteobacteria as the most common taxa. Microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that both Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were abundant in the activated sludge, confirming that the two primer pairs target two different fractions of the bacterial community. Furthermore, terminal restriction fragment polymorphism analyses of a series of four activated sludge samples showed that the two primer pairs would have resulted in different conclusions about community stability and the factors contributing to changes in community composition. In conclusion, different PCR primer pairs, although considered universal, target different ranges of bacteria and will thus show the diversity and dynamics of different fractions of the bacterial community in the analyzed sample. We also show that while a database search can serve as an indicator of how universal a primer pair is, an experimental assessment is necessary to evaluate the suitability for a specific environmental sample. PMID:24098498

  14. Design and testing of multiplex RT-PCR primers for the rapid detection of influenza A virus genomic segments: Application to equine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, EunJung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Shin, Yeun-Kyung; Song, Jae-Young

    2016-02-01

    The avian influenza A virus causes respiratory infections in animal species. It can undergo genomic recombination with newly obtained genetic material through an interspecies transmission. However, the process is an unpredictable event, making it difficult to predict the emergence of a new pandemic virus and distinguish its origin, especially when the virus is the result of multiple infections. Therefore, identifying a novel influenza is entirely dependent on sequencing its whole genome. Occasionally, however, it can be time-consuming, costly, and labor-intensive when sequencing many influenza viruses. To compensate for the difficulty, we developed a rapid, cost-effective, and simple multiplex RT-PCR to identify the viral genomic segments. As an example to evaluate its performance, H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV) was studied for the purpose. In developing this protocol to amplify the EIV eight-segments, a series of processes, including phylogenetic analysis based on different influenza hosts, in silico analyses to estimate primer specificity, coverage, and variation scores, and investigation of host-specific amino acids, were progressively conducted to reduce or eliminate the negative factors that might affect PCR amplification. Selectively, EIV specific primers were synthesized with dual priming oligonucleotides (DPO) system to increase primer specificity. As a result, 16 primer pairs were selected to screen the dominantly circulating H3N8 EIV 8 genome segments: PA (3), PB2 (1), PA (3), NP (3), NA8 (2), HA3 (1), NS (1), and M (2). The diagnostic performance of the primers was evaluated with eight sets composing of four segment combinations using viral samples from various influenza hosts. The PCR results suggest that the multiplex RT-PCR has a wide range of applications in detection and diagnosis of newly emerging EIVs. Further, the proposed procedures of designing multiplex primers are expected to be used for detecting other animal influenza A viruses.

  15. Development of 2, 7-Diamino-1, 8-Naphthyridine (DANP) Anchored Hairpin Primers for RT-PCR Detection of Chikungunya Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huixin; Parimelalagan, Mariya; Takei, Fumie; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan; Ng, Lee Ching; Ho, Phui San; Nakatani, Kazuhiko; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-08-01

    A molecular diagnostic platform with DANP-anchored hairpin primer was developed and evaluated for the rapid and cost-effective detection of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) with high sensitivity and specificity. The molecule 2, 7-diamino-1, 8-naphthyridine (DANP) binds to a cytosine-bulge and emits fluorescence at 450 nm when it is excited by 400 nm light. Thus, by measuring the decline in fluorescence emitted from DANP-primer complexes after PCR reaction, we could monitor the PCR progress. By adapting this property of DANP, we have previously developed the first generation DANP-coupled hairpin RT-PCR assay. In the current study, we improved the assay performance by conjugating the DANP molecule covalently onto the hairpin primer to fix the DANP/primer ratio at 1:1; and adjusting the excitation emission wavelength to 365/430 nm to minimize the background signal and a 'turn-on' system is achieved. After optimizing the PCR cycle number to 30, we not only shortened the total assay turnaround time to 60 minutes, but also further reduced the background fluorescence. The detection limit of our assay was 0.001 PFU per reaction. The DANP-anchored hairpin primer, targeting nsP2 gene of CHIKV genome, is highly specific to CHIKV, having no cross-reactivity to a panel of other RNA viruses tested. In conclusion, we report here a molecular diagnostic assay that is sensitive, specific, rapid and cost effective for CHIKV detection and can be performed where no real time PCR instrumentation is required. Our results from patient samples indicated 93.62% sensitivity and 100% specificity of this method, ensuring that it can be a useful tool for rapid detection of CHIKV for outbreaks in many parts of the world.

  16. Development of 2, 7-Diamino-1, 8-Naphthyridine (DANP) Anchored Hairpin Primers for RT-PCR Detection of Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huixin; Parimelalagan, Mariya; Takei, Fumie; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan; Ng, Lee Ching; Ho, Phui San; Nakatani, Kazuhiko; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    A molecular diagnostic platform with DANP-anchored hairpin primer was developed and evaluated for the rapid and cost-effective detection of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) with high sensitivity and specificity. The molecule 2, 7-diamino-1, 8-naphthyridine (DANP) binds to a cytosine-bulge and emits fluorescence at 450 nm when it is excited by 400 nm light. Thus, by measuring the decline in fluorescence emitted from DANP—primer complexes after PCR reaction, we could monitor the PCR progress. By adapting this property of DANP, we have previously developed the first generation DANP-coupled hairpin RT-PCR assay. In the current study, we improved the assay performance by conjugating the DANP molecule covalently onto the hairpin primer to fix the DANP/primer ratio at 1:1; and adjusting the excitation emission wavelength to 365/430 nm to minimize the background signal and a ‘turn-on’ system is achieved. After optimizing the PCR cycle number to 30, we not only shortened the total assay turnaround time to 60 minutes, but also further reduced the background fluorescence. The detection limit of our assay was 0.001 PFU per reaction. The DANP-anchored hairpin primer, targeting nsP2 gene of CHIKV genome, is highly specific to CHIKV, having no cross-reactivity to a panel of other RNA viruses tested. In conclusion, we report here a molecular diagnostic assay that is sensitive, specific, rapid and cost effective for CHIKV detection and can be performed where no real time PCR instrumentation is required. Our results from patient samples indicated 93.62% sensitivity and 100% specificity of this method, ensuring that it can be a useful tool for rapid detection of CHIKV for outbreaks in many parts of the world. PMID:27571201

  17. Four PCR primers necessary for the detection of periplasmic nitrate reductase genes in all groups of Proteobacteria and in environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Klatte, Tobias; Evans, Laura; Whitehead, Rebekah N; Cole, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    Generic primers are available for detecting bacterial genes required for almost every reaction of the biological nitrogen cycle, the one notable exception being napA (gene for the molybdoprotein of the periplasmic nitrate reductase) encoding periplasmic nitrate reductases. Using an iterative approach, we report the first successful design of three forward oligonucleotide primers and one reverse primer that, in three separate PCRs, can amplify napA DNA from all five groups of Proteobacteria. All 140 napA sequences currently listed in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database are predicted to be amplified by one or more of these primer pairs. We demonstrate that two pairs of these primers also amplify PCR products of the predicted sizes from DNA isolated from human faeces, confirming their ability to direct the amplification of napA fragments from mixed populations. Analysis of the resulting amplicons by high-throughput sequencing will enable a good estimate to be made of both the range and relative abundance of nitrate-reducing bacteria in any community, subject only to any unavoidable bias inherent in a PCR approach to molecular characterization of a highly diverse target.

  18. Four PCR primers necessary for the detection of periplasmic nitrate reductase genes in all groups of Proteobacteria and in environmental DNA

    PubMed Central

    Klatte, Tobias; Evans, Laura; Whitehead, Rebekah N.; Cole, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Generic primers are available for detecting bacterial genes required for almost every reaction of the biological nitrogen cycle, the one notable exception being napA (gene for the molybdoprotein of the periplasmic nitrate reductase) encoding periplasmic nitrate reductases. Using an iterative approach, we report the first successful design of three forward oligonucleotide primers and one reverse primer that, in three separate PCRs, can amplify napA DNA from all five groups of Proteobacteria. All 140 napA sequences currently listed in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database are predicted to be amplified by one or more of these primer pairs. We demonstrate that two pairs of these primers also amplify PCR products of the predicted sizes from DNA isolated from human faeces, confirming their ability to direct the amplification of napA fragments from mixed populations. Analysis of the resulting amplicons by high-throughput sequencing will enable a good estimate to be made of both the range and relative abundance of nitrate-reducing bacteria in any community, subject only to any unavoidable bias inherent in a PCR approach to molecular characterization of a highly diverse target. PMID:21265796

  19. Effect of Primers Hybridizing to Different Evolutionarily Conserved Regions of the Small-Subunit rRNA Gene in PCR-Based Microbial Community Analyses and Genetic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Schmalenberger, Achim; Schwieger, Frank; Tebbe, Christoph C.

    2001-01-01

    Genetic profiling techniques of microbial communities based on PCR-amplified signature genes, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis or single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, are normally done with PCR products of less than 500-bp. The most common target for diversity analysis, the small-subunit rRNA genes, however, are larger, and thus, only partial sequences can be analyzed. Here, we compared the results obtained by PCR targeting different variable (V) regions (V2 and V3, V4 and V5, and V6 to V8) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene with primers hybridizing to evolutionarily conserved flanking regions. SSCP analysis of single-stranded PCR products generated from 13 different bacterial species showed fewer bands with products containing V4-V5 (average, 1.7 bands per organism) than with V2-V3 (2.2 bands) and V6-V8 (2.3 bands). We found that the additional bands (>1 per organism) were caused by intraspecies operon heterogeneities or by more than one conformation of the same sequence. Community profiles, generated by PCR-SSCP from bacterial-cell consortia extracted from rhizospheres of field-grown maize (Zea mays), were analyzed by cloning and sequencing of the dominant bands. A total of 48 sequences could be attributed to 34 different strains from 10 taxonomical groups. Independent of the primer pairs, we found proteobacteria (α, β, and γ subgroups) and members of the genus Paenibacillus (low G+C gram-positive) to be the dominant organisms. Other groups, however, were only detected with single primer pairs. This study gives an example of how much the selection of different variable regions combined with different specificities of the flanking “universal” primers can affect a PCR-based microbial community analysis. PMID:11472932

  20. Primer evaluation and adaption for cost-efficient SYBR Green-based qPCR and its applicability for specific quantification of methanogens.

    PubMed

    Reitschuler, Christoph; Lins, Philipp; Illmer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In the present study nine promising primer sets, targeting Archaea and methanogenic Archaea in particular, were evaluated in silico, in vitro and in situ concerning specificity, accuracy and applicability in end-point (ep-) and especially quantitative (q-)PCR research. The main goal was to adapt and evaluate already adapted primer sets, which were partially designed in combination with TaqMan probes, in substantially cheaper SYBR Green-based qPCR applications. An initial 16S rRNA gene bank-based in silico evaluation revealed high coverage potentials for all primers within targeted groups, ranging from 71 to 90%, except the Methanosaeta specific set showing a low potential of 37%. Mentionable cross-reacting potentials could be detected for the Methanothermobacter, Methanomicrobiales and Methanoculleus sets. The in vitro evaluation with selected reference organisms revealed a specific behavior for most primer sets, while the Methanosarcina and Methanothermobacter sets showed most problematic cross-reactions in epPCR application. We were able to show that primers for detecting the total archaeal community, methanogenic orders Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanococcales and the genus Methanoculleus performed in a highly specific way and allowed an accurate quantification of targeted organisms without the use of expensive TaqMan probes. However, primer pairs designed for detecting Methanomicrobiales, Methanothermobacter, Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta are not suitable for SYBR Green applications. The reliability of in situ quantifications was assessed for a typical methanogenic community, derived from a thermophilic fermenter, and confirmed via denaturing gradient gel band quantification and sequencing. Thereby, we revealed high abundances of methanogenic Archaea, mainly comprising Methanoculleus and Methanosarcinales, while Methanobacteriales only formed a minor fraction.

  1. A newly designed degenerate PCR primer based on pmoA gene for detection of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria from different ecological niches.

    PubMed

    Han, Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2013-12-01

    A new pmoA gene-based PCR primer set was designed for detection of nitrite-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (n-damo) bacteria from four different ecosystems, namely rice paddy soil, freshwater reservoir, reed bed, and sludge from wastewater treatment plant. This primer set showed high specificity and efficiency in recovering n-damo bacteria from these diverse samples. The obtained sequences showed 88-94 and 90-96% similarity to nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively, with the known NC10 phylum bacterium. According to the UniFrac principal coordinates analysis (PCoA), DNA sequences retrieved by the new PCR primer set in this study formed a separate group from the reported sequences, indicating higher diversity of n-damo in the environment. This newly designed PCR primer is capable of amplifying not only the currently known n-damo bacteria but also those that have not been reported, providing new information on the ecological diversity and distribution of this group of microorganisms in the ecosystem.

  2. Superior Multiplexing Capacity of PlexPrimers Enables Sensitive and Specific Detection of SNPs and Clustered Mutations in qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lit Yeen; Walker, Samantha Michelle; Lonergan, Tina; Lima, Nicole Elizabeth; Todd, Alison Velyian

    2017-01-01

    Background Whilst qPCR provides an extremely powerful tool for genetic analysis, some applications such as multiplexing variant alleles (eg SNPs, point mutations or deletions), remain challenging using current primer/probe systems. The novel design features of PlexPrimers allow sensitive, multiplexed analysis of variant alleles even when these are tightly clustered. Method PlexPrimers were combined with PlexZymes in qPCR assays for the detection of SNPs in human absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) genes; clustered mutations in the 23S rRNA gene which confer antibiotic resistance to Mycoplasma genitalium; and deletions within the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Results The combination of PlexPrimers and PlexZymes allowed robust multiplexing of targets which resulted in 100% concordance with results obtained using hydrolysis probe kits for 14 SNPs in the ADME genes. A 7-plex qPCR assay targeting M. genitalium, 5 clustered mutations associated with macrolide resistance and an internal control, allowed efficient amplification of all targets, with all 5 mutations detected in a single channel. Finally, the strategy was employed to analyse common EGFR mutants with high sensitivity, detecting deletions present at only 0.01%. Conclusion PlexPrime is a novel technology for the detection of genetic variants. Unlike previous strategies, the combination of PlexPrimers with PlexZymes enables both allele-specific detection and allele-specific amplification in qPCR. The study demonstrated highly sensitive and specific detection of mutations and SNPs, and superior multiplexing capacity. The ability to multiplex clustered genetic variants reduces the time to result providing more actionable information. PMID:28114309

  3. A novel Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR based assay for genotyping SNP rs12303764(G/T) of human Unc-51 like kinase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Rohit; Duseja, Ajay; Changotra, Harish

    2017-02-01

    Various case-control studies have shown association of single nucleotide polymorphism rs12303764(G/T) in ULK1 with crohn's disease. The techniques used in these studies were time consuming, complicated and require sophisticated/expensive instruments. Therefore, in order to overcome these problems, we have developed a new, rapid and cost effective Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR assay to genotype single nucleotide polymorphism rs12303764(G/T) of ULK1 gene. We manually designed allele specific primers. DNA fragment amplified using outer primers was sequenced to obtain samples with known genotypes (GG, GT and TT) for further use in the development of T-ARMS-PCR assay. Amplification conditions were optimized for parameters; annealing temperature, Taq DNA polymerase and primers. The developed T-ARMS-PCR assay was applied to genotype one hundred samples from healthy individuals. Genotyping results of 10 DNA samples from healthy individuals for rs12303764(G/T) by T-ARMS-PCR assay and sequencing were concordant. The newly developed assay was further applied to genotype samples from 100 healthy individuals of North Indian origin. Genotype frequencies were 9, 34 and 57 % for GG, GT and TT, respectively. Allele frequencies were 0.26 and 0.74 for G and T, respectively. The allele frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium (p = 0.2443). T-ARMS-PCR assay developed in our laboratory for genotyping rs12303764 (G/T) of ULK1 gene is time saving and cost-effective as compared to the available methods. Furthermore, this is the first study reporting allelic and genotype frequencies of ULK1 rs12303764 (G/T) variants in North Indian population.

  4. Identification of new primer binding site mutations at TH01 and D13S317 loci and determination of their corresponding STR alleles by allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengrui; Xuan, Jinfeng; Xing, Jiaxin; Ding, Mei; Wang, Baojie; Pang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Several commercial multiplex PCR kits for the amplification of short tandem repeat (STR) loci have been extensively applied in forensic genetics. Consequently, large numbers of samples have been genotyped, and the number of discordant genotypes observed has also increased. We observed allele dropout with two novel alleles at the STR loci TH01 and D13S317 during paternity testing using the AmpFℓSTR Identifiler PCR Amplification Kit. The lost alleles reappeared when alternative PCR primer pairs were used. A sequence analysis revealed a G-to-A substitution 82 bases downstream of the last TCAT motif of the repeat region at the TH01 locus (GenBank accession: D00269) and a G-to-T substitution 90 bases upstream of the first TATC motif of the repeat region at the D13S317 locus (GenBank accession: G09017). The frequencies of these two point mutations were subsequently investigated in the Chinese population using sequence-specific primer PCR (SSP-PCR), but neither of these mutations was detected in any of the samples tested. In addition, the DNA samples in which the mutations were identified were amplified to type the point mutations by SSP-PCR to determine the corresponding STR alleles at the two loci. Subsequently, the amplified PCR products with different point mutations and STR repeat numbers were directly sequenced because this strategy overcomes the appearance overlapping peaks generated by different STR alleles and accurately characterizes genotypes. Thus, our findings not only provide useful information for DNA databases and forensic identification but also establish an effective strategy for typing STR alleles with primer binding site mutations.

  5. Wet-lab tested microRNA assays for qPCR studies with SYBR® Green and DNA primers in pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Mentzel, Caroline M J; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Córdoba, Sarai; Herrera Uribe, Juber; Busk, Peter K; Cirera, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are involved in several biological processes including those that mediate disease pathophysiology. Hence, quantifying microRNA expression levels can provide important and novel insights into disease biology. In recent years, the pig has emerged as an excellent large animal model for studying human diseases and conditions (e.g. obesity) due to similarities in organ size, gastro-intestinal tract, metabolism, immune response, genetics and the availability of relevant tissues that are not normally easily available in humans. We have previously developed two useful tools in the field of microRNA quantitative real time PCR (qPCR): 1) a very specific, sensitive and simple qPCR method based on DNA primers, MiR-specific qPCR; and 2) the free primer-design software miRprimer. The present study integrates in a publicly accessible database all available information on validated porcine microRNA qPCR assays that have utilized these tools. Due to the high phylogenetic conservation in microRNA sequence between pig, humans and other domestic species this database is a very valuable resource for the broader scientist community who are working on microRNAs and want to use readily tested qPCR assays in a simple and cost-effective manner.

  6. Development of allele-specific primer PCR for a swine TLR2 SNP and comparison of the frequency among several pig breeds of Japan and the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Muneta, Yoshihiro; Minagawa, Yu; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Shinkai, Hiroki; Uenishi, Hirohide; Splichal, Igor

    2012-05-01

    In the present study, we have developed an allele-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (ASP-PCR) for genotyping a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of swine Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) (C406G), which is related to the prevalence of pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. We also compared the allele frequency among several pig breeds of Japan and the Czech Republic. Allele-specific primers were constructed by introducing 1-base mismatch sequence before the SNP site. The swine TLR2 C406G mutation was successfully determined by the ASP-PCR using genomic DNA samples in Japan as previously genotyped by a sequencing method. Using the PCR condition determined, genomic DNA samples from pig blood obtained from 110 pigs from 7 different breeds in the Czech Republic were genotyped by the ASP-PCR. The genotyping results from the ASP-PCR were completely matched with the results from the sequencing method. The allele frequency of the swine TLR2 C406G mutation was 27.5% in the Czech Republic and 3.6% in Japan. The C406G mutation was only found in the Landrace breed in Japan, and was almost exclusively found in the Landrace breed in the Czech Republic as well. These results indicated the usefulness of ASP-PCR for detecting a specific SNP for swine TLR2.

  7. Patho-Genes.org: a website dedicated to gene sequences of potential bioterror bacteria and PCR primers used to amplify them.

    PubMed

    Gardès, Julien; Bachar, Dipankar; Croce, Olivier; Christen, Richard

    2012-09-01

    Pathogenic agents can be very hard to detect, and usually they do not cause illness for several hours or days. To improve the speed and the accuracy of detection tests and satisfy the needs of early diagnosis, molecular biology methods such as PCR are now used. However, selecting a proper target gene and designing good primers is often not easy. We present a dedicated website, http://patho-genes.org, where we provide every sequence, functional annotation, published primer and relevant article for every annotated gene of major pathogenic bacterial species listed as key agents to be used for a bioterrorism attack. Each published primer was analysed to determine its melting temperature, its specificity and its coverage (i.e. its sensitivity against every allele of its target gene). Data generated have been organized in the form of data sheet for each gene, which are available through multiple browser panels and query systems.

  8. Use of conserved genomic regions and degenerate primers in a PCR-based assay for the detection of members of the genus Caulimovirus.

    PubMed

    Pappu, H R; Druffel, K L

    2009-04-01

    The genus Caulimovirus consists of several distinct virus species with a double-stranded DNA genome that infect diverse plant species. A comparative analysis of the sequences of known Caulimovirus species revealed two regions that are conserved in all Caulimovirus species with the exception of Strawberry vein banding virus. Degenerate primers based on these two regions were designed and tested in a polymerase chain reaction-based assay for broad spectrum detection of members of this genus. Cauliflower mosaic virus, Figwort mosaic virus and three distinct caulimoviruses associated with dahlia (Dahlia variabilis) were used to show the utility of this test in detecting diverse caulimoviruses. The primer pair gave an amplicon of expected size (840bp). Amplicons from each virus were cloned and sequenced to verify their identity. The primer pair and the PCR assay provide approach for the broad spectrum detection of several members of the genus Caulimovirus.

  9. Differentiation of mycoplasmalike organisms (MLOs) in European fruit trees by PCR using specific primers derived from the sequence of a chromosomal fragment of the apple proliferation MLO.

    PubMed

    Jarausch, W; Saillard, C; Dosba, F; Bové, J M

    1994-08-01

    A 1.8-kb chromosomal DNA fragment of the mycoplasmalike organism (MLO) associated with apple proliferation was sequenced. Three putative open reading frames were observed on this fragment. The protein encoded by open reading frame 2 shows significant homologies with bacterial nitroreductases. From the nucleotide sequence four primer pairs for PCR were chosen to specifically amplify DNA from MLOs associated with European diseases of fruit trees. Primer pairs specific for (i) Malus-affecting MLOs, (ii) Malus- and Prunus-affecting MLOs, and (iii) Malus-, Prunus-, and Pyrus-affecting MLOs were obtained. Restriction enzyme analysis of the amplification products revealed restriction fragment length polymorphisms between Malus-, Prunus, and Pyrus-affecting MLOs as well as between different isolates of the apple proliferation MLO. No amplification with either primer pair could be obtained with DNA from 12 different MLOs experimentally maintained in periwinkle.

  10. A new PCR primer for the identification of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis based on rRNA sequences coding the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and 5 x 8S regions.

    PubMed

    Imai, T; Sano, A; Mikami, Y; Watanabe, K; Aoki, F H; Branchini, M L; Negroni, R; Nishimura, K; Miyaji, M

    2000-08-01

    Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genes including the 5.8S ribosomal (r)RNA of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were amplified and the DNA sequences were determined. Based on a comparison of the sequence information, a new polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer pair was designed for specific amplification of DNA for P. brasiliensis. This primer pair amplified a 418-bp DNA sequence and was 100% successful in identifying 29 strains of P. brasiliensis (including the reference strains) isolated from the regions of Brazil, Costa Rica, Japan, Argentina or from different sources. The results of specificity tests of these primers to compare the fungus with those of Aspergillus fumigatus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum and Penicillium marneffei are also reported.

  11. Evaluation of cells and biological reagents for adventitious agents using degenerate primer PCR and massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    McClenahan, Shasta D; Uhlenhaut, Christine; Krause, Philip R

    2014-12-12

    We employed a massively parallel sequencing (MPS)-based approach to test reagents and model cell substrates including Chinese hamster ovary (CHO), Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK), African green monkey kidney (Vero), and High Five insect cell lines for adventitious agents. RNA and DNA were extracted either directly from the samples or from viral capsid-enriched preparations, and then subjected to MPS-based non-specific virus detection with degenerate oligonucleotide primer (DOP) PCR. MPS by 454, Illumina MiSeq, and Illumina HiSeq was compared on independent samples. Virus detection using these methods was reproducibly achieved. Unclassified sequences from CHO cells represented cellular sequences not yet submitted to the databases typically used for sequence identification. The sensitivity of MPS-based virus detection was consistent with theoretically expected limits based on dilution of virus in cellular nucleic acids. Capsid preparation increased the number of viral sequences detected. Potential viral sequences were detected in several samples; in each case, these sequences were either artifactual or (based on additional studies) shown not to be associated with replication-competent viruses. Virus-like sequences were more likely to be identified in BLAST searches using virus-specific databases that did not contain cellular sequences. Detected viral sequences included previously described retrovirus and retrovirus-like sequences in CHO, Vero, MDCK and High Five cells, and nodavirus and endogenous bracovirus sequences in High Five insect cells. Bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine hokovirus, and porcine circovirus sequences were detected in some reagents. A recently described parvo-like virus present in some nucleic acid extraction resins was also identified in cells and extraction controls from some samples. The present study helps to illustrate the potential for MPS-based strategies in evaluating the presence of viral nucleic acids in various sample types

  12. Development of PCR primers for specific amplification of two distinct regions of the genomes of San Miguel sea-lion and vesicular exanthema of swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Neill, J D; Seal, B S

    1995-02-01

    The San Miguel sea-lion viruses (SMSV) and vesicular exanthema of swine viruses (VESV) are members of the calicivirus family and aetiologic agents of vesicular disease in susceptible hosts. These two virus groups have been shown by several serological methods to be closely related antigenically. To further examine their relatedness, two sets of non-degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed for the specific amplification of two distinct regions of the SMSV and VESV genomes using a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol. The sequence of the primers were based on the nucleotide sequence of SMSV serotypes 1 and 4. The RNAs from a number of SMSV serotypes and a single VESV isolate were used as template in this study. These included SMSV serotypes 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 13 and 14 and VESV serotype A48. Also included in this study were Tillamook calicivirus (Bos-1 calicivirus, BCV) and a recently isolated skunk calicivirus (SCV). The first primer set amplified a 357-bp fragment from the 2C-like or RNA-helicase-encoding region (11 of 11 viruses) and the second set amplified a fragment from the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase region (520 bp, 9 of 11 viruses). These primer sets did not amplify product from either feline calicivirus or mink calicivirus. The results of this study demonstrate the genetic relatedness of SMSV and VESV and the potential usefulness of RT-PCR to detect and identify these viruses in diagnostic and routine screening applications.

  13. Several concerns about the primer design in the universal molecular beacon real-time PCR assay and its application in HBV DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Huang, Yong; Song, Chen; Zhao, Meiping; Li, Yuanzong

    2007-06-01

    A universal hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA detection kit is appealing for the worldwide diagnosis and monitoring of the treatment of different mutant types of hepatitis B virus. A sensitive and reproducible real-time PCR assay based on the universal molecular beacon (U-MB) technique was developed for the detection of HBV DNA in serum. The U-MB probe used in the assay has no interaction with the HBV DNA sequence. The U-MB technique not only reduced the cost of HBV detection but also had the potential for the development of a universal detection kit for different mutant HBV types and other DNA systems. To demonstrate its clinical utility, 90 serum samples were analyzed using the U-MB real-time PCR method. In the experiments we found that several crucial factors needed to be considered in the primer design, such as the avoidance of formation of severe primer-dimer and primer self-hairpin structure. With the optimized primer sets, satisfactory results were obtained for all the tested samples. We concluded that this assay would be an excellent candidate for a universal HBV DNA detection method.

  14. Sensitive and specific detection of Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris by PCR using species-specific primers based on hrpF gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Jin; Lee, Byoung Moo; Ho-Hahn, Jang; Lee, Gil Bok; Park, Dong Suk

    2004-01-01

    A sensitive and specific assay was developed to detect bacterial black rot of crucifers caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (X. c. pv. campestris), in cabbage seed and plant. Primers XCF and XCR from hrpF homologous to nolX, host recognition protein, were used to amplify a 525 bp DNA fragment. PCR technique was applied to detect the pathogen in naturally infected seed and plant of cabbage. The PCR product was only produced from X. c. pv. campestris among 40 isolates of Xanthomonas strains, Escherichia coli (O157:H7), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, and other reference bacteria.

  15. Sensitive and specific detection of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri by PCR using pathovar specific primers based on hrpW gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Suk; Hyun, Jae Wook; Park, Young Jin; Kim, Jung Sun; Kang, Hee Wan; Hahn, Jang Ho; Go, Seung Joo

    2006-01-01

    A sensitive and specific assay was developed to detect citrus bacterial canker caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, in leaves and fruits of citrus. Primers XACF and XACR from hrpW homologous to pectate lyase, modifying the structure of pectin in plants, were used to amplify a 561 bp DNA fragment. PCR technique was applied to detect the pathogen in naturally or artificially infected leaves of citrus. The PCR product was only produced from X. axonopodis pv. citri among 26 isolates of Xanthomonas strains, Escherichia coli (O157:H7), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, and other reference microbes.

  16. Differentiation of Plum pox virus isolates by single-strand conformation polymorphism and low-stringency single specific primer PCR analysis of HC-Pro genome region.

    PubMed

    Gadiou, S; Safárová, D; Navrátil, M

    2009-01-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and low-stringency single specific primer (LSSP)-PCR were assessed for suitability and reliability in genotyping of Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates. Examined PPV isolates included 16 PPV-D, 12 PPV-M, and 14 PPV-Rec isolates collected in Czech Republic. The analysis was performed on the helper component protease (HC-Pro) region of the PPV genome. SSCP and LSSP-PCR allowed the differentiation of PPV strain, but SSCP was not able to distinguish isolates within the same strain. The individual genotyping of each PPV isolate was obtained by LSSP-PCR. Nevertheless, both SSCP and LSSP-PCR techniques are suitable for preliminary screening of genetic variability of plant RNA viruses.

  17. Primers to block the amplification of symbiotic apostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene in a PCR-based copepod diet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Guangxing

    2014-05-01

    Pelagic copepods play an important role in the marine food web. However, a full understanding of the ecological status of this zooplankton group depends on the careful study of their natural diets. In previous PCR-based copepod diet studies, we found many apostome ciliates that live symbiotically under the exoskeleton of the copepods, and their sequences were often over-represented in the 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) libraries. As a first step to address this issue, we designed three apostome ciliate 18S rDNA blocking primers, and tested their blocking efficiency against apostome ciliate 18s rDNA under various PCR conditions. Using a semi-quantitative PCR method, we optimized the conditions to efficiently amplify the 18S rDNA of the prey while simultaneously excluding the symbiotic apostome ciliates. This technique will facilitate PCR-based diet studies of copepods and other zooplankton in their natural environments.

  18. Identification of the Corn Pathogen Pantoea stewartii by Mass Spectrometry of Whole-Cell Extracts and Its Detection with Novel PCR Primers

    PubMed Central

    Wensing, Annette; Zimmermann, Stefan; Geider, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii is the causative agent of Stewart's wilt, a bacterial disease transmitted by the corn flea beetle mainly to sweet corn (Zea mays). In many countries, it is classified as a quarantine organism and must be differentiated from other yellow enteric bacteria frequently occurring with corn. We have created novel primers from the pstS-glmS region of P. stewartii for use in conventional PCR (cPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR). To facilitate rapid diagnosis, we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. Using whole-cell protein extracts, profiles were generated with a Bruker microflex machine, and the bacteria classified. P. stewartii strains were clearly distinguished from strains of Pantoea agglomerans, Pantoea dispersa, and Pantoea ananatis. Dendrogram analysis of the protein profiles confirmed the score values and showed the formation of separate clades for each species. The identification achieved by MALDI-TOF MS analysis agrees with the diagnosis by specific PCR primers. The combination of both methods allows a rapid and simple identification of the corn pathogen. P. stewartii subsp. stewartii and P. stewartii subsp. indologenes are highly related and can be distinguished not only by virulence assays and indole tests but also by a characteristic pattern in the nucleotide sequence of recA. PMID:20656863

  19. PCR primers for the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins K, L, and M and survey of staphylococcal enterotoxin types in Staphylococcus aureus isolates from food poisoning cases in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Li-Tung; Lin, Chia-Wei; Yang, Chi-Yea; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2006-05-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are important causative agents in gastroenteritidis and food poisoning cases. They are serologically grouped into five major classical types, i.e., SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, and SEE. In addition, new SEs, such as SEG through SEM, have recently been identified and characterized. In an attempt to survey the distribution of classical and new SEs in organisms responsible for staphylococcal infections in Taiwan, we developed PCR primers for the genes that define the SEK, SEL, and SEM types. Bacterial strains other than sek, sel, and sem Staphylococcus aureus, including strains of other Staphylococcus species, did not generate any false-positive results when examined with these primers. The expression potential for the sek, sel, and sem types were also determined by reverse transcription-PCR. Together with the PCR primers specific for the classical SEs and other new SEs, including SEG, SEH, SEI, and SEJ, we surveyed the SE genes in S. aureus strains isolated from food poisoning cases. For 147 S. aureus isolates originating from food poisoning cases, 109 (74.1%) were positive for one or more SE genes. Of them, the major classical enterotoxin type was sea (28.6%), followed by seb (20.4%), sec (8.2%), and sed (2.0%). For the new SE types, sei (30.6%) was detected the most often, followed by sek (18.4%), sem (12.9%), and sel (8.2%). Also, 64 (43.5%) of the total bacterial strains had more than one enterotoxin gene.

  20. Development of real-time PCR primer and probe sets for detecting degenerated and non-degenerated forms of the butanol-producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Cho, Min Ok; Um, Youngsoon; Sang, Byoung-In

    2010-05-01

    Degeneration is one of the limiting factors in butanol fermentation, and it must be monitored and prevented for stable butanol production. In Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, the most well-known butanol-producing microorganism, degeneration is caused by the loss of the pSOL1 plasmid that carries essential genes involved in solvent production. In this study, we designed two specific primer and probe sets for real-time qPCR (RT-qPCR) detection of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (the C. aceto set) and pSOL1-possessing C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (the DGS set). Specific primer and probe sets were designed on the basis of the 16S rDNA sequence and pSOL1 sequence. The number of degenerated C. acetobutylicum could be quantified by subtracting the number of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 containing pSOL1 from the total number of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The primer and probe sets permitted the specific detection and quantification of degenerated C. acetobutylicum and total butanol-producing C. acetobutylicum by RT-qPCR.

  1. Development of PCR primers and a DNA macroarray for the simultaneous detection of major Staphylococcus species using groESL gene.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Cheng; Lu, Hsi-Chi; Li, Sheng-Chih; Chang, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Hsin-Yen; Lin, Chia-Wei; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2012-03-01

    Staphylococcus spp., including S. aureus, S. intermedius, S. hyicus, S. epidermidis, S. saprophyticus, S. haemolyticus, S. xylosus, and S. carnosus, are major bacterial species associated with food poisoning, and human and veterinary clinics. Traditional methods for the identification of these staphylococci are time-consuming, laborious, or inaccurate. Therefore, rapid and accurate diagnostic methods are needed. In this study, we designed the DNA probes and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for the detection of the aforementioned Staphylococcus species. These primers were proved to be specific for the detection of their corresponding target strains. Furthermore, by using a consensus primer pair, we were able to co-amplify the intergenic region of groES-groEL for these staphylococci. Followed by a chromogenic macroarray system with the specific probes on the plastic chips, these staphylococci in milk products or clinical samples could be simultaneously detected. When the system was used for the inspection of milk or urine samples containing N × 10⁰ target cells per milliliter of the sample, all these staphylococcal species could be identified after an 8-h pre-enrichment step. This system also allowed the adequate diagnosis of bacteremia, since N × 10⁰ target cells per milliliter of the blood samples could be detected after a 12-h pre-enrichment. Compared to the multiplex PCR method, this approach has the additional advantage that it allowed the discrimination of more bacterial strains-even some bacterial strains that may generate PCR products with the same molecular sizes.

  2. Identification of the sex of a wide range of Carinatae birds by PCR using primer sets selected from chicken EE0.6 and its related sequences.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Y; Suzuki, M; Ogawa, A; Munechika, I; Murata, K; Mizuno, S

    2001-01-01

    A 0.6 kb EcoRI fragment (EE0.6), cloned from the W chromosome of chickens, is a nonrepetitive sequence and contains an exonlike sequence, ET15, which is likely a part of a pseudogene. The EE0.6 sequence is conserved in all species of birds examined both in Carinatae and Ratitae. A counterpart sequence of EE0.6 is present on the Z chromosome. The extent of diversity between the W- and Z-linked sequences are variable among species. The W- and Z-linked EE0.6 sequences, cloned from 12 different species, were compared and four forward and three reverse primers were selected to amplify parts of the EE0.6 sequence by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By choosing a suitable combination of primers for EE0.6 and a set of primers for a Z/W-common sequence, as an internal control, the sex of 36 species belonging to 16 different orders of Carinatae could be determined clearly by PCR. The sex of two other species representing different orders could be determined by Southern blot hybridization using ET15 as a probe. For the two Ratitae species, emu and ostrich, EE0.6 sequences on W and Z chromosomes could not be distinguished either by PCR or Southern blotting.

  3. Novel method for preparation of the template DNA and selection of primers to differentiate the material rice cultivars of rice wine by PCR.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi; Suzuki, Keitaro; Haraguchi, Kazutomo; Nakamura, Sumiko

    2008-04-24

    As many rice wine brewers label the name of the cultivar of the material rice, authentication technology is necessary. The problems are (1) decomposition of DNAs during the fermentation, (2) contamination of DNAs from microorganisms, (3) co-existence of PCR inhibitors, such as polyphenols. The present authors improved the PCR method by (1) lyophilizing and pulverizing the rice wine to concentrate DNAs, (2) decomposition of starches and proteins so as not to inhibit DNA extraction by the use of heat-resistant amylase and proteinase K, (3) purification of the template DNA by the combination of CTAB method and fractional precipitation by 70% EtOH. To prevent the amplification of microorganism's DNAs during PCR, the present authors selected the suitable plant-specific primers. It became possible to prepare the template DNAs for PCR from the rice wine. The sequences of the amplified DNAs by PCR were ascertained to be same with those of material rice. Mislabeling of material rice cultivar was detected by PCR using the commercial rice wine. It became possible to extract and purify the template DNAs for PCR from the rice wine and to differentiate the material rice cultivars by the PCR using the rice wine as a sample.

  4. Improving PCR detection of prey in molecular diet studies: importance of group-specific primer set selection and extraction protocol performances.

    PubMed

    Zarzoso-Lacoste, Diane; Corse, Emmanuel; Vidal, Eric

    2013-01-01

    While the morphological identification of prey remains in predators' faeces is the most commonly used method to study trophic interactions, many studies indicate that this method does not detect all consumed prey. Polymerase chain reaction-based methods are increasingly used to detect prey DNA in the predator food bolus and have proven efficient, delivering highly accurate results. When studying complex diet samples, the extraction of total DNA is a critical step, as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors may be co-extracted. Another critical step involves a careful selection of suitable group-specific primer sets that should only amplify DNA from the targeted prey taxon. In this study, the food boluses of five Rattus rattus and seven Rattus exulans were analysed using both morphological and molecular methods. We tested a panel of 31 PCR primer pairs targeting bird, invertebrate and plant sequences; four of them were selected to be used as group-specific primer pairs in PCR protocols. The performances of four DNA extraction protocols (QIAamp(®) DNA stool mini kit, DNeasy(®) mericon food kit and two of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-based methods) were compared using four variables: DNA concentration, A(260) /A(280) absorbance ratio, food compartment analysed (stomach or faecal contents) and total number of prey-specific PCR amplification per sample. Our results clearly indicate that the A(260) /A(280) absorbance ratio, which varies between extraction protocols, is positively correlated to the number of PCR amplifications of each prey taxon. We recommend using the DNeasy(®) mericon food kit (QIAGEN), which yielded results very similar to those achieved with the morphological approach. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Optimization of chloroplast microsatellite PCR conditions and primer screening for endangered Rheum officinale, Rheum palmatum, and Rheum tanguticum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Guo, Z J; Han, L; Li, Y; Wang, X M

    2014-07-29

    Chloroplast microsatellite primers were developed in order to provide more population genetic information of endangered Rheum officinale, R. palmatum, and R. tanguticum for conservation. The dried roots and rhizomes of these plants are important in traditional Chinese medicine. The results showed that the optimum concentrations of Mg(2+), Taq DNA polymerase, dNTPs, template DNA, and primers in a 25-μL reaction system were 2.0 mM, 1.0 U, 0.10 mM, 20 ng, and 0.8 μM, respectively. Fourteen of 53 primer combinations were chosen for their high clarity and repetition in three species, and their annealing temperatures ranged from 56 to 58°C. These primers and the optimized polymerase chain reaction system may provide a tool for understanding the demography and genetic variation of these endangered plants.

  6. The allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay, a new real-time PCR method for fine quantification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Billard, A; Laval, V; Fillinger, S; Leroux, P; Lachaise, H; Beffa, R; Debieu, D

    2012-02-01

    The evolution of fungicide resistance within populations of plant pathogens must be monitored to develop management strategies. Such monitoring often is based on microbiological tests, such as microtiter plate assays. Molecular monitoring methods can be considered if the mutations responsible for resistance have been identified. Allele-specific real-time PCR approaches, such as amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR and mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR, are, despite their moderate efficacy, among the most precise methods for refining SNP quantification. We describe here a new real-time PCR method, the allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay (ASPPAA PCR). This method makes use of mixtures of allele-specific minor groove binder (MGB) TaqMan probes and allele-specific primers for the fine quantification of SNPs from a pool of DNA extracted from a mixture of conidia. It was developed for a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is responsible for resistance to the sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicide fenhexamid, resulting in the replacement of the phenylalanine residue (encoded by the TTC codon) in position 412 of the enzymatic target (3-ketoreductase) by a serine (TCC), valine (GTC), or isoleucine (ATC) residue. The levels of nonspecific amplification with the ASPPAA PCR were reduced at least four times below the level of currently available allele-specific real-time PCR approaches due to strong allele specificity in amplification cycles, including two allele selectors. This new method can be used to quantify a complex quadriallelic SNP in a DNA pool with a false discovery rate of less than 1%.

  7. Novel PCR primers for the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota designed based on the comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Kyung; Kim, Hye-Jin; Cho, Jae-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Based on comparative phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences deposited in an RDP database, we constructed a local database of thaumarchaeotal 16S rRNA gene sequences and developed a novel PCR primer specific for the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota. Among 9,727 quality-filtered (chimeral-checked, size >1.2 kb) archaeal sequences downloaded from the RDP database, 1,549 thaumarchaeotal sequences were identified and included in our local database. In our study, Thaumarchaeota included archaeal groups MG-I, SAGMCG-I, SCG, FSCG, RC, and HWCG-III, forming a monophyletic group in the phylogenetic tree. Cluster analysis revealed 114 phylotypes for Thaumarchaeota. The majority of the phylotypes (66.7%) belonged to the MG-I and SCG, which together contained most (93.9%) of the thaumarchaeotal sequences in our local database. A phylum-directed primer was designed from a consensus sequence of the phylotype sequences, and the primer's specificity was evaluated for coverage and tolerance both in silico and empirically. The phylum-directed primer, designated THAUM-494, showed >90% coverage for Thaumarchaeota and <1% tolerance to non-target taxa, indicating high specificity. To validate this result experimentally, PCRs were performed with THAUM-494 in combination with a universal archaeal primer (ARC917R or 1017FAR) and DNAs from five environmental samples to construct clone libraries. THAUM-494 showed a satisfactory specificity in empirical studies, as expected from the in silico results. Phylogenetic analysis of 859 cloned sequences obtained from 10 clone libraries revealed that >95% of the amplified sequences belonged to Thaumarchaeota. The most frequently sampled thaumarchaeotal subgroups in our samples were SCG, MG-I, and SAGMCG-I. To our knowledge, THAUM-494 is the first phylum-level primer for Thaumarchaeota. Furthermore, the high coverage and low tolerance of THAUM-494 will make it a potentially valuable tool in understanding the phylogenetic diversity and

  8. Genus-specific primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene for PCR detection of members of the genus Verrucosispora.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingyi; Hong, Kui; Goodfellow, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about the genus Verrucosispora though it does contain organisms which produce novel antibiotics. A set of genus-specific oligonucleotide primers was generated to gain an insight into the presence, distribution and taxonomic diversity of members of this genus in diverse samples taken from marine habitats. In silico and pure culture studies showed that the primers matched perfectly with target sequences of the 16S rRNA genes of representatives of the genus Verrucosispora. The primers, designated S-G-Verr-0195-a-S-20 and S-G-Verr-1152-a-A-18, amplified an ≈960 bp stretch of the 16S rRNA genes of Verrucosispora strains but not those of representatives of other genera classified in the family Micromonosporaceae. Genus-specific amplicons were detected from 17 out of 20 community DNA samples prepared from diverse marine sediments and coastal soils. Phylogenetic analysis of over 40% of clones derived from five of the samples indicated they belonged to novel Verrucosispora species. The primers were also used to confirm the identity of Verrucosispora-like strains isolated from two of the environmental samples. The primers can be used to facilitate the isolation of novel Verrucosispora strains by allowing prescreening of environmental samples and the subsequent identification of verrucosisporae on selective isolation plates. For this purpose, a novel medium facilitating the recovery of Verrucosispora strains was formulated and used to recover novel isolates validated using the novel PCR primers. This medium may be useful as the basis for development of a selective medium.

  9. Geographical clustering of Trypanosoma cruzi I groups from Colombia revealed by low-stringency single specific primer-PCR of the intergenic regions of spliced-leader genes.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana María; Arboleda-Sánchez, Sair; Rodríguez, Ingrid Bibiana; Cura, Carolina; Salazar, Alexander; Del Mazo, Jesús; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    A low-stringency single-primer polymerase chain reaction (LSSP-PCR) typing procedure targeted to the intergenic regions of spliced-leader genes (SL) was designed to profile Trypanosoma cruzi I stocks from endemic regions of Colombia. Comparison between SL-LSSP-PCR profiles of parasite DNA from vector faeces and cultures isolated from those faeces showed more conservative signatures than profiles using LSSP-PCR targeted to the minicircle variable regions (kDNA). This was also observed by analysing 15 parasite clones from one stock as well as serial samples of a same stock after in vitro culturing or inoculation into mice. Thus, SL-LSSP-PCR appears more appropriate than kDNA-LSSP-PCR for reliable typing of major T. cruzi I groups from in vitro cultured stocks and triatomine faeces. SL-LSSP-PCR grouped 46 of 47 T. cruzi I Colombian stocks according to their geographical procedences in four clusters: Cluster Cas from Casanare Department, Cluster Mg from Northern Magdalena department, Cluster Mom from Momposina Depression in Southern Magdalena and finally Cluster NW from northwestern Colombia, including Sucre, Chocó, Córdoba and Antioquia departments. Sequence analysis identified punctual mutations among amplicons from each cluster. Within Cluster Mg, sequence polymorphism allowed association with different sylvatic vector species. Novel SL sequences and LSSP-PCR profiles are reported from T. cruzi I infecting Eratyrus cuspidatus, Panstrongylus geniculatus and Rhodnius pallescens vectors.

  10. Comparative evaluation of the GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and PGMY09/11 primer sets for HPV detection by PCR in oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Sibele Morais Miyata; Rivero, Elena Riet Correa; Bazzo, Maria Luiza; Onofre, Alexandre Sherlley Casimiro

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and PGMY09/11 primer sets for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by single step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nested PCR in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). DNA extracted from FFPE tissues were tested for amplification of the human beta globin gene with PCO3/4 primers. Positive samples for this gene were tested for HPV DNA using single step PCR with GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and PGMY09/11 primer sets. All negative samples at single step PCR with MY09/11 and PGMY09/11 were subjected to a further PCR with GP5+/6+ primers using the non-amplified product in the previously reactions (nested PCR) as samples. Among 26 samples, 23 were positive for the human beta globin gene and were considered viable for HPV DNA detection by PCR. Single step PCR with GP5+/6+ and MY09/11 primers and MY/GP+ nested PCR did not amplify HPV DNA in any samples. PGMY09/11 primers detected HPV DNA in 13.0% of OSCC cases and this rate was raise to 17.4% with the use of PGMY/GP+ nested PCR. According to our results the PGMY/GP+ nested PCR is the most appropriate primer set for the detection of HPV DNA using FFPE samples from OSCC.

  11. Design and application of specific 16S rDNA-targeted primers for assessing endophytic diversity in Dendrobium officinale using nested PCR-DGGE.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Zhou, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Sui-Juan; Liu, Wen-Hong; Hu, Xiu-Fang

    2013-11-01

    Novel specific 16S rDNA-targeted primers were successfully designed and applied to the characterization of endophytic diversity in Dendrobium officinale. Using the popular universal bacterial primers 27f/1492r, the fragments of chloroplast and mitochondrion 16S/18S rDNA were amplified from D. officinale. They shared high nucleotide identity with the chloroplast 16S rDNAs (99-100 %) and with the mitochondrion 18S rDNAs (93-100 %) from various plants, respectively, and both shared 73-86 % identities with the bacterial 16S rDNA sequences in GenBank. The current bacterial universal primers, including 27f/1492r, match well with the chloroplast and mitochondrion 16S/18S rDNAs, which accordingly renders these primers not useful for endophytic diversity analysis. Novel 16S rDNA-targeted primers fM1 (5'-CCGCGTGNRBGAHGAAGGYYYT-3') and rC5 (5'-TAATCCTGTTTGCTCC CCAC-3') were designed, which show good specificity compared to the 16S/18S rDNAs of D. officinale, and perfect universality within bacteria except for Cyanobacteria. The primers fM1/rC5, together with 515f-GC/rC5, which overlaps the whole V4 region of 16S rDNA, were subjected to nested polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) to analyze the diversity of endophytic bacteria in D. officinale from three different sources in China. The results showed diversities in roots and stems of the plants from all three locations. Altogether, 29 bands were identified as bacteria, with the dominant group being Proteobacteria and the dominant genus being Burkholderia, some of which commonly has the function of nitrogen fixation and thus may play potentially important roles in D. officinale. Therefore, the nested PCR-DGGE method based on the novel primers provides a good alternative for investigating the communities and roles of endophytes in D. officinale.

  12. Identification of human herpesvirus 6 variants A and B by primer-specific real-time PCR may help to revisit their respective role in pathology.

    PubMed

    Boutolleau, David; Duros, Caroline; Bonnafous, Pascale; Caïola, Delphine; Karras, Alexandre; Castro, Nathalie De; Ouachée, Marie; Narcy, Philippe; Gueudin, Marie; Agut, Henri; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès

    2006-03-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) isolates are classified into two variants, termed HHV-6A and HHV-6B, on the basis of distinct genetic, antigenic and biological characteristics, but the specific pathogenicity of each variant remains poorly understood. To design a rapid, sensitive and specific real-time variant-specific PCR (VS-PCR) method to differentiate both variants in biological specimens. The VS-PCR was adapted from a real-time PCR assay, based on TaqMan technology, previously developed for the genome quantitation of both HHV-6 variants [Gautheret-Dejean A, Manichanh C, Thien-Ah-Koon F, Fillet AM, Mangeney N, Vidaud M, et al. Development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the diagnosis of human herpesvirus-6 infection and application to bone marrow transplant patients. J Virol Meth 2002;100:27-35], a consensual reverse primer (Taq2) being changed into two variant-specific primers named H6A and H6B. This method was applied to a large set of biological specimens obtained in different pathological contexts. The sensitivity threshold was about 10 copies/well for HHV-6A-specific PCR (PCR-A) and 1 copy/well for HHV-6B-specific PCR (PCR-B). Both assays showed a linear dynamic range from 10 to 100,000 copies of HHV-6 DNA. Regarding the specificity and the capacity of discrimination of each assay, one variant could be detected and identified in the presence of more than 1000 times higher concentrations of the other variant in virus mixtures. The comparison of the results obtained with this VS-PCR with those previously obtained with a classic PCR method allowed us to validate our new technique on a wide panel of biological samples, including numerous patients with severe HHV-6-related symptoms. The high prevalence of HHV-6B was confirmed in healthy individuals and immunocompromised patients. HHV-6A was identified in distinct samples from several patients exhibiting neurological disorders. We developed a new VS-PCR assay, able to differentiate HHV-6A and HHV-6

  13. Use of 16S rRNA Gene-Targeted Group-Specific Primers for Real-Time PCR Analysis of Predominant Bacteria in Mouse Feces

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yun-Wen; Chen, Mang-Kun; Yang, Bing-Ya; Huang, Xian-Jie; Zhang, Xue-Rui; He, Liang-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are widely used for studying gastrointestinal (GI) tract-related diseases. It is necessary and important to develop a new set of primers to monitor the mouse gut microbiota. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-targeted group-specific primers for Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Deferribacteres, “Candidatus Saccharibacteria,” Verrucomicrobia, Tenericutes, and Proteobacteria were designed and validated for quantification of the predominant bacterial species in mouse feces by real-time PCR. After confirmation of their accuracy and specificity by high-throughput sequencing technologies, these primers were applied to quantify the changes in the fecal samples from a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis mouse model. Our results showed that this approach efficiently predicted the occurrence of colitis, such as spontaneous chronic inflammatory bowel disease in transgenic mice. The set of primers developed in this study provides a simple and affordable method to monitor changes in the intestinal microbiota at the phylum level. PMID:26187967

  14. Development and evaluation of specific PCR primers targeting the ribosomal DNA-internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of peritrich ciliates in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lei; Zhang, Qianqian; Gong, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Peritrich ciliates are highly diverse and can be important bacterial grazers in aquatic ecosystems. Morphological identifications of peritrich species and assemblages in the environment are time-consuming and expertise-demanding. In this study, two peritrich-specific PCR primers were newly designed to amplify a fragment including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal rDNA from environmental samples. The primers showed high specificity in silico, and in tests with peritrich isolates and environmental DNA. Application of these primers in clone library construction and sequencing yielded exclusively sequences of peritrichs for water and sediment samples. We also found the ITS1, ITS2, ITS, D1 region of 28S rDNA, and ITS+D1 region co-varied with, and generally more variable than, the V9 region of 18S rDNA in peritrichs. The newly designed specific primers thus provide additional tools to study the molecular diversity, community composition, and phylogeography of these ecologically important protists in different systems.

  15. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  16. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  17. Optimization of PCR in application of hot start Taq DNA polymerase for detection of Erwinia amylovora with primers FER1-F and FER1-R.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, D; Kevresan, S

    2010-01-01

    There are two approaches in detection of bacterium Erwinia amylovora by PCR. One is based on detection of plasmid pEA29 and the other is based on detection of a chromosomal DNA sequence, specific for E. amylovora, in a sample. Since pathogenic strains without pEA29 have been isolated from the environment, methods based on this plasmid have been compromised and PCR methods based on chromosomal DNA species specific sequences became only reliable methods. PCR method with chromosomal primers FER1-F and FER1-R is currently the most reliable method due to its high sensitivity and specificity. The goal of this research is to make a significant improvement of the method by optimization of PCR in application of hot start DNA Taq polymerase, instead of wax, to obtain a hot start reaction. This enzyme, which is currently widely applied, can provide simpler achievement of hot start, saving labor and time and decreasing possibility of cross contamination of samples. Experiments showed that simple replacement of a regular recombinant Taq DNA polymerase by a hot start Taq DNA polymerase leads to complete failure of the reaction. Many optimization experiments had to be carried out to obtain an operational and reliable PCR which simultaneously has high sensitivity and specificity. Content of the reaction mixture, as well as temperature and time parameters of PCR, were significantly changed to achieve proper optimization.

  18. Development of genomic microsatellite multiplex PCR using dye-labeled universal primer and its validation in pedigree analysis of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Li, Qi; Song, Junlin; Yu, Hong

    2017-02-01

    There is an increasing requirement for traceability of aquaculture products, both for consumer protection and for food safety. There are high error rates in the conventional traceability systems depending on physical labels. Genetic traceability technique depending on DNA-based tracking system can overcome this problem. Genealogy information is essential for genetic traceability, and microsatellite DNA marker is a good choice for pedigree analysis. As increasing genotyping throughput of microsatellites, microsatellite multiplex PCR has become a fast and cost-effective technique. As a commercially important cultured aquatic species, Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has the highest global production. The objective of this study was to develop microsatellite multiplex PCR panels with dye-labeled universal primer for pedigree analysis in C. gigas, and these multiplex PCRs were validated using 12 full-sib families with known pedigrees. Here we developed six informative multiplex PCRs using 18 genomic microsatellites in C. gigas. Each multiplex panel contained a single universal primer M13(-21) used as a tail on each locus-specific forward primer and a single universal primer M13(-21) labeled with fluorophores. The polymorphisms of the markers were moderate, with an average of 10.3 alleles per locus and average polymorphic information content of 0.740. The observed heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.492 to 0.822. Cervus simulations revealed that the six panels would still be of great value when massive families were analysed. Pedigree analysis of real offspring demonstrated that 100% of the offspring were unambiguously allocated to their parents when two multiplex PCRs were used. The six sets of multiplex PCRs can be an important tool for tracing cultured individuals, population genetic analysis, and selective breeding program in C. gigas.

  19. Real-time PCR detection of Staphylococcus aureus in milk and meat using new primers designed from the heat shock protein gene htrA sequence.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Cheng; Fan, Chih-Ming; Liao, Wan-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ku; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2007-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus may cause foodborne disease outbreaks and staphylococcal infections and is one of the major causes of mastitis. Rapid and reliable methods for detection of this microorganism in milk and other foods are needed. In this study, we designed a primer set from the sequence of the heat shock protein gene htrA, a gene coding for high-temperature-requirement A (HtrA) protein, and used it for real-time PCR detection of S. aureus isolates: 16 reference strains and 40 strains isolated from food-poisoning cases. All strains tested generated positive results. Bacterial strains other than S. aureus, including strains of other Staphylococcus species, did not produce positive results. When this primer set was used for the real-time PCR detection of S. aureus in milk and meat samples without the preenrichment step, samples with target cell numbers greater than 10(3) CFU/ml or CFU/g could be detected, indicating the potential quantitative ability of this real-time PCR assay. With a 10-h preenrichment step, however, a detection limit of 1 CFU/ml or CFU/g could be obtained.

  20. PhiSiGns: an online tool to identify signature genes in phages and design PCR primers for examining phage diversity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phages (viruses that infect bacteria) have gained significant attention because of their abundance, diversity and important ecological roles. However, the lack of a universal gene shared by all phages presents a challenge for phage identification and characterization, especially in environmental samples where it is difficult to culture phage-host systems. Homologous conserved genes (or "signature genes") present in groups of closely-related phages can be used to explore phage diversity and define evolutionary relationships amongst these phages. Bioinformatic approaches are needed to identify candidate signature genes and design PCR primers to amplify those genes from environmental samples; however, there is currently no existing computational tool that biologists can use for this purpose. Results Here we present PhiSiGns, a web-based and standalone application that performs a pairwise comparison of each gene present in user-selected phage genomes, identifies signature genes, generates alignments of these genes, and designs potential PCR primer pairs. PhiSiGns is available at (http://www.phantome.org/phisigns/; http://phisigns.sourceforge.net/) with a link to the source code. Here we describe the specifications of PhiSiGns and demonstrate its application with a case study. Conclusions PhiSiGns provides phage biologists with a user-friendly tool to identify signature genes and design PCR primers to amplify related genes from uncultured phages in environmental samples. This bioinformatics tool will facilitate the development of novel signature genes for use as molecular markers in studies of phage diversity, phylogeny, and evolution. PMID:22385976

  1. Use of tuf gene-based primers for the PCR detection of probiotic Bifidobacterium species and enumeration of bifidobacteria in fermented milk by cultural and quantitative real-time PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Sen-Je; Hwang, Wen-Zhe; Chiang, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Hsin-Chih; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2010-10-01

    Due to the increasing use of bifidobacteria in probiotic products, it is essential to establish a rapid method for the qualitative and quantitative assay of the bifidobacteria in commercial products. In this study, partial sequences of the tuf gene for 18 Bifidobacterium strains belonging to 14 species were determined. Alignment of these sequences showed that the similarities among these Bifidobacterium species were 82.24% to 99.72%. Based on these tuf gene sequences, 6 primer sets were designed for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay of B. animalis subsp. animalis, B. animalis subsp. lactis, B. bifidum, B. breve, B. longum subsp. infantis, B. longum subsp. longum, and the genus of Bifidobacterium, respectively. These Bifidobacterium species are common probiotic species present in dairy and probiotic products. When each target Bifidobacterium spp. was assayed with the designed primers, PCR product with expected size was generated. In addition, for each target species, more than 70 bacterial strains other than the target species, including strains of other Bifidobacterium species, strains of Lactobacillus spp., Enterococcus spp., and other bacterial species, all generated negative results. PCR assay with primers specific to B. animalis subsp. lactis and B. longum subsp. longum confirmed the presence of these Bifidobacterium species in commercial yogurt products. In addition, for each product, enumeration of the bifidobacteria cells by culture method with BIM-25 agar and the quantitative real-time PCR showed similar cell counts. Such results indicated that within 15-d storage (4 °C) after manufacture, all the bifidobacteria cells originally present in yogurt products were viable and culturable during the storage.

  2. BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2: improvements to the BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR assay for bovine leukemia virus by reducing primer degeneracy and constructing an optimal standard curve.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Kitamura-Muramatsu, Yuri; Yuan, Yuan; Polat, Meripet; Saito, Susumu; Aida, Yoko

    2015-05-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the etiological agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. Because BLV infection can remain clinically silent, the proviral load is an important index for estimating disease progression. CoCoMo-qPCR, an assay developed to estimate BLV proviral load, allows the highly sensitive detection of BLV originating in different countries. Here, we developed a modified version of the CoCoMo-qPCR assay, the "BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2" assay, which uses optimized degenerate primers. We also constructed a new plasmid standard. Finally, we used both assays to examine DNA samples from BLV-infected cattle and compared the results.

  3. Rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy in chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y by quantitative fluorescence-PCR combined with short tandem repeat and fluorescence-labeled homologous gene quantitative‑PCR using 4-color fluorescently labeled universal primers.

    PubMed

    Long, Ju; Ye, Xuehe; Weng, Xunjin; Fu, Kepeng; Sun, Lei; Pang, Wanrong

    2013-11-01

    The present study aimed to develop a rapid diagnostic test of aneuploidy in chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y through a program combining short tandem repeat (STR) typing with fluorescence-labeled homologous gene quantitative‑polymerase chain reaction (fHGQ-PCR), which avoids misjudgment risks by using one method alone. Furthermore, fluorescently labeled universal primers not only ensure the accuracy of the results but also reduces the cost of fluorescent labels. The verification of DNA extracted from samples confirmed by karyotype analysis with quantitative fluorescence (QF)-PCR shows that the results obtained using the QF-PCR program are consistent with the results of karyotype analysis in rapidly diagnosing the aneuploidy of chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y.

  4. PCR Primer Design for 16S rRNAs for Experimental Horizontal Gene Transfer Test in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kentaro; Sato, Mitsuharu; Tsukuda, Miyuki

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the Escherichia coli ribosome is robust enough to accommodate foreign 16S rRNAs from diverse gamma- and betaproteobacteria bacteria (Kitahara et al., 2012). Therein, we used the common universal primers Bac8f and UN1541r to obtain a nearly full-length gene. However, we noticed that these primers overlap variable sites at 19[A/C] and 1527[U/C] in Bac8f and UN1541r, respectively, and thus, the amplicon could contain mutations. This is problematic, particularly for the former site, because the 19th nucleotide pairs with the 916th nucleotide, which is a part of the "central pseudoknot" and is critical for function. Therefore, we mutationally investigated the role of the base pair using several 16S rRNAs from gamma- and betaproteobacteria. We found that both the native base pairs (gammaproteobacterial 19A-916U and betaproteobacterial 19C-916G) and the non-native 19A-916G pair retained function, whereas the non-native 19C-916U was defective 16S rRNAs. We next designed a new primer set, Bac1f and UN1542r, so that they do not overlap the potential mismatch sites. 16S rRNA amplicons obtained from the environmental metagenome using the new primer set were dominated by proteobacterial species (~85%). Subsequent functional screening identified various 16S rRNAs from proteobacteria, all of which contained native 19A-916U or 19C-916G base pairs. The primers developed in this study are thus advantageous for functional characterization of foreign 16S rRNA in E. coli with no artifacts.

  5. PCR Primer Design for 16S rRNAs for Experimental Horizontal Gene Transfer Test in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Kentaro; Sato, Mitsuharu; Tsukuda, Miyuki

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the Escherichia coli ribosome is robust enough to accommodate foreign 16S rRNAs from diverse gamma- and betaproteobacteria bacteria (Kitahara et al., 2012). Therein, we used the common universal primers Bac8f and UN1541r to obtain a nearly full-length gene. However, we noticed that these primers overlap variable sites at 19[A/C] and 1527[U/C] in Bac8f and UN1541r, respectively, and thus, the amplicon could contain mutations. This is problematic, particularly for the former site, because the 19th nucleotide pairs with the 916th nucleotide, which is a part of the “central pseudoknot” and is critical for function. Therefore, we mutationally investigated the role of the base pair using several 16S rRNAs from gamma- and betaproteobacteria. We found that both the native base pairs (gammaproteobacterial 19A–916U and betaproteobacterial 19C–916G) and the non-native 19A–916G pair retained function, whereas the non-native 19C–916U was defective 16S rRNAs. We next designed a new primer set, Bac1f and UN1542r, so that they do not overlap the potential mismatch sites. 16S rRNA amplicons obtained from the environmental metagenome using the new primer set were dominated by proteobacterial species (~85%). Subsequent functional screening identified various 16S rRNAs from proteobacteria, all of which contained native 19A–916U or 19C–916G base pairs. The primers developed in this study are thus advantageous for functional characterization of foreign 16S rRNA in E. coli with no artifacts. PMID:28293553

  6. Diversity of Methane-Cycling Archaea in Hydrothermal Sediment Investigated by General and Group-Specific PCR Primers

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas P.

    2014-01-01

    The zonation of anaerobic methane-cycling Archaea in hydrothermal sediment of Guaymas Basin was studied by general primer pairs (mcrI, ME1/ME2, mcrIRD) targeting the alpha subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) and by new group-specific mcrA and 16S rRNA gene primer pairs. The mcrIRD primer pair outperformed the other general mcrA primer pairs in detection sensitivity and phylogenetic coverage. Methanotrophic ANME-1 Archaea were the only group detected with group-specific primers only. The detection of 14 mcrA lineages surpasses the diversity previously found in this location. Most phylotypes have high sequence similarities to hydrogenotrophs, methylotrophs, and anaerobic methanotrophs previously detected at Guaymas Basin or at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, and oil reservoirs worldwide. Additionally, five mcrA phylotypes belonging to newly defined lineages are detected. Two of these belong to deeply branching new orders, while the others are new species or genera of Methanopyraceae and Methermicoccaceae. Downcore diversity decreases from all groups detected in the upper 6 cm (∼2 to 40°C, sulfate measurable to 4 cm) to only two groups below 6 cm (>40°C). Despite the presence of hyperthermophilic genera (Methanopyrus, Methanocaldococcus) in cooler surface strata, no genes were detected below 10 cm (≥60°C). While mcrA-based and 16S rRNA gene-based community compositions are generally congruent, the deeply branching mcrA cannot be assigned to specific 16S rRNA gene lineages. Our study indicates that even among well-studied metabolic groups and in previously characterized model environments, major evolutionary branches are overlooked. Detecting these groups by improved molecular biological methods is a crucial first step toward understanding their roles in nature. PMID:25527539

  7. Undergraduate Virology Exercises Demonstrate Conventional and Real-Time PCR Using Commercially Available HIV Primers and Noninfectious Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.; Wasilewski, Melissa A.; Farrell, James C.; Glick, David L.

    2009-01-01

    It is an extraordinary challenge to offer an undergraduate laboratory course in virology that teaches hands-on, relevant molecular biology techniques using nonpathogenic models of human virus detection. To our knowledge, there exists no inexpensive kits or reagent sets that are appropriate for demonstrating real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in an…

  8. Undergraduate Virology Exercises Demonstrate Conventional and Real-Time PCR Using Commercially Available HIV Primers and Noninfectious Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.; Wasilewski, Melissa A.; Farrell, James C.; Glick, David L.

    2009-01-01

    It is an extraordinary challenge to offer an undergraduate laboratory course in virology that teaches hands-on, relevant molecular biology techniques using nonpathogenic models of human virus detection. To our knowledge, there exists no inexpensive kits or reagent sets that are appropriate for demonstrating real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in an…

  9. Diversity of methane-cycling archaea in hydrothermal sediment investigated by general and group-specific PCR primers.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Teske, Andreas P

    2015-02-01

    The zonation of anaerobic methane-cycling Archaea in hydrothermal sediment of Guaymas Basin was studied by general primerpairs (mcrI, ME1/ME2, mcrIRD) targeting the alpha subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) and by new group specific mcrA and 16S rRNA gene primer pairs. The mcrIRD primer pair outperformed the other general mcrA primer pairs indetection sensitivity and phylogenetic coverage. Methanotrophic ANME-1 Archaea were the only group detected with group specific primers only. The detection of 14 mcrA lineages surpasses the diversity previously found in this location. Most phylotypes have high sequence similarities to hydrogenotrophs, methylotrophs, and anaerobic methanotrophs previously detected at Guaymas Basin or at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, and oil reservoirs worldwide. Additionally, five mcrA phylotypes belonging to newly defined lineages are detected. Two of these belong to deeply branching new orders, while the others are new species or genera of Methanopyraceae and Methermicoccaceae. Downcore diversity decreases from all groups detected in the upper 6 cm(2 to 40 °C, sulfate measurable to 4 cm) to only two groups below 6 cm (>40 °C). Despite the presence of hyperthermophilic genera (Methanopyrus, Methanocaldococcus) in cooler surface strata, no genes were detected below 10 cm (>60 °C). While mcrAbased and 16S rRNA gene-based community compositions are generally congruent, the deeply branching mcrA cannot be assigned to specific 16S rRNA gene lineages. Our study indicates that even among well-studied metabolic groups and in previously characterized model environments, major evolutionary branches are overlooked. Detecting these groups by improved molecular biological methods is a crucial first step toward understanding their roles in nature.

  10. Specific detection and identification of [Actinobacillus] muris by PCR using primers targeting the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Gougoula, Christina; Sager, Martin

    2013-08-01

    [Actinobacillus] muris represents along with [Pasteurella] pneumotropica the most prevalent Pasteurellaceae species isolated from the laboratory mouse. Despite the biological and economic importance of Pasteurellaceae in relation to experimental animals, no molecular based methods for the identification of [A.] muris are available. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a PCR method allowing detection and identification of [A.] muris. In this assay, a Pasteurellaceae common forward primer based on a conserved region of the 16S rRNA gene was used in conjunction with two different reverse primers specific for [A.] muris, targeting the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer sequences. The specificity of the assay was tested against 78 reference and clinical isolates of Pasteurellaceae, including 37 strains of [A.] muris. In addition, eight other mice associated bacterial species which could pose a diagnostic problem were included. The assay showed 100% sensitivity and 97.95% specificity. Identification of the clinical isolates was validated by ITS profiling and when necessary by 16S rRNA sequencing. This multiplex PCR represents the first molecular tool able to detect [A.] muris and may become a reliable alternative to the present diagnostic methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MiFish, a set of universal PCR primers for metabarcoding environmental DNA from fishes: detection of more than 230 subtropical marine species

    PubMed Central

    Miya, M.; Sato, Y.; Fukunaga, T.; Sado, T.; Poulsen, J. Y.; Sato, K.; Minamoto, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, H.; Araki, H.; Kondoh, M.; Iwasaki, W.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a set of universal PCR primers (MiFish-U/E) for metabarcoding environmental DNA (eDNA) from fishes. Primers were designed using aligned whole mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences from 880 species, supplemented by partial mitogenome sequences from 160 elasmobranchs (sharks and rays). The primers target a hypervariable region of the 12S rRNA gene (163–185 bp), which contains sufficient information to identify fishes to taxonomic family, genus and species except for some closely related congeners. To test versatility of the primers across a diverse range of fishes, we sampled eDNA from four tanks in the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium with known species compositions, prepared dual-indexed libraries and performed paired-end sequencing of the region using high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies. Out of the 180 marine fish species contained in the four tanks with reference sequences in a custom database, we detected 168 species (93.3%) distributed across 59 families and 123 genera. These fishes are not only taxonomically diverse, ranging from sharks and rays to higher teleosts, but are also greatly varied in their ecology, including both pelagic and benthic species living in shallow coastal to deep waters. We also sampled natural seawaters around coral reefs near the aquarium and detected 93 fish species using this approach. Of the 93 species, 64 were not detected in the four aquarium tanks, rendering the total number of species detected to 232 (from 70 families and 152 genera). The metabarcoding approach presented here is non-invasive, more efficient, more cost-effective and more sensitive than the traditional survey methods. It has the potential to serve as an alternative (or complementary) tool for biodiversity monitoring that revolutionizes natural resource management and ecological studies of fish communities on larger spatial and temporal scales. PMID:26587265

  12. MiFish, a set of universal PCR primers for metabarcoding environmental DNA from fishes: detection of more than 230 subtropical marine species.

    PubMed

    Miya, M; Sato, Y; Fukunaga, T; Sado, T; Poulsen, J Y; Sato, K; Minamoto, T; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, H; Araki, H; Kondoh, M; Iwasaki, W

    2015-07-01

    We developed a set of universal PCR primers (MiFish-U/E) for metabarcoding environmental DNA (eDNA) from fishes. Primers were designed using aligned whole mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences from 880 species, supplemented by partial mitogenome sequences from 160 elasmobranchs (sharks and rays). The primers target a hypervariable region of the 12S rRNA gene (163-185 bp), which contains sufficient information to identify fishes to taxonomic family, genus and species except for some closely related congeners. To test versatility of the primers across a diverse range of fishes, we sampled eDNA from four tanks in the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium with known species compositions, prepared dual-indexed libraries and performed paired-end sequencing of the region using high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies. Out of the 180 marine fish species contained in the four tanks with reference sequences in a custom database, we detected 168 species (93.3%) distributed across 59 families and 123 genera. These fishes are not only taxonomically diverse, ranging from sharks and rays to higher teleosts, but are also greatly varied in their ecology, including both pelagic and benthic species living in shallow coastal to deep waters. We also sampled natural seawaters around coral reefs near the aquarium and detected 93 fish species using this approach. Of the 93 species, 64 were not detected in the four aquarium tanks, rendering the total number of species detected to 232 (from 70 families and 152 genera). The metabarcoding approach presented here is non-invasive, more efficient, more cost-effective and more sensitive than the traditional survey methods. It has the potential to serve as an alternative (or complementary) tool for biodiversity monitoring that revolutionizes natural resource management and ecological studies of fish communities on larger spatial and temporal scales.

  13. Development and Validation of PCR Primers To Assess the Diversity of Clostridium spp. in Cheese by Temporal Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Le Bourhis, Anne-Gaëlle; Saunier, Katiana; Doré, Joël; Carlier, Jean-Philippe; Chamba, Jean-François; Popoff, Michel-Robert; Tholozan, Jean-Luc

    2005-01-01

    A nested-PCR temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) approach was developed for the detection of bacteria belonging to phylogenetic cluster I of the genus Clostridium (the largest clostridial group, which represents 25% of the currently cultured clostridial species) in cheese suspected of late blowing. Primers were designed based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence, and the specificity was confirmed in PCRs performed with DNAs from cluster I and non-cluster I species as the templates. TTGE profiles of the PCR products, comprising the V5-V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene, allowed us to distinguish the majority of cluster I species. PCR-TTGE was applied to analyze commercial cheeses with defects. All cheeses gave a signal after nested PCR, and on the basis of band comigration with TTGE profiles of reference strains, all the bands could be assigned to a clostridial species. The direct identification of Clostridium spp. was confirmed by sequencing of excised bands. C. tyrobutyricum and C. beijerinckii contaminated 15 and 14 of the 20 cheese samples tested, respectively, and C. butyricum and C. sporogenes were detected in one cheese sample. Most-probable-number counts and volatile fatty acid were determined for comparison purposes. Results obtained were in agreement, but only two species, C. tyrobutyricum and C. sporogenes, could be isolated by the plating method. In all cheeses with a high amount of butyric acid (>100 mg/100 g), the presence of C. tyrobutyricum DNA was confirmed by PCR-TTGE, suggesting the involvement of this species in butyric acid fermentation. These results demonstrated the efficacy of the PCR-TTGE method to identify Clostridium in cheeses. The sensitivity of the method was estimated to be 100 CFU/g. PMID:15640166

  14. Development and validation of PCR primers to assess the diversity of Clostridium spp. in cheese by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, Anne-Gaëlle; Saunier, Katiana; Doré, Joël; Carlier, Jean-Philippe; Chamba, Jean-François; Popoff, Michel-Robert; Tholozan, Jean-Luc

    2005-01-01

    A nested-PCR temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) approach was developed for the detection of bacteria belonging to phylogenetic cluster I of the genus Clostridium (the largest clostridial group, which represents 25% of the currently cultured clostridial species) in cheese suspected of late blowing. Primers were designed based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence, and the specificity was confirmed in PCRs performed with DNAs from cluster I and non-cluster I species as the templates. TTGE profiles of the PCR products, comprising the V5-V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene, allowed us to distinguish the majority of cluster I species. PCR-TTGE was applied to analyze commercial cheeses with defects. All cheeses gave a signal after nested PCR, and on the basis of band comigration with TTGE profiles of reference strains, all the bands could be assigned to a clostridial species. The direct identification of Clostridium spp. was confirmed by sequencing of excised bands. C. tyrobutyricum and C. beijerinckii contaminated 15 and 14 of the 20 cheese samples tested, respectively, and C. butyricum and C. sporogenes were detected in one cheese sample. Most-probable-number counts and volatile fatty acid were determined for comparison purposes. Results obtained were in agreement, but only two species, C. tyrobutyricum and C. sporogenes, could be isolated by the plating method. In all cheeses with a high amount of butyric acid (>100 mg/100 g), the presence of C. tyrobutyricum DNA was confirmed by PCR-TTGE, suggesting the involvement of this species in butyric acid fermentation. These results demonstrated the efficacy of the PCR-TTGE method to identify Clostridium in cheeses. The sensitivity of the method was estimated to be 100 CFU/g.

  15. Triplex tetra-primer ARMS-PCR method for the simultaneous detection of MTHFR c.677C>T and c.1298A>C, and MTRR c.66A>G polymorphisms of the folate-homocysteine metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Lajin, Bassam; Alachkar, Amal; Sakur, Amir Alhaj

    2012-02-01

    The folate-homocysteine metabolic pathway was shown to play an important role in several diseases such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. The c.677C>T and c.1298A>C polymorphisms of the Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, and c.66A>G of the Methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) gene are the most commonly investigated polymorphisms in the folate-homocysteine metabolic pathway. The currently used methods for the detection of the three polymorphisms are either slow and laborious or extremely expensive. In this paper, a new highly optimized method for the simultaneous detection of the three single nucleotide polymorphisms is described. The proposed method utilizes 12 primers in a single PCR reaction to detect the three polymorphisms simultaneously based on the principle of tetra-primer ARMS-PCR (also known as PCR-CTPP). The proposed method offers extremely fast, economical, and simple detection. Validation by PCR-RFLP showed 100% concordance in genotype assignment. The proposed method was successfully applied to a sample of the Syrian population (n=126), which was not previously genotyped for any of the three SNPs. The variant allele frequencies were found to be 31, 29, and 43% for the c.677C>T, c.1298A>C, and c.66A>G polymorphisms, respectively. The proposed method is the first to detect three SNPs in a single PCR reaction based on tetra-primer ARMS-PCR or PCR-CTPP. We suggest that the use of Betaine may play an important role in multiplex tetra-primer ARMS-PCR or PCR-CTPP based on its potential capacity to close the gap in melting temperature between different primers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cryptococcus neoformans Typing by PCR Fingerprinting Using (GACA)4 Primers Based on C. neoformans Genome Project Data▿

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Massimo; Esposto, Maria Carmela; Liberi, Giordano; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2007-01-01

    Four (GACA)4 PCR fingerprinting sequences, used as markers to identify serotypes A and D and AD hybrids, were retrieved in four Cryptococcus neoformans genome databases. Their locations, both in serotype A and D genomes, were confirmed by chromosomal hybridization with specific probes. Two sequences were recognized to code for hypothetical functional proteins. PMID:17670921

  17. A Molecular Approach to Nested RT-PCR Using a New Set of Primers for the Detection of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Mohammad; Ravanshad, Mehrdad; Bagban, Ashraf; Fallahi, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is the etiologic agent of AIDS. The disease can be transmitted via blood in the window period prior to the development of antibodies to the disease. Thus, an appropriate method for the detection of HIV-1 during this window period is very important. Objectives This descriptive study proposes a sensitive, efficient, inexpensive, and easy method to detect HIV-1. Patients and Methods In this study 25 serum samples of patients under treatment and also 10 positive and 10 negative control samples were studied. Twenty-five blood samples were obtained from HIV-1-infected individuals who were receiving treatment at the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) research center of Imam Khomeini hospital in Tehran. The identification of HIV-1-positive samples was done by using reverse transcription to produce copy deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) and then optimizing the nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Two pairs of primers were then designed specifically for the protease gene fragment of the nested real time-PCR (RT-PCR) samples. Electrophoresis was used to examine the PCR products. The results were analyzed using statistical tests, including Fisher’s exact test, and SPSS17 software. Results The 325 bp band of the protease gene was observed in all the positive control samples and in none of the negative control samples. The proposed method correctly identified HIV-1 in 23 of the 25 samples. Conclusions These results suggest that, in comparison with viral cultures, antibody detection by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAs), and conventional PCR methods, the proposed method has high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HIV-1. PMID:27679699

  18. Simultaneous Detection and Genotype Determination of HSV 1 and 2 by Real-time PCR Using Melting Curve Analysis and a Unique Pair of Primers.

    PubMed

    Paryan, Mahdi; Mohammadi-Yeganeh, Samira; Rezvan, Houri; Kia, Vahid; Mansouri, Ardalan; Mirab Samiee, Siamak

    2017-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a human pathogen that causes different pathologic manifestations. Rapid and feasible detection and discrimination methods for HSV genotyping is a challenge in clinical laboratories, especially in children suffering from herpetic encephalitis. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping assay using SYBR Green I was established. We designed only 1 pair of primer for HSV 1 and 2, targeting thymidine kinase gene conserved region. HSV genotypes were determined by PCR using melting curve analysis with LightCycler. Different HSV genotypes were successfully detected in all clinical samples. The melting temperature for HSV 1 and 2 was 85.5±0.78°C and 89±0.53°C, respectively. These 2 genotypes were completely distinguished by means of the accurate melting assay. Importantly, detection was reliably performed within only 1 hour. The assay had no cross-reactivity across species, an excellent dynamic range from 10 to 10 copies per reaction, a good intra-assay and interassay reproducibility, and a detection limit of a single copy per reaction. Our homebrew designed and validated quantitative real-time PCR followed by a melting curve analysis provided a rapid and convenient screening test for differential identification of HSV genotypes 1 and 2. We recommend the large-scale application of this method for HSV 1 and 2 detection.

  19. Detection of Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc, and Weissella species in human feces by using group-specific PCR primers and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Walter, J; Hertel, C; Tannock, G W; Lis, C M; Munro, K; Hammes, W P

    2001-06-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of DNA fragments generated by PCR with 16S ribosomal DNA-targeted group-specific primers was used to detect lactic acid bacteria (LAB) of the genera Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc, and Weissella in human feces. Analysis of fecal samples of four subjects revealed individual profiles of DNA fragments originating not only from species that have been described as intestinal inhabitants but also from characteristically food-associated bacteria such as Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus curvatus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Pediococcus pentosaceus. Comparison of PCR-DGGE results with those of bacteriological culture showed that the food-associated species could not be cultured from the fecal samples by plating on Rogosa agar. On the other hand, all of the LAB species cultured from feces were detected in the DGGE profile. We also detected changes in the types of LAB present in human feces during consumption of a milk product containing the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus DR20. The analysis of fecal samples from two subjects taken before, during, and after administration of the probiotic revealed that L. rhamnosus was detectable by PCR-DGGE during the test period in the feces of both subjects, whereas it was detectable by culture in only one of the subjects.

  20. IMP PCR primers detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for Anopheles gambiae species identification, Mopti and Savanna rDNA types, and resistance to dieldrin in Anopheles arabiensis.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Elien E; Howell, Paul I; Benedict, Mark Q

    2006-12-19

    Polymerase chain reactions to distinguish single-nucleotide polymorphisms are commonly used for mosquito identification and identifying insecticide resistance alleles. However, the existing methods used for primer design often result in analyses that are not robust or require additional steps. Utilizing oligonucleotides that are unique in having an intentional mismatch to both templates three bases from the SNP at the 3-prime end, three new PCR assays that distinguish SNP targets using standard gel electrophoresis of undigested DNA fragments were developed and tested. These were applied to: (1) an alternative ribosomal DNA PCR assay to distinguish five members of the Anopheles gambiae complex; (2) detection of the Mopti and Savanna rDNA types; and (3) an assay to distinguish resistance to dieldrin (Rdl) alleles in Anopheles arabiensis. Reproducible specific amplification of the target alleles was observed in all three assays. The results were consistent with existing analyses but proved simpler and the results more distinct in our hands. The simplicity and effectiveness of the method should be utilized in these and other PCR analyses to increase their specificity and simplicity. These results have the potential to be extended not only to mosquito analyses but also to parasite and human polymorphisms.

  1. IMP PCR primers detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for Anopheles gambiae species identification, Mopti and Savanna rDNA types, and resistance to dieldrin in Anopheles arabiensis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Elien E; Howell, Paul I; Benedict, Mark Q

    2006-01-01

    Background Polymerase chain reactions to distinguish single-nucleotide polymorphisms are commonly used for mosquito identification and identifying insecticide resistance alleles. However, the existing methods used for primer design often result in analyses that are not robust or require additional steps. Methods Utilizing oligonucleotides that are unique in having an intentional mismatch to both templates three bases from the SNP at the 3-prime end, three new PCR assays that distinguish SNP targets using standard gel electrophoresis of undigested DNA fragments were developed and tested. These were applied to: (1) an alternative ribosomal DNA PCR assay to distinguish five members of the Anopheles gambiae complex; (2) detection of the Mopti and Savanna rDNA types; and (3) an assay to distinguish resistance to dieldrin (Rdl) alleles in Anopheles arabiensis. Results Reproducible specific amplification of the target alleles was observed in all three assays. The results were consistent with existing analyses but proved simpler and the results more distinct in our hands. Conclusion The simplicity and effectiveness of the method should be utilized in these and other PCR analyses to increase their specificity and simplicity. These results have the potential to be extended not only to mosquito analyses but also to parasite and human polymorphisms. PMID:17177993

  2. Touchdown General Primer (GP5+/GP6+) PCR and optimized sample DNA concentration support the sensitive detection of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark F; Adamson, Christine S C; Simmons-Arnold, Linda; Cooper, Kumarasen

    2005-11-16

    The GP5+/GP6+ PCR assay is a well-established HPV detection technique. This study has examined the effects of incorporating 'hot start' and 'touchdown' steps into the protocol. In addition, dTTP was substituted with dUTP to permit contamination control measures against carry-over PCR product. Firstly, HPV-16 was amplified from SiHa cell DNA (0.1 ng-100 ng) diluted in a background of C-33A DNA (100 ng-2 microg). Secondly, the detection of small quantities (15ag-1.5pg) of HPV recombinant plasmids (types 16, 31, 33, 45, 51, 52, and 56) diluted in C-33A DNA was investigated. Thirdly, clinical sample DNA extracts (cervical smears, formalin-fixed vaginal lesions and breast tumors) were tested for HPV. Six different PCR protocols were assessed. HPV was detected by gel electrophoresis, and by Southern and dot blot hybridization. HPV detection sensitivity was dependent on the total amount of DNA in a PCR. Touchdown protocols supported HPV-16 detection from 1 ng or 0.5 ng SiHa cell DNA in a background of 2 microg or 1 microg C-33A DNA respectively, and from 0.1 ng of SiHa cell DNA (approximately 28 copies HPV-16) in 500 ng or 100 ng background DNA. Under standard GP5+/GP6+ annealing conditions, HPV-16 went undetected when the DNA content of a PCR was 2 microg or 1 microg, and with 500 ng C-33A DNA the sensitivity limit was 1 ng SiHa cell DNA. HPV recombinant plasmids were each detected with high (albeit varying) sensitivity by a touchdown protocol. HPV-31 was better amplified under standard annealing conditions (1.5fg in 100 ng background DNA) than by a touchdown approach (15fg detection limit). HPV-52 was not amplified by the standard protocol at the dilutions tested. Seventeen different HPV types were demonstrated in 47/65 (72%) abnormal cytology samples recorded as HPV negative by standard GP5+/GP6+ conditions. Twenty-one different HPV types were recorded in 111/114 (97%) vaginal lesions. Multiple infections were also detectable using a touchdown approach. Of 26 breast

  3. A universal primer set for PCR amplification of nuclear histone H4 genes from all animal species.

    PubMed

    Pineau, Pascal; Henry, Michel; Suspène, Rodolphe; Marchio, Agnès; Dettai, Agnès; Debruyne, Régis; Petit, Thierry; Lécu, Alexis; Moisson, Pierre; Dejean, Anne; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre

    2005-03-01

    To control the quality of genomic DNA of samples from a wide variety of animals, a heminested PCR assay specifically targeting a nuclear gene has been developed. The histone H4 gene family comprises a small number of genes considered among the most conserved genes in living organisms. Tissue samples from necropsies and from cells belonging to 43 different species were studied, eight samples from invertebrates and 35 samples from vertebrates covering all classes. Ancient DNA samples from three Siberian woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius) dating between 40,000 and 49,000 years before present were also tested for PCR amplification. Performance of HIST2H4 amplification were also compared with those of previously published universal PCRs (28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and cytochrome b). Overall, 95% of species studied yielded an amplification product, including some old samples from gorilla and chimpanzees. The data indicate that the HIST2H4 amplimers are, thus, suitable for both DNA quality testing as well as species identification in the animal kingdom.

  4. PrimerView: high-throughput primer design and visualization.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput primer design is routinely performed in a wide number of molecular applications including genotyping specimens using traditional PCR techniques as well as assembly PCR, nested PCR, and primer walking experiments. Batch primer design is also required in validation experiments from RNA-seq transcriptome sequencing projects, as well as in generating probes for microarray experiments. The growing popularity of next generation sequencing and microarray technology has created a greater need for more primer design tools to validate large numbers of candidate genes and markers. To meet these demands I here present a tool called PrimerView that designs forward and reverse primers from multi-sequence datasets, and generates graphical outputs that map the position and distribution of primers to the target sequence. This module operates from the command-line and can collect user-defined input for the design phase of each primer. PrimerView is a straightforward to use module that implements a primer design algorithm to return forward and reverse primers from any number of FASTA formatted sequences to generate text based output of the features for each primer, and also graphical outputs that map the designed primers to the target sequence. PrimerView is freely available without restrictions.

  5. EasyExonPrimer: automated primer design for exon sequences.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David J

    2006-01-01

    EasyExonPrimer is a web-based software that automates the design of PCR primers to amplify exon sequences from genomic DNA. EasyExonPrimer is written in Perl and uses Primer3 to design PCR primers based on the genome builds and annotation databases available at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu/). It masks repeats and known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites in the genome and designs standardised primers using optimised conditions. Users can input genes by RefSeq mRNA ID, gene name or keyword. The primer design is optimised for large-scale resequencing of exons. For exons larger than 1 kb, the user has the option of breaking the exon sequence down into overlapping smaller fragments. All primer pairs are then verified using the In-Silico PCR software to test for uniqueness in the genome. We have designed >1000 pairs of primers for 90 genes; 95% of the primer pairs successfully amplified exon sequences under standard PCR conditions without requiring further optimisation. EasyExonPrimer is available from http://129.43.22.27/~primer/. The source code is also available upon request. Xiaolin Wu (forestwu@mail.nih.gov).

  6. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Primer and PCR Clamping by LNA Oligonucleotide to Enhance the Amplification of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions in Investigating the Community Structures of Plant-Associated Fungi.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Masakazu; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Sakai, Masao

    2016-09-29

    The simultaneous extraction of host plant DNA severely limits investigations of the community structures of plant-associated fungi due to the similar homologies of sequences in primer-annealing positions between fungi and host plants. Although fungal-specific primers have been designed, plant DNA continues to be excessively amplified by PCR, resulting in the underestimation of community structures. In order to overcome this limitation, locked nucleic acid (LNA) primers and PCR clamping by LNA oligonucleotides have been applied to enhance the amplification of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. LNA primers were designed by converting DNA into LNA, which is specific to fungi, at the forward primer side. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which are complementary to the host plants, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the reverse primer. Plant-specific DNA was then converted into LNA at the shifted position from the 3' end of the primer-binding position. PCR using the LNA technique enhanced the amplification of fungal ITS regions, whereas those of the host plants were more likely to be amplified without the LNA technique. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis displayed patterns that reached an acceptable level for investigating the community structures of plant-associated fungi using the LNA technique. The sequences of the bands detected using the LNA technique were mostly affiliated with known isolates. However, some sequences showed low similarities, indicating the potential to identify novel fungi. Thus, the application of the LNA technique is considered effective for widening the scope of community analyses of plant-associated fungi.

  7. Use of PCR primers and probes based on the 23S rRNA and internal transcription spacer (ITS) gene sequence for the detection and enumerization of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum in feed supplements.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chieh-Hsien; Yu, Bi; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2010-06-01

    Novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers designed from the 16S-23S internal transcription spacer (ITS) rRNA and 23S rRNA genes, respectively, were used for the specific detection of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Molecular weights of the PCR products were 221 and 599 bp, respectively. Strains of L. acidophilus and L. plantarum obtained from the culture center, dairy products, infant stool and other samples, could be identified with these PCR primers. DNAs from other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species including strains of Lactobacillus pentosus which was closely related to L. plantarum, and bacteria species other than LAB, would not generate the false positive results. When this PCR primer set was used for the detection of L. acidophilus and L. plantarum in feed supplement or feed starter samples, reliable results were obtained. Furthermore, when these L. acidophilus or L. plantarum specific primers were used as DNA probes for the colony hybridization of L. acidophilus and L. plantarum, the viable cells of these LAB species in culture and feed supplements or starter products could be identified and enumerized. The method described here thus offers a rapid and economic way to inspect and assure the quality of the feed supplements or fermentation starters.

  8. Development of a 16S rRNA Gene Primer and PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Method for Rapid Detection of Members of the Genus Megasphaera and Species-Level Identification ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Akihiro; Abe, Shinko; Nashirozawa, Shiho; Shimada, Sayaka; Fujimoto, Naoshi; Suzuki, Masaharu

    2011-01-01

    The genus Megasphaera is relevant to the environment, human health and food, and renewable energy for the future. In this study, a primer set was designed for PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses to detect and identify the members of Megasphaera. Direct detection and identification were achieved for environmental samples and isolates. PMID:21705538

  9. [A method using long primers for cloning the upstream sequence of delta-6 fatty acid desaturases gene of Thamnidium elegans by nested inverse PCR].

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Pei; Sun, Wei; Li, Ming-Chun; Wei, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Xing, Lai-Jun

    2006-07-01

    Thamnidium elegans is a kind of phycomycete that produces essential unsaturated fatty acids, particularly y-linolenic acid. In this process, delta6-Fatty acid desaturase (D6D) plays a key role due to its enzymatic properties that catalyze the delta6 site dehydrogenation of precursor linoleic acid (18:2delta(9, 12) n-6) and a-linolenic acid (18:3delta(9, 12, 15) n-3). This reaction is the first and rate-limiting step of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) synthesis pathways. After we have isolated and cloned the gene coding delta6-fatty acid desaturase from Thamnidium elegans As3.2806 (GenBank accession number DQ099380), our interest focuses on the promotion and regulation of the gene transcription. To achieve this aim, we designed long primers and used nested inverse PCR to amplify DNA flanking sequences. First, genome of Thamnidium elegans was extracted and digested with restriction enzymes EcoR I and Kpn I , respectively. Then we ligated the digested DNA with T4 ligase at low concentration which is propitious for linear DNA to joint intromolecule. According to the sequence of delta6-fatty acid desaturase gene of Thamnidium elegans, we designed a couple of 35nt long inverse primers and two couples of shorter inverse primers for inverse PCR. Three rounds of PCR reactions were performed. In the primary reaction, the ligated DNA was used as a template, and the product was used as the template of the secondary reaction, the tertiary reaction was achieved in the same way. After all the three rounds of reactions, we got a nice product about 4 kb from the EcoR I digested sample, in which a 1.3kb 5' upstream sequence (GenBank accession number DQ309425) of delta6-fatty acid desaturase gene containing several putative regulatory elements including TATA. box, FSE-2, AP-1 sites, CCAAT cis-element site and STRE-binding site was derived after sequencing. All of these implied intensely that this 1.3kb fragment is a condition-regulated promoter. It is the first report about

  10. Multi-primer qPCR assay capable of highly efficient and specific detection of the vast majority of all known Mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Salling, H K; Bang-Christensen, S R

    2016-05-01

    Mycoplasma bacteria are able to pass through sterilizing grade filters due to their small size and lack of a cell wall, making them a common contaminant of biopharmaceutical productions. The classical method for detecting Mycoplasma is described in the European Pharmacopeia (Ph.Eur) 2.6.7. The method takes 28 days to perform, due to the slow growing nature of some Mycoplasma species. The Ph.Eur has described Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) as a rapid alternative to the classical method. Here we present the development of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay capable of unambiguous detection of Mycoplasma with high sensitivity and specificity. The broadness of detection and the specificity towards Mycoplasma has been investigated by in silico analysis of the primer sequences followed by testing on purified Mycoplasma DNA as well as DNA from closely related genera. The assay will in all probability detect at least 356 species and strains of Mycoplasma, Spiroplasma and Acholeplasma with high sensitivity. To our knowledge this assay has the most uniform amplification efficiency over the broadest range of species and it is extremely specific towards Mycoplasma. With appropriate validation, the assay can be applied as a powerful tool for rapid Mycoplasma detection in the biopharmaceutical industry.

  11. Genetic structure of soil population of fungus Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.: Fr.: Molecular reidentification of the species and genetic differentiation of isolates using polymerase chain reaction technique with universal primers (UP-PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Bulat, S.A.; Mironenko, N.V.; Zholkevich, Yu.G.

    1995-07-01

    The genetic structure of three soil populations of fungus Fusarium oxysporum was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers (UP-PCR). Distinct UP-PCR variants revealed by means of cross-dot hybridization of amplified DNA and restriction analysis of nuclear ribosomal DNA represent subspecies or sibling species of F. oxysporum. The remaining isolates of F. oxysporum showed moderate UP-PCR polymorphism characterized by numerous types, whose relatedness was analyzed by computer treatment of the UP-PCR patterns. The genetic distance trees based on the UP-PCR patterns, which were obtained with different universal primers, demonstrated similar topology. This suggests that evolutionarily important genome rearrangements correlatively occur within the entire genome. Isolates representing different UP-PCR polymorphisms were encountered in all populations, being distributed asymmetrically in two of these. In general, soil populations of F. oxysporum were represented by numerous genetically isolated groups with a similar genome structure. The genetic heterogeneity of the isolates within these groups is likely to be caused by the parasexual process. The usefulness of the UP-PCR technique for population studies of F. oxysporum was demonstrated. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Neuraminidase Subtyping of Avian Influenza Viruses with PrimerHunter-Designed Primers and Quadruplicate Primer Pools

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanyan; Khan, Mazhar; Măndoiu, Ion I.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously developed a software package called PrimerHunter to design primers for PCR-based virus subtyping. In this study, 9 pairs of primers were designed with PrimerHunter and successfully used to differentiate the 9 neuraminidase (NA) genes of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in multiple PCR-based assays. Furthermore, primer pools were designed and successfully used to decrease the number of reactions needed for NA subtyping from 9 to 4. The quadruplicate primer-pool method is cost-saving, and was shown to be suitable for the NA subtyping of both cultured AIVs and uncultured AIV swab samples. The primers selected for this study showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in NA subtyping by RT-PCR, SYBR green-based Real-time PCR and Real-time RT-PCR methods. AIV RNA of 2 to 200 copies (varied by NA subtypes) could be detected by these reactions. No unspecific amplification was displayed when detecting RNAs of other avian infectious viruses such as Infectious bronchitis virus, Infectious bursal disease virus and Newcastle disease virus. In summary, this study introduced several sensitive and specific PCR-based assays for NA subtyping of AIVs and also validated again the effectiveness of the PrimerHunter tool for the design of subtyping primers. PMID:24312367

  13. Neuraminidase subtyping of avian influenza viruses with PrimerHunter-designed primers and quadruplicate primer pools.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Khan, Mazhar I; Khan, Mazhar; Măndoiu, Ion; Măndoiu, Ion I

    2013-01-01

    We have previously developed a software package called PrimerHunter to design primers for PCR-based virus subtyping. In this study, 9 pairs of primers were designed with PrimerHunter and successfully used to differentiate the 9 neuraminidase (NA) genes of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in multiple PCR-based assays. Furthermore, primer pools were designed and successfully used to decrease the number of reactions needed for NA subtyping from 9 to 4. The quadruplicate primer-pool method is cost-saving, and was shown to be suitable for the NA subtyping of both cultured AIVs and uncultured AIV swab samples. The primers selected for this study showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in NA subtyping by RT-PCR, SYBR green-based Real-time PCR and Real-time RT-PCR methods. AIV RNA of 2 to 200 copies (varied by NA subtypes) could be detected by these reactions. No unspecific amplification was displayed when detecting RNAs of other avian infectious viruses such as Infectious bronchitis virus, Infectious bursal disease virus and Newcastle disease virus. In summary, this study introduced several sensitive and specific PCR-based assays for NA subtyping of AIVs and also validated again the effectiveness of the PrimerHunter tool for the design of subtyping primers.

  14. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Primer and PCR Clamping by LNA Oligonucleotide to Enhance the Amplification of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions in Investigating the Community Structures of Plant–Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Masakazu; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Sakai, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous extraction of host plant DNA severely limits investigations of the community structures of plant–associated fungi due to the similar homologies of sequences in primer–annealing positions between fungi and host plants. Although fungal-specific primers have been designed, plant DNA continues to be excessively amplified by PCR, resulting in the underestimation of community structures. In order to overcome this limitation, locked nucleic acid (LNA) primers and PCR clamping by LNA oligonucleotides have been applied to enhance the amplification of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. LNA primers were designed by converting DNA into LNA, which is specific to fungi, at the forward primer side. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which are complementary to the host plants, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the reverse primer. Plant-specific DNA was then converted into LNA at the shifted position from the 3′ end of the primer–binding position. PCR using the LNA technique enhanced the amplification of fungal ITS regions, whereas those of the host plants were more likely to be amplified without the LNA technique. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis displayed patterns that reached an acceptable level for investigating the community structures of plant–associated fungi using the LNA technique. The sequences of the bands detected using the LNA technique were mostly affiliated with known isolates. However, some sequences showed low similarities, indicating the potential to identify novel fungi. Thus, the application of the LNA technique is considered effective for widening the scope of community analyses of plant–associated fungi. PMID:27600711

  15. Correlation Between Pneumocystis jirovecii Mitochondrial Genotypes and High and Low Fungal Loads Assessed by Single Nucleotide Primer Extension Assay and Quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Olivi, Martine; Cabaret, Odile; Foulet, Françoise; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Millon, Laurence; Berceanu, Ana; Cordonnier, Catherine; Costa, Jean-Marc; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We designed a single nucleotide primer extension (SNaPshot) assay for Pneumocystis jirovecii genotyping, targeting mt85 SNP of the mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA locus, to improve minority allele detection. We then analyzed 133 consecutive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids tested positive for P. jirovecii DNA by quantitative real-time PCR, obtained from two hospitals in different locations (Hospital 1 [n = 95] and Hospital 2 [n = 38]). We detected three different alleles, either singly (mt85C: 39.1%; mt85T: 24.1%; mt85A: 9.8%) or together (27%), and an association between P. jirovecii mt85 genotype and the patient's place of hospitalization (p = 0.011). The lowest fungal loads (median = 0.82 × 10(3) copies/μl; range: 15-11 × 10(3) ) were associated with mt85A and the highest (median = 1.4 × 10(6) copies/μl; range: 17 × 10(3) -1.3 × 10(7) ) with mt85CTA (p = 0.010). The ratios of the various alleles differed between the 36 mixed-genotype samples. In tests of serial BALs (median: 20 d; range 4-525) from six patients with mixed genotypes, allele ratio changes were observed five times and genotype replacement once. Therefore, allele ratio changes seem more frequent than genotype replacement when using a SNaPshot assay more sensitive for detecting minority alleles than Sanger sequencing. Moreover, because microscopy detects only high fungal loads, the selection of microscopy-positive samples may miss genotypes associated with low loads.

  16. A real-time PCR approach based on SPF10 primers and the INNO-LiPA HPV genotyping extra assay for the detection and typing of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Micalessi, M Isabel; Boulet, Gaëlle A; Bogers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    A highly sensitive SPF10 real-time PCR was developed to achieve simultaneous amplification and detection of the human papillomavirus (HPV) target. That way, LiPA analysis of the HPV-negative samples can be avoided, reducing workload and cost. Here, we describe in detail a SYBR Green I-based real-time PCR assay based on SPF10 primers using the LightCycler(®) 480 system to generate and detect HPV amplicons, which are compatible with the LiPA assay.

  17. Rapid and efficient identification of the mouse leptin receptor mutation (C57BL/KsJ-db/db) by tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) analysis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Harry; Nam, Hajin; Suh, Jun-Gyo

    2016-03-01

    The C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) mouse has a point mutation in the leptin receptor gene and is one of the most useful animal model for non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in human. Since the homozygote of C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) mouse is infertile, detection of point mutation in the leptin receptor gene is important for efficient maintaining strains as well as mass production of homozygotes. To develop a rapid and efficient genotyping method for C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) mouse, the tetra-primer amplification-refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) was used. The 407 and 199 bp PCR products were amplified from normal (+/+) mice; while the 407 and 268 bp PCR products were amplified from homozygotes (db/db) mice; and the 407, 268, and 199 bp PCR products were amplified from heterozygotes (db/+) mice. This result showed that the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR analysis by us is suitable to detect point mutation of the leptin receptor gene. Taken together, our method will dramatically reduce animal use for maintenance of strains as well as production of homozygote in the C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) strains.

  18. Improving qPCR methodology for detection of foaming bacteria by analysis of broad-spectrum primers and a highly specific probe for quantification of Nocardia spp. in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Asvapathanagul, P; Olson, B H

    2017-01-01

    To develop qPCR broad-spectrum primers combined with a Nocardia genus-specific probe for the identification of a broad spectrum of Nocardia spp. and to analyse the effects of using this developed primer and probe set on the ability to quantify Nocardia spp. in mixed DNA. The consequences of using a degenerative primer set and species-specific probe for the genus Nocardia on qPCR assays were examined using DNA extracts of pure cultures and activated sludge. The mixed DNA extracts where the target organism Nocardia flavorosea concentration ranged from 5 × 10(2) to 5 × 10(6) copies per reaction, while the background organism's DNA (Mycobacterium bovis) concentration was held at 5 × 10(6) copies per reaction, only produced comparable cycle threshold florescence levels when N. flavorosea concentration was greater than or equal to the background organism concentration. When concentrations of N. flavorosea were lowered in increments of 1 log, while holding M. bovis concentrations constant at 5 × 10(6) copies per reaction, all assays demonstrated delayed cycle threshold values with a maximum 34·6-fold decrease in cycle threshold at a ratio of 10(6) M. bovis: 10(2) N. flavorosea copies per reaction. The data presented in this study indicated that increasing the ability of a primer set to capture a broad group of organisms can affect the accuracy of quantification even when a highly specific probe is used. This study examined several applications of molecular tools in complex communities such as evaluating the effect of mispriming vs interference. It also elucidates the importance of understanding the community genetic make-up on primer design. Degenerative primers are very useful in amplifying bacterial DNA across genera, but reduce the efficiency of qPCR reactions. Therefore, standards that address closely related background species must be used to obtain accurate qPCR results. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Differentiation of entC1 from entC2/entC3 with a single primer pair using simple and rapid SYBR Green-based RT-PCR melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Sowmya; Ramlal, Shylaja; Venkataswamachari, Bhavani Peddayelachagiri; Paul, Soumya; Kingston, Joseph; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2016-10-01

    In spite of their involvement in foodborne illness, the epidemiological relevance of staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC) subtypes is poorly documented may be due to high sequence similarity. Among subtypes, SEC1, SEC2, and SEC3 exhibit more than 97 % homology because of which specific detection tools are seldom available to identify and differentiate them. In this study, a SYBR Green-based RT-PCR followed by melt curve analysis was developed for differentiation of entC1 from entC2/entC3 using a single primer pair. Nucleotide sequences of all three subtypes were analyzed using Clustal Omega program and the region with significant sequence variation/heterogeneity (where utmost SNPs were closely located and accessible for RT-PCR) was selected for amplification by designing a single primer pair that could amplify all three subtypes. In spite of same amplicon size, entC1 showed distinct melt peak at 76 °C. However, due to high similarity between entC2 and entC3, the developed format was deficient to discriminate between them and both showed melt peak at 82 °C. Reliability of developed RT-PCR was evaluated using various naturally contaminated samples and 91 food and clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates where satisfactory results were obtained in comparison with commercial immunoassay kit and conventional PCRs using validated primers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first method being reported to differentiate entC1 from entC2/entC3 using single primer pair which is unachievable by conventional PCR due to same amplicon size. As benefits, the method is sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive with no requirement of fluorescent probes, multiple primers, and post-PCR procedures. Thus, the assay might find its utility as a detection tool in epidemiological survey of foodborne outbreaks for simultaneous identification and differentiation of entC1 from entC2/entC3.

  20. Development, validation and application of specific primers for analyzing the clostridial diversity in dark fermentation pit mud by PCR-DGGE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Long; Wang, Hai-Yan; Wu, Qun; Xu, Yan

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a Clostridia-specific primer set SJ-F and SJ-R, based on the available 16S rRNA genes sequences from database, was successfully designed and authenticated by theoretical and experimental evaluations. It targeted 19 clostridial families and unclassified_Clostridia with different coverage rates. The specificity and universality of novel primer set was tested again using the dark fermentation pit mud (FPM). It was demonstrated that a total of 13 closest relatives including 12 species were affiliated with 7 clostridial genera, respectively. Compared to the well-accepted bacterial universal primer pair P2/P3, five unexpected clostridial genera including Roseburia, Tissierella, Sporanaerobacter, Alkalibacter and Halothermothrix present in the FPM were also revealed. Therefore, this study could provide a good alternative to investigate the clostridial diversity and monitor their population dynamics rapidly and efficiently in various anaerobic environments and dark fermentation systems in future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of gastroenteritis viruses among pediatric patients in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan, between 2006 and 2013 using multiplex reverse transcription PCR-based assays involving fluorescent dye-labeled primers.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto, Naoki; Hisatsune, Yuri; Toukubo, Yasushi; Tanizawa, Yukie; Shimazu, Yukie; Takao, Shinichi; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Noda, Mamoru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2017-05-01

    Multiplex reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays involving fluorescent dye-labeled primers were modified to detect 10 types of gastroenteritis viruses by adding two further assays to a previously developed assay. Then, these assays were applied to clinical samples, which were collected between January 2006 and December 2013. All 10 types of viruses were effectively detected in the multiplex RT-PCR-based assays. In addition, various viral parameters, such as the detection rates and age distributions of each viral type, were examined. The frequency and types of mixed infections were also investigated. Among the 186 virus-positive samples, genogroup II noroviruses were found to be the most common type of virus (32.7%), followed by group A rotaviruses (10.6%) and parechoviruses (10.3%). Mixed infections were observed in 37 samples, and many of them were detected in patients who were less than 2 years old. These observations showed that the multiplex RT-PCR-based assays involving fluorescent dye-labeled primers were able to effectively detect the viruses circulating among pediatric acute gastroenteritis patients and contributed to the highly specific and sensitive diagnosis of gastroenteritis. J. Med. Virol. 89:791-800, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Universal primer-multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (UP-M-PCR) and capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence analysis for the simultaneous detection of six genetically modified maize lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunjiao; Xu, Wentao; Zhai, Zhifang; Luo, Yunbo; Yan, Xinghua; Zhang, Nan; Huang, Kunlun

    2011-05-25

    To meet the labeling and traceability requirement of genetically modified (GM) maize and their products for trade and regulation, it is essential to develop a specific detection method for monitoring the presence of GM content. In this work, six GM maize lines, including GA21, Bt11, NK603, Bt176, Mir604, and Mon810, were simultaneously detected by universal primer-multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (UP-M-PCR), and the amplicons for the six event-specific genes as well as the endogenous Ivr gene were successfully separated by the method of capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF). The UP-M-PCR method overcame the disadvantages in conventional M-PCR, such as complex manipulation, lower sensitivity, amplification disparity resulting from different primers, etc., and in combination with CE-LIF, it obtained a high sensitivity of 0.1 ng for both single and mixed DNA samples. The established method can be widely used for the qualitative identification of the GM maize lines.

  3. Rapid identification of Gram-positive anaerobic coccal species originally classified in the genus Peptostreptococcus by multiplex PCR assays using genus- and species-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuli; Liu, Chengxu; McTeague, Maureen; Vu, Ann; Liu, Jia Yia; Finegold, Sydney M

    2003-07-01

    Here, a rapid and reliable two-step multiplex PCR assay for identifying 14 Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) species originally classified in the genus Peptostreptococcus (Anaerococcus hydrogenalis, Anaerococcus lactolyticus, Anaerococcus octavius, Anaerococcus prevotii, Anaerococcus tetradius, Anaerococcus vaginalis, Finegoldia magna, Micromonas micros, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Peptoniphilus asaccharolyticus, Peptoniphilus harei, Peptoniphilus indolicus, Peptoniphilus ivorii and Peptoniphilus lacrimalis) is reported. Fourteen type strains representing 14 GPAC species were first identified to the genus level by multiplex PCR (multiplex PCR-G). Since three of these genera (Finegoldia, Micromonas and Peptostreptococcus) contain only a single species, F. magna, M. micros and P. anaerobius, respectively, these organisms were identified to the species level directly by using the multiplex PCR-G. Then six species of the genus Anaerococcus (A. hydrogenalis, A. lactolyticus, A. octavius, A. prevotii, A. vaginalis and A. tetradius) were further identified to the species level using multiplex PCR assays (multiplex PCR-Ia and multiplex PCR-Ib). Similarly, five species of the genus Peptoniphilus (Pn. asaccharolyticus, Pn. harei, Pn. indolicus, Pn. ivorii and Pn. lacrimalis) were identified to the species level using multiplex PCR-IIa and multiplex PCR-IIb. The established two-step multiplex PCR identification scheme was applied to the identification of 190 clinical isolates of GPAC species that had been identified previously to the species level by 16S rRNA sequencing and phenotypic tests. The identification obtained from multiplex PCR assays showed 100 % agreement with 16S rDNA sequencing identification, but only 65 % (123/190) agreement with the identification obtained by phenotypic tests. The multiplex PCR scheme established in this study is a simple, rapid and reliable method for the identification of GPAC species. It will permit a more accurate assessment of the

  4. Specific primer design for the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Li-Yeh; Cheng, Yu-Huei; Yang, Cheng-Hong

    2013-10-01

    The design of primers has a major impact on the success of PCR in relation to the specificity and yield of the amplified product. Here, we introduce the applications of PCR as well as the definition and characteristics for PCR primer design. Recent primer design tools based on Primer3, along with several computational intelligence-based primer design methods which have been applied in primer design, are also reviewed. In addition, characteristics of population-based methods used in primer design are discussed in detail.

  5. Use of site-directed mutagenesis of allele-specific PCR primers to identify the GSTM1 A, GSTM1 B, GSTM1 A,B and GSTM1 null polymorphisms at the glutathione S-transferase, GSTM1 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, A A; Zhao, L; Alldersea, J; Pearson, W R; Strange, R C

    1993-01-01

    We describe the identification of the GSTM1 null, GSTM1 A, GSTM1 B and GSTM1 A,B polymorphisms at the glutathione S-transferase GSTM1 locus using a single-step PCR method. Target DNA was amplified using primers to intron 6 and exon 7 with site-directed mutagenesis being used to introduce a restriction site in DNA amplified from GSTM1 *A, thereby allowing differentiation of this allele and GSTM1 *B. The accuracy of this approach in identifying the GSTM1 A, GSTM1 B, GSTM1 A,B and GSTM1 null polymorphisms was confirmed by comparison with, firstly, an established PCR method that distinguishes GSTM1 *0 homozygotes from individuals with the other GSTM1 genotypes and, secondly, GSTM1 phenotypes determined using chromatofocusing. Images Figure 1 PMID:8216235

  6. UniPrimer: A Web-Based Primer Design Tool for Comparative Analyses of Primate Genomes.

    PubMed

    Batnyam, Nomin; Lee, Jimin; Lee, Jungnam; Hong, Seung Bok; Oh, Sejong; Han, Kyudong

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome sequences of various primates have been released due to advanced DNA-sequencing technology. A combination of computational data mining and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to validate the data is an excellent method for conducting comparative genomics. Thus, designing primers for PCR is an essential procedure for a comparative analysis of primate genomes. Here, we developed and introduced UniPrimer for use in those studies. UniPrimer is a web-based tool that designs PCR- and DNA-sequencing primers. It compares the sequences from six different primates (human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, and rhesus macaque) and designs primers on the conserved region across species. UniPrimer is linked to RepeatMasker, Primer3Plus, and OligoCalc softwares to produce primers with high accuracy and UCSC In-Silico PCR to confirm whether the designed primers work. To test the performance of UniPrimer, we designed primers on sample sequences using UniPrimer and manually designed primers for the same sequences. The comparison of the two processes showed that UniPrimer was more effective than manual work in terms of saving time and reducing errors.

  7. The use of RT-PCR for determination of separate end-points for the strains IB H120 and IB D274 in titration of the combination vaccine Poulvac IB® primer.

    PubMed

    Geerligs, H J; Meinders, C A M; Snel, J; Duyves, W

    2013-11-01

    Poulvac IB® Primer is a lyophilized vaccine containing two attenuated infectious bronchitis strains in one vial, IB H120 and IB D274. For quantification of the viral content of the vaccine, dilution series of the final product are inoculated in embryonated chicken eggs. After the incubation period of seven days standard practice is for the embryos to be taken from each egg and examined visually for IB specific lesions; these readings are used to determine an end-point in viral titrations. The result is a titre value to which both strains contribute. However, it is not clear what the live virus titre is for strain IB H120 and for strain IB D274. In order to determine end-points in the titration for each of the two strains, we collected the allantoic fluids from each egg after the incubation period and tested these for the presence of IB H120 and IB D274 by a strain specific reverse phase PCR. Based on the data obtained by PCR we were able to determine an end-point for each of the two strains. For a given commercial batch of Poulvac IB primer we determined titres of 10(6.31) EID50 per vial for IB H120 and 10(6.59) EID50 for IB D274 using PCR for end-point determination. These end-points matched well with the end-point determined for both strains cumulatively after visual examination, i.e. 10(6.67) EID50 per vial. It is concluded that PCR is a suitable means to determine end-points in titrations of live viruses. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Detection of bacteria and fungi in blood of patients with febrile neutropenia by real-time PCR with universal primers and probes.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Hideto; Ohzono, Nanae; Inamura, Norikazu; Kato, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Akaike, Hiroto; Terada, Kihei; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2015-03-01

    Febrile neutropenia is the main treatment-related cause of mortality in cancer patients. During June 2012 to April 2014, 97 blood culture samples were collected from patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancy and cancer with febrile neutropenia episodes (FNEs). The samples were examined for the presence of bacteria and fungi using real-time PCR amplification and sequencing of 16S and 18S rRNA genes. Bacteria were identified in 20 of 97 samples (20.6%) by the real-time PCR assay and in 10 of 97 (10.3%) samples by blood culture. In 6 blood culture-positive samples, the real-time PCR assay detected the same type of bacteria. No fungi were detected by the real-time PCR assay or blood culture. During antibiotic therapy, all samples were negative by blood culture, but the real-time PCR assay yielded a positive result in 2 cases of 2 (100%). The bacterial DNA copy number was not well correlated with the serum C-reactive protein titer of patients with FNEs. We conclude that a real-time PCR assay could provide better detection of causative microbes' in a shorter time, and with a smaller blood sample than blood culture. Using a real-time PCR assay in combination with blood culture could improve microbiological documentation of FNEs.

  9. Influence of primer sequences and DNA extraction method on detection of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in ground beef by real-time PCR targeting the eae, stx, and serogroup-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Wasilenko, Jamie L; Fratamico, Pina M; Narang, Neelam; Tillman, Glenn E; Ladely, Scott; Simmons, Mustafa; Cray, William C

    2012-11-01

    Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections, particularly those caused by the "big six" or "top six" non-O157 serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) can result in severe illness and complications. Because of their significant public health impact and the notable prevalence of STEC in cattle, methods for detection of the big six non-O157 STEC in ground beef have been established. Currently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service detection methods for screening beef samples for non-O157 STEC target the stx(1), stx(2), and eae virulence genes, with the 16S rRNA gene as an internal control, in a real-time PCR multiplex assay. Further, the serogroup is determined by PCR targeting genes in the E. coli O-antigen gene clusters of the big six non-O157 serogroups. The method that we previously reported was improved so that additional stx variants, stx(1d), stx(2e), and stx(2g), are detected. Additionally, alignments of the primers targeting the eae gene were used to improve the detection assay so that eae subtypes that could potentially be of clinical significance would also be detected. Therefore, evaluation of alternative real-time PCR assay primers and probes for the stx and eae reactions was carried out in order to increase the stx and eae subtypes detected. Furthermore, a Tris-EDTA DNA extraction method was compared with a previously used procedure that was based on a commercially available reagent. The Tris-EDTA DNA extraction method significantly decreased the cycle threshold values for the stx assay (P < 0.0001) and eae assay (P < 0.0001), thereby increasing the ability to detect the targets. The use of different stx primers and probes increased the subtypes detected to include stx(1d), stx(2e), and stx(2g), and sequence data showed that modification of the eae primer should allow the known eae subtypes to be detected.

  10. Degenerate primer design for highly variable genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Kelvin; Shrivastava, Susmita; Stockwell, Timothy B

    2015-01-01

    The application of degenerate PCR primers towards target amplification and sequencing is a useful technique when a population of organisms under investigation is evolving rapidly, or is highly diverse. Degenerate bases in these primers are specified with ambiguity codes that represent alternative nucleotide configurations. Degenerate PCR primers allow the simultaneous amplification of a heterogeneous population by providing a mixture of PCR primers each of which anneal to an alternative genotype found in the isolated sample. However, as the number of degenerate bases specified in a pair of primers rises, the likelihood of amplifying unwanted alternative products also increases. These alternative products may confound downstream data analyses if their levels begin to obfuscate the desired PCR products. This chapter describes a set of computational methodologies that may be used to minimize the degeneracy of designed primers, while still maximizing the proportion of genotypes assayed in the targeted population.

  11. Development of SCAR marker specific to non-toxic Jatropha curcas L. and designing a novel multiplexing PCR along with nrDNA ITS primers to circumvent the false negative detection.

    PubMed

    Mastan, Shaik G; Sudheer, Pamidimarri D V N; Rahman, Hifzur; Reddy, Muppala P; Chikara, Jitendra

    2012-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L., a multipurpose shrub, has acquired significant economic importance for its seed oil which can be converted to biodiesel an emerging alternative to petro-diesel. In addition to the commercial value, it is also having medicinal and even high nutritional value to use as animal fodder which is limited due to the toxicity. Development of molecular marker will enable to differentiate non-toxic from toxic variety of J. curcas in a mixed population and also for quality control since the toxic components of J. curcas has deleterious effect on animals. In the present study, the efforts were made to generate the specific SCAR marker for toxic and/or non-toxic J. curcas from RAPD markers. Among the markers specific for toxic and non-toxic varieties, four were selected, purified, cloned, sequenced, and designed primers out of which one set of primers NT-JC/SCAR I/OPQ15-F and R could able to discriminate the non-toxic with toxic Jatropha by giving expected 430 bp size amplification in non-toxic variety. Furthermore, novel multiplex PCR was designed using the nrDNA ITS primers to overcome the false negatives. Present work also demonstrates utility of the conserved regions of nrDNA coding genes in ruling out the artifacts in PCR-like false negatives frequently occur in SCAR due to various reasons. The specific SCAR markers generated in the present investigation will help to distinguish non-toxic from toxic varieties of J. curcas or vice versa, and isolated marker along with designed multiplex protocol has applications in quality control for selective cultivation of non-toxic variety and will also assist in breeding and molecular mapping studies.

  12. Comparative analysis of two 16S rRNA gene-based PCR primer sets provides insight into the diversity distribution patterns of anammox bacteria in different environments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuailong; Hong, Yiguo; Wu, Jiapeng; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Bin, Liying; Pan, Yueping; Guan, Fengjie; Wen, Jiali

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high divergence among 16S rRNA genes of anammox bacteria, different diversity pattern of the community could be resulted from using different primer set. In this study, the efficiencies and specificities of two commonly used sets, Amx368F/Amx820R and Brod541F/Amx820R, were evaluated by exploring the diversity characteristics of anammox bacteria in sediments from marine, estuary, and freshwater wetland. Statistical analysis indicated that the base mispairing rate between bases on 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved by Amx368F/Amx820R and their corresponding ones on primer Brod541F was quite high, suggesting the different efficiency and specificity of Amx368F/Amx820R and Brod541F/Amx820R. Further experimental results demonstrated that multiple genera of anammox bacteria, including Ca. Scalindua, Ca. Brocadia, and Ca. Kuenenia, were able to be detected by Amx368F/Amx820R, but only Ca. Scalindua could be retrieved by Brod541F/Amx820R. Moreover, the phylogenetic clusters of Ca. Scalindua by Amx368F/Amx820R were different completely from those by Brod541F/Amx820R, presenting a significant complementary effect. By joint application of these two primer sets, the diversity distribution patterns of anammox bacteria in different environments were analyzed. Almost all retrieved sequences from marine sediments belonged to Ca. Scalindua. Sequences from freshwater wetland were affiliated to Ca. Brocadia and two new clusters, while high diversity of anammox bacteria was found in estuary, including Ca. Scalindua, Ca. Brocadia, and Ca. Kuenenia, corresponding to the river-sea intersection environmental feature. In total, these two prime sets have different characteristic for anammox bacteria detecting from environmental samples, and their combined application could achieve better diversity display of anammox community.

  13. PCR-based molecular discrimination of Pandora neoaphidis isolates from related entomopathogenic fungi and development of species-specific diagnostic primers.

    PubMed

    Tymon, Anna M; Shah, Paresh A; Pell, Judith K

    2004-04-01

    Studies were performed to assess the genetic variation amongst isolates of the aphid-pathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis (syn. Erynia neoaphidis). 37 isolates were examined, from a range of pest and non-pest aphid species, as well as 21 from eight other entomophthoralean species. Universal primers were used to amplify the ITS rDNA regions and all of the species tested produced discrete ITS groups, with the exception of Conidiobolus spp. Neighbour-joining analysis of the ITS2 regions from P. neoaphidis, P. kondoiensis and Zoophthora radicans demonstrated that these three species formed distinct groups with sequence identities of 58-82% between the groups. An ITS size of ca 1,100 bp was diagnostic for P. neoaphidis, while ca 1,450 bp was characteristic of P. kondoiensis. ITS-RFLP analysis failed to yield intraspecific polymorphisms in any of the P. neoaphidis isolates screened, although it was useful in distinguishing between different entomophthoralean species. Some intraspecific variation in the ITS region was detected in a number of isolates of Z. radicans and Conidiobolus spp. We propose that two isolates previously identified as P. neoaphidis based on conidia morphology, are actually P. kondoiensis based on molecular studies. Sequencing analysis of the complete ITS region from P. neoaphidis and P. kondoiensis allowed species-specific primers to be developed for P. neoaphidis and P. kondoiensis. These were used to screen aphids infected in laboratory bioassays and from field-collected samples, without prior isolation of the fungus. The primers are useful tools for quantifying the epizootiology of P. neoaphidis in aphid populations, as well as assessing competitive interactions between these two species.

  14. Polymerase chain reaction with nearby primers.

    PubMed

    Garafutdinov, Ravil R; Galimova, Aizilya A; Sakhabutdinova, Assol R

    2017-02-01

    DNA analysis of biological specimens containing degraded nucleic acids such as mortal remains, archaeological artefacts, forensic samples etc. has gained more attention in recent years. DNA extracted from these samples is often inapplicable for conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), so for its amplification the nearby primers are commonly used. Here we report the data that clarify the features of PCR with nearby and abutting primers. We have shown that the proximity of primers leads to significant reduction of the reaction time and ensures the successful performance of DNA amplification even in the presence of PCR inhibitors. The PCR with abutting primers is usually characterized by the absence of nonspecific amplification products that causes extreme sensitivity with limit of detection on single copy level. The feasibility of PCR with abutting primers was demonstrated on species identification of 100 years old rotten wood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection and analysis of six lizard adenoviruses by consensus primer PCR provides further evidence of a reptilian origin for the atadenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P; Johnson, Calvin M; Garner, Michael M; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2004-12-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses belong to the genus Atadenovirus, supporting the reptilian origin of atadenoviruses. This PCR method may be useful for obtaining templates for initial sequencing of novel adenoviruses.

  16. Deconstructing the polymerase chain reaction: understanding and correcting bias associated with primer degeneracies and primer-template mismatches.

    PubMed

    Green, Stefan J; Venkatramanan, Raghavee; Naqib, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive to mismatches between primer and template, and mismatches can lead to inefficient amplification of targeted regions of DNA template. In PCRs in which a degenerate primer pool is employed, each primer can behave differently. Therefore, inefficiencies due to different primer melting temperatures within a degenerate primer pool, in addition to mismatches between primer binding sites and primers, can lead to a distortion of the true relative abundance of targets in the original DNA pool. A theoretical analysis indicated that a combination of primer-template and primer-amplicon interactions during PCR cycles 3-12 is potentially responsible for this distortion. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel amplification strategy, entitled "Polymerase-exonuclease (PEX) PCR", in which primer-template interactions and primer-amplicon interactions are separated. The PEX PCR method substantially and significantly improved the evenness of recovery of sequences from a mock community of known composition, and allowed for amplification of templates with introduced mismatches near the 3' end of the primer annealing sites. When the PEX PCR method was applied to genomic DNA extracted from complex environmental samples, a significant shift in the observed microbial community was detected. Furthermore, the PEX PCR method provides a mechanism to identify which primers in a primer pool are annealing to target gDNA. Primer utilization patterns revealed that at high annealing temperatures in the PEX PCR method, perfect match annealing predominates, while at lower annealing temperatures, primers with up to four mismatches with templates can contribute substantially to amplification. The PEX PCR method is simple to perform, is limited to PCR mixes and a single exonuclease step which can be performed without reaction cleanup, and is recommended for reactions in which degenerate primer pools are used or when mismatches between primers and

  17. URPD: a specific product primer design tool

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) plays an important role in molecular biology. Primer design fundamentally determines its results. Here, we present a currently available software that is not located in analyzing large sequence but used for a rather straight-forward way of visualizing the primer design process for infrequent users. Findings URPD (yoUR Primer Design), a web-based specific product primer design tool, combines the NCBI Reference Sequences (RefSeq), UCSC In-Silico PCR, memetic algorithm (MA) and genetic algorithm (GA) primer design methods to obtain specific primer sets. A friendly user interface is accomplished by built-in parameter settings. The incorporated smooth pipeline operations effectively guide both occasional and advanced users. URPD contains an automated process, which produces feasible primer pairs that satisfy the specific needs of the experimental design with practical PCR amplifications. Visual virtual gel electrophoresis and in silico PCR provide a simulated PCR environment. The comparison of Practical gel electrophoresis comparison to virtual gel electrophoresis facilitates and verifies the PCR experiment. Wet-laboratory validation proved that the system provides feasible primers. Conclusions URPD is a user-friendly tool that provides specific primer design results. The pipeline design path makes it easy to operate for beginners. URPD also provides a high throughput primer design function. Moreover, the advanced parameter settings assist sophisticated researchers in performing experiential PCR. Several novel functions, such as a nucleotide accession number template sequence input, local and global specificity estimation, primer pair redesign, user-interactive sequence scale selection, and virtual and practical PCR gel electrophoresis discrepancies have been developed and integrated into URPD. The URPD program is implemented in JAVA and freely available at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/urpd/. PMID:22713312

  18. URPD: a specific product primer design tool.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Li-Yeh; Cheng, Yu-Huei; Yang, Cheng-Hong

    2012-06-19

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) plays an important role in molecular biology. Primer design fundamentally determines its results. Here, we present a currently available software that is not located in analyzing large sequence but used for a rather straight-forward way of visualizing the primer design process for infrequent users. URPD (yoUR Primer Design), a web-based specific product primer design tool, combines the NCBI Reference Sequences (RefSeq), UCSC In-Silico PCR, memetic algorithm (MA) and genetic algorithm (GA) primer design methods to obtain specific primer sets. A friendly user interface is accomplished by built-in parameter settings. The incorporated smooth pipeline operations effectively guide both occasional and advanced users. URPD contains an automated process, which produces feasible primer pairs that satisfy the specific needs of the experimental design with practical PCR amplifications. Visual virtual gel electrophoresis and in silico PCR provide a simulated PCR environment. The comparison of Practical gel electrophoresis comparison to virtual gel electrophoresis facilitates and verifies the PCR experiment. Wet-laboratory validation proved that the system provides feasible primers. URPD is a user-friendly tool that provides specific primer design results. The pipeline design path makes it easy to operate for beginners. URPD also provides a high throughput primer design function. Moreover, the advanced parameter settings assist sophisticated researchers in performing experiential PCR. Several novel functions, such as a nucleotide accession number template sequence input, local and global specificity estimation, primer pair redesign, user-interactive sequence scale selection, and virtual and practical PCR gel electrophoresis discrepancies have been developed and integrated into URPD. The URPD program is implemented in JAVA and freely available at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/urpd/.

  19. DETECTION OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM USING rRNA, tri5, AND Β-TUBULIN PRIMERS AND DETERMINING THEIR RELATIVE COPY NUMBER BY REAL TIME PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research utilizes the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine ribosomal copy number of fungal organisms found in unhealthy indoor environments. Knowing specific copy numbers will allow for greater accuracy in quantification when utilizing current pQCR tec...

  20. Reference gene selection, primer design and amplification interference of quantitative real-time PCR in tomato and orange subjected to environmental and disease stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Response of gene expression in the oxylipin pathway to chilling and heating in tomatoes at full ripe stage was investigated. Total RNA was isolated from tomato pericarp tissue, and gene expression of Tomlox A-Tomlox D, HPL and ADH were determined by real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using t...

  1. DETECTION OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM USING rRNA, tri5, AND Β-TUBULIN PRIMERS AND DETERMINING THEIR RELATIVE COPY NUMBER BY REAL TIME PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research utilizes the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine ribosomal copy number of fungal organisms found in unhealthy indoor environments. Knowing specific copy numbers will allow for greater accuracy in quantification when utilizing current pQCR tec...

  2. Assessing mycoplasma contamination of cell cultures by qPCR using a set of universal primer pairs targeting a 1.5 kb fragment of 16S rRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Audrey; Tardy, Florence; Allatif, Omran; Grosjean, Isabelle; Blanquier, Bariza

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasmas (a generic name for Mollicutes) are a predominant bacterial contaminant of cell culture and cell derived products including viruses. This prokaryote class is characterized by very small size and lack of a cell wall. Consequently, mycoplasmas escape ultrafiltration and visualization under routine microscopic examination, hence the ease with which cells in culture can be contaminated, with routinely more than 10% of cell lines being contaminated. Mycoplasma are a formidable threat both in fundamental research by perverting a whole range of cell properties and functions and in the pharmacological use of cells and cell derived products. Although many methods have been developed, there is still a need for a sensitive, universal assay. Here is reported the development and validation of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based on the amplification of a 1.5 kb fragment covering the 16S rDNA of the Mollicute class by real-time PCR using universal U1 and U8 degenerate primers. The method includes the addition of a DNA loading probe to each sample to monitor DNA extraction and the absence of PCR inhibitors in the extracted DNA, a positive mycoplasma 16S rDNA traceable reference sample to exclude any accidental contamination of an unknown sample with this reference DNA, an analysis procedure based on the examination of the melting curve and the size of the PCR amplicon, followed by quantification of the number of 16S rDNA copies (with a lower limit of 19 copies) when relevant, and, if useful, the identification of the contaminating prokaryote by sequencing. The method was validated on a collection of mycoplasma strains and by testing over 100 samples of unknown contamination status including stocks of viruses requiring biosafety level 2, 3 or 4 containments. When compared to four established methods, the m16S_qPCR technique exhibits the highest sensitivity in detecting mycoplasma contamination. PMID:28225826

  3. The specific isolation of complete 5S rDNA units from chromosome 1A of hexaploid, tetraploid, and diploid wheat species using PCR with head-to-head oriented primers.

    PubMed

    Van Campenhout, S; Stappen, J V; Volckaert, G

    2001-08-01

    The presence of 5S rDNA units on chromosome 1A of Triticum aestivum was shown by the development of a specific PCR test, using head-to-head oriented primers. This primer set allowed the amplification of complete 5S DNA units and was used to isolate SS-Rrna-A1 sequences from polyploid and diploid wheat species. Multiple-alignment and parsimony analyses of the 132 sequences divided the sequences into four types. The isolates from T. aestivum and the tetraploid species (T. dicoccoides, T. dicoccum, T durum, T. araraticum, and T timopheevi) were all of one type, which was shown to be closely related to the type mainly characteristic for T. urartu. The other two types were isolated exclusively from the diploid species T. monococcum, T aegilopoides, T. thaoudar, and T. sinskajae and the hexaploid species T. zhukovski. Triticum monococcum was the only species for which representatives of each of the four sequence types were found to be present. Further, we discuss the possible multicluster arrangement of the 5S-Rrna-A1 array.

  4. Deconstructing the Polymerase Chain Reaction: Understanding and Correcting Bias Associated with Primer Degeneracies and Primer-Template Mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stefan J.; Venkatramanan, Raghavee; Naqib, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive to mismatches between primer and template, and mismatches can lead to inefficient amplification of targeted regions of DNA template. In PCRs in which a degenerate primer pool is employed, each primer can behave differently. Therefore, inefficiencies due to different primer melting temperatures within a degenerate primer pool, in addition to mismatches between primer binding sites and primers, can lead to a distortion of the true relative abundance of targets in the original DNA pool. A theoretical analysis indicated that a combination of primer-template and primer-amplicon interactions during PCR cycles 3–12 is potentially responsible for this distortion. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel amplification strategy, entitled “Polymerase-exonuclease (PEX) PCR”, in which primer-template interactions and primer-amplicon interactions are separated. The PEX PCR method substantially and significantly improved the evenness of recovery of sequences from a mock community of known composition, and allowed for amplification of templates with introduced mismatches near the 3’ end of the primer annealing sites. When the PEX PCR method was applied to genomic DNA extracted from complex environmental samples, a significant shift in the observed microbial community was detected. Furthermore, the PEX PCR method provides a mechanism to identify which primers in a primer pool are annealing to target gDNA. Primer utilization patterns revealed that at high annealing temperatures in the PEX PCR method, perfect match annealing predominates, while at lower annealing temperatures, primers with up to four mismatches with templates can contribute substantially to amplification. The PEX PCR method is simple to perform, is limited to PCR mixes and a single exonuclease step which can be performed without reaction cleanup, and is recommended for reactions in which degenerate primer pools are used or when mismatches between primers

  5. Phonics Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    This primer lists the 44 sounds in the English language and then gives steps for teaching those 44 sounds and their most common spelling patterns. In addition to learning sounds and spellings, each day the student must read lists of phonetically related words and spell these words from dictation. Phonics instruction must be reinforced by having…

  6. Primer3--new capabilities and interfaces.

    PubMed

    Untergasser, Andreas; Cutcutache, Ioana; Koressaar, Triinu; Ye, Jian; Faircloth, Brant C; Remm, Maido; Rozen, Steven G

    2012-08-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a basic molecular biology technique with a multiplicity of uses, including deoxyribonucleic acid cloning and sequencing, functional analysis of genes, diagnosis of diseases, genotyping and discovery of genetic variants. Reliable primer design is crucial for successful PCR, and for over a decade, the open-source Primer3 software has been widely used for primer design, often in high-throughput genomics applications. It has also been incorporated into numerous publicly available software packages and web services. During this period, we have greatly expanded Primer3's functionality. In this article, we describe Primer3's current capabilities, emphasizing recent improvements. The most notable enhancements incorporate more accurate thermodynamic models in the primer design process, both to improve melting temperature prediction and to reduce the likelihood that primers will form hairpins or dimers. Additional enhancements include more precise control of primer placement-a change motivated partly by opportunities to use whole-genome sequences to improve primer specificity. We also added features to increase ease of use, including the ability to save and re-use parameter settings and the ability to require that individual primers not be used in more than one primer pair. We have made the core code more modular and provided cleaner programming interfaces to further ease integration with other software. These improvements position Primer3 for continued use with genome-scale data in the decade ahead.

  7. High occurrence of Bathyarchaeota (MCG) in the deep-sea sediments of South China Sea quantified using newly designed PCR primers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tiantian; Liang, Qianyong; Niu, Mingyang; Wang, Fengping

    2017-08-01

    The archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota, which is composed of a large number of diverse lineages, is widespread and abundant in marine sediments. Environmental factors that control the distribution, abundance and evolution of this largely diversified archaeal phylum are currently unclear. In this study, a new pair of specific primers that target the major marine subgroups of bathyarchaeotal 16S rRNA genes was designed and evaluated to investigate the distribution and abundance of Bathyarchaeota in marine sediments. The abundance of Bathyarchaeota along two sediment cores from the deep-sea sediments of South China Sea (SCS, each from the Dongsha and Shenhu area) was determined. A strong correlation was found between the bathyarchaeotal abundance and the content of total organic carbon (TOC), suggesting an important role of Bathyarchaeota in organic matter remineralisation in the sediments of SCS. Furthermore, diversity analysis revealed that subgroups Bathy-2, Bathy-8 and Bathy-10 were dominant bathyarchaeotal members of the deep-sea sediments in the SCS. Bathy-8 was found predominantly within the reducing and deeper sediment layers, while Bathy-10 occurred preferentially in the oxidizing and shallower sediment layers. Our study lays a foundation for the further understanding of the ecological functions and niche differentiation of the important but not well-understood sedimentary archaeal group. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Design and validation of a RT-qPCR procedure for diagnosis and quantification of most types of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus using a single pair of degenerated primers.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, D; Cutrín, J M; Olveira, J G; Dopazo, C P

    2016-12-27

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is an important virus which affects the salmonid aquaculture industry worldwide; therefore, it is important to develop rapid and reliable methods of diagnosis to detect the disease at early stages. Nowadays, RT-qPCR is replacing other methods because it provides additional information on the viral load, which is important to have a better understanding of the virus replication level and of the stage of the infection and its risk level. The main problem stems from the high diversity of this virus, which can compromise the reliability of the diagnosis. In this study, we have designed an RT-qPCR procedure for diagnosis and quantification of IPNV based on a single pair of primers targeted to segment B. The procedure has been validated, in vitro and in vivo, testing two different types of standards against seven reference strains and 23 field isolates from different types. The procedure is reliable for the detection of any type, with a detection limit of 31 TCID50  mL(-1) , 50 pfu mL(-1) or 66 RNA copies mL(-1) , depending on the standard. All the standard curves showed high reliability (R(2)  > 0.95). The results support the high reliability of this new procedure for the diagnosis and quantification of IPNV.

  9. [Detection of JAK2V617F mutation rate by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR using allele specific primer and TaqMan-MGB probe for dual inhibiting amplification of wild type alleles].

    PubMed

    Liang, Guo-Wei; Shao, Dong-Hua; He, Mei-Ling; Cao, Qing-Yun

    2012-12-01

    This study was purposed to develop a real-time PCR assay for sensitive quantification of JAK2V617F allele burden in peripheral blood and to evaluate the clinical value of this method. Both allele-specific mutant reverse primer and wild-type TaqMan-MGB probe were used for dual-inhibiting amplification of wild-type alleles in a real-time PCR, and then the JAK2V617F mutant alleles were amplified specially. The standard curve for quantification of JAK2V617F was established by percentages of JAK2V617F alleles with threshold cycle (Ct) values in a real-time PCR. Furthermore, 89 apparent healthy donors were tested by this method. The results showed that the quantitative lower limit of this method for JAK2V617F was 0.1%, and the intra- and inter-assay average variability for quantifying percentage of JAK2V617F in total DNA was 4.1% and 6.1%, respectively. Two JAK2V617F-positive individuals were identified (the percentage of JAK2V617F alleles were 0.64% and 0.98%, respectively) using this method in blood from 89 apparently healthy donors. It is concluded that the developed method with highly sensitive and reproducible quantification of JAK2V617F mutant burden can be used clinically for diagnosis and evaluation of disease prognosis and efficacy of therapy in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Moreover, this technique can be also used for quantitative detection of variety of single nucleotide mutation.

  10. Primer-BLAST: a tool to design target-specific primers for polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Coulouris, George; Zaretskaya, Irena; Cutcutache, Ioana; Rozen, Steve; Madden, Thomas L

    2012-06-18

    Choosing appropriate primers is probably the single most important factor affecting the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Specific amplification of the intended target requires that primers do not have matches to other targets in certain orientations and within certain distances that allow undesired amplification. The process of designing specific primers typically involves two stages. First, the primers flanking regions of interest are generated either manually or using software tools; then they are searched against an appropriate nucleotide sequence database using tools such as BLAST to examine the potential targets. However, the latter is not an easy process as one needs to examine many details between primers and targets, such as the number and the positions of matched bases, the primer orientations and distance between forward and reverse primers. The complexity of such analysis usually makes this a time-consuming and very difficult task for users, especially when the primers have a large number of hits. Furthermore, although the BLAST program has been widely used for primer target detection, it is in fact not an ideal tool for this purpose as BLAST is a local alignment algorithm and does not necessarily return complete match information over the entire primer range. We present a new software tool called Primer-BLAST to alleviate the difficulty in designing target-specific primers. This tool combines BLAST with a global alignment algorithm to ensure a full primer-target alignment and is sensitive enough to detect targets that have a significant number of mismatches to primers. Primer-BLAST allows users to design new target-specific primers in one step as well as to check the specificity of pre-existing primers. Primer-BLAST also supports placing primers based on exon/intron locations and excluding single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites in primers. We describe a robust and fully implemented general purpose primer design tool that designs target-specific PCR

  11. Primer-BLAST: A tool to design target-specific primers for polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Choosing appropriate primers is probably the single most important factor affecting the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Specific amplification of the intended target requires that primers do not have matches to other targets in certain orientations and within certain distances that allow undesired amplification. The process of designing specific primers typically involves two stages. First, the primers flanking regions of interest are generated either manually or using software tools; then they are searched against an appropriate nucleotide sequence database using tools such as BLAST to examine the potential targets. However, the latter is not an easy process as one needs to examine many details between primers and targets, such as the number and the positions of matched bases, the primer orientations and distance between forward and reverse primers. The complexity of such analysis usually makes this a time-consuming and very difficult task for users, especially when the primers have a large number of hits. Furthermore, although the BLAST program has been widely used for primer target detection, it is in fact not an ideal tool for this purpose as BLAST is a local alignment algorithm and does not necessarily return complete match information over the entire primer range. Results We present a new software tool called Primer-BLAST to alleviate the difficulty in designing target-specific primers. This tool combines BLAST with a global alignment algorithm to ensure a full primer-target alignment and is sensitive enough to detect targets that have a significant number of mismatches to primers. Primer-BLAST allows users to design new target-specific primers in one step as well as to check the specificity of pre-existing primers. Primer-BLAST also supports placing primers based on exon/intron locations and excluding single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites in primers. Conclusions We describe a robust and fully implemented general purpose primer design tool

  12. Salinas primer.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy Francis; Reese, Garth M.; Bhardwaj, Manoj Kumar

    2004-08-01

    Salinas provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis. This capability is required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of weapons systems. General capabilities for modal, statics and transient dynamics are provided. Salinas is similar to commercial codes like Nastran or Abaqus. It has some nonlinear capability, but excels in linear computation. It is different than the above commercial codes in that it is designed to operate efficiently in a massively parallel environment. Even for an experienced analyst, running a new finite element package can be a challenge. This little primer is intended to make part of this task easier by presenting the basic steps in a simple way. The analyst is referred to the theory manual for details of the mathematics behind the work. The User's Notes should be used for more complex inputs, and will have more details about the process (as well as many more examples). More information can be found on our web pages, 3 or 4. Finite element analysis can be deceptive. Any software can give the wrong answers if used improperly, and occasionally even when used properly. Certainly a solid background in structural mechanics is necessary to build an adequate finite element model and interpret the results. This primer should provide a quick start in answering some of the more common questions that come up in using Salinas.

  13. PrimerZ: streamlined primer design for promoters, exons and human SNPs.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Fang; Lin, Yi-Jung; Cheng, Yu-Chang; Lee, Kuo-Hsi; Huang, Cheng-Chih; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Yao, Adam

    2007-07-01

    PrimerZ (http://genepipe.ngc.sinica.edu.tw/primerz/) is a web application dedicated primarily to primer design for genes and human SNPs. PrimerZ accepts genes by gene name or Ensembl accession code, and SNPs by dbSNP rs or AFFY_Probe IDs. The promoter and exon sequence information of all gene transcripts fetched from the Ensembl database (http://www.ensembl.org) are processed before being passed on to Primer3 (http://frodo.wi.mit.edu/cgi-bin/primer3/primer3_www.cgi) for individual primer design. All results returned from Primer 3 are organized and integrated in a specially designed web page for easy browsing. Besides the web page presentation, csv text file export is also provided for enhanced user convenience. PrimerZ automates highly standard but tedious gene primer design to improve the success rate of PCR experiments. More than 2000 primers have been designed with PrimerZ at our institute since 2004 and the success rate is over 70%. The addition of several new features has made PrimerZ even more useful to the research community in facilitating primer design for promoters, exons and SNPs.

  14. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    DOEpatents

    Ulanovsky, Levy

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  15. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    DOEpatents

    Ulanovsky, Levy; Raja, Mugasimangalam C.

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  16. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-01-01

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects. PMID:9611248

  17. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-06-15

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects.

  18. Generation of polymerase chain reaction-specific probes for library screening using single degenerate primers.

    PubMed

    Hommes, N G; Arp, D J; Sayavedra-Soto, L A

    1995-03-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were made to peptide sequences from hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from Nitrosomonas europaea. The primers were used singly in PCR reactions to amplify portions of the gene for HAO from genomic DNA. Southern hybridizations using fragments amplified with each primer showed that they labeled the same genomic DNA fragments. The PCR-amplified fragments were successfully used to screen a gene library for clones containing the HAO gene. The method of isolating genes by PCR with single primers has general utility.

  19. Use of labeled primers for differential display

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1995-02-01

    The differential display of eukaryotic cDNAs using PCR allows for determination of mRNA species differentially expressed when comparing two similar cell populations. This procedure uses a (T){sub 12}XY oligonucleotide as the 3 ft primer and an arbitrary 8-10-mer as the 5 ft primer. Labeling occurs by inclusion of {alpha}[{sup 33}P]-dATP in the PCR reaction. Two artifacts caused by this approach are (1) random printing from dT present from affinity purification of PolyA+RNA and (2) hybridization of the arbitrary primer to template target sequences on both cDNA strands. In this work, we have developed an approach for both eliminating smearing and identifying nonspecific bands on sequencing gels. By separately using 5 ft-end-labeled (T){sub 12}XY and arbitrary primers to label bands and comparing two differential display patterns rather than including labeled nucleotides in the PCR reaction itself, we can detect only those products incorporating the M{sub 12}XY primer on the 3 ft ends and the arbitrary primer on 5 ft ends. Those bands that are generated randomly in the PCR reaction are readily detectable and can be ignored. If on the other hand, one is interested only in a diagnostic banding pattern for differential display, benefit can be derived from the simplicity of the pattern obtained when labeled (T){sub 12}XY is used.

  20. Loop-Mediated Amplification Accelerated by Stem Primers

    PubMed Central

    Gandelman, Olga; Jackson, Rebecca; Kiddle, Guy; Tisi, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplifications (iNAATs) have become an important alternative to PCR for in vitro molecular diagnostics in all fields. Amongst iNAATs Loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) has gained much attention over the last decade because of the simplicity of hardware requirements. LAMP demonstrates performance equivalent to that of PCR, but its application has been limited by the challenging primer design. The design of six primers in LAMP requires a selection of eight priming sites with significant restrictions imposed on their respective positioning and orientation. In order to relieve primer design constraints we propose an alternative approach which uses Stem primers instead of Loop primers and demonstrate the application of STEM-LAMP in assaying for Clostridium difficile, Listeria monocytogenes and HIV. Stem primers used in LAMP in combination with loop-generating and displacement primers gave significant benefits in speed and sensitivity, similar to those offered by Loop primers, while offering additional options of forward and reverse orientations, multiplexing, use in conjunction with Loop primers or even omission of one or two displacement primers, where necessary. Stem primers represent a valuable alternative to Loop primers and an additional tool for IVD assay development by offering more choices for primer design at the same time increasing assay speed, sensitivity, and reproducibility. PMID:22272122

  1. PHUSER (Primer Help for USER): a novel tool for USER fusion primer design.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Hansen, Niels Bjørn; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Genee, Hans Jasper; Holm, Dorte Koefoed; Carlsen, Simon; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Wernersson, Rasmus

    2011-07-01

    Uracil-Specific Exision Reagent (USER) fusion is a recently developed technique that allows for assembly of multiple DNA fragments in a few simple steps. However, designing primers for USER fusion is both tedious and time consuming. Here, we present the Primer Help for USER (PHUSER) software, a novel tool for designing primers specifically for USER fusion and USER cloning applications. We also present proof-of-concept experimental validation of its functionality. PHUSER offers quick and easy design of PCR optimized primers ensuring directionally correct fusion of fragments into a plasmid containing a customizable USER cassette. Designing primers using PHUSER ensures that the primers have similar annealing temperature (T(m)), which is essential for efficient PCR. PHUSER also avoids identical overhangs, thereby ensuring correct order of assembly of DNA fragments. All possible primers are individually analysed in terms of GC content, presence of GC clamp at 3'-end, the risk of primer dimer formation, the risk of intra-primer complementarity (secondary structures) and the presence of polyN stretches. Furthermore, PHUSER offers the option to insert linkers between DNA fragments, as well as highly flexible cassette options. PHUSER is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/phuser/.

  2. Virtual PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Clague, D S; Vandersall, J A; Hon, G; Williams, P L

    2006-02-23

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stands among the keystone technologies for analysis of biological sequence data. PCR is used to amplify DNA, to generate many copies from as little as a single template. This is essential, for example, in processing forensic DNA samples, pathogen detection in clinical or biothreat surveillance applications, and medical genotyping for diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is used in virtually every laboratory doing molecular, cellular, genetic, ecologic, forensic, or medical research. Despite its ubiquity, we lack the precise predictive capability that would enable detailed optimization of PCR reaction dynamics. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop Virtual PCR (VPCR) software, a computational method to model the kinetic, thermodynamic, and biological processes of PCR reactions. Given a successful completion, these tools will allow us to predict both the sequences and concentrations of all species that are amplified during PCR. The ability to answer the following questions will allow us both to optimize the PCR process and interpret the PCR results: What products are amplified when sequence mixtures are present, containing multiple, closely related targets and multiplexed primers, which may hybridize with sequence mismatches? What are the effects of time, temperature, and DNA concentrations on the concentrations of products? A better understanding of these issues will improve the design and interpretation of PCR reactions. The status of the VPCR project after 1.5 years of funding is consistent with the goals of the overall project which was scoped for 3 years of funding. At half way through the projected timeline of the project we have an early beta version of the VPCR code. We have begun investigating means to improve the robustness of the code, performed preliminary experiments to test the code and begun drafting manuscripts for publication. Although an experimental protocol for testing the code was developed, the preliminary

  3. Primer3—new capabilities and interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Untergasser, Andreas; Cutcutache, Ioana; Koressaar, Triinu; Ye, Jian; Faircloth, Brant C.; Remm, Maido; Rozen, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a basic molecular biology technique with a multiplicity of uses, including deoxyribonucleic acid cloning and sequencing, functional analysis of genes, diagnosis of diseases, genotyping and discovery of genetic variants. Reliable primer design is crucial for successful PCR, and for over a decade, the open-source Primer3 software has been widely used for primer design, often in high-throughput genomics applications. It has also been incorporated into numerous publicly available software packages and web services. During this period, we have greatly expanded Primer3’s functionality. In this article, we describe Primer3’s current capabilities, emphasizing recent improvements. The most notable enhancements incorporate more accurate thermodynamic models in the primer design process, both to improve melting temperature prediction and to reduce the likelihood that primers will form hairpins or dimers. Additional enhancements include more precise control of primer placement—a change motivated partly by opportunities to use whole-genome sequences to improve primer specificity. We also added features to increase ease of use, including the ability to save and re-use parameter settings and the ability to require that individual primers not be used in more than one primer pair. We have made the core code more modular and provided cleaner programming interfaces to further ease integration with other software. These improvements position Primer3 for continued use with genome-scale data in the decade ahead. PMID:22730293

  4. Development of Specific Primer for Tricholoma matsutake

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jang-Han

    2009-01-01

    In this study, in an effort to develop a method for the molecular detection of Tricholoma matsutake in Korea from other closely related Tricholomataceae, a species-specific PCR primer pair, TmF and TmR, was designed using nuclear ribosomal intertranscribed spacer (ITS) sequences. The DTmF and DTmR sequences were 5'-CCTGACGCCAATCTTTTCA-3' and 5'-GGAGAGCAGACTTGTGAGCA-3', respectively. The PCR primers reliably amplified only the ITS sequences of T. matsutake, and not those of other species used in this study. PMID:23983557

  5. Use of labeled primers for differential display

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1995-01-01

    Two artifacts introduced in using differential display technology are (1) random priming from dT present from affinity purification of PolyA+ RNA and (2) hybridization of the arbitrary primer to template target sequences on both cDNA strands. We have developed a method eliminating both problems. By separately using 5`-end-labeled (T){sub 12}XY and arbitrary primers to label bands and comparing two differential display patterns, we can detect only those products incorporating the (T){sub 12}XY primer on the 3` ends and the arbitrary primer on 5` ends. Those bands that are generated randomly in the PCR are readily detectable and can be ignored.

  6. Microsatellite primers for red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this note, we document polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) primer pairs for 101, nuclear-encoded microsatellites designed and developed from a red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) genomic library. The 101 microsatellites (Genbank Accession Numbers EU015882-EU015982) were amplified successfully and used to...

  7. Polyacid macromolecule primers

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-12-26

    Hydrophilic polyacids are described, such as macromolecules of polyitaconic acid and polyacrylic acid, where such macromolecules have molecular weights >50,000 as primers between a polymeric top coating, such as polyurethane, and an oxidized aluminum or aluminum alloy. A near monolayer of primer is used in polymeric adhesive/oxidized aluminum adhered joint systems in 0.05% primer concentration to give superior results in standard peel tests. 2 figs.

  8. Polyacid macromolecule primers

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Hydrophylic polyacids, such as macromolecules of polyitaconic acid and polyacrylic acid, where such macromolecules have molecular weights >50,000 as primers between a polymeric top coating, such as polyurethane, and an oxidized aluminum or aluminum alloy. A near monolayer of primer is used in polymeric adhesive/oxidized aluminum adhered joint systems in 0.05% primer concentration to give superior results in standard peel tests.

  9. Transmission Investment: A Primer

    SciTech Connect

    McGarvey, Joe

    2006-10-15

    This primer highlights recent trends in transmission investment, summarizes the division of jurisdictional authority over transmission, and presents four alternative models for transmission ownership. (author)

  10. Universal multiplexable matK primers for DNA barcoding of angiosperms1

    PubMed Central

    Heckenhauer, Jacqueline; Barfuss, Michael H. J.; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: PCR amplification of the matK barcoding region is often difficult when dealing with multiple angiosperm families. We developed a primer cocktail to amplify this region efficiently across angiosperm diversity. Methods and Results: We developed 14 matK primers (seven forward, seven reverse) for multiplex PCR, using sequences available in GenBank for 178 taxa belonging to 123 genera in 41 families and 18 orders. Universality of these new multiplexed primers was tested with 53 specimens from 44 representative angiosperm families in 23 different orders. Our primers showed high PCR amplification and sequencing success. Conclusions: These results show that our newly developed primers are highly effective for multiplex PCR and can be employed in future barcode projects involving taxonomically diverse samples across angiosperms. Using multiplex primers for barcoding will reduce the cost and time needed for PCR amplification. PMID:27347449

  11. Universal multiplexable matK primers for DNA barcoding of angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Heckenhauer, Jacqueline; Barfuss, Michael H J; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2016-06-01

    PCR amplification of the matK barcoding region is often difficult when dealing with multiple angiosperm families. We developed a primer cocktail to amplify this region efficiently across angiosperm diversity. We developed 14 matK primers (seven forward, seven reverse) for multiplex PCR, using sequences available in GenBank for 178 taxa belonging to 123 genera in 41 families and 18 orders. Universality of these new multiplexed primers was tested with 53 specimens from 44 representative angiosperm families in 23 different orders. Our primers showed high PCR amplification and sequencing success. These results show that our newly developed primers are highly effective for multiplex PCR and can be employed in future barcode projects involving taxonomically diverse samples across angiosperms. Using multiplex primers for barcoding will reduce the cost and time needed for PCR amplification.

  12. A real-time PCR approach based on SPF10 primers and the INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay for the detection and typing of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Micalessi, M I; Boulet, G A; Vorsters, A; De Wit, K; Jannes, G; Mijs, W; Ieven, M; Van Damme, P; Bogers, J J

    2013-01-01

    The SPF10 PCR targets a conserved 65bp region of the HPV L1 gene for broad-spectrum amplification. The LiPA assay allows subsequent genotyping of the HPV amplicons. This study aims to develop a SPF10 real-time PCR to achieve simultaneous amplification and detection of the HPV target. That way, LiPA analysis of the HPV-negative samples can be avoided, reducing workload and cost. The real-time PCR shows an analytical sensitivity of 29.7 copies for HPV 6, 16, 18 and 31 and an HPV-specific melting peak. Thirty-one HPV DNA plasmids were genotyped correctly using the SPF10 real-time PCR in combination with the LiPA. Here, the LiPA assay was performed at an increased hybridisation temperature (49.5°C) in combination with a reduced amplicon volume (1μl) to avoid cross-reactivity. In conclusion, the SPF10 real-time PCR proves to be very sensitive and generates amplicons, which are compatible with the LiPA.

  13. Quick spacecraft charging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Brian Arthur

    2014-03-12

    This is a presentation in PDF format which is a quick spacecraft charging primer, meant to be used for program training. It goes into detail about charging physics, RBSP examples, and how to identify charging.

  14. A novel technique for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms by analyzing consumed allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, G; Umetsu, K; Yuasa, I; Sato, M; Sakabe, M; Naito, E; Yamanouchi, H; Suzuki, T

    2001-02-01

    We present a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique, termed consumed allele-specific primer analysis (CASPA), as a new strategy for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. The method involves the use of labeled allele-specific primers, differing in length, with several noncomplementary nucleotides added in the 5'-terminal region. After PCR amplification, the amounts of the remaining primers not incorporated into the PCR products are determined. Thus, nucleotide substitutions are identified by measuring the consumption of primers. In this study, the CASPA method was successfully applied to ABO genotyping. In the present method, the allele-specific primer only anneals with the target polymorphic site on the DNA, so it is not necessary to analyze the PCR products. Therefore, this method is only little affected by modification of the PCR products. The CASPA method is expected to be a useful tool for typing of SNPs.

  15. Exquisite allele discrimination by toehold hairpin primers

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, Michelle; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect and monitor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biological samples is an enabling research and clinical tool. We have developed a surprising, inexpensive primer design method that provides exquisite discrimination between SNPs. The field of DNA computation is largely reliant on using so-called toeholds to initiate strand displacement reactions, leading to the execution of kinetically trapped circuits. We have now similarly found that the short toehold sequence to a target of interest can initiate both strand displacement within the hairpin and extension of the primer by a polymerase, both of which will further stabilize the primer:template complex. However, if the short toehold does not bind, neither of these events can readily occur and thus amplification should not occur. Toehold hairpin primers were used to detect drug resistance alleles in two genes, rpoB and katG, in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and ten alleles in the Escherichia coli genome. During real-time PCR, the primers discriminate between mismatched templates with Cq delays that are frequently so large that the presence or absence of mismatches is essentially a ‘yes/no’ answer. PMID:24990378

  16. Simultaneous detection of Legionella species and L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. longbeachae and L. micdadei using conserved primers and multiple probes in a multiplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Cross, Kristen E; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Benitez, Alvaro J; Brown, Ellen W; Diaz, Maureen H; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-07-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe respiratory disease that is estimated to cause between 8,000 and 18,000 hospitalizations each year, though the exact burden is unknown due to under-utilization of diagnostic testing. Although Legionella pneumophila is the most common species detected in clinical cases (80-90%), other species have also been reported to cause disease. However, little is known about Legionnaires' disease caused by these non-pneumophila species. We designed a multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of all Legionella spp. and simultaneous specific identification of four clinically-relevant Legionella species, L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. longbeachae, and L. micdadei, using 5'-hydrolysis probe real-time PCR. The analytical sensitivity for detection of nucleic acid from each target species was ≤50fg per reaction. We demonstrated the utility of this assay in spiked human sputum specimens. This assay could serve as a tool for understanding the scope and impact of non-pneumophila Legionella species in human disease.

  17. China Energy Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2009-11-16

    Based on extensive analysis of the 'China Energy Databook Version 7' (October 2008) this Primer for China's Energy Industry draws a broad picture of China's energy industry with the two goals of helping users read and interpret the data presented in the 'China Energy Databook' and understand the historical evolution of China's energy inustry. Primer provides comprehensive historical reviews of China's energy industry including its supply and demand, exports and imports, investments, environment, and most importantly, its complicated pricing system, a key element in the analysis of China's energy sector.

  18. Real-time colorimetric detection of DNA methylation of the PAX1 gene in cervical scrapings for cervical cancer screening with thiol-labeled PCR primers and gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Liou, Yu-Ligh; Kang, Ya-Nan; Tan, Zhi-Rong; Peng, Ming-Jing; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background DNA methylation can induce carcinogenesis by silencing key tumor suppressor genes. Analysis of aberrant methylation of tumor suppressor genes can be used as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for cancer. In this study, we propose a colorimetric method for the detection of DNA methylation of the paired box gene 1 (PAX1) gene in cervical scrapings obtained from 42 patients who underwent cervical colposcopic biopsy. Methods A thiolated methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) primer was used to generate MSP products labeled with the thiol group at one end. After bisulfite conversion and MSP amplification, the unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were placed in a reaction tube and NaCl was added to induce aggregation of bare AuNPs without generating polymerase chain reaction products. After salt addition, the color of AuNPs remained red in the methylated PAX1 gene samples because of binding to the MSP-amplified products. By contrast, the color of the AuNP colloid solution changed from red to blue in the non-methylated PAX1 gene samples because of aggregation of AuNPs in the absence of the MSP-amplified products. Furthermore, PAX1 methylation was quantitatively detected in cervical scrapings of patients with varied pathological degrees of cervical cancer. Conventional quantitative MSP (qMSP) was also performed for comparison. Results The two methods showed a significant correlation of the methylation frequency of the PAX1 gene in cervical scrapings with severity of cervical cancer (n=42, P<0.05). The results of the proposed method showed that the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) of PAX1 were 0.833, 0.742, and 0.739 for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasms grade 2 and worse lesions (CIN2+), cervical intraepithelial neoplasms grade 3 and worse lesions (CIN3+), and squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting CIN2+ lesions were 0.941 and 0.600, respectively, with

  19. MPD: multiplex primer design for next-generation targeted sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Thomas S; Kotlar, Alex; Cutler, David J

    2017-01-05

    Targeted resequencing offers a cost-effective alternative to whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing when investigating regions known to be associated with a trait or disease. There are a number of approaches to targeted resequencing, including microfluidic PCR amplification, which may be enhanced by multiplex PCR. Currently, there is no open-source software that can design next-generation multiplex PCR experiments that ensures primers are unique at a genome-level and efficiently pools compatible primers. We present MPD, a software package that automates the design of multiplex PCR primers for next-generation sequencing. The core of MPD is implemented in C for speed and uses a hashed genome to ensure primer uniqueness, avoids placing primers over sites of known variation, and efficiently pools compatible primers. A JavaScript web application ( http://multiplexprimer.io ) utilizing the MPD Perl package provides a convenient platform for users to make designs. Using a realistic set of genes identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we achieve 90% coverage of all exonic regions using stringent design criteria. Using the first 47 primer pools for wet-lab validation, we sequenced ~25Kb at 99.7% completeness with a mean coverage of 300X among 313 samples simultaneously and identified 224 variants. The number and nature of variants we observe are consistent with high quality sequencing. MPD can successfully design multiplex PCR experiments suitable for next-generation sequencing, and simplifies retooling targeted resequencing pipelines to focus on new targets as new genetic evidence emerges.

  20. Primer on Social Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darcy, Robert L.

    An elaboration of the author's booklet entitled "First Steps Toward Economic Understanding," this primer is designed to help the reader develop a functional understanding of the economic process so that he can make wiser decisions on issues of social policy and on matters affecting his economic well-being. The document is not "economics in one…

  1. An SAT® Validity Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    This primer should provide the reader with a deeper understanding of the concept of test validity and will present the recent available validity evidence on the relationship between SAT® scores and important college outcomes. In addition, the content examined on the SAT will be discussed as well as the fundamental attention paid to the fairness of…

  2. Systems Engineering Measurement Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    Systems Engineering Measurement Primer A Basic Introduction to Systems Engineering Measurement Concepts and Use Version 1.0 March 1998 This document...Federal Systems Garry Roedler Lockheed Martin Management & Data Systems Cathy Tilton The National Registry, Inc. E. Richard Widmann Raytheon Systems...IV 1. INTRODUCTION

  3. Nulcear materials production: Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Nuclear Materials Production (NMP) is responsible for managing the production and recovery of nuclear materials for national defense. NMP oversees the production of radioactive materials for government, commercial, industrial, and medical applications. This Primer is a general introduction to NMP's major activities.

  4. PCR test for detecting Taenia solium cysticercosis in pig carcasses.

    PubMed

    Sreedevi, Chennuru; Hafeez, Mohammad; Kumar, Putcha Anand; Rayulu, Vukka Chengalva; Subramanyam, Kothapalli Venkata; Sudhakar, Krovvidi

    2012-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was employed to detect Taenia solium DNA in muscle lesions for validation of the meat inspection results of slaughtered pigs. Two sets of oligonucleotide primers, one targeted against the large subunit rRNA gene (TBR primers) and the other targeted against cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (Cox1 primers) of T. solium were used in this study. On reactivity in PCR test, the TBR primers and the Cox1 primers yielded products of 286 and 984 bp, respectively, in cysticercosis positive cases. Both the sets of primers were found to be highly specific, since they did not yield any PCR product in negative controls. A total of 225 pig carcasses were screened for cysticercosis by meat inspection, out of which 25 carcasses with visible cysts (16 viable and 9 degenerated cysts) were also confirmed to be positive for cysticercosis in PCR test. However, out of the 35 carcasses with suspected lesions on meat inspection, only two were found to be positive for cysticercosis in PCR test. The detection limits for both the primer sets were analyzed. The TBR primer set could detect up to 10 pg of cysticercus DNA, whereas the Cox1 primer set could detect only up to 1 ng. It is evident from the study that PCR test is an efficient tool for validation of meat inspection results and also to rule out ambiguity in carcass judgment of suspected cases of porcine cysticercosis.

  5. Inverse PCR for Point Mutation Introduction.

    PubMed

    Silva, Diogo; Santos, Gustavo; Barroca, Mário; Collins, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Inverse PCR is a powerful tool for the rapid introduction of desired mutations at desired positions in a circular double-stranded DNA sequence. Here, custom-designed mutant primers oriented in the inverse direction are used to amplify the entire circular template with incorporation of the required mutation(s). By careful primer design it can be used to perform such diverse modifications as the introduction of point mutations and multiple mutations, the insertion of new sequences, and even sequence deletions. Three primer formats are commonly used; nonoverlapping, partially overlapping and fully overlapping primers, and here we describe the use of nonoverlapping primers for introduction of a point mutation. Use of such a primer setup in the PCR reaction, with one of the primers containing the desired mismatch mutation, results in the amplification of a linear, double-stranded, mutated product. Methylated template DNA is removed from the nonmethylated PCR product by DpnI digestion and the PCR product is then phosphorylated by polynucleotide kinase treatment before being recircularized by ligation, and transformed to E. coli. This relatively simple site-directed mutagenesis procedure is of major importance in biology and biotechnology today where it is commonly employed for the study and engineering of DNA, RNA, and proteins.

  6. Greene SCPrimer: a rapid comprehensive tool for designing degenerate primers from multiple sequence alignments

    PubMed Central

    Jabado, Omar J.; Palacios, Gustavo; Kapoor, Vishal; Hui, Jeffrey; Renwick, Neil; Zhai, Junhui; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is widely applied in clinical and environmental microbiology. Primer design is key to the development of successful assays and is often performed manually by using multiple nucleic acid alignments. Few public software tools exist that allow comprehensive design of degenerate primers for large groups of related targets based on complex multiple sequence alignments. Here we present a method for designing such primers based on tree building followed by application of a set covering algorithm, and demonstrate its utility in compiling Multiplex PCR primer panels for detection and differentiation of viral pathogens. PMID:17135211

  7. Microsatellite primer resource for Populus developed from

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; Yang, Xiaohan; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wullschleger, Stan D; Huang, Prof. Minren; Li, Shuxian; Zhang, Xinye

    2008-01-01

    In this study, 148 428 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs were designed from the unambiguously mapped sequence scaffolds of the Nisqually-1 genome. The physical position of the priming sites were identified along each of the 19 Populus chromosomes, and it was specified whether the priming sequences belong to intronic, intergenic, exonic or UTR regions. A subset of 150 SSR loci were amplified and a high amplification success rate (72%) was obtained in P. tremuloides, which belongs to a divergent subgenus of Populus relative to Nisqually-1. PCR reactions showed that the amplification success rate of exonic primer pairs was much higher than that of the intronic/intergenic primer pairs. Applying ANOVA and regression analyses to the flanking sequences of microsatellites, the repeat lengths, the GC contents of the repeats, the repeat motif numbers, the repeat motif length and the base composition of the repeat motif, it was determined that only the base composition of the repeat motif and the repeat motif length significantly affect the microsatellite variability in P. tremuloides samples. The SSR primer resource developed in this study provides a database for selecting highly transferable SSR markers with known physical position in the Populus genome and provides a comprehensive genetic tool to extend the genome sequence of Nisqually-1 to genetic studies in different Populus species.

  8. Identification of bacterial plant pathogens using multilocus PCR and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    PCR/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS, previously known as “TIGER”) utilizes PCR with broad range primers to amplify products from wide array of organisms within a taxonomic group, followed by analysis of PCR amplicons using mass spectrometry. Computer analysis of precise masses ...

  9. PrimerSNP: a web tool for whole-genome selection of allele-specific and common primers of phylogenetically-related bacterial genomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiqiang; Lin, Hong; Van Deynze, Allen; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Francis, Martha; Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes Macedo; Civerolo, Edwin L

    2008-01-01

    Background The increasing number of genomic sequences of bacteria makes it possible to select unique SNPs of a particular strain/species at the whole genome level and thus design specific primers based on the SNPs. The high similarity of genomic sequences among phylogenetically-related bacteria requires the identification of the few loci in the genome that can serve as unique markers for strain differentiation. PrimerSNP attempts to identify reliable strain-specific markers, on which specific primers are designed for pathogen detection purpose. Results PrimerSNP is an online tool to design primers based on strain specific SNPs for multiple strains/species of microorganisms at the whole genome level. The allele-specific primers could distinguish query sequences of one strain from other homologous sequences by standard PCR reaction. Additionally, PrimerSNP provides a feature for designing common primers that can amplify all the homologous sequences of multiple strains/species of microorganisms. PrimerSNP is freely available at . Conclusion PrimerSNP is a high-throughput specific primer generation tool for the differentiation of phylogenetically-related strains/species. Experimental validation showed that this software had a successful prediction rate of 80.4 – 100% for strain specific primer design. PMID:18937861

  10. An improved arbitrary primed PCR method for rapid characterization of transposon insertion sites.

    PubMed

    Das, Sankar; Noe, Jody C; Paik, Sehmi; Kitten, Todd

    2005-10-01

    Modifications were made to published arbitrary primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) procedures that resulted in increased specificity and sensitivity. Several arbitrary primer sequences were also evaluated, resulting in recommendations for primer design.

  11. Primer on Beam Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-27

    emphasis on neutral particle beam (NPB) optical devices. It explains how the motion of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields is...Inc. San Diego, California Table of Contents Page 1. Introduction 1 1.1 Organization of Primer 1 1.2 Introduction to Neutral Particle Beam...102 Figures Figure Pag© 1. Generic Neutral Particle Beam Device 4 2. An orthogonal three dimensional coordinate system 11 3. Trajectory of a

  12. Primer on molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  13. Lead Free Electric Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-06

    Resonance NSWC-IH Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head NTI Nano Technology, Inc . PAD Propellant Actuated Devices PEG Polyethylene Glycol... supplied hardware components and WC 868 propellant. Each round was assembled according to the drawing specification modifying only the primer...Nanotechnologies, Inc . (now NovaCentrix since July 2006), and it was characterized by the China Lake Chemistry Division prior to being used in formulation

  14. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  15. Crystalline Silica Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    substance and will present a nontechnical overview of the techniques used to measure crystalline silica. Because this primer is meant to be a starting point for anyone interested in learning more about crystalline silica, a list of selected readings and other resources is included. The detailed glossary, which defines many terms that are beyond the scope of this publication, is designed to help the reader move from this presentation to a more technical one, the inevitable next step.

  16. Comparison and validation of some ITS primer pairs useful for fungal metabarcoding studies.

    PubMed

    Op De Beeck, Michiel; Lievens, Bart; Busschaert, Pieter; Declerck, Stéphan; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Colpaert, Jan V

    2014-01-01

    Current metabarcoding studies aiming to characterize microbial communities generally rely on the amplification and sequencing of relatively short DNA regions. For fungi, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operon has been accepted as the formal fungal barcode. Despite an increasing number of fungal metabarcoding studies, the amplification efficiency of primers is generally not tested prior to their application in metabarcoding studies. Some of the challenges that metabarcoding primers should overcome efficiently are the amplification of target DNA strands in samples rich in non-target DNA and environmental pollutants, such as humic acids, that may have been co-extracted with DNA. In the current study, three selected primer pairs were tested for their suitability as fungal metabarcoding primers. The selected primer pairs include two primer pairs that have been frequently used in fungal metabarcoding studies (ITS1F/ITS2 and ITS3/ITS4) and a primer pair (ITS86F/ITS4) that has been shown to efficiently amplify the ITS2 region of a broad range of fungal taxa in environmental soil samples. The selected primer pairs were evaluated in a 454 amplicon pyrosequencing experiment, real-time PCR (qPCR) experiments and in silico analyses. Results indicate that experimental evaluation of primers provides valuable information that could aid in the selection of suitable primers for fungal metabarcoding studies. Furthermore, we show that the ITS86F/ITS4 primer pair outperforms other primer pairs tested in terms of in silico primer efficiency, PCR efficiency, coverage, number of reads and number of species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained. These traits push the ITS86F/ITS4 primer pair forward as highly suitable for studying fungal diversity and community structures using DNA metabarcoding.

  17. Comparison and Validation of Some ITS Primer Pairs Useful for Fungal Metabarcoding Studies

    PubMed Central

    Op De Beeck, Michiel; Lievens, Bart; Busschaert, Pieter; Declerck, Stéphan; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Colpaert, Jan V.

    2014-01-01

    Current metabarcoding studies aiming to characterize microbial communities generally rely on the amplification and sequencing of relatively short DNA regions. For fungi, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operon has been accepted as the formal fungal barcode. Despite an increasing number of fungal metabarcoding studies, the amplification efficiency of primers is generally not tested prior to their application in metabarcoding studies. Some of the challenges that metabarcoding primers should overcome efficiently are the amplification of target DNA strands in samples rich in non-target DNA and environmental pollutants, such as humic acids, that may have been co-extracted with DNA. In the current study, three selected primer pairs were tested for their suitability as fungal metabarcoding primers. The selected primer pairs include two primer pairs that have been frequently used in fungal metabarcoding studies (ITS1F/ITS2 and ITS3/ITS4) and a primer pair (ITS86F/ITS4) that has been shown to efficiently amplify the ITS2 region of a broad range of fungal taxa in environmental soil samples. The selected primer pairs were evaluated in a 454 amplicon pyrosequencing experiment, real-time PCR (qPCR) experiments and in silico analyses. Results indicate that experimental evaluation of primers provides valuable information that could aid in the selection of suitable primers for fungal metabarcoding studies. Furthermore, we show that the ITS86F/ITS4 primer pair outperforms other primer pairs tested in terms of in silico primer efficiency, PCR efficiency, coverage, number of reads and number of species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained. These traits push the ITS86F/ITS4 primer pair forward as highly suitable for studying fungal diversity and community structures using DNA metabarcoding. PMID:24933453

  18. SP-Designer: a user-friendly program for designing species-specific primer pairs from DNA sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Villard, Pierre; Malausa, Thibaut

    2013-07-01

    SP-Designer is an open-source program providing a user-friendly tool for the design of specific PCR primer pairs from a DNA sequence alignment containing sequences from various taxa. SP-Designer selects PCR primer pairs for the amplification of DNA from a target species on the basis of several criteria: (i) primer specificity, as assessed by interspecific sequence polymorphism in the annealing regions, (ii) the biochemical characteristics of the primers and (iii) the intended PCR conditions. SP-Designer generates tables, detailing the primer pair and PCR characteristics, and a FASTA file locating the primer sequences in the original sequence alignment. SP-Designer is Windows-compatible and freely available from http://www2.sophia.inra.fr/urih/sophia_mart/sp_designer/info_sp_designer.php. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Recovery of the mitochondrial COI barcode region in diverse Hexapoda through tRNA-based primers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding uses a 650 bp segment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene as the basis for an identification system for members of the animal kingdom and some other groups of eukaryotes. PCR amplification of the barcode region is a key step in the analytical chain, but it sometimes fails because of a lack of homology between the standard primer sets and target DNA. Results Two forward PCR primers were developed following analysis of all known arthropod mitochondrial genome arrangements and sequence alignment of the tRNA-W gene which was usually located within 200 bp upstream of the COI gene. These two primers were combined with a standard reverse primer (LepR1) to produce a cocktail which generated a barcode amplicon from 125 of 141 species that included representatives of 121 different families of Hexapoda. High quality sequences were recovered from 79% of the species including groups, such as scale insects, that invariably fail to amplify with standard primers. Conclusions A cocktail of two tRNA-W forward primers coupled with a standard reverse primer amplifies COI for most hexapods, allowing characterization of the standard barcode primer binding region in COI 5' as well as the barcode segment. The current results show that primers designed to bind to highly conserved gene regions upstream of COI will aid the amplification of this gene region in species where standard primers fail and provide valuable information to design a primer for problem groups. PMID:20615258

  20. Diagnosis of Oropouche virus infection by RT-nested-PCR.

    PubMed

    Moreli, Marcos Lázaro; Aquino, Victor Hugo; Cruz, Ana Cecília R; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu M

    2002-01-01

    Using the RT-PCR with primers that anneal to the 5' and the 3' extremities of the genome segments of bunyaviruses and internal primers that anneal to the S segment of Simbu serogroup viruses in a nested PCR it was possible to amplify the Oropouche virus (ORO) genome from the sera of three patients. These results show that this RT-nested-PCR is a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of Oropouche fever infections. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Simple sequence repeat marker loci discovery using SSR primer.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew J; Love, Christopher G; Batley, Jacqueline; Barker, Gary; Edwards, David

    2004-06-12

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have become important molecular markers for a broad range of applications, such as genome mapping and characterization, phenotype mapping, marker assisted selection of crop plants and a range of molecular ecology and diversity studies. With the increase in the availability of DNA sequence information, an automated process to identify and design PCR primers for amplification of SSR loci would be a useful tool in plant breeding programs. We report an application that integrates SPUTNIK, an SSR repeat finder, with Primer3, a PCR primer design program, into one pipeline tool, SSR Primer. On submission of multiple FASTA formatted sequences, the script screens each sequence for SSRs using SPUTNIK. The results are parsed to Primer3 for locus-specific primer design. The script makes use of a Web-based interface, enabling remote use. This program has been written in PERL and is freely available for non-commercial users by request from the authors. The Web-based version may be accessed at http://hornbill.cspp.latrobe.edu.au/

  2. Cross-kingdom amplification using Bacteria-specific primers: Complications for studies of coral microbial ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galkiewicz, J.P.; Kellogg, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    PCR amplification of pure bacterial DNA is vital to the study of bacterial interactions with corals. Commonly used Bacteria-specific primers 8F and 27F paired with the universal primer 1492R amplify both eukaryotic and prokaryotic rRNA genes. An alternative primer set, 63F/1542R, is suggested to resolve this problem. Copyright ?? 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. USER-derived cloning methods and their primer design.

    PubMed

    Salomonsen, Bo; Mortensen, Uffe H; Halkier, Barbara A

    2014-01-01

    Uracil excision-based cloning through USER™ (Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent) is an efficient ligase-free cloning technique that comprises USER cloning, USER fusion, and USER cassette-free (UCF) USER fusion. These USER-derived cloning techniques enable seamless assembly of multiple DNA fragments in one construct. Though governed by a few simple rules primer design for USER-based fusion of PCR fragments can prove time-consuming for inexperienced users. The Primer Help for USER (PHUSER) software is an easy-to-use primer design tool for USER-based methods. In this chapter, we present a PHUSER software protocol for designing primers for USER-derived cloning techniques.

  4. Computational intelligence-based polymerase chain reaction primer selection based on a novel teaching-learning-based optimisation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Huei

    2014-12-01

    Specific primers play an important role in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments, and therefore it is essential to find specific primers of outstanding quality. Unfortunately, many PCR constraints must be simultaneously inspected which makes specific primer selection difficult and time-consuming. This paper introduces a novel computational intelligence-based method, Teaching-Learning-Based Optimisation, to select the specific and feasible primers. The specified PCR product lengths of 150-300 bp and 500-800 bp with three melting temperature formulae of Wallace's formula, Bolton and McCarthy's formula and SantaLucia's formula were performed. The authors calculate optimal frequency to estimate the quality of primer selection based on a total of 500 runs for 50 random nucleotide sequences of 'Homo species' retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The method was then fairly compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) and memetic algorithm (MA) for primer selection in the literature. The results show that the method easily found suitable primers corresponding with the setting primer constraints and had preferable performance than the GA and the MA. Furthermore, the method was also compared with the common method Primer3 according to their method type, primers presentation, parameters setting, speed and memory usage. In conclusion, it is an interesting primer selection method and a valuable tool for automatic high-throughput analysis. In the future, the usage of the primers in the wet lab needs to be validated carefully to increase the reliability of the method.

  5. Laser Doppler velocimetry primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced research in experimental fluid dynamics required a familiarity with sophisticated measurement techniques. In some cases, the development and application of new techniques is required for difficult measurements. Optical methods and in particular, the laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) are now recognized as the most reliable means for performing measurements in complex turbulent flows. And such, the experimental fluid dynamicist should be familiar with the principles of operation of the method and the details associated with its application. Thus, the goals of this primer are to efficiently transmit the basic concepts of the LDV method to potential users and to provide references that describe the specific areas in greater detail.

  6. PD5: a general purpose library for primer design software.

    PubMed

    Riley, Michael C; Aubrey, Wayne; Young, Michael; Clare, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Complex PCR applications for large genome-scale projects require fast, reliable and often highly sophisticated primer design software applications. Presently, such applications use pipelining methods to utilise many third party applications and this involves file parsing, interfacing and data conversion, which is slow and prone to error. A fully integrated suite of software tools for primer design would considerably improve the development time, the processing speed, and the reliability of bespoke primer design software applications. The PD5 software library is an open-source collection of classes and utilities, providing a complete collection of software building blocks for primer design and analysis. It is written in object-oriented C(++) with an emphasis on classes suitable for efficient and rapid development of bespoke primer design programs. The modular design of the software library simplifies the development of specific applications and also integration with existing third party software where necessary. We demonstrate several applications created using this software library that have already proved to be effective, but we view the project as a dynamic environment for building primer design software and it is open for future development by the bioinformatics community. Therefore, the PD5 software library is published under the terms of the GNU General Public License, which guarantee access to source-code and allow redistribution and modification. The PD5 software library is downloadable from Google Code and the accompanying Wiki includes instructions and examples: http://code.google.com/p/primer-design.

  7. Plastid primers for angiosperm phylogenetics and phylogeography1

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: PCR primers are available for virtually every region of the plastid genome. Selection of which primer pairs to use is second only to selection of the genic region. This is particularly true for research at the species/population interface. Methods: Primer pairs for 130 regions of the chloroplast genome were evaluated in 12 species distributed across the angiosperms. Likelihood of amplification success was inferred based upon number and location of mismatches to target sequence. Intraspecific sequence variability was evaluated under three different criteria in four species. Results: Many published primer pairs should work across all taxa sampled, with the exception of failure due to genomic reorganization events. Universal barcoding primers were the least likely to work (65% success). The list of most variable regions for use within species has little in common with the lists identified in prior studies. Discussion: Published primer sequences should amplify a diversity of flowering plant DNAs, even those designed for specific taxonomic groups. “Universal” primers may have extremely limited utility. There was little consistency in likelihood of amplification success for any given publication across lineages or within lineage across publications. PMID:26082876

  8. PD5: A General Purpose Library for Primer Design Software

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Michael C.; Aubrey, Wayne; Young, Michael; Clare, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex PCR applications for large genome-scale projects require fast, reliable and often highly sophisticated primer design software applications. Presently, such applications use pipelining methods to utilise many third party applications and this involves file parsing, interfacing and data conversion, which is slow and prone to error. A fully integrated suite of software tools for primer design would considerably improve the development time, the processing speed, and the reliability of bespoke primer design software applications. Results The PD5 software library is an open-source collection of classes and utilities, providing a complete collection of software building blocks for primer design and analysis. It is written in object-oriented C++ with an emphasis on classes suitable for efficient and rapid development of bespoke primer design programs. The modular design of the software library simplifies the development of specific applications and also integration with existing third party software where necessary. We demonstrate several applications created using this software library that have already proved to be effective, but we view the project as a dynamic environment for building primer design software and it is open for future development by the bioinformatics community. Therefore, the PD5 software library is published under the terms of the GNU General Public License, which guarantee access to source-code and allow redistribution and modification. Conclusions The PD5 software library is downloadable from Google Code and the accompanying Wiki includes instructions and examples: http://code.google.com/p/primer-design PMID:24278254

  9. Mega primer-mediated molecular cloning strategy for chimaeragenesis and long DNA fragment insertion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Chang-Jun; Jiang, Hui; Zhou, Lu; Li, Wen-Ying; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Wu, Lei; Meng, Er; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2017-04-30

    Molecular cloning methods based on primer and overlap-extension PCR are widely used due to their simplicity, reliability, low cost and high efficiency. In this article, an efficient mega primer-mediated (MP) cloning strategy for chimaeragenesis and long DNA fragment insertion is presented. MP cloning is a seamless, restriction/ligation-independent method that requires only three steps: (i) the first PCR for mega primer generation; (ii) the second PCR for exponential amplification mediated by the mega primers and (iii) DpnI digestion and transformation. Most importantly, for chimaeragenesis, genes can be assembled and constructed into the plasmid vector in a single PCR step. By employing this strategy, we successfully inserted four DNA fragments (approximately 500 bp each) into the same vector simultaneously. In conclusion, the strategy proved to be a simple and efficient tool for seamless cloning.

  10. Rapid diagnosis of poliovirus infection by PCR amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Chezzi, C

    1996-01-01

    A single-tube, single-primer-set reverse transcription-PCR assay was developed for the rapid detection of polioviruses in infected tissue culture fluids and clinical materials. The poliovirus-specific PCR primers are located in the VP1-2A region of the poliovirus genome. They generate a 290-bp product and can be used in duplex reactions with general enterovirus primers. The primers span the region used for genotype determination, so that genotype analysis of wild-type polioviruses can be performed by direct sequencing of the PCR products. Of 125 virus isolates typed as polioviruses by neutralization assays, 125 (100%) were also positive by PCR, and of 38 isolates typed as non-polio enteroviruses by conventional techniques, 38 (100%) were also negative by PCR. The assay described here is rapid, highly sensitive, and specific and has clinical applicability in the diagnosis of poliovirus infections. PMID:8784577

  11. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  12. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

    1998-06-30

    A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

  13. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    2005-04-19

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  14. A primer on water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Langbein, Walter Basil

    1960-01-01

    When you open the faucet you expect water to flow. And you expect it to flow night or day, summer or winter, whether you want to fill a glass or water the lawn. It should be clean and pure, without any odor.You have seen or read about places where the water doesn't have these qualities. You may have lived in a city where you were allowed to water the lawn only during a few hours of certain days. We know a large town where the water turns brown after every big rainstorm.Beginning shortly after World War II, large areas in the Southwestern United States had a 10-year drought, and newspapers published a lot of information about its effects. Some people say that the growing demand for water will cause serious shortages over much of the country in the next 10 to 40 years. But it has always been true that while water wells and springs dry up in some places, floods may be occurring in other places at the same time.Nearly every month news stories are published describing floods somewhere in the country. In fact, every year, on the average, 75,000 persons are forced from their homes by floods. In some years, as in 1951 when the lower Kansas River experienced a great flood, half a million people are affected. To understand the reasons for such recurring distress, it is necessary to know something about rivers and about the flat land or flood plain that borders the river.Interest in water and related problems is growing as our population increases and as the use of water becomes steadily greater. To help meet this heightened interest in general information about water and its use and control is the reason this primer was written. The primer is in two parts. The first part tells about hydrology, or the science that concerns the relation of water to our earth, and the second part describes the development of water supplies and the use of water. The Geological Survey is publishing this primer in nontechnical language in the hope that it will enable the general reader to

  15. A Brief Taxometrics Primer

    PubMed Central

    Beauchaine, Theodore P.

    2009-01-01

    Taxometric procedures provide an empirical means of determining which psychiatric disorders are typologically distinct from normal behavioral functioning. Although most disorders reflect extremes along continuously distributed behavioral traits, identifying those that are discrete has important implications for accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, early identification of risk, and improved understanding of etiology. This article provides (a) brief descriptions of the conceptual bases of several taxometric procedures, (b) example analyses using simulated data, and (c) strategies for avoiding common pitfalls that are often observed in taxometrics research. To date, most taxometrics studies have appeared in the adult psychopathology literature. It is hoped that this primer will encourage interested readers to extend taxometrics research to child and adolescent populations. PMID:18088222

  16. Metabolomics: A Primer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Locasale, Jason W

    2017-04-01

    Metabolomics generates a profile of small molecules that are derived from cellular metabolism and can directly reflect the outcome of complex networks of biochemical reactions, thus providing insights into multiple aspects of cellular physiology. Technological advances have enabled rapid and increasingly expansive data acquisition with samples as small as single cells; however, substantial challenges in the field remain. In this primer we provide an overview of metabolomics, especially mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics, which uses liquid chromatography (LC) for separation, and discuss its utilities and limitations. We identify and discuss several areas at the frontier of metabolomics. Our goal is to give the reader a sense of what might be accomplished when conducting a metabolomics experiment, now and in the near future.

  17. A study of PCR inhibition mechanisms using real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Opel, Kerry L; Chung, Denise; McCord, Bruce R

    2010-01-01

    In this project, real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was utilized to study the mechanism of PCR inhibition through examination of the effect of amplicon length, melting temperature, and sequence. Specifically designed primers with three different amplicon lengths and three different melting temperatures were used to target a single homozygous allele in the HUMTH01 locus. The effect on amplification efficiency for each primer pair was determined by adding different concentrations of various PCR inhibitors to the reaction mixture. The results show that a variety of inhibition mechanisms can occur during the PCR process depending on the type of co-extracted inhibitor. These include Taq inhibition, DNA template binding, and effects on reaction efficiency. In addition, some inhibitors appear to affect the reaction in more than one manner. Overall we find that amplicon size and melting temperature are important in some inhibition mechanisms and not in others and the key issue in understanding PCR inhibition is determining the identity of the interfering substance.

  18. Estimation of teaching-learning-based optimization primer design using regression analysis for different melting temperature calculations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Primers plays important role in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments, thus it is necessary to select characteristic primers. Unfortunately, manual primer design manners are time-consuming and easy to get human negligence because many PCR constraints must be considered simultaneously. Automatic programs for primer design were developed urgently. In this study, the teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO), a robust and free of algorithm-specific parameters method, is applied to screen primers conformed primer constraints. The optimal primer frequency (OPF) based on three known melting temperature formulas is estimated by 500 runs for primer design in each different number of generations. We selected optimal primers from fifty random nucleotide sequences of Homo sapiens at NCBI. The results indicate that the SantaLucia's formula is better coupled with the method to get higher optimal primer frequency and shorter CPU-time than the Wallace's formula and the Bolton and McCarthy's formula. Through the regression analysis, we also find the generations are significantly associated with the optimal primer frequency. The results are helpful for developing the novel TLBO-based computational method to design feasible primers.

  19. 30 CFR 56.6304 - Primer protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Primer protection. 56.6304 Section 56.6304... Primer protection. (a) Tamping shall not be done directly on a primer. (b) Rigid cartridges of explosives... the primer except where the blasthole contains sufficient depth of water to protect the primer...

  20. 30 CFR 56.6304 - Primer protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Primer protection. 56.6304 Section 56.6304... Primer protection. (a) Tamping shall not be done directly on a primer. (b) Rigid cartridges of explosives... the primer except where the blasthole contains sufficient depth of water to protect the primer...

  1. 30 CFR 56.6304 - Primer protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Primer protection. 56.6304 Section 56.6304... Primer protection. (a) Tamping shall not be done directly on a primer. (b) Rigid cartridges of explosives... the primer except where the blasthole contains sufficient depth of water to protect the primer...

  2. 30 CFR 56.6304 - Primer protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Primer protection. 56.6304 Section 56.6304... Primer protection. (a) Tamping shall not be done directly on a primer. (b) Rigid cartridges of explosives... the primer except where the blasthole contains sufficient depth of water to protect the primer...

  3. 30 CFR 56.6304 - Primer protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Primer protection. 56.6304 Section 56.6304... Primer protection. (a) Tamping shall not be done directly on a primer. (b) Rigid cartridges of explosives... the primer except where the blasthole contains sufficient depth of water to protect the primer...

  4. [Rapid PCR authentication Lonicera japanica].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Hou, Jing-Yi; Huang, Lu-Qi; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan

    2014-10-01

    To simply and rapid authenticate Lonicera japanica. Rapid allele-specific PCR primer was designed base on trnL-trnF 625 G/T Single nucleotide polymorphism and the PCR reaction systems including annealing temperature was optimized; optimized results were performed to authenticate L. japanica and its 9 adulterants. When 100 x SYBR Green I was added in the PCR product of 87 degrees C initial denatured 1 min; 87 degrees C denatured 5 s, 68 degrees C annealing 5 s, 30 cycle; L. japanica visualize strong green fluorescence under 365 nm UV lamp whereas adulterants without. The results indicate rapid allele-specific PCR could authenticate L. japanica and its adulterants rapidly and simply.

  5. Selective and universal primers for trematode barcoding in freshwater snails.

    PubMed

    Routtu, J; Grunberg, D; Izhar, R; Dagan, Y; Guttel, Y; Ucko, M; Ben-Ami, F

    2014-07-01

    Trematodes are significant pathogens of high medical, veterinary, and environmental importance. They are hard to isolate from their intermediate hosts, and their early life stages are difficult to identify morphologically. Therefore, primers were developed for trematodes to create a species barcoding system and allow selective PCR amplification in mixed samples. The specific oligonucleotide primer was universal for trematodes that infected several freshwater snail species in Israel. The diagnostic tool is based on the 18S rDNA gene. In contrast to morphological identification, trematode barcoding is rapid as it is based on a sequence of only 800 bp, and it classifies species accurately due to high polymorphism between conserved areas.

  6. Sensitive and robust detection of citrus greening (huanglongbing) bacterium "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" by DNA amplification with new 16S rDNA-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Takashi; Iwanami, Toru

    2012-10-01

    Citrus greening disease is caused by "Candidatus Liberibacter spp.," including "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las)." For detecting this disease, we designed new primers from the Las 16S rDNA and used a very small DNA template for PCR. More Las-infected tissues were detected with our primers than with the common primers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    1 Real - time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei Vipin K. Rastogi1, Tu-chen Cheng1, Lisa Collins1 and Jennifer Bagley2 1...A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Real - time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B.pseudomallei 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...risk. There is currently no real - time PCR assay for detection of both of these pathogens. Primers and probes corresponding to specific genomic regions

  8. PCR for capsular typing of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Falla, T J; Crook, D W; Brophy, L N; Maskell, D; Kroll, J S; Moxon, E R

    1994-01-01

    A PCR method for the unequivocal assignment of Haemophilus influenzae capsular type (types a to f) was developed. PCR primers were designed from capsule type-specific DNA sequences cloned from the capsular gene cluster of each of the six capsular types. PCR product was amplified only from the capsular type for which the primers were designed. Product was confirmed by using either an internal oligonucleotide or restriction endonuclease digestion. A total of 172 H. influenzae strains of known capsular type (determined genetically) comprising all capsular types and noncapsulate strains were tested by PCR capsular typing. In all cases the PCR capsular type corresponded to the capsular genotype determined by restriction fragment length poly