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Sample records for intubating trauma patients

  1. Submandibular intubation in awake patient of panfacial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kamra, SK; Khandavilli, HK; Banerjee, P

    2016-01-01

    Maxillofacial trauma patients present with airway problems. Submandibular intubation is an effective means of intubation to avoid tracheostomy for operative procedures. Airway is secured with oral endotracheal intubation in paralyzed patient and tube is then transplaced in sub mental or submandibular region. However there may be instances when paralyzing such trauma patients is not safe and short term tracheostomy is the only airway channel available for conduction of anesthesia. We report a case of submandibular intubation in awake patient of maxillofacial trauma with anticipated intubation problems. PMID:27833492

  2. Is it safe to use frova airway intubating device during tracheal intubation in difficult airway patient with multiple and chest trauma?

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Waseem M; Alsubaie, Nourah; Nouh, Thamer A; Al-Nassar, Sami A

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic chest injury is one of the leading causes of death in motor vehicle accident (MVA). A complete tracheobronchial injury occurred in 1% of trauma cases and most of the cases died before arrival to the emergency department. We report a 37-year-old female involved in MVA presented to the emergency room (ER) with normal vital signs. Ten minutes later, her saturation dropped to 75%, which required ventilation; however, two attempts for endotracheal intubation failed. The third time frova airway intubating introducer used and succeeded. Immediately after tracheal intubation, the patient started to have extensive subcutaneous emphysema and severe hypoxia; chest X-ray showed right side tension pneumothorax which was not relieved by a chest tube insertion. Bronchoscopy confirmed total transection of the right main bronchus and lower tracheal laceration and injury. Emergency thoracotomy and repair of both trachea and the right main bronchus were successful.

  3. Dental trauma prevention during endotracheal intubation--review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mańka-Malara, Katarzyna; Gawlak, Dominika; Hovhannisyan, Anahit; Klikowska, Marta; Kostrzewa-Janicka, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation is a procedure performed during general anaesthesia with the use of an endotracheal tube in order to maintain a patent airway. This routinely used procedure is connected with a risk of complications within the region of the masticatory system. Trauma of teeth, their surrounding structures and the soft tissue of the oral cavity is observed in app. 1.38 per 1000 procedures. The main causes of this damage are the surgical skills and experience of the surgeon, the anatomical conditions present and the mode of conducting the procedure. In order to reduce the risk of postoperative complications, patients with a high risk of sustaining an injury during endotracheal intubation should be equipped with elastic mouthguards, which reduces the possibility of damage. The scoring in a scale of endotracheal intubation difficulty should be used for qualification for the use of such mouthguards.

  4. Airway Management in Maxillofacial Trauma: Do We Really Need Tracheostomy/Submental Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Geeta; Mittal, Rajinder K.; Katyal, Sunil; Uppal, Sanjeev; Mittal, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are various techniques available for airway management in patients with maxillofacial trauma. Patients with panfacial injuries may need surgical airway access like submental intubation or tracheostomy, which have their associated problems. We have been managing these types of cases by a novel technique, i.e, intraoperative change of nasotracheal to orotracheal intubation. Aim: To review our experience about various techniques for the airway management in patient with maxillofacial trauma. To analyse the possibility of using nasotracheal intubation and intraoperative change of nasotracheal to orotracheal intubation in panfacial fractures. Materials and Methods: In a tertiary care centre four hundred eighty seven patients of maxillofacial injuries, operated over a period of 2 years were reviewed in relation to age, sex, mode of injury, type of facial fractures, methods of airway management and their associated complications. Results: Young patients with male predominance is the most common affected population. Panfacial fracture is the most common type of injury (39.83%) among facial fractures. Airway was managed with intraoperative change of nasotracheal to orotracheal intubation in 33.05% of the patients whereas submental intubation or tracheostomy was done in 8.62% of the patients. Conclusion: Nasal route for endotracheal intubation is not a contraindication in the presence of nasal fractures, base of skull fractures and CSF leak. By changing the nasotracheal intubation to orotracheal intubation intraoperatively in cases panfacial fractures, most of the tracheostomies and submental intubations can be avoided. PMID:24783087

  5. Submental intubation: alternative short-term airway management in maxillofacial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravi Raja; Vyloppilli, Suresh; Thangavelu, Annamala; Joseph, Benny; Ahsan, Auswaf

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess submental route intubation as an alternative technique to a tracheostomy in the management of the airway in cranio-maxillofacial trauma, along with an assessment of its morbidity and complications. Materials and Methods Submental intubation was performed in 17 patients who had maxillofacial panfacial trauma and management was done under general anesthesia during a period of one year from 2013 to 2014 at Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dentistry, the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church Medical College, Kochi, India. Results In all 17 cases, the technique of submental intubation was found to be simple and reliable. Hypertrophic scars were noted in three cases, orocutaneous fistula and mucocele in one case each. All these complications were managed comfortably without significant morbidity to the patient. Conclusion Submental intubation is a good technique that can be used regularly in the management of the airway in cranio-maxillofacial trauma, but with some manageable complications. PMID:27429937

  6. Teaching fibreoptic intubation in anaesthetised patients.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, H G; Marsch, S C; Keller, H L; Strebel, S; Anselmi, L; Drewe, J

    1994-04-01

    One hundred ASA grade 1 and 2 patients requiring orotracheal intubation for various general surgical procedures were randomly assigned to receive either expert rigid laryngoscopic or novice fibreoptic orotracheal intubation under total intravenous anaesthesia. Five anaesthesia residents in the 4th year, with no prior experience in fibreoptic laryngoscopy, participated in a fibreoptic training course, viewing two instructional videos and practising on the intubation manikin. Each resident intubated 20 patients in a randomised fashion either as an expert laryngoscopist or as a fibreoptic novice. The time (SEM) to achieve successful intubation was statistically different for fibreoptic and rigid intubation (77.2 (5.1) s vs 17.7 (1.6) s, p < 0.01). The time to achieve successful rigid laryngoscopic intubation remained constant over the ten intubations, whereas time required for fibreoptic intubation decreases significantly (p < 0.01). The learning objectives (fibreoptic intubation times in 60 s or less and with 90% or greater success rate on the first intubation attempt) were met by all residents. The haemodynamic profile was similar for fibreoptically intubated and conventionally intubated patients and there was no difference between the first two or the last two fibreoptic or rigid intubations. The study was designed to detect a difference of 10% in means (assuming alpha = 0.05 and beta < or = 0.2). The incidence of postoperative sore throat, dysphagia or hoarseness was similar in both groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Randomized study comparing the efficacy of a self-retaining bicanaliculus intubation stent with Crawford intubation in patients with canalicular obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaie, Syed Ziaeddin; Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Rajabi, Mohammad Bagher; Eshraghi, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of self-retaining stent (SRS) bicanalicular intubation with bicanalicular silicone (Crawford) intubation in patients with canalicular and punctal obstruction. Methods In this prospective, randomized clinical trial, 38 patients with canalicular or punctal obstruction (25 partial, 13 complete) and epiphora were randomized into two groups. Twenty-one patients (14 with partial and seven with complete obstruction) underwent SRS intubation and 17 patients underwent bicanalicular silicon intubation in a randomized fashion. Results After a mean follow-up of 6 months following tube removal, 16 (76%, 12 partial, four complete) of the 21 eyes in the SRS intubation group and 13 (76%, 10 partial, three complete) in the bicanalicular silicon intubation group had a successful outcome and remained symptom-free. For partial obstructions, the success rate was 85% and 90% for the SRS and bicanalicular silicon intubation groups, respectively. The corresponding values for complete obstruction were 63% and 50% for the SRS and bicanalicular silicon intubation groups, respectively. Conclusion SRS could effectively substitute for a more extensive procedure such as bicanalicular silicon intubation in patients with canalicular obstruction, particularly those with partial obstruction. The newly developed SRS intubation procedure has the advantages of simple, easy implementation and extubation, low cost, and a lower rate of trauma when compared with bicanalicular silicon intubation. PMID:22259230

  8. Risk Factors for Hypotension in Urgently Intubated Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    fold increase in the odds of death. The use of propofol for the induction of anesthesia for endotracheal intubation in critically ill burned patients...did not increase the odds of hypotension or death. In burn patients requiring emergent endotracheal intubation in the BICU, the care team should...01 DEC 2012 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Risk factors for hypotension in urgently intubated burn patients 5a

  9. Submental Intubation in Patients with Complex Maxillofacial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Yuseon; Kang, Seong Sik; Kim, Minsoo; Son, Hee Jeong; Park, Jaewoo; Kim, Jeong-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Airway management in patients with complex maxillofacial injuries is a challenge to anesthesiologists. Submental intubation is a useful technique that is less invasive than tracheostomy in securing the airways where orotracheal and nasotracheal intubation cannot be performed. This procedure avoids the use of tracheostomy and bypasses its associated morbidities. A flexible and kink-resistant reinforced endotracheal tube with detachable universal connector is commonly used for submental intubation. Herein, we report cases involving submental intubation using a reinforced endotracheal tube with a non-detachable universal connector in patients with complex maxillofacial injuries. PMID:27924286

  10. Thromboprophylaxis for trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Luis Manuel Barrera; Perel, Pablo; Ker, Katharine; Cirocchi, Roberto; Farinella, Eriberto; Morales, Carlos Hernando

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of thromboprophylaxis in trauma patients on mortality and incidence of DVT and PE. To compare the effects of different thromboprophylaxis interventions and their relative effects according to the type of trauma. PMID:25267908

  11. [Regional anesthesia of the airways in difficult tracheal intubation in a conscious patient with spontaneous respiration].

    PubMed

    Dziadz'ko, A M

    2002-01-01

    Clinical pattern of anesthesia, hemodynamic and gas exchange states were evaluated in 64 patients with congenital or acquired damage of maxillary-facial region due to tumor or trauma. 51 patients were intubated under locoregional anesthesia of the upper respiratory tract (superior laryngeal nerves, glossopharyngeal nerves, intratracheal anesthesia) by means of blind nasal or oral fiberoptic retrograde and by using laryngeal mask technique. In 12 cases fiberoptic device was used for intubation under local anesthesia by lidocaine solution. There was no airways obstruction in any case. Satisfactory anesthesia in oropharynx, larynx and trachea was reached in all cases, the most profound blockage of airways and lack of pharyngeal and laryngeal reflexes being in patients under locoregional anesthesia. So locoregional anesthesia can be used for awake intubation.

  12. Preparation of the patient and the airway for awake intubation

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Venkateswaran

    2011-01-01

    Awake intubation is usually performed electively in the presence of a difficult airway. A detailed airway examination is time-consuming and often not feasible in an emergency. A simple 1-2-3 rule for airway examination allows one to identify potential airway difficulty within a minute. A more detailed airway examination can give a better idea about the exact nature of difficulty and the course of action to be taken to overcome it. When faced with an anticipated difficult airway, the anaesthesiologist needs to consider securing the airway in an awake state without the use of anaesthetic agents or muscle relaxants. As this can be highly discomforting to the patient, time and effort must be spent to prepare such patients both psychologically and pharmacologically for awake intubation. Psychological preparation is best initiated by an anaesthesiologist who explains the procedure in simple language. Sedative medications can be titrated to achieve patient comfort without compromising airway patency. Additional pharmacological preparation includes anaesthetising the airway through topical application of local anaesthetics and appropriate nerve blocks. When faced with a difficult airway, one should call for the difficult airway cart as well as for help from colleagues who have interest and expertise in airway management. Preoxygenation and monitoring during awake intubation is important. Anxious patients with a difficult airway may need to be intubated under general anaesthesia without muscle relaxants. Proper psychological and pharmacological preparation of the patient by an empathetic anaesthesiologist can go a long way in making awake intubation acceptable for all concerned. PMID:22174458

  13. Risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia: among trauma patients with and without brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gianakis, Anastasia; McNett, Molly; Belle, Josie; Moran, Cristina; Grimm, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates remain highest among trauma and brain injured patients; yet, no research compares VAP risk factors between the 2 groups. This retrospective, case-controlled study identified risk factors for VAP among critically ill trauma patients with and without brain injury. Data were abstracted on trauma patients with (cases) and without (controls) brain injury. Data gathered on n = 157 subjects. Trauma patients with brain injury had more emergent and field intubations. Age was strongest predictor of VAP in cases, and ventilator days predicted VAP in controls. Trauma patients with brain injury may be at higher risk for VAP.

  14. Endotracheal Intubation in Patients Treated for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph B.; Nicholas, Katherine S.; Varelas, Panayiotis N.; Harsh, Donna M.; Durkalski, Valerie; Silbergleit, Robert; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Limited data describe the frequency, timing, or indications for endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients with status epilepticus. A better understanding of the characteristics of patients with status epilepticus requiring airway interventions could inform clinical care. We sought to characterize ETI use in patients with prehospital status epilepticus. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing intravenous lorazepam to intramuscular midazolam for prehospital status epilepticus treatment. Subjects received ETI in the prehospital, Emergency Department (ED), or inpatient setting at the discretion of caregivers. Results Of 1023 enrollments, 218 (21 %) received ETI. 204 (93.6 %) of the ETIs were performed in the hospital and 14 (6.4 %) in the prehospital setting. Intubated patients were older (52 vs 41 years, p < 0.001), and men underwent ETI more than women (26 vs 21 %, p = 0.047). Patients with ongoing seizures on ED arrival had a higher rate of ETI (32 vs 16 %, p < 0.001), as did those who received rescue anti-seizure medication (29 vs 20 %, p = 0.004). Mortality was higher for intubated patients (7 vs 0.4 %, p < 0.001). Most ETI (n = 133, 62 %) occurred early (prior to or within 30 min after ED arrival), and late ETI was associated with higher mortality (14 vs 3 %, p = 0.002) than early ETI. Conclusions ETI is common in patients with status epilepticus, particularly among the elderly or those with refractory seizures. Any ETI and late ETI are both associated with higher mortality. PMID:25623785

  15. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) <200. Baseline characteristics, physiologic variables, arterial blood gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios.

  16. Psychological care in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Mohta, Medha; Sethi, A K; Tyagi, Asha; Mohta, Anup

    2003-01-01

    The clinician manages trauma patients in the emergency room, operation theatre, intensive care unit and trauma ward with an endeavour to provide best possible treatment for physical injuries. At the same time, it is equally important to give adequate attention to behavioural and psychological aspects associated with the event. Knowledge of the predisposing factors and their management helps the clinician to prevent or manage these psychological problems. Various causes of psychological disturbances in trauma patients have been highlighted. These include pain, the sudden and unexpected nature of events and the procedures and interventions necessary to resuscitate and stabilise the patient. The ICU and trauma ward environment, sleep and sensory deprivation, impact of injury on CNS, medications and associated pre-morbid conditions are also significant factors. Specific problems that concern the traumatised patients are helplessness, humiliation, threat to body image and mental symptoms. The patients react to these stressors by various defence mechanisms like conservation withdrawal, denial, regression, anger, anxiety and depression. Some of them develop delirium or even more severe problems like acute stress disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder. Physical, pharmacological or psychological interventions can be performed to prevent or minimise these problems in trauma patients. These include adequate pain relief, prevention of sensory and sleep deprivation, providing familiar surroundings, careful explanations and reassurance to the patient, psychotherapy and pharmacological treatment whenever required.

  17. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Sarah B; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-01-01

    Injured patients stress the transfusion service with frequent demands for uncrossmatched red cells and plasma, occasional requirements for large amounts of blood products and the need for new and better blood products. Transfusion services stress trauma centers with demands for strict accountability for individual blood component units and adherence to indications in a clinical field where research has been difficult, and guidance opinion-based. New data suggest that the most severely injured patients arrive at the trauma center already coagulopathic and that these patients benefit from prompt, specific, corrective treatment. This research is clarifying trauma system requirements for new blood products and blood-product usage patterns, but the inability to obtain informed consent from severely injured patients remains an obstacle to further research. PMID:21083009

  18. Airway Management of the Patient with Maxillofacial Trauma: Review of the Literature and Suggested Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Michal; Bahouth, Hany; Leiser, Yoav; Abu El-Naaj, Imad

    2015-01-01

    According to the Advanced Trauma Life Support recommendations for managing patients with life-threatening injuries, securing the airway is the first task of a primary caregiver. Airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma is complex and crucial because it can dictate a patient's survival. Securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma is often extremely difficult because the trauma involves the patient's airway and their breathing is compromised. In these patients, mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation are anticipated to be difficult. Additionally, some of these patients may not yet have been cleared of a cervical spine injury, and all are regarded as having a full stomach and having an increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The requirements of the intended maxillofacial operation may often preclude the use of an oral intubation tube, and alternative methods for securing the airway should be considered before the start of the surgery. In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with maxillofacial trauma, cooperation between maxillofacial surgeons, anesthesiologists, and trauma specialists is needed. In this review, we discuss the complexity and difficulties of securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma and present our approach for airway management of such patients. PMID:26161411

  19. Awake intubation.

    PubMed

    Peiris, Kawshala; Frerk, Chris

    2008-03-01

    Securing the airway is a core skill in anaesthesia, the gold standard of which is tracheal intubation. Normally this is achieved after induction of anaesthesia. However, some circumstances demand an awake approach. Awake intubation can be achieved via several methods. Using the fibreoptic laryngoscope is the most widely used technique in the UK with minimal patient discomfort and a wide margin of safety. When compared with attempts at difficult direct laryngoscopy, awake fibreoptic intubation provides excellent cardiovascular stability when performed under good topical anaesthesia and conscious sedation. Understanding the equipment used as well as preparing the patient and being aware of potential pitfalls are important elements to performing a successful awake intubation.

  20. Hypothermia and the trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Chun, Rosaleen; Brown, Ross; Simons, Richard K.

    Hypothermia has profound effects on every system in the body, causing an overall slowing of enzymatic reactions and reduced metabolic requirements. Hypothermic, acutely injured patients with multisystem trauma have adverse outcomes when compared with normothermic control patients. Trauma patients are inherently predisposed to hypothermia from a variety of intrinsic and iatrogenic causes. Coagulation and cardiac sequelae are the most pertinent physiological concerns. Hypothermia and coagulopathy often mandate a simplified approach to complex surgical problems. A modification of traditional classification systems of hypothermia, applicable to trauma patients is suggested. There are few controlled investigations, but clinical opinion strongly supports the active prevention of hypothermia in the acutely traumatized patient. Preventive measures are simple and inexpensive, but the active reversal of hypothermia is much more complicated, often invasive and controversial. The ideal method of rewarming is unclear but must be individualized to the patient and is institution specific. An algorithm reflecting newer approaches to traumatic injury and technical advances in equipment and techniques is suggested. Conversely, hypothermia has selected clinical benefits when appropriately used in cases of trauma. Severe hypothermia has allowed remarkable survivals in the course of accidental circulatory arrest. The selective application of mild hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury is an area with promise. Deliberate circulatory arrest with hypothermic cerebral protection has also been used for seemingly unrepairable injuries and is the focus of ongoing research. PMID:10526517

  1. Intubation without use of stylet for McGrath videolaryngoscopy in patients with expected normal airway

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Sook Young; Lee, Su Youn; Kim, Yong Beom; Kim, Jong Yeop

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: During McGrath videolaryngoscope (VL) intubation, a styletted endotracheal tube maintaining an upward distal tip angle is recommended by some manufacturers. However, a styletted endotracheal tube can elicit rare but potentially serious complications. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a nonstyletted tube with exaggerated curvature would be noninferior to a styletted tube for orotracheal intubation using McGrath VL in patients with expected normal airway, by comparing the time to intubation and ease of intubation. Methods: One hundred forty patients, ages 19 to 70 years (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II), undergoing tracheal intubation for elective surgery were randomly allocated to the nonstylet group (n = 70) or the stylet group (n = 70). Anesthesia induction consisted of propofol, remifentanil, and rocuronium. The primary outcome was time to intubation assessed by a blind observer. Cormack and Lehane glottic grade, easy of intubation, and intubation difficulty score (IDS) were also assessed. Results: Median time to intubation [interquartile range] was not different between the nonstylet group and the stylet group (26 [24–32.5] s vs 27 [25–31] s, P = 0.937). There was no significant in median IDS between the nonstylet group and the stylet group (P = 0.695). Conclusion: This study shows that a nonstyletted endotracheal tube with exaggerated curvature has a similar performance to a styletted tube with a hockey-stick curvature during intubation using McGrath VL regarding time taken to successful intubation and easiness of intubation. PMID:27902612

  2. Comparative study of heart rate responses to laryngoscopic endotracheal intubation and to endotracheal intubation using intubating laryngeal mask airway under general anaesthesia in patients with pure mitral stenosis for closed mitral commissurotomy.

    PubMed

    Das, Soumi; Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Goswampi, Anupam; Kundu, Kanak Kanti

    2013-04-01

    The various drugs and methods studied in an attempt to curb the haemodynamic stress response associated with conventional laryngoscopic endotracheal intubation have not been found to be ompletely satisfactory. The rise in heart rate can be detrimental to patients with mitral stenosis. This study was aimed to compare the heart rate responses to endotracheal intubation using conventional laryngoscope and with the help of intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) in patients with isolated mitral stenosis. Thirty-four adult patients of either sex, aged between 18 and 40 years with isolated mitral stenosis to undergo closed mitral commissurotomy were randomly allocated into two groups : Group A (n=17)- To be intubated using laryngoscopy. Group B (n=17)- To be intubated with the help of ILMA. The heart rate was recorded immediately preinduction, just prior to introducing the intubating device and postintubation every minute up to first 5 minutes. On applying statistical tests, it was found that the median heart rate values in group A at 2, 3, 4 and 5 minutes postintubation were significantly higher than in group B (p<0.05). Although use of both laryngosope and ILMA for endotracheal intubation was associated with rise in heart rate, the rise was less with ILMA compared to laryngoscope. Hence, it can be concluded that use of ILMA may be a preferable device for endotracheal intubation laryngoscopy in patients with isolated mitral stenosis.

  3. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Matthew M.; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S.; Mains, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  4. Intubation Biomechanics: Laryngoscope Force and Cervical Spine Motion during Intubation in Cadavers—Cadavers vs. Patients, the Effect of Repeated Intubations, and the Effect of Type II Odontoid Fracture on C1-C2 Motion

    PubMed Central

    Hindman, Bradley J.; From, Robert P.; Fontes, Ricardo B.; Traynelis, Vincent C.; Todd, Michael M.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Puttlitz, Christian M.; Santoni, Brandon G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to characterize: 1) cadaver intubation biomechanics, including the effect of repeated intubations; and 2) the relationship between intubation force and the motion of an injured cervical segment. Methods Fourteen cadavers were serially intubated using force-sensing Macintosh and Airtraq laryngoscopes in random order, with simultaneous cervical spine motion recorded with lateral fluoroscopy. Motion of the C1-C2 segment was measured in the intact and injured state (Type II odontoid fracture). Injured C1-C2 motion was proportionately corrected for changes in intubation forces that occurred with repeated intubations. Results Cadaver intubation biomechanics were comparable to those of patients in all parameters other than C2-C5 extension. In cadavers, intubation force (Set 2/Set1 force ratio = 0.61 [95% CI: 0.46, 0.81]; P=0.002) and Oc-C5 extension (Set 2 –Set 1 difference = −6.1 degrees [95% CI: −11.4, −0.9]; P=0.025) decreased with repeated intubations. In cadavers, C1-C2 extension did not differ: 1) between intact and injured states; or 2) in the injured state, between laryngoscopes (with and without force correction). With force correction, in the injured state, C1-C2 subluxation was greater with the Airtraq (mean difference 2.8 mm [95% CI: 0.7, 4.9 mm]; P=0.004). Discussion With limitations, cadavers may be clinically relevant models of intubation biomechanics and cervical spine motion. In the setting of a Type II odontoid fracture, C1-C2 motion during intubation with either the Macintosh or Airtraq does not appear to greatly exceed physiologic values or to have a high likelihood of hyperextension or direct cord compression. PMID:26288267

  5. Patient safety in emergency airway management and rapid sequence intubation: metaphorical lessons from skydiving.

    PubMed

    Levitan, Richard M

    2003-07-01

    Concern about patient safety and failed rapid sequence intubation has led to an increased awareness of potentially difficult laryngoscopy situations and algorithms promoting techniques in awake patients. Given the low overall incidence of failed laryngoscopy, however, prediction of difficult laryngoscopy has poor positive predictive value and uncertain clinical utility, especially in emergency settings. Non-rapid sequence intubation approaches have comparatively lower chances of intubation success, require more time, and are associated with more complications. As a specialty, emergency medicine has adopted rapid sequence intubation as the mainstay of emergency airway treatment for many appropriate reasons; the problem that must be addressed is how patient safety can be ensured while what is an inherently dangerous procedure is performed. A novel way to conceptualize patient risk and safety issues in rapid sequence intubation is to examine how inherent risk is managed in skydiving. Metaphorical lessons from skydiving that are applicable to rapid sequence intubation include (1) a redundancy of safety; (2) a methodic approach to primary chute deployment; (3) use of backup chutes that are fast, simple, and easy to deploy; (4) attention to monitoring; and (5) equipment vigilance. This article reviews how each of these lessons apply metaphorically to rapid sequence intubation, wherein the primary chute is laryngoscopy, the backup chute is rescue ventilation, and monitoring involves pulse oximetry.

  6. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy-assisted endotracheal intubation in a patient with a large tracheal tumor.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lei; Feng, Yan-Hua; Ma, Hai-Chun; Dong, Su

    2015-04-01

    In the event of a high degree of airway obstruction, endotracheal intubation can be impossible and even dangerous, because it can cause complete airway obstruction, especially in patients with high tracheal lesions. However, a smaller endotracheal tube under the guidance of a bronchoscope can be insinuated past obstructive tumor in most noncircumferential cases. Here we report a case of successful fiberoptic bronchoscopy-assisted endotracheal intubation in a patient undergoing surgical resection of a large, high tracheal tumor causing severe tracheal stenosis. A 42-year-old Chinese man presented with dyspnea, intermittent irritable cough, and sleep deprivation for one and a half years. X-rays and computed tomography scan of the chest revealed an irregular pedunculated soft tissue mass within the tracheal lumen. The mass occupied over 90% of the lumen and caused severe tracheal stenosis. Endotracheal intubation was done to perform tracheal tumor resection under general anesthesia. After several failed conventional endotracheal intubation attempts, fiberoptic bronchoscopy-assisted intubation was successful. The patient received mechanical ventilation and then underwent tumor resection and a permanent tracheostomy. This case provides evidence of the usefulness of the fiberoptic bronchoscopy-assisted intubation technique in management of an anticipated difficult airway and suggests that tracheal intubation can be performed directly in patients with a tracheal tumor who can sleep in the supine position, even if they have occasional sleep deprivation and severe tracheal obstruction as revealed by imaging techniques.

  7. Bench-to-bedside review: Early tracheostomy in critically ill trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Shirawi, Nehad; Arabi, Yaseen

    2006-01-01

    A significant proportion of trauma patients require tracheostomy during intensive care unit stay. The timing of this procedure remains a subject of debate. The decision for tracheostomy should take into consideration the risks and benefits of prolonged endotracheal intubation versus tracheostomy. Timing of tracheostomy is also influenced by the indications for the procedure, which include relief of upper airway obstruction, airway access in patients with cervical spine injury, management of retained airway secretions, maintenance of patent airway and airway access for prolonged mechanical ventilation. This review summarizes the potential advantages of tracheostomy versus endotracheal intubation, the different indications for tracheostomy in trauma patients and studies examining early versus late tracheostomy. It also reviews the predictors of prolonged mechanical ventilation, which may guide the decision regarding the timing of tracheostomy. PMID:16356202

  8. Predictors of Difficult Intubation Among Malay Patients in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Tantri, Aida Rosita; Firdaus, Riyadh; Salomo, Sahat Tumpal

    2016-01-01

    Background Failure to maintain an adequate airway can lead to brain damage and death. To reduce the risk of difficulty in maintaining an airway during general anesthesia, there are several known predictors of difficult intubation. People with a Malay background have different craniofacial structures in comparison with other individuals. Therefore, different predictors should be used for patients of Malay race. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the ability to predict difficult visualization of the larynx (DVL) in Malay patients based on several predictors, such as the modified Mallampati test (MMT), thyromental distance (TMD), and hyomental distance ratio (HMDR). Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study included 277 consecutive patients requiring general anesthesia. All subjects were evaluated using the MMT, TMD, and HMDR, and the cut-off points for the airway predictors were Mallampati III and IV, < 6.5 cm, and < 1.2, respectively. During direct laryngoscopy, the laryngeal view was graded using the Cormack-Lehane (CL) classification. CL grades III and IV were considered difficult visualization. The area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity for each predictor were calculated both as sole and combined predictors. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine independent predictors of DVL. Results Difficulty in visualizing the larynx was found in 28 (10.1%) patients. The AUC, sensitivity, and specificity for the three airway predictors were as follows: MMT: 0.614, 10.7%, and 99.2%; HMDR: 0.743, 64.2%, and 74%; and TMD: 0.827, 82.1%, and 64.7%. The combination providing the best prediction in our study involved the MMT, HMDR, and TMD with an AUC, sensitivity, and specificity of 0.835, 60.7%, and 88.8%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that the MMT, HMDR, and TMD were independent predictors of DVL. Conclusions The TMD, with a cut-off point of 65 mm, had superior diagnostic value compared with the HMDR and

  9. Awake nasotracheal intubation using fiberoptic bronchoscope in a pediatric patient with Freeman-Sheldon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Park, S Y; Min, S K; Kim, J H; Lee, S Y; Moon, B K

    2005-09-01

    The Freeman-Sheldon syndrome is a congenital disease primarily affecting the facial, limb and respiratory muscles that give rise to classical clinical features including typical whistling face and short webbed neck associated with difficult intubation. We present successful awake nasotracheal intubation in a 6-year-old patient with typical clinical features of Freeman-Sheldon syndrome by using fiberoptic bronchoscope on two separate occasions.

  10. Incidence Rate of Post-Intubation Tracheal Stenosis in Patients Admitted to Five Intensive Care Units in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farzanegan, Roya; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Zangi, Mahdi; Golestani Eraghi, Majid; Noorbakhsh, Shahram; Doozandeh Tabarestani, Neda; Shadmehr, Mohammad Behgam

    2016-01-01

    Background Tracheal stenosis is one of the worst complications associated with endotracheal intubation and it is the most common reason for reconstructive airway surgeries. Due to various local risk factors, the incidence rate of tracheal stenosis may vary in different countries. In order to estimate the incidence rate of post-intubation tracheal stenosis (PITS) in patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), a follow-up study was planned. As there was no similar methodological model in the literature, a feasibility step was also designed to examine the whole project and to enhance the follow-up rate. Objectives To estimate the PITS incidence rate in patients admitted to ICUs, as well as to evaluate the feasibility of the study. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted in five hospitals in two provinces (Tehran and Arak) of Iran from November 2011 to March 2013. All patients admitted to ICUs who underwent more than 24 hours of endotracheal intubation were included. Upon their discharge from the ICUs, the patients received oral and written educational materials intended to ensure a more successful follow-up. The patients were asked to come back for follow-up three months after their extubation, or sooner in case of any symptoms developing. Those with dyspnea or stridor underwent a bronchoscopy. The asymptomatic patients were given a spirometry and then they underwent a bronchoscopy if the flow-volume loop suggested airway stenosis. Results Some seventy-three patients (70% men) were included in the study. Multiple trauma secondary to motor vehicle accidents (52%) was the most common cause of intubation. Follow-ups were completed in only 14 (19.2%, CI = 0.109 - 0.300) patients. One patient (7%, CI = 0.007 - 0.288) developed symptomatic tracheal stenosis that was confirmed by bronchoscopy. The barriers to a successful follow-up were assessed on three levels: ineffective oral education upon discharge, improper usage of educational materials, and

  11. Nasogastric tube insertion in anesthetized and intubated patients: a new and reliable method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The “Rusch” intubation stylet is used to make endotracheal tube intubation easy. We designed this study to evaluate the usage of this equipment in the guidance of nasogastric tube (NGT) insertion. Methods A total of 103 patients, aged 23 to 70 years, undergoing gastrointestinal or hepatic surgeries that required intraoperative NGT insertions were enrolled into our study. The patients were randomly allocated to the control group (Group C) or the stylet group (Group S) according to a computerized, random allocation software program. In the control group, the NGT was inserted with the patient’s head in an intubating position. In the stylet group, the NGT was inserted with the assistance of a “Rusch” intubation stylet tied together at the tips by a slipknot. The success rates of the two methods, the durations of the insertions, and the occurrences of complications were recorded. All of the failed cases in the control group were subjected to the new technique used in the stylet group, and the successful rescue rate was also evaluated. Results Successful insertions were recorded for 52/53 patients (98.1%) in Group S and for 32/50 patients (64%) in Group C. The mean insertion times were 39.5 ± 19.5 seconds in Group C and 40.3 ± 23.2 seconds in Group S. Successful rescues of failure cases in Group C were achieved in 17/18 patients (94.4%) with the assistance of a “Rusch” intubation stylet. Conclusions The “Rusch” intubation stylet-guided method is reliable with a high success rate of NGT insertion in anesthetized and intubated patients. Trial registration Institutional Review Board of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (IRB: 98-2669B) and Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12611000423910) PMID:22853453

  12. Thyroid crisis in the maxillofacial trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Robert J; Lewis, Tashorn; Miller, Jared; Clarkson, Earl I

    2014-11-01

    Thyroid crisis, also known as thyroid storm, is a rare complication of thyrotoxicosis that results in a hypermetabolic and hyperadrenergic state. This condition requires prompt recognition and treatment because the mortality from thyroid crisis approaches 30%. Thyrotoxicosis alone will usually not progress to thyroid crisis. Thyroid crisis will typically be precipitated by some concomitant event such as infection, iodine-containing contrast agents, medications such as amiodarone, pregnancy, or surgery. Trauma is a rare precipitator of thyroid crisis. Several published studies have reported thyroid crisis resulting from blunt or penetrating neck trauma. Significant systemic trauma, such as motor vehicle accidents, has also been reported to precipitate thyroid crisis. It is very unusual for minor trauma to precipitate thyroid crisis. In the present study, we report the case of a patient who had incurred relatively minor maxillofacial trauma and developed thyroid crisis 2 weeks after the initial trauma.

  13. Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Toker, Serdar; Hak, David J.; Morgan, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are known collectively as venous thromboembolism (VTE). Venous thromboembolic events are common and potentially life-threatening complications following trauma with an incidence of 5 to 63%. DVT prophylaxis is essential in the management of trauma patients. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy for trauma patients is unknown. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been considered risk factors for VTE; however it is unclear which combination of risk factors defines a high-risk group. Modalities available for trauma patient thromboprophylaxis are classified into pharmacologic anticoagulation, mechanical prophylaxis, and inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. The available pharmacologic agents include low-dose heparin (LDH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), and factor Xa inhibitors. Mechanical prophylaxis methods include graduated compression stockings (GCSs), pneumatic compression devices (PCDs), and A-V foot pumps. IVCs are traditionally used in high risk patients in whom pharmacological prophylaxis is contraindicated. Both EAST and ACCP guidelines recommend primary use of LMWHs in trauma patients; however there are still controversies regarding the definitive VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. Large randomized prospective clinical studies would be required to provide level I evidence to define the optimal VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. PMID:22084663

  14. Methemoglobinemia after fiberoptic intubation in a patient with an unstable cervical fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Basra, Sushil K; Vives, Michael J; Reilly, Mark C; Reiter, Mitchell F; Kushins, Lawrence G

    2006-06-01

    Methemoglobinemia, a condition associated with cyanosis and diminished pulse oximetry values, has been reported after use of local anesthetics to facilitate fiberoptic intubation. The majority of reports in the literature detail this development during diagnostic procedures such as endoscopy and bronchoscopy. A case of methemoglobinemia in a multiple-injury patient with an unstable compressive-flexion injury of the cervical spine undergoing fiberoptic intubation is presented. A literature review of this entity is also presented. The patient underwent fiberoptic intubation using topical pharyngeal anesthetics before planned cervical corpectomy, strut grafting and instrumentation. He became acutely cyanotic with abruptly diminished pulse oximetry readings. Subsequent blood gas analysis demonstrated methemoglobinemia. Intravenous methylene blue administration led to an uncomplicated resolution of the condition. Surgeons and anesthesiologists who manage such patients should be aware of methemoglobinemia, a rare but potentially fatal complication related to topical airway anesthetics.

  15. The optimal succinylcholine dose for intubating emergency patients: retrospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Ezzat, Alaa; Fathi, Essam; Zarour, Ahmad; Singh, Rajvir; Abusaeda, M. Osama; Hussien, M. Magdy

    2011-01-01

    Background Succinylcholine remains the drug of choice for satisfactory rapid-sequence tracheal intubation. It is not clear from the literature why the 1 mg/kg dose of succinylcholine has been traditionally used. The effective dose (ED95) of succinylcholine is less than 0.3 mg/kg. The dose of 1 mg/kg represents 3.5 to 4 times the ED95. Objectives To compare the effect of the traditionally used 1 mg/kg of succinylcholine with lower doses of 0.6 mg/kg and 0.45 mg/kg on intubation condition regarding the onset time, duration of action, duration of abdominal fasciculation, and the intubation grading. Methods This retrospective comparative study was carried into three groups of ASA III & IV (American Society of Anesthesiologist's Physical Status III and IV) non-prepared emergency patients who were intubated at emergency department of Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar during January 1st 2007 to August 31, 2010. The Institutional Research Board (IRB) approval was obtained. This study was limited to 88 patients who received fentanyl 1µg/kg followed by etomidate 0.3 mg/kg intravenously as induction agents and succinylcholine as a muscle relaxant agent in doses of 0.45 mg/kg, 0.6 mg/kg, or 1 mg/kg. Results Increasing the succinylcholine dosage shortened the onset time, prolonged the duration of action, and prolonged the duration of abdominal fasciculation significantly (P<.001). Tracheal intubation was 100% successful in the three groups of patients. Conclusion Succinylcholine dose of 0.45 mg/kg provides an optimal intubation condition in ASA III & IV emergency non-prepared patients. Duration of action of succinylcholine is dose dependent; reducing the dose allows a more rapid return of spontaneous respiration and airway reflexes. PMID:21772925

  16. Comparison of the air-Q intubating laryngeal airway and the cobra perilaryngeal airway as conduits for fiber optic-guided intubation in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Karim K.; Youssef, Maha M. I.; ElZayyat, Nashwa S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the methods proposed in cases of difficult airway management in children is using a supraglottic airway device as a conduit for tracheal intubation. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of the Air-Q Intubating Laryngeal Airway (Air-Q) and the Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway (CobraPLA) to function as a conduit for fiber optic-guided tracheal intubation in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 children with ages ranging from 1 to 6 years, undergoing elective surgery, were randomized to have their airway managed with either an Air-Q or CobraPLA. Outcomes recorded were the success rate, time and number of attempts required for fiber optic-guided intubation and the time required for device removal after intubation. We also recorded airway leak pressure (ALP), fiber optic grade of glottic view and occurrence of complications. Results: Both devices were successfully inserted in all patients. The intubation success rate was comparable with the Air-Q and the CobraPLA (96.7% vs. 90%), as was the first attempt success rate (90% vs. 80%). The intubation time was significantly longer with the CobraPLA (29.5 ± 10.9 s vs. 23.2 ± 9.8 s; P < 0.05), but the device removal time was comparable in the two groups. The CobraPLA showed a significantly higher ALP (20.8 ± 5.2 cmH2O vs. 16.3 ± 4.5 cmH2O; P < 0.001), but the fiber optic grade of glottic view was comparable with the two devices. The CobraPLA was associated with a significantly higher incidence of blood staining of the device on removal and post-operative sore throat. Conclusion: Both the Air-Q and CobraPLA can be used effectively as a conduit for fiber optic-guided tracheal intubation in children. However, the Air-Q proved to be superior due to a shorter intubation time and less airway morbidity compared with the CobraPLA. PMID:25422603

  17. [Secondary lung diseases in patients with nasotracheal intubation. Role of nosocomial sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Meyer, P; Guérin, J M; Habib, Y; Lévy, C

    1988-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is a frequent infectious complication in ICU patients. All the patients with prolonged nasotracheal intubation presenting with nosocomial pneumonia according to Salata's criteria were examined for sinusitis in the prospective study. Diagnosis was confirmed via CT-scan views and transnasal sinus puncture. In eleven nasally intubated patients, CT-scan views showed air fluid levels and multiple sinus involvement. Bacteriological studies isolated the same gram negative bacilli in both sinus and bronchial aspirates. In four cases, a polymicrobial sinusitis was found with a single organism predominant. This predominant germ was always found in bronchial aspirate. Recovery from pneumonia was obtained only after sinus drainage. Treatment included removing the nasal tubes, or performing tracheostomy and systemic antibiotics. One patient required surgical maxillary sinus drainage after failure of medical management. The occurrence of nosocomial pneumonia in nasotracheally intubated patients should lead physicians to explore the paranasal sinuses. Sinus CT-scan views should be routinely obtained in the assessment of pulmonary sepsis in patients with prolonged nasotracheal intubation. Persistent or ignored nosocomial sinusitis in such circumstances could be a major source of treatment failure.

  18. Microbiology of endotracheal aspirates in intubated pediatric intensive care unit patients: correlations with radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Golden, S E; Shehab, Z M; Bjelland, J C; Ryan, K J; Ray, C G

    1987-07-01

    We studied the utility of Gram-stained smears and semiquantitative cultures of endotracheal aspirates (ETAs) in diagnosing pneumonia in intubated patients in a pediatric intensive care unit. The chest radiographs of 35 intubated patients were independently reviewed by a pediatric radiologist and classified into probable, possible and unlikely pneumonias. Concomitant bacteriologic and radiographic information was available in 15 episodes of probable and 13 of possible pneumonia. These findings were compared with the ETAs obtained during the study from patients with no radiographic evidence of pneumonia (N = 21). There was a good correlation between ETA findings and radiographic evidence of pneumonia when ETAs were obtained within 60 minutes of initial intubation. Only a growth of greater than or equal to 3+ of a pathogen was associated with probable pneumonia when ETAs were obtained more than 60 minutes from initial intubation. There was a poor correlation between the microbiologic findings from ETAs and the results of blood cultures and postmortem examinations. Moreover 5 of 10 pairs of ETAs obtained within 18 hours of each other demonstrated discordant results. The ETAs from patients with indwelling endotracheal tubes correlated poorly with radiographic findings and are of questionable value in diagnosing the presence of pneumonia or its etiology in this group. They must be cautiously interpreted in critically ill patients.

  19. Non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery in patients aged 80 years and older

    PubMed Central

    Facktor, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is routinely performed with general anesthesia and double-lumen endotracheal intubation, but this technique may stress an elderly patient’s functional reserve. We chose to study the safety and efficacy of non-intubated VATS, utilizing local anesthesia, sedation, and spontaneous ventilation in the elderly. Methods The medical records of all patients aged 80 years and older who underwent VATS under local anesthesia and sedation during the time period 6/1/2002 to 6/1/2010 at Geisinger Health System (Pennsylvania, USA) and 10/1/2011 to 12/31/2014 at Sinai Hospital (Maryland, USA) were retrospectively reviewed. Unsuccessful attempts at this technique were eligible for inclusion but there were none. No patient was excluded based on comorbidity. Results A total of 96 patients ranging in age from 80 to 104 years underwent 102 non-intubated VATS procedures: pleural biopsy/effusion drainage with or without talc 73, drainage of empyema 17, evacuate hemothorax 4, pericardial window 3, lung biopsy 2, treat chylothorax 2, treat pneumothorax 1. No patient required intubation or conversion to thoracotomy. No patient required a subsequent procedure or biopsy. Complications occurred in three patients (3.1% morbidity): cerebrovascular accident, pulmonary embolism, prolonged air leak. One 94-year-old patient died from overanticoagulation and two 84-year-old patients died of their advanced lung cancers (3.1% morbidity). Conclusions Non-intubated VATS utilizing local anesthesia and sedation in the elderly is well tolerated and safe for a number of indications. PMID:26046042

  20. A Novel and Innovative Way of Nasogastric Tube Insertion in Anesthetized Intubated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Kishore, Kamal; Sachan, Vertika; Chatterjee, Arnidam

    2017-01-01

    Nasogastric tube (NGT) placement in anesthetized and intubated is sometimes very challenging with more than 50% failure rate in the first attempt. We describe a newer innovative Sahu's three in one, technique with use of GlideScope and forward placement of intubated trachea by external laryngeal maneuver, these both techniques lead to separation of trachea from esophagus so that endoscopic jejunal feeding tube guide wire strengthen NGT can be guided and manipulated to esophagus under direct vision. After informed consent, we used Sahu's three in one combo technique to insert NGT in adult anesthetized and intubated patients of both the sexes with high success in the first attempt. We found this technique easy, helpful, less time consuming with high success rate. PMID:28298795

  1. The role of magnesium sulfate in tracheal intubation without muscle relaxation in patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Hassan-Ali; Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Montazeri, Kamran; Dehghani, Alireza; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Muscle relaxant agents usually use to facilitate tracheal intubation; however, sometimes limitations exist. Magnesium (Mg) sulfate is a candidate for muscle relaxant substitute. This study was designed to determine the effect of Mg sulfate accompanied with propofol and fentanyl in patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. Materials and Methods: In a double-blind randomized protocol and before tracheal intubation, Mg sulfate 40, 45, or 50 mg/kg in 100 ml of saline (Groups 1–3, respectively) or saline alone (Group 4) were administrated intravenously in 100 patients (n = 25 in each group) with the American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) physical Status I, II, or III. The patients' intubation condition in all subjects were determined and described. Results: The patients' demographic data including age, ASA, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, intraocular pressure, and body mass index were not significantly different between the groups. A better mask ventilation feasibility in Mg sulfate 45 group (Group 2) was observed when compared with Mg sulfate 50 (Group 3) (P = 0.022) and saline group (Group 4) (P = 0.021). In addition, the vocal cord movement and muscle relaxant requirement in saline group were significantly different from others groups (P < 0.05). The laryngoscopic time in saline group was greater than other groups significantly (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Intravenous administration of Mg sulfate accompanied with propofol and fentanyl facilitates the tracheal intubation without neuromuscular blocking agents. To avoid Mg level increasing in plasma; however, the low dose of Mg sulfate is suggested. PMID:28163742

  2. Inadvertent Endobronchial Intubation in a Patient With a Short Neck Length.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Bryant; Sakai, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Inadvertent placement of the endotracheal tube into the right bronchus during intubation for general anesthesia is a fairly common occurrence. Many precautions should be taken by the anesthesia provider in order to minimize the incidence of endobronchial intubation, including bilateral auscultation of the lungs, use of the 21/23 rule, and palpation of the inflated endotracheal cuff at the sternal notch. These provisions, however, are not foolproof; anesthesia providers should realize that endobronchial intubation may occur from time to time because of variations in patient anatomy, changes in patient positioning, and cephalad pressures exerted during surgery. A 58-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease received general endotracheal anesthesia for a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. His height was 165 cm (5 ft, 5 in) and the endotracheal tube was secured at his incisors at 21 cm after placement with a rigid laryngoscope. Bilateral breath sounds were confirmed with auscultation, although they were distant because of his chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. After radiographic examination in the postanesthesia care unit, a right main-stem intubation was revealed to have taken place, resulting in complete atelectasis of the left lung. After repositioning of the endotracheal tube, radiography confirmed that the patient had an anatomically short tracheal length.

  3. A simple technique for intubating the mouth during OGD in patients with previous neck radiation

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Christina E; Achakzai, Akbar Amin; O'Hanlon, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    Trismus and microstomia are commonly associated complications of neck irradiation. In recent years we are seeing an increase in the number of patients with various head and neck cancers being treated with radiotherapy. This can pose a significant challenge in performing oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) in this cohort of patients. We describe a novel technique for intubating the mouth during OGD in patients with previous neck radiation. Instead of placing a standard mouthpiece, we place the barrel of a 5 mm syringe, which is cut in half, into the patient's mouth. This method allows easy passage of the gastroscope, where the mouth opening is limited by trismus from prior radiation. It also serves to protect the patient's teeth during OGD. Successful intubation with a gastroscope is possible in patients with severe trismus using our novel technique. PMID:24849645

  4. Complications from submental endotracheal intubation: a prospective study and literature review.

    PubMed

    de Toledo, Guilherme Lacerda; Bueno, Sebastião Cristian; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; Amaral, Márcio Bruno Figueiredo

    2013-06-01

    Submental endotracheal intubation, as compared to the use of tracheotomy, is an alternative for the surgical management of maxillofacial trauma, as described by Altemir FH (The submental route for endotracheal intubation: a new technique. J Maxillofac Surg 1986; 14: 64). Although the submental endotracheal intubation is a useful technique, a wide range of complications have been reported in the literature. The core aim of this article is to present additional data from 17 patients who have undergone submental endotracheal intubation and who have received at least 6 months of postoperative follow up. A prospective study was carried out on patients who suffered maxillofacial trauma between 2008 and 2011. Age, gender, etiology of trauma, fracture type, complications, and follow up were evaluated. Case series, as well as retrospective and prospective studies regarding submental endotracheal intubation in maxillofacial trauma, were also reviewed. This study demonstrated a low rate of complications in submental endotracheal intubation and no increase in operative time within the evaluated sample. The submental endotracheal intubation may be considered a simple, secure, and effective technique for operative airway control in major maxillofacial traumas.

  5. Endotracheal intubation with flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy in patients with abnormal anatomic conditions of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Elizondo, Eduardo; Navarro, Francisco; Pérez-Romo, Alfredo; Ortega, Concepción; Muñoz, Heberto; Cicero, Raúl

    2007-11-01

    We performed a retrospective chart review to evaluate the indications for endotracheal intubation via flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy in patients who were scheduled for surgery or who were hospitalized in the intensive care unit of our 1100-bed, tertiary care university hospital. We reviewed 9201 clinical records of anesthetic procedures during which endotracheal intubation had been performed from January to December 2002. We identified 66 patients who had been intubated with flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. On preanesthetic examination, 61 of these patients had been found to be poor candidates for conventional laryngoscopic intubation-51 because of abnormal head and neck anatomy and 10 because of reduced visual access to the airway (Mallampati class IV). The remaining 5 patients were intubated via flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy after conventional intubation had failed during emergency surgery. Our study emphasizes (1) the importance of the preanesthetic examination of surgical patients, to identify those in whom conventional intubation would likely be problematic, and (2) the need to have fiberoptic bronchoscopes and an anesthesiologist or bronchoscopist skilled in their use available in operating suites and intensive care units.

  6. Blood transfusion in trauma patients: unresolved questions.

    PubMed

    Cushing, M; Shaz, B H

    2011-03-01

    Massive transfusion is an essential part of resuscitation efforts in acute trauma patients. The goal is to quickly correct trauma-induced coagulopathy and replace red blood cell (RBC) mass with the minimal number as well as the appropriate choice of blood components to minimize the possible adverse effects of transfusions. Early trauma induced coagulopathy (ETIC) is present in about 20% of patients upon hospital admission and predicts for decreased survival. The mechanism of ETIC is still being elucidated; however, most theories of ETIC's pathophysiology justify the early use of plasma. Most massive transfusion protocol (MTP) ratios deliver blood products in a ratio of 1:1:1 for RBCs:plasma:platelets, which is supported by the majority of the literature demonstrating improved patient survival with higher ratios (>1 plasma and platelet for every 2 RBCs transfused). Indeed, formula-driven MTPs allow trauma services to react quickly to ETIC and provide coagulation factors and platelets in these ratios without having to wait for the results of coagulation assays while the patient's coagulopathy worsens. New MTPs are being created which are adjusted according to an individual's coagulation laboratory values based on point-of-care laboratory tests, such as thromboelastography. When creating an MTP, product wastage due to inappropriate activation and improper product storage should be considered and closely monitored. Another area of discussion regarding transfusion in trauma includes the potential association of prolonged storage of RBCs and adverse outcomes, which has yet to be confirmed. Significant progress has been made in the transfusion management of trauma patients, but further studies are required to optimize patient care and outcomes.

  7. Ketamine in the field: the use of ketamine for induction of anaesthesia before intubation in injured patients in the field.

    PubMed

    Gofrit, O N; Leibovici, D; Shemer, J; Henig, A; Shapira, S C

    1997-01-01

    Intubating the subconscious, struggling patient in a pre-hospital setting can be a difficult task even in experienced hands. We performed a clinical prospective study to evaluate the applicability of ketamine for induction of anaesthesia before intubation in the field. Ketamine was distributed to all air medical rescue teams--trained reserve army volunteers from various medical specialties. Lectures and literature concerning the use of ketamine for anaesthesia induction before intubation were given. The physicians were instructed to administer ketamine, in a dose of 2 mg/kg intravenously, if a single intubation attempt failed. Following the administration of ketamine, a questionnaire was filled in by the physician. Analysis of the data was performed after 24 months. During the study period, intubation was indicated in 161 injured patients evacuated by air in Israel. In 29 patients (18 per cent) the first intubation attempt had failed and they were given ketamine. The reasons for failure of the first intubation attempt were restlessness or trismus in 23 patients and traumatic distortion of the upper airway anatomical landmarks in six. Following ketamine administration, intubation was successful in 19 patients (65.5 per cent) in all of whom the indication for ketamine administration was restlessness or trismus. All patients with upper airway anatomy distortion were given a cricothyroidotomy. There were no complications attributed to ketamine. All patients reached hospital alive. This preliminary study suggests that the use of ketamine in this pre-hospital setting is safe. The drug is effective in cases where the primary reason for failure to intubate is restlessness or trismus. The drug is not effective in cases of anatomical damage to the upper airway. In these cases, cricothyroidotomy should probably be performed as early as possible.

  8. [Emergency anesthesia, airway management and ventilation in major trauma. Background and key messages of the interdisciplinary S3 guidelines for major trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, M; Matthes, G; Kanz, K G; Waydhas, C; Fischbacher, M; Fischer, M; Böttiger, B W

    2011-11-01

    Patients with multiple trauma presenting with apnea or a gasping breathing pattern (respiratory rate <6/min) require prehospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) and ventilation. Additional indications are hypoxia (S(p)O(2)<90% despite oxygen insufflation and after exclusion of tension pneumothorax), severe traumatic brain injury [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS)<9], trauma-associated hemodynamic instability [systolic blood pressure (SBP)<90 mmHg] and severe chest trauma with respiratory insufficiency (respiratory rate >29/min). The induction of anesthesia after preoxygenation is conducted as rapid sequence induction (analgesic, hypnotic drug, neuromuscular blocking agent). With the availability of ketamine as a viable alternative, the use of etomidate is not encouraged due to its side effects on adrenal function. An electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure measurement and pulse oximetry are needed to monitor the emergency anesthesia and the secured airway. Capnography is absolutely mandatory to confirm correct placement of the endotracheal tube and to monitor tube dislocations as well as ventilation and oxygenation in the prehospital and hospital setting. Because airway management is often complicated in trauma patients, alternative devices and a fiber-optic endoscope need to be available within the hospital. Use of these alternative measures for airway management and ventilation should be considered at the latest after a maximum of three unsuccessful intubation attempts. Emergency medical service (EMS) physicians should to be trained in emergency anesthesia, ETI and alternative methods of airway management on a regular basis. Within hospitals ETI, emergency anesthesia and ventilation are to be conducted by trained and experienced anesthesiologists. When a difficult airway or induction of anesthesia is expected, endotracheal intubation should be supervised or conducted by an anesthesiologist. Normoventilation should be the goal of mechanical ventilation. After arrival in the

  9. Hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation performed with video and direct laryngoscopy in patients scheduled for major cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Sarkılar, Gamze; Sargın, Mehmet; Sarıtaş, Tuba Berra; Borazan, Hale; Gök, Funda; Kılıçaslan, Alper; Otelcioğlu, Şeref

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to compare the hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation performed with direct and video laryngoscope in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery and to assess the airway and laryngoscopic characteristics. One hundred ten patients were equally allocated to either direct Macintosh laryngoscope (n = 55) or indirect Macintosh C-MAC video laryngoscope (n = 55). Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure, and heart rate were recorded prior to induction anesthesia, and immediately and two minutes after intubation. Airway characteristics (modified Mallampati, thyromental distance, sternomental distance, mouth opening, upper lip bite test, Wilson risk sum score), mask ventilation, laryngoscopic characteristics (Cormack-Lehane, percentage of glottic opening), intubation time, number of attempts, external pressure application, use of stylet and predictors of difficult intubation (modified Mallampati grade 3-4, thyromental distance < 6 cm, upper lip bite test class 3, Wilson risk sum score ≥ 2, Cormack-Lehane grade 3-4) were recorded. Hemodynamic parameters were similar between the groups at all time points of measurement. Airway characteristics and mask ventilation were no significant between the groups. The C-MAC video laryngoscope group had better laryngoscopic view as assessed by Cormack-Lehane and percentage of glottic view, and a longer intubation time. Number of attempts, external pressure, use of stylet, and difficult intubation parameters were similar. Endotracheal intubation performed with direct Macintosh laryngoscope or indirect Macintosh C-MAC video laryngoscope causes similar and stable hemodynamic responses.

  10. Geospatial Analysis of Pediatric EMS Run Density and Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Matthew; Loker, William; Warden, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The association between geographic factors, including transport distance, and pediatric emergency medical services (EMS) run clustering on out-of-hospital pediatric endotracheal intubation is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if endotracheal intubation procedures are more likely to occur at greater distances from the hospital and near clusters of pediatric calls. Methods This was a retrospective observational study including all EMS runs for patients less than 18 years of age from 2008 to 2014 in a geographically large and diverse Oregon county that includes densely populated urban areas near Portland and remote rural areas. We geocoded scene addresses using the automated address locator created in the cloud-based mapping platform ArcGIS, supplemented with manual address geocoding for remaining cases. We then use the Getis-Ord Gi spatial statistic feature in ArcGIS to map statistically significant spatial clusters (hot spots) of pediatric EMS runs throughout the county. We then superimposed all intubation procedures performed during the study period on maps of pediatric EMS-run hot spots, pediatric population density, fire stations, and hospitals. We also performed multivariable logistic regression to determine if distance traveled to the hospital was associated with intubation after controlling for several confounding variables. Results We identified a total of 7,797 pediatric EMS runs during the study period and 38 endotracheal intubations. In univariate analysis we found that patients who were intubated were similar to those who were not in gender and whether or not they were transported to a children’s hospital. Intubated patients tended to be transported shorter distances and were older than non-intubated patients. Increased distance from the hospital was associated with reduced odds of intubation after controlling for age, sex, scene location, and trauma system entry status in a multivariate logistic regression. The

  11. Interleukin-6 as a marker of inflammation secondary to endotracheal intubation in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Panagiotis V S; Chalkias, Athanasios; Brozou, Vasiliki; Papageorgiou-Brousta, Mary; Kaparos, George; Koutsovasilis, Anastasios; Xanthos, Theodoros; Iacovidou, Nicoletta

    2013-12-01

    Ιnterleukin-6 (IL-6) has been identified as an early biochemical marker of inflammation both in animal and human studies. With this study, we sought to examine the development of local inflammation of the glottic tissues in correlation with the duration of intubation in anesthetized pediatric patients. We measured IL-6 levels in the organic material isolated from the tip of the tube post-extubation in 48 children aged 7 months to 14 years old who were submitted to a total of 72 surgical procedures. A statistically significant positive correlation (ρ = 0.28, p = 0.05) was detected among duration of anesthesia and IL-6 concentration. The odds of having detectable IL-6 levels rose by 36.7 % for every 10 min of anesthetic duration (p = 0.045). In conclusion, the increase of IL-6 in relation to the duration of the intubation indicates an increased risk of inflammation.

  12. Trauma injury in adult underweight patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Lai, Wei-Hung; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the injury characteristics, severity, and outcome between underweight and normal-weight patients hospitalized for the treatment of all kinds of trauma injury. This study was based on a level I trauma center Taiwan. The detailed data of 640 underweight adult trauma patients with a body mass index (BMI) of <18.5 kg/m2 and 6497 normal-weight adult patients (25 > BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m2) were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and independent Student's t-test were performed to compare the differences. Propensity score matching with logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of underweight on mortality. Underweight patients presented a different bodily injury pattern and a significantly higher rate of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU) than did normal-weight patients; however, no significant differences in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, injury severity score (ISS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital length of stay were found between the two groups. However, further analysis of the patients stratified by two major injury mechanisms (motorcycle accident and fall injury) revealed that underweight patients had significantly lower GCS scores (13.8 ± 3.0 vs 14.5 ± 2.0, P = 0.020), but higher ISS (10.1 ± 6.9 vs 8.4 ± 5.9, P = 0.005), in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.69–11.35; P = 0.006), and ICU admittance rate (24.1% vs 14.3%, P = 0.007) than normal-weight patients in the fall accident group, but not in the motorcycle accident group. However, after propensity score matching, logistic regression analysis of well-matched pairs of patients with either all trauma, motorcycle accident, or fall injury did not show a significant influence of underweight on mortality. Exploratory data analysis revealed that underweight patients

  13. Associations Between Prolonged Intubation and Developing Post-extubation Dysphagia and Aspiration Pneumonia in Non-neurologic Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Park, Young Sook; Song, You Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the associations between the duration of endotracheal intubation and developing post-extubational supraglottic and infraglottic aspiration (PEA) and subsequent aspiration pneumonia. Methods This was a retrospective observational study from January 2009 to November 2014 of all adult patients who had non-neurologic critical illness, required endotracheal intubation and were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Demographic information, intensive care unit (ICU) admission diagnosis, severity of critical illness, duration of endotracheal intubation, length of stay in ICU, presence of PEA and severity of dysphagia were reviewed. Results Seventy-four patients were enrolled and their PEA frequency was 59%. Patients with PEA had significantly longer endotracheal intubation durations than did those without (median [interquartile range]: 15 [9-21] vs. 10 [6-15] days; p=0.02). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the endotracheal intubation duration was significantly associated with PEA (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.18; p=0.04). Spearman correlation analysis of intubation duration and dysphagia severity showed a positive linear association (r=0.282, p=0.02). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of endotracheal intubation duration for developing PEA and aspiration pneumonia were 0.665 (95% CI, 0.542-0.788; p=0.02) and 0.727 (95% CI, 0.614-0.840; p=0.001), respectively. Conclusion In non-neurologic critically ill patients, the duration of endotracheal intubation was independently associated with PEA development. Additionally, the duration was positively correlated with dysphagia severity and may be helpful for identifying patients who require a swallowing evaluation after extubation. PMID:26605174

  14. Early evaluation and resuscitation of the pediatric trauma patient.

    PubMed

    DeRoss, Anthony L; Vane, Dennis W

    2004-05-01

    Trauma is the leading case of death for children in the United States. Effective initial resuscitation of pediatric trauma patients can reduce mortality. Guidelines have been developed to facilitate patient care in a systematic and productive manner. Advances have been made in both diagnostic and therapeutic methods. The evaluation and treatment of trauma patients will continue to engage pediatric surgeons as efforts in trauma prevention become more successful.

  15. I-gel Laryngeal Mask Airway Combined with Tracheal Intubation Attenuate Systemic Stress Response in Patients Undergoing Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chaoliang; Chai, Xiaoqing; Kang, Fang; Huang, Xiang; Hou, Tao; Tang, Fei; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The adverse events induced by intubation and extubation may cause intracranial hemorrhage and increase of intracranial pressure, especially in posterior fossa surgery patients. In this study, we proposed that I-gel combined with tracheal intubation could reduce the stress response of posterior fossa surgery patients. Methods. Sixty-six posterior fossa surgery patients were randomly allocated to receive either tracheal tube intubation (Group TT) or I-gel facilitated endotracheal tube intubation (Group TI). Hemodynamic and respiratory variables, stress and inflammatory response, oxidative stress, anesthesia recovery parameters, and adverse events during emergence were compared. Results. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were lower in Group TI during intubation and extubation (P < 0.05 versus Group TT). Respiratory variables including peak airway pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension were similar intraoperative, while plasma β-endorphin, cortisol, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, malondialdehyde concentrations, and blood glucose were significantly lower in Group TI during emergence relative to Group TT. Postoperative bucking and serious hypertensions were seen in Group TT but not in Group TI. Conclusion. Utilization of I-gel combined with endotracheal tube in posterior fossa surgery patients is safe which can yield more stable hemodynamic profile during intubation and emergence and lower inflammatory and oxidative response, leading to uneventful recovery. PMID:26273146

  16. Comparison of rocuronium at two different doses and succinylcholine for endotracheal intubation in adult patients for elective surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, SG; Gangadharan, S; Gopakumar, AK

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of rocuronium at two different doses, that is, 0.6 mg/kg (2 × ED95) and 0.9 mg/kg (3 × ED95), were compared with succinylcholine (2 mg/kg) when used for endotracheal intubation in adult patients for elective surgeries under general anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Ninety patients were divided into three groups of 30 each. Groups A, B received injection rocuronium at 0.6 mg/kg, 0.9 mg/kg respectively and Group C received succinylcholine at 2 mg/kg. Onset of action of relaxant, intubation conditions, time taken to intubate and duration of action were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: To compare the statistical difference in the age, weight, height of the study subjects, onset of action of relaxant, intubation conditions, time taken to intubate, and duration of action analysis of variance and unpaired t-test were used. Results: The onset time was considerably shorter with rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg than 0.6 mg/kg. The onset time of rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg was found to be significantly longer than succinylcholine 2 mg/kg. Time taken to intubate was shortest with succinylcholine 2 mg/kg. The time taken to intubate with the rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg was found to be comparable to that of rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg. Intubation score of rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg was the best (17.75), which was comparable with succinylcholine. However, the intubation score obtained with rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg was inferior. Duration of action was shortest with succinylcholine. The duration of action is prolonged when the dose of rocuronium is increased from 0.6 to 0.9 mg/kg. Conclusion: Rapid sequence induction of anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl, succinylcholine allowed a more rapid endotracheal intubation sequence and created superior intubation conditions than rocuronium. However, the technique of using a large dose of rocuronium to achieve perfect conditions for tracheal intubation may have application whenever succinylcholine is relatively contraindicated. PMID:27833478

  17. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressures in Patients Intubated Prior to Helicopter EMS Transport

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Joseph; Ford-Webb, Tucker; Weisberg, Stacy; LeBlanc, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endotracheal intubation is a common intervention in critical care patients undergoing helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) transportation. Measurement of endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressures is not common practice in patients referred to our service. Animal studies have demonstrated an association between the pressure of the ETT cuff on the tracheal mucosa and decreased blood flow leading to mucosal ischemia and scarring. Cuff pressures greater than 30 cmH2O impede mucosal capillary blood flow. Multiple prior studies have recommended 30 cmH2O as the maximum safe cuff inflation pressure. This study sought to evaluate the inflation pressures in ETT cuffs of patients presenting to HEMS. Methods We enrolled a convenience sample of patients presenting to UMass Memorial LifeFlight who were intubated by the sending facility or emergency medical services (EMS) agency. Flight crews measured the ETT cuff pressures using a commercially available device. Those patients intubated by the flight crew were excluded from this analysis as the cuff was inflated with the manometer to a standardized pressure. Crews logged the results on a research form, and we analyzed the data using Microsoft Excel and an online statistical analysis tool. Results We analyzed data for 55 patients. There was a mean age of 57 years (range 18–90). The mean ETT cuff pressure was 70 (95% CI= [61–80]) cmH2O. The mean lies 40 cmH2O above the maximum accepted value of 30 cmH2O (p<0.0001). Eighty-four percent (84%) of patients encountered had pressures above the recommended maximum. The most frequently recorded pressure was >120 cmH2O, the maximum pressure on the analog gauge. Conclusion Patients presenting to HEMS after intubation by the referral agency (EMS or hospital) have ETT cuffs inflated to pressures that are, on average, more than double the recommended maximum. These patients are at risk for tracheal mucosal injury and scarring from decreased mucosal capillary blood flow

  18. Comparison of the Levitan FPS Scope and the single-use bougie for simulated difficult intubation in anaesthetised patients.

    PubMed

    Greenland, K B; Liu, G; Tan, H; Edwards, M; Irwin, M G

    2007-05-01

    A randomised cross-over study was performed in 34 patients with no evidence of airway difficulties, following induction of general anaesthesia, to compare the efficacy of the Levitan FPS scope (LFPS) and the single-use bougie for tracheal intubation during simulated grade IIIa laryngoscopy. Success rates for intratracheal placement of the device, and the time required for insertion and tracheal intubation were recorded. Both devices were equally successful (31/34 for the LFPS vs 29/34 for the bougie) for insertion into the glottis. The mean insertion time for the LFPS was statistically longer than that for the bougie (4.4-12.5 s) but this difference was not clinically relevant. Intubation times were similar between the two devices. Major problems hindering successful intubation using the LFPS were the presence of a narrow epiglottic-pharyngeal wall space and copious secretions. An inability to maintain the desired shape was the principal cause of failure with the bougie.

  19. Shikani Optical Stylet versus Macintosh Laryngoscope for Intubation in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Cervical Spondylosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mao; Li, Xiao-Xi; Guo, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Airway management is critical in patients with cervical spondylosis, a population with a high incidence of difficult airway. Intubation with Shikani Optical Stylet (SOS) has become increasingly popular in difficult airway. We compared the effects of intubation with SOS versus Macintosh laryngoscope (MLS) in patients undergoing surgery for cervical spondylosis. Methods: A total of 270 patients scheduled for elective surgery for cervical spondylosis of spinal cord and nerve root type from August 2012 to January 2016 were enrolled and randomly allocated to the MLS or SOS group by random numbers. Patients were evaluated for difficult airway preoperatively, and Cormack-Lehane laryngoscopy classification was determined during anesthesia induction. Difficult airway was defined as Cormack-Lehane Grades III–IV. Patients were intubated with the randomly assigned intubation device. The success rate, intubation time, required assistance, immediate complications, and postoperative complaints were recorded. Categorical variables were analyzed by Chi-square test, and continuous variables were analyzed by independent samples t-test or rank sum test. Results: The success rate of intubation among normal airways was 100% in both groups. In patients with difficult airway, the success rates in the MLS and SOS groups were 84.2% and 94.1%, respectively (P = 0.605). Intubation with SOS took longer compared with MLS (normal airway: 25.1 ± 5.8 s vs. 24.5 ± 5.7 s, P = 0.426; difficult airway: 38.5 ± 8.5 s vs. 36.1 ± 8.2 s, P = 0.389). Intubation with SOS required less assistance in patients with difficult airway (5.9% vs. 100%, P < 0.001). The frequency of postoperative sore throat was lower in SOS group versus MLS group in patients with normal airway (22.0% vs. 34.5%, P = 0.034). Conclusions: SOS is a safe and effective airway management device in patients undergoing surgery for cervical spondylosis. Compared with MLS, SOS appears clinically beneficial for intubation

  20. Acoustic sensor versus electrocardiographically derived respiratory rate in unstable trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiming; Menne, Ashley; Hu, Peter; Stansbury, Lynn; Gao, Cheng; Dorsey, Nicolas; Chiu, William; Shackelford, Stacy; Mackenzie, Colin

    2016-06-07

    Respiratory rate (RR) is important in many patient care settings; however, direct observation of RR is cumbersome and often inaccurate, and electrocardiogram-derived RR (RRECG) is unreliable. We asked how data derived from the first 15 min of RR recording after trauma center admission using a novel acoustic sensor (RRa) would compare to RRECG and to end-tidal carbon dioxide-based RR ([Formula: see text]) from intubated patients, the "gold standard" in predicting life-saving interventions in unstable trauma patients. In a convenience sample subset of trauma patients admitted to our Level 1 trauma center, enrolled in the ONPOINT study, and monitored with RRECG, some of whom also had [Formula: see text] data, we collected RRa using an adhesive sensor with an integrated acoustic transducer (Masimo RRa™). Using Bland-Altman analysis of area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves, we compared the first 15 min of continuous RRa and RRECG to [Formula: see text] and assessed the performance of these three parameters compared to the Revised Trauma Score (RTS) in predicting blood transfusion 3, 6, and 12 h after admission. Of the 1200 patients enrolled in ONPOINT from December 2011 to May 2013, 1191 had RRECG data recorded in the first 15 min, 358 had acoustic monitoring, and 14 of the latter also had [Formula: see text]. The three groups did not differ demographically or in mechanism of injury. RRa showed less bias (0.8 vs. 6.9) and better agreement than RRECG when compared to [Formula: see text]. At [Formula: see text] 10-29 breaths per minute, RRa was more likely to be the same as [Formula: see text] and assign the same RTS. In predicting transfusion, features derived from RRa and RRECG gave AUROCs 0.59-0.66 but with true positive rate 0.70-0.89. RRa monitoring is a non-invasive option to glean valid RR data to assist clinical decision making and could contribute to prediction models in non-intubated unstable trauma patients.

  1. Ischemic subglottic damage following a short-time intubation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marta João; Aparício, José; Mota, Teresa; Spratley, Jorge; Ribeiro, Augusto

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study is to report a case of ischemic subglottic damage after a short-time intubation with a large, overinflated endotracheal tube cuff in a child. The study uses individual case report. A 6-year-old boy was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit after a head trauma intubated with a 5.5-mm inner diameter cuffed endotracheal tube overinflated with 16 ml of air that produced a pressure of more than 120 cm H2O. The endotracheal tube cuff pressure produced by inflation was reduced after 4 h. The child presented postextubation stridor with subglottic edema. Inappropriate handling of tracheal intubation without accurate measurement of endotracheal tube size and intracuff pressures of endotracheal tubes, can cause airway trauma and place patients at risk.

  2. Noninvasive ventilation in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Karcz, Marcin K; Papadakos, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Trauma patients are a diverse population with heterogeneous needs for ventilatory support. This requirement depends mainly on the severity of their ventilatory dysfunction, degree of deterioration in gaseous exchange, any associated injuries, and the individual feasibility of potentially using a noninvasive ventilation approach. Noninvasive ventilation may reduce the need to intubate patients with trauma-related hypoxemia. It is well-known that these patients are at increased risk to develop hypoxemic respiratory failure which may or may not be associated with hypercapnia. Hypoxemia in these patients is due to ventilation perfusion mismatching and right to left shunt because of lung contusion, atelectasis, an inability to clear secretions as well as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax, all of which are common in trauma patients. Noninvasive ventilation has been tried in these patients in order to avoid the complications related to endotracheal intubation, mainly ventilator-associated pneumonia. The potential usefulness of noninvasive ventilation in the ventilatory management of trauma patients, though reported in various studies, has not been sufficiently investigated on a large scale. According to the British Thoracic Society guidelines, the indications and efficacy of noninvasive ventilation treatment in respiratory distress induced by trauma have thus far been inconsistent and merely received a low grade recommendation. In this review paper, we analyse and compare the results of various studies in which noninvasive ventilation was applied and discuss the role and efficacy of this ventilator modality in trauma. PMID:25685722

  3. Optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for attenuating hemodynamic changes after endotracheal intubation in healthy patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Oh Haeng; Kang, Hyun; Shin, Hwa-Yong; Baek, Chong-Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intravenous oxycodone has been used as an adjunct to anesthetic agents. This study aimed to assess the optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for the attenuation of the hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was conducted. Ninety-five patients were randomly divided into 5 groups based on the oxycodone dose: 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 mg/kg. After administering the assigned dose of intravenous oxycodone, anesthesia was induced with thiopental. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline, before intubation, and 1, 2, and 3 minutes after intubation. The percentage increase of BP was calculated as (highest BP after intubation − baseline BP)/baseline BP × 100 (%). The percentage increase of HR was calculated in same formula as above. Hypertension was defined as a 15% increase of systolic BP from baseline, and probit analysis was conducted. Results: Hemodynamic data from 86 patients were analyzed. The percentage increase of mean arterial pressure after intubation in groups 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 was significantly different from that in the control (P < 0.001). For HR, the percentage increase was lower than control group when oxycodone was same or more than 0.1 mg/kg (P < 0.05). Using probit analysis, the 95% effective dose (ED95) for preventing hypertension was 0.159 mg/kg (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.122–0.243). In addition, ED50 was 0.020 mg/kg (95% CI, −0.037 to 0.049). However, oxycodone was not effective for maintaining the HR in our study dosage. There were no significant differences in the incidence of hypotension during induction between groups. Conclusions: Using 0.1 mg/kg of intravenous oxycodone is sufficient to attenuate the increase of BP and HR during induction period in healthy patients. The ED95, which was 0.159 mg/kg, can be useful to adjust the dosage of IV oxycodone for maintain stable BP

  4. Brother, have you got a light? Assessing the need for intubation in patients sustaining burn injury secondary to home oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Amani, Hamed; Lozano, Daniel D; Blome-Eberwein, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Home oxygen therapy use has steadily increased for the past 30 years. A majority of these patients suffer from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease secondary to smoking. Although warned of the danger of smoking while on oxygen, patients continue to do so, potentially resulting in cutaneous burns and suspected inhalation injury. Those suspected of inhalation injury are intubated for airway control. In the English literature, there is a paucity of data discussing the need for intubation. To date, this is the largest study to determine whether intubated patients had inhalation injury as observed by bronchoscopy and whether intubation was necessary. All patient's charts who sustained burns while on home oxygen therapy from May 2000 to May 2010 were retrospectively reviewed (n = 86). Data collected were age, sex, TBSA, ventilator days, length of stay (LOS), and presence or absence of inhalation. Of those patients intubated, a subset analysis was performed to determine whether intubation in the "Field" or "Outside Hospital" correlated with inhalation injury compared with intubation in our Emergency Department. Eighty-six patients (mean age 64 years, mean %TBSA 2.6) were included. Before transfer to the burn unit, 32 patients (37%) were intubated and 52 patients (61%) were not intubated. Of the 32 intubated patients, bronchoscopy confirmed inhalation injury in 12 patients (39%). No significant difference was seen in %TBSA between intubated vs nonintubated patients (3.5 vs 2.0, respectively). However, there was a difference in LOS between the two groups (12.7 vs 2.8, respectively). No difference was found in incidence of inhalation injury between patients intubated in the "Field/Outside Hospital" compared with patients intubated in our Emergency Department (39% and 37.5%, respectively). Between the subgroups, no difference was found in %TBSA, ventilator days, or LOS. One patient admitted for airway observation required intubation and one patient failed extubation

  5. Can intravenous acetaminophen reduce the needs to more opioids to control pain in intubated patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mahshidfar, Babak; Sameti, Azadeh; Abbasi, Saeed; Farsi, Davood; Mofidi, Mani; Hafezimoghadam, Peyman; Rahimzadeh, Popak; Rezai, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen on reducing the need for morphine sulfate in intubated patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Settings and Design: Current study was done as a clinical trial on the patients supported by mechanical ventilator. Subjects and Methods: Behavioral pain scale (BPS) scoring system was used to measure pain in the patients. All of the patients received 1 g, IV acetaminophen, every 6 h during the 1st and 3rd days of admission and placebo during the 2nd and 4th days. Total dose of morphine sulfate needed, its complications, and the BPS scores at the end of every 6 h interval were compared. Results: Totally forty patients were enrolled. The mean pain scores were significantly lower in the 2nd and 4th days (4.33 and 3.66, respectively; mean: 4.0) in which the patients had received just morphine sulfate compared to the 1st and 3rd days (7.36 and 3.93, respectively; mean: 5.65) in which the patients had received acetaminophen in addition to morphine sulfate too (P < 0.001). Cumulative dose of morphine sulfate used, was significantly higher in the 1st and 3rd days (8.92 and 3.15 mg, respectively; 12.07 mg in total) compared to the 2nd and 4th days (6.47 mg and 3.22 mg, respectively; 9.7 mg in total) (P = 0.035). Conclusion: In our study, IV acetaminophen had no effect on decreasing the BPSs and need of morphine sulfate in intubated patients admitted to ICU. PMID:27630458

  6. The degree of intubation difficulties and the frequency of complications in obese patients at the Hospital Emergency Department and the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Cierniak, Marcin; Sobczak, Renata; Timler, Dariusz; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Borkowski, Bartosz; Gaszyński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The intubation difficulties in obese patients are not a new problem. They may result from an accumulation of fat in the oral cavity and cheeks. A thick tongue is also a significant factor. The literature reports that some tests to determine the intubation difficulties in obese people may be unreliable. The observed predictors of difficult intubation were the thyromental and sternomental distance and the intubation difficulty scale: FRONT score. The aim of this study was to assess the degree of difficult intubation in obese patients by the parameters such as the thyromental and sternomental distance. The authors also tried to evaluate the frequency of the guidewire usage and the number of intubation attempts in obese patients in the research sample. The study included the group of 153 patients intubated in prehospital conditions. The research was conducted in 3 clinical centers receiving patients from prehospital care. Among the members of the research sample, obese patients with body mass index >35 were selected and evaluated for various predictors of intubation difficulties. Quantitative analysis of differences in the incidence of the variables was assessed using the chi-squared test for P < 0.05. Analyses were performed in STATISTICA.Complications such as postintubation hematomas were more frequent in obese patients of the research sample. The frequency of the guidewire usage observed in that group was also higher. As anticipated by the adopted predictors, most of the obese patients were classified as difficult to intubate. There is a correlation between the occurrence of injuries and the prevalence of obesity in the research sample and the same dependency has been demonstrated in the issue concerning the use of the guidewire. Although the majority of predictors indicated patients with intubation difficulties, many predictors could show falsely positive results. The greater amount of intubation attempts was observed in obese patients. Further studies

  7. The degree of intubation difficulties and the frequency of complications in obese patients at the Hospital Emergency Department and the Intensive Care Unit: Case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cierniak, Marcin; Sobczak, Renata; Timler, Dariusz; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Borkowski, Bartosz; Gaszyński, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    The intubation difficulties in obese patients are not a new problem. They may result from an accumulation of fat in the oral cavity and cheeks. A thick tongue is also a significant factor. The literature reports that some tests to determine the intubation difficulties in obese people may be unreliable. The observed predictors of difficult intubation were the thyromental and sternomental distance and the intubation difficulty scale: FRONT score.The aim of this study was to assess the degree of difficult intubation in obese patients by the parameters such as the thyromental and sternomental distance. The authors also tried to evaluate the frequency of the guidewire usage and the number of intubation attempts in obese patients in the research sample.The study included the group of 153 patients intubated in prehospital conditions. The research was conducted in 3 clinical centers receiving patients from prehospital care. Among the members of the research sample, obese patients with body mass index >35 were selected and evaluated for various predictors of intubation difficulties. Quantitative analysis of differences in the incidence of the variables was assessed using the chi-squared test for P < 0.05. Analyses were performed in STATISTICA.Complications such as postintubation hematomas were more frequent in obese patients of the research sample. The frequency of the guidewire usage observed in that group was also higher. As anticipated by the adopted predictors, most of the obese patients were classified as difficult to intubate.There is a correlation between the occurrence of injuries and the prevalence of obesity in the research sample and the same dependency has been demonstrated in the issue concerning the use of the guidewire. Although the majority of predictors indicated patients with intubation difficulties, many predictors could show falsely positive results. The greater amount of intubation attempts was observed in obese patients. Further studies devoted to

  8. Pentax-airway scope for tracheal intubation breaks through the limitation of neck motion in an ankylosing spondylitis patient wearing halo vest--a case report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Chun; Jimmy-Ong; Lee, Chia-Ling; Lan, Cing-Hong; Chen, Tsung-Ying; Lai, Hsien-Yong

    2010-12-01

    The Airway Scope (AWS) provides better glottic view than the conventional direct laryngoscopy in tracheal intubation. With it, the endotracheal tube can be more easily inserted into the tracheal lumen easily. We hereby presented a 24-year-old ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patient wearing a halo vest who was successfully intubated for undergoing cervical spine surgery involving C1 and C2 under general anesthesia. Pre-operative airway assessment revealed that he was a case of difficult intubation. An AWS was used for oral tracheal intubation which was achieved smoothly in the first attempt. AWS can be an alternative device for airway management in a patient wearing halo vest.

  9. Parker Flex-It stylet is as effective as GlideRite Rigid stylet for orotracheal intubation by Glidescope

    PubMed Central

    Sheta, Saad A.; Abdelhalim, Ashraf A.; ElZoughari, Ismail A.; AlZahrani, Tariq A.; Al-Saeed, Abdulhamid H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate Parker Flex-It stylet as an alternative to GlideRite Rigid stylet to aid tracheal intubation with the Glidescope. Methods: This prospective randomized trial was conducted at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between May and December 2014. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 equal groups receiving intubation by Glidescope using either GlideRite Rigid stylet (Group GS) or Parker Flex-It stylet (Group PS). The total intubation time, ease of intubation, incidences of successful intubation at first attempt, number of intubation attempts, use of optimization maneuvers, and possible complications were recorded. Results: No significant differences between both groups regarding the total intubation time (p=0.08) was observed. Intubation was significantly easier in group PS compared with group GS as measured by visual analogue scale (p=0.001) with no significant differences between the groups regarding the rate of successful tracheal intubation from first attempt (p=0.524). However, the number of attempts at intubation and usage of external laryngeal manipulation were similar in both groups (p>0.05). The incidence of sore throat, dysphagia, hoarseness, and trauma were significantly higher in group GS (p<0.05). Conclusion: Parker Flex-It stylet is as effective as GlideRite Rigid stylet when used by experienced operators in patients with normal airways using Glidescope; however, it is easier and less traumatic. PMID:26620987

  10. Evaluation of SOCOM Wireless Monitor in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Livingstone AS, Schulman CI, Namias N, Proctor KG: Is hydroxyethyl starch safe in penetrating trauma patients? An analysis with propensity score...with hydroxyethyl starch J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2014 Dec;77(6):859-864. 9) Allen CJ, Tashiro J, Valle EJ, Thorson CM, Shariatmadar S, Schulman CI... starch solutions safe in trauma patients? Presented at 2014 MHSRS (Military Health Science Research Symposium), Fort Lauderdale, FL, Aug 2014 14

  11. Reported Childhood Trauma and Suicide Attempts in Schizophrenic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Alec

    2005-01-01

    Childhood traumas are associated with suicidal behavior but this aspect has not been examined in relation to schizophrenia. In this study, 50 chronic schizophrenic patients who had attempted suicide were compared with 50 chronic schizophrenic patients who had never attempted suicide for their scores on the 34-item Childhood Trauma Questionnaire…

  12. A rare complication of tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Shukeri, Wan Fadzlina Wan Muhd; Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan; Nadarajan, Chandran

    2016-01-01

    Accidental endobronchial intubation is a frequent complication in critically ill patients requiring tracheal intubation (TI). If such complication occurs, it is more often the right main bronchus that is intubated due to anatomical reasons. Left main bronchus (LMB) intubation is rare. Here, we report a case with auscultatory, bronchoscopic, and radiographic evidence of accidental LMB intubation in a pregnant woman with dengue shock syndrome. We highlight this case to increase awareness about this possible-but-rare complication of TI. PMID:27275080

  13. Rapidity and efficacy of ultrasonographic sliding lung sign and auscultation in confirming endotracheal intubation in overweight and obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sunil; Surendran, Jayasankar; Paul, Jerry; Kumar, Lakshmi

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Obese individuals are predisposed to difficult airway and intubation. They usually yield confusing or misleading auscultatory findings. We aimed to assess the rapidity and efficacy of ultrasonographic (USG) sliding lung sign for confirming endotracheal intubation in normal as well as overweight and obese surgical patients. Methods: This prospective, observational study was performed in forty surgical patients. Twenty patients with body mass index (BMI) <25 were recruited to Group A, whereas twenty patients with BMI ≥25 constituted Group B. Following induction and intubation, appearance of end-tidal carbon dioxide waveform was used to confirm endotracheal intubation. Presence of breath sounds bilaterally was sought by auscultation, and time taken for auscultatory confirmation was noted. The USG confirmation of air entry to the lung field as indicated by lung sliding was sought, and the time taken was noted. Chi-square test, independent t-test and paired t-test were used as applicable. Results: Auscultatory confirmation was more rapid in Group A as compared to Group B (9.34 ± 2.43 s vs. 14.35 ± 5.53 s, P = 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in USG confirmation time in both the groups (8.57 ± 2.05 s vs. 8.61 ± 1.66 s). Four patients in Group B had doubtful breath sounds against none in Group A. There was no doubtful lung slide with USG in both groups. One case of endobronchial intubation in Group B was diagnosed with USG which was doubtful by auscultation. Conclusion: Ultrasound directed confirmation of endotracheal tube placement in overweight and obese patients is superior in speed and accuracy in comparison to the standard auscultatory method.

  14. Tracheal intubation in patients with rigid collar immobilisation of the cervical spine: a comparison of Airtraq and LMA CTrach devices.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Z I; Yildiz, T; Baykara, Z N; Solak, M; Toker, K

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Airtraq and CTrach in lean patients with simulated cervical spine injury after application of a rigid cervical collar. Eighty-six consenting adult patients of ASA physical status 1 or 2, who required elective tracheal intubation were included in this study in a randomised manner. Anaesthesia was induced using 1 microg kg(-1) fentanyl, 3 mg kg(-1) propofol and 0.6 mg kg(-1) rocuronium, following which a rigid cervical collar was applied. Comparison was then made between tracheal intubation techniques using either the AirTraq or CTrach device. The mean (SD) time to see the glottis was shorter with the Airtraq than the CTrach (11.9 (6.8) vs 37.6 (16.7)s, respectively; p < 0.001). The mean (SD) time taken for tracheal intubation was also shorter with the Airtraq than the CTrach (25.6 (13.5) and 66.3 (29.3)s, respectively; p < 0.001). There was less mucosal damage in the Airtraq group (p = 0.008). Our findings demonstrate that use of the Airtraq device shortened the tracheal intubation time and reduced the mucosal damage when compared with the CTrach in patients who require cervical spine immobilisation.

  15. Usefulness of full outline of unresponsiveness score to predict extubation failure in intubated critically-ill patients: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Said, Tarek; Chaari, Anis; Hakim, Karim Abdel; Hamama, Dalia; Casey, William Francis

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the usefulness of the full outline of unresponsiveness (FOUR) score in predicting extubation failure in critically ill intubated patients admitted with disturbed level of conscious in comparison with the Glasgow coma scale (GCS). Patients and Methods: All intubated critically ill patients with a disturbed level of consciousness were assessed using both the FOUR score and the GCS. The FOUR score and the GCS were compared regarding their predictive value for successful extubation at 14 days after intubation as a primary outcome measure. The 28-day mortality and the neurological outcome at 3 months were used as secondary outcome measures. Results: Eighty-six patients were included in the study. Median age was 63 (50–77) years. Sex–ratio (M/F) was 1.46. On admission, median GCS was 7 (3–10) while median FOUR score was 8.5 (2.3–11). A GCS ≤ 7 predicted the extubation failure at 14 days after intubation with a sensitivity of 88.5% and specificity of 68.3%, whereas a FOUR score <10 predicted the same outcome with a sensitivity of 80.8% and a specificity of 81.7%. The areas under the curves was significantly higher with the FOUR score than with GCS (respectively 0.867 confidence interval [CI]: 95% [0790–0.944] and 0.832 CI: 95% [0.741–0.923]; P = 0.014). When calculated before extubation, FOUR score <12 predicted extubation failure with a sensitivity of 92.3% and a specificity of 85%, whereas a GCS <12 predicted the same outcome with a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 61.7%. Both scores had similar accuracy for predicting 28-day mortality and neurological outcome at 3 months. Conclusion: The FOUR score is superior to the GCS for the prediction of successful extubation of intubated critically ill patients. PMID:28149821

  16. Conservative and surgical management of pancreatic trauma in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Menahem, Benjamin; Lim, Chetana; Lahat, Eylon; Salloum, Chady; Osseis, Michael; Lacaze, Laurence; Compagnon, Philippe; Pascal, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of pancreatic trauma is complex. The aim of this study was to report our experience in the management of pancreatic trauma. Methods All patients hospitalized between 2005 and 2013 for pancreatic trauma were included. Traumatic injuries of the pancreas were classified according to the American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) in five grades. Mortality and morbidity were analyzed. Results A total of 30 patients were analyzed (mean age: 38±17 years). Nineteen (63%) patients had a blunt trauma and 12 (40%) had pancreatic injury ≥ grade 3. Fifteen patients underwent exploratory laparotomy and the other 15 patients had nonoperative management (NOM). Four (13%) patients had a partial pancreatectomy [distal pancreatectomy (n=3) and pancreaticoduodenectomy (n=1)]. Overall, in hospital mortality was 20% (n=6). Postoperative mortality was 27% (n=4/15). Mortality of NOM group was 13% (n=2/15) in both cases death was due to severe head injury. Among the patients who underwent NOM, three patients had injury ≥ grade 3, one patient had a stent placement in the pancreatic duct and two patients underwent endoscopic drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Conclusions Operative management of pancreatic trauma leads to a higher mortality. This must not be necessarily related to the pancreas injury alone but also to the associated injuries including liver, spleen and vascular trauma which may cause impaired outcome more than pancreas injury. PMID:28124001

  17. McGRATH MAC videolaryngoscope versus Macintosh laryngoscope for orotracheal intubation in intensive care patients: the randomised multicentre MACMAN trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Arthur; Le Thuaut, Aurelie; Boisrame-Helms, Julie; Kamel, Toufik; Mercier, Emmanuelle; Ricard, Jean Damien; Lemiale, Virginie; Champigneulle, Benoit; Reignier, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Critically ill patients with acute respiratory, neurological or cardiovascular failure requiring invasive mechanical ventilation are at high risk of difficult intubation and have organ dysfunctions associated with complications of intubation and anaesthesia such as hypotension and hypoxaemia. The complication rate increases with the number of intubation attempts. Videolaryngoscopy improves elective endotracheal intubation. McGRATH MAC is the lightest videolaryngoscope and the most similar to the Macintosh laryngoscope. The primary goal of this trial was to determine whether videolaryngoscopy increased the frequency of successful first-pass intubation in critically ill patients, compared to direct view Macintosh laryngoscopy. Methods and analysis MACMAN is a multicentre, open-label, randomised controlled superiority trial. Consecutive patients requiring intubation are randomly allocated to either the McGRATH MAC videolaryngoscope or the Macintosh laryngoscope, with stratification by centre and operator experience. The expected frequency of successful first-pass intubation is 65% in the Macintosh group and 80% in the videolaryngoscope group. With α set at 5%, to achieve 90% power for detecting this difference, 185 patients are needed in each group (370 in all). The primary outcome is the proportion of patients with successful first-pass orotracheal intubation, compared between the two groups using a generalised mixed model to take the stratification factors into account. Ethics and dissemination The study project has been approved by the appropriate ethics committee (CPP Ouest 2, # 2014-A00674-43). Informed consent is not required, as both laryngoscopy methods are considered standard care in France; information is provided before study inclusion. If videolaryngoscopy proves superior to Macintosh laryngoscopy, its use will become standard practice, thereby decreasing first-pass intubation failure rates and, potentially, the frequency of intubation

  18. Congenital Renal Fusion and Ectopia in the Trauma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ditchek, Jordan J.; Kiffin, Chauniqua; Carrillo, Eddy H.

    2016-01-01

    We present two separate cases of young male patients with congenital kidney anomalies (horseshoe and crossed fused renal ectopia) identified following blunt abdominal trauma. Despite being rare, ectopic and fusion anomalies of the kidneys are occasionally noted in a trauma patient during imaging or upon exploration of the abdomen. Incidental renal findings may influence the management of traumatic injuries to preserve and protect the patient's renal function. Renal anomalies may be asymptomatic or present with hematuria, flank or abdominal pain, hypotension, or shock, even following minor blunt trauma or low velocity impact. It is important for the trauma clinician to recognize that this group of congenital anomalies may contribute to unusual symptoms such as gross hematuria after minor trauma, are readily identifiable during CT imaging, and may affect operative management. These patients should be informed of their anatomical findings and encouraged to return for long-term follow-up. PMID:27895945

  19. Role of the trauma-room chest x-ray film in assessing the patient with severe blunt traumatic injury

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Barry A.; Ali, Jameel; Towers, Mark J.; Sharkey, P. William

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To examine the accuracy of standard trauma-room chest x-ray films in assessing blunt abdominal trauma and to determine the significance of missed injuries under these circumstances. Design A retrospective review. Setting A regional trauma unit in a tertiary-care institution. Patients Multiply injured trauma patients admitted between January 1988 and December 1990 who died within 24 hours of injury and in whom an autopsy was done. Intervention Standard radiography of the chest. Main Outcome Measures Chest injuries diagnosed and recorded by the trauma room team from standard anteroposterior x-ray films compared with the findings at autopsy and with review of the films by a staff radiologist initially having no knowledge of the injuries and later, if injuries remained undetected, having knowledge of the autopsy findings. Results Thirty-seven patients met the study criteria, and their cases were reviewed. In 11 cases, significant injuries were noted at autopsy and not by the trauma-room team, and in 7 cases these injuries were also missed by the reviewing radiologist. Injuries missed by the team were: multiple rib fractures (11 cases), sternal fractures (3 cases), diaphragmatic tear (2 cases) and intimal aortic tear (1 case). In five cases, chest tubes were not inserted despite the presence (undiagnosed) of multiple rib fractures and need for intubation and positive-pressure ventilation. Conclusions Significant blunt abdominal trauma, potentially requiring operative management or chest-tube insertion, may be missed on the initial anteroposterior chest x-ray film. Caution must therefore be exercised in interpreting these films in the trauma resuscitation room. PMID:8599789

  20. The Orthopaedic Trauma Patient Experience: A Qualitative Case Study of Orthopaedic Trauma Patients in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Nathan N.; Mugarura, Rodney; Slobogean, Gerard P.; Bouchard, Maryse

    2014-01-01

    The disability adjusted life years (DALYs) associated with injuries have increased by 34% from 1990 to 2010, making it the 10th leading cause of disability worldwide, with most of the burden affecting low-income countries. Although disability from injuries is often preventable, limited access to essential surgical services contributes to these increasing DALY rates. Similar to many other low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), Uganda is plagued by a growing volume of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to explore the orthopaedic trauma patient's experience in accessing medical care in Uganda and what affects the injury might have on the socioeconomic status for the patient and their dependents. We also evaluate the factors that impact an individual's ability to access an appropriate treatment facility for their traumatic injury. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients 18 year of age or older admitted with a fractured tibia or femur at Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. As limited literature exists on the socioeconomic impacts of disability from trauma, we designed a descriptive qualitative case study, using thematic analysis, to extract unique information for which little has been previously been documented. This methodology is subject to less bias than other qualitative methods as it imposes fewer preconceptions. Data analysis of the patient interviews (n = 35) produced over one hundred codes, nine sub-themes and three overarching themes. The three overarching categories revealed by the data were: 1) the importance of social supports; 2) the impact of and on economic resources; and 3) navigating the healthcare system. Limited resources to fund the treatment of orthopaedic trauma patients in Uganda leads to reliance of patients on their friends, family, and hospital connections, and a tremendous economic burden that falls on the patient and their dependents. PMID:25360815

  1. Patient Preferences for Discussing Childhood Trauma in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellen; Athale, Ninad; Sciolla, Andrés F; Catz, Sheryl L

    2017-01-01

    Context: Exposure to traumatic events is common in primary care patients, yet health care professionals may be hesitant to assess and address the impact of childhood trauma in their patients. Objective: To assess patient preferences for discussing traumatic experiences and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with clinicians in underserved, predominantly Latino primary care patients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Main Outcome Measure: We evaluated patients with a questionnaire assessing comfort to discuss trauma exposure and symptoms using the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study questionnaire and the Primary Care-PTSD screen. The questionnaire also assessed patients’ confidence in their clinicians’ ability to help with trauma-related issues. Surveys were collected at an integrated medical and behavioral health care clinic. Results: Of 178 adult patients asked, 152 (83%) agreed to participate. Among participants, 37% screened positive for PTSD, 42% reported 4 or more ACEs, and 26% had elevated scores on both measures. Primary Care-PTSD and ACE scores were strongly positively correlated (r = 0.57, p < 0.001). Most patients agreed they were comfortable being asked about trauma directly or through screening questionnaires and did not oppose the inclusion of trauma-related information in their medical record. In addition, most patients perceived their clinician as comfortable asking questions about childhood trauma and able to address trauma-related problems. Conclusion: Screening is acceptable to most primary care patients regardless of trauma exposure or positive PTSD screening. Findings may aid primary care clinicians to consider screening regularly for ACEs and PTSD to better serve the health care needs of trauma-exposed patients. PMID:28333604

  2. Air-Q intubating laryngeal airway: A study of the second generation supraglottic airway device

    PubMed Central

    Attarde, Viren Bhaskar; Kotekar, Nalini; Shetty, Sarika M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Air-Q intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILA) is used as a supraglottic airway device and as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. This study aims to assess the efficacy of the Air-Q ILA regarding ease of insertion, adequacy of ventilation, rate of successful intubation, haemodynamic response and airway morbidity. Methods: Sixty patients presenting for elective surgery at our Medical College Hospital were selected. Following adequate premedication, baseline vital parameters, pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded. Air-Q size 3.5 for patients 50-70 kg and size 4.5 for 70-100 kg was selected. After achieving adequate intubating conditions, Air-Q ILA was introduced. Confirming adequate ventilation, appropriate sized endotracheal tube was advanced through the Air-Q blindly to intubate the trachea. Placement of the endotracheal tube in trachea was confirmed. Results: Air-Q ILA was successfully inserted in 88.3% of patients in first attempt and 11.7% patients in second attempt. Ventilation was adequate in 100% of patients. Intubation was successful in 76.7% of patients with Air-Q ILA. 23.3% of patients were intubated by direct laryngoscopy following failure with two attempts using Air-Q ILA. Post-intubation the change in heart rate was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). 10% of patients were noted to have a sore throat and 5% of patients had mild airway trauma. Conclusion: Air-Q ILA is a reliable device as a supraglottic airway ensuring adequate ventilation as well as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. It benefits the patient by avoiding the stress of direct laryngoscopy and is also superior alternative device for use in a difficult airway. PMID:27212722

  3. Emergency nursing management of the multiple trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Kosmos, C A

    1989-01-01

    This case study reinforces key principles in caring for multiply injured trauma victims. The Primary Survey is a tool developed to allow those caring for trauma patients to prioritize injuries. Those injuries identified in the Primary Survey will be the most life threatening.

  4. Hemoperitoneum secondary to intercostal arterial bleeding in a trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Laeeq, K.; Cheung, S.; Phillips, B.

    2017-01-01

    Blunt trauma resulting in rib fractures can be associated with hemothorax, pneumothorax, pulmonary contusions or less frequently chest and abdominal wall hematomas. Our case describes the first report of hemoperitoneum secondary to intercostal arterial bleeding from blunt trauma in a patient on anticoagulation. PMID:28108633

  5. Use of laryngeal mask airway for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for patients with pectus excavatum undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaojun; Mao, Songsong; Cui, Jianxiu; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Haiyu; Xie, Liang; Zhang, Dongkun; Shi, Ruiqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the safety and feasibility of the use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for patients with pectus excavatum (PE) undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure. Methods Between July 2015 and December 2015, 30 selected patients with PE were planned to undergo a thoracoscopic Nuss procedure using LMA for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia in the Guangdong General Hospital. The clinical data were analyzed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of this technique. Results Of the 30 selected patients, two were female, the mean age was 16.04±5.09 years and the average Haller index was 3.37±0.88. A total of 27 cases (90%) succeeded at the first attempt, one patient required conversion to an endotracheal tube (ETT) because of continuous air leak. The peripheral O2 saturation (SpO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) values, heart rate (HR), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) remained stable throughout the procedure in all cases. All of the 30 patients were successfully corrected without requiring conversion to an open surgery. Two patients experienced postoperative nausea and one reported a sore throat. Neither gastro-esophageal reflux nor in-hospital mortality occurred. Conclusions The use of LMA for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for selected patients with PE undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure is clinically safe and technically feasible. PMID:27621860

  6. Reported childhood trauma and suicide attempts in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Roy, Alec

    2005-12-01

    Childhood traumas are associated with suicidal behavior but this aspect has not been examined in relation to schizophrenia. In this study, 50 chronic schizophrenic patients who had attempted suicide were compared with 50 chronic schizophrenic patients who had never attempted suicide for their scores on the 34-item Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). It was found that schizophrenics who had attempted suicide reported significantly higher CTQ scores for emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect, and physical neglect than schizophrenics who had never attempted suicide. Therefore, childhood trauma may be a risk factor predisposing schizophrenic patients to attempt suicide.

  7. Incidental findings in trauma patients during focused assessment with sonography for trauma.

    PubMed

    Lanitis, Sophocles; Zacharioudakis, Constantinos; Zafeiriadou, Paraskevi; Armoutides, Vasileios; Karaliotas, Charilaos; Sgourakis, George

    2012-03-01

    During the initial assessment of trauma patients they usually undergo a Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) in which there are occasionally incidental findings of other surgical conditions. In this audit we discuss the incidence, demographics, and implications of these findings and we propose a management algorithm. Within 2 years we managed 6041 trauma patients in the emergency department based on the Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols, 95 per cent of which underwent a FAST ultrasound. Incidental findings were reported in 468 patients (7.8%), whereas in a further 11.2 per cent of these patients there was a second finding. The mean age of these patients was 57.55 years (15-105), and most of them were men (51.1%). The vast majority of the findings were related to the liver and biliary tree (52.1%) followed by the urinary track (27.1% + 8%). In multivariate analysis only the age was a significant factor associated with incidental findings (P < 0.001) whereas in univariate analysis both the gender [men (54.1%) vs women (45.9), P = 0.013] and the mechanism of trauma (P < 0.001) were as important as the age (P < 0.001). The patients who had incidental findings were 15 years older than the rest. The detection of unknown surgical conditions in FAST may lead to managerial and possible medico-legal issues rendering the development of a proper algorithm mandatory.

  8. Nasotracheal intubation: an unusual cause of palatal perforation in an insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patient.

    PubMed

    Bhowate, Rahul; Dubey, Alok

    2004-01-01

    A case of palatal perforation occurring in 7-year-old girl with IDDM due to nasotracheal intubation is reported. The child, who was not previously diagnosed of IDDM, was brought to hospital in comatose stage and was put on nasotracheal tube for maintaining respiration. This paper highlights the link between IDDM and palatal perforation communicating the nasal cavity due to naso-tracheal intubation.

  9. Airtraq, LMA CTrach and Macintosh Laryngoscopes in Tracheal Intubation Training: A Randomized Comparative Manikin Study

    PubMed Central

    Saraçoğlu, Ayten; Dal, Didem; Baygın, Ömer; Göğüş, Fevzi Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective Training students on simulators before allowing their direct contact with patients is well accepted. There is no clinical or manikin-based simulation study in the literature comparing tracheal intubation with Airtraq, laryngeal mask airway (LMA) CTrach and Macintosh laryngoscopes performed by medical students having no prior intubation experience. Methods After obtaining written informed consents, 123 participants were included in the study. The participants were asked to intubate the manikin five times with each device randomly. After all the participants had completed their fifth intubations, the measurements were performed. The primary outcome variables were the first-attempt success rate and the time for a successful intubation, while the secondary outcome variables were to determine the scores of dental trauma, the difficulty visual analogue scale and the optimization manoeuvres. Results The LMA CTrach group revealed a significantly higher number of intubation attempts. The mean time for a successful intubation was the longest in the LMA CTrach group (17.66±8.22 s, p<0.05). Students defined the Airtraq as the easiest to use and the Macintosh laryngoscope as the most difficult device to use and learn. Dental trauma severity was significantly lower in the Airtraq group than in the other groups (p<0.05), and it was found to be 0 in 81.1% in the Airtraq group. The head extension optimization manoeuvre rate was significantly higher with the Macintosh laryngoscope than with the Airtraq laryngoscope (p<0.05). Conclusion This study, in which different types of laryngoscopes were compared, revealed that the Airtraq laryngoscope has advantages, such as shorter intubation duration, less additional optimization manoeuvres, less dental trauma intensity and is easier to learn compared with the LMA CTrach and Macintosh laryngoscopes. PMID:27366562

  10. Can ultrasound help to manage patients with scrotal trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Adlan, T

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to the scrotum are uncommon but, when they do occur, frequently lead to serious complications. Early complications include testicular infarction, necrosis and abscess formation; in the longer-term trauma may result in testicular atrophy and subfertility. Early surgical intervention in patients with testicular rupture can significantly improve the clinical outcome and reduce the need for delayed orchidectomy. However, clinical examination of the scrotum following trauma is difficult and frequently inaccurate; this may result in incorrect triage of patients for surgical exploration. Scrotal ultrasound can reliably assess scrotal injuries and diagnose testicular rupture with a high level of accuracy. Additionally, ultrasound can provide important information regarding testicular perfusion, which can further inform decisions on surgical management. This article reviews the sonographic findings that may be encountered in patients with scrotal trauma, with an emphasis on blunt trauma. It describes the pivotal role that ultrasound can play in the accurate triage of these patients to surgical or conservative management. PMID:27433221

  11. Comparison the efficacy of herbal mouthwash with chlorhexidine on gingival index of intubated patients in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Sahra; Rezaei, Korosh; Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Jarahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Momeni, Ehsan; Bagherinasab, Mostafa; Targhi, Mehrdad Gaffari; Memarzadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intubated patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) are not able to take care of their mouth health, so they are at risk of bacterial colonization and dental plaques formation that can lead to systemic diseases such as pneumonia and gingivitis. Aims: In randomized, double-blind clinical study, the efficacy of natural herbal mouthwash containing Salvadora persica ethanol extract and Aloe vera gel was compared with chlorhexidine on gingival index (GI) of intubated patients in ICU. Materials and Methods: Seventy-six intubated patients (18–64 years old with mean age 40.35 ± 13.2) in ICU were admitted to this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: (1) Herbal mouthwash and (2) chlorhexidine solution. Before the intervention, the GIs was measured by modified GI device into two groups. The mouth was rinsed by mouthwashes every 2–3 h for 4 days. 2 h after the last intervention, GIs were determined. Results: Along with mechanical methods, herbal mouthwash in reducing GI was statistically significant than that of chlorhexidine (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results of this study introduce a new botanical extract mouthwash with dominant healing effects on GI (1.5 ± 0.6) higher than that of synthetic mouthwash, chlorhexidine (2.31 ± 0.73). PMID:28298822

  12. Does C-MAC® video laryngoscope improve the nasotracheal intubating conditions compared to Macintosh direct laryngoscope in paediatric patients posted for tonsillectomy surgeries?

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vinuta V; Subramanya, Bala H; Kiranchand, N; Bhaskar, S Bala; Dammur, Srinivasalu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: C-MAC® video laryngoscope (VL) with Macintosh blade has been found to improve Cormack-Lehane (C-L) laryngoscopic view as well as intubating conditions for orotracheal intubation. However, studies done on the performance of C-MAC® VL for nasotracheal intubation (NTI) are very few in number. Hence, we compared laryngoscopy and intubating conditions between Macintosh direct laryngoscope and C-MAC® VL for NTI. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I, II patients, aged 8–18 years, posted for tonsillectomy surgeries under general anaesthesia with NTI were randomised, into two groups. Patients in group 1 were intubated using Macintosh direct laryngoscope and group 2 with C-MAC® VL. C-L grading, time required for intubation, need for additional manoeuvres and haemodynamic changes during and after intubation were compared between the groups. Results: C-L grade 1 views were obtained in 26 and 29 patients in group 1 and group 2, respectively (86.7% vs. 96.7%). Remaining patients were having C-L grade 2 (13.3% vs. 3.3%). Duration of intubation was less than a minute in group 2 (93.3%). Need for additional manoeuvres (M1–M5) were more in group 1 (97% vs. 77%). M1 (external manipulation) was needed more in group 2 compared to group 1 (53.3% vs. 30%). Magill's forceps alone (M4) and M4 with additional external manipulation (M5) were needed more in group 1 compared to group 2 (60% vs. 16%). Conclusion: The overall performance of C-MAC® VL was better when compared to conventional direct Macintosh laryngoscope during NTI in terms of glottis visualisation, intubation time and need for additional manoeuvres. PMID:27761036

  13. Evaluation of Wireless Vital Signs Monitor in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    segment elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients). An additional 23 prehospital patients were excluded because of missing or incomplete data...tool (J Trauma Acute Care Surgery 2014 Mar;76(3):743-9.), and is among the important findings from this project...Trauma Acute Care Surgery 2014 Mar;76(3):743-9 2) Van Haren RM, Ryan ML, Thorson CM, Namias N, Livingstone AS, Proctor KG: Bilateral near infrared

  14. Trauma in patients with temporomandibular disorders: frequency and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    De Boever, J A; Keersmaekers, K

    1996-02-01

    Controversy exists on the aetiological importance and the effect of jaw macrotrauma (fractures excluded) on the occurrence of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of jaw injury in TMD patients and to compare the severity of the symptoms, the clinical characteristics and the treatment outcome in TMD patients with or without a history of trauma to the head and neck region directly linked to the onset of symptoms. The study sample included 400 consecutive TMD clinical patients. In 24.5% of patients the onset of the pain and dysfunction could be linked directly to the trauma, mainly whiplash accidents. No significant differences could be found between the two groups in daily recurrent headache, dizziness, neck pain, joint crepitation and pain in the joints. Maximal mouth opening was less than 20 mm in 14.3% of patients with a history of trauma and in 4.1% of those without such a history. According to the Helkimo dysfunction index (DI), more trauma than non-trauma TMD patients belonged to the severe dysfunction groups (DI 4 and 5) at first examination. The outcome of a conservative treatment procedure (counselling, occlusal splint, physiotherapy, occasionally occlusal therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs was not different between the two groups at the 1 year evaluation. The degree of maximal opening was similar: less than 20 mm in 3.7% and 2.2% in trauma and non-trauma patients respectively. Forty percent and 41% respectively were symptom free or had DI = 1. The results suggest that external trauma to the joint or to the jaw in general is an important initiating factor in the aetiology of TMD but also that the prognosis is favourable.

  15. Tranexamic Acid (TXA) in Trauma Patients: Barriers to Use among Trauma Surgeons and Emergency Physicians

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Tranexamic Acid (TXA) is currently the only drug with prospective clinical evidence supporting its use in bleeding trauma patients. We sought to better understand the barriers preventing its use and elicit suggestions to further its use in trauma patients in the state of Maryland. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study. Results. The overall response rate was 38%. Half of all participants reported being familiar with the CRASH-2 trial and MATTERs study. Half reported being aware of TXA as part of their institution's massive transfusion protocol. The majority of participants felt that TXA would have a significant positive impact on the survival of trauma patients. A majority also felt that the use of TXA would increase if its administration was the responsibility of both trauma surgeons and emergency physicians. Conclusion. Only half of responders reported being aware of TXA as being part of their institution's massive transfusion protocol. Lack of awareness of the clinical data supporting its use is a major barrier. However, most trauma providers and emergency physicians do have a favorable view of TXA and support its incorporation into massive transfusion protocols. We believe that more studies of this kind on both state and national level are needed. PMID:28316839

  16. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maegele, Marc

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries, Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid. The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care. The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system. The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept. The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first"). If no immediate treatment is necessary, a "Secondary Sur- vey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism. Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme. Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go")toTR-DGU® certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks. Due to the difficult pre- hospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and, as consequence, the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low. Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited. The present article provides a synopsis of rec- ommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multi- disciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung", the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible.

  17. Identifying and Managing a Malpositioned Endotracheal Tube Bite Block in an Orotracheally Intubated Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hui-Ling; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Wu, Huey-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The universal bite block is increasingly used in orotracheally intubated patients. Here, we report a case of pilot tube dysfunction caused by a malpositioned universal bite block in an orotracheally intubated patient. We summarize the key points on identifying and managing a malpositioned universal bite block from this case and literature review.A 74-year-old woman was emergently intubated during an episode of hyperkalemia-related cardiac arrest. A universal bite block was used for fixing the endotracheal tube. After her condition stabilized, ventilator weaning was attempted; however, a positive cuff-leak test result was observed.The cuff-leak test revealed a lack of elasticity of the pilot balloon, which was completely deflated after 2 mL of air was removed. Pilot tube dysfunction was highly suspected. The bite block was slightly pulled out, and 8 mL of air was aspirated from the pilot tube. The patient was successfully extubated without stridor and respiratory distress.Our case highlighted that a malpositioned bite block may obstruct the pilot tube, causing unfavorable consequences. While fixing the bite block on an endotracheal tube, it is crucial to ensure that the takeoff point of the pilot tube is located within the C-notch of the bite block.

  18. Genetic predisposition for development of complications in multiple trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Frank; Mommsen, Philipp; Frink, Michael; van Griensven, Martijn; Krettek, Christian

    2011-05-01

    The care of multiple trauma patients has been improved through advances made in preclinical treatment, surgical procedures, and intensive care medicine. However, posttraumatic complications such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and sepsis remain a major problem following multiple trauma. Components of the innate immune system and other inflammatory mediators (e.g., procalcitonin) play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of posttraumatic complications. Studies investigating the genetic predisposition for complications after multiple trauma have provided evidence for a genetic heterogeneity in the posttraumatic immune response. The differences in response to multiple trauma associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms may contribute to the development of new genetically tailored diagnostic and therapeutic interventions improving outcome in this patient population. In addition, detrimental adverse effects of adjuvant therapy could be avoided in other patients who, by genotype, are predicted not to benefit.

  19. Observational research in trauma radiology: should patients be informed?

    PubMed

    Brink, Monique; Deunk, Jaap; van Tongeren, Paul; Blickman, Johan G

    2009-01-01

    The need for prospective studies in trauma radiology emerges as knowledge on the appropriate use of imaging becomes increasingly important in this field. Prospective observational studies enroll patients after research questions are articulated but only observe medical practice and should not compromise or change patient treatment. However, controversy exists regarding the requirement of informed consent from trauma patients in this type of study. This is reflected not only in differences in reporting informed consent in recent scientific publications on trauma radiology but also by the fact that policies regarding this topic vary in different parts of the world. The authors consider whether requesting informed consent is appropriate in prospective observational studies in trauma radiology from practical and different ethical perspectives.

  20. Thromboelastography-guided transfusion Therapy in the trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Brazzel, Charice

    2013-04-01

    This article presents thromboelastography (TEG) as an important assay to incorporate into anesthesia practice for development of evidence-based therapy of trauma patients receiving blood transfusions. The leading cause of death worldwide results from trauma. Hemorrhage is responsible for 30% to 40% of trauma mortality and accounts for almost 50% of the deaths occurring in the initial 24 hours following the traumatic incident. On admission, 25% to 35% of trauma patients present with coagulopathy, which is associated with a sevenfold increase in morbidity and mortality. The literature supports that routine plasma-based routine coagulation tests, such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and international normalized ratio, are inadequate for monitoring coagulopathy and guided transfusion therapy in trauma patients. A potential solution is incorporating the use of the TEG assay into the care of trauma patients to render evidence-based therapy for patients requiring massive blood transfusions. Analysis with TEG provides a complete picture of hemostasis, which is far superior to isolated, static conventional tests. The result is a fast, well-designed, and precise diagnosis enabling more cost-effective treatment, improved clinical outcome, accurate use of blood products, and pharmaceutical therapies at the point of care.

  1. Compliance to advanced trauma life support protocols in adult trauma patients in the acute setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols provide a common approach for trauma resuscitations. This was a quality review assessing compliance with ATLS protocols at a Level I trauma center; specifically whether the presence or absence of a trauma team leader (TTL) influenced adherence. Methods This retrospective study was conducted on adult major trauma patients with acute injuries over a one-year period in a Level I Canadian trauma center. Data were collected from the Alberta Trauma Registry, and adherence to ATLS protocols was determined by chart review. Results The study identified 508 patients with a mean Injury Severity Score of 24.5 (SD 10.7), mean age 39.7 (SD 17.6), 73.8% were male and 91.9% were involved in blunt trauma. The overall compliance rate was 81.8% for primary survey and 75% for secondary survey. The TTL group compared to non-TTL group was more likely to complete the primary survey (90.9% vs. 81.8%, p = 0.003), and the secondary survey (100% vs. 75%, p = 0.004). The TTL group was more likely than the non-TTL group to complete the following tasks: insertion of two large bore IVs (68.2% vs. 57.7%, p = 0.014), digital rectal exam (64.6% vs. 54.7%, p = 0.023), and head to toe exam (77% vs. 67.1%, p = 0.013). Mean times from emergency department arrival to diagnostic imaging were also significantly shorter in the TTL group compared to the non-TTL group, including times to pelvis xray (mean 68min vs. 107min, p = 0.007), CT chest (mean 133min vs. 172min, p = 0.005), and CT abdomen and pelvis (mean 136min vs. 173min, p = 0.013). Readmission rates were not significantly different between the TTL and non-TTL groups (3.5% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.642). Conclusions While many studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of trauma systems on outcomes, few have explored the direct influence of the TTL on ATLS compliance. This study demonstrated that TTL involvement during resuscitations was associated with improved

  2. Lateral Cervical Spine Radiography to Demonstrate Absence of Bony Displacement After Intubation in a Patient with an Acute Type III Odontoid Fracture.

    PubMed

    Easker, David D; Policeni, Bruno A; Hindman, Bradley J

    2015-07-15

    A 72-year-old patient with an acute traumatic Type III odontoid fracture presented to the operating room for an urgent orthopedic procedure with a history of uncontrolled gastroesophageal reflux, a full stomach, and active vomiting. Rather than fiberoptic intubation, a rapid sequence intubation with manual inline stabilization was performed using a videolaryngoscope. A lateral cervical spine radiograph immediately after intubation showed no change in alignment of the fracture of C1-C2. In the presence of cervical spine instability, a postintubation radiograph provides assurance that the cervical spine is appropriately aligned during subsequent surgery.

  3. Cruciform position for trauma resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Biswadev; Fitzgerald, Mark C; Olaussen, Alexander; Thaveenthiran, Prasanthan; Bade-Boon, Jordan; Martin, Katherine; Smit, De Villiers; Cameron, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Multiply injured patients represent a particularly demanding subgroup of trauma patients as they require urgent simultaneous clinical assessments using physical examination, ultrasound and invasive monitoring together with critical management, including tracheal intubation, thoracostomies and central venous access. Concurrent access to multiple body regions is essential to facilitate the concept of 'horizontal' resuscitation. The current positioning of trauma patient, with arms adducted, restricts this approach. Instead, the therapeutic cruciform positioning, with arms abducted at 90°, allows planning and performing of multiple life-saving interventions simultaneously. This positioning also provides a practical surgical field with improved sterility and procedural access.

  4. Evaluation of the GlideScope for tracheal intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilisation by a semi-rigid collar.

    PubMed

    Bathory, I; Frascarolo, P; Kern, C; Schoettker, P

    2009-12-01

    Application of cervical collars may reduce cervical spine movements but render tracheal intubation with a standard laryngoscope difficult if not impossible. We hypothesised that despite the presence of a Philadelphia Patriot cervical collar and with the patient's head taped to the trolley, tracheal intubation would be possible in 50 adult patients using the GlideScope and its dedicated stylet. Laryngoscopy was attempted using a Macintosh laryngoscope with a size 4 blade, and the modified Cormack-Lehane grade was scored. Subsequently, laryngoscopy with the GlideScope was graded and followed by tracheal intubation. All patients' tracheas were successfully intubated with the GlideScope. The median (IQR) intubation time was 50 s (43-61 s). The modified Cormack-Lehane grade was 3 or 4 at direct laryngoscopy. It was significantly reduced with the GlideScope (p < 0.0001), reaching grade 2a in most patients. Tracheal intubation in patients wearing a semi-rigid collar and having their head taped to the trolley is possible with the help of the GlideScope.

  5. Randomised controlled trial comparing the Ambu® aScope™2 with a conventional fibreoptic bronchoscope in orotracheal intubation of anaesthetised adult patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, J K; Ng, I; Ang, J P; Koh, S M; Lee, K; Mezzavia, P; Morris, J; Loh, F; Segal, R

    2015-07-01

    Fibreoptic intubation remains an essential skill for anaesthetists to master. In addition to the reusable fibrescope, an alternative disposable videoscope is available (aScope(™)2, Ambu®, Ballerup, Denmark). A total of 60 anaesthetised adult patients were randomised to either having orotracheal intubation using the aScope 2 or a Karl Storz fibrescope. Intubations were performed by experienced operators who were familiar with both devices. The primary outcome was the Global Rating Scale score. Secondary outcomes included intubation success, number of intubation attempts and intubation time. Other subjective outcomes including practicality, useability and image quality were also recorded. There was no significant difference in the Global Rating Scale score, intubation success orintubation time between the aScope 2 or Karl Storz fibrescope. Global Rating Scale scores were three and two in the aScope 2 and Karl Storz groups respectively (P=0.14). All of the other subjective outcomes were similar between the two groups, except that operators found it easier to use the aScope 2 compared to the fibrescope. There was no significant difference in clinical performance between the aScope 2 and the Karl Storz fibreoptic bronchoscope. The aScope's practicality, disposability and recently improved version (aScope(™)3) potentially make it an acceptable alternative to the reusable fibrescope.

  6. [Intubation of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis with a 7.5-mm-ID armored endotracheal tube using a laryngeal mask airway].

    PubMed

    Mashio, H; Kojima, T; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H; Ito, Y; Kato, M

    1997-12-01

    A 71-year-old male patient with rheumatoid arthritis was scheduled for posterior fusion of the cervical spine. He showed limited cervical movement and atrophic mandible. Tracheal intubation was difficult in his last anesthetic management for the same surgery. This time, we planned a special procedure for predicted difficult tracheal intubation. After induction of general anesthesia, a size-4 laryngeal mask airway was inserted. Next, a flexible fiberscope sheathed with a 6.0-mm-ID cuffed endotracheal tube was inserted through a laryngeal mask airway into the trachea, and the fiberscope was withdrawn. Then, an endotracheal tube changer was inserted through the endotracheal tube. The laryngeal mask airway and the endotracheal tube were withdrawn simultaneously leaving the tube changer. Finally, a 7.5-mm-ID armored endotracheal tube was inserted through the tube changer. The procedure applied in this case is a safe and reliable intubating method in patients with difficult tracheal intubation.

  7. Prevalence of whiplash trauma in TMD patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Häggman-Henrikson, B; Rezvani, M; List, T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to describe the prevalence of whiplash trauma in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and to describe clinical signs and symptoms in comorbid TMD/whiplash compared with TMD localised to the facial region. A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Bandolier databases was carried out for articles published from 1 January 1966 to 31 December 2012. The systematic search identified 129 articles. After the initial screening of abstracts, 32 articles were reviewed in full text applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Six studies on the prevalence of neck trauma in patients with TMD met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Two of the authors evaluated the methodological quality of the included studies. The reported prevalence of whiplash trauma ranged from 8·4% to 70% (median 35%) in TMD populations, compared with 1·7-13% in the non-TMD control groups. Compared with patients with TMD localised to the facial region, TMD patients with a history of whiplash trauma reported more TMD symptoms, such as limited jaw opening and more TMD pain, and also more headaches and stress symptoms. In conclusion, the prevalence of whiplash trauma is higher in patients with TMD compared with non-TMD controls. Furthermore, patients with comorbid TMD/whiplash present with more jaw pain and more severe jaw dysfunction compared with TMD patients without a history of head-neck trauma. These results suggest that whiplash trauma might be an initiating and/or aggravating factor as well as a comorbid condition for TMD.

  8. [Prophylactic use of icatibant before tracheal intubation of a patient with hereditary angioedema type III. (A literature review of perioperative management of patients with hereditary angioedema type III)].

    PubMed

    Iturri Clavero, F; González Uriarte, A; Tamayo Medel, G; Gamboa Setién, P M

    2014-01-01

    Type III hereditary angioedema is a rare familial disorder that has recently been described as a separate condition. Triggers for episodes of angioedema include surgery, dental procedures, and tracheal intubation maneuvers. Since episodes affecting the upper airway are potentially life-threatening, prophylactic treatment is recommended in these situations. The use of icatibant (Firazyr(®)), for prevention of angioedema prior to tracheal intubation, is reported in a patient with type iii hereditary angioedema. A literature review on the anesthetic management of this condition was conducted.

  9. Endotracheal intubation in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2015-06-17

    Endotracheal intubation in the ICU is a high-risk procedure, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Up to 40% of cases are associated with marked hypoxemia or hypotension. The ICU patient is physiologically very different from the usual patient who undergoes intubation in the operating room, and different intubation techniques should be considered. The common operating room practice of sedation and neuromuscular blockade to facilitate intubation may carry significant risk in the ICU patient with a marked oxygenation abnormality, particularly when performed by the non-expert. Preoxygenation is largely ineffective in these patients and oxygen desaturation occurs rapidly on induction of anesthesia, limiting the time available to secure the airway. The ICU environment is less favorable for complex airway management than the operating room, given the frequent lack of availability of additional equipment or additional expert staff. ICU intubations are frequently carried out by trainees, with a lesser degree of airway experience. Even in the presence of a non-concerning airway assessment, these patients are optimally managed as a difficult airway, utilizing an awake approach. Endotracheal intubation may be achieved by awake direct laryngoscopy in the sick ICU patient whose level of consciousness may be reduced by sepsis, hypercapnia or hypoxemia. As the patient's spontaneous respiratory efforts are not depressed by the administration of drugs, additional time is available to obtain equipment and expertise in the event of failure to secure the airway. ICU intubation complications should be tracked as part of the ICU quality improvement process.

  10. Endotracheal intubation

    MedlinePlus

    ... RF, McGill JW, Clinton JE. Tracheal intubation. In: Roberts JR, ed. Roberts and Hedges' Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine . 6th ... commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer ...

  11. Worthing Physiological Score vs Revised Trauma Score in Outcome Prediction of Trauma patients; a Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Nakhjavan-Shahraki, Babak; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Hajighanbari, Mohammad Javad; Karimi, Parviz; Baikpour, Masoud; Mirzay Razaz, Jalaledin; Yaseri, Mehdi; Shahsavari, Kavous; Mahdizadeh, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Awareness about the outcome of trauma patients in the emergency department (ED) has become a topic of interest. Accordingly, the present study aimed to compare the rapid trauma score (RTS) and worthing physiological scoring system (WPSS) in predicting in-hospital mortality and poor outcome of trauma patients. Methods: In this comparative study trauma patients brought to five EDs in different cities of Iran during the year 2016 were included. After data collection, discriminatory power and calibration of the models were assessed and compared using STATA 11. Results: 2148 patients with the mean age of 39.50±17.27 years were included (75.56% males). The AUC of RTS and WPSS models for prediction of mortality were 0.86 (95% CI: 0.82-0.90) and 0.91 (95% CI: 0.87-0.94), respectively (p=0.006). RTS had a sensitivity of 71.54 (95% CI: 62.59-79.13) and a specificity of 97.38 (95% CI: 96.56-98.01) in prediction of mortality. These measures for the WPSS were 87.80 (95% CI: 80.38-92.78) and 83.45 (95% CI: 81.75-85.04), respectively. The AUC of RTS and WPSS in predicting poor outcome were 0.81 (95% CI: 0.77-0.85) and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.92), respectively (p<0.0001). Conclusion: The findings showed a higher prognostic value for the WPSS model in predicting mortality and severe disabilities in trauma patients compared to the RTS model. Both models had good overall performance in prediction of mortality and poor outcome. PMID:28286838

  12. Negative- versus positive-pressure ventilation in intubated patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Recent experimental data suggest that continuous external negative-pressure ventilation (CENPV) results in better oxygenation and less lung injury than continuous positive-pressure ventilation (CPPV). The effects of CENPV on patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remain unknown. Methods We compared 2 h CENPV in a tankrespirator ("iron lung") with 2 h CPPV. The six intubated patients developed ARDS after pulmonary thrombectomy (n = 1), aspiration (n = 3), sepsis (n = 1) or both (n = 1). We used a tidal volume of 6 ml/kg predicted body weight and matched lung volumes at end expiration. Haemodynamics were assessed using the pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO) system, and pressure measurements were referenced to atmospheric pressure. Results CENPV resulted in better oxygenation compared to CPPV (median ratio of arterial oxygen pressure to fraction of inspired oxygen of 345 mmHg (minimum-maximum 183 to 438 mmHg) vs 256 mmHg (minimum-maximum 123 to 419 mmHg) (P < 0.05). Tank pressures were -32.5 cmH2O (minimum-maximum -30 to -43) at end inspiration and -15 cmH2O (minimum-maximum -15 to -19 cmH2O) at end expiration. NO Inspiratory transpulmonary pressures decreased (P = 0.04) and airway pressures were considerably lower at inspiration (-1.5 cmH2O (minimum-maximum -3 to 0 cmH2O) vs 34.5 cmH2O (minimum-maximum 30 to 47 cmH2O), P = 0.03) and expiration (4.5 cmH2O (minimum-maximum 2 to 5) vs 16 cmH2O (minimum-maximum 16 to 23), P =0.03). During CENPV, intraabdominal pressures decreased from 20.5 mmHg (12 to 30 mmHg) to 1 mmHg (minimum-maximum -7 to 5 mmHg) (P = 0.03). Arterial pressures decreased by approximately 10 mmHg and central venous pressures by 18 mmHg. Intrathoracic blood volume indices and cardiac indices increased at the initiation of CENPV by 15% and 20% (P < 0.05), respectively. Heart rate and extravascular lung water indices remained unchanged. Conclusions CENPV with a tank respirator improved gas exchange in patients with ARDS at

  13. Pediatric trauma BIG score: Predicting mortality in polytraumatized pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Gamasy, Mohamed Abd El-Aziz; Elezz, Ahmed Abd El Basset Abo; Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy Mohamed; Elrazek, Mohamed El Sayed Ali Abd

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a worldwide health problem and the major cause of death and disability, particularly affecting the young population. It is important to remember that pediatric trauma care has made a significant improvement in the outcomes of these injured children. Aim of the Work: This study aimed at evaluation of pediatric trauma BIG score in comparison with New Injury Severity Score (NISS) and Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) in Tanta University Emergency Hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Tanta University Emergency Hospital to all multiple trauma pediatric patients attended to the Emergency Department for 1 year. Pediatric trauma BIG score, PTS, and NISS scores were calculated and results compared to each other and to observed mortality. Results: BIG score ≥12.7 has sensitivity 86.7% and specificity 71.4%, whereas PTS at value ≤3.5 has sensitivity 63.3% and specificity 68.6% and NISS at value ≥39.5 has sensitivity 53.3% and specificity 54.3%. There was a significant positive correlation between BIG score value and mortality rate. Conclusion: The pediatric BIG score is a reliable mortality-prediction score for children with traumatic injuries; it uses international normalization ratio (INR), Base Excess (BE), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) values that can be measured within a few minutes of sampling, so it can be readily applied in the Pediatric Emergency Department, but it cannot be applied on patients with chronic diseases that affect INR, BE, or GCS. PMID:27994378

  14. Prevalence of Prehospital Hypoxemia and Oxygen Use in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    prehospital endotracheal intubation . Hypoxemia occurred in 86 (38.4%), paramedics suspected traumatic brain injury in 22 (9.8%), and 20 (8.9%) were...admitted; 36.2% sustained a penetrating injury. None underwent prehospital endotracheal intubation . Hypoxemia occurred in 86 (38.4%), paramedics...36.2% sustained a penetrating injury. No subject underwent endotracheal intubation in the pre hospital setting; 7 (3.1%) underwent intubation in the

  15. Difficult fiber-optic intubation in a patient with giant neck masses: The role of McCoy laryngoscope in elevating compressed laryngeal aperture.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Lijen; Chen, Hung-Shu; Tan, Ping-Heng; Liu, Ping-Hsin; Hsieh, Shao-Wei; Hung, Kuo-Chuan

    2013-12-01

    Airway management in patients with giant neck masses is usually a challenge to anesthesiologists. A giant neck mass could compress the airway and thus impede endotracheal intubation. We encountered a situation where the giant neck masses of a patient pushed the epiglottis posteriorly toward the posterior pharyngeal wall and compressed the laryngeal aperture narrowing after anesthetic induction, causing direct laryngoscopic intubation and sequential fiber-optic intubation failed. The neck masses twisted the aryepiglottic fold tortuously and clogged the laryngeal aperture tightly, making a flexible fiber-optic bronchoscope unable to pass through the laryngeal aperture. Later, we utilized a McCoy laryngoscope alternately to lift the compressed larynx up and away from the posterior pharyngeal wall, creating a passage and completing endotracheal intubation successfully with the aid of a gum elastic bougie. Our case suggested that the tilting tip blade of the McCoy laryngoscope could lever the tongue base up against the tumor mass compression to improve laryngeal views and facilitate endotracheal intubation when a difficult fiber-optic intubation was encountered on a compressed laryngeal aperture.

  16. Embolization of Isolated Lumbar Artery Injuries in Trauma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Hinrichs, Clay R.; Hubbi, Basil; Doddakashi, Satish; Bahramipour, Philip; Schubert, Johanna

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the angiographic findings and results of embolotherapy in the management of lumbar artery trauma. Methods. All patients with lumbar artery injury who underwent angiography and percutaneous embolization in a state trauma center within a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Radiological information and procedural reports were reviewed to assess immediate angiographic findings and embolization results. Long-term clinical outcome was obtained by communication with the trauma physicians as well as with chart review. Results. In a 10-year period, 255 trauma patients underwent abdominal aortography. Eleven of these patients (three women and eight men) suffered a lumbar artery injury. Angiography demonstrated active extravasation (in nine) and/or pseudoaneurysm (in four). Successful selective embolization of abnormal vessel(s) was performed in all patients. Coils were used in six patients, particles in one and gelfoam in five patients. Complications included one retroperitoneal abscess, which was treated successfully. One patient returned for embolization of an adjacent lumbar artery due to late pseudoaneurysm formation. Conclusions. In hemodynamically stable patients, selective embolization is a safe and effective method for immediate control of active extravasation, as well as to prevent future hemorrhage from an injured lumbar artery.

  17. Evaluating an Ultrasound Algorithm for Patients with Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c . THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...Algorithm for Patients with Blunt Abdominal Trauma RTO-MP-HFM-109 P6 - 7 Table 1: Patients undergoing laparotomy U S US results C T CT result...11] Henneman PL, Marx JA, Moore EE. 1990. Diagnostic

  18. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures for Hand and Wrist Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Dacombe, Peter Jonathan; Amirfeyz, Rouin; Davis, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are important tools for assessing outcomes following injuries to the hand and wrist. Many commonly used PROMs have no evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a hand and wrist trauma population. This systematic review examines the PROMs used in the assessment of hand and wrist trauma patients, and the evidence for reliability, validity, and responsiveness of each measure in this population. Methods: A systematic review of Pubmed, Medline, and CINAHL searching for randomized controlled trials of patients with traumatic injuries to the hand and wrist was carried out to identify the PROMs. For each identified PROM, evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness was identified using a further systematic review of the Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, and reverse citation trail audit procedure. Results: The PROM used most often was the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire; the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), Gartland and Werley score, Michigan Hand Outcomes score, Mayo Wrist Score, and Short Form 36 were also commonly used. Only the DASH and PRWE have evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in patients with traumatic injuries to the hand and wrist; other measures either have incomplete evidence or evidence gathered in a nontraumatic population. Conclusions: The DASH and PRWE both have evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a hand and wrist trauma population. Other PROMs used to assess hand and wrist trauma patients do not. This should be considered when selecting a PROM for patients with traumatic hand and wrist pathology. PMID:27418884

  19. [Objective assessment of trauma severity in patients with spleen injuries].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, V S; Ivanov, V A; Alekseev, S V; Vaniukov, V P

    2013-01-01

    The work presents an analysis of condition severity of 139 casualties with isolated and combined spleen injuries on admission to a surgical hospital. The assessment of condition severity was made using the traditional gradation and score scale VPH-SP. The degree of the severity of combined trauma of the spleen was determined by the scales ISS. The investigation showed that the scale ISS and VPH-SP allowed objective measurement of the condition severity of patients with spleen trauma. The score assessment facilitated early detection of the severe category of the patients, determined the diagnostic algorithm and the well-timed medical aid.

  20. Long-term survival in elderly patients with a do-not-intubate order treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Scarpazza, Paolo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Amboni, Paolo; di Franco, Giuseppe; Raschi, Stefania; Usai, Pierfranco; Bernareggi, Monica; Bonacina, Cristiano; Melacini, Chiara; Cattaneo, Roberta; Bencini, Serena; Pravettoni, Chiara; Riario-Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Passalacqua, Gianni; Casali, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) is an effective tool in treating patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF), since it reduces both the need for endotracheal intubation and the mortality in comparison with nonventilated patients. A particular issue is represented by the outcome of NIMV in patients referred to the emergency department for ARF and with a do-not-intubate (DNI) status because of advanced age or excessively critical conditions. This study evaluated long-term survival in a group of elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF who had a DNI order and who were successfully treated by NIMV. Methods: The population consisted of 54 patients with a favorable outcome after NIMV for ARF. They were followed up for 3 years by regular control visits, with at least one visit every 4 months, or as needed according to the patient’s condition. Of these, 31 continued NIMV at home and 23 were on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) alone. Results: A total of 16 of the 52 patients had not survived at the 1-year follow-up, and another eight patients died during the 3-year observation, with an overall mortality rate of 30.8% after 1 year and 46.2% after 3 years. Comparing patients who continued NIMV at home with those who were on LTOT alone, 9 of the 29 patients on home NIMV died (6 after 1 year and 3 after 3 years) and 15 of the 23 patients on LTOT alone died (10 after 1 year and 5 after 3 years). Conclusion: These results show that elderly patients with ARF successfully treated by NIMV following a DNI order have a satisfactory long-term survival. PMID:21814461

  1. How we provide thawed plasma for trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, James R; Zielinski, Martin D; Berns, Kathleen S; Badjie, Karafa S; Tauscher, Craig D; Hammel, Scott A; Zietlow, Scott P; Jenkins, Donald

    2015-08-01

    Almost 50% of trauma-related fatalities within the first 24 hours of injury are related to hemorrhage. Improved survival in severely injured patients has been demonstrated when massive transfusion protocols are rapidly invoked as part of a therapeutic approach known as damage control resuscitation (DCR). DCR incorporates the early use of plasma to prevent or correct trauma-induced coagulopathy. DCR often requires the transfusion of plasma before determination of the recipient's ABO group. Historically, group AB plasma has been considered the "universal donor" plasma product. At our facility, the number of AB plasma products produced on an annual basis was found to be inadequate to support the trauma service's DCR program. A joint decision was made by the transfusion medicine and trauma services to provide group A thawed plasma (TP) for in-hospital and prehospital DCR protocols. A description of the implementation of group A TP into the DCR program is provided as well as outcome data pertaining to the use of TP in trauma patients.

  2. Injury Severity Scores and Nutritional Status in the Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    total lymphocyte count , d) creatinine height index, and e) urine urea nitrogen (Anderson, 1987; Blazey et al., 1986; Curtas, Chapman, & Meguid, 1989...and burn patients as being at high-risk for hospital-induced malnutrition . The trauma patient has been demonstrated to experience a period of...Nutritional supplements were studied by Peterson et al. (1988) indicating a 32% septic complication rate for patients receiving total parenteral

  3. Effects of preanesthetic dexmedetomidine on hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation in elderly patients undergoing treatment for hypertension: a randomized, double-blinded trial

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Dexmedetomidine is an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist with sedative, anxiolytic, and analgesic properties. This study was designed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of preoperative administration of 0.5 µg/kg dexmedetomidine on hemodynamic responses caused by endotracheal intubation in elderly patients undergoing treatment for hypertension. Methods Forty elderly (≥ 65 years old) patients who had been receiving hypertension treatment, had American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II, and were scheduled to undergo elective noncardiac surgery were randomly selected and assigned to 2 groups. Group C received normal saline and group D received 0.5 µg/kg dexmedetomidine intravenously over 10 min just before endotracheal intubation. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded preoperatively in the ward, immediately after study drug administration, and at 1, 3, and 5 min after endotracheal intubation. Results Compared to group C, group D showed significantly lower SBP and MAP at 1, 3, and 5 min as well as significantly lower DBP and HR at 3 and 5 min after endotracheal intubation. Conclusions In elderly patients receiving hypertension treatment, a single preanesthetic dose of dexmedetomidine (0.5 µg/kg) effectively suppressed the hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation. PMID:28184265

  4. Comparison of intubation success and glottic visualization using King Vision and C-MAC videolaryngoscopes in patients with cervical spine injuries with cervical immobilization: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Shravanalakshmi, Dhanyasi; Bidkar, Prasanna U.; Narmadalakshmi, K.; Lata, Suman; Mishra, Sandeep K.; Adinarayanan, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Glottic visualization can be difficult with cervical immobilization in patients with cervical spine injury. Indirect laryngoscopes may provide better glottic visualization in these groups of patients. Hence, we compared King Vision videolaryngoscope, C-MAC videolaryngoscope for endotracheal intubation in patients with proven/suspected cervical spine injury. Methods: After standard induction of anesthesia, 135 patients were randomized into three groups: group C (conventional C-MAC videolaryngoscope), group K (King Vision videolaryngoscope), and group D (D blade C-MAC videolaryngoscope). Cervical immobilization was maintained with Manual in line stabilization with anterior part of cervical collar removed. First pass intubation success, time for intubation, and glottic visualization (Cormack – Lehane grade and percentage of glottic opening) were noted. Intubation difficulty score (IDS) was used for grading difficulty of intubation. Five-point Likert scale was used for ease of insertion of laryngoscope. Results: First attempt success rate were 100% (45/45), 93.3% (42/45), and 95.6% (43/45) in patients using conventional C-MAC, King Vision, and D blade C-MAC videolaryngoscopes, respectively. Time for intubation in seconds was significantly faster with conventional C-MAC videolaryngoscope (23.3 ± 4.7) compared to D blade C-MAC videolaryngoscope (26.7 ± 7.1), whereas conventional C-MAC and King Vision were comparable (24.9 ± 7.2). Good grade glottic visualization was obtained with all the three videolaryngoscopes. Conclusion: All the videolaryngoscopes provided good glottic visualization and first attempt success rate. Conventional C-MAC insertion was significantly easier. We conclude that all the three videolaryngoscopes can be used effectively in patients with cervical spine injury. PMID:28217398

  5. Nasal intubation: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Varun; Acharya, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Nasal intubation technique was first described in 1902 by Kuhn. The others pioneering the nasal intubation techniques were Macewen, Rosenberg, Meltzer and Auer, and Elsberg. It is the most common method used for giving anesthesia in oral surgeries as it provides a good field for surgeons to operate. The anatomy behind nasal intubation is necessary to know as it gives an idea about the pathway of the endotracheal tube and complications encountered during nasotracheal intubation. Various techniques can be used to intubate the patient by nasal route and all of them have their own associated complications which are discussed in this article. Various complications may arise while doing nasotracheal intubation but a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and physics behind the procedure can help reduce such complications and manage appropriately. It is important for an anesthesiologist to be well versed with the basics of nasotracheal intubation and advances in the techniques. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy and the advent of newer devices have abolished the negative effect of blindness of the procedure. PMID:27994382

  6. [Diagnostics and treatment strategies for multiple trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, R; Pape, H-C

    2016-02-01

    Severe trauma is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The initial treatment and diagnostics are of immense importance in polytraumatized patients. The initial approach mainly focuses on the advanced trauma life support (ATLS) concept. This includes the identification of life-threatening conditions and application of life-saving interventions. Depending on the physiological condition of the patient, the surgical treatment strategies of early total care (ETC) or damage control orthopedics (DCO) can be chosen. Appropriate surgical management can reduce the incidence of associated delayed systemic complications. This review summarizes the most commonly used definitions of polytrauma (including the Berlin polytrauma definition) and classification systems of severely injured patients. Moreover, the recently introduced treatment strategy of the safe definitive surgery concept for severely injured patients is also discussed in this article.

  7. Microvascular response to red blood cell transfusion in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Jordan A; MacLennan, Paul A; Vandromme-Cusick, Marianne J; Angotti, Jonathan M; Magnotti, Louis J; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Rue, Loring W; Barnum, Scott R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-03-01

    Trauma patients are often transfused allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) in an effort to augment tissue oxygen delivery. However, the effect of RBC transfusion on microvascular perfusion in this patient population is not well understood. To this end, we investigated the effect of RBC transfusion on sublingual microvascular perfusion in trauma patients. Sublingual microcirculation was imaged at bedside with a sidestream dark-field illumination microscope before and after transfusion of one RBC unit in hemodynamically stable, anemic trauma patients. The perfused proportion of capillaries (PPC) before and after transfusion was determined, and the percent change in capillary perfusion following transfusion (ΔPPC) calculated. Sublingual microcirculation was observed in 30 patients. Mean age was 47 (SD, 21) years, mean Injury Severity Score was 29 (SD, 16), and mean pretransfusion hemoglobin was 7.5 (SD, 0.9) g/dL. No patients had a mean arterial pressure of less than 65 mmHg (mean, 89 [SD, 17] mmHg) or lactate of greater than 2.5 mmol/L (mean, 1.1 [SD, 0.3] mmol/L). Following transfusion, ΔPPC ranged from +68% to -36% and was found to inversely correlate significantly with pretransfusion PPC (Spearman r = -0.63, P = 0.0002). Pretransfusion PPC may be selectively deranged in otherwise stable trauma patients. Patients with relatively altered baseline PPC tend to demonstrate improvement in perfusion following transfusion, whereas those with relatively normal perfusion at baseline tend to demonstrate either no change or, in fact, a decline in PPC. Bedside sublingual imaging may have the potential to detect subtle perfusion defects and ultimately inform clinical decision making with respect to transfusion.

  8. Microvascular Response to Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jordan A.; MacLennan, Paul A.; Vandromme–Cusick, Marianne J.; Angotti, Jonathan M.; Magnotti, Louis J.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Rue, Loring W.; Barnum, Scott R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma patients are often transfused allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) in an effort to augment tissue oxygen delivery. However, the effect of RBC transfusion on microvascular perfusion in this patient population is not well understood. To this end, we investigated the effect of RBC transfusion on sublingual microvascular perfusion in trauma patients. Methods Sublingual microcirculation was imaged at bedside with a sidestream dark field illumination microscope before and after transfusion of one RBC unit in hemodynamically stable, anemic trauma patients. The proportion of perfused capillaries (PPC) pre- and post-transfusion was determined, and the percent change in capillary perfusion following transfusion (ΔPPC) calculated. Results Sublingual microcirculation was observed in 30 patients. Mean age was 47 (SD=21), mean ISS was 29 (SD=16), and mean pre-transfusion hemoglobin was 7.5 g/dL (SD=0.9). No patients had MAP < 65 mm Hg (mean 89 mm Hg, SD 17) or lactate > 2.5 mmol/L (mean 1.1 mmol/L, SD 0.3). Following transfusion, ΔPPC ranged from +68% to -36% and was found to inversely correlate significantly with pre-transfusion PPC (Spearman r= -0.63, p=0.0002). Conclusions Pre-transfusion PPC may be selectively deranged in otherwise stable trauma patients. Patients with relatively altered baseline PPC tend to demonstrate improvement in perfusion following transfusion, while those with relatively normal perfusion at baseline tend to demonstrate either no change or, in fact, a decline in PPC. Bedside sublingual imaging may have the potential to detect subtle perfusion defects and ultimately inform clinical decision making with respect to transfusion. PMID:22344313

  9. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults.

    PubMed

    Frerk, C; Mitchell, V S; McNarry, A F; Mendonca, C; Bhagrath, R; Patel, A; O'Sullivan, E P; Woodall, N M; Ahmad, I

    2015-12-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team.

  10. The Kepler intubation system.

    PubMed

    Hemmerling, Thomas M; Wehbe, Mohamad; Zaouter, Cedrick; Taddei, Riccardo; Morse, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Our goal in this study was to develop a robotic intubation system and to conduct a feasibility pilot study on the use of a robotic intubation system for endotracheal intubations. The Kepler Intubation System was developed, consisting of a remote control center (joystick and intubation cockpit) linked to a standard videolaryngoscope via a robotic arm. Ninety intubations were performed by the Kepler Intubation System on an airway trainer mannequin by a single operator. The first group of 30 intubations was performed with the operator in direct view of the mannequin (direct view group). The second group of 30 intubations was performed with the operator unable to see the mannequin (indirect view group). Thirty semiautomated intubations were also performed during which the robotic system replayed a trace of a previously recorded intubation maneuver (semiautomated group). First-attempt success rates and intubation times for each trial were recorded. Trends were analyzed using linear regression. Data are presented as mean (SD). All intubations were successful at first attempt. The mean intubation times were 46 (18) seconds, 51 (19) seconds, and 41 (1) seconds for the direct view, indirect view, and semiautomated group, respectively. Both the direct and indirect view groups had a negative slope, denoting that each successive trial required less time. The semiautomated group had a slope of 0 and a low SD of 1 second, illustrating the high reproducibility of automated intubations. We concluded that a robotic intubation system has been developed that can allow remote intubations within 40 to 60 seconds.

  11. Resuscitation and coagulation in the severely injured trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Midwinter, Mark J.; Woolley, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Developments in the resuscitation of the severely injured trauma patient in the last decade have been through the increased understanding of the early pathophysiological consequences of injury together with some observations and experiences of recent casualties of conflict. In particular, the recognition of early derangements of haemostasis with hypocoagulopathy being associated with increased mortality and morbidity and the prime importance of tissue hypoperfusion as a central driver to this process in this population of patients has led to new resuscitation strategies. These strategies have focused on haemostatic resuscitation and the development of the ideas of damage control resuscitation and damage control surgery continuum. This in turn has led to a requirement to be able to more closely monitor the physiological status, of major trauma patients, including their coagulation status, and react in an anticipatory fashion. PMID:21149355

  12. Endocrine and metabolic response to trauma in hypovolemic patients treated at a trauma center in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bahten, Luiz CV; Mauro, Fernando HO; Domingos, Maria F; Scheffer, Paula H; Pagnoncelli, Bruno H; Wille, Marco AR

    2008-01-01

    Background The metabolic changes in trauma patients with shock contribute directly to the survival of the patient. To understand these changes better, we made a rigorous analysis of the variations in the main examinations requested for seriously polytraumatized patients. Methods Prospective analysis of patients with blunt or penetrating trauma with hypovolemic shock, with systolic arterial pressure (SAP) equal to or lower than 90 mmHg at any time during initial treatment in the emergency room and aged between 14 and 60 years old. The following exams were analyzed: sodium, potassium, blood test, glycemia and arterial gasometry. The tests were carried out at intervals: T0 (the first exam, collected on admission) and followed by T24 (24 hours after admission), T48 (48 hours after admission), T72 (72 hours after admission). Results The test evaluations showed that there was a tendency towards hyperglycemia, which was more evident upon admission to hospital. The sodium in all the patients was found to be normal upon admission, with a later decline. However, no patient had significant hyponatremia; there was no significant variation in the potassium variable; the gasometry, low pH, BE (base excess) and bicarbonate levels when the first sample was collected and increased later with PO2 and PCO2 showing only slight variations, which meant an acidotic state during the hemorrhagic shock followed by a response from the organism to reestablish the equilibrium, retaining bicarbonate. The red blood count, shown by the GB (globular volume) and HB (hemoglobin) was normal upon entry but later it dropped steadily until it fell below normal; the white blood count (leukocytes, neutrophils and band neutrophil) remained high from the first moment of evaluation. Conclusion In this study we demonstrated the main alterations that took place in patients with serious trauma, emphasizing that even commonly requested laboratory tests can help to estimate metabolic alterations. Suitable

  13. Trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain and spine injury (TBI/TSI) is a leading cause of death and lifelong disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain, skull, and spine, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and variance in trauma mechanisms result in a wide range of age-specific traumas and patterns of brain and spine injuries. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head and spine injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI/TSI, which enhances sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, will guide therapy, and may give important information about the prognosis. The purposes of this chapter are to: (1) discuss the unique epidemiology, mechanisms, and characteristics of TBI/TSI in children; (2) review the anatomic and functional imaging techniques that can be used to study common and rare pediatric TBI/TSI and their complications; (3) comprehensively review frequent primary and secondary brain injuries; and (4) to give a short overview of two special types of pediatric TBI/TSI: birth-related and nonaccidental injuries.

  14. Reliability of indications for cervical spine films in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, D L; Gillespie, K R; McCarthy, M C; Mail, J T; Lappas, J C; Broadie, T A

    1989-10-01

    Common emergency room practice mandates cervical spine (C-spine) films in all trauma patients with potential injuries. With the increasing costs of medical care, such liberal criteria may not be justified. This 1-year prospective study of 860 patients who presented to a Level I Trauma Center was undertaken to determine the signs and symptoms that would select the patients at risk of C-spine injury. The clinical presentation of each patient was correlated with the presence of C-spine fracture. Twenty-four patients (2.8%) had injuries demonstrated by plain film radiography. The incidence of fracture in 536 symptomatic patients was 4%. A significant likelihood of C-spine fracture was seen in patients with respiratory compromise (100%), motor dysfunction (54.5%), and altered sensorium (8.9%) (p less than 0.001). No fractures were seen in asymptomatic patients (p less than 0.001). Cervical spine radiography should be performed in patients with abnormal neurologic findings or symptoms referable to the neck. In alert asymptomatic patients, cervical spine radiography may be omitted.

  15. [Cost analysis of the treatment of patients with multiple trauma].

    PubMed

    Rösch, M; Klose, T; Leidl, R; Gebhard, F; Kinzl, L; Ebinger, T

    2000-08-01

    Current clinical management after multiple trauma is expensive. The aim of the present study was to quantify the actual costs of inpatient treatment after multiple trauma in a German university hospital, to compare the actual costs with the reimbursement rates, and to identify important determinants of costs. Routine documentation of hospital costs at a patient level was not available. Therefore a method for calculating the costs of resource utilization during clinical treatment of patients was developed. The concept was based on financial and utilization data provided by the hospital administration and patient-specific data. The average costs per case in the study group (mean ISS = 37) were 73.613 DM, maximal costs were up to 292.490 DM. The most costly components were intensive care, accounting for 60%, followed by procedures in the operating room (24%). A comparison with the reimbursement rates resulted in an average loss of 23.211 DM per case. Factors significantly associated with the costs of acute care hospitalization were outcome, injury severity, pattern of injury, blood volume replacement, length of mechanical ventilation, and number of operations. Whereas patient age, CNS state, mechanism of injury, pre-hospital care, and time between accident and hospital admission revealed no effect. Given the current reimbursement rates, multiple trauma care clearly belongs to those categories of care which have to be subsidized within the hospital. Any challenge to the optimal level of care resulting from this should be avoided.

  16. [Endoscopic diagnosis, treatment and prevention of intubation related injuries of the larynx and trachea in neurosurgical patients].

    PubMed

    Gasanov, A L; Levitskaia, N N; Pinchuk, T P; Danielian, Sh N; Petrikov, S S; Efremenko, S V

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study was to assess of efficacy of endoscopic diagnosis, prevention and treatment of intubation related larynx and tracheal injuries in patients with acute neurosurgical pathology and prolonged mechanical ventilation. 199 patients with different neurosurgical pathology were enrolled in the study group. Mean age was 50 +/- 14. Control group consisted of 399 patient. Mean age was 43 +/- 12. Clinical state of patient from both group were similar. Endoscopic method in the study group included revision of airways via nasal route with tracheostomy tube inserted. Larynx and tracheal injuries by endoscopy were identified in 42 patients (33.6%) in the study group and in 12 patients (7.6) in the control group. Such injuries weren't mentioned in 83 patients in study group and in 146 patients of the control group. Tracheal stenosis was developed in the study group in 0,8% of patients, which is by 7,9 times lower than in the control group (6.3%). We consider that this result was achieved due to our approach to treatment and prevention of tracheal stenosis.

  17. C-MAC® video laryngoscope with D-BLADE™ and Frova introducer for awake intubation in a patient with parapharyngeal mass

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, S; Dhanger, S; Tilak, P; Gnanasekar, R

    2016-01-01

    Parapharyngeal tumors are rare head and neck tumors which can present as an intraoral mass and can pose great challenge to anesthesiologists. The primary concern is the difficult airway due to gross anatomical distortion of the upper airway. Securing the airway in an awake state should be the primary goal of anesthesiologists to avoid catastrophic complications. Herewith, we report the successful use of C-MAC® video laryngoscope with the acute-angle D-BLADE™ in combination with Frova introducer for awake intubation in a patient with parapharyngeal mass after multiple attempts of failed fiber-optic intubation. PMID:27833500

  18. Hot Climate and Perioperative Outcome in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bhawna; Katyal, Sunil; Gautam, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Extreme hot climatic conditions constitute a major public health threat. Recent studies have shown higher rate of perioperative complications during hot weather. Although a lot of researches have been carried out to evaluate effect of hot climatic conditions and its correlation with other medical conditions, but very little has been studied in trauma patients. Aim To evaluate the impact of hot climatic conditions on perioperative morbidity in trauma patients. Materials and Methods We enrolled 100 trauma patients scheduled for surgery after approval by the Hospital and University Ethical Committee. Patients were grouped as Control Group (C) when outdoor temperature ranged in comfortable zone i.e., 20-290C and Study Group (S) when outdoor temperature ranged 400C or more. Patients living in regular air conditioned atmosphere (more than 18 hours per day) and with co-morbid conditions or on drugs interfering with temperature regulation were excluded. Student’s t-test, z-test and chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis. Results Both groups were comparable in terms of demographics, age (control group C=38.2±12.93 years and in group S= 40.14 ± 15.98 years), sex, socioeconomic status and type of surgery. Mean Trauma Index Score (TIS) were 6.20±1.56 and 5.80±1.31 respectively. All patients were of low risk as per Shoe Maker’s risk criteria. Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) stay was similar. Mean duration of hospital stay was 12.16 ± 8.50 days in group C and 10.98 ± 6.90 days in group S (p-value 0.21). 20% patients in group C whereas 54% in group S had complications (p= 0.009). There was a higher incidence of infections as well as respiratory distress in group S. On multiple logistic regression analysis peak environmental temperature was found to be the single independent risk factor for predicting perioperative morbidity. Conclusion High ambient temperature adversely affects the outcome of surgery even in low risk young trauma patients

  19. Mucormycosis of the Forehead and Sinuses in a Trauma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nathan; Kimbrough, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection in immunocompetent patients. It is not commonly seen in trauma patients who sustain multisystem injuries and are often exposed to numerous infectious sources. A multidisciplinary approach between medical and surgical specialties is crucial to ensuring timely diagnosis and treatment as morbidity and mortality can be high once acquired. In addition to antifungal therapy, radical debridement and reconstruction by plastic surgery is often necessary. Review of the literature shows that there is no definitive reconstructive technique for mucormycosis of the forehead and sinuses because the amount of tissue destruction may be varied in location and depth, therefore requiring varying extents of debridement. However, other reconstructive techniques commonly used for oncologic and trauma reconstructions can be used to achieve functionality and a satisfactory cosmetic result. Few facial reconstructions after infection with mucormycosis have been documented in the literature. PMID:27536497

  20. [Head trauma patients and their life course].

    PubMed

    Gilart de Keranflec'h, Charlotte; Décaillet, François

    2017-03-01

    A traumatic brain injury constitutes a complex treatment situation. Nurses are on the frontline having to assume a difficult position between idealism and fatalism with regard to the care pathway and quality of life. Taking a long-term approach to the care and systemised feedback from the patients form simple and economical levers for improvement.

  1. On-scene times for trauma patients in West Yorkshire.

    PubMed Central

    Goodacre, S W; Gray, A; McGowan, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether length of time on-scene in patients with major injury was associated with severity of injury or with abnormal on-scene physiology. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of a convenience sample of patients in whom prehospital on-scene times were entered onto the regional major trauma database. On-scene times of patients were analysed to assess whether ultimate injury severity score or on scene physiology measurements affected times. This was undertaken by examining subgroups of patients with similar injury severity or physiological measurements by Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney testing and comparing 95% confidence intervals of the mean on-scene times. RESULTS: The mean on-scene time for 111 non-entrapped patients was 26 minutes (95% confidence interval 23.5 to 28.6). Patients with injury severity score of > 15, with a Glasgow coma scale of < 13, and with an abnormal pulse spent significantly less time on-scene than less severely injured or physiologically deranged patients. CONCLUSIONS: Paramedics have the ability to recognise patients with severe injury and reduce on-scene times. On-scene times were consistently long throughout all subgroups of major trauma patients. PMID:9315926

  2. Why Do We Put Cervical Collars On Conscious Trauma Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Benger, Jonathan; Blackham, Julian

    2009-01-01

    In this commentary we argue that fully alert, stable and co-operative trauma patients do not require the application of a semi-rigid cervical collar, even if they are suspected of underlying cervical spine fracture, unless their conscious level deteriorates or they find the short-term support of a cervical collar helpful. Despite the historical and cultural barriers that exist, the potential benefits are such that this hypothesis merits rigorous testing in well-designed research trials. PMID:19765308

  3. Why do we put cervical collars on conscious trauma patients?

    PubMed

    Benger, Jonathan; Blackham, Julian

    2009-09-18

    In this commentary we argue that fully alert, stable and co-operative trauma patients do not require the application of a semi-rigid cervical collar, even if they are suspected of underlying cervical spine fracture, unless their conscious level deteriorates or they find the short-term support of a cervical collar helpful. Despite the historical and cultural barriers that exist, the potential benefits are such that this hypothesis merits rigorous testing in well-designed research trials.

  4. Is non-thyroidal illness syndrome a predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Zehra; Kirakli, Cenk; Cimen, Pınar; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Talay, Fahrettin; Tibet, Gultekin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is considered to be associated with adverse outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In this study, we evaluated the association between NTIS and prolonged weaning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients admitted to the ICU. Materials and methods: In total, 125 patients with COPD admitted to our ICU who underwent invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) were enrolled. We collected each patient’s baseline characteristics including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, body mass index (BMI), and thyroid hormones 24 h after ICU admission. The presence of pulmonary infection was also recorded. The primary outcome was prolonged weaning, defined as patients who failed at least three weaning attempts or required > 7 days of weaning after the first spontaneous breathing trial. Results: Of the 127 patients studied, 64 had normal thyroid function tests and 61 had NTIS. Patients with NTIS had significantly higher APACHE II scores, prolonged weaning, and pulmonary infection. Patients with NTIS had a higher risk for prolonged weaning (odds ratio, OR = 3.21; 95% CI = 1.31-7.83).The presence of pulmonary infection was also an independent risk factors for prolonged weaning. Conclusions: NTIS may be an independent predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated COPD patients. PMID:26309710

  5. [Enteral nutrition in the multiple trauma patient].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J A; Montejo González, J C

    1992-01-01

    The hypermetabolism that develops in patients with severe polytraumatism has led to the need for an aggressive metabolic-nutritional support from the start. Parenteral Nutrition is the preferred technique in many instances, due to the doubts on the effectiveness of enteral nutrition in the control of the metabolic response and to problems of gastrointestinal tolerance derived from its administration. However, the role of enteral nutrition as an important factor which limits the development of bacterial translocation and the chain of events leading to multiorganic failure appears to be more and more well-established and is an important argument for justifying the early administration of enteral nutrition in these patients. In accordance with the accumulated experience of several authors over the past few years, enteral nutrition may be administered early in polytraumatized patients. This is not only accompanied by the evidence of acceptable gastrointestinal tolerance to the diet, but also by additional advantages compared to parenteral nutrition, such as the maintenance of trophism and immunocompetence of the digestive mucosa, the reduction of septic complications and also greater nutritional effectiveness which can be evaluated by the behaviour of the seric proteins used as nutritional evolution markers. The interest of the different diet formulae which exist at present, for example diets enriched with branched-chain amino acids, diets with added fibre, peptidic diets, specific pulmonary diets or "euglycaemic diets" is evaluated in this review. All these diets may mean an increase in the effectiveness and/or tolerance of enteral nutrition in polytraumatized patients, and also contribute to the handling of specific problems such as "stress" hyperglycaemia or the withdrawal of mechanical ventilation support. The use of specific nutrients for the digestive mucosa, such as glutamine or short chain fatty acids seems to be an important factor in the reduction of

  6. Safety and efficacy of vena cava filters in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Giannoudis, Peter V; Pountos, Ippokratis; Pape, Hans Christoph; Patel, Jai V

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), due to its sudden onset, notoriously difficult diagnosis, unpredictable nature and often fatal outcome, remains one of the most feared complications in surgical practice. Trauma patients with multisystem injuries, extremity or pelvic fractures and head or spinal cord injuries often pose a significant dilemma for the surgeon because of the inability to use conventional measures such as anticoagulation therapy and compression devices. On the other hand, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is high among trauma patients and the attendant risk of PE is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Inferior vena cava (IVC) interruption by placement of diverse filtering devices has evolved over the past three decades. With the use of these devices, the risk of PE has been reduced dramatically. However, variable rates of complications are reported from their use. In this study, we review all the available data on IVC filter placement in trauma patients and we discuss the potential complications of IVC filters in order to understand better the risk/benefit ratio of their use.

  7. Radiation exposure in body computed tomography examinations of trauma patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortesniemi, M.; Kiljunen, T.; Kangasmäki, A.

    2006-06-01

    Multi-slice CT provides an efficient imaging modality for trauma imaging. The purpose of this study was to provide absorbed and effective dose data from CT taking into account the patient size and compare such doses with the standard CT dose quantities based on standard geometry. The CT examination data from abdominal and thoracic scan series were collected from 36 trauma patients. The CTDIvol, DLPw and effective dose were determined, and the influence of patient size was applied as a correction factor to calculated doses. The patient size was estimated from the patient weight as the effective radius based on the analysis from the axial images of abdominal and thoracic regions. The calculated mean CTDIvol, DLPw and effective dose were 15.2 mGy, 431 mGy cm and 6.5 mSv for the thorax scan, and 18.5 mGy, 893 mGy cm and 14.8 mSv for the abdomen scan, respectively. The doses in the thorax and abdomen scans taking the patient size into account were 34% and 9% larger than the standard dose quantities, respectively. The use of patient size in dose estimation is recommended in order to provide realistic data for evaluation of the radiation exposure in CT, especially for paediatric patients and smaller adults.

  8. Difficult endotracheal intubation secondary to tracheal deviation and stenosis in a patient with severe kyphoscoliosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyun; Jo, Jun-ho

    2016-01-01

    We report on a case of difficult endotracheal intubation in a patient with marked tracheal deviation at an angle of 90 degrees combined with stenosis due to kyphoscoliosis with vertebral body fusion. After induction of general anesthesia, a proper laryngeal view was easily obtained using a videolaryngoscope. But a tracheal tube could not be advanced more than 3 cm beyond the vocal cords due to resistance, despite various attempts, including the use of small size tubes, full rotation of the tube tip, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Ultimately, the airway was successfully secured by placing a tube tip above the area of resistance and by additionally packing saline-soaked gauzes around the tracheal inlet to minimize gas leakage and to fasten the tube in the trachea. PMID:27482317

  9. Oxidative stress in severe pulmonary trauma in critical ill patients. Antioxidant therapy in patients with multiple trauma--a review.

    PubMed

    Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Papurica, Marius; Dumbuleu, Maria Corina; Chira, Alexandru Mihai; Rosu, Oana Maria; Sandesc, Dorel

    2015-01-01

    Multiple trauma patients require extremely good management and thus, the trauma team needs to be prepared and to be up to date with the new standards of intensive therapy. Oxidative stress and free radicals represent an extremely aggressive factor to cells, having a direct consequence upon the severity of lung inflammation. Pulmonary tissue is damaged by oxidative stress, leading to biosynthesis of mediators that exacerbate inflammation modulators. The subsequent inflammation spreads throughout the body, leading most of the time to multiple organ dysfunction and death. In this paper, we briefly present an update of biochemical effects of oxidative stress and free radical damage to the pulmonary tissue in patients in critical condition in the intensive care unit. Also, we would like to present a series of active substances that substantially reduce the aggressiveness of free radicals, increasing the chances of survival.

  10. Comparing Clonidine and Lidocaine on Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation in Controlled Hypertensive Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltani Mohammadi, Sussan; Maziar, Alireza; Saliminia, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemodynamic fluctuations in response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation and their potential hazards have been well-recognized, especially in hypertensive patients. Many drugs in various combinations have been used to attenuate these adverse responses. Objectives: We conducted a study to compare lidocaine with clonidine on the attenuation of hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, in controlled hypertensive patients undergoing general anesthesia. Patients and Methods: Eighty-six patients of American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) class II, who were aged 18 to 65-years-old and were scheduled for elective surgeries under general anesthesia, were included. The patients were randomly divided into two equal groups. The clonidine group received 0.2 mg oral clonidine 90 minutes before surgery and the lidocaine group received a placebo tablet at the same time. All patients in both groups were anesthetized with the same technique, including: intravenous fentanyl 3 mcg/kg, sodium thiopental 5 mg/kg, and atracurium 0.5 mg/kg. The lidocaine group received 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine but the clonidine group received the same volume of saline ninety seconds before intubation. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded before intubation and 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes after endotracheal intubation. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups’ hemodynamic parameters, including heart rate and systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures at the measured points. There were also no significant differences within each group in hemodynamic responses at the measured points (P > 0.05). Twenty patients in the clonidine and three patients in the lidocaine group complained of mouth dryness (P = 0.001). Fourteen patients in the clonidine and four patients in the lidocaine group had bradycardia (P = 0.008). Nineteen patients in the clonidine and six patients in the lidocaine group had orthostatic hypotension (P = 0

  11. Renal profile in patients with orthopaedic trauma: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ashish; John, Bobby; Pawar, Basant; Sadiq, Shalinder

    2009-08-01

    This prospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence of acute renal failure (ARF) and to identify factors contributing to development of ARF in orthopaedic trauma patients. A total of 55 patients who presented over a period of one year with trauma to upper and lower limbs were studied. Patients with renal injury, chest or abdominal injury, isolated fractures of the hands, feet and axial skeleton involvement were excluded. Out of these, five developed acute renal failure, three recovered and two died. The overall incidence of ARF in this study was 9.1%. Patients with lower limb injuries are at higher risk of developing ARF. Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) > or = 7, higher age, patient presenting with shock, increased myoglobin levels in urine and serum have been correlated with a greater risk of patients developing ARF and a higher mortality. This study attempts to determine the magnitude of crush injury causing renal failure and the incidence of renal failure in patients with injuries affecting the appendicular skeleton exclusively.

  12. Heightened Temporal Summation of Pain in Patients with Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders and History of Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Amanda L.; Morris, Matthew C.; Bruehl, Stephen; Westbrook, Travis D.; Walker, Lynn S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) report experiencing trauma more often than healthy controls, but little is known regarding psychophysical correlates. Purpose Test the hypothesis that adolescents and young adults with FGIDs since childhood and a trauma history (n = 38) would exhibit heightened temporal summation to thermal pain stimuli, an index of central sensitization, and greater clinical symptoms compared to patients with FGIDs and no trauma history (n = 95) and healthy controls (n =135). Methods Participants completed self-report measures, an experimental pain protocol, and psychiatric diagnostic interview as part of a larger longitudinal study. Results FGID+Trauma patients exhibited greater temporal summation than FGID+No Trauma patients and healthy controls. Additionally, FGID+Trauma patients exhibited greater gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal symptom severity, number of chronic pain sites, and disability. Conclusions Assessing for trauma history in patients with FGIDs could identify a subset at risk for greater central sensitization and pain-related symptoms. PMID:25967582

  13. Development of an orthopedic surgery trauma patient handover checklist

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Justin; Donnon, Tyrone; Hutchison, Carol; Duffy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background In surgery, preoperative handover of surgical trauma patients is a process that must be made as safe as possible. We sought to determine vital clinical information to be transferred between patient care teams and to develop a standardized handover checklist. Methods We conducted standardized small-group interviews about trauma patient handover. Based on this information, we created a questionnaire to gather perspectives from all Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) members about which topics they felt would be most important on a handover checklist. We analyzed the responses to develop a standardized handover checklist. Results Of the 1106 COA members, 247 responded to the questionnaire. The top 7 topics felt to be most important for achieving patient safety in the handover were comorbidities, diagnosis, readiness for the operating room, stability, associated injuries, history/mechanism of injury and outstanding issues. The expert recommendations were to have handover completed the same way every day, all appropriate radiographs available, adequate time, all appropriate laboratory work and more time to spend with patients with more severe illness. Conclusion Our main recommendations for safe handover are to use standardized checklists specific to the patient and site needs. We provide an example of a standardized checklist that should be used for preoperative handovers. To our knowledge, this is the first checklist for handover developed by a group of experts in orthopedic surgery, which is both manageable in length and simple to use. PMID:24461220

  14. Analyzing fat embolism syndrome in trauma patients at AIIMS Apex Trauma Center, New Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Babita; D’souza, Nita; Sawhney, Chhavi; Farooque, Kamran; Kumar, Ajeet; Agrawal, Pramendra; Misra, M C

    2011-01-01

    Background: Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a constellation of symptoms and signs subsequent to orthopedic trauma. Materials and Methods: The clinical profile of FES in the trauma population was studied over 2 years and 8 months. Results: The incidence of FES among all patients with long bone and pelvic fractures was 0.7% (12). The mean injury severity score was 10.37 (SD 1.69) (range 9-14). The diagnosis of FES was made by clinical and laboratory criteria. Hypoxia was the commonest presentation (92%). The average days of onset of symptoms were 3.5 (SD1.29) days. Management included ventilator support in 75%, average ventilator days being 7.8 (SD 4.08) days. The average ICU stay and hospital stay were 9.1 days and 29.7 days, respectively. A mortality of 8.3% (1) was observed. Conclusion: Fat embolism remains a diagnosis of exclusion and is a clinical dilemma. Clinically apparent FES is unusual and needs high index of suspicion, especially in long bone and pelvic fractures. PMID:21887021

  15. Preoxygenation using invasive ventilator in volume control mode in patients with emergency intubation can shorten the time of preoxygenation and improve the quality of preoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Sun, Jiang-Li; Bai, Zheng-Hai; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Zheng-Liang; Pei, Hong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preoxygenation can rapidly improve oxygenation and enhance the security of endotracheal intubation, so it is very essential before endotracheal intubation. The conventional preoxygenation method self-inflating bag (SIB) is not very effective in case of emergency. So our study aims to find a more effective method of preoxygenation in a critical situation. We retrospectively analyzed data of 105 patients in this study. A total of 49 patients with preoxygenation with invasive ventilator in volume control mode (VCM) and 56 patients with preoxygenation with SIB were included. No significant differences were detected in the baseline data of the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Time of preoxygenation (95%) was 174 (168–180) seconds in group VCM and 205 (199–212) seconds in group SIB (P < 0.05), and multifactor linear regression showed that its main risk factors were the methods of preoxygenation and PO2 before preoxygenation (P < 0.05). Immediate SPO2 after preoxygenation was 91 (89–92)% in group VCM and 85 (83–86)% in group SIB (P < 0.05). Total time of preoxygenation and intubation was 266 (252–280) seconds in group VCM and 318 (298–338) seconds in group SIB (P < 0.05). The 24-hour and overall survival rate in group SIB were lower than in group VCM (P > 0.05). Cox regression showed that SaO2 at 5 minutes after intubation was the major risk factor for the survival rate. Invasive ventilator with volume control mode can shorten the time of preoxygenation and improve the quality of preoxygenation in patients with emergency intubation and may be a better method of preoxygenation in a critical situation. PMID:27749553

  16. Zinc Supplementation in Adult Mechanically Ventilated Trauma Patients is Associated with Decreased Occurrence of Ventilator-associated Pneumonia: A Secondary Analysis of a Prospective, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzadeh Kiabi, Farshad; Alipour, Abbas; Darvishi-Khezri, Hadi; Aliasgharian, Aily; Emami Zeydi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a type of lung infection that typically affects critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The aim of this analysis is to determine potential association between zinc supplementation with the occurrence of VAP in adult mechanically ventilated trauma patients. Subjects and Methods: This secondary analysis of a prospective observational study was carried out over a period of 1 year in ICUs of one teaching hospital in Iran. A total of 186 adults mechanically ventilated trauma patients, who required at least 48 h of MV and received zinc sulfate supplement (n = 82) or not (n = 104) during their ICU stay, were monitored for the occurrence of VAP until their discharge from the ICU or death. Results: Forty-one of 186 patients developed VAP, 29.09 days after admission (95% confidence interval [CI]: 26.27–31.9). The overall incidence of VAP was 18.82 cases per 1000 days of intubation (95% CI: 13.86–25.57). Patients who received zinc sulfate supplement have smaller hazard of progression to VAP than others (hazard ratio: 0.318 [95% CI: 0.138–0.732]; P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The findings show that zinc supplementation may be associated with a significant reduction in the occurrence of VAP in adult mechanically ventilated trauma patients. Further well-designed randomized clinical trials to confirm the efficacy of this potential preventive modality are warranted. PMID:28197049

  17. Real Money: Complications and Hospital Costs in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hemmila, Mark R.; Jakubus, Jill L.; Maggio, Paul M.; Wahl, Wendy L.; Dimick, Justin B.; Campbell, Darrell A.; Taheri, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Major postoperative complications are associated with a substantial increase in hospital costs. Trauma patients are known to have a higher rate of complications than the general surgery population. We sought to utilize the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) methodology to evaluate hospital costs, length of stay, and payment associated with complications in trauma patients. Study Design Using NSQIP principles, patient data were collected on 512 adult patients admitted to the trauma service for > 24 hours at a Level 1 trauma center (2004–2005). Patients were placed in one of three groups: no complications (none), ≥ 1 minor complication (minor, e.g., urinary tract infection), or ≥ 1 major complication (major, e.g., pneumonia). Total hospital charges, costs, payment, and length of stay associated with each complication group were determined from a cost accounting database. Multiple regression was used to determine the costs of each type of complication after adjusting for differences in age, gender, new injury severity score (nISS), Glasgow coma scale score (GCS), maximum head abbreviated injury scale (AIS), and first emergency department systolic blood pressure. Results 330 (64%) patients had no complications, 53 (10%) had ≥ 1 minor complication, and 129 (25%) had ≥ 1 major complication. Median hospital charges increased from $33,833 (none) to $81,936 (minor) and $150,885 (major). The mean contribution to margin per day was similar for the no complication and minor complication groups ($994 vs $1,115, p=0.7). Despite higher costs, the patients in the major complication group generated a higher mean contribution to margin per day when compared to the no complication group ($2,168, p<0.001). The attributable increase in median total hospital costs when adjusted for confounding variables was $19,915 for the minor complication group (p<0.001), and $40,555 for the major complication group (p<0.001). Conclusion Understanding the costs

  18. Delayed sequence intubation: is it ready for prime time?

    PubMed

    Taylor, John A; Hohl, Corinne Michele

    2017-01-01

    Clinical question Does delayed sequence intubation (DSI) improve preoxygenation and safety when intubating otherwise uncooperative patients? Article chosen Weingart SD, Trueger S, Wong N, et al. Delayed sequence intubation: a prospective observational study. Ann Emerg Med 2015;65(4):349-55. doi:10.1016/j.annemergmed.2014.09.025 OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the administration of ketamine 3 minutes prior to the administration of a muscle relaxant allows for optimal preoxygenation in uncooperative patients undergoing intubation.

  19. Comparison of the single-use Ambu(®) aScope™ 2 vs the conventional fibrescope for tracheal intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilisation by a semirigid collar*.

    PubMed

    Krugel, V; Bathory, I; Frascarolo, P; Schoettker, P

    2013-01-01

    Fibreoptic intubation remains a key technique for the management of difficult intubation. We randomly compared the second generation single-use Ambu(®) aScope™ 2 videoscope with a standard re-usable flexible intubating fibrescope in 50 tracheal intubations in patients with a difficult airway simulated by a semirigid collar. All patients' tracheas were intubated successfully with the aScope 2 or the re-usable fibrescope. The median (IQR [range]) time to intubate was significantly longer with the aScope 2 70 (55-97 [41?-226]) s vs 50 (40-59 [27-175]) s, p = 0.0003) due to an increased time to see the carina. Quality of vision was significantly lower with the aScope 2 (excellent 24 (48%) vs 49 (98%), p = 0.0001; good 22 (44%) vs 1 (2%), p = 0.0001; poor 4 (8%) vs 0, p = 0.12) but with no difference in the subjective ease to intubate (easy score of 31 (62%) vs 38 (76%), p = 0.19; intermediate 12 (24%) vs 7 (14%), p = 0.31; difficult 7 (14%) vs 5 (5%), p = 0.76). The longer times to intubate and the poorer scores for quality of vision do not support the use of the single-use aScope 2 videoscope as an alternative to the re-usable fibrescope.

  20. Levodopa reverse stridor and prevent subsequent endotracheal intubation in Parkinson disease patients with bilateral vocal cord palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Chan; Wu, Meng-Ni; Liou, Li-Min; Chang, Yang-Pei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Respiratory abnormalities are often overlooked; however, because of their potential comorbidity, they must be analyzed to determine the most effective treatment for patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Among various theories on respiratory abnormalities in PD, “upper airway obstruction” and “restrictive respiratory disorders” are 2 of the most accepted etiologies; both appear to be related to basal ganglia dysfunction. Complex vocal cord muscle dysfunction contributes to stridor, which can be a manifestation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic dysfunction. Stridor is a lethal form of upper airway obstruction in PD patients; its most frequent causes are bilateral vocal cord palsy, laryngeal spasms, and dystonia of the supra-laryngeal muscle. Several previous studies have suggested that levodopa administration induces a significant improvement of both lung function and symptoms of parkinsonian syndrome. Case Summary: We reported a 77-year-old gentleman PD patient admitted for acute levodopa-responsive stridor resulting from bilateral vocal cord palsy. Dopaminergic therapy prevented the need for subsequent endotracheal intubation and tracheostomy treatment. Conclusion: It is vital to understand that complex vocal cord muscle dysfunction may be related to nigrostriatal dopaminergic dysfunction in PD patients. The strategy of levodopa up-titration should be considered an option because it may be beneficial in relieving both stridor and parkinsonian syndrome, and in preventing respiratory failure. PMID:27977587

  1. Intentional esophageal intubation to improve visualization during emergent endotracheal intubation in the context of massive vomiting: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sorour, Khaled; Donovan, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Impaired visualization during intubation due to vomitus of gastric contents is a potential cause of failed intubation. An 82-year-old woman was intubated emergently for respiratory distress secondary to aspiration of gastric contents. Her intubation was hindered by the presence of a massive amount of ongoing vomitus that impaired visualization and overwhelmed all suction capabilities. Intentional blind intubation of the esophagus with an endotracheal tube was performed with successful diversion of ongoing vomitus away from the airway. Thereafter, after brief suctioning, the larynx was quickly visualized and the patient was successfully intubated.

  2. Decision tool for the early diagnosis of trauma patient hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liangyou; McKenna, Thomas M; Reisner, Andrew T; Gribok, Andrei; Reifman, Jaques

    2008-06-01

    We present a classifier for use as a decision assist tool to identify a hypovolemic state in trauma patients during helicopter transport to a hospital, when reliable acquisition of vital-sign data may be difficult. The decision tool uses basic vital-sign variables as input into linear classifiers, which are then combined into an ensemble classifier. The classifier identifies hypovolemic patients with an area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.76 (standard deviation 0.05, for 100 randomly-reselected patient subsets). The ensemble classifier is robust; classification performance degrades only slowly as variables are dropped, and the ensemble structure does not require identification of a set of variables for use as best-feature inputs into the classifier. The ensemble classifier consistently outperforms best-features-based linear classifiers (the classification AUC is greater, and the standard deviation is smaller, p<0.05). The simple computational requirements of ensemble classifiers will permit them to function in small fieldable devices for continuous monitoring of trauma patients.

  3. An epidemiological analysis of patients with abdominal trauma in an eastern Indian metropolitan city.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Halder, Sandip Kumar; Paira, Susil Kumar; Mukherjee, Ramanuj; Kumar, Soumen Kanti; Mukherjee, Saibal Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The profile and pattern of abdominal trauma is changing with progressing civilisation. We are lacking epidemiological data from most parts of the world. This study was conducted to prepare a database in our set up and look into the pattern of abdominal trauma, make an aetiological correlation of abdominal trauma with the types of injuries, identify the preventable factors causing delay in intervention and, compare the data with the other available national and international data. This prospective, observational study was done in a teaching hospital in a metropolitan city of eastern India. Records of patients with abdominal trauma were collected in predesigned forms, from admission to discharge. Data were analysed applying standard statistical techniques. Males (87.3%) predominated with the age range between 21 and 30 years, and the majority (73.5%) had blunt abdominal trauma. Compression injury (57.3%) commonly caused blunt trauma and stab injuries caused majority of penetrating trauma. The commonest organ injured both in blunt and penetrating trauma was small bowel (30.7% and 33.3% respectively). It was found that prehospital trauma care is virtually non-existent in this region. We are lacking a uniform protocol for the management of abdominal trauma across the hospitals. With the availability of better investigational modalities we are moving more towards a conservative approach to the abdominal trauma patients, especially the blunt abdominal trauma patients with solid organ injuries.

  4. Randomized controlled study comparing the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation with McCoy, Macintosh, and C-MAC laryngoscopes in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Buhari, Faiza Sulaiman; Selvaraj, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Earlier studies have shown that the type of laryngoscope blade influences the degree of hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the hemodynamic response to oral endotracheal intubation with C-MAC laryngoscopy and McCoy laryngoscopy compared to that of Macintosh laryngoscopy in adult patients under general anesthesia. Material and Methods: This is a prospective randomized parallel group study. Ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists I patients were randomly allotted into three groups. Group A – Macintosh laryngoscopy (control group). Group B – laryngoscopy with McCoy laryngoscope. Group C – laryngoscopy with C-MAC video laryngoscope. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were monitored at baseline (just before induction), just before intubation (T0), 1 min (T1), 3 min (T3), 5 min (T5), and 10 min (T10) after intubation. Intergroup comparison of study parameters was done by unpaired sample t-test for normal data and Mann-Whitney U-test for skewed data. For within-group comparison, the repeated measures of ANOVA for normal data and Friedman followed by Wilcoxon signed rank test for skewed data were performed. Results: In C-MAC group, the HR was significantly higher than the Macintosh group at 3 min after intubation, whereas SBP, DBP, and MAP were significantly higher at 1 min. McCoy group showed a similar response compared to Macintosh group at all time intervals. Conclusion: C-MAC video laryngoscope has a comparatively greater hemodynamic response than Macintosh laryngoscope. PMID:28096584

  5. The use of Quantiferon-TB gold in-tube test in screening latent tuberculosis among Saudi Arabia dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Wakeel, Jamal Saleh; Makoshi, Ziyad; Al Ghonaim, Mohammed; Al Harbi, Ali; Al Suwaida, Abdulkareem; Algahtani, Farjah; Al Hedaithy, Mogbil; Almogairin, Sultan; Abdullah, Sami

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Screening for tuberculosis (TB) is a key strategy for controlling infection. This study aimed to detect latent TB among dialysis patients. METHODS: This is a prospective study conducted in King Saud University, Riyadh involving hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients aged ≥18 years. Patients were screened for latent TB infection (LTBI) using both TBskin test (TST) and QuantiFERONTB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT). All participants were followed-up clinically and radiologically every 3 months for 2 years. RESULTS: A total of 243 (181 HD and 62 PD) patients were included and 112(46.1%) were males. 45.3% showed positive QFT in HD patients with sensitivity of 91.7%, specificity of 71.4%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 19.5%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 91.1%. TST results in HD showed that positive TST was 17.4%, sensitivity was 63.2%, specificity was 95.5%, PPV was 51.5%, and NPV was 91.1%. Five (8.1%) showed positive QFT in PD patients with sensitivity of 7.7%, specificity of 91.8%, PPV of 6.6%, and NPV of 92.3%. TST results in PD showed that positive TST was 9.8%, sensitivity was 35.7%, specificity was 97.9%, PPV was 55.8%, and NPV was 93.3%. Previous TB infection was significantly correlated with QFT only in HD patients, but significantly associated with TST in both HD and PD patients. Also in HD, QFT was significantly associated with TST (P = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS: Due to high variability of QFT-GIT sensitivity, we recommend its use for its NPV and to use either TST or QFT in screening latent TB. PMID:26664568

  6. Foreign Body Obstruction Preventing Blind Nasal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Simon

    2006-01-01

    A healthy young male patient was scheduled for dental care under nasotracheal intubated general anesthesia. The presence of a plastic calculator key complicated the intubation. This case report describes the event and reviews some possible techniques for coping with an airway that becomes obstructed by a foreign object. PMID:16863390

  7. Comparative Efficacy of the Air-Q Intubating Laryngeal Airway during General Anesthesia in Pediatric Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Eun Jin; Choi, Geun Joo; Kang, Hyun; Baek, Chong Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Cheol; Bang, Si Ra

    2016-01-01

    Air-Q® (air-Q) is a supraglottic airway device which can be used as a guidance of intubation in pediatric as well as in adult patients. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of air-Q compared to other airway devices during general anesthesia in pediatric patients by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 10 studies including 789 patients were included in the final analysis. Compared with other supraglottic airway devices, air-Q showed no evidence for a difference in leakage pressure and insertion time. The ease of insertion was significantly lower than other supraglottic airway devices. The success rate of intubation was significantly lower than other airway devices. However, fiberoptic view was better through the air-Q than other supraglottic airway devices. Therefore, air-Q could be a safe substitute for other airway devices and may provide better fiberoptic bronchoscopic view. PMID:27419134

  8. [Blood transfusion and adjunctive therapy in the bleeding trauma patient].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y

    2008-11-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage is the most common cause of potentially preventable death in massive trauma. In addition to the early identification of potential bleeding sources and angiographic embolisation or surgical bleeding control, in-hospital management will aim at maintain tissue oxygenation with volume replacement using crystalloids, colloids and RBC. In general, RBC transfusion is recommended to maintain hemoglobin between 7-10g/dL. The complex combination of clotting factors and platelets consumption, loss and dilution, shock, hypothermia, acidosis and colloid-induced hemostatic alterations leads to coagulopathic bleeding. Most guidelines recommend the use of FFP in significant bleeding complicated by coagulopathy (PT, aPTT >1.5 times control). Platelets should be administered to maintain a platelet count above 50 x 10(9)/L (100 x 10(9)/L in patients with traumatic brain injury). However, standard laboratory tests have poor correlation with in vivo coagulopathy and the test results are not rapidly available. Empiric guidelines derived from mathematical hemodilution models developed in elective surgery settings may not be appropriate for trauma settings where significant bleeding may have already occurred. Moreover, coagulopathy is frequently present on admission in severely injured patients. Recent litterature suggests that FFP and platelets should be given early and more often to injured patients requiring massive transfusion. The place of adjunctive hemostatic therapy is discussed.

  9. Exhaled Breath Metabolomics for the Diagnosis of Pneumonia in Intubated and Mechanically-Ventilated Intensive Care Unit (ICU)-Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Oort, Pouline M. P.; de Bruin, Sanne; Weda, Hans; Knobel, Hugo H.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bos, Lieuwe D.

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of hospital-acquired pneumonia remains challenging. We hypothesized that analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath could be used to diagnose pneumonia or the presence of pathogens in the respiratory tract in intubated and mechanically-ventilated intensive care unit patients. In this prospective, single-centre, cross-sectional cohort study breath from mechanically ventilated patients was analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Potentially relevant VOCs were selected with a p-value < 0.05 and an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) above 0.7. These VOCs were used for principal component analysis and partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). AUROC was used as a measure of accuracy. Ninety-three patients were included in the study. Twelve of 145 identified VOCs were significantly altered in patients with pneumonia compared to controls. In colonized patients, 52 VOCs were significantly different. Partial least square discriminant analysis classified patients with modest accuracy (AUROC: 0.73 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57–0.88) after leave-one-out cross-validation). For determining the colonization status of patients, the model had an AUROC of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.57–0.82) after leave-one-out cross-validation. To conclude, exhaled breath analysis can be used to discriminate pneumonia from controls with a modest to good accuracy. Furthermore breath profiling could be used to predict the presence and absence of pathogens in the respiratory tract. These findings need to be validated externally. PMID:28218729

  10. Creating a Patient and Family Advisory Council at a level 1 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Willis, Reda; Krichten, Amy; Eldredge, Kelli; Carney, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Partnering with patients and families through a Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC) provides the opportunities to improve health care quality and safety. PFAC is a well-defined group of patients, families, and staff members who meet on a regular basis to ensure that patient's experiences, points of view, and recommendations are identified and shared with the organization. In fall 2010, at our level 1 trauma center, Trauma Services collaborated with the trauma nursing staff to formulate our first trauma-related PFAC.

  11. Efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine on patient's satisfaction, comfort and sedation during awake fibre-optic intubation in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy posted for elective cervical fixation

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, Saikat; Basak, Samir; Acharjee, Amita; Chakraborty, Indrani

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Various anaesthetic drugs, in addition to airway block, are used for producing favourable intubation conditions during awake fibre-optic intubation (AFOI), but most of them cause respiratory depression and hypoxaemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) dexmedetomidine (DEX) on sedation, patient comfort and cardiovascular responses during AFOI in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Methods: This randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, prospective study was conducted on 56 adult patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) undergoing elective cervical fixation, who were randomly allocated into two groups - Group D and Group C. Group D patients received DEX infusion at a rate of 1 μg/kg for the first 10 min followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h and Group C received 0.9% normal saline infusion in the same manner. Airway blocks with lignocaine were given to all patients before undergoing AFOI. Patient's alertness, sedation and cardiorespiratory changes during the procedure were assessed by the Observer Assessment Awareness and Sedation (OAA/S) scale. On the 1st post-operative day, patient's' comfort during AFOI was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Patients of Group D had an acceptable level of sedation (OAA/S score: 20 to 17 with greater comfort and satisfaction (VAS: 40–60), compared to control group (VAS: 50–90, P < 0.001.). Moreover, haemodynamic parameters were less significantly altered in the DEX group during AFOI. Conclusions: IV DEX infusion during AFOI improves patient's tolerances with an acceptable level of sedation without significant haemodynamic instability and respiratory depression. PMID:28250482

  12. Running out of gas but not trauma patients: the effect of the price of gas on trauma admissions.

    PubMed

    Goettler, Claudia E; Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Waibel, Brett H; Edwards, Melinda; Wilhelmsen, Bruce; Rotondo, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    As fuel costs steadily rise and motor vehicle collisions continue to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, we examined the relationship between the price of gasoline and the rate of trauma admissions related to gasoline consumption (GRT). The National Trauma Registry of the American College of Surgeons data of a rural Level I trauma center were queried over 27 consecutive months to identify the rate of trauma admissions/month related to gas utilization compared with the number of nongasoline related trauma admissions, based on season and day of the week. The average price/gallon of regular gas in our region was obtained from the NorthCarolinaGasPrices. com database. A log linear model with a Poisson distribution was created. No significant association exists between the average price/gallon of gasoline and the GRT rate across the months, seasons, and weekday and weekend periods. As the price of gas continues to rise, the rate of rural GRT does not decrease. Over a longer period of time and with skyrocketing prices, this relationship may not hold true. These findings may also be explained by the rural area where limited alternative transportation opportunities exist and a trauma patient population participating in high risk behavior regardless of cost.

  13. High Dynamic Range Characterization of the Trauma Patient Plasma Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Wei-Jun; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Kaushal, Amit; Monroe, Matthew E.; Varnum, Susan M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Maier, Ronald V.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY While human plasma represents an attractive sample for disease biomarker discovery, the extreme complexity and large dynamic range in protein concentrations present significant challenges for characterization, candidate biomarker discovery, and validation. Herein, we describe a strategy that combines immunoaffinity subtraction and subsequent chemical fractionation based on cysteinyl peptide and N-glycopeptide captures with 2D-LC-MS/MS to increase the dynamic range of analysis for plasma. Application of this “divide-and-conquer” strategy to trauma patient plasma significantly improved the overall dynamic range of detection and resulted in confident identification of 22,267 unique peptides from four different peptide populations (cysteinyl peptides, non-cysteinyl peptides, N-glycopeptides, and non-glycopeptides) that covered 3654 different proteins with 1494 proteins identified by multiple peptides. Numerous low-abundance proteins were identified, exemplified by 78 “classic” cytokines and cytokine receptors and by 136 human cell differentiation molecules. Additionally, a total of 2910 different N-glycopeptides that correspond to 662 N-glycoproteins and 1553 N-glycosylation sites were identified. A panel of the proteins identified in this study is known to be involved in inflammation and immune responses. This study established an extensive reference protein database for trauma patients, which provides a foundation for future high-throughput quantitative plasma proteomic studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms that underlie systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:16684767

  14. High Dynamic Range Characterization of the Trauma Patient Plasma Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Kaushal, Amit; Monroe, Matthew E.; Varnum, Susan M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Maier, Ronald V.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-06-08

    While human plasma represents an attractive sample for disease biomarker discovery, the extreme complexity and large dynamic range in protein concentrations present significant challenges for characterization, candidate biomarker discovery, and validation. Herein, we describe a strategy that combines immunoaffinity subtraction and chemical fractionation based on cysteinyl peptide and N-glycopeptide captures with 2D-LC-MS/MS to increase the dynamic range of analysis for plasma. Application of this ''divide-and-conquer'' strategy to trauma patient plasma significantly improved the overall dynamic range of detection and resulted in confident identification of 22,267 unique peptides from four different peptide populations (cysteinyl peptides, non-cysteinyl peptides, N-glycopeptides, and non-glycopeptides) that covered 3654 nonredundant proteins. Numerous low-abundance proteins were identified, exemplified by 78 ''classic'' cytokines and cytokine receptors and by 136 human cell differentiation molecules. Additionally, a total of 2910 different N-glycopeptides that correspond to 662 N-glycoproteins and 1553 N-glycosylation sites were identified. A panel of the proteins identified in this study is known to be involved in inflammation and immune responses. This study established an extensive reference protein database for trauma patients, which provides a foundation for future high-throughput quantitative plasma proteomic studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms that underlie systemic inflammatory responses.

  15. Hematologic disorders in trauma patients during parenteral alimentation with lipids.

    PubMed

    Faintuch, J; Machado, F K; Freire, A N; Reis, J R; Machado, M; Pinto, L P; Ramos, S M; Loebens, M; Jovchelevich, V; Pinotti, H W

    1996-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition with lipids is a well-accepted modality of metabolic support in seriously ill trauma patients. Intolerance to lipid administration is unusual when dosage limits are not exceeded, and few hematologic disturbances have been recorded with modern fat emulsions. In the course of intravenous alimentation of six adults admitted for traumatic lesions, eosinophilia with or without leukocytopenia was noticed after periods of four days to five weeks. Principal clinical events and hematologic derangements were documented in this population. Sepsis was not always present in the patients by the time of the complication, and in those that did require antibiotics and other drugs, the prescription remained unchanged along the episode. Discontinuation of the nutritional regimen with lipids was followed by normalization of the hematologic profile, suggesting that an acute or sub-acute allergic reaction was responsible. The appearance of skin rash in two occasions reinforces this hypothesis, and the possibility of hemophagocytosis merits consideration in two of the cases who displayed reversible acute leukocytopenia. It is concluded that blood cell aberrations are possible during intravenous feeding with lipids in trauma subjects, but tend to respond to suppression of the lipid-containing nutritional prescription.

  16. Factors Associated with the Use of Helicopter Inter-facility Transport of Trauma Patients to Tertiary Trauma Centers within an Organized Rural Trauma System

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Kenneth; Garwe, Tabitha; Bhandari, Naresh; Danford, Brandon; Albrecht, Roxie

    2016-01-01

    Objective A review of the literature yielded little information regarding factors associated with the decision to use ground (GEMS) or helicopter (HEMS) emergency medical services for trauma patients transferred inter-facility. Furthermore, studies evaluating the impact of inter-facility transport mode on mortality have reported mixed findings. Since HEMS transport is generally reserved for more severely injured patients, this introduces indication bias, which may explain the mixed findings. Our objective was to identify factors at referring non-tertiary trauma centers (NTC) influencing transport mode decision. Methods This was a case-control study of trauma patients transferred from a Level III or IV NTC to a tertiary trauma center (TTC) within 24-hours reported to the Oklahoma State Trauma Registry between 2005 and 2012. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine clinical and non-clinical factors associated with the decision to use HEMS. Results A total of 7380 patients met the study eligibility. Of these, 2803(38%) were transported inter-facility by HEMS. Penetrating injury, prehospital EMS transport, severe torso injury, hypovolemic shock, and TBI were significant predictors (p<0.05) of HEMS use regardless of distance to a TTC. Association between HEMS use and male gender, Level IV NTC, and local ground EMS resources varied by distance from the TTC. Many HEMS transported patients had minor injuries and normal vital signs. Conclusions Our results suggest that while distance remains the most influential factor associated with HEMS use, significant differences exist in clinical and non-clinical factors between patients transported by HEMS versus GEMS. To ensure comparability of study groups, studies evaluating outcome differences between HEMS and GEMS should take factors determining transport mode into account. The findings will be used to develop propensity scores to balance baseline risk between GEMS and HEMS patients for use in subsequent studies

  17. The effects of preemptive pregabalin on attenuation of stress response to endotracheal intubation and opioid-sparing effect in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Ayya Syama; Kodali, Rajeshkumar; Sulaiman, Sajith; Ravullapalli, Harish; Karthekeyan, Ranjith; Vakamudi, Mahesh

    2012-01-01

    The clinical study was designed to evaluate and compare single preoperative dose of pregabalin to a placebo regarding hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation, to assess perioperative fentanyl requirement and any side-effects. It was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel assignment, efficacy study. The study was done at a tertiary university hospital. This study was a comparison between two groups of 30 adult patients scheduled for elective off pump coronary artery bypass surgery. In the control group, the patients were given placebo capsules, and in the pregabalin group, the patients were given pregabalin 150 mg capsule orally 1 h before surgery. The patients were compared for hemodynamic changes before the start of the surgery, after induction, 1, 3, and 5 min after intubation. Additionally, fentanyl requirement during surgery and the first postoperative day was also compared. The present study shows that a single oral dose of 150 mg pregabalin given 1 h before surgery attenuated the pressor response to tracheal intubation in adults, but the drug did not show any effect on perioperative opioid consumption and was devoid of side-effects in the given dose.

  18. Effects of combination oral care on oral health, dry mouth and salivary pH of intubated patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jang, Chun Sun; Shin, Yong Soon

    2016-10-01

    Intubated patients are at risk of oral health problems. Although a variety of oral care regimens for intubated patients have been studied, there is a lack of research on the effects of combination oral care that includes tooth brushing, chlorhexidine and cold water. This open-labelled, randomized, controlled trial aimed to evaluate the effects of combination oral care on oral health status. Participants aged 20 years and older were recruited on the first day after intubation through convenience sampling in a medical intensive care unit. Random assignment was performed using an internet randomization service. The primary outcome was oral health status. Data were collected during May and June 2013. Participants were randomized to one of two groups (23 intervention and 21 control). The final analysis included 18 patients with combination oral care and 17 in the control group. The intervention group had better oral health (effect size = 1.56), less dry mouth and higher salivary pH than the control group. Any additional burden of providing combination oral care to patients who are mechanically ventilated is worthwhile in terms of clinical outcomes.

  19. The use of massive transfusion protocol for trauma and non-trauma patients in a civilian setting: what can be done better?

    PubMed Central

    Wijaya, Ramesh; Cheng, Hui Min Gloria; Chong, Chee Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Massive transfusion protocol (MTP) is increasingly used in civilian trauma cases to achieve better haemostatic resuscitation in patients requiring massive blood transfusions (MTs), with improved survival outcomes. However, in non-trauma patients, evidence for MTP is lacking. This study aims to assess the outcomes of a newly established MTP in a civilian setting, for both trauma and non-trauma patients, in an acute surgical care unit. METHODS A retrospective cohort analysis was performed on 46 patients for whom MTP was activated in Changi General Hospital, Singapore. The patients were categorised into trauma and non-trauma groups. Assessment of Blood Consumption (ABC) score was used to identify MTP trauma patients and analyse over-activation rates. RESULTS Only 39.1% of all cases with MTP activation eventually received MTs; 39.8% of the MTs were for non-trauma patients. Mean fresh frozen plasma to packed red blood cells (pRBC) ratio achieved with MTP was 0.741, while mean platelet to pRBC ratio was 0.213. The 24-hour mortality rate for all patients who received an MT upon MTP activation was 33.3% (trauma vs. non-trauma group: 45.5% vs. 14.3%). The ABC scoring system used for trauma patients had a sensitivity and specificity of 81.8% and 41.2%, respectively. CONCLUSION MTP may be used for both trauma and non-trauma patients in acute care surgery. Scoring systems to predict the need for an MT, improved compliance to predefined transfusion ratios and regular reviews of the MTP are necessary to optimise MTPs and to improve the outcomes of patients receiving MTs. PMID:27211577

  20. Impact of a trauma system on outcome of severely injured patients.

    PubMed

    Shackford, S R; Mackersie, R C; Hoyt, D B; Baxt, W G; Eastman, A B; Hammill, F N; Knotts, F B; Virgilio, R W

    1987-05-01

    We examined the impact of a trauma system on the survival of patients with a Trauma Score of 8 or less. We compared the observed survival with that predicted using a method that calculates the probability of survival (Ps) based on age, physiologic score, and anatomic severity of injury. Of 3394 patients triaged to trauma centers in a 12-month period, 283 (8.3%) had a Trauma Score of 8 or less. Sufficient data were available in 189 patients with blunt trauma to make the survival comparison. The Ps was 18%; the observed survival was 29%. Of 60 patients with penetrating trauma and complete data, the Ps was 8%; the observed survival was 20%. We attribute the improved survival to the integration of prehospital and hospital care and expeditious surgery.

  1. Endotracheal intubation in swine.

    PubMed

    Chum, Helen; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2012-11-01

    Swine are commonly used as research models for cardiovascular surgery and disease, gastrointestinal disease, organ transplantation and intra-renal surgery. These surgical models require anesthesia and, consequently, endotracheal intubation in order to protect the airway; prevent aspiration of saliva, blood and foreign materials; and maintain positive pressure ventilation of the animal. Successful intubation is vital to the stable maintenance of swine under inhalational anesthesia. Here we discuss key features of swine anatomy that make intubation challenging, equipment necessary for successful intubation and techniques for endotracheal intubation in swine.

  2. Do they really care? How trauma patients perceive nurses' caring behaviors.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Alison S; Hayes, Janice S; Clukey, Lory; Curtis, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Applying the theory of Nursing as Caring can help the nurse provide care that is perceived as caring by moderately to severely injured trauma patients. The Caring Behaviors Inventory was administered in a 1-to-1 interview format to hospitalized trauma patients in a level 2 trauma center. Nurses were positively perceived in their caring behaviors with some variation based on gender and ethnicity. The modified Caring Behaviors Inventory is quick to use and is reliable and valid.

  3. To characterize the incidence of airway misplacement of nasogastric tubes in anesthetized intubated patients by using a manometer technique.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shao-Wei; Chen, Hung-Shu; Chen, Yi-Ting; Hung, Kuo-Chuan

    2017-04-01

    This study characterized the incidence of airway misplacement of nasogastric (NG) tubes in surgical patients, and the benefit of using a manometer to discriminate gastric placement from airway placement of NG tubes. Subjects included adult patients scheduled for abdominal surgery. After tracheal intubation, a 16 Fr. NG tube was inserted blindly through the nostril, and its position was assessed using the auscultation (10-ml air insufflation) or manometer (attached to NG tubes) techniques. Briefly, a biphasic pressure change synchronous with airway pressure during mechanical ventilation indicated airway misplacement. The presence of a notable pressure change while compressing the epigastric area indicated a gastric placement. A surgeon made the final confirmation of NG tube placement within the stomach using manual palpation of the tube immediately after laparotomy. The first-attempt success rate was 82.7 % in 104 patients. There were 29 misplacements of 130 attempted insertions (oral cavity, n = 23; trachea, n = 3; distal esophagus, n = 3). The incidence of airway misplacement was 2.9 % (3 of 104 cases). For confirmation of gastric placement, the auscultation technique had a sensitivity of 100.0 % and a specificity of 79.3 %. In contrast, the manometer technique had a sensitivity of 100.0 % and a specificity of 100.0 % in the discrimination of gastric placement from airway placement of NG tubes. Airway misplacement of NG tubes is not uncommon in surgical patients, and the manometer technique may be a reliable and safe method to discriminate gastric placement from airway placement of NG tubes.

  4. Not Just an Urban Phenomenon: Uninsured Rural Trauma Patients at Increased Risk for Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Harland, Karisa K.; Hoffman, Bryce; Liao, Junlin; Choi, Kent; Skeete, Dionne; Denning, Gerene

    2015-01-01

    Introduction National studies of largely urban populations showed increased risk of traumatic death among uninsured patients, as compared to those insured. No similar studies have been done for major trauma centers serving rural states. Methods We performed retrospective analyses using trauma registry records from adult, non-burn patients admitted to a single American College of Surgeons-certified Level 1 trauma center in a rural state (2003–2010, n=13,680) and National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) registry records (2002–2008, n=380,182). Risk of traumatic death was estimated using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results We found that 9% of trauma center patients and 27% of NTDB patients were uninsured. Overall mortality was similar for both (~4.5%). After controlling for covariates, uninsured trauma center patients were almost five times more likely to die and uninsured NTDB patients were 75% more likely to die than commercially insured patients. The risk of death among Medicaid patients was not significantly different from the commercially insured for either dataset. Conclusion Our results suggest that even with an inclusive statewide trauma system and an emergency department that does not triage by payer status, uninsured patients presenting to the trauma center were at increased risk of traumatic death relative to patients with commercial insurance. PMID:26587084

  5. Blunt pediatric laryngotracheal trauma: case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kadish, H; Schunk, J; Woodward, G A

    1994-03-01

    Blunt laryngotracheal trauma can be a life-threatening event. Two cases of isolated blunt laryngotracheal trauma in pediatric patients are presented. One case involves a 12-year-old mate who suffered isolated tracheal trauma from a fall. He developed respiratory distress and required a tracheostomy. Intraoperatively he was noted to have a thyroid cartilage fracture. The other case involves a 14-year-old female who was kicked in the neck by a horse. After unsuccessful intubation attempts that completed a tracheal transection, she required an emergency cricothyrotomy and a subsequent tracheostomy. The diagnosis, differential diagnosis, associated injuries, and treatment options for blunt laryngeal trauma are reviewed.

  6. Detection of the Most Common Microorganisms and Their Resistance against Anti-microbials in Intubated Patients in an ICU in Kerman, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sarafzadeh, Farhad; Sohrevardi, SeyedMojtaba; Gharehghozli, Maryam; Ahmadinejad, Mehdi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-microbial resistance in intubated patients in intensive care unit (ICU) of Bahonar hospital in Kerman province, Iran during the year 2008. Tracheal samples were obtained from 111 intubated patients in the ICU by broncoalveolar lavage method. Amikacin, Ceftazidim and Imipenem were used to evaluate antibiotic susceptibility. For detecting anti-microbial susceptibility, minimum inhibitory concentration method were used. Colony counts equal or more than 104 microorganisms/mL were considered resistant. Overall we obtained positive tracheal cultures from 32 patients (29%) out of 111 intubated ones. The most common micro organisms isolated were Klebsiella (90.6%), Acinetobacter (28.1%) and Pseudomonas (21.9%). The results showed that the most common resistance was against to ceftazidim. The susceptibility of Klebsiellain tracheal cultures to the antibiotics was only 5%. E. coli in both sexes was 100% resistant to the tested antibiotics. In the ICU, There was a very big problem concerning antibiotic resistance. Most of the isolated microorganisms were resistant to both the old and the new antibiotics. It may be related to the inappropriate use of antibiotics, bacterial contamination of enteral feeding and infection transmission by medical staff or instruments. PMID:24381610

  7. A comparison of the Airtraq®, McGrath®, and Macintosh laryngoscopes for difficult paediatric intubation: A manikin study

    PubMed Central

    Inagawa, Gaku; Asakura, Ayako; Goto, Takahisa; Ka, Koui

    2017-01-01

    Background The efficacy of devices for difficult intubation in paediatric patients, especially with a Cormack-Lehane grade 4 view, has yet to be established. We compared intubating parameters among three devices (the Airtraq®, McGrath®, and Macintosh laryngoscopes). Methods This study is a randomised cross-over trial. Participants were 20 anaesthetists. Each device was tested three times using a paediatric manikin with a Cormack-Lehane grade 4 view. The order to use each device was randomised by a computer-generated random sequence. The primary endpoint was the rate of successful intubation. Secondary endpoints included the time taken to intubate, percentage of glottic opening score, and severity of potential dental trauma. Results The successful intubation rates of the Airtraq®, McGrath®, and Macintosh laryngoscopes were 100%, 72%, and 45%, respectively. The risk ratio of the success rates of Airtraq® compared with McGrath® and Macintosh laryngoscopes were 1.40 (95% CI; 1.19–1.64, P < 0.001) and 2.22 (95% CI; 1.68–2.94, P < 0.001), respectively. The modified Cormack-Lehane grade and percentage of the glottic opening score were better for the Airtraq® than for the other devices. The dental trauma score was lower for the Airtraq® than for the other devices. There were no significant differences in the intubation time among the groups. Conclusions The Airtraq® had higher success rate, had better visibility, and was associated with less dental trauma than the other devices in a difficult paediatric intubation model with a Cormack-Lehane grade 4 view. PMID:28187213

  8. Difficult airway and difficult intubation in postintubation tracheal stenosis: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Kontakiotis, Theodoros; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karanikas, Michael; Simoglou, Christos; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Mitrakas, Alexandros; Esebidis, Agisilaos; Konoglou, Maria; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Zervas, Vasilis; Aggelopoulou, Christina; Mikroulis, Dimitrios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Management of a “difficult airway” remains one of the most relevant and challenging tasks for anesthesiologists and pulmonary physicians. Several conditions, such as inflammation, trauma, tumor, and immunologic and metabolic diseases, are considered responsible for the difficult intubation of a critically ill patient. In this case report we present the case of a 46-year-old male with postintubation tracheal stenosis. We will focus on the method of intubation used, since the patient had a “difficult airway” and had to be intubated immediately because he was in a life-threatening situation. Although technology is of utter importance, clinical examination and history-taking remain invaluable for the appropriate evaluation of the critically ill patient in everyday medical life. Every physician who will be required to perform intubation has to be familiar with the evaluation of the difficult airway and, in the event of the unanticipated difficult airway, to be able to use a wide variety of tools and techniques to avoid complications and fatality. PMID:22802693

  9. Upper Airway Sequelae in Burn Patients Requiring Endotracheal Intubation or Tracheostomy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    airways. In adult patients, our experi - It was remarkable that autopsy findings in 12 patients ence is that as long as the nasotracheal tube is not...tracheostomy. Acta Anaesthesiol TB et al., eds. Progress in Anaesthesiology : Proceedings of the Scand 1979; 23:57-68. Fourth World Congress of

  10. Intubating condition, hemodynamic parameters and upper airway morbidity: A comparison of intubating laryngeal mask airway with standard direct laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, J.; Tripathy, Debendra Kumar; Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Mishra, Gayatri; Chandrasekhar, L. J.; Ezhilarasu, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA) is a relatively new device designed to have better intubating characteristics than the standard Laryngeal Mask Airway. This study was designed to compare Intubating Laryngeal Mask with standard Direct Laryngoscopy (DLS), taking into account ease of intubation, time taken for intubation, success rate of intubation, hemodynamic responses and upper airway morbidity. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients, ASA I or II, of age between 20 and 60 years, were enrolled in this prospective and randomized study. They were randomly allocated to one of the two groups: group ILMA, Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway; group DLS, Direct Laryngoscopy. The patients were intubated orally using either equipment after induction of general anesthesia. Results and Conclusions: DLS is comparatively a faster method to secure tracheal intubation than Intubating Laryngeal Mask. ILMA offers no advantage in attenuating the hemodynamic responses compared to direct laryngoscope. The success rate of intubation through Intubating Laryngeal Mask is comparable with that of DLS. The upper airway morbidity and mean oxygen saturation are comparable in both the groups. PMID:25885300

  11. Sedation and analgesia for the pediatric trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Grabinsky, Andreas; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2012-01-01

    The number of children requiring sedation and analgesia for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures has increased substantially in the last decade. Both anesthesiologist and non-anesthesiologists are involved in varying settings outside the operating room to provide safe and effective sedation and analgesia. Procedural sedation has become standard of care and its primary aim is managing acute anxiety, pain, and control of movement during painful or unpleasant procedures. There is enough evidence to suggest that poorly controlled acute pain causes suffering, worse outcome, as well as debilitating chronic pain syndromes that are often refractory to available treatment options. This article will provide strategies to provide safe and effective sedation and analgesia for pediatric trauma patients. PMID:23181210

  12. How to avoid microaspiration? A key element for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in intubated ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Blot, Stijn I; Poelaert, Jan; Kollef, Marin

    2014-11-28

    Microaspiration of subglottic secretions through channels formed by folds in high volume-low pressure poly-vinyl chloride cuffs of endotracheal tubes is considered a significant pathogenic mechanism of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Therefore a series of prevention measures target the avoidance of microaspiration. However, although some of these can minimize microaspiration, benefits in terms of VAP prevention are not always obvious. Polyurethane-cuffed endotracheal tubes successfully reduce microaspiration but high quality data demonstrating VAP rate reduction are lacking. An analogous conclusion can be made regarding taper-shaped cuffs compared with classic barrel-shaped cuffs. More clinical data regarding these endotracheal tube designs are needed to demonstrate clinical value in addition to in vitro-based evidence. The clinical usefulness of endotracheal tubes developed for subglottic secretions drainage is established in multiple studies and confirmed by meta-analysis. Any change in cuff design will fail to prevent microaspiration if the cuff is insufficiently inflated. At least one well-designed trial demonstrated that continuous cuff pressure monitoring and control decrease the risk of VAP. Gel lubrication of the cuff prior to intubation temporarily hampers microaspiration through sludging the channels formed by folds in high volume-low pressure cuffs. As the beneficial effect of gel lubrication is temporarily, its potential to reduce VAP risk is probably nonsignificant. A minimum positive end-expiratory pressure of at least 5 cmH2O can be recommended as it reduces the risk of microaspiration in vitro and in vivo. One randomized controlled study demonstrated a reduced risk of VAP in patients ventilated with PEEP (5-8 cmH2O). Regarding head-of-bed elevation, it can be recommended to avoid supine positioning. Whether a 45° head-of-bed elevation is to be preferred above 25-30° head-of-bed elevation remains unproven. Finally, the routine monitoring of

  13. [Interdisciplinary treatment of severely injured patients in the trauma resuscitation room].

    PubMed

    Wurmb, Thomas; Müller, Thorben; Jansen, Hendrik; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Roewer, Norbert; Kühne, Christian A

    2010-06-01

    The trauma resuscitation room in emergency departments is an important link between preclinical treatment and clinical management of patients with multiple trauma. For the trauma team (Trauma Surgery, Anaesthesiology, Radiology) to respond adequately, a high degree of training and standardisation is required. With arrival of the patient, the trauma team starts with priority orientated resuscitation. After life-threatening problems have been resolved, the diagnostic work is started with plain films of the chest and the pelvis and FAST. Additional plain films are made depending on further suspected injuries. Reassessment of the patient is done and necessary emergency interventions are performed before the patient is transferred to the radiology department for organ focused computed tomography. CT has gained importance in the early diagnostic phase of trauma care. The development of Multislice Helical Computed Tomography (MSCT) has led to substantial refinement in the diagnostic work-up. For many institutions it has become an essential part of the imaging of the traumatized patient. Delayed and insufficient medical interventions have a high impact on negative patient outcome. Anticipating and dealing with critical situations might reduce preventable errors in the treatment process and can be achieved by implementation of an algorithm-based structured workflow. In that context some elements of quality management are well established in clinical practice. In the presented paper we describe the effort that needs to be done to provide optimal care for multiple trauma patients after admission to a designed trauma centre.

  14. Alcohol, cannabis and cocaine usage in patients with trauma injuries.

    PubMed

    McDonald, A; Duncan, N D; Mitchell, D I

    1999-12-01

    Sera from 111 patients with trauma injuries, who presented to the Accident and Emergency Unit (A&E), University Hospital of the West Indies, during a 3-month period, were screened for blood alcohol. Urine specimens were analysed for metabolites of cannabis and cocaine. Sixty-two per cent (62%) of patients were positive for at least one substance and 20% for two or more. Positivity rates were as follows: cannabis (46%), alcohol (32%) with 71% of these having blood alcohol levels (BAC) greater than 80 mg per decilitre; cocaine (6%). Substance usage was most prevalent in the third decade of life. The patients who yielded a positive result were significantly younger than those who were negative. There was no significant difference in age or substance usage between the victims of interpersonal violence or road traffic accidents. In the group designated "other accidents", patients were significantly older and had a lower incidence of substance usage than the other two groups. Cannabis was the most prevalent substance in all groups. Fifty per cent (50%) and fifty-five per cent (55%) of victims of road accidents and interpersonal violence, respectively, were positive for cannabis compared with 43% and 27% for alcohol, respectively. There was no significant difference in Hospital Stay or Injury Severity Score between substance users and non-users.

  15. Risk factors and mortality associated with undertriage at a level I safety-net trauma center: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Barsi, Chris; Harris, Peter; Menaik, Rich; Reis, Nicholas C; Munnangi, Swapna; Elfond, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with undertriage and the risk factors for mortality among the undertriaged patients at a level I safety-net trauma center. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of all trauma patients who presented to a level I safety-net trauma center with an injury severity score >15 over a 2-year period (2013–2014). Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to determine the risk factors predictive of undertriage in major trauma patients (injury severity score >15) and of mortality in undertriaged patients. Results During the 2-year study period, 334 of 2,485 admitted trauma patients presented with major trauma and were included in our study. From the univariate analysis, variables that were found to be independently associated with mortality in undertriaged patients included intubation, Glasgow Coma Scale score, revised trauma score, and dementia. Independent risk factors that were found to be significantly associated with undertriage in severely injured trauma patients included Glasgow Coma Scale score, motor vehicle crash, falls, revised trauma score, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, intubation, and dementia. When a multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate the statistically significant risk factors, dementia was found to be significantly associated with undertriage in severely injured trauma patients. Conclusion Severely injured trauma patients with dementia are at significant risk for undertriage. Early identification of these risk factors while triaging at a level I safety-net trauma center could translate into improved patient outcomes following severe trauma. PMID:27877069

  16. [Hemostasis management in multiple trauma patients--value of near-patient diagnostic methods].

    PubMed

    Jámbor, Csilla; Heindl, Bernhard; Spannagl, Michael; Rolfes, Caroline; Dinges, Gerhard Klaus; Frietsch, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Massively transfused multiple trauma patients commonly develop a complex coagulopathy which needs immediate treatment. Near-patient diagnostic methods are available for the management of this coagulopathy and for the guidance of the therapeutic options with blood products and haemostatic drugs: conventional laboratory analysis methods adapted to the point-of-care (POC) situation (blood gas analysis, point of care PT, APTT and platelet count), and the complex whole blood methods used for near-patient coagulation monitoring (thromboelastometry and platelet function analysis). Based on the new Guidelines of the German Medical Association for the use of blood and plasma derivates, interventions with blood products and haemostatic drugs in multiple trauma patients are suggested. The diagnostic value of near-patient methods for coagulation monitoring is discussed.

  17. Medical record keeping and system performance in orthopaedic trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cosic, Filip; Kimmel, Lara; Edwards, Elton

    2016-02-18

    the quality loop. The present study has highlighted that the standard of orthopaedic trauma medical record keeping at an Australian Level 1 trauma centre is below what is expected and several key areas of documentation require improvement. This paper further evaluates the system performance of the out-patient system, an area where, to the authors knowledge, there is no previous work published. The findings show that the performance was below what is expected for surgical review, with many patients failing to be reviewed by their operating surgeon.What are the implications for practitioners? The present study shows that there is a poor level of documentation and a standard of out-patient review below what is expected. The implications of these findings will be to highlight current deficiencies to practitioners and promote change in current practice to improve the quality of medical record documentation among medical staff. Further, the findings of poor system performance will promote change in the current system of delivering out-patient care to patients.

  18. The effect of introducing a Trauma Network on patient flow, hospital finances and trainee operating.

    PubMed

    Hipps, Daniel; Jameson, Simon; Murty, An; Gregory, Rob; Large, David; Gregson, Jackie; Refaie, Ramsay; Reed, Mike

    2015-02-01

    In April 2012 the National Health Service in England introduced the Trauma Network system with the aim of improving the quality of trauma care. In this study we wished to determine how the introduction of the Trauma network has affected patient flow, hospital finances and orthopaedic trauma training across our region. The overall pattern of trauma distribution was not greatly affected, reflecting the relative rarity of major trauma in the UK. A small decrease in the total number of operations performed by trainees was noted in our region. Trainees at units designated as Major Trauma Centres gained slightly more operative experience in trauma procedures overall, and specifically in those associated with high energy, such as long bone nail insertion and external fixation procedures. However, there have been no significant changes in this pattern since the introduction of the Trauma Networks. Falling operative numbers presents a challenge for delivering high quality training within a surgical training programme, and each case should be seen as a vital educational opportunity. Best practice tariff targets for trauma were delivered for 99% of cases at our MTCs. Future audit and review to analyse the evolving role of the MTCs is desirable.

  19. Trauma in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Sarsam, Sinan H; Meyers, Deborah E; Civitello, Andrew B; Agunanne, Enoch E; Odegaard, Peggy; Cohn, William E; Frazier, O H

    2013-11-01

    Trauma-related failure of a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) has not previously been reported. We present 4 cases in which LVAD complications were likely caused by external trauma and led to failure of a HeartMate II device. In 1 case, the onset of symptoms was delayed and the patient did not seek medical attention until months after the traumatic event. All 4 patients required surgical intervention, and 1 patient died of respiratory complications several months postoperatively. In conclusion, a history of external trauma should be considered as a possible etiologic factor when LVAD-supported patients in previously stable condition present with device malfunction.

  20. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults†

    PubMed Central

    Frerk, C.; Mitchell, V. S.; McNarry, A. F.; Mendonca, C.; Bhagrath, R.; Patel, A.; O'Sullivan, E. P.; Woodall, N. M.; Ahmad, I.

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team. PMID:26556848

  1. Comparison of Bispectral Index Monitoring With the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool in the Pain Assessment of Intubated Adult Patients After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Faritous, Zahra; Barzanji, Arvin; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Ghadrdoost, Behshid; Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Aghdaei, Nahid; Alavi, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Detecting pain is crucial in sedated and mechanically ventilated patients, as they are unable to communicate verbally. Objectives This study aimed to compare Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring with the Critical-care pain observation tool (CPOT) and vital signs for pain assessment during painful procedures in intubated adult patients after cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods Seventy consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery (coronary artery bypass graft or valvular surgery) were enrolled in the study. Pain evaluations were performed early after the operation in the intubated and sedated patients by using BIS and CPOT, and also checking the vital signs. The pain assessments were done at three different times: 1) baseline (immediately before any painful procedure, including tracheal suctioning or changing the patient’s position), 2) during any painful procedure, and 3) five minutes after the procedure (recovery time). Results The mean values for CPOT, BIS, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) scores were significantly different at different times; they were increased during suctioning or changing position, and decreased five minutes after these procedures (CPOT: 3.98 ± 1.65 versus 1.31 ± 1.07, respectively (P ≤ 0.0001); BIS: 84.94 ± 10.52 versus 63.48 ± 12.17, respectively (P ≤ 0.0001); MAP: 92.88 ± 15.37 versus 89.77 ± 14.72, respectively (P = 0.003)). Change in heart rate (HR) was not significant over time (95.68 ± 16.78 versus 93.61 ± 16.56, respectively; P = 0.34). CPOT scores were significantly positively correlated with BIS at baseline, during painful stimulation, and at recovery time, but were not correlated with HR or MAP, except at baseline. BIS scores were significantly correlated with MAP but not with HR. Conclusions It appears that BIS monitoring can be used for pain assessment along with the CPOT tool in intubated patients, and it is much more sensitive than monitoring of hemodynamic changes. BIS monitoring can be used more

  2. Delays in transfer of elderly less-injured trauma patients can have deadly consequences.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter E; Colavita, Paul D; Fleming, Gregory P; Huynh, Toan T; Christmas, A Britton; Sing, Ronald F

    2014-11-01

    Transfer of severely injured patients to regional trauma centers is often expedited; however, transfer of less-injured, older patients may not evoke the same urgency. We examined referring hospitals' length of stay (LOS) and compared the subsequent outcomes in less-injured transfer patients (TP) with patients presenting directly (DP) to the trauma center. We reviewed the medical records of less-injured (Injury Severity Score [ISS] 9 or less), older (age older than 60 years) patients transferred to a regional Level 1 trauma center to determine the referring facility LOS, demographics, and injury information. Outcomes of the TP were then compared with similarly injured DP using local trauma registry data. In 2011, there were 1657 transfers; the referring facility LOS averaged greater than 3 hours. In the less-injured patients (ISS 9 or less), the average referring facility LOS was 3 hours 20 minutes compared with 2 hours 24 minutes in more severely injured patients (ISS 25 or greater, P < 0.05). The mortality was significantly lower in the DP patients (5.8% TP vs 2.6% DP, P = 0.035). Delays in transfer of less-injured, older trauma patients can result in poor outcomes including increased mortality. Geographic challenges do not allow for every patient to be transported directly to a trauma center. As a result, we propose further outreach efforts to identify potential causes for delay and to promote compliance with regional referral guidelines.

  3. New method of preoxygenation for orotracheal intubation in patients with hypoxaemic acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit, non-invasive ventilation combined with apnoeic oxygenation by high flow nasal oxygen: the randomised OPTINIV study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Samir; Molinari, Nicolas; De Jong, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal intubation in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with severe life-threatening complications including severe hypoxaemia. Preoxygenation before intubation has been recommended in order to decrease such complications. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV)-assisted preoxygenation allows increased oxygen saturation during the intubation procedure, by applying a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to prevent alveolar derecruitment. However, the NIV mask has to be taken off after preoxygenation to allow the passage of the tube through the mouth. The patient with hypoxaemia does not receive oxygen during this period, at risk of major hypoxaemia. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) has a potential for apnoeic oxygenation during the apnoea period following the preoxygenation with NIV. Whether application of HFNC combined with NIV is more effective at reducing oxygen desaturation during the intubation procedure compared with NIV alone for preoxygenation in patients with hypoxaemia in the ICU with acute respiratory failure remains to be established. Methods and analysis The HFNC combined to NIV for decreasing oxygen desaturation during the intubation procedure in patients with hypoxaemia in the ICU (OPTINIV) trial is an investigator-initiated monocentre randomised controlled two-arm trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment. The OPTINIV trial randomises 50 patients with hypoxaemia requiring orotracheal intubation for acute respiratory failure to receive NIV (pressure support=10, PEEP=5, fractional inspired oxygen (FiO2)=100%) combined with HFNC (flow=60 L/min, FiO2=100%, interventional group) or NIV alone (reference group) for preoxygenation. The primary outcome is lowest oxygen saturation during the intubation procedure. Secondary outcomes are intubation-related complications, quality of preoxygenation and ICU mortality. Ethics and dissemination The study project has been approved by the appropriate ethics committee (CPP Sud

  4. Trauma patterns in patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hokkam, Emad; Gonna, Abdelaziz; Zakaria, Ossama; El-shemally, Amany

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modern civilization and the sharp rise in living standards have led to dramatic changes in trauma pattern in Saudi Arabia. This study aimed to describe the different patterns of injuries of patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital (JGH) in the southwest corner of Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A total number of 1 050 patients were enrolled in the study. A pre-organized data sheet was prepared for each patient attended the Emergency Department of JGH from February 2012 to January 2013. It contains data about socio-demographics, trauma data, clinical evaluation results, investigations as well as treatment strategies. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 25.3±16.8 years. Most (45.1%) of the patients were at age of 18–30 years. Males (64.3%) were affected by trauma more common than females. More than half (60.6%) of the patients were from urban areas. The commonest kind of injury was minor injury (60%), followed by blunt trauma (30.9%) and then penetrating trauma (9.1%). The mean time from the incident to arrival at hospital was 41.3±79.8 minutes. The majority (48.2%) of the patients were discharged after management of trivial trauma, whereas 2.3% were admitted to ICU, 7.7% transferred to inpatient wards, and 17.7% observed and subsequently discharged. The mortality rate of the patients was 2.6%. CONCLUSION: Trauma is a major health problem, especially in the young population in Saudi Arabia. Blunt trauma is more frequent than penetrating trauma, with road traffic accidents accounting for the majority. PMID:25802567

  5. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: Patient Response to a Primary Care Provider Communication Training.

    PubMed

    Green, Bonnie L; Saunders, Pamela A; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2016-01-01

    Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders and health outcomes; yet there is little training of primary care providers about trauma's effects, and how to better interact with trauma survivors. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), to evaluate its feasibility and preliminary efficacy. We randomized four primary care sites to training or wait-list conditions; PCPs at wait-list sites were trained after reassessment. Primary care providers (PCPs) were Family Medicine residents (n = 17; 2 sites) or community physicians (n = 13; 2 sites). Outcomes reported here comprised a survey of 400 actual patients seen by the PCPs in the study. Patients, mostly minority, completed surveys before or after their provider received training. Patients rated PCPs significantly higher after training on a scale encompassing partnership issues. Breakdowns showed lower partnership scores for those with trauma or posttraumatic stress symptoms. Future studies will need to include more specific trauma-related outcomes. Nevertheless, this training is a promising initial approach to teaching trauma-informed communication skills to PCPs.

  6. Controversies in the Management of the Trauma Patient.

    PubMed

    Rodman, Regina E; Kellman, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    Facial trauma is a significant cause of morbidity in the United States. Despite the large volume of trauma surgeries at most academic institutions, there is still controversy regarding management of many traumatic injuries. The literature lacks clear-cut best practices for most fractures. In orbital trauma, there is debate about the optimal timing of repair, preferred biomaterial to be used, and the utility of evaluation afterward with intraoperative computed tomographic scan. In repair of mandible fractures, there is debate regarding open versus closed reduction of subcondylar fractures, or alternatively, endoscopic repair.

  7. Patients with generalized anxiety disorder and a history of trauma: somatic symptom endorsement.

    PubMed

    Brawman-Mintzer, Olga; Monnier, Jeannine; Wolitzky, Kate B; Falsetti, Sherry A

    2005-05-01

    The authors investigated the types and rates of trauma exposure and differences in symptom endorsement in a clinical sample of patients diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Fifty-eight patients with GAD were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID) and Trauma Assessment for Adults. In order to explore the relationship between specific traumatic event(s) and clinical presentation, the presence of somatic symptoms associated with GAD, including muscle tension, autonomic hyperactivity, and vigilance/scanning clusters (using DSM-III-R criteria), were examined. Patients with a history of sexual assault before 18 years (25.9%) endorsed fewer somatic symptoms, specifically fewer motor tension and autonomic GAD symptoms, than patients with other types of trauma. These findings indicate that early exposure to serious trauma, specifically childhood sexual assault, may lead to a different clinical presentation in GAD patients.

  8. Cervical Spinal Motion During Orotracheal Intubation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Sixteen fresh human cadavers were intubated while recording cervical motion using a cine fluoroscopic technique. Segmental cervical motion from the...intubation was performed using no external stabilization, Gardner-Wells traction and manual in-line cervical immobilization. The cadaveric spine motion...immobilization reduced motion at the destabilize C4-5 level. Four patients without significant cervical pathology and normal motion of flexion

  9. Ear trauma.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Kylee; Fralich, Laura; Stevenson, J Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Understanding basic ear anatomy and function allows an examiner to quickly and accurately identify at-risk structures in patients with head and ear trauma. External ear trauma (ie, hematoma or laceration) should be promptly treated with appropriate injury-specific techniques. Tympanic membrane injuries have multiple mechanisms and can often be conservatively treated. Temporal bone fractures are a common cause of ear trauma and can be life threatening. Facial nerve injuries and hearing loss can occur in ear trauma.

  10. Assessment of intubation in croup and epiglottitis.

    PubMed

    Zulliger, J J; Schuller, D E; Beach, T P; Garvin, J P; Birck, H G; Frank, J E

    1982-01-01

    Nasotracheal intubation for the management of airway obstruction in acute epiglottitis has become a well-received practice. However, the same technique has not received widespread support in laryngotracheobronchitis. The purpose of this study was to update the series of nasotracheal intubations in croup and epiglottitis from Columbus Children's Hospital with the specific intent to evaluate its effectiveness. All patients were evaluated for any immediate and delayed complications. Delayed complications were evaluated using parent interviews and measuring expiratory flow rates. This study of 45 children intubated for epiglottitis and 83 intubations for croup reconfirms the earlier report from this institution about its safety in both conditions. However, it has identified a subset of the croup patients who are definitely at risk to develop complications of the technique. In those children under 1 year of age, a disturbingly high incidence of subglottic stenosis was identified and this appeared to be related to the patient's age, tube size, serial intubations (dilatations), and duration of intubation. Suggested guidelines for airway management in the light of the new information are presented.

  11. Acute traumatic coagulopathy among major trauma patients in an urban tertiary hospital in sub Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mortality from trauma remains a major public health issue as it is the leading cause of death in persons aged 5 to 44 years .Uncontrolled hemorrhage and coagulopathy is responsible for over 50% of all trauma related deaths within the first 48hrs of admission. Coagulation profiles are not routinely done among trauma patients in resource limited settings and there is a paucity of data on acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) in sub Saharan Africa. The study was conducted to evaluate the prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time (PT/PTT) as predictors of mortality and morbidity among major trauma patients. Methods A prospective cohort study was carried out, in which major trauma patients admitted in A&E department between December 2011 to April 2012 were recruited. Five (5) mls of venous blood was drawn from a convenient vein within 10 minutes of the patient’s arrival at A&E for analysis of PT/PTT. Patients were stratified into two groups by the presence/absence of coagulopathy then followed up for a 2 week period for morbidity and mortality. Results A total of 182 major trauma patients were recruited; 149 (81.9%) were males, the mean age was 29.5 years (SD 9.8). Prevalence of coagulopathy was 54% (98/182). The mean ISS for the ATC group was 36.9 and the non ATC group was 26.9 (p=0.001). Patients with ATC stayed longer in hospital 11.24 days than non ATC patients 8 days (p=0.001). ATC was strongly associated with ARI (p= 0.003). Mortality was more in the ATC group 29 deaths compared to 9 deaths in the non ATC group. PTT was a strong independent predictor of mortality. Conclusion A significant proportion of major trauma patients were coagulopathic. Initial coagulation profile is useful in predicting outcomes for major trauma patients. PMID:23150904

  12. Intravenous pyelogram results in association with renal pathology and therapy in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Bergren, C T; Chan, F N; Bodzin, J H

    1987-05-01

    The charts of 127 consecutive patients who sustained renal trauma between December 1977 and January 1984 were reviewed in order to relate the results of intravenous pyelogram (IVP) to the magnitude of renal pathology. Eighty-eight cases resulted from blunt trauma and 39 cases had penetrating injuries. There were 34 gunshot wounds and five stab wounds. An IVP was performed in 116 patients. All cases of blunt trauma with an IVP reported as normal had no renal pathology greater than contusion. Intravenous pyelogram results in penetrating injuries had a 75% false negative rate. Findings of nonvisualization or extravasation were significant for fractures, perforation, or pedicle injuries in all trauma. Eight of the patients with nonpenetrating wounds and 37 of the patients with penetrating injury underwent exploratory laparotomy. Sixteen nephrectomies were performed for a nephrectomy rate of 12.6% of the total series. This nephrectomy rate is comparable to similar studies which are reviewed.

  13. Childhood trauma and adult interpersonal relationship problems in patients with depression and anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although a plethora of studies have delineated the relationship between childhood trauma and onset, symptom severity, and course of depression and anxiety disorders, there has been little evidence that childhood trauma may lead to interpersonal problems among adult patients with depression and anxiety disorders. Given the lack of prior research in this area, we aimed to investigate characteristics of interpersonal problems in adult patients who had suffered various types of abuse and neglect in childhood. Methods A total of 325 outpatients diagnosed with depression and anxiety disorders completed questionnaires on socio-demographic variables, different forms of childhood trauma, and current interpersonal problems. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was used to measure five different forms of childhood trauma (emotional abuse, emotional neglect, physical abuse, physical neglect, and sexual abuse) and the short form of the Korean-Inventory of Interpersonal Problems Circumplex Scale (KIIP-SC) was used to assess current interpersonal problems. We dichotomized patients into two groups (abused and non-abused groups) based on CTQ score and investigated the relationship of five different types of childhood trauma and interpersonal problems in adult patients with depression and anxiety disorders using multiple regression analysis. Result Different types of childhood abuse and neglect appeared to have a significant influence on distinct symptom dimensions such as depression, state-trait anxiety, and anxiety sensitivity. In the final regression model, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, and sexual abuse during childhood were significantly associated with general interpersonal distress and several specific areas of interpersonal problems in adulthood. No association was found between childhood physical neglect and current general interpersonal distress. Conclusion Childhood emotional trauma has more influence on interpersonal problems in adult patients with

  14. Effect of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in elderly patients with hypercapnic acute-on-chronic respiratory failure and a do-not-intubate order.

    PubMed

    Scarpazza, Paolo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; di Franco, Giuseppe; Raschi, Stefania; Usai, Pierfranco; Bernareggi, Monica; Bonacina, Cristiano; Melacini, Chiara; Vanni, Silvia; Bencini, Serena; Pravettoni, Chiara; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Riario-Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Guffanti, Enrico; Casali, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) is effective in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). It proved to reduce the need of endotracheal intubation (ETI), the incidence of ETI-associated pneumonia, and mortality compared to nonventilated patients. A particular aspect concerns the outcome of NIMV in patients referring to an emergency room (ER) for ARF, and with a do-not-intubate (DNI) status due to advanced age or critical conditions. The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of NIMV in a group of elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF who had a DNI status. An overall number of 62 subjects (30 males, 32 females, mean age 81 +/- 4.8 years, range 79-91 years) referred to our semi-intensive respiratory department were enrolled in the study. The underlying diseases were severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 50/62 subjects, restrictive thoracic disorders in 7/62 subjects, and multiorgan failure in 5/62 subjects. Fifty-four/62 patients were successfully treated with NIMV while 2/62 did not respond to NIMV and were therefore submitted to ETI (one survived). Among NIMV-treated patients, death occurred in 6 patients after a mean of 9.9 days; the overall rate of NIMV failure was 12.9%. Negative prognostic factors for NIMV response proved to be: an older age, a low Glasgow Coma Score, a high APACHE score at admission, a high PaCO2 after 12 hours and a low pH both after 1 and 12 hours of NIMV. We conclude that elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF with a DNI status can be successfully treated by NIMV.

  15. Effect of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in elderly patients with hypercapnic acute-on-chronic respiratory failure and a do-not-intubate order

    PubMed Central

    Scarpazza, Paolo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; di Franco, Giuseppe; Raschi, Stefania; Usai, Pierfranco; Bernareggi, Monica; Bonacina, Cristiano; Melacini, Chiara; Vanni, Silvia; Bencini, Serena; Pravettoni, Chiara; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Galeazzo, Gian; Riario-Sforza; Guffanti, Enrico; Casali, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) is effective in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). It proved to reduce the need of endotracheal intubation (ETI), the incidence of ETI-associated pneumonia, and mortality compared to nonventilated patients. A particular aspect concerns the outcome of NIMV in patients referring to an emergency room (ER) for ARF, and with a do-not-intubate (DNI) status due to advanced age or critical conditions. The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of NIMV in a group of elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF who had a DNI status. An overall number of 62 subjects (30 males, 32 females, mean age 81 ± 4.8 years, range 79–91 years) referred to our semi-intensive respiratory department were enrolled in the study. The underlying diseases were severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 50/62 subjects, restrictive thoracic disorders in 7/62 subjects, and multiorgan failure in 5/62 subjects. Fifty-four/62 patients were successfully treated with NIMV while 2/62 did not respond to NIMV and were therefore submitted to ETI (one survived). Among NIMV-treated patients, death occurred in 6 patients after a mean of 9.9 days; the overall rate of NIMV failure was 12.9%. Negative prognostic factors for NIMV response proved to be: an older age, a low Glasgow Coma Score, a high APACHE score at admission, a high PaCO2 after 12 hours and a low pH both after 1 and 12 hours of NIMV. We conclude that elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF with a DNI status can be successfully treated by NIMV. PMID:19281095

  16. Patterns of Errors Contributing to Trauma Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Russell L.; Jurkovich, Gregory J.; McIntyre, Lisa K.; Foy, Hugh M.; Maier, Ronald V.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify patterns of errors contributing to inpatient trauma deaths. Methods: All inpatient trauma deaths at a high-volume level I trauma center from 1996 to 2004 inclusive were audited. Data were collected with daily trauma registry chart abstraction, weekly morbidity and mortality reports, hospital quality assurance reports, and annual trauma registry analyses of risk of death using TRISS and HARM methodology. Deaths that met criteria for low to medium probability of mortality or those with quality of care concerns were analyzed for errors and then subjected to 3-stage peer review at weekly departmental, monthly hospital, and annual regional forums. Patterns of errors were constructed from the compiled longitudinal data. Results: In 9 years, there were 44,401 trauma patient admissions and 2594 deaths (5.8%), of which 601 met low to medium mortality risks. Sixty-four patients (0.14% admissions, 2.47% deaths) had recognized errors in care that contributed to their death. Important error patterns included: failure to successfully intubate, secure or protect an airway (16%), delayed operative or angiographic control of acute abdominal/pelvic hemorrhage (16%), delayed intervention for ongoing intrathoracic hemorrhage (9%), inadequate DVT or gastrointestinal prophylaxis (9%), lengthy initial operative procedures rather than damage control surgery in unstable patients (8%), over-resuscitation with fluids (5%), and complications of feeding tubes (5%). Resulting data-directed institutional and regional trauma system policy changes have demonstrably reduced the incidence of associated error-related deaths. Conclusions: Preventable deaths will occur even in mature trauma systems. This review has identified error patterns that are likely common in all trauma systems, and for which policy interventions can be effectively targeted. PMID:16926563

  17. Pattern of maxillofacial fractures in severe multiple trauma patients: a 7-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Alves, La-Salete; Aragão, Irene; Sousa, Maria-José Carneiro; Gomes, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of facial trauma is high. This study has the primary objective of documenting and cataloging maxillofacial fractures in polytrauma patients. From a total of 1229 multiple trauma cases treated at the Emergency Room of the Santo Antonio Hospital - Oporto Hospital Center, Portugal, between August 2001 and December 2007, 251 patients had facial wounds and 209 had maxillofacial fractures. Aged ranged form 13 to 86 years. The applied selective method was based on the presence of facial wound with Abbreviated Injury Scale ≥1. Men had a higher incidence of maxillofacial fractures among multiple trauma patients (86.6%) and road traffic accidents were the primary cause of injuries (69.38%). Nasoorbitoethmoid complex was the most affected region (67.46%) followed by the maxilla (57.42%). The pattern and presentation of maxillofacial fractures had been studied in many parts of the world with varying results. Severe multiple trauma patients had different patterns of maxillofacial injuries. The number of maxillofacial trauma is on the rise worldwide as well as the incidence of associated sequelae. Maxillofacial fractures on multiple trauma patients were more frequent among males and in road traffic crashes. Knowing such data is elementary. The society should have a key role in the awareness of individuals and in prevention of road traffic accidents.

  18. Impact of Sexual Trauma on HIV Care Engagement: Perspectives of Female Patients with Trauma Histories in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Watt, Melissa H; Dennis, Alexis C; Choi, Karmel W; Ciya, Nonceba; Joska, John A; Robertson, Corne; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2016-11-19

    South African women have disproportionately high rates of both sexual trauma and HIV. To understand how sexual trauma impacts HIV care engagement, we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 15 HIV-infected women with sexual trauma histories, recruited from a public clinic in Cape Town. Interviews explored trauma narratives, coping behaviors and care engagement, and transcripts were analyzed using a constant comparison method. Participants reported multiple and complex traumas across their lifetimes. Sexual trauma hindered HIV care engagement, especially immediately following HIV diagnosis, and there were indications that sexual trauma may interfere with future care engagement, via traumatic stress symptoms including avoidance. Disclosure of sexual trauma was limited; no women had disclosed to an HIV provider. Routine screening for sexual trauma in HIV care settings may help to identify individuals at risk of poor care engagement. Efficacious treatments are needed to address the psychological and behavioral sequelae of trauma.

  19. Tablets in trauma: using mobile computing platforms to improve patient understanding and experience.

    PubMed

    Furness, Nicholas D; Bradford, Oliver J; Paterson, Maurice P

    2013-03-01

    Tablets are becoming commonplace in the health care setting. Patients often request to view their radiographs after sustaining trauma. This can be challenging, especially if patients are immobile. The authors performed a prospective, questionnaire-based study to assess inpatient desire to view radiographs on tablets and whether viewing images affected patient-rated outcomes of understanding and satisfaction. Enabling trauma patients to view their images on a tablet is a worthwhile practice because it improves patient involvement in decision making, satisfaction, perceived understanding, and overall experience.

  20. Collecting core data in severely injured patients using a consensus trauma template: an international multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction No worldwide, standardised definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data from severely injured trauma patients. This study evaluated the feasibility of collecting the data variables of the international consensus-derived Utstein Trauma Template. Methods Trauma centres from three different continents were invited to submit Utstein Trauma Template core data during a defined period, for up to 50 consecutive trauma patients. Directly admitted patients with a New Injury Severity Score (NISS) equal to or above 16 were included. Main outcome variables were data completeness, data differences and data collection difficulty. Results Centres from Europe (n = 20), North America (n = 3) and Australia (n = 1) submitted data on 965 patients, of whom 783 were included. Median age was 41 years (interquartile range (IQR) 24 to 60), and 73.1% were male. Median NISS was 27 (IQR 20 to 38), and blunt trauma predominated (91.1%). Of the 36 Utstein variables, 13 (36%) were collected by all participating centres. Eleven (46%) centres applied definitions of the survival outcome variable that were different from those of the template. Seventeen (71%) centres used the recommended version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Three variables (age, gender and AIS) were documented in all patients. Completeness > 80% was achieved for 28 variables, and 20 variables were > 90% complete. Conclusions The Utstein Template was feasible across international trauma centres for the majority of its data variables, with the exception of certain physiological and time variables. Major differences were found in the definition of survival and in AIS coding. The current results give a clear indication of the attainability of information and may serve as a stepping-stone towards creation of a European trauma registry. PMID:21992236

  1. Analysis of the incidence of postintubation injuries in patients intubated in the prehospital or early hospital conditions of the hospital emergency department and the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cierniak, Marcin; Timler, Dariusz; Sobczak, Renata; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Sekalski, Przemyslaw; Borkowska, Natalia; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background Intubation is still one of the best methods to secure the airway. In the case of prehospital or early hospital conditions when factors such as urgency, stress, or inaccuracy of the undertaken activities are involved, the risk of causing complications, for instance, edema or postintubation injuries, increases, especially while dealing with a difficult intubation. The risk of improper inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff also increases, which is considered in this study. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of postintubation complications, such as postintubation injuries or edema, in a research sample, and to examine whether such complications occur more often, for example, while using a guidewire. In this study, we also evaluated the injuries associated with the inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff. Materials and methods This study was performed on a group of 153 patients intubated in prehospital conditions. The tests were carried out in three clinical sites that received patients from prehospital care. Postintubation injuries were revealed and photographed using videolar-yngoscope, such as the C-MAC and the McGrath series 5. The endotracheal tube cuff pressure was measured using a pressure gage manual (VBM Medizintechnik GmbH). The quantitative analyses of differences between incidence of variables were assessed using χ2 test for P<0.05. Analyses have been carried out using the Statistica software. Results In the group of 153 patients, postintubation injuries occurred in 17% of cases. The dependency between using the guidewire and the occurrence of the hematomas and loss of mucosa was statistically significant (P<0.01). In nearly half (42%) of the patients the endotracheal tube cuff pressure was excessively inflated over 30 cm H2O, and in two cases, endotracheal tube displacement was observed on account of poor cuff inflation (<20 cm H2O). Conclusion The highest percentage of overfilled cuffs were observed in the

  2. Comparison between two mobile pre-hospital care services for trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Pre-hospital care (PH) in Brazil is currently in the phase of implementation and expansion, and there are few studies on the impacts of this public health service. The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of care and severity of trauma among the population served, using trauma scores, attendance response times, and mortality rates. This work compares two pre-hospital systems: the Mobile Emergency Care Service, or SAMU 192, and the Fire Brigade Group, or CB. Method Descriptive study evaluating all patients transported by both systems in Catanduva, SP, admitted to a single hospital. Results 850 patients were included, most of whom were men (67.5%); the mean age was 38.5 ± 18.5 years. Regarding the use of PH systems, most patients were transported by SAMU (62.1%). The trauma mechanisms involved motorcycle accidents in 32.7% of cases, transferred predominantly by SAMU, followed by falls (25.8%). Regarding the response time, CB showed the lowest rates. In relation to patient outcome, only 15.5% required hospitalization. The average score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 14.7 ± 1.3; average RTS was 7.7 ± 0.7; ISS 3.8 ± 5.9; and average TRISS 97.6 ± 9.3. The data analysis showed no statistical differences in mortality between the groups studied (SAMU - 1.5%; CB - 2.5%). The trauma scores showed a higher severity of trauma among the fatal victims. Conclusion Trauma victims are predominantly young and male; the trauma mechanism that accounted for the majority of PH cases was motorcycle accidents; CB responded more quickly than SAMU; and there was no statistical difference between the services of SAMU and CB in terms of severity of the trauma and mortality rates. PMID:23531089

  3. Attenuation of cardiovascular stress response to endotracheal intubation by the use of remifentanil in patients undergoing Cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Kutlesic, Marija S; Kutlesic, Ranko M; Mostic-Ilic, Tatjana

    2016-04-01

    The induction-delivery time during Cesarean section is traditionally conducted under light anesthesia because of the possibility of anesthesia-induced neonatal respiratory depression. The serious consequences of such an approach could be the increased risk of maternal intraoperative awareness and exaggerated neuroendocrine and cardiovascular stress response to laryngoscopy, endotracheal intubation, and surgical stimuli. Here, we briefly discuss the various pharmacological options for attenuation of stress response to endotracheal intubation during Cesarean delivery and then focus on remifentanil, its pharmacokinetic properties, and its use in anesthesia, both in clinical studies and case reports. Remifentanil intravenous bolus doses of 0.5-1 μg/kg before the induction to anesthesia provide the best compromise between attenuating maternal stress response and minimizing the possibility of neonatal respiratory depression. Although neonatal respiratory depression, if present, usually resolves in a few minutes without the need for prolonged resuscitation measures, health care workers skilled at neonatal resuscitation should be present in the operating room whenever remifentanil is used.

  4. Utility of esophageal gastroduodenoscopy at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Haan, James M; Bochicchio, Grant V; Scalea, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    Background The utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) performed at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is unclear. We examined whether EGD at time of PEG yielded clinically useful information important in patient care. We also reviewed the outcome and complication rates of EGD-PEG performed by trauma surgeons. Methods Retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing EGD with PEG at a level I trauma center from 1/01–6/03. Results 210 patients underwent combined EGD with PEG by the trauma team. A total of 37% of patients had unsuspected upper gastrointestinal lesions seen on EGD. Of these, 35% had traumatic brain injury, 10% suffered multisystem injury, and 47% had spinal cord injury. These included 15 esophageal, 61 gastric, and six duodenal lesions, mucosal or hemorrhagic findings on EGD. This finding led to a change in therapy in 90% of patients; either resumption/continuation of H2 -blockers or conversion to proton-pump inhibitors. One patient suffered an upper gastrointestinal bleed while on H2-blocker. It was treated endoscopically. Complication rates were low. There were no iatrogenic visceral perforations seen. Three PEGs were inadvertently removed by the patient (1.5%); one was replaced with a Foley, one replaced endoscopically, and one patient underwent gastric repair and open jejunostomy tube. One PEG leak was repaired during exploration for unrelated hemorrhage. Six patients had significant site infections (3%); four treated with local drainage and antibiotics, one requiring operative debridement and later closure, and one with antibiotics alone. Conclusion EGD at the time of PEG may add clinically useful data in the management of trauma patients. Only one patient treated with acid suppression therapy for EGD diagnosed lesions suffered delayed gastrointestinal bleeding. Trauma surgeons can perform EGD and PEG with acceptable outcomes and complication rates. PMID:17615081

  5. Fluid resuscitation of trauma patients: how fast is the optimal rate?

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Yasuaki; Tohira, Hideo; Mizobata, Yasumitsu; Matsuoka, Tetsuya; Yokota, Junichiro

    2005-11-01

    The Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines recommend an initial rapid infusion of fluid (1-2 L) in trauma and hemorrhage victims as a diagnostic procedure to aid treatment decisions. Although patient response to initial fluid resuscitation is the key to determining therapeutic strategies, the appropriate rate of infusion is not clearly defined. Ninety-nine adult (age >16 years) blunt trauma victims with hypotension were enrolled. Patients were classified into 3 groups according to hemodynamic state after initial fluid resuscitation and requirement of surgical intervention. Total volume and rate of infusion differed significantly between the groups (P < .05). Patients requiring fluid administration at higher rate were all hemodynamically unstable and required immediate surgical intervention. Moreover, rate of infusion was the best predictor of the patients who required immediate surgical intervention. Moderate fluid infusion rate should be considered to allow identification of the patient's response to initial fluid resuscitation.

  6. Consequences of Transfusing Blood Components in Patients With Trauma: A Conceptual Model.

    PubMed

    Jones, Allison R; Frazier, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Transfusion of blood components is often required in resuscitation of patients with major trauma. Packed red blood cells and platelets break down and undergo chemical changes during storage (known as the storage lesion) that lead to an inflammatory response once the blood components are transfused to patients. Although some evidence supports a detrimental association between transfusion and a patient's outcome, the mechanisms connecting transfusion of stored components to outcomes remain unclear. The purpose of this review is to provide critical care nurses with a conceptual model to facilitate understanding of the relationship between the storage lesion and patients' outcomes after trauma; outcomes related to trauma, hemorrhage, and blood component transfusion are grouped according to those occurring in the short-term (≤30 days) and the long-term (>30 days). Complete understanding of these clinical implications is critical for practitioners in evaluating and treating patients given transfusions after traumatic injury.

  7. Prosthodontic Approach in Management of Prolonged Neonatal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shital K; Rathod, Vishnu B; Ambadkar, Priyanka S; Patil, Charudutt N

    2016-01-01

    Intubation is a routine intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) for preterm neonates with respiratory distress, inadequate gag reflex, poor sucking and swallowing. Prolonged intubation in neonates can be done by nasal or oral route. Although naso-tracheal intubation may reduce movement of the tube, it may contribute to airway obstruction, possible hypoxia, and occlusion of the nasal aperture during a crucial period of development further contributing to laboured breathing. Being obligate nasal breathers, oro-tracheal route is the preferred method of intubation in premature infants as oral mucosa is less susceptible to damage than nasal mucosa. Ineffective stabilization of the tubes is a frequent problem often resulting in accidental extubation and displacement of orotracheal and orogastric tube. Hence, these tubes must be stabilized against displacement from tongue and jaw movements to prevent discomfort and subsequent tissue trauma. Complications of prolonged endotracheal intubation include palatal groove formation by pressure against the hard palate, infection, accidental extubation, malposition, laryngeal or tracheal edema and ulceration, tracheal stenosis, vocal cord injury. Various oral appliances are used for infants to stabilize the tubes and prevent complications associated with long term intubation. This case report describes a prosthodontic approach in management of prolonged neonatal intubation. PMID:28050517

  8. Prosthodontic Approach in Management of Prolonged Neonatal Intubation.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Vikas B; Shah, Shital K; Rathod, Vishnu B; Ambadkar, Priyanka S; Patil, Charudutt N

    2016-11-01

    Intubation is a routine intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) for preterm neonates with respiratory distress, inadequate gag reflex, poor sucking and swallowing. Prolonged intubation in neonates can be done by nasal or oral route. Although naso-tracheal intubation may reduce movement of the tube, it may contribute to airway obstruction, possible hypoxia, and occlusion of the nasal aperture during a crucial period of development further contributing to laboured breathing. Being obligate nasal breathers, oro-tracheal route is the preferred method of intubation in premature infants as oral mucosa is less susceptible to damage than nasal mucosa. Ineffective stabilization of the tubes is a frequent problem often resulting in accidental extubation and displacement of orotracheal and orogastric tube. Hence, these tubes must be stabilized against displacement from tongue and jaw movements to prevent discomfort and subsequent tissue trauma. Complications of prolonged endotracheal intubation include palatal groove formation by pressure against the hard palate, infection, accidental extubation, malposition, laryngeal or tracheal edema and ulceration, tracheal stenosis, vocal cord injury. Various oral appliances are used for infants to stabilize the tubes and prevent complications associated with long term intubation. This case report describes a prosthodontic approach in management of prolonged neonatal intubation.

  9. Nutritional management of critically ill trauma patients in the deployed military setting.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J O; Turner, S; Johnston, A McD

    2011-09-01

    The role of nutritional support in critical illness is well established. This article reviews the nutritional management of military trauma patients in the deployed setting, which poses special challenges for the surgeon and intensivist. There is little direct evidence relating to the nutritional management of trauma patients in general, and military trauma patients in particular, but much of the evidence accrued in the civilian and non-trauma critical care setting can be extrapolated to military practice. There is strong consensus that feeding should be commenced as soon possible after injury. Enteral nutrition should be used in preference to parenteral nutrition whenever possible. If available, supplemental parenteral feeding can be considered if enteral delivery is insufficient. Gastrointestinal anastomoses and repairs, including those in the upper gastrointestinal tract, are not a contraindication to early enteral feeding. Intragastric delivery is more physiological and usually more convenient than postpyloric feeding, and thus the preferred route for the initiation of nutritional support. Feeding gastrostomies or jejunostomies should not be used for short-term nutritional support. Enteral feeding of patients with an open abdomen does not delay closure and may reduce the incidence of pneumonia, and enteral nutrition should be continued for scheduled relook surgery not involving hollow viscera or airway. Glutamine supplementation may improve outcome in trauma patients, but fish-oil containing feeds, while showing some promise, should be reserved for subgroups of patients with ARDS.

  10. Impact of trauma and surgical treatment on the quality of life of patients with facial fractures.

    PubMed

    Conforte, J J; Alves, C P; Sánchez, M del P R; Ponzoni, D

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the impact of oral and maxillofacial trauma and surgical treatment on the quality of life of patients. The study included 66 patients (age range 18-65 years) with facial fractures; 33 required surgical treatment and 33 required conservative (non-surgical) treatment. Quality of life was evaluated by applying the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) immediately after diagnosis of the trauma (T1), 30 days after surgery or trauma (T2), and 90 days after surgery or trauma (T3). For the control group (conservative treatment), there was a change in quality of life at T1 and T2. A change in quality of life was found for all of the surgical patients, regardless of the type of fracture and the observation period analyzed. There was no statistical difference when T1, T2, and T3 were compared in cases of zygomatic, Le Fort I, and nasal fractures, however there was an improvement in the quality of life of patients with mandibular fractures (P=0.0102) and multiple facial fractures (P=0.0097) at T3. Facial trauma caused the greatest impact on the quality of life of surgical patients at T1. The surgical treatment significantly improved quality of life for patients with mandibular and multiple facial fractures.

  11. Sphenoid Sinus and Sphenoid Bone Fractures in Patients with Craniomaxillofacial Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cantini Ardila, Jorge Ernesto; Mendoza, Miguel Ángel Rivera; Ortega, Viviana Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sphenoid bone fractures and sphenoid sinus fractures have a high morbidity due to its association with high-energy trauma. The purpose of this study is to describe individuals with traumatic injuries from different mechanisms and attempt to determine if there is any relationship between various isolated or combined fractures of facial skeleton and sphenoid bone and sphenoid sinus fractures. Methods We retrospectively studied hospital charts of all patients who reported to the trauma center at Hospital de San José with facial fractures from December 2009 to August 2011. All patients were evaluated by computed tomography scan and classified into low-, medium-, and high-energy trauma fractures, according to the classification described by Manson. Design This is a retrospective descriptive study. Results The study data were collected as part of retrospective analysis. A total of 250 patients reported to the trauma center of the study hospital with facial trauma. Thirty-eight patients were excluded. A total of 212 patients had facial fractures; 33 had a combination of sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures, and facial fractures were identified within this group (15.5%). Gender predilection was seen to favor males (77.3%) more than females (22.7%). The mean age of the patients was 37 years. Orbital fractures (78.8%) and maxillary fractures (57.5%) were found more commonly associated with sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures. Conclusions High-energy trauma is more frequently associated with sphenoid fractures when compared with medium- and low-energy trauma. There is a correlation between facial fractures and sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures. A more exhaustive multicentric case-control study with a larger sample and additional parameters will be essential to reach definite conclusions regarding the spectrum of fractures of the sphenoid bone associated with facial fractures. PMID:24436756

  12. Impact of the age of stored blood on trauma patient mortality: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, Nicholas; Froese, Patrick C.; Erdogan, Mete; Green, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The impact of the age of stored red blood cells on mortality in patients sustaining traumatic injuries requiring transfusion of blood products is unknown. The objective of this systematic review was to identify and describe the available literature on the use of older versus newer blood in trauma patient populations. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, Lilac and the Cochrane Database for published studies comparing the transfusion of newer versus older red blood cells in adult patients sustaining traumatic injuries. Studies included for review reported on trauma patients receiving transfusions of packed red blood cells, identified the age of stored blood that was transfused and reported patient mortality as an end point. We extracted data using a standardized form and assessed study quality using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. Results Seven studies were identified (6780 patients) from 3936 initial search results. Four studies reported that transfusion of older blood was independently associated with increased mortality in trauma patients, while 3 studies did not observe any increase in patient mortality with the use of older versus newer blood. Three studies associated the transfusion of older blood with adverse patient outcomes, including longer stay in the intensive care unit, complicated sepsis, pneumonia and renal dysfunction. Studies varied considerably in design, volumes of blood transfused and definitions applied for old and new blood. Conclusion The impact of the age of stored packed red blood cells on mortality in trauma patients is inconclusive. Future investigations are warranted. PMID:26384149

  13. Restorative rehabilitation in a patient with sports trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Vohra, Fahim; Lillywhite, Graeme R.

    2016-01-01

    Sports trauma frequently involves insult to oral soft and hard tissues resulting in loss of tooth structure and tooth loss. Multiple sporting equipment's are employed to prevent irreversible damage to oro-facial structures, and to reduce the overall cost of treatment. However in the undesired consequence of loss of oral structures, multiple treatment options are utilized to restore, esthetics, comfort and function. Osseointegrated implant supported rehabilitation of oral structures in trauma cases provides highly predictable treatment outcomes along with preservation of remaining tissues. This case report presents the management of avulsed teeth caused by hockey stick injury, with osseointegrated dental implant supported fixed partial dentures in esthetic zone using contemporary restorative techniques. PMID:28042278

  14. Comparison of hemodynamic responses to intubation: Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope versus McCoy laryngoscope in presence of rigid cervical collar simulating cervical immobilization for traumatic cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Nitesh; Purohit, Shobha; Kalra, Poonam; Lall, Tarun; Khare, Avneesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intubation is known to cause an exaggerated hemodynamic response in the form of tachycardia, hypertension, and dysrhythmias. In cervical spine instability, intubation has to be performed using cervical immobilization to prevent exacerbation of spinal cord injuries. Application of rigid cervical collar may reduce cervical spine movements, but it hinders tracheal intubation with a standard laryngoscope. The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic responses to fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) and McCoy laryngoscope in patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia with rigid cervical collar simulating cervical spine immobilization in the situation of cervical trauma. Methods: Thirty-two patients in the age range 20–50 years, of American Society of Anaesthesiologist I-II, and of either sex undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into each group. There were two groups according to the technique used for intubation: Group A (flexible FOB) and Group B (McCoy laryngoscope). Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, intraoperatively, immediately before and after induction, and immediately after intubation. Thereafter, every min for next 5 min. Statistical Analysis: Intergroup comparison of categorical data was done by Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Intergroup comparison of quantitative data was done by the parametric test (unpaired t-test), and probability was considered to be significant if <0.05. Results: Due to intubation response, HR and blood pressure increased significantly (P < 0.05) above preoperative values in McCoy group as compared to the fiberoptic group. Conclusion: We suggest that the flexible FOB is an effective and better method of intubation in a situation like traumatic cervical spine injury and provides stable hemodynamics. PMID:26712970

  15. Intraosseous injection of iodinated computed tomography contrast agent in an adult blunt trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Thomas E; Paxton, James H; Myers, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Intraosseous venous access can be life-saving in trauma patients when traditional methods for obtaining venous access are difficult or impossible. Because many blunt trauma patients require expeditious evaluation by computed tomography (CT) scans with intravenous contrast, it is important to evaluate whether intraosseous catheters can be used for administering CT contrast agents in lieu of waiting until secure peripheral intravenous or central venous catheter access can be established. Previous case reports have demonstrated that tibial intraosseous catheters can be used to safely administer CT contrast in the pediatric patient population. Here we report a case in which intraosseous access was the only means of administering intravenous contrast agent in an adult blunt trauma patient. An intraosseous catheter was placed in the standard manner in the right proximal humerus. Intravenous contrast agent was administered through the intraosseous catheter, using the standard blunt trauma protocol at our institution. CT scans were evaluated by a staff radiologist and assessed for the adequacy of diagnosis for blunt traumatic injuries. CT scans of the thorax, abdomen, and pelvis were considered to be adequate for diagnostic purposes and subjectively equivalent to those of studies using traditional central venous access. The intraosseous catheter was discontinued the following day. No complications of intraosseous placement or of contrast administration were identified. Intraosseous catheterization appears to be a feasible and effective alternative to traditional methods of venous access in the administration of iodinated contrast agents for CT evaluation in adult blunt trauma patients. Further study is warranted.

  16. Coagulopathy in Trauma Patients: What Are the Main Influence Factors?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology 2009, 22:255–260 Purpose of review Coagulopathy and bleeding after severe injury is a common problem. Whenever caring... experience in interpreting TEG graphs. Familiarity and experience with clinical TEGs can be very beneficial when it comes to guiding the choice of...analysis of a multicenter experience . J Trauma 1994; 37:426–432. 6 Dirkmann D, Hanke AA, Görlinger K, Peters J. Hypothermia and acidosis

  17. Fluid management in patients with trauma: Restrictive versus liberal approach

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Ahuja, Jogesh

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death worldwide, and almost 30% of trauma deaths are due to blood loss. A number of concerns have been raised regarding the advisability of the classic principles of aggressive crystalloid resuscitation in traumatic hemorrhagic shock. Some recent studies have shown that early volume restoration in certain types of trauma before definite hemostasis may result in accelerated blood loss, hypothermia, and dilutional coagulopathy. This review discusses the advances and changes in protocols in fluid resuscitation and blood transfusion for treatment of traumatic hemorrhage shock. The concept of low volume fluid resuscitation also known as permissive hypotension avoids the adverse effects of early aggressive resuscitation while maintaining a level of tissue perfusion that although lower than normal, is adequate for short periods. Permissive hypotension is part of the damage control resuscitation strategy, which targets the conditions that exacerbate hemorrhage. The elements of this strategy are permissive hypotension, minimization of crystalloid resuscitation, control of hypothermia, prevention of acidosis, and early use of blood products to minimize coagulopathy. PMID:26330707

  18. Profile of trauma patients in the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, Kundavaram Paul Prabhakar; Chakraborthy, Nilanchal; Pandian, Gautham Raja; Dhanawade, Vineet Subodh; Bhanu, Thomas Kurien; Priya, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in India. This study was done to improve the understanding of the mode of trauma, severity of injuries, and outcome of trauma victims in our hospital. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective observational study of all adult trauma patients more than 18-year-old presenting to our emergency department (ED). Details of the incident, injuries, and outcome were noted. Results: The ED attended to 16,169 patients during the 3-month study period with 10% (1624/16,169) being adult trauma incidents. The gender distribution was 73.6% males and 26.4% females. The mean age was 40.2 ± 16.7 years. The median duration from time of incident to time of arrival to the ED was 3 h (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.5–6.5) for priority one patients, 3 h (IQR: 1.5–7.7) for priority two patients, and 1.5 h (IQR: 1–7) for priority three patients. The average number of trauma incidents increased by 28% during the weekends. Road traffic accident (RTA) (65%) was the most common mode of injury, followed by fall on level ground (13.5%), fall from height (6.3%), work place injuries (6.3%), and others. Traumatic brain injury was seen in 17% of patients while 13.3% had polytrauma with two-wheeler accidents contributing to the majority. The ED team alone managed 23.4% of patients while the remaining 76.6% required evaluation and treatment by the trauma, surgical teams. The in-hospital mortality rate was 2.3%. Multivariate analysis showed low Glasgow coma score (odds ratio [OR]: 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.55–0.76, P < 0.001) and high respiratory rate (OR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.07–1.24, P < 0.001) to be independent predictors of mortality among polytrauma victims. Conclusions: RTA and falls are the predominant causes of trauma. A simple physiological variable-based scoring system such as the revised trauma score may be used to prioritize patients with polytrauma. PMID:28217583

  19. Reduced Mortality by Physician-Staffed HEMS Dispatch for Adult Blunt Trauma Patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of domestic physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) for the transport of patients with severe trauma to a hospital. The study included patients with blunt trauma who were transported to our hospital by physician-staffed HEMS (Group P; n = 100) or nonphysician-staffed HEMS (Group NP; n = 80). Basic patient characteristics, transport time, treatment procedures, and medical treatment outcomes assessed using the Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) were compared between groups. We also assessed patients who were transported to the hospital within 3 h of injury in Groups P (Group P3; n = 50) and NP (Group NP3; n = 74). The severity of injury was higher, transport time was longer, and time from hospital arrival to operation room transfer was shorter for Group P than for Group NP (P < 0.001). Although Group P patients exhibited better medical treatment outcomes compared with Group NP, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.134 vs. 0.730). However, the difference in outcomes was statistically significant between Groups P3 and NP3 (P = 0.035 vs. 0.546). Under the current domestic trauma patient transport system in South Korea, physician-staffed HEMS are expected to increase the survival of patients with severe trauma. In particular, better treatment outcomes are expected if dedicated trauma resuscitation teams actively intervene in the medical treatment process from the transport stage and if patients are transported to a hospital to receive definitive care within 3 hours of injury. PMID:27550497

  20. Reduced Mortality by Physician-Staffed HEMS Dispatch for Adult Blunt Trauma Patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Huh, Yo; Lee, John Cj; Kim, Younghwan; Moon, Jonghwan; Youn, Seok Hwa; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Tea Youn; Kim, Juryang; Kim, Hyoju

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of domestic physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) for the transport of patients with severe trauma to a hospital. The study included patients with blunt trauma who were transported to our hospital by physician-staffed HEMS (Group P; n = 100) or nonphysician-staffed HEMS (Group NP; n = 80). Basic patient characteristics, transport time, treatment procedures, and medical treatment outcomes assessed using the Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) were compared between groups. We also assessed patients who were transported to the hospital within 3 h of injury in Groups P (Group P3; n = 50) and NP (Group NP3; n = 74). The severity of injury was higher, transport time was longer, and time from hospital arrival to operation room transfer was shorter for Group P than for Group NP (P < 0.001). Although Group P patients exhibited better medical treatment outcomes compared with Group NP, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.134 vs. 0.730). However, the difference in outcomes was statistically significant between Groups P3 and NP3 (P = 0.035 vs. 0.546). Under the current domestic trauma patient transport system in South Korea, physician-staffed HEMS are expected to increase the survival of patients with severe trauma. In particular, better treatment outcomes are expected if dedicated trauma resuscitation teams actively intervene in the medical treatment process from the transport stage and if patients are transported to a hospital to receive definitive care within 3 hours of injury.

  1. The water method is effective in difficult colonoscopy - it enhances cecal intubation in unsedated patients with a history of abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Surinder K; Leung, Joseph W; Siao-Salera, Rodelei M; Guy, Jackson

    2011-01-01

    Background Colonoscopy in unsedated patients in the US is considered to be difficult. Success rate of cecal intubation is limited by discomfort. Colonoscopy in patients with a history of abdominal surgery is also considered to be difficult due to adhesion-related bowel angulations. The water method has been shown to significantly reduce pain during colonoscopy. Objective To test the hypothesis that the water method enhances the completion of colonoscopy in unsedated patients with a history of abdominal surgery. Design The data bases of two parallel RCT were combined and analyzed. Setting Two Veterans Affairs endoscopy units. Patient and Methods The water and air methods were compared in these two parallel RCT examining unsedated patients. Those with a history of abdominal surgery were selected for evaluation. Main Outcome Measurements Completion of unsedated colonoscopy. Results Among patients with a history of abdominal surgery, the proportion completing unsedated colonoscopy in the water group (19 of 22) was significantly higher than that (11 of 22) in the air group (p=0.0217, Fisher's exact test). Limitations Small number of predominantly male veterans, unblinded colonoscopists, not all types of abdominal surgery (e.g. hysterectomy, gastrectomy) predisposing to difficult colonoscopy were represented. Conclusion This proof-of-principle assessment confirms that in patients with a history of abdominal surgery the water method significantly increases the proportion able to complete unsedated colonoscopy. The water method deserves to be evaluated in patients with other factors associated with difficult colonoscopy. PMID:22586531

  2. Comparison of different intubation techniques performed inside a moving ambulance: a manikin study.

    PubMed

    Wong, K B; Lui, C T; Chan, William Y W; Lau, T L; Tang, Simon Y H; Tsui, K L

    2014-08-01

    OBJECTIVE. Airway management and endotracheal intubation may be required urgently when a patient deteriorates in an ambulance or aircraft during interhospital transfer or in a prehospital setting. The objectives of this study were: (1) to compare the effectiveness of conventional intubation by Macintosh laryngoscope in a moving ambulance versus that in a static ambulance; and (2) to compare the effectiveness of inverse intubation and GlideScope laryngoscopy with conventional intubation inside a moving ambulance. DESIGN. Comparative experimental study. SETTING. The experiment was conducted in an ambulance provided by the Auxiliary Medical Service in Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS. A group of 22 doctors performed endotracheal intubation on manikins with Macintosh laryngoscope in a static and moving ambulance. In addition, they performed conventional Macintosh intubation, inverse intubation with Macintosh laryngoscope, and GlideScope intubation in a moving ambulance in both normal and simulated difficult airways. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. The primary outcome was the rate of successful intubation. The secondary outcomes were time taken for intubation, subjective glottis visualisation grading, and eventful intubation (oesophageal intubation, intubation time >60 seconds, and incisor breakage) with different techniques or devices. RESULTS. In normal airways, conventional Macintosh intubation in a static ambulance (95.5%), conventional intubation in a moving ambulance (95.5%), as well as GlideScope intubation in a moving ambulance (95.5%) were associated with high success rates; the success rate of inverse intubation was comparatively low (54.5%; P=0.004). In difficult airways, conventional Macintosh intubation in a static ambulance (86.4%), conventional intubation in a moving ambulance (90.9%), and GlideScope intubation in a moving ambulance (100%) were associated with high success rates; the success rate of inverse intubation was comparatively lower (40.9%; P=0.034). CONCLUSIONS

  3. Laryngeal complications by orotracheal intubation: Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Luiz Alberto Alves; de Cavalho, Glauber Barbosa; Brito, Valeska Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Sumamry Introduction: The injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation are common in our way and widely told by literature. Generally the pipe rank of or consequence of its permanence in the aerial ways of the patient is caused by accidents in. It has diverse types of larynx injuries, caused for multiple mechanisms. Objective: To verify, in literature, the main causes of laryngeal complications after- orotracheal intubation and its mechanisms of injury. Revision of Literature: The searched databases had been LILACS, BIREME and SCIELO. Were updated, books and theses had been used, delimiting itself the period enters 1953 the 2009. The keywords used for the search of articles had been: complications, injuries, larynx, intubation, endotracheal, orotracheal, granulomas, stenosis. 59 references had been selected. The used criteria of inclusion for the choice of articles had been the ones that had shown to the diverse types of injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation and its pathophysiology. Final Considerations: This revision of literature was motivated by the comment in the practical clinic of a great number of laryngeal sequels in patients submitted to the orotracheal intubation. Of that is ahead important the knowledge, for the professionals of the area of health, the types of complications and its causes, with intention to prevent them, adopting measured of prevention of these injuries. PMID:25991942

  4. Trauma patients warrant upper and lower extremity venous duplex ultrasound surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Alonso; Tyroch, Alan H.; McLean, Susan F.; Smith, Jody; Ramos, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Background: Due to the high incidence of thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis [DVT] and pulmonary embolus [PE]) after injury, many trauma centers perform lower extremity surveillance duplex ultrasounds. We hypothesize that trauma patients are at a higher risk of upper extremity DVTs (UEDVTs) than lower extremity DVTs (LEDVTs), and therefore, all extremities should be evaluated. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart and trauma registry review of Intensive Care Unit trauma patients with upper and LEDVTs detected on surveillance duplex ultrasound from January 2010 to December 2014 was carried out. Variables reviewed were age, gender, injury severity score, injury mechanism, clot location, day of clot detection, presence of central venous pressure catheter, presence of inferior vena cava filter, mechanical ventilation, and fracture. Results: A total of 136 patients had a DVT in a 5-year period: upper - 71 (52.2%), lower - 61 (44.9%), both upper and lower - 4 (2.9%). Overall, 75 (55.2%) patients had a UEDVT. Upper DVT vein: Brachial (62), axillary (26), subclavian (11), and internal jugular (10). Lower DVT vein: femoral (58), popliteal (14), below knee (4), and iliac (2). 10.3% had a PE: UEDVT - 5 (6.7%) and LEDVT - 9 (14.8%) P = 0.159. Conclusions: The majority of the DVTs in the study were in the upper extremities. For trauma centers that aggressively screen the lower extremities with venous duplex ultrasound, surveillance to include the upper extremities is warranted. PMID:28367009

  5. Do Minority or White Patients Respond to Brief Alcohol Intervention in Trauma Centers? A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Roudsari, Bahman; Caetano, Raul; Frankowski, Ralph; Field, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The current study evaluated if the effectiveness of brief alcohol intervention in reducing 6- and 12-month risk of injuries in a large level 1 urban trauma center varies based on trauma patients’ ethnicity. Methods Eligible White, Hispanic and Black trauma patients ≥ 18 years old were randomized to brief alcohol intervention, or treatment as usual. The intervention, implemented by trained health educators, was a “non-confrontational, patient centered conversation” focused on patients’ drinking pattern with the purpose of encouraging them to change risky drinking. Study outcomes were patient-reported 6 and 12 month incidence of all-type injuries, alcohol-related injuries and serious injuries (i.e. injuries requiring emergency department visit or hospital admission). Results A total of 1,493 trauma patients (668 Whites, 537 Hispanics, 288 Blacks) participated in this study. After one year of follow-up, we were not able to detect any important association between brief intervention and the risk of all-type injuries, alcohol-related injuries or, serious injuries among study participants. In addition, the association between brief intervention and the outcomes of interest was not modified by patients’ ethnicity. Conclusions Our study, congruent with some recent publications, implies that there are some patient- and provider-related impediments that could restrict the effectiveness of brief intervention programs in trauma centers, regardless of patient ethnicity. Unless those impediments are identified and eliminated, assuming that brief intervention will be an effective strategy for controlling future alcohol-related injuries among trauma patients and should be provided under any circumstances, might not be reasonable. PMID:19250705

  6. Hepatitis E Virus Infection after Platelet Transfusion in an Immunocompetent Trauma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Trouve-Buisson, Thibaut; Pouzol, Patricia; Larrat, Sylvie; Decaens, Thomas; Payen, Jean-Francois

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection causes acute liver disease, but severe infections are rare in immunocompetent patients. We describe a case of HEV infection in a previously healthy male trauma patient in France who received massive transfusions. Genotyping confirmed HEV in a transfused platelet pool and the donor. PMID:27983485

  7. [Care for multi-trauma patients, from the transfer to the operating theatre to intensive care].

    PubMed

    Dhollande, Noémie; Vigani, Séverine; Angot, Nathalie; Sirabella, Julien

    2013-09-01

    Nurses caring for multi-trauma patients returning from the operating theatre need to have extensive knowledge. Their role is to prevent and detect any complications, and namely respiratory and neurological complications, and act efficiently to keep the patient's condition from deteriorating.

  8. Informed consent in trauma: does written information improve patient recall of risks? A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Hannah K; Manjaly, Joseph G; Yousri, Taher; Upadhyay, Neil; Taylor, Hazel; Nicol, Stephen G; Livingstone, James A

    2012-09-01

    Informed consent is vital to good surgical practice. Pain, sedative medication and psychological distress resulting from trauma are likely to adversely affect a patient's ability to understand and retain information thus impairing the quality of the consent process. This study aims to assess whether provision of written information improves trauma patient's recall of the risks associated with their surgery. 121 consecutive trauma patients were randomised to receive structured verbal information or structured verbal information with the addition of supplementary written information at the time of obtaining consent for their surgery. Patients were followed up post-operatively (mean 3.2 days) with a questionnaire to assess recall of risks discussed during the consent interview and satisfaction with the consent process. Recall of risks discussed in the consent interview was found to be significantly improved in the group receiving written and verbal information compared to verbal information alone (mean questionnaire score 41% vs. 64%), p=0.0014 using the Mann-Whitney U test. Patient satisfaction with the consent process was improved in the group receiving written and verbal information and 90% of patients in both groups expressed a preference for both written and verbal information compared to verbal information alone. Patients awaiting surgery following trauma can pose a challenge to adequately inform about benefits conferred, the likely post operative course and potential risks. Written information is a simple and cost-effective means to improve the consent process and was popular with patients.

  9. Gene Expression of Proresolving Lipid Mediator Pathways Is Associated With Clinical Outcomes in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sarah K.; Butler, Kathryn L.; Hayden, Douglas; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Serhan, Charles N.; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Specialized proresolving lipid mediators have emerged as powerful modulators of inflammation and activators of resolution. Animal models show significant benefits of specialized proresolving lipid mediators on survival and wound healing after major burn trauma. To date, no studies have investigated specialized proresolving lipid mediators and their relation to other lipid mediator pathways in humans after trauma. Here we determine if patients with poor outcomes after trauma have dysregulated lipid mediator pathways. Design We studied blood leukocyte expression of 18 genes critical to the synthesis, signaling, and metabolism of specialized proresolving lipid mediators and proinflammatory lipid mediators, and we correlated these expression patterns with clinical outcomes in trauma patients from the Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury study. Setting Seven U.S. medical trauma centers. Subjects Ninety-six patients enrolled in the Inflammation and Host Response to Injury study, after blunt trauma and unambiguously classified as having uncomplicated or complicated recoveries. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers were enrolled as controls. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Within each patient, the 18 genes of interest were used to calculate scores for distinct families of lipid mediators, including resolvins, lipoxins, prostaglandins, and leukotrienes, as well as leukotriene to resolvin score ratios. Scores were built using a simple weighting scheme, taking into consideration both dependent and independent activities of enzymes and receptors responsible for lipid mediator biosynthesis and function. Individually, ALOX12, PTGS2, PTGES, PTGDS, ALOX5AP, LTA4H, FPR2, PTGER2, LTB4R, HPGD, PTGR1, and CYP4F3 were expressed differentially over 28 days posttrauma between patients with uncomplicated and complicated recoveries (p < 0.05). When all genes were combined into scores, patients with uncomplicated recoveries had differential and higher resolvin

  10. Trauma in the pregnant patient: an evidence-based approach to management.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kurt A; Bryce, Suzanne

    2013-04-01

    The management of acute trauma in the pregnant patient relies on a thorough understanding of the underlying physiology of pregnancy. This issue reviews the evidence regarding important considerations in pregnant trauma patients, including the primary and secondary survey as well as the possibility for Rh exposure, placental abruption, uterine rupture, and the need for a prompt perimortem cesarean section in the moribund patient. Because ionizing radiation is always a concern in pregnancy, the circumstances where testing provides benefits that outweigh risks to the fetus are discussed. Emergency clinicians are encouraged to advocate for trauma prevention, including proper safety restraints for motor vehicles and screening for domestic violence, as these measures have been shown to be effective in reducing morbidity and mortality in this population. Recommendations for monitoring, admission, discharge, and follow-up are also noted.

  11. Characteristics and visual outcomes of patients hospitalized for ocular trauma in central China: 2006–2011

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ying; Zhang, Feng-Yan; Peng, Guang-Hua; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Guang-Ming; Wang, Wen-Zhan; Ma, Jing; Ren, Shi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    AIM To complete the data of ocular trauma in central China, as a well-known tertiary referral center for ocular trauma, we documented the epidemiological characteristics and visual outcomes of patients hospitalized for ocular trauma in this region. METHODS A retrospective study of patients hospitalized for ocular trauma in central China from 2006 to 2011 was performed. RESULTS This study included 5964 eyes of 5799 patients. The average age was 35.5±21.8y with a male-to-female ratio of 2.8:1. The most common age was 45-59y age group. Most patients were farmers and workers (51.9%). The most common injuries were firework related (24.5%), road traffic related (24.2%), and work related (15.0%). Among the most common causative agents were firecrackers (24.5%), followed by metal/knife/scissors (21.4%). Most injuries occurred in January (14.2%), February (27.0%), and August (10.0%). There were 8.5% patients with ocular injuries combined with other injuries. The incidence of open ocular injuries (4585 eyes, 76.9%) was higher than closed ocular injuries (939 eyes, 15.7%). The incidences of chemical and thermal ocular injuries were 1.2% and 0.6%. Ocular trauma score (OTS) predicted final visual acuity at non light perception (NLP), 20/200-20/50 and 20/40 with a sensitivity of 100%, and light perception (LP)/hand motion (HM) and 1/200-19/200 with a specificity of 100%. CONCLUSIONS This study provides recent epidemiological data of patients hospitalized for ocular trauma in central China. Some factors influencing the visual outcome include time interval between injury and visit to the clinic, wound location, open or closed globe injury, initial visual acuity, and OTS. PMID:25709927

  12. A surgical approach in the management of mucormycosis in a trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Zahoor, B A; Piercey, J E; Wall, D R; Tetsworth, K D

    2016-11-01

    Mucormycosis as a consequence of trauma is a devastating complication; these infections are challenging to control, with a fatality rate approaching 96% in immunocompromised patients. We present a case where a proactive approach was successfully employed to treat mucormycosis following complex polytrauma. Aggressive repeated surgical debridement, in combination with appropriate antifungal therapy, proved successful in this instance. In our opinion, mucormycosis in trauma mandates an aggressive surgical approach. This prevents ascending dissemination of mucormycosis and certainly reduces the risk of patient mortality as a direct result. Anti-fungal therapy should be used secondarily as an adjunct together with surgical debridement, or as an alternative when surgical intervention is not feasible.

  13. Nursing Workload in Intensive Care Unit Trauma Patients: Analysis of Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lilia de Souza; Domingues, Cristiane de Alencar; Poggetti, Renato Sérgio; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Background From the perspective of nurses, trauma patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) demand a high degree of nursing workload due to hemodynamic instability and the severity of trauma injuries. This study aims to identify the factors related to the high nursing workload required for trauma victims admitted to the ICU. Methods This is a prospective, cross-sectional study using descriptive and correlation analyses, conducted with 200 trauma patients admitted to an ICU in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The nursing workload was measured using the Nursing Activities Score (NAS). The distribution of the NAS values into tertiles led to the identification of two research groups: medium/low workload and high workload. The Chi-square, Fisher's exact, Mann-Whitney and multiple logistic regression tests were utilized for the analyses. Findings The majority of patients were male (82.0%) and suffered blunt trauma (94.5%), with traffic accidents (57.5%) and falls (31.0%) being prevalent. The mean age was 40.7 years (±18.6) and the mean NAS was 71.3% (±16.9). Patient gender, the presence of pulmonary failure, the number of injured body regions and the risk of death according to the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II were factors associated with a high degree of nursing workload in the first 24 hours following admission to the ICU. Conclusion Workload demand was higher in male patients with physiological instability and multiple severe trauma injuries who developed pulmonary failure. PMID:25375369

  14. The ABO Histo-Blood Group and AKI in Critically Ill Patients with Trauma or Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian J.; Mangalmurti, Nilam S.; Nguyen, Tam D.; Holena, Daniel N.; Wu, Qufei; Nguyen, Ethan T.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Lanken, Paul N.; Christie, Jason D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Shashaty, Michael G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective ABO blood types are determined by antigen modifications on glycoproteins and glycolipids and associated with altered plasma levels of inflammatory and endothelial injury markers implicated in AKI pathogenesis. We sought to determine the association of ABO blood types with AKI risk in critically ill patients with trauma or sepsis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted two prospective cohort studies at an urban, academic, level I trauma center and tertiary referral center; 497 patients with trauma admitted to the surgical intensive care unit between 2005 and 2010 with an injury severity score >15 and 759 patients with severe sepsis admitted to the medical intensive care unit between 2008 and 2013 were followed for 6 days for the development of incident AKI. AKI was defined by Acute Kidney Injury Network creatinine and dialysis criteria. Results Of 497 patients with trauma, 134 developed AKI (27%). In multivariable analysis, blood type A was associated with higher AKI risk relative to type O among patients of European descent (n=229; adjusted risk, 0.28 versus 0.14; risk difference, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.03 to 0.24; P=0.02). Of 759 patients with sepsis, AKI developed in 326 (43%). Blood type A again conferred higher AKI risk relative to type O among patients of European descent (n=437; adjusted risk, 0.53 versus 0.40; risk difference, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.04 to 0.23; P=0.01). Findings were similar when analysis was restricted to those patients who did not develop acute respiratory distress syndrome or were not transfused. We did not detect a significant association between blood type and AKI risk among individuals of African descent in either cohort. Conclusions Blood type A is independently associated with AKI risk in critically ill patients with trauma or severe sepsis of European descent, suggesting a role for ABO glycans in AKI susceptibility. PMID:26342043

  15. Alcohol and other psychoactive drugs in trauma patients aged 10–14 years

    PubMed Central

    Li, G.; Chanmugam, A.; Rothman, R.; DiScala, C.; Paidas, C.; Kelen, G.

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To examine the prevalence of alcohol and/or other psychoactive drugs, such as marijuana and cocaine (AODs), involved in preteen trauma patients. Methods—Toxicological testing results were analyzed for 1356 trauma patients aged 10–14 years recorded in the National Pediatric Trauma Registry for the years 1990–95. Results—Of the 1356 patients who received toxicological screening at the time of admission, 116 (9%) were positive for AODs. AOD involvement increased with age. Patients with pre-existing mental disorders were nearly three times as likely as other patients to be AOD positive (23% v 8%, p<0.01). AOD involvement was more prevalent in intentional injuries and in injuries that occurred at home. Conclusions—AODs in preteen trauma are of valid concern, in particular among patients with mental disorders or intentional injuries. The role of AODs in childhood injuries needs to be further examined using standard screening instruments and representative study samples. PMID:10385826

  16. Implementation and Evaluation of a Ward-Based eLearning Program for Trauma Patient Management.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kate; Wiseman, Taneal; Kennedy, Belinda; Kourouche, Sarah; Goldsmith, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The majority of trauma nursing education is focused on the emergency phases of care. We describe the development and evaluation of a trauma eLearning module for the ward environment. The module was developed using adult learning principles and implemented in 2 surgical wards. There were 3 phases of evaluation: (1) self-efficacy of nurses; (2) relevance and usability of the module and; (3) application of knowledge learnt. The majority indicated they had applied new knowledge, particularly when performing a physical assessment (85.7%), communicating (91.4%), and identifying risk of serious illness (90.4%). Self-efficacy relating to confidence in caring for patients, communication, and escalating clinical deterioration improved (p = .023). An eLearning trauma patient assessment module for ward nursing staff improves nursing knowledge and self-efficacy.

  17. Prehospital Use of Cervical Collars in Trauma Patients: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Asbjørnsen, Helge; Habiba, Samer; Sunde, Geir Arne; Wester, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The cervical collar has been routinely used for trauma patients for more than 30 years and is a hallmark of state-of-the-art prehospital trauma care. However, the existing evidence for this practice is limited: Randomized, controlled trials are largely missing, and there are uncertain effects on mortality, neurological injury, and spinal stability. Even more concerning, there is a growing body of evidence and opinion against the use of collars. It has been argued that collars cause more harm than good, and that we should simply stop using them. In this critical review, we discuss the pros and cons of collar use in trauma patients and reflect on how we can move our clinical practice forward. Conclusively, we propose a safe, effective strategy for prehospital spinal immobilization that does not include routine use of collars. PMID:23962031

  18. [Geriatric trauma centers - requirements catalog. An initiative to promote and guarantee the quality of care of elderly trauma patients receiving inpatient care].

    PubMed

    Gogol, M; van den Heuvel, D; Lüttje, D; Püllen, R; Reingräber, A C; Schulz, R-J; Veer, A; Wittrich, A

    2014-06-01

    For the care of the elderly, specific geriatric care facilities in hospitals and specialized rehabilitation centers have been established in the last 20 years throughout Germany. In addition, trauma surgery departments in hospitals and clinics also provide comprehensive care for trauma patients. The present requirements catalog was developed with the aim to ensure the standardization and quality assurance of these care facilities. Thus, the structural basics and, in particular, the structured cooperation between geriatrics and trauma surgery are described and defined in terms of structure, process, and outcome quality. The Bundesverband Geriatrie, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geriatrie, and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gerontologie und Geriatrie offer documentation for external and internal use and evaluation of the structures and processes for certification of geriatric trauma centers. Prerequisite for certification is to meet the technical requirements defined in the requirements catalogue or documents derived from it, and proof of a quality management system according to ISO 9001.

  19. Safety and efficacy of tranexamic acid in bleeding paediatric trauma patients: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Denisa; Dehaeck, Ruben; Lorenzetti, Diane; Guilfoyle, Jonathan; Poon, Man-Chiu; Steele, MacGregor; Lardner, David; Ma, Irene Wai Yan; Brindle, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Trauma is the leading cause of death among children aged 1–18. Studies indicate that better control of bleeding could potentially prevent 10–20% of trauma-related deaths. The antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid (TxA) has shown promise in haemorrhage control in adult trauma patients. However, information on the potential benefits of TxA in children remains sparse. This review proposes to evaluate the current uses, benefits and adverse effects of TxA in the bleeding paediatric trauma population. Methods and analysis A structured search of bibliographic databases (eg, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL) has been undertaken to retrieve randomised controlled trials and cohort studies that describe the use of TxA in paediatric trauma patients. To ensure that all relevant data were captured, the search did not contain any restrictions on language or publication time. After deduplication, citations will be screened independently by 2 authors, and selected for inclusion based on prespecified criteria. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment will be performed independently and in duplicate. Meta-analytic methods will be employed wherever appropriate. Ethics and dissemination This study will not involve primary data collection, and formal ethical approval will therefore not be required. The findings of this study will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication and at relevant conference meetings. Trial registration number CRD42016038023. PMID:27660323

  20. Effect of amino acid infusion on glucose production in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Long, C L; Nelson, K M; Geiger, J W; Theus, W L; Clark, J A; Laws, H L; Blakemore, W S

    1996-03-01

    The relationship between precursor supply and hepatic glucose output (HGO) was examined in 8 control subjects and 12 trauma patients after a fasting period of approximately 60 hours. Glucose kinetics were measured with a primed-constant infusion of [U-14C]glucose and [6-3H]glucose. The basal rate of HGO was 5.45 +/- 0.22 micromol x kg-1 x min-1 in the controls and 13.16 +/- 0.76 micromol x kg-1 x min-1 following trauma (p < 0.001). Four hours after amino acid infusion of 1.3 g x kg-1 x 24 h-1, HGO in the controls was unchanged at 5.35 +/- 0.22 micromol x kg-1 x min-1 but it had decreased to 11.71 +/- 0.67 micromol x kg-1 after trauma (p < 0.001). We conclude that increasing the supply of gluconeogenic precursors does not stimulate HGO in normal subjects after fasting or after severe trauma and that factors other than to availability of amino acids are responsible for the enhanced rate of HGO in trauma patients.

  1. Guidelines for the Management of a Pregnant Trauma Patient.

    PubMed

    Jain, Venu; Chari, Radha; Maslovitz, Sharon; Farine, Dan; Bujold, Emmanuel; Gagnon, Robert; Basso, Melanie; Bos, Hayley; Brown, Richard; Cooper, Stephanie; Gouin, Katy; McLeod, N Lynne; Menticoglou, Savas; Mundle, William; Pylypjuk, Christy; Roggensack, Anne; Sanderson, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Objectif : Une femme enceinte sur 12 en vient à subir des traumatismes physiques et ceux-ci exercent des effets importants sur la mortalité et la morbidité maternelles, ainsi que sur l’issue de la grossesse. La mise en œuvre d’une approche multidisciplinaire s’avère justifiée pour assurer l’optimisation des issues, et ce, tant pour la mère que pour son fœtus. Le présent document a pour but d’offrir, aux fournisseurs de soins obstétricaux, une approche systématique factuelle qu’ils pourront utiliser pour assurer la prise en charge des patientes enceintes ayant subi un traumatisme. Issues : Issues sanitaires et économiques considérables, par comparaison avec les pratiques de rechange. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans Medline, CINAHL et The Cochrane Library entre octobre 2007 et septembre 2013 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (« pregnancy », « Cesarean section », « hypotension », « domestic violence », « shock ») et de mots clés (« trauma », « perimortem Cesarean », « Kleihauer-Betke », « supine hypotension », « electrical shock ») appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre janvier 1968 et septembre 2013. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en février 2014. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualit

  2. [Heat and moisture exchangers for conditioning of inspired air of intubated patients in intensive care. The humidification properties of passive air exchangers under clinical conditions].

    PubMed

    Rathgeber, J; Züchner, K; Kietzmann, D; Weyland, W

    1995-04-01

    Heat and moisture exchangers (HME) are used as artificial noses for intubated patients to prevent tracheo-bronchial or pulmonary damage resulting from dry and cold inspired gases. HME are mounted directly on the tracheal tube, where they collect a large fraction of the heat and moisture of the expired air, adding this to the subsequent inspired breath. The effective performance depends on the water-retention capacity of the HME: the amount of water added to the inspired gas cannot exceed the stored water uptake of the previous breath. This study evaluates the efficiency of four different HME under laboratory and clinical conditions using a new moisture-measuring device. METHODS. In a first step, the absolute efficiency of four different HME (DAR Hygrobac, Gibeck Humid-Vent 2P, Pall BB 22-15 T, and Pall BB 100) was evaluated using a lung model simulating physiological heat and humidity conditions of the upper airways. The model was ventilated with tidal volumes of 500, 1,000, and 1,500 ml and different flow rates. The water content of the ventilated air was determined between tracheal tube and HME using a new high-resolution humidity meter and compared with the absolute water loss of the exhaled air at the gas outlet of a Siemens Servo C ventilator measured with a dew-point hygrometer. Secondly, the moisturizing efficiency was evaluated under clinical conditions in an intensive care unit with 25 intubated patients. Maintaining the ventilatory conditions for each patient, the HME were randomly changed. The humidity data were determined as described above and compared with the laboratory findings. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. The water content at the respirator outlet is inversely equivalent to the humidity of the inspired gases and represents the water loss from the respiratory tract if the patient is ventilated with dry gases. Moisture retention and heating capacity decreased with higher volumes and higher flow rates. These data are simple to obtain without affecting the

  3. Correlation between catecholamine levels and outcome in patients with severe head trauma.

    PubMed

    Salehpoor, F; Bazzazi, A M; Estakhri, R; Zaheri, M; Asghari, B

    2010-08-01

    Some studies have shown that catecholamines and the changes in their levels during and after head trauma can be useful in predicting the outcome in head trauma patients. The goal of this study is to search for a probable relation between urine levels of catecholamines and prognosis in patients with severe head trauma. Fifty four patients with severe head trauma Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS < or = 8) on admission time were recruited in Imam Reza Hospital within one. These patients were included when having no major accompanying trauma in other organs. Twenty four hour urine was collected after admission and levels of metanephrine and nor-metanephrine were measured. The relation between urine levels of these metabolites with final outcome and also with GCS at admission, 24, 48 h and 1 week after admission and discharge time and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) were studied. Fifty two patients, 48 males and 4 females with a mean age of 32.3 +/- 14.7 (3-72) years were included. The main underlying etiologies were motorcycle (46.2%) and car accidents (25%). Diffuse axonal injury, brain contusion and subdural hematoma were three main diagnoses (28.8, 17.3 and 15.4% of the cases, respectively). 19 (36.5%) of the patients expired within the study period. The mean level of metanephrine and normetanephrine in urine were 207.9 +/- 200.5 and 330.2 +/- 218.4 microg in 24 h, respectively. There was no meaningful relation between urine levels of these metabolites and any of GCS and GOS. There was also no meaningful relation between these parameters and final prognosis in patients.

  4. Screening for osteoporosis following non-vertebral fractures in patients aged 50 and older independently of gender or level of trauma energy-a Swiss trauma center approach.

    PubMed

    Hemmeler, Christoph; Morell, Sabrina; Amsler, Felix; Gross, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Screening in a standardized manner for osteoporosis in non-vertebral fracture patients aged 50 and older independently of both gender and level of trauma energy yielded the indication for osteoporotic therapy for every fourth male high-energy fracture patient.

  5. Predictive value of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-tuberculosis Gold In-Tube test for development of active tuberculosis in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Ekrem Cengiz; Gunluoglu, Gulşah; Gunluoglu, Mehmet Zeki; Tural, Seda; Sökücü, Sinem

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemodialysis (HD) patients are at increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) compared with the general population. QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) for LTBI detection is more promising than tuberculin skin test (TST) in HD patients. AIM: In our study, we evaluated the value of the TST and QFT-G In-Tube (QFG-IT) test in the development of active tuberculosis (TB), in the HD patients, and in healthy controls. METHODS: The study enrolled 95 HD patients and ninety age-matched, healthy controls. The TST and QFG-IT were performed. All the subjects were followed up 5 years for active TB disease. RESULTS: Compared to the healthy controls, a high prevalence of LTBI was found in the HD patients by QFG-IT (41% vs. 25%). However, no significant difference was detected by TST (32% vs. 31%). Four HD patients and one healthy control progressed to active TB disease within the 5-year follow-up. For active TB discovered subjects, QFG-IT was positive in all, but TST was positive in two (one patient and one healthy control). In HD patients; sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of QFG-IT, and TST for active TB was 100% and 25%, 62% and 67%, 10%, and 3%, and 100% and 95%, respectively. Receiver operating curve analysis revealed that the results are significantly different (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: QFG-IT test is a more useful diagnostic method than TST for detecting those who will progress to active TB in HD patients. PMID:27168859

  6. The trauma bubble: patient and family experience of serious burn injury.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Janice G; Taggart, Susan B; Johnston, Rae A; Ko, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the lived experience of burn injury for Australian patients and families. Of specific interest was the period covering emergency and inhospital care and early experiences of transition into the community. Eighteen participants including patients with serious burn injury and close family members engaged in indepth, semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using Heideggerian phenomenology and were interpreted within the framework of Merleau-Ponty's philosophy of the body. Participants experienced substantial emotional trauma that was unrelated to burn size or severity. Emotional distress was highest amongst people with facial burns. Strong recollections of the accident and poorly managed pain seemed to exacerbate the experience of trauma. Patients described physical otherness, memories of consuming, embodied pain, and recycling of the initial catastrophe. Family members expressed vicarious suffering and were confronted by the physical otherness of their loved one. Participants were isolated in their "bubble of trauma" as they tried to contain grief and loss, and protect loved ones from their distress. Emotional trauma persisted after discharge challenging family functioning and adjustment. These findings support a systematic approach to identifying and responding to the emotional needs of patients and family, including early information about possible emotional reactions to traumatic events and proactive engagement with psychology services. Best practice approaches for early pain management should be a focus for both clinical care and further research.

  7. Redox Changes Induced by General Anesthesia in Critically Ill Patients with Multiple Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sandesc, Dorel; Dumache, Raluca; Nartita, Radu; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Luca, Loredana; Vernic, Corina; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea

    2015-01-01

    The critically ill polytrauma patient is a constant challenge for the trauma team due to the complexity of the complications presented. Intense inflammatory response and infections, as well as multiple organ dysfunctions, significantly increase the rate of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Moreover, due to the physiological and biochemical imbalances present in this type of patients, the bioproduction of free radicals is significantly accelerated, thus installing the oxidative stress. In the therapeutic management of such patients, multiple surgical interventions are required and therefore they are being subjected to repeated general anesthesia. In this paper, we want to present the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress in critically ill patients with multiple traumas and the implications of general anesthesia on the redox mechanisms of the cell. We also want to summarize the antioxidant treatments able to reduce the intensity of oxidative stress by modulating the biochemical activity of some cellular mechanisms. PMID:26693352

  8. The relationship between childhood trauma, emotion recognition, and irritability in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Bilgi, Mustafa Melih; Taspinar, Seval; Aksoy, Burcu; Oguz, Kaya; Coburn, Kerry; Gonul, Ali Saffet

    2017-02-03

    This study investigated the relationship between childhood trauma, irritability, and emotion recognition, in schizophrenia patients during a psychotic break. Thirty-six schizophrenia inpatients and 36 healthy controls were assessed with the Irritability Questionnaire (IRQ) and two facial emotion recognition tasks, the Emotion Discrimination Test (EDT) and Emotion Identification Test (EIT). Patients were further assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM III-R Axis II Disorders (SCID-II), the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-28 (CTQ-28). EDT and EIT performance was significantly impaired in patients compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, patients tended to misidentify sad, surprised, or angry faces as showing fear, and this misidentification correlated with the patients' irritability. Childhood adversity increased irritability both directly and indirectly through emotion misidentification.

  9. Presumed latent ocular tuberculosis diagnosed with the positive quantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test in a HLA-A29-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Carlos Mario; Atencia, Cesar; Merayo-Lloves, Jesus; Fernandez-Vega Sanz, Alvaro

    2015-06-04

    A 59-year-old Hispanic woman presented with a 3-year history of floaters associated with bilateral reduced visual acuity. Her best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/40. Both anterior segments were without inflammation, but fundoscopy showed mild vitreous inflammation and multiple inflammatory choroidal lesions. Tests for inflammatory and infectious diseases were negative except for human leucocyte antigen A29. The patient was diagnosed with birdshot choroidoretinopathy, and treatment was initiated with cyclosporine A 2.5 mg/kg/day. One year after treatment, the patient reported systemic symptoms with no improvement in visual acuity. Fundus findings remained with vitreal inflammation. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test was positive, and a diagnosis of presumed latent ocular tuberculosis (TB) was made. We initiated anti-TB treatment for 9 months. At 6 months of anti-TB therapy, there was no active inflammation. The patient was followed for 2 years with no medications and no active inflammation. Her final BCVA was 20/25.

  10. [Safe:Trac course series of the German Society for Trauma Surgery on patient safety].

    PubMed

    Burghofer, K; Lackner, C K

    2009-08-01

    Based on crew resource management of the airline industry the German Society for Trauma Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie, DGU) was the first scientific community in Germany to develop and implement a training course for patient safety. The S:training courses contain four course formats which focus on the prehospital life support (S:PLS), the operating room (S:OR), the trauma room (S:TR) and the intensive care unit (S:ICU). In the training the importance of the human factor for the management of acute major trauma is developed by means of presentations, training videos, practical training, discussions and realistic case scenarios associated with the special working environment of the participants. A specially developed course manual acts as a work and reference book and course booking is possible at http://www.safe-trac.de.

  11. Screening of differentially expressed genes between multiple trauma patients with and without sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ji, S C; Pan, Y T; Lu, Q Y; Sun, Z Y; Liu, Y Z

    2014-03-17

    The purpose of this study was to identify critical genes associated with septic multiple trauma by comparing peripheral whole blood samples from multiple trauma patients with and without sepsis. A microarray data set was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. This data set included 70 samples, 36 from multiple trauma patients with sepsis and 34 from multiple trauma patients without sepsis (as a control set). The data were preprocessed, and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were then screened for using packages of the R language. Functional analysis of DEGs was performed with DAVID. Interaction networks were then established for the most up- and down-regulated genes using HitPredict. Pathway-enrichment analysis was conducted for genes in the networks using WebGestalt. Fifty-eight DEGs were identified. The expression levels of PLAU (down-regulated) and MMP8 (up-regulated) presented the largest fold-changes, and interaction networks were established for these genes. Further analysis revealed that PLAT (plasminogen activator, tissue) and SERPINF2 (serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade F, member 2), which interact with PLAU, play important roles in the pathway of the component and coagulation cascade. We hypothesize that PLAU is a major regulator of the component and coagulation cascade, and down-regulation of PLAU results in dysfunction of the pathway, causing sepsis.

  12. Optimizing Physical Activity Among Older Adults Post Trauma: Overcoming System and Patient Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells PT, Chris L.; Boltz, Marie; Holtzman, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    By 2050 it is anticipated that close to half (40%) of all trauma patients will be over the age of 65. Recovery post trauma for these individuals is more complicated than among younger individuals. Specifically there is an increased risk for: (1) functional decline; (2) higher mortality rates; (3) longer length of stay; (4) greater resource consumption; (5) nursing home placement; (6) adverse events such as infections, pressure ulcers and falls; and (7) rehospitalization post discharge. Early mobilization has been shown to improve outcomes. Unfortunately, there are many challenges to early mobilization. The Function Focused Care Intervention was developed to overcome these challenges. The purpose of this paper was to describe the initial recruitment of the first 25 participants and delineate the challenges and successes associated with implementation of this intervention. Overall the intervention was implemented as intended and recruitment rates were consistent with other studies. Most patients were female, white and on average 79 years of age. Optimizing physical activity of patients was a low priority for the nurses with patient safety taking precedence. Patients spent most of the time in bed. Age, depression and tethering were the only factors that were associated with physical activity and functional outcomes of patients. Ongoing work is needed to keep patients physically active in the immediate post trauma recovery period. PMID:26547682

  13. Pseudopancreatitis on computed tomography in a patient with isolated blunt head trauma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Computed tomography is commonly used to exclude occult injuries in patients with trauma, but imaging can reveal findings that are of uncertain etiology or clinical significance. We present a case of unsuspected pancreatic abnormality in a female patient with trauma who sustained an isolated blunt head injury. Case presentation A 25-year-old female Caucasian patient sustained massive blunt and penetrating head trauma, secondary to a large object penetrating through the vehicle windshield. Based on the mechanism of injury and clinical evaluation, it was felt to be an isolated head injury. However, computed tomography of her abdomen revealed an occult, intra-abdominal finding of significant pancreatic enlargement and peripancreatic fluid. There was no computed tomography evidence of parenchymal pancreatic laceration. The appearance of her pancreas on computed tomography was identical to that of acute pancreatitis or low-grade pancreatic injury, but her clinical history and laboratory values were not consistent with this, hence the term ‘pseudopancreatitis’. Later surgery for organ donation confirmed diffuse pancreatic and peripancreatic edema, but no hematoma, contusion or other evidence for direct traumatic injury. This was an isolated intra-abdominal abnormality. Conclusion The routine use of computed tomography in patients who have sustained trauma has led to increasing detection of unexpected findings. Clinical information such as mechanism of injury and blood work, along with careful evaluation of ancillary imaging findings (or lack of), is important for the provision of an appropriate differential diagnosis. We discuss the possible mechanism and differential diagnosis of an isolated pancreatic abnormality in the setting of non-abdominal trauma, which includes shock pancreas, overhydration, traumatic pancreatic injury and pancreatitis secondary to other etiologies. PMID:24529327

  14. Immunoinflammatory Response in Critically Ill Patients: Severe Sepsis and/or Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Nada; Djordjevic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Immunoinflammatory response in critically ill patients is very complex. This review explores some of the new elements of immunoinflammatory response in severe sepsis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha in severe acute pancreatitis as a clinical example of immune response in sepsis, immune response in severe trauma with or without secondary sepsis, and genetic aspects of host immuno-inflammatory response to various insults in critically ill patients. PMID:24371374

  15. Comparison of the Sensitivity of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB According to Patient Age

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Won; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Eun Young; Kim, Se Joong; Lee, Yeon Joo; Park, Jong Sun; Cho, Young-Jae; Yoon, Ho Il; Yim, Jae-Joon; Lee, Choon-Taek; Lee, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are two types of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) in use for the detection of tuberculosis (TB) infection, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (GFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB. Owing to contradictory reports regarding whether the results of these IGRAs are affected by the age of the patient, we aimed to determine if these two tests have age-related differences in sensitivity. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of diagnosed TB patients who were tested using either QFT-GIT or T-SPOT.TB from February 2008 to December 2013. The positivity of the two tests was analyzed and compared with true TB infection, which was defined as active TB based on either a positive Mycobacterium culture or a positive TB polymerase chain reaction. The QFT-GIT group included 192 TB patients, and the T-SPOT.TB group included 212 TB patients. Of the patients with pulmonary TB, 76 (39.6%) were in the QFT-GIT group and 143 (67.5%) in the T-SPOT.TB group. The overall sensitivity was 80.2% for QFT-GIT and 91.0% for T.SPOT.TB. The sensitivities of QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB according to age group were as follows: <29 years, 93.3% and 96.7%; 30–49 years, 86.5% and 94.7%; 50–69 years, 76.8% and 87.5%; and >70 years, 68.3% and 85.7%, respectively. The trend of age-related changes in sensitivity was significant for both QFT-GIT (p = 0.004) and T.SPOT.TB (p = 0.039). However, only QFT-GIT was significantly related to age in the multivariate analysis. QFT-GIT, but not T-SPOT.TB, was significantly affected by patient age. PMID:27258377

  16. Increased risk of endotracheal intubation and heart failure following acute myocardial infarction in patients with urolithiasis: a nationwide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shun-Ku; Liu, Jui-Ming; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Ting, Yuan-Tien; Pang, See-Tong; Hsu, Ren-Jun; Lin, Po-Hung

    2017-01-01

    Background Urolithiasis is a common urinary tract disease worldwide. It has been connected to systemic diseases, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. In the current study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between urolithiasis and the complications of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Materials and methods Data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 of the National Health Insurance Research Database. All AMI cases, both those who were hospitalized and those who were treated in the emergency department, were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code. Results A total of 37,052 patients with urinary calculi and 148,209 control subjects were enrolled in this study. The average follow-up period was 9.51 years. The risk of AMI was higher among patients with urolithiasis (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.03–1.13). We detected a significant association between urolithiasis and intubation (aHR 1.53, 95% CI 1.36–1.73), intensive care unit treatment (aHR 1.22, 95% CI 1.13–1.32), heart failure (aHR 1.59, 95% CI 1.42–1.78), shock (aHR 1.53, 95% CI 1.32–1.77), and arrhythmias (aHR 1.18, 95% CI 1.06–1.33). Furthermore, certain medical treatments for urolithiasis were found to be related to myocardial infarction (MI). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were significantly associated with a high risk of AMI. In contrast, allopurinol, thiazide diuretic, potassium-sparing diuretics, and α-blockers have negative association with AMI. Conclusion Urolithiasis had a significantly increased risk of endotracheal intubation and heart failure following AMI. In addition, urolithiasis was also associated with a high risk of intensive care unit treatment, shock, and arrhythmias after AMI. Medical treatments for urolithiasis may decrease the risk of MI, except the use of NSAIDs

  17. Evaluation of Sensorimotor Nerve Damage in Patients with Maxillofacial Trauma; a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Poorian, Behnaz; Bemanali, Mehdi; Chavoshinejad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate sensorimotor nerve damage in patients with maxillofacial trauma referring to Taleghani hospital, Tehran, Iran Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted during a 2-year period from 2014 to 2012 in Taleghani hospital of Tehran. We included a total number of 495 patients with maxillofacial trauma referring to our center during the study period. The demographic information, type of fracture, location of fracture and nerve injuries were assessed and recorded in each patients. The frequency of sensorimotor injuries in these patients was recorded. Data are presented as frequencies and proportions as appropriate. Results: Overall we included 495 patients with maxillofacial trauma with mean age of 31.5±13.8 years. There were 430 (86.9% men and in 65 (13.1%) women among the patients. The frequency of nerve injuries was 67.7% (336 patients). The mean age of the patients with nerve injuries was 33.4 ± 3.7 years. Marginal mandibular branch of facial nerve was the most common involved nerve being involved in 5 patients (1%). Regarding trigeminal nerve, the inferior alveolar branch (194 patients 39.1%) was the most common involved branch followed by infraorbital branch (135 patients 27.2%). Mandibular fracture was the most common injured bone being reported in 376 patient (75.9%) patients followed by zygomatic bone in 100 patient (20%). Conclusion: The most frequent fracture occurred in mandible followed by zygoma and the most injured nerve was inferior alveolar nerve followed by infraorbital branch of trigeminal nerve. In facial nerve the marginal branch was the most involved nerve. The frequency of nerve injury and the male to female ratio was higher in the current study compared to the literature. PMID:27331065

  18. Outcome of Concurrent Occult Hemothorax and Pneumothorax in Trauma Patients Who Required Assisted Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Ismail; Tawfeek, Zainab; El-Menyar, Ayman; Zarour, Ahmad; Afifi, Ibrahim; Kumar, Suresh; Latifi, Rifat; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The management and outcomes of occult hemopneumothorax in blunt trauma patients who required mechanical ventilation are not well studied. We aimed to study patients with occult hemopneumothorax on mechanical ventilation who could be carefully managed without tube thoracostomy. Methods. Chest trauma patients with occult hemopneumothorax who were on mechanical ventilation were prospectively evaluated. The presence of hemopneumothorax was confirmed by CT scanning. Hospital length of stay, complications, and outcome were recorded. Results. A total of 56 chest trauma patients with occult hemopneumothorax who were on ventilatory support were included with a mean age of 36 ± 13 years. Hemopneumothorax was managed conservatively in 72% cases and 28% underwent tube thoracostomy as indicated. 29% of patients developed pneumonia, 16% had Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), and 7% died. Thickness of hemothorax, duration of mechanical ventilation, and development of ARDS were significantly associated with tube thoracostomy in comparison to no-chest tube group. Conclusions. The majority of occult hemopneumothorax can be carefully managed without tube thoracostomy in patients who required positive pressure ventilation. Tube thoracotomy could be restricted to those who had evidence of increase in the size of the hemothorax or pneumothorax on follow-up chest radiographs or developed respiratory compromise. PMID:25785199

  19. Impact of emergency medical helicopter transport directly to a university hospital trauma center on mortality of severe blunt trauma patients until discharge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The benefits of transporting severely injured patients by helicopter remain controversial. This study aimed to analyze the impact on mortality of helicopter compared to ground transport directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. Methods The French Intensive Care Research for Severe Trauma cohort study enrolled 2,703 patients with severe blunt trauma requiring admission to University hospital intensive care units within 72 hours. Pre-hospital and hospital clinical data, including the mode of transport, (helicopter (HMICU) versus ground (GMICU), both with medical teams), were recorded. The analysis was restricted to patients admitted directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. The main endpoint was mortality until ICU discharge. Results Of the 1,958 patients analyzed, 74% were transported by GMICU, 26% by HMICU. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 26 (interquartile range (IQR) 19 to 34) for HMICU patients and 25 (IQR 18 to 34) for GMICU patients. Compared to GMICU, HMICU patients had a higher median time frame before hospital admission and were more intensively treated in the pre-hospital phase. Crude mortality until hospital discharge was the same regardless of pre-hospital mode of transport. After adjustment for initial status, the risk of death was significantly lower (odds ratio (OR): 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 0.98, P = 0.035) for HMICU compared with GMICU. This result did not change after further adjustment for ISS and overall surgical procedures. Conclusions This study suggests a beneficial impact of helicopter transport on mortality in severe blunt trauma. Whether this association could be due to better management in the pre-hospital phase needs to be more thoroughly assessed. PMID:23131068

  20. An innovative approach to orotracheal intubations: the Alexandrou Angle of Intubation position.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, Nikolaos A; Yeh, Benson; Barbara, Paul; Leber, Mark; Marshall, Lewis W

    2011-01-01

    Visualization of the vocal cords is paramount during orotracheal intubations. We employed a novel patient position in this derivation study. The Alexandrou Angle of Intubation (AAI) position is defined as a 20°-30° incline where the supine patient's head is elevated in relation to the body and legs. Our study participants were blinded to the goals of the research as well as our novel technique. Using intubation manikins, our participants ranked their preference for visualizing the vocal cords between the Flat, Trendelenburg, and AAI positions. A majority (58.8%) of our study participants preferred the AAI for visualizing the vocal cords over the other two positions. Future studies will reveal whether AAI will play a significant role in emergent airway management.

  1. Trends in Racial Disparities for Injured Patients Admitted to Trauma Centers

    PubMed Central

    Glance, Laurent G; Osler, Turner M; Mukamel, Dana B; Meredith, J Wayne; Li, Yue; Qian, Feng; Dick, Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether outcome disparities between black and white trauma patients have decreased over the last 10 years. Data Source Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study. Study Design We performed an observational cohort study on 191,887 patients admitted to 28 Level 1 and Level II trauma centers. The main outcomes of interest were (1) death, (2) death or major complication, and (3) failure-to-rescue. Hospitals were categorized according to the proportion of black patients. Multivariate regression models were used to estimate trends in racial disparities and to assess whether the source of racial disparities was within or between hospitals. Principal Findings Trauma patients admitted to hospitals with high concentrations of blacks (>20 percent) had a 45 percent higher odds of death (adj OR: 1.45, 95 percent CI: 1.09–1.92) and a 73 percent higher odds of death or major complication (adj OR: 1.73, 95 percent CI: 1.42–2.11) compared with patients admitted to hospitals treating low proportions of blacks. Blacks and whites admitted to the same hospitals had no difference in mortality (adj OR: 1.05, 95 percent CI: 0.87, 1.27) or death or major complications (adj OR: 1.01; 95 percent CI: 0.90, 1.13). The odds of overall mortality, and death or major complications have been reduced by 32 percent (adj OR: 0.68; 95 percent CI: 0.54–0.86) and 28 percent (adj OR: 0.72; 95 percent CI: 0.60–0.85) between 2000 and 2009, respectively. Racial disparities did not change over 10 years. Conclusion Despite the overall improvement in outcomes, the gap in quality of care between black and white trauma patients in Pennsylvania has not narrowed over the last 10 years. Racial disparities in trauma are due to the fact that black patients are more likely to be treated in lower quality hospitals compared with whites. PMID:23662602

  2. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit: impact on managing uncertainty for patient-centered communication.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert F; Gustin, Jillian

    2013-09-01

    A case of acute lung injury (ALI) progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation (ETMV) is presented. The palliative medicine service was asked to address concerns expressed by the patient's spouse reflecting uncertainty regarding outcome expectations. Acknowledging and confronting the uncertainties of a critical illness is an essential component of patient-centered communication. Addressing and managing uncertainty for the case scenario requires consideration of both short- and long-term outcomes including mortality, ventilator independence, and adverse effects on quality of life for survivors. In this paper, ALI/ARDS requiring ETMV in the ICU was used as a focal point for preparing a prognostic assessment incorporating these issues. This assessment was based on a review of recently published literature regarding mortality and ventilator independence of survivors for adult patients receiving ETMV for ALI/ARDS in the ICU. In the studies reviewed, long-term survival reported at 60 days to 1 year was 50-73% with greater than 84% of the survivors in each study breathing independently. Selected articles discussing outcomes other than mortality or recovery of respiratory function, particularly quality of life implications for ALI/ARDS survivors, were also reviewed. A case of of ALI/ARDS requiring ETMV in the ICU is used to illustrate the situation of an incapacitated critically ill patient where the outcome is uncertain. Patient-centered communication should acknowledge and address this uncertainty. Managing uncertainty consists of effectively expressing a carefully formulated prognostic assessment and using sound communication principles to alleviate the distress associated with the uncertain outcome probabilities.

  3. Teaching tracheal intubation: Airtraq is superior to Macintosh laryngoscope

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tracheal intubation with Macintosh laryngoscope is taught to medical students as it is a lifesaving procedure. However, it is a difficult technique to learn and the consequences of intubation failure are potentially serious. The Airtraq optical laryngoscope is a relatively novel intubation device, which allows visualization of the glottic plane without alignment of the oral, pharyngeal, and tracheal axes, possessing advantages over Macintosh for novice personnel. We introduced a teaching mode featured with a progressive evaluation scheme for preparation and performance of tracheal intubation with medical students in this prospective randomized crossover trial who had no prior airway management experience to find the superior one. Methods Twenty-six medical students of the 8-year programme in the 6th year participated in this trial, when they did their one-week rotation in the department of anaesthesiology. Each of the students intubated 6 patients, who were scheduled for surgeries under general anaesthesia, each laryngoscope for 3 patients respectively. One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients scheduled for surgical procedures requiring tracheal intubation were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to undergo tracheal intubation using Macintosh (n = 75) or Airtraq (n =74) laryngoscope. The progressive evaluation scheme was applied to each intubation attempt. Results Intubation success rate was significantly higher in Airtraq group than Macintosh group (87.8% vs. 66.7%, P < 0.05). Duration of glottis exposure was significantly shorter in Airtraq group compared to Macintosh group (50 ± 19 s vs. 81 ± 27 s, P < 0.001). A grade I Cormack and Lehane glottic view was obtained in 94.6% of patients in the Airtraq group versus 32% of patients in the Macintosh group (P <0.001). Duration of intubation in Airtraq group was significantly shorter (68 ± 21 s vs. 96 ± 22 s, P < 0.05) compared to Macintosh group

  4. Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) versus multidetector computed tomography in hemodynamically stable emergency patients.

    PubMed

    Fornell Pérez, R

    2017-02-10

    This critically appraised topic (CAT) study aims to evaluate the quality and extent of the scientific evidence that supports the use of focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) versus multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in hemodynamically stable trauma patients in the emergency room. An efficient search of the literature yielded several recent articles with a high level of evidence. The CAT study concludes that FAST is an acceptable initial imaging test in hemodynamically stable patients, although its performance is limited in certain circumstances. The decision whether to use MDCT should be determined by evaluating the patient's degree of instability and the distance to the MDCT scanner. Nevertheless, few articles address the question of the distance to MDCT scanners in emergency departments.

  5. Interleukin-6 Plasmatic Levels in Patients with Head Trauma and Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Alessandra Armstrong; Sotomaior, Vanessa Santos; Sakamoto, Keyth Suga; de Camargo Neto, Cyro Pereira; Martins, Carolina; Aguiar, Luiz Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The exact role of inflammatory response in hemorrhagic contusions is not fully characterized. The present study quantified IL-6 plasmatic levels in patients with closed head trauma and hemorrhagic contusions during the first 6 to 12 hours postrauma. The association between the plasmatic IL-6 levels, severity of trauma according to the Glasgow Coma Scale, volume of intracerebral hemorrhage and patient's clinical evolution were investigated. Although inflammation is a multifactorial process, a strong correlation between IL-6 levels, volume of traumatic hemorrhage and in-hospital evolution could be observed. A correlation between the IL-6 levels quantified 6 hours postrauma and progression of lesion volume between admission and 12 hours postrauma is suggested. The present study reinforces the importance of IL-6 in influencing the clinical conditions of a patient with cerebral injuries, particularly hemorrhagic contusions. PMID:22028746

  6. Implementation and Evaluation of a Wiki Involving Multiple Stakeholders Including Patients in the Promotion of Best Practices in Trauma Care: The WikiTrauma Interrupted Time Series Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Alexis F; Witteman, Holly O; Lauzier, François; Moore, Lynne; Lamontagne, François; Horsley, Tanya; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Droit, Arnaud; Weiss, Matthew; Tremblay, Sébastien; Lachaine, Jean; Le Sage, Natalie; Émond, Marcel; Berthelot, Simon; Plaisance, Ariane; Lapointe, Jean; Razek, Tarek; van de Belt, Tom H; Brand, Kevin; Bérubé, Mélanie; Clément, Julien; Grajales III, Francisco Jose; Eysenbach, Gunther; Kuziemsky, Craig; Friedman, Debbie; Lang, Eddy; Muscedere, John; Rizoli, Sandro; Roberts, Derek J; Scales, Damon C; Sinuff, Tasnim; Stelfox, Henry T; Gagnon, Isabelle; Chabot, Christian; Grenier, Richard; Légaré, France

    2015-01-01

    Background Trauma is the most common cause of mortality among people between the ages of 1 and 45 years, costing Canadians 19.8 billion dollars a year (2004 data), yet half of all patients with major traumatic injuries do not receive evidence-based care, and significant regional variation in the quality of care across Canada exists. Accordingly, our goal is to lead a research project in which stakeholders themselves will adapt evidence-based trauma care knowledge tools to their own varied institutional contexts and cultures. We will do this by developing and assessing the combined impact of WikiTrauma, a free collaborative database of clinical decision support tools, and Wiki101, a training course teaching participants how to use WikiTrauma. WikiTrauma has the potential to ensure that all stakeholders (eg, patients, clinicians, and decision makers) can all contribute to, and benefit from, evidence-based clinical knowledge about trauma care that is tailored to their own needs and clinical setting. Objective Our main objective will be to study the combined effect of WikiTrauma and Wiki101 on the quality of care in four trauma centers in Quebec. Methods First, we will pilot-test the wiki with potential users to create a version ready to test in practice. A rapid, iterative prototyping process with 15 health professionals from nonparticipating centers will allow us to identify and resolve usability issues prior to finalizing the definitive version for the interrupted time series. Second, we will conduct an interrupted time series to measure the impact of our combined intervention on the quality of care in four trauma centers that will be selected—one level I, one level II, and two level III centers. Participants will be health care professionals working in the selected trauma centers. Also, five patient representatives will be recruited to participate in the creation of knowledge tools destined for their use (eg, handouts). All participants will be invited to

  7. [The transillumination technique. An alternative to conventional intubation?].

    PubMed

    Lipp, M; de Rossi, L; Daubländer, M; Thierbach, A

    1996-10-01

    The technique of light-guided intubation is based on the principle that a source of light brought into the trachea results in clearly visible and defined transcutaneous illumination, while no illumination can be observed with the light source in the oesophagus (Fig. 1-7). The Trachlight is a reintroduced instrument for this alternative intubation technique. The essential developments are: a length-adjustable stylet with a removable internal metal wire, a brighter light source, a stable handle with tight fixation of the endotracheal tube, and a time-dependent warning device to avoid extended intubations. One hundred twenty patients (Mallampati I. ASA I-III) were included in the study (conventional intubation [group KL, n = 60]. Trachlight intubation [group TT, n = 60]. The goals of the investigation were to examine the handling, application, problems, limitations, and possible indications of the method. The recorded parameters were: number of intubation attempts: course and duration of intubation; complications; and difficulties. In 40 patients (20 in each group) the indication for invasive blood pressure measurement was given due to the surgical procedure, and circulatory parameters were recorded at defined moments during the intubation course. In group KL 55 patients were intubated in the attempt, 4 on the second, and 1 on the third (mean duration 23.6 +/- 10.4 s, range 12-60 s). Complications were: unilateral intubation (3 patients), bradycardia (2), asystole (1) and soft-tissue injury (1). Of the 60 patients in group TT. 54 were intubated successfully, the mean time needed being 29.9 +/- 14.8 s (range: 6-61 s). The remaining 6 were then intubated by the conventional method. Positive results in group TT included: easy handling and application, no injury to soft tissues or teeth, and invariably correct placement of the tube. Problems included: sufficient transillumination was achieved only after (entire) dimming of the room, insufficient control over the distal

  8. Utility of bispectral index in the management of multiple trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Saeed; Parchani, Ashok; El-Menyar, Ayman; Zarour, Ahmad; Al-Thani, Hassan; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring in multiple trauma patients has become a common practice in monitoring the sedation levels. We aimed to assess the utility of BIS in the trauma intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted in the trauma ICU at Hamad General Hospital in Qatar between 2011 and 2012. Patients were divided in two groups: Group I (without BIS monitoring) and Group II (with BIS monitoring). The depth of sedation was clinically evaluated with Ramsey Sedation Scale, changes in vital signs and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) level. Use of sedatives, analgesics, and muscle relaxants were also recorded. Data were compared using Chi-square and Student t-tests. Results: A total of 110 mechanically ventilated trauma patients were enrolled with a mean age of 36 ± 14 years. The rate of head injury was greater in Group I when compared with Group II (94% vs. 81%, P = 0.04). In comparison to Group I, patients in Group II had lower GCS and higher mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) (6.3 ± 2.5 vs. 7.4 ± 2.7 and 25.5 ± 8.5 vs. 21.2 ± 4.7, respectively, P = 0.03). The used midazolam dose was less in Group II in comparison to Group I (5.2 ± 2.3 vs. 6.1 ± 2.1, P = 0.03). Also, fentanyl dose was less in Group II (152 ± 58 vs. 187 ± 59, P = 0.004). The rate of agitation, failure of extubation and tracheostomy in Group II were lower than those in Group I, P = 0.001. The length of stay for patients Group I was longer (14.6 ± 7.1 vs. 10.2 ± 5.9 days) in comparison to group II, P = 0.001. Conclusion: Management of multiple trauma patients in the trauma ICU with BIS monitoring was found to be associated with better outcomes. BIS monitoring is a guide for adjusting the dosage of sedative agents. It can also minimize agitation, failure of extubation, and length of stay in ICU. PMID:25317356

  9. Benefits of Initial Limited Crystalloid Resuscitation in Severely Injured Trauma Patients at Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Robinson, Richard D.; Phillips, Jessica Laureano; Kirk, Alexander J.; Duane, Therese M.; Umejiego, Johnbosco; Stanzer, Melanie; Campbell-Furtick, Mackenzie B.; Zenarosa, Nestor R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether initial limited crystalloid resuscitation (LCR) benefits to all severely injured trauma patients receiving blood transfusions at emergency department (ED) is uncertain. We aimed to determine the role of LCR and its associations with packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion during initial resuscitation. Methods Trauma patients receiving blood transfusions were reviewed from 2004 to 2013. Patients with LCR (L group, defined as < 2,000 mL) and excessive crystalloid resuscitation (E group, defined as ≥ 2,000 mL) were compared separately in terms of basic demographic, clinical variables, and hospital outcomes. Logistic regression, R-square (R2), and Spearman rho correlation were used for analysis. Results A total of 633 patients were included. The mortality was 51% in L group and 45% in E group (P = 0.11). No statistically significant difference was found in terms of basic demographics, vital signs upon arrival at ED, or injury severity between the groups. The volume of blood transfused strongly correlated with the volume of crystalloid infused in E group (R2 = 0.955). Crystalloid to PRBC (C/PRBC) ratio was 0.8 in L group and 1.3 in E group (P < 0.01). The correlations between C/PRBC and ED versus ICU versus hospital length of stay (LOS) via Spearman rho were 0.25, 0.22, and 0.22, respectively. Conclusions Similar outcomes were observed in trauma patients receiving blood transfusions regardless of the crystalloid infusion volume. More crystalloid infusions were associated with more blood transfusions. The C/PRBC did not demonstrate predictive value regarding mortality but might predict LOS in severely injured trauma patients. PMID:26566408

  10. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in Trauma Patients Using Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Wille, R. Heiss, P.; Herold, T.; Jung, E. M. Schreyer, A. G. Hamer, O. W. Rennert, J. Hoffstetter, P. Stroszczynski, C.; Zorger, N.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the feasibility and efficacy of endovascular embolization with liquid embolic agent ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx) in patients with acute traumatic arterial bleeding. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 patients (9 men and 4 women; mean age 45 years) with severe trauma who underwent embolotherapy using Onyx from November 2003 to February 2009. Bleeding was located in the pelvis (5 patients), kidney (3 patients), mesenteric region (2 patients), retroperitoneal space (2 patients), neck (1 patient), and thigh (1 patient). In three cases (23.1%), Onyx was used in conjunction with coils. We evaluate the technical and clinical success, procedural and embolization time, occurrence of rebleeding, and embolotherapy-related complications, such as necrosis or migration of Onyx into nontarget vessels. Results: In all patients, embolotherapy was technically and clinically successful on the first attempt. Control of bleeding could be reached with a mean time of 19 (range, 4-63) min after correct placement of the microcatheter in the feeding artery. No recurrent bleeding was detected. No unintended necrosis or migration of Onyx into a nontarget region was observed. During the follow-up period, three patients (23.1%) died due to severe intracranial hemorrhage, cardiac arrest, and sepsis. Conclusions: Transcatheter embolization with new liquid embolic agent Onyx is technically feasible and effective in trauma patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  11. Preventing secondary complications in trauma patients with implementation of a multidisciplinary mobilization team.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Cynthia Ball

    2015-01-01

    Management of the trauma patient is complex. Immobility or bed rest has detrimental effects on multiple body systems. Early mobilization, especially in the multi-injured patient, can be challenging requiring a multidisciplinary team effort. Health care team members' and patient's understanding and perceptions of bed rest greatly influence successful early mobilization. Integrating a multidisciplinary mobility program in the acute care setting can decrease secondary complications and hospital length of stay ultimately improving patient outcomes. Using the strategy for translating research into evidence based practice by incorporating the 4 "Es" of Engage, Educate, Execute, and Evaluate will assist in creating a culture of mobility.

  12. Penetrating Neck Trauma: Review of 192 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodie, Mohsen; Sanei, Behnam; Moazeni-Bistgani, Mohammad; Namgar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Background The neck region contains a high density of vital organ structures within a relatively small and unprotected anatomic region, making it one of the most vulnerable areas of the body for all types of injuries. Objectives In this article, we studied penetrating neck trauma cases in Alzahra Hospital over a 10-year period. Patients and Methods In this retrospective, descriptive, analytical study, penetrating neck trauma cases admitted to Alzahra Hospital between April 2000 and April 2010 were analyzed for epidemiology, mechanism of trauma, zone of trauma, therapeutic method, injuries to other organs, complications, and mortality. Results Among 192 penetrating neck injuries, the mean age at the time of injury was 25.08 ± 15.02 years. Of these cases, 96.4% occurred in men. The most common mechanisms of trauma was stab wounds (85.93%). In 56.3% of penetrating neck injuries, zone 2 was involved. Neck exploration was positive in 84.4% of cases, and 52.1% of patients underwent surgery. Vascular exploration was the most common cause of surgery (67.2% of patients). The most common surgical intervention was vein ligation (50.8% of cases). In 11.98% of cases, another organ injury occurred simultaneously, and chest injury was the most common coexisting problem (65.2%). Complications were reported in 9.3% of patients, and the need for intubation was the most common complication (5.2% of patients). Mortality rate was 1.5%. Conclusions According to the findings of this study, the most common cause of penetrating neck injuries was stab wounds, and the majority of patients were young men, therefore, preventive measures should be implemented. Because of fatal complications associated with neck injuries, we recommend early neck exploration in unstable cases or when injuries are deeper than the platysma. PMID:24719835

  13. Destination Healthcare Facility of Shocked Trauma Patients in Scotland: Analysis of Transfusion and Surgical Capability of Receiving Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    of this study is to evaluate the resource provision of the destination hospital of Scottish trauma patients exhibiting evidence of pre-hospital shock...Methods: Patients who sustained a traumatic injury between November 2008 and October 2010 were retrospectively identified from the Scottish Ambulance... Scottish trauma patients are transported to a hospital with full transfusion capability, although the majority lack surgical sub-specialty

  14. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial of immediate total-body CT scanning in trauma patients (REACT-2)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) scanning has become essential in the early diagnostic phase of trauma care because of its high diagnostic accuracy. The introduction of multi-slice CT scanners and infrastructural improvements made total-body CT scanning technically feasible and its usage is currently becoming common practice in several trauma centers. However, literature provides limited evidence whether immediate total-body CT leads to better clinical outcome then conventional radiographic imaging supplemented with selective CT scanning in trauma patients. The aim of the REACT-2 trial is to determine the value of immediate total-body CT scanning in trauma patients. Methods/design The REACT-2 trial is an international, multicenter randomized clinical trial. All participating trauma centers have a multi-slice CT scanner located in the trauma room or at the Emergency Department (ED). All adult, non-pregnant, severely injured trauma patients according to predefined criteria will be included. Patients in whom direct scanning will hamper necessary cardiopulmonary resuscitation or who require an immediate operation because of imminent death (both as judged by the trauma team leader) are excluded. Randomization will be computer assisted. The intervention group will receive a contrast-enhanced total-body CT scan (head to pelvis) during the primary survey. The control group will be evaluated according to local conventional trauma imaging protocols (based on ATLS guidelines) supplemented with selective CT scanning. Primary outcome will be in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes are differences in mortality and morbidity during the first year post trauma, several trauma work-up time intervals, radiation exposure, general health and quality of life at 6 and 12 months post trauma and cost-effectiveness. Discussion The REACT-2 trial is a multicenter randomized clinical trial that will provide evidence on the value of immediate total-body CT scanning during the primary

  15. Management of pulseless and apneic trauma patients: are aggressive measures justified?

    PubMed

    Lo, Chong-Jeh; Chang, Wen-Ling

    2007-01-01

    This study prospectively examined the care of trauma patients in extremis on presentation to a tertiary medical center between January 2000 and August 31, 2002. There were 144 patients who presented without a pulse or spontaneous respiration and required cardiopulmonary resuscitation (mean age, 41.5+/-2.3 years; male-to-female ratio, 105:39). Successfully resuscitated patients, who were either admitted to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) or who were taken to the operating room for surgical exploration, had significantly shorter duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (14.55+/-1.64 minutes vs. 33.32+/-1.23 minutes; P < 0.001) and received less amounts of epinephrine than those who died in the emergency room (P < 0.05). One hundred sixteen patients died in the emergency room. Nineteen admitted patients died within 24 hours of presentation. Nine patients survived beyond 24 hours and all of them were admitted directly to the SICU for the management of brain injury. Six patients were taken to the operating room for surgical exploration to control the bleeding; all of them died in the operating room or shortly thereafter in the SICU. No patient in this study survived to be discharged. The financial cost of successfully resuscitated patients was significantly higher than that of patients who died in the emergency room (P < 0.001). Instead of insisting on aggressive measures to resuscitate trauma patients in extremis on presentation, the authors suggest we should redirect that fervor toward efforts made to promote trauma awareness and injury prevention programs.

  16. PTSD Symptom Severities, Interpersonal Traumas, and Benzodiazepines Are Associated with Substance-Related Problems in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guina, Jeffrey; Nahhas, Ramzi W.; Goldberg, Adam J.; Farnsworth, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is commonly associated with substance-related problems, yet associations between specific substances and specific posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSSs) are understudied. We hypothesized that substance-related problems are associated with PTSS severities, interpersonal traumas, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey methodology in a consecutive sample of adult outpatients with trauma histories (n = 472), we used logistic regression to examine substance-related problems in general (primary, confirmatory analysis), as well as alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug problems specifically (secondary, exploratory analyses) in relation to demographics, trauma type, PTSSs, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Results: After adjusting for multiple testing, several factors were significantly associated with substance-related problems, particularly benzodiazepines (AOR = 2.78; 1.99 for alcohol, 2.42 for tobacco, 8.02 for illicit drugs), DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis (AOR = 1.92; 2.38 for alcohol, 2.00 for tobacco, 2.14 for illicit drugs), most PTSSs (especially negative beliefs, recklessness, and avoidance), and interpersonal traumas (e.g., assaults and child abuse). Conclusion: In this clinical sample, there were consistent and strong associations between several trauma-related variables and substance-related problems, consistent with our hypotheses. We discuss possible explanations and implications of these findings, which we hope will stimulate further research, and improve screening and treatment. PMID:27517964

  17. MR intensity measurements of nondenervated muscle in patients following severe forearm trauma.

    PubMed

    Viddeleer, A R; Sijens, P E; van Ooijen, P M A; Kuypers, P D L; Hovius, S E R; Oudkerk, M

    2011-08-01

    Fluid increases resulting in higher MRI signal intensities in T(2) -weighted and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences can be used to diagnose nerve injury. By comparing the signal intensities over time, MRI may become a new method for monitoring the healing process. Muscle edema is assessed by comparing the signal intensity of affected muscle with that of nonaffected muscle. However, in severe forearm trauma, the signal of nondenervated muscle may also be increased by wound edema, thus masking the effect of denervation. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of wound edema on muscle signal intensity in 29 consecutive patients examined on a 1.5-T MRI scanner at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after severe forearm trauma. The long-term course of wound edema and the influence of wound distance were thus investigated using a standardized imaging, calibration and post-processing protocol. The signal intensities of nondenervated intrinsic hand muscles were measured in the affected and contralateral sides. Muscle signal intensities were increased on the trauma side at 1 and 3 months (18% and 7.4%, respectively; p < 0.001) and normalized thereafter. In the contralateral hand, no significant signal changes were seen. No relationship was found between wound distance and the severity of wound edema. This study shows that wound edema influences muscle signal intensity comparisons in patients with forearm trauma. When comparing denervated muscle with nondenervated muscle, an additional scan of the contralateral side is indicated during the first 6 months after trauma to assess the extent of wound edema. After 6 months, the ipsilateral side can be used for muscle signal intensity comparisons.

  18. CRASH-2 Study of Tranexamic Acid to Treat Bleeding in Trauma Patients: A Controversy Fueled by Science and Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Binz, Sophia; McCollester, Jonathon; Thomas, Scott; Miller, Joseph; Pohlman, Timothy; Waxman, Dan; Shariff, Faisal; Tracy, Rebecca; Walsh, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic, to trauma. CRASH-2, a large randomized controlled trial, was the first to show a reduction in mortality and recommend tranexamic acid use in bleeding trauma patients. However, this paper was not without controversy. Its patient recruitment, methodology, and conductance in moderate-to-low income countries cast doubt on its ability to be applied to trauma protocols in countries with mature trauma networks. In addition to traditional vetting in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, CRASH-2 came about at a time when advances in communication technology allowed debate and influence to be leveraged in new forms, specifically through the use of multimedia campaigns, social media, and Internet blogs. This paper presents a comprehensive view of tranexamic acid utilization in trauma from peer-reviewed evidence to novel multimedia influences. PMID:26448897

  19. CRASH-2 Study of Tranexamic Acid to Treat Bleeding in Trauma Patients: A Controversy Fueled by Science and Social Media.

    PubMed

    Binz, Sophia; McCollester, Jonathon; Thomas, Scott; Miller, Joseph; Pohlman, Timothy; Waxman, Dan; Shariff, Faisal; Tracy, Rebecca; Walsh, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic, to trauma. CRASH-2, a large randomized controlled trial, was the first to show a reduction in mortality and recommend tranexamic acid use in bleeding trauma patients. However, this paper was not without controversy. Its patient recruitment, methodology, and conductance in moderate-to-low income countries cast doubt on its ability to be applied to trauma protocols in countries with mature trauma networks. In addition to traditional vetting in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, CRASH-2 came about at a time when advances in communication technology allowed debate and influence to be leveraged in new forms, specifically through the use of multimedia campaigns, social media, and Internet blogs. This paper presents a comprehensive view of tranexamic acid utilization in trauma from peer-reviewed evidence to novel multimedia influences.

  20. Does selective digestive decontamination prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia in trauma patients?

    PubMed

    Chaari, Anis; Zribi, Emna; Dammak, Hssan; Ghadoun, Hatem; Chtara, Kamilia; Sfar, Souad; Bahloul, Mabrouk; Bouaziz, Mounir

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is particularly high in patients with trauma. The efficacy and safety of selective digestive decontamination (SDD) was not studied extensively. We aimed in our randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate whether SDD prevents VAP onset in multiple trauma patients. All adult patients admitted in our intensive care unit for multiple trauma with a predicted duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) over 48 hours were included. We included 44 patients who were divided into 4 groups: group A receiving subglottic and gastric treatment suspension (polymyxin E 100 mg, vancomycin 1 g, and amphotericin B 500 mg), group B receiving placebo, group C receiving subglottic placebo and gastric treatment suspension, and group D receiving subglottic treatment suspension and gastric placebo. The suspension was given 4 times a day during 7 consecutive days. To this topical treatment, we associated an intravenous administration of cefotaxime (1 g 3 times a day during 4 consecutive days). The incidence of VAP in the 4 groups was, respectively, 45.5%, 46.2%, 22.2%, and 27.3% (P=0.236). In multivariate analysis, none of the 3 tested regimens was identified as a protective factor against VAP. However, prolonged duration of MV was the only independent factor predicting VAP onset (odds ratio=1.1; 95% confidence interval [1.1-1.4]; P=0.049).

  1. Pre-Hospital Intravenous Fluid is Associated with Increased Survival in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, David A.; Fabricant, Löic J.; Differding, Jerry; Diggs, Brian; Underwood, Samantha; De La Cruz, Dodie; Holcomb, John B.; Brasel, Karen J.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Fox, Erin E.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Phelan, Herb A.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Muskat, Peter; Myers, John G.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Wade, Charles E.; Cotton, Bryan A.; Schreiber, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delivery of intravenous crystalloid fluids (IVF) remains a tradition-based priority during pre-hospital resuscitation of trauma patients. Hypotensive and targeted resuscitation algorithms have been shown to improve patient outcomes. We hypothesized that receiving any pre-hospital IVF is associated with increased survival in trauma patients compared to receiving no pre-hospital IVF. Methods Prospective data from ten Level 1 trauma centers were collected. Patient demographics, pre-hospital IVF volume, pre-hospital and Emergency Department vital signs, life-saving interventions, laboratory values, outcomes and complications were collected and analyzed. Patients who did or did not receive pre-hospital IVF were compared. Tests for non-parametric data were utilized to assess significant differences between groups (p ≤ 0.05). Cox regression analyses were performed to determine the independent influence of IVF on outcome and complications. Results The study population consisted of 1245 trauma patients; 45 were removed due to incomplete data; 84% (n=1009) received pre-hospital IVF, and 16% (n=191) did not. There was no difference between the groups with respect to gender, age, and Injury Severity Score. The on-scene systolic blood pressure (SBP) was lower in the IVF group (110 vs. 100 mmHg, p<0.04) and did not change significantly after IVF, measured at ED admission (110 vs. 105 mmHg, p=0.05). Hematocrit/hemoglobin, fibrinogen, and platelets were lower (p<0.05), and Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio and Partial Thromboplastin Time were higher (p<0.001) in the IVF group. The IVF group received a median fluid volume of 700ml (IQR: 300-1300). The Cox regression revealed that pre-hospital fluid administration was associated with increased survival, Hazard Ratio: 0.84 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.72, 0.98; p=0.03). Site differences in ISS and fluid volumes were demonstrated (p<0.001). Conclusions Pre-hospital IVF volumes commonly used by PROMMTT

  2. Factors Associated with Intubation Time and ICU Stay After CABG

    PubMed Central

    Flegler, Suzanny; Paro, Flavia Marini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with intubation time and intensive care unit stay after coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS This was a retrospective study, whose data collection was performed in the hospital charts of 160 patients over 18 years, who underwent surgery from September 2009 to July of 2013 in a hospital in the state of Espirito Santo, Brazil. RESULTS The mean age of the subjects was 61.44±8.93 years old and 68.8% were male. Subjects had a mean of 5.17±8.42 days of intensive care unit stay and mean intubation time of 10.99±8.41 hours. We observed statistically significant positive correlation between the following variables: patients' age and intubation time; patients' age and intensive care unit stay; intubation time and intensive care unit stay. CONCLUSION In conclusion, the study showed that older patients had longer intubation time and increased intensive care unit stay. Furthermore, patients with longer intubation time had increased intensive care unit stay. PMID:26934403

  3. Objective and personalized longitudinal assessment of a pregnant patient with post severe brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Elizabeth B.; Lande, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Following severe trauma to the brain (whether internally generated by seizures, tumors or externally caused by collision with or penetration of objects) individuals may experience initial coma state followed by slow recovery and rehabilitation treatment. At present there is no objective biometric to track the daily progression of the person for extended periods of time. Objective: We introduce new analytical techniques to process data from physically wearable sensors and help track the longitudinal progression of motions and physiological states upon the brain trauma. Setting and Participant: The data used to illustrate the methods were collected at the hospital settings from a pregnant patient in coma state. The patient had brain trauma from a large debilitating seizure due to a large tumor in the right pre-frontal lobe. Main Measures: We registered the wrist motions and the surface-skin-temperature across several daily sessions in four consecutive months. A new statistical technique is introduced for personalized analyses of the rates of change of the stochastic signatures of these patterns. Results: We detected asymmetries in the wrists’ data that identified in the dominant limb critical points of change in physiological and motor control states. These patterns could blindly identify the time preceding the baby’s delivery by C-section when the patient systematically brought her hand to her abdominal area. Changes in temperature were sharp and accompanied by systematic changes in the statistics of the motions that rendered her dominant wrist’s micro-movements more systematically reliable and predictable than those of the non-dominant writst. Conclusions: The new analytics paired with wearable sensing technology may help track the day-by-day individual progression of a patient with post brain trauma in clinical settings and in the home environment. PMID:25852516

  4. The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone in the maxillofacial trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Lieblich, S E; Forman, D; Berger, J; Gold, B D

    1985-05-01

    The maxillofacial trauma patient whose neurologic status undergoes a rapid and serious deterioration may have a severe hyponatremia secondary to the inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Other causes of hyponatremia must be ruled out, especially posttraumatic cerebral salt wasting, which necessitates a different mode of therapy. A case of SIADH is reported, and the work-up and differential diagnosis of posttraumatic hyponatremia are discussed.

  5. Bicanalicular versus monocanalicular intubation after failed probing in congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Zavarzadeh, Najmeh; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim; Hosseini, Seyedeh Simindokht; Abrishami, Yalda; Rajabi, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the clinical outcomes of different intubation techniques in the cases of failed primary probing. METHODS This retrospective study was performed on 338 patients with the diagnosis of congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction with age 1-4y that had failed primary probing. Intubation was performed under light sedation in operating room and the stent was left 3mo in place. Clinical outcome was investigated 3mo after tube removal. RESULTS Bicanalicular intubation method had higher complete and relative success rates compared to monocanalicular intubation (P=0.00). In addition, Monoka intubation had better outcomes compared to Masterka technique (P=0.046). No difference was found between genders but the higher the age, the better the outcomes with bicanalicular technique rather than monocanalicular. CONCLUSION Overall success rate of bicanalicular intubation is superior to monocanalicular technique especially in older ages. Also, based upon our clinical outcomes, Masterka intubation is not recommended in cases of failed probing. PMID:27803865

  6. Fiberoptic Guided Retrograde Intubation in an Anticipated Difficult Airway: Revival of an Antiquated Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ninu, Marie; Yunus, Md.; Syiemiong, Newstar

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde intubation is an invaluable technique which can be helpful in anticipated difficult airway situation. In this advanced era where fiberoptic intubation and video laryngoscopes are in abundant use, retrograde intubation is a forgotten technique. However, it may be useful in various difficult airway situations in this advanced era. In our case the patient had a bitter experience with previous fiberoptic intubation. Owing to that we had planned and performed a fiber optic guided retrograde intubation, where we had kept the fiberoptic bronchoscope in the pharynx keeping larynx and vocal cords in the focus to facilitate the emergence of guide wire through one of the nostrils as well as direct visual confirmation of intubation. This fiber optic guided retrograde intubation is a first reported case of its kind in a predicted difficult airway which can be beneficial in different difficult airway situations. PMID:27891428

  7. Hyperkalemia After Packed Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    both adults and children, hypokalemia has been reported more frequently than hyperkalemia. The largest reported series of which we are aware...retrospective in nature, reported an incidence of hypokalemia of 72% in children undergoing liver transplantation; hyperkalemia occurred in less than 5% of...patients.1 Others have likewise observed hypokalemia to be more common after transfusion.2–4 In the few, small studies describing hyperkalemia after

  8. Two Paradigmatic Approaches to Borderline Patients With a History of Trauma

    PubMed Central

    LEWIS, JUDITH L.

    1996-01-01

    A significant number of patients with the diagnosis of borderline personality disorder have a history of childhood trauma. This article attempts to integrate the treatment approach of Judith Herman to traumatized patients with the psychodynamic approach of Otto Kernberg to borderline patients. To facilitate paradigm shifts between these two approaches, they are presented side by side with one set of terms translated into the other. Aspects of the therapeutic relationship and process are compared and contrasted, and a preliminary attempt is made to integrate these two treatment models. PMID:22700260

  9. Increased total serum random cortisol levels predict mortality in critically ill trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Urmil; Polite, Nathan; Wood, Teresa; Lieber, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Dysfunction in the hypothalamopituitary adrenal axis is thought to exist; however, there continues to be controversy about what level of serum cortisol corresponds to adrenal insufficiency. Few studies have focused on the significance of serum random cortisol in the critically ill trauma patient. Trauma patients with total serum random cortisol levels drawn in the intensive care unit within the first seven days of hospitalization were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome measured was in-hospital mortality. Two hundred forty-two patients were analyzed. Nonsurvivors had significantly higher mean cortisol levels than survivors (28.7 ± 15.80 μg/dL vs 22.9 ± 12.35 μg/dL, P = 0.01). Patients with cortisol 30 μg/dL or greater were more likely to die with odds ratio of 2.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5 to 5). The odds ratio increased to 4.0 and 3.8 (95% CI, 1.4 to 11.4 and 1.3 to 10.9) when cortisol was drawn on hospital Day 2 and Days 3 through 7, respectively. Among nonsurvivors, patients with an injury severity score less than 25 had significantly higher cortisol levels than patients with an Injury Severity Score 25 or higher (35.3 ± 19.21 μg/dL vs 25.7 ± 13.21 μg/dL, P = 0.009). Patients with massive transfusion, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, or solid organ injury did not have significantly different cortisol levels. The covariate-adjusted area under the receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that cortisol level has a 77 per cent accuracy in differentiating survivors from nonsurvivors. Higher cortisol levels were predictive of mortality in critically ill trauma patients. Whether serum cortisol level is a marker that can be modified remains an area of interest for future study.

  10. [THE SEARCH AFTER PROGNOSTIC TESTS OF DEVELOPMENT OF UROLITHIASIS OF PATIENTS WITH VERTEBRO-CEREBROSPINAL TRAUMA].

    PubMed

    Stogov, M V; Schurova, E N; Kireieva, E A

    2015-11-01

    The article presents analysis of alterations of biochemical indicators in blood serum and day urine of 22 patients in acute and early periods after vertebro-cerebrospinal trauma. Out of total number of patients in 10 (main group) in post-traumatic period urolithiasis developed In 12 patients no signs of urolithiasis were detected These examinedpatients were included into comparative group. The reference group was composed with 20 healthy individuals. The concentration of urea, creatinine, uric acid, calcium and inorganic phosphate in blood serum and day urine were detected In patients of main group statistically significant increasing of levels of urea and creatinine was detected in blood serum relative to patients of comparative group. In examined patients of main group clearance of urea was reliably lower than both values of comparative group (up to 2.55 times; p < 0.05) and indicators of reference group (up to 3.75 times; p < 0.05). In patients of this group, clearance of uric acid also had reliable differences from indicators both in comparative group and reference group. Therefore, in patients in acute and early periods of vertebro- cerebrospinal trauma expressed disorders of biochemical indicators of blood serum and urine that can be referred to predictors of risk of development of urolithiasis in the following. The most informative tests were increasing of concentration of urea in blood serum more than 5.30 mmol/l (ratio of likelihood ofpositive test--4.26) and decreasing of clearance of uric acid and urea.

  11. Developing process guidelines for trauma care in the Netherlands for severely injured patients: results from a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In organised trauma systems the process of care is the key to quality. Nevertheless, the optimal process of trauma care remains unclear due to lack of or inconclusive evidence. Because monitoring and improving the performance of a trauma system is complex, this study aimed to develop consensus-based process guidelines for trauma care in the Netherlands for severely injured patients. Methods A five-round Delphi study was conducted with 141 participants that represent all professions involved in trauma care. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to evaluate whether consensus extended across all professions and to detect possible bias. Results Consensus was reached on 21 guidelines within 4 categories: timeliness, actions, competent teams and interdisciplinary process. Timeliness guidelines set specific critical limits and definitions for 10 time intervals in the time period from an emergency call until the patient leaves the trauma room. Action guidelines reflect aspects of appropriate care and strongly rely on the international Advanced Trauma Life Support principles. Competence guidelines include flow charts to assess the competence of prehospital and emergency department teams. Essential to competent teams are education and experience of all team members. The interdisciplinary process guideline focuses on cooperation, communication and feedback within and between all professions involved. Consensus was extended across all professions and no bias was detected. Conclusions In this Delphi study, a large expert panel agreed on a set of guidelines describing the optimal process of care for severely injured trauma patients in the Netherlands. In addition to time intervals and appropriate actions, these guidelines emphasise the importance of team competence and interdisciplinary processes in trauma care. The guidelines can be seen as a description of a best practice and a new field standard in the Netherlands. The next step is to implement the guidelines and

  12. Mental Trauma Experienced by Caregivers of patients with Diffuse Axonal Injury or Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Syed Hassan, Syed Tajuddin; Jamaludin, Husna; Abd Raman, Rosna; Mohd Riji, Haliza; Wan Fei, Khaw

    2013-01-01

    Context As with care giving and rehabilitation in chronic illnesses, the concern with traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly with diffuse axonal injury (DAI), is that the caregivers are so overwhelmingly involved in caring and rehabilitation of the victim that in the process they become traumatized themselves. This review intends to shed light on the hidden and silent trauma sustained by the caregivers of severe brain injury survivors. Motor vehicle accident (MVA) is the highest contributor of TBI or DAI. The essence of trauma is the infliction of pain and suffering and having to bear the pain (i.e. by the TBI survivor) and the burden of having to take care and manage and rehabilitate the TBI survivor (i.e. by the TBI caregiver). Moreover many caregivers are not trained for their care giving task, thus compounding the stress of care giving and rehabilitating patients. Most research on TBI including DAI, focus on the survivors and not on the caregivers. TBI injury and its effects and impacts remain the core question of most studies, which are largely based on the quantitative approach. Evidence Acquisition Qualitative research can better assess human sufferings such as in the case of DAI trauma. While quantitative research can measure many psychometric parameters to assess some aspects of trauma conditions, qualitative research is able to fully reveal the meaning, ramification and experience of TBI trauma. Both care giving and rehabilitation are overwhelmingly demanding; hence , they may complicate the caregivers’ stress. However, some positive outcomes also exist. Results Caregivers involved in caring and rehabilitation of TBI victims may become mentally traumatized. Posttraumatic recovery of the TBI survivor can enhance the entire family’s closeness and bonding as well as improve the mental status of the caregiver. Conclusions A long-term longitudinal study encompassing integrated research is needed to fully understand the traumatic experiences of

  13. A PROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS AMONG ELDERLY TRAUMA PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Martin D; Kuntz, Melissa M.; Polites, Stephanie F.; Boggust, Andy; Nelson, Heidi; Khasawneh, Mohammad A.; Jenkins, Donald H; Harmsen, Scott; Ballman, Karla V.; Pieper, Rembert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) have been deemed “reasonably preventable” by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) thereby eliminating reimbursement. Elderly trauma patients, however, are at high risk for developing urinary tract infections (UTI) given their extensive comorbidities, immobilization, and environmental changes in the urine which provide the ideal environment for bacterial overgrowth. Whether these patients develop CAUTI as a complication of their hospitalization or have asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) or UTI upon admission must be determined in order to justify the “reasonably preventable” classification. We hypothesize that a significant proportion of elderly patients will present with ASB or UTI on admission. Methods IRB permission was obtained to perform a prospective, observational clinical trial of all elderly (≥ 65 years) patients admitted to our Level I Trauma Center as a result of injury. Urinalysis (UA) and culture (UCx) were obtained at admission, 72 hours, and, if diagnosed with UTI, at 2 weeks after injury. Mean cost of UTI was calculated based Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates of $862 – $1,007 per UTI. Results Of 201 eligible patients, 129 agreed to participate (64%). Mean age was 81±8.6 years. All patients had a blunt mechanism of injury (76% falls) with a mean Injury Severity Score of 13.8±7.6. Of the 18 (14%) patients diagnosed with CAUTI, 14 (78%) were present at admission. Additionally, there were 18 (14%) patients with ASB on admission. The most common bacterial species present on admission urine culture were E. coli (24%) and Enterococcus (16%). Clinical features associated with bacteriuria on admission included a history of UTI, positive gram stain, abnormal microscopy, and pyuria. The estimated loss of reimbursement for 18 UTIs on admission was $15,516 – $18,126; however, given an estimated cost of $1981 to screen all patients with UA and UCx at admission

  14. Submental intubation in maxillofacial fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It can be challenging to create a safe airway in maxilla facial fracture and some skull surgeries. In this case study, the patient experienced jaw fractures that disturbed the dental occlusion and associated fracture of the base of the skull. Neither nasal nor oral intubation was possible based on the side effects of tracheotomy; therefore, submental intubation was applied successfully. The procedure and results are presented in the text. PMID:27429940

  15. Retrievable Vena Cava Filters in Major Trauma Patients: Prevalence of Thrombus Within the Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrer, Arie; Zippel, Douglas; Garniek, Alexander; Golan, Gil; Bensaid, Paul; Simon, Daniel; Rimon, Uri

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the prevalence of thrombus within a retrievable vena cava filter inserted prophylactically in major trauma patients referred for filter extraction. Between November 2002 and August 2005, 80 retrievable inferior vena cava filters (68 Optease and 12 Gunther-Tulip) were inserted into critically injured trauma patients (mean injury severity score 33.5). The filters were inserted within 1 to 6 (mean 2) days of injury. Thirty-seven patients were referred for filter removal (32 with Optease and 5 with Gunther-Tulip). The indwelling time was 7 to 22 (mean 13) days. All patients underwent inferior vena cavography prior to filter removal. There were no insertion-related complications and all filters were successfully deployed. Forty-three (54%) of the 80 patients were not referred for filter removal, as these patients continued to have contraindications to anticoagulation. Thirty-seven patients (46%) were referred for filter removal. In eight of them (22%) a large thrombus was seen within the filters and they were left in place, all with the Optease device. The other 29 filters (36%) were removed uneventfully.We conclude that the relatively high prevalence of intrafilter thrombi with the Optease filter may be explained by either spontaneous thrombus formation or captured emboli.

  16. Changes in oxidative stress from tracheal aspirates sampled during chest physical therapy in hospitalized intubated infant patients with pneumonia and secretion retention

    PubMed Central

    Leelarungrayub, Jirakrit; Borisuthibandit, Thirasak; Yankai, Araya; Boontha, Kritsana

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to show the changes in oxidative stress and clinical condition from either chest physical therapy (CPT) or CPT with aerosol treatment in infant patients with pneumonia. Methods From 52 intubated patients, three groups were composed: groups A, B, and C comprising 21 patients aged 5.3±0.6 months (CPT program), 20 patients aged 5.6±0.7 months (aerosol treatment before CPT program), and eleven patients aged 5.0±0.35 months (control), respectively. CPT was composed of manual percussion and vibration before suction in a specific position for draining secretion and re-expanding collapsed lungs. Groups A and B received three sessions of treatment three times daily for 6 days, when tracheal aspirates were collected for evaluating oxidative stress markers for the thiol group: vitamin E, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances-malondialdehyde, and hyarulonan. Furthermore, lung injury score and oxygenation index (PvO2/FiO2 ratio) were recorded daily. Results All parameters in group C did not change statistically during study. The thiol group increased significantly in group A after day 4, and increased significantly on days 3 and 6 when compared to day 1 in group B. Vitamin E levels increased significantly on days 3, 5, and 6 in group A, and days 3, 4, and 6 in group B, when compared to day 1. Whereas, the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances-malondialdehyde adduct showed a significant reduction after day 4 in groups A and B, when compared to day 1. Hyarulonan levels showed a significant reduction after day 3 in group A and on day 2 in group B. In addition, lung injury score decreased slightly and nonsignificantly in groups A and B, whereas the oxygenation index increased significantly after day 4 in group A and on day 6 in group B. Conclusion These preliminary results suggest that CPT with or without aerosol treatment possibly reduces oxidative stress and enhances oxygenation status in infant patients. PMID:27660455

  17. [Training of endotracheal intubation for an emergency medical technician and three cases of endotracheal intubation during emergency situation].

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Toru; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2007-05-01

    It is said that airway management is an important part of lifesaving at the prehospital care for a seriously ill emergency patient. We performed the training of endotracheal intubation for an emergency medical technician, and in this report we discussed the results of trainings and examined 3 cases of endotracheal intubation in the emergency situation after training. Various kinds of problem arose through this training, for example, difficulty to get the consent from patients, overlap of a case for clinical resident and emergency medical technician, large responsibility of the anesthesiologist as a teaching staff. In addition, there may be no useful case for lifesaving at the emergency situation in 3 cases of endotracheal intubation. We consider that it may be difficult, but possibility cannot deny if endotracheal intubation by emergency medical technicians contribute to lifesaving rate improvement from viewpoint of prehospital care.

  18. Dependent coverage provision led to uneven insurance gains and unchanged mortality rates in young adult trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Sommers, Benjamin D; Tsai, Thomas C; Scott, Kirstin W; Schwartz, Aaron L; Song, Zirui

    2015-01-01

    Insurance coverage has increased among young adults as a result of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provision that allows young adults to remain covered under their parents' plans until age twenty-six. However, little is known about the provision's effects on the clinical outcomes and insurance coverage of patients with trauma--the most frequent cause of death and physical disability among young adults. Using 2007-12 data from the National Trauma Data Bank, we conducted a difference-in-differences analysis of coverage rates among trauma patients ages 19-25 (compared to patients ages 26-34, who served as the control group), and we examined trauma-relevant outcomes by patient, injury, and hospital characteristics. We found a 3.4-percentage-point decrease in uninsurance status among younger trauma patients following the policy change. The decrease was concentrated among men, non-Hispanic whites, those with relatively less severe injuries, and those who presented to nonteaching hospitals. We did not detect significant changes in the use of intensive care or in overall mortality. The heterogeneous coverage impact of the ACA dependent coverage provision on high- versus low-risk trauma patients has implications for future efforts to expand coverage.

  19. The contribution of opiate analgesics to the development of infectious complications in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Oppeltz, Richard F; Holloway, Travis L; Covington, Cody J; Schwacha, Martin G

    2015-01-01

    Trauma-related pain is a natural consequence of injury and its surgical management; however, the relationship between opiates and complications in trauma patients is unknown. To study this a retrospective chart review of selected subjects following traumatic injury with admission to the SICU for > 3 days was performed, and opiate administration data was collected for the first 3 days of admission. Associated data from each subject’s chart was also collected. Analysis of the data revealed that increased opiate intake after admission to the SICU was associated with significantly increased SICU and hospital LOS independent of injury severity. This increase in LOS was independent of mechanical ventilation in the moderate ISS group. Infectious complications were also more prevalent in the moderate ISS group with higher opiate use. These findings suggest that increased doses of opiate analgesics in trauma patients may contribute to an increased overall LOS and associated infectious complications. Analgesic regimes that minimize opiate intake, while still providing adequate pain relief, may be advantageous in reducing LOS, complications and reduce hospitalization costs. PMID:26309777

  20. Nursing intuition as an assessment tool in predicting severity of injury in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cork, Lora L

    2014-01-01

    Emergency nurses assess patients using objective and subjective data. When the charge nurse takes report from a paramedic, another form of assessment occurs. By eliciting apt data and using trauma-scoring criteria, a decision to enact a "trauma code" occurs. Considering the cost and staff utilization, it is important for the charge nurse to make sound decisions when activating a trauma code. The objective of this study is to explore the validity of nurses' use of intuition in patients to predict the severity of their injuries, and whether it impacts their choice to institute a trauma code.The study design was a descriptive, quantitative, cross-sectional record review and cohort analysis. The setting was a rural Trauma Level III emergency department (ED) located 80 miles from the nearest Level I trauma center. Phase I was a convenience cluster sample of all charge nurses in an ED. Phase II was a collection of all trauma records from June 2010 to May 2012. The inclusion criterion for Phase I subjects was that all participants were currently working as ED charge nurses. Analysis for Phase I data consisted of evaluating demographic information provided in questions 1 through 6 in a questionnaire. For Phase II data, a power analysis using Cohen's d was performed to determine the sample size to be evaluated. On the basis of the 2012 trauma data, a total of 419 records needed to be assessed (confidence interval, 0.164; P < .286). Two groups were created: (1) gut instinct only, and (2) all other criteria. Injury severity scores were categorized by ascending severity: (1) 0 to 4, (2) 5 to 9, (3) 10 to 16, (4) 17 to 24, and (5) greater than 25. The data analysis consisted of a 2-tailed t test for probability and a linear regression analysis using Pearson's r for correlation. In Phase I, 6 of the 8 charge nurses responded. Results showed an average of greater than 10 years of experience as an ED registered nurse, certification was equally yes and no, and highest level of

  1. Psychopathology, childhood trauma, and personality traits in patients with borderline personality disorder and their sisters.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Lise; Paris, Joel; Guttman, Herta; Russell, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to document and compare adverse childhood experiences, and personality profiles in women with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and their sisters, and to determine how these factors impact current psychopathology. Fifty-six patients with BPD and their sisters were compared on measures assessing psychopathology, personality traits, and childhood adversities. Most sisters showed little evidence of psychopathology. Both groups reported dysfunctional parent-child relationships and a high prevalence of childhood trauma. Subjects with BPD reported experiencing more emotional abuse and intrafamilial sexual abuse, but more similarities than differences between probands and sisters were found. In multilevel analyses, personality traits of affective instability and impulsivity predicted DIB-R scores and SCL-90-R scores, above and beyond trauma. There were few relationships between childhood adversities and other measures of psychopathology. Sensitivity to adverse experiences, as reflected in the development of psychopathology, appears to be influenced by personality trait profiles.

  2. Characterization of the spectrum of hemodynamic profiles in trauma patients with acute neurogenic shock☆

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Richard L.; Baker, Stephen D.; Sterling, Sarah A.; Porter, John M; Jones, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neurogenic shock considered a distributive type of shock secondary to loss of sympathetic outflow to the peripheral vasculature. In this study, we examine the hemodynamic profiles of a series of trauma patients with a diagnosis of neurogenic shock. Methods Hemodynamic data were collected on a series of trauma patients determined to have spinal cord injuries with neurogenic shock. A well-established integrated computer model of human physiology was used to analyze and categorize the hemodynamic profiles from a system analysis perspective. A differentiation between these categories was presented as the percent of total patients. Results Of the 9 patients with traumatic neurogenic shock, the etiology of shock was decrease in peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) in 3 (33%; 95% confidence interval, 12%–65%), loss of vascular capacitance in 2 (22%; 6%–55%) and mixed peripheral resistance and capacitance responsible in 3 (33%; 12%–65%), and purely cardiac in 1 (11%; 3%–48%). The markers of sympathetic outflow had no correlation to any of the elements in the patients' hemodynamic profiles. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that hypotension of neurogenic shock can have multiple mechanistic etiologies and represents a spectrum of hemodynamic profiles. This understanding is important for the treatment decisions in managing these patients. PMID:23566731

  3. Mini-plate removal in maxillofacial trauma patients during a five-year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence of indications for the removal of mini-plates over a five-year period in maxillofacial trauma patients. Materials and Methods The medical records of 530 patients who underwent treatment with mini-plate fixation after maxillofacial trauma were reviewed for a five-year period (May 2007 to May 2012). Patients were evaluated concerning the number of mini-plates removed, age and gender distributions, time between insertion and removal, indication for removal, and site of removal. Results The plates of 120 patients were removed (26 females and 94 males). The removal rate was 22.6%. The most frequent indication for removal was patient demand (81.7%), followed by tooth extraction (7.5%), and pain (3.3%). The most frequent removal site was the mandible (95.0%). Conclusion The number of mini-plates removed was small, and the most common indication for removal was patient demand. There is no evidence to support a recommendation for the routine removal of titanium mini-plates. PMID:27595084

  4. Cerebral salt wasting in a patient with head trauma: management with saline hydration and fludrocortisone.

    PubMed

    Askar, Akram; Tarif, Nauman

    2007-03-01

    Hyponatremia secondary to the syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone secretion is commonly observed in patients with various neurological disorders. Cerebral salt wasting (CSW), although uncommon, has also been reported to frequently result in hyponatremia. Here, we report a case of CSW in a patient with head trauma without evidence of cerebrovascular injury or brain edema. He was diagnosed on the basis of high fractional excretion of urinary sodium and uric acid along with extremely low serum uric acid. Improvements in serum sodium levels after saline hydration and fludrocortisone administration further supported the diagnosis, even in the presence of normal brain and atrial natriuretic peptide levels.

  5. Measuring trauma and stressful events in childhood and adolescence among patients with first-episode psychosis: Initial factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Trauma Experiences Checklist

    PubMed Central

    Cristofaro, Sarah L.; Cleary, Sean D.; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Broussard, Beth; Chapman, Colby; Haggard, Patrick J.; Jananeh, Sara; Myers, Neely L.; Compton, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Past trauma and stressful events, especially in childhood and adolescence, are common among individuals with serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia. Traumatic experiences are thought to be a socio-environmental risk factor not only for poorer outcomes, but also potentially for the onset of these disorders. Because improved measurement tools are needed, we developed and studied, among 205 first-episode psychosis patients, the factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and initial validity of the Trauma Experiences Checklist (TEC), our measure of trauma and stressful events during childhood/adolescence. We assessed validity of subscales using correlations with Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form, Parental Harsh Discipline, Violence Exposure, and TEC-Informant Version scores. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in two internally consistent subscales (Cronbach’s =0.79 and 0.80, respectively), interpersonal abuse and family stress, and violence, death, and legal involvement. Scores from the former subscale were substantially associated with CTQ-SF physical, emotional, and sexual abuse (r=0.42–0.57, all p<0.001) and Violence Exposure (r=0.49, p<0.001). On the other hand, violence, death, and legal involvement scores were most highly correlated with Violence Exposure (r=0.49, p<0.001), and not with most CTQ-SF subscales. The TEC is a potentially useful tool in assessing diverse traumatic life events across various social contexts during childhood and adolescence. PMID:23850437

  6. McGrath Series 5 videolaryngoscope vs Airtraq DL videolaryngoscope for double-lumen tube intubation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Li; Liao, Mingfeng; Li, Li; Qian, Wei; Hu, Rong; Chen, Kun; Zhang, Chuanhan; Yao, Wenlong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Many studies have shown Airtraq videolaryngoscope provided faster tracheal intubation and a higher success rate than other videolaryngoscopes. Recently, different types of videolaryngoscopes have been reported for use in double-lumen tube (DLT) intubation. However, the advantages and disadvantages between them remain undetermined for DLT intubation. In this study, we compared the Airtraq DL videolaryngoscope with the McGrath Series 5 videolaryngoscope for DLT intubation by experienced anesthesiologists. Methods: Ninety patients with expected normal airways were randomly allocated to either the Airtraq or McGrath group. The primary outcome was DLT intubation time. The secondary outcomes were glottic view, success rate, subjective ease of intubation (100-mm visual analog scale, 0 = easy; 100 = difficult), incidence of DLT malposition, and postoperative intubation-related complication. Results: The airway characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups. Cormack and Lehane grades significantly improved with the use of the McGrath and Airtraq videolaryngoscopes, compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope. The intubation success rate on the first attempt was 93% in the Airtraq group and 95% in the McGrath group (P > 0.05). The intubation time in the McGrath group is longer than that in the Airtraq group (39.9 [9.1]s vs 28.6 [13.6]s, P < 0.05). But intubation difficulty score, the incidence of DLT malposition and intubation-related complication were comparable between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: When using videolaryngoscopes for DLT intubation, the Airtraq DL is superior to the McGrath Series 5 in intubation time, but it does not decrease intubation difficulty. PMID:28002347

  7. Nasal septum giant pyogenic granuloma after a long lasting nasal intubation: case report.

    PubMed

    Neves-Pinto, Roberto M; Carvalho, Adolpho; Araujo, Elizabeth; Alberto, Carlos; Basilio-De-Oliveira; De Carvalho, Gustavo Adolpho

    2005-03-01

    The authors present a case of Pyogenic Granuloma (PG) arising from the nasal septum in the posterior nasal cavity of a patient male sex, caucasian, 32 years old, with a previous history of cranioencephalic trauma, several neurosurgeries for different subsequent neurological problems and the use of a nasogastric tube for feeding (nasal intubation) during 30 days. He underwent surgery in St. Vincent de Paul Hospital (Rio de Janeiro) on May 18, 1993, for the tumor removal and straightening of the nasal septum. Under endoscopic guidance the complete excision of the tumor mass was perfectly done thanks to the excellent exposure of the lesion, provided by the enlarged telescopic view, and the wide access afforded by the septum straighttening plus the cartilaginous septum mobilization through the maxilla-premaxilla approach of Cottle, allied to the lateralization and volume reduction of the right inferior nasal concha, simultaneously performed, thus making lateral rhinotomy or "degloving" unnecessary. The patient is until now (2004) completely free of the lesion operated on. This is the first report in the literature of such a lesion associated to nasal intubation as the triggering agent.

  8. Cardiac Troponin I is Increased in Patients with Polytrauma and Chest or Head Trauma. Results of A Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, Ruggero; Mitaritonno, Michele; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background We performed a retrospective case-control study to assess the values of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in a large number of patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) with different types of trauma. Methods The study population consisted of all patients aged 18 years or older admitted to the local ED with all types of traumas over a 1-year period. Results of cTnI were compared with those of 125 consecutive blood donors and 25 non-cardiac chest pain ED patients. Results The final study population consisted of 380 trauma patients, 10 with isolated abdominal trauma, 99 with isolated trauma of the limbs, 49 with isolated chest trauma, 145 with isolated head trauma and 77 with polytrauma. The concentration of cTnI did not differ among the three study populations, but the frequency of measurable values was substantially higher in patients with trauma (63%) than in blood donors and non-cardiac chest pain ED patients (both 20%). The frequency of cTnI values above the 99th percentile of the reference range was significantly higher in trauma patients (20%) than in blood donors (0%) and noncardiac chest pain ED patients (8%). Increased cTnI values were more frequent after head trauma (21%), chest trauma (27%) and polytrauma (29%) compared to patients with abdominal (0%) or limbs trauma (8%). Conclusions These results suggest that the measurement of cardiac troponin may be advisable to identify potential cardiac involvement in trauma patients, especially in those with polytrauma and head or chest trauma. PMID:28356878

  9. Clinical Significance of Tissue Factor and CD13 Double-Positive Microparticles in Sirs Patients with Trauma and Severe Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hisatake; Yamakawa, Kazuma; Ogura, Hiroshi; Koh, Taichin; Matsumoto, Naoya; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Activated immune cells such as monocytes are key factors in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) following trauma and sepsis. Activated monocytes induce almost all tissue factor (TF) expression contributing to inflammation and coagulation. TF and CD13 double-positive microparticles (TF/CD13MPs) are predominantly released from these activated monocytes. This study aimed to evaluate TF/CD13MPs and assess their usefulness as a biomarker of pathogenesis in early SIRS following trauma and sepsis. This prospective study comprising 24 trauma patients, 25 severe sepsis patients, and 23 healthy controls was conducted from November 2012 to February 2015. Blood samples were collected from patients within 24 h after injury and diagnosis of severe sepsis and from healthy controls. Numbers of TF/CD13MPs were measured by flow cytometry immediately thereafter. Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were calculated at patient enrollment. APACHE II and SOFA scores and International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) diagnostic criteria algorithm were calculated at the time of enrollment of severe sepsis patients. Numbers of TF/CD13MPs were significantly increased in both trauma and severe sepsis patients versus controls and correlated significantly with ISS and APACHE II score in trauma patients and with APACHE II and ISTH DIC scores in severe sepsis patients. Increased numbers of TF/CD13MPs correlated significantly with severities in the acute phase in trauma and severe sepsis patients, suggesting that TF/CD13MPs are important in the pathogenesis of early SIRS following trauma and sepsis.

  10. Early physical and functional rehabilitation of trauma patients in the Médecins Sans Frontières trauma centre in Kunduz, Afghanistan: luxury or necessity?

    PubMed Central

    Gohy, Bérangère; Ali, Engy; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Schillberg, Erin; Nasim, Masood; Naimi, Muhammad Mahmood; Cheréstal, Sophia; Falipou, Pauline; Weerts, Eric; Skelton, Peter; Van Overloop, Catherine; Trelles, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background In Afghanistan, Médecins Sans Frontières provided specialised trauma care in Kunduz Trauma Centre (KTC), including physiotherapy. In this study, we describe the development of an adapted functional score for patient outcome monitoring, and document the rehabilitation care provided and patient outcomes in relation to this functional score. Methods A descriptive cohort study was done, including all patients admitted in the KTC inpatient department (IPD) between January and June 2015. The adapted functional score was collected at four points in time: admission and discharge from both IPD and outpatient department (OPD). Results Out of the 1528 admitted patients, 92.3% (n = 1410) received at least one physiotherapy session. A total of 1022 patients sustained either lower limb fracture, upper limb fracture, traumatic brain injury or multiple injury. Among them, 966 patients received physiotherapy in IPD, of whom 596 (61.7%) received IPD sessions within 2 days of admission; 696 patients received physiotherapy in OPD. Functional independence increased over time; among patients having a functional score taken at admission and discharge from IPD, 32.2% (172/535) were independent at discharge, and among patients having a functional score at OPD admission and discharge, 79% (75/95) were independent at discharge. Conclusions The provision of physiotherapy was feasible in this humanitarian setting, and the tailored functional score appeared to be relevant. PMID:27738078

  11. Effects of Intravenous Fluid Therapy on Clinical and Biochemical Parameters of Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Paydar, Shahram; Bazrafkan, Hamid; Golestani, Nasim; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Akrami, Abbas; Moradi, Ali Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The administration of crystalloid fluids is considered as the first line treatment in management of trauma patients. Infusion of intravenous fluids leads to various changes in hemodynamic, metabolic and coagulation profiles of these patients. The present study attempted to survey some of these changes in patients with mild severity trauma following normal saline infusion. Methods: This study comprised 84 trauma patients with injury of mild severity in Shahid Rajaei Hospital, Shiraz, Iran, during 2010-2011. The coagulation and metabolic values of each patient were measured before and one and six hours after infusion of one liter normal saline. Then, the values of mentioned parameters on one and six hours after infusion were compared with baseline measures using repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: Eighty four patients included in the present study (76% male). Hemoglobin (Hb) (df: 2; F=32.7; p<0.001), hematocrit (Hct) (df: 2; F=30.7; p<0.001), white blood cells (WBC) (df: 2; F=10.6; p<0.001), and platelet count (df: 2; F=4.5; p=0.01) showed the decreasing pattern following infusion of one liter of normal saline. Coagulation markers were not affected during the time of study (p>0.05). The values of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) showed statistically significant decreasing pattern (df: 2; F=5.6; p=0.007). Pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) (df: 2; F=6.4; p=0.002), bicarbonate (HCO3) (df: 2; F=7.0; p=0.001), and base excess (BE) (df: 2; F=3.3; p=0.04) values showed a significant deteriorating changes following hydration therapy. Conclusion: It seems that, the infusion of one liter normal saline during one hour will cause a statistically significant decrease in Hb, Hct, WBC, platelet, BUN, BE, HCO3, and PCO2 in trauma patients with mild severity of injury and stable condition. The changes in, coagulation profiles, pH, PvO2, and electrolytes were not statistically remarkable. PMID:26495354

  12. Improving Early Identification of the High-Risk Elderly Trauma Patient By Emergency Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Newgard, Craig D.; Holmes, James F.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Staudenmayer, Kristan; Wittwer, Lynn; Stecker, Eric; Dai, Mengtao; Hsia, Renee Y.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective We sought to (1) define the high-risk elderly trauma patient based on prognostic differences associated with different injury patterns and (2) derive alternative field trauma triage guidelines that mesh with national field triage guidelines to improve identification of high-risk elderly patients. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of injured adults ≥ 65 years transported by 94 EMS agencies to 122 hospitals in 7 regions from 1/1/2006 through 12/31/2008. We tracked current field triage practices by EMS, patient demographics, out-of-hospital physiology, procedures and mechanism of injury. Outcomes included Injury Severity Score ≥ 16 and specific anatomic patterns of serious injury using Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥ 3 and surgical interventions. In-hospital mortality was used as a measure of prognosis for different injury patterns. Results 33,298 injured elderly patients were transported by EMS, including 4.5% with ISS ≥ 16, 4.8% with serious brain injury, 3.4% with serious chest injury, 1.6% with serious abdominal-pelvic injury and 29.2% with serious extremity injury. In-hospital mortality ranged from 18.7% (95% CI 16.7–20.7) for ISS ≥ 16 to 2.9% (95% CI 2.6–3.3) for serious extremity injury. The alternative triage guidelines (any positive criterion from the current guidelines, GCS ≤ 14 or abnormal vital signs) outperformed current field triage practices for identifying patients with ISS ≥ 16: sensitivity (92.1% [95% CI 89.6–94.1%] vs. 75.9% [95% CI 72.3–79.2%]), specificity (41.5% [95% CI 40.6–42.4%] vs. 77.8% [95% CI 77.1–78.5%]). Sensitivity decreased for individual injury patterns, but was higher than current triage practices. Conclusions High-risk elderly trauma patients can be defined by ISS ≥ 16 or specific non-extremity injury patterns. The field triage guidelines could be improved to better identify high-risk elderly trauma patients by EMS, with a reduction in triage specificity. PMID:26477345

  13. Comparison between different tests and their combination for prediction of difficult intubation: An analytical study

    PubMed Central

    Basunia, Sandip Roy; Ghosh, Sarmila; Bhattacharya, Susmita; Saha, Indranil; Biswas, Atanu; Prasad, Anu

    2013-01-01

    Context: There is an impelling need for accurate tests to predict difficult intubation, as failure to achieve endotracheal intubation causes significant morbidity and mortality in anesthetic practice. Aim: To calculate the validity of the different tests along with their combination and agreement when compared with endotracheal intubation in predicting difficult intubation. Settings and Design: Operation theaters, analytical study. Materials and Methods: Three hundred patients aged between 16 and 60 years of American society of anesthesiologist (ASA) physical status I and II, scheduled for elective surgical procedures requiring endotracheal intubation were studied during January-July 2012. Mallampati grade (MP), sternomental distance (SMD), thyromental distance (TMD), and Delilkan and Calder test were recorded for every patient. Endotracheal intubation was performed by an experienced anesthesiologist blinded to the measurements and recorded grading of intubation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), likelihood ratio (LR), odds ratio (OR), and kappa coefficient of tests individually and in combination were calculated. Statistical Analysis Used: IBM SPSS software (version 16.0) and Epi-info software (version 3.2). Results: Difficult and failed intubation was 13.3% and 0.6%, respectively. Difficult intubation increased with age. TMD and Calder test showed highest sensitivity individually and Dellilkan's test showed least sensitivity. Among the combination of tests, MP with SMD and MP with Calder test had the highest sensitivity. Conclusion: Among individual test TMD and Calder are better predictive tests in terms of sensitivity. Combination of tests increases the chance of prediction of difficult intubation. PMID:25885730

  14. Improve the Communication, Decrease the Distance: The Investigation into Problematic Communication and Delays in Inter-Hospital Transfer of Rural Trauma Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avtgis, Theodore A.; Polack, E. Phillips; Martin, Matthew M.; Rossi, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Time delays in the treatment and transfer of trauma patients is a contributing factor responsible for many fatalities. Time delays are more characteristic of rural trauma systems due to factors such as greater distance, and delays in accident reporting. Efforts to reduce the trauma transfer process have resulted in many changes in protocol and use…

  15. Anxiety and trauma perception and quality of life in patients who have undergone replantation.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Alper; Bekler, Halil; Karacaoglu, Ercan; Servet, Erkan; Gokay, Nevzat Selim

    2011-10-01

    The difficulty in keeping an amputated limb biologically alive is overcome day by day thanks to the successful replantation procedures applied in the early period. However, the reflections of this biological success on patients in functional and psychological terms may not be pleasing all the time. In our study, we aimed to evaluate the perceptual responses of patients to trauma after replantation and their possible effects on clinical results. We conducted a retrospective study of 43 patients who underwent replantation. The average age was 32.4 years and the average follow-up period was 38.6 months. When the results of the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Beck's Depression Inventory, and the assessment scores of the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand survey were evaluated, there was a negative correlation between the patients diagnosed with depression and all SF-36 subunits. A negative correlation between the severity of trauma and the average physical and mental values included in the SF-36 evaluations was observed (R = 0.48, R = 0.51, respectively),. These results revealed that the psychology of the patient was one of the important factors that could not be ignored in the success of replantation.

  16. A study on posttraumatic experience of road traffic accident afflicted maxillofacial trauma patient at tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Shrestha, Suraksha

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Patients are usually left in a vulnerable state after an accident. Because of this, they long for a good encounter when they are brought to the hospital. Physical impairment and psychological morbidities are some of the complications that can occur to them. Traditionally, surgeons tend to pay little attention to a patient's emotional and psychological perspective. The aim of this study was to understand the experience of oral and maxillofacial trauma patients due to road traffic accident right from immediate after the accident till the end of definitive treatment. Materials and Methods: Phenomenological approach of qualitative study was used to explore these patients’ experience. Twenty subjects involved in road traffic accidents without any cognitive impairment aged 18 and above were recruited. Purposive sampling was used to include maximal variation sample regarding age, gender, types of injury, and types of treatment received. Semi-structured and open-ended interview approach was used to obtain in-depth information. Results: Seven themes were identified to describe the patients’ response to and experience after meeting with a road traffic accident; they are unreal experiences, emotional responses, need to inform and need for information, need for assistance, their perception toward the maxillofacial injury, their experience on treatment and staff-patient interaction. Conclusion: This qualitative study has provided an in-depth understanding of patients experience during maxillofacial trauma and treatment, which otherwise cannot be obtained by the use of surveys and test questions. PMID:28250673

  17. Factors Influencing Continuous Breath Signal in Intubated and Mechanically-Ventilated Intensive Care Unit Patients Measured by an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jan Hendrik; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Colombo, Camilla; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bos, Lieuwe D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Continuous breath analysis by electronic nose (eNose) technology in the intensive care unit (ICU) may be useful in monitoring (patho) physiological changes. However, the application of breath monitoring in a non-controlled clinical setting introduces noise into the data. We hypothesized that the sensor signal is influenced by: (1) humidity in the side-stream; (2) patient-ventilator disconnections and the nebulization of medication; and (3) changes in ventilator settings and the amount of exhaled CO2. We aimed to explore whether the aforementioned factors introduce noise into the signal, and discuss several approaches to reduce this noise. Methods: Study in mechanically-ventilated ICU patients. Exhaled breath was monitored using a continuous eNose with metal oxide sensors. Linear (mixed) models were used to study hypothesized associations. Results: In total, 1251 h of eNose data were collected. First, the initial 15 min of the signal was discarded. There was a negative association between humidity and Sensor 1 (Fixed-effect β: −0.05 ± 0.002) and a positive association with Sensors 2–4 (Fixed-effect β: 0.12 ± 0.001); the signal was corrected for this noise. Outliers were most likely due to noise and therefore removed. Sensor values were positively associated with end-tidal CO2, tidal volume and the pressure variables. The signal was corrected for changes in these ventilator variables after which the associations disappeared. Conclusion: Variations in humidity, ventilator disconnections, nebulization of medication and changes of ventilator settings indeed influenced exhaled breath signals measured in ventilated patients by continuous eNose analysis. We discussed several approaches to reduce the effects of these noise inducing variables. PMID:27556467

  18. Analyzing patient's waiting time in emergency & trauma department in public hospital - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslan, Shazwa; Tahir, Herniza Md; Nordin, Noraimi Azlin Mohd; Zaharudin, Zati Aqmar

    2014-09-01

    Emergency and Trauma Department (ETD) is an important element for a hospital. It provides medical service, which operates 24 hours a day in most hospitals. However overcrowding is not exclusion for ETD. Overflowing occurs due to affordable services provided by public hospitals, since it is funded by the government. It is reported that a patient attending ETD must be treated within 90 minutes, in accordance to achieve the Key Performance Indicator (KPI). However, due to overcrowd situations, most patients have to wait longer than the KPI standard. In this paper, patient's average waiting time is analyzed. Using Chi-Square Test of Goodness, patient's inter arrival per hour is also investigated. As conclusion, Monday until Wednesday was identified as the days that exceed the KPI standard while Chi-Square Test of Goodness showed that the patient's inter arrival is independent and random.

  19. The Quality of Pre-hospital Circulatory Management in Patients With Multiple Trauma Referred to the Trauma Center of Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, Iran, in the First Six Months of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulatory management is a critical issue in pre-hospital transportation phase of multiple trauma patients. However, the quality of this important care did not receive enough attention. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of pre-hospital circulatory management in patients with multiple trauma. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. The study population consisted of all patients with multiple trauma who had been transferred by emergency medical services (EMS) to the central trauma department in Kashan Shahid Beheshti medical center, Kashan, Iran. We recruited a convenience sample of 400 patients with multiple trauma. Data were collected using the circulatory assessment questionnaire and controlling hemorrhage (CAQCH) that were designed by the researchers and were described by using frequency tabulations, central tendency measures, and variability indices. The chi-square test was used to analyze the data. Results The study sample consisted of 263 males (75.2%); 57.75% had lower levels of education and 28.75% were workers. The most common mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (85.4%). We found that the quality of circulatory management was unfavorable in 61% of the cases. A significant relationship was observed between the quality of circulatory management and type of trauma and staff’s employment status. Conclusions The quality of pre-hospital circulatory management provided to patients with multiple trauma was unfavorable. Therefore, establishment of in-service training programs on circulatory management is recommended. PMID:27556056

  20. Nutritional intervention in cognitively impaired geriatric trauma patients: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Eschbach, D; Kirchbichler, T; Wiesmann, T; Oberkircher, L; Bliemel, C; Ruchholtz, S; Buecking, B

    2016-01-01

    Background Most studies focusing on improving the nutritional status of geriatric trauma patients exclude patients with cognitive impairment. These patients are especially at risk of malnutrition at admission and of worsening during the perioperative fasting period. This study was planned as a feasibility study to identify the difficulties involved in including this high-risk collective of cognitively impaired geriatric trauma patients. Patients and methods This prospective intervention study included cognitively impaired geriatric patients (Mini–Mental State Examination <25, age >65 years) with hip-related fractures. We assessed Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS 2002), body mass index, calf circumference, American Society of Anesthesiologists’ classification, and Braden Scale. All patients received parenteral nutritional supplementation of 800 kcal/d for the 96-hour perioperative period. Serum albumin and pseudocholinesterase were monitored. Information related to the study design and any complications in the clinical course were documented. Results A total of 96 patients were screened, among whom eleven women (median age: 87 years; age range: 74–91 years) and nine men (median age: 82 years; age range: 73–89 years) were included. The Mini–Mental State Examination score was 9.5 (0–24). All patients were manifestly undernourished or at risk according to MNA and NRS 2002. The body mass index was 23 kg/m2 (13–30 kg/m2), the calf circumference was 29.5 cm (18–34 cm), and the mean American Society of Anesthesiologists’ classification status was 3 (2–4). Braden Scale showed 18 patients at high risk of developing pressure ulcers. In all, 12 patients had nonsurgical complications with 10% mortality. Albumin as well as pseudocholinesterase dropped significantly from admission to discharge. The study design proved to be feasible. Conclusion The testing of MNA and NRS 2002 was feasible. Cognitively impaired trauma patients

  1. Unusual Displacement of a Mobilised Dental Bridge during Orotracheal Intubation.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Salvaterra, Francesca; Tiano, Letizia; Gaudio, Rosa Maria; Galligioni, Helmut; Ori, Carlo; Avato, Francesco Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dental trauma during tracheal intubation mostly happens in case of poor dentition, restricted mouth opening, and/or difficult laryngoscopy. 57-year-old man undergoing laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma had his dental work detached at induction of anesthesia. Oropharyngeal direct view, manual inspection, fibreoptic nosendoscopy, tracheobronchoscopy, and fiberoptic inspection of the esophagus and stomach were unsuccessful in locating the dislodged bridge. While other possible exams were considered, such as lateral and AP x-ray of head and neck, further meticulous manual "sweepings" of the mouth were performed, and by moving the first and second fingers below the soft palate deep towards the posterolateral wall of the pharynx, feeling consistent with a dental prosthesis was detected in the right pharyngeal recess. Only after pulling the palatopharyngeal arch upward was it possible to grasp it and extract it out with the aid of a Magill Catheter Forceps. Even though the preexisting root and bridge deficits were well reported by the consultant dentist, the patient was fully reimbursed. The lack of appropriate documentation of the advanced periodontal disease in the anesthesia records, no mention of potential risks on anesthesia consent, and insufficient protective measures during airway instrumentation reinforced the reimbursement claim.

  2. Admission serum albumin is predicitve of outcome in critically ill trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jin; Bochicchio, Grant V; Joshi, Manjari; Bochicchio, Kelly; Costas, Ainhoa; Tracy, Kate; Scalea, Thomas M

    2004-12-01

    There is a paucity of data evaluating serum albumin on admission as a predictor of outcome in adult trauma patients. Our objectives were to evaluate whether or not hypoalbuminemia on admission is a predictor of adverse outcome in trauma patients. Prospective data was collected daily on 1023 patients over a 2-year period. Patients were stratified by serum albumin level on admission, age, gender, injury severity, and comorbid conditions. Outcome was measured by ICU and hospital length of stay, ventilator days, incidence of infection, and mortality. Student t test, chi2, and multilinear regression analysis were used to determine level of significance. Blunt injuries accounted for the majority (78%) of the admissions. The mean age of the study population was 43+/-21 years with a mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 21.4+/-12. The majority of patients were male (74.5%). The mean albumin level on admission was 2.9+/-1.8. Five hundred ninety-three (58%) patients were admitted with a serum albumin level of > or =2.6 as compared to 430 patients (42%) with an admission albumin level of <2.6. Patients with a lower serum albumin level were found to have a significantly greater ICU (17.1 vs 14.2 days) and hospital length of stay (17.3 vs 20.1 days, P'< 0.05), ventilator days (11.1 vs 13.5 days, P < 0.05), and mortality (P = 0.008) when matched for age and injury severity. The relative risk of infection and mortality increased greater than 2.5-fold in patients with increased age and low serum albumin when analyzed by multilinear regression analysis, P < 0.001. An admission serum albumin level of <2.6 g/dL is a significant independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. The combination of increased age and low albumin level was most predictive of infection and mortality. Early nutrition should be considered in these high-risk patients.

  3. Intubation methods by novice intubators in a manikin model.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Darragh C; Barnes, Robert L; Aratani, Ashley K; Lee, Dane C; Lau, Christopher A; Morton, Paul N; Yamamoto, Loren G; Berg, Benjamin W

    2013-10-01

    Tracheal Intubation is an important yet difficult skill to learn with many possible methods and techniques. Direct laryngoscopy is the standard method of tracheal intubation, but several instruments have been shown to be less difficult and have better performance characteristics than the traditional direct method. We compared 4 different intubation methods performed by novice intubators on manikins: conventional direct laryngoscopy, video laryngoscopy, Airtraq® laryngoscopy, and fiberoptic laryngoscopy. In addition, we attempted to find a correlation between playing videogames and intubation times in novice intubators. Video laryngoscopy had the best results for both our normal and difficult airway (cervical spine immobilization) manikin scenarios. When video was compared to direct in the normal airway scenario, it had a significantly higher success rate (100% vs 83% P=.02) and shorter intubation times (29.1 ± 27.4 sec vs 45.9 ± 39.5 sec, P=.03). In the difficult airway scenario video laryngoscopy maintained a significantly higher success rate (91% vs 71% P=0.04) and likelihood of success (3.2 ± 1.0 95%CI [2.9-3.5] vs 2.4 ± 0.9 95%CI [2.1-2.7]) when compared to direct laryngoscopy. Participants also reported significantly higher rates of self-confidence (3.5 ± 0.6 95%CI [3.3-3.7]) and ease of use (1.5 ± 0.7 95%CI [1.3-1.8]) with video laryngoscopy compared to all other methods. We found no correlation between videogame playing and intubation methods.

  4. Sublingual glyceryl trinitrate during colonoscopy and terminal ileal intubation: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hill, Patsy-Anne; Panteleimonitis, Sofoklis; McKay, Graham; Watson, Carol; Prach, Andre; Macdonald, Angus

    2017-02-01

    Background and aims Sublingual glyceryl trinitrate has been used as an aid to cannulate the Sphincter of Oddi during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Its role in terminal ileal intubation during colonoscopy is unknown. This study examines the role of sublingual glyceryl trinitrate in terminal ileal intubation during colonoscopy. Methods A triple-blind randomized controlled trial comparing sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (800 µg) vs. placebo (saline) in relation to terminal ileal intubation during colonoscopy was performed. Following caecal intubation, participants received sublingual glyceryl trinitrate/placebo followed by a 2-min observation period before intubation was attempted. Data on time to intubate the terminal ileum and intubation rate were collected. Results A total of 110 patients (age: 58 years (18-75)) were recruited and randomised as per protocol: 54 received sublingual glyceryl trinitrate. Terminal ileal intubation was successful in all patients receiving sublingual glyceryl trinitrate and in 53 (94.6%) of those receiving saline ( p = 0.243: Fischer's exact). The median time taken for ileal intubation after application of spray was 72.5 (7-900) s in the glyceryl trinitrate group compared with 125 (5-900) s in the placebo group ( p = 0.150: Mann-Whitney). There were no major adverse events reported in either group. Conclusions Terminal ileal intubation rates and timing were very good in both groups. Routine sublingual glyceryl trinitrate was not proven to be beneficial in improving terminal ileal intubation or intubation success rates in the hands of experienced colonoscopists. However, trends in this small study might suggest that glyceryl trinitrate could be useful in the hands of less experienced colonoscopists or in difficult terminal ileal intubation cases.

  5. Association between trauma patients' severity and critical care nursing workload in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lingli; Mayner, Lidia; Wang, Honghong

    2014-12-01

    The correlation between patients' severity and nursing workload for multiple trauma patients within the first 24 h of admission was explored in this study. Multiple trauma adult patients (n = 229) admitted in the emergency rescue room of a public hospital in China over a 1 year period were enrolled in this study. The worst values of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II scores and the Nursing Activity Score were collected during the first 24 h after admission. The predicted number of registered nurses was calculated for the corresponding severity groups. In the results, one-way ANOVA revealed that the Nursing Activity Score in the seven severity groups differed significantly. The total Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II score had a positive correlation with the Nursing Activity Score. The predicted number of registered nurses required was 0.6 for the low group, 0.7 for the moderate group, 1.0 for the severe group, and 1.1 for the extremely severe group. Patients' illness severity is an important indicator of nursing workload, especially in nurse staff allocation within the emergency department.

  6. Acute effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers in critically ill patients with craniocerebral trauma

    PubMed Central

    de Cerqueira Neto, Manoel Luiz; Moura, Álvaro Vieira; Cerqueira, Telma Cristina Fontes; Aquim, Esperidião Elias; Reá-Neto, Álvaro; Oliveira, Mirella Cristine; da Silva Júnior, Walderi Monteiro; Santana-Filho, Valter J.; Herminia Scola, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers on cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics and blood gas variables. METHOD: A descriptive, longitudinal, prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial that included 20 critical patients with severe craniocerebral trauma who were receiving mechanical ventilation and who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Each patient was subjected to the physiotherapeutic maneuvers of vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow (5 minutes on each hemithorax), along with subsequent airway suctioning with prior instillation of saline solution, hyperinflation and hyperoxygenation. Variables related to cardiovascular and cerebral hemodynamics and blood gas variables were recorded after each vibrocompression, increased manual expiratory flow and airway suctioning maneuver and 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. RESULTS: The hemodynamic and blood gas variables were maintained during vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow maneuvers; however, there were increases in mean arterial pressure, intracranial pressure, heart rate, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary capillary pressure during airway suctioning. All of the values returned to baseline 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. CONCLUSION: Respiratory physiotherapy can be safely performed on patients with severe craniocerebral trauma. Additional caution must be taken when performing airway suctioning because this technique alters cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics, even in sedated and paralyzed patients. PMID:24141836

  7. Inappropriate preinjury warfarin use in trauma patients: A call for a safety initiative

    PubMed Central

    HH, Hon; Elmously, A; Stehly, CD; Stoltzfus, JC; Granson, MA; Stawicki, SP; Hoey, BA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Warfarin continues to be widely prescribed for a variety of conditions. It has been shown that preinjury warfarin may worsen outcomes in trauma patients. We hypothesized that a substantial proportion of injured patients seen at our institution were receiving preinjury warfarin for inappropriate indications and that a significant number of such patients had subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic international normalized ratios as well as increased mortality. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of registry data from a Level I trauma center was conducted for the period from January 2004 to July 2013. Included were patients aged ≥22 years (based on the youngest recorded patient on warfarin in this study). Abstracted variables included patient age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Maximum Abbreviated Injury Score for Head (MAISH), mortality, hospital length of stay (HLOS), indication(s) for anticoagulant therapy, admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and admission international normalized ratio (INR). Suitability of warfarin indication(s) was determined using the most recent American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) Guidelines. Inappropriate warfarin administration was defined as use inconsistent with these guidelines. For outcome comparisons, a case-control design with 1:1 ratio was used, matching patients taking preinjury warfarin to a random sample of trauma patients who were not taking warfarin. Severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) was defined as MAISH ≥4. Results: A total of 700 out of 14,583 patients aged ≥22 years were receiving preinjury warfarin (4.8% incidence, WG). This group was age- and ISS-matched with 700 patients (4.8% total sample) who were not taking warfarin (NWG) in a total case-control sample of 1,400. The two groups were similar in age, gender, ISS, and initial GCS. According to the ACCP guidelines, 115/700 (16.4%) patients in the warfarin group were receiving anticoagulation for inappropriate indications. Nearly 65% of the

  8. Impact of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose in evaluation of trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Maxfield, Mark W.; Schuster, Kevin M.; McGillicuddy, Edward A.; Young, Calvin J.; Ghita, Monica; Bokhari, S.A. Jamal; Oliva, Isabel B.; Brink, James A.; Davis, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND A recent study showed that computed tomographic (CT) scans contributed 93% of radiation exposure of 177 patients admitted to our Level I trauma center. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) is an algorithm that reduces the noise level in reconstructed images and therefore allows the use of less ionizing radiation during CT scans without significantly affecting image quality. ASIR was instituted on all CT scans performed on trauma patients in June 2009. Our objective was to determine if implementation of ASIR reduced radiation dose without compromising patient outcomes. METHODS We identified 300 patients activating the trauma system before and after the implementation of ASIR imaging. After applying inclusion criteria, 245 charts were reviewed. Baseline demographics, presenting characteristics, number of delayed diagnoses, and missed injuries were recorded. The postexamination volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose-length product (DLP)reported by the scanner for CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis and CT scans of the brain and cervical spine were recorded. Subjective image quality was compared between the two groups. RESULTS For CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, the mean CTDIvol(17.1 mGy vs. 14.2 mGy; p < 0.001) and DLP (1,165 mGy·cm vs. 1,004 mGy·cm; p < 0.001) was lower for studies performed with ASIR. For CT scans of the brain and cervical spine, the mean CTDIvol(61.7 mGy vs. 49.6 mGy; p < 0.001) and DLP (1,327 mGy·cm vs. 1,067 mGy·cm; p < 0.001) was lower for studies performed with ASIR. There was no subjective difference in image quality between ASIR and non-ASIR scans. All CT scans were deemed of good or excellent image quality. There were no delayed diagnoses or missed injuries related to CT scanning identified in either group. CONCLUSION Implementation of ASIR imaging for CT scans performed on trauma patients led to a nearly 20% reduction in ionizing radiation without compromising outcomes or image quality

  9. Variation in emergency department use of cervical spine radiography for alert, stable trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Vandemheen, K; Laupacis, A; Brison, R; Eisenhauer, M A; Greenberg, G H; MacPhail, I; McKnight, R D; Reardon, M; Verbeek, R; Worthington, J; Lesiuk, H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To, assess the emergency department use of cervical spine radiography for alert, stable adult trauma patients in terms of utilization, yield for injury and variation in practices among hospitals and physicians. DESIGN: Retrospective survey of health records. SETTING: Emergency departments of 6 teaching and 2 community hospitals in Ontario and British Columbia. PATIENTS: Consecutive alert, stable adult trauma patients seen with potential cervical spine injury between July 1, 1994, and June 30, 1995. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Total number of eligible patients, referral for cervical spine radiography (overall, by hospital and by physician), presence of cervical spine injury, patient characteristics and hospitals associated with use of radiography. RESULTS: Of 6855 eligible patients, cervical spine radiography was ordered for 3979 (58.0%). Only 60 (0.9%) patients were found to have an acute cervical spine injury (fracture, dislocation or ligamentous instability); 98.5% of the radiographic films were negative for any significant abnormality. The demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients were similar across the 8 hospitals, and no cervical spine injuries were missed. Significant variation was found among the 8 hospitals in the rate of ordering radiography (p < 0.0001), from a low of 37.0% to a high of 72.5%. After possible differences in case severity and patient characteristics at each hospital were controlled for, logistic regression analysis revealed that 6 of the hospitals were significantly associated with the use of radiography. At 7 hospitals, there was significant variation in the rate of ordering radiography among the attending emergency physicians (p < 0.05), from a low of 15.6% to a high of 91.5%. CONCLUSIONS: Despite considerable variation among institutions and individual physicians in the ordering of cervical spine radiography for alert, stable trauma patients with similar characteristics, no cervical spine injuries were missed. The

  10. Readability of Trauma-Related Patient Education Materials From the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Eltorai, Adam E. M.; P. Thomas, Nathan; Yang, Heejae; Daniels, Alan H.; Born, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Context: According to the american medical association (AMA) and the national institutes of health (NIH), the recommended readability of patient education materials should be no greater than a sixth-grade reading level. The online patient education information produced by the american academy of orthopaedic surgeons (AAOS) may be too complicated for some patients to understand. This study evaluated whether the AAOS’s online trauma-related patient education materials meet recommended readability guidelines for medical information. Evidence Acquisition: Ninety-nine articles from the “Broken Bones and Injuries” section of the AAOS-produced patient education website, orthoinfo.org, were analyzed for grade level readability using the Flesch-Kincaid formula, a widely-used and validated tool to evaluate the text reading level. Results for each webpage were compared to the AMA/NIH recommended sixth-grade reading level and the average reading level of U.S. adults (eighth-grade). Results: The mean (SD) grade level readability for all patient education articles was 8.8 (1.1). All but three of the articles had a readability score above the sixth-grade level. The readability of the articles exceeded this level by an average of 2.8 grade levels (95% confidence interval, 2.6 - 3.0; P < 0.0001). Furthermore, the average readability of the articles exceeded the average reading skill level of U.S. adults (eighth grade) by nearly an entire grade level (95% confidence interval, 0.6-1.0; P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The majority of the trauma-related articles from the AAOS patient education website have readability levels that may make comprehension difficult for a substantial portion of the patient population. PMID:27218045

  11. Lower extremity vascular stenting for a post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm in a young trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Joshua A; Hager, Eric; Henry, David; Martin, Niels D

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms has become a viable, less invasive option when compared to open repair. Due to the relative youth of this technology, studies have yet to be concluded on the long-term patency of stent grafts in this population. For this reason, concern exists with endovascular stent placement in the young trauma patient. In this study, we present a case and review the literature on a post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery in a 19-year-old man treated with an endovascular stent. PMID:21769220

  12. Commentary on Predictors of Failed Primary Abdominal Closure in the Trauma Patient with an Open Abdomen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    abdomen leads to the loss of abdominal wall domain and the need for skin autografting over viscera with planned ventral hernia.As the open abdomen...MAY 2013 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Commentary on "predictors of failed primary abdominal closure in the...Z39-18 Commentary on ‘‘Predictors of Failed Primary Abdominal Closure in the Trauma Patient with an Open Abdomen’’ Jonathan B. Lundy, MD Damage

  13. RBC AGE AND POTENTIATION OF TRANSFUSION RELATED PATHOLOGY IN TRAUMA PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jordan A.; Barnum, Scott R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2011-01-01

    The specific negative clinical manifestations associated with the transfusion of stored red blood cells (RBCs) and the corresponding mechanisms responsible for such phenomena remain poorly defined. Our recent studies document that leukodepleted older RBC units potentiate transfusion-related toxicity in trauma patients. It is our hypothesis that the transfusion of relatively older blood impedes microvascular perfusion. The central mechanisms proposed to mediate this microcirculatory alteration include: i) the loss of RBC-dependent control of nitric oxide mediated homeostasis concerning vasodilation, and ii) immune cell and complement activation. In this review, we outline the background for our hypothesis and detail our current investigations toward the understanding of this pathophysiology. PMID:21496048

  14. Red blood cell age and potentiation of transfusion-related pathology in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Jordan A; Barnum, Scott R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2011-04-01

    The specific negative clinical manifestations associated with the transfusion of stored red blood cells (RBCs) and the corresponding mechanisms responsible for such phenomena remain poorly defined. Our recent studies document that leukoreduced older RBC units potentiate transfusion-related toxicity in trauma patients. It is our hypothesis that the transfusion of relatively older blood impedes microvascular perfusion. The central mechanisms proposed to mediate this microcirculatory alteration include: 1) the loss of RBC-dependent control of nitric oxide-mediated homeostasis concerning vasodilation and 2) immune cell and complement activation. In this review, we outline the background for our hypothesis and detail our current investigations toward the understanding of this pathophysiology.

  15. Cervical Spinal Motion During Intubation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Ten fresh human cadavers were intubated while recording cervical motion using a cinefluoroscopic technique. Segmental cervical motion from the...performed using no external stabilization, Gardner-Wells traction and manual in-line cervical immobilization. The data are currently being analyzed. A...paper entitled Segmental cervical spine motion during orotracheal intubation of the intact and injured spine with and without external stabilization was published in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

  16. Reconstruction of soft plate necrosis after endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyuck Jae; Lim, So Young; Pyon, Jai-Kyong; Mun, Goo Hyun; Bang, Sa Ik; Oh, Kap Sung

    2014-01-01

    Uvular necrosis after long-term endotracheal intubation has been previously reported, but there have been no reports regarding soft palate necrosis after endotracheal intubation. Recently, we encountered 2 patients who had a high degree of soft palate necrosis following endotracheal intubation during long-term care in the intensive care unit. This study reports noncongenital soft palate cleft caused by endotracheal intubation. Two patients, aged 30 and 38 years, with noncongenital cleft palate were treated with pharyngeal flap and/or palatoplasty at our institution from March 2011 to May 2013. Initially, the patients complained of acquired speech disorder and severe oronasal regurgitation caused by a palatal defect. Speech ability was evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively by a perceptual language test and nasopharyngoscopy. The cleft soft palates of both patients were completely repaired, and the aforementioned symptoms improved after surgery. Postoperative courses were uneventful in both of the cases, and neither patient experienced a recurrence. Although rare, long-term intensive care unit care with endotracheal intubation can cause noncongenital soft palate cleft. In cases with iatrogenic cleft palate that does not heal with conservative treatment, surgical procedures such as pharyngeal flap and palatoplasty can be helpful.

  17. Delayed detection of subcutaneous emphysema following routine endotracheal intubation -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Park, Woo Young; Choi, Eunkyeong; Koo, Bon Nyeo

    2010-01-01

    A tracheal intubation-related tracheobronchial rupture is a relatively rare complication. We report a case of tracheobronchial rupture after single lumen endotracheal intubation. Twenty four hours after extubation of an endotracheal tube, subcutaneous emphysema developed on the patient's neck. A pneumomediastinum was also detected by computerized tomography (CT). The patient recovered uneventfully after conservative management. PMID:20877710

  18. An Abdominal CT may be Safe in Selected Hypotensive Trauma Patients with Positive FAST Exam

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mackenzie R.; Holcomb, John B.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) and hypotension often indicates urgent surgery. An abdomen/pelvis CT (apCT) may allow less invasive management but the delay may be associated with adverse outcomes. Methods Patients in the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion study with hypotension and a positive FAST (HF+) who underwent a CT (apCT+) were compared to those who did not. Results Of the 92 HF+ identified, 32(35%) underwent apCT during initial evaluation and apCT was associated with decreased odds of an emergency operation, OR 0.11 95% CI (0.001–0.116) and increased odds of angiographic intervention, OR 14.3 95% CI (1.5–135). There was no significant difference in 30 day mortality or need for dialysis. Conclusion An apCt in HF+ patients is associated with reduced odds of emergency surgery, but not mortality. Select HF+ patients can safely undergo apCT to obtain clinically useful information. PMID:25805456

  19. Mechanistic determinates of the acute coagulopathy of trauma (ACoT) in patients requiring emergency surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sixta, Sherry L; Hatch, Quinton M; Matijevic, Nena; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B; Cotton, Bryan A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The development of acute coagulopathy of trauma (ACoT) is associated with a significant increase in mortality. However, the contributory mechanisms behind ACoT have yet to be clearly defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of multiple variables, including base deficit and injury severity, on development of ACoT within a subset of critically ill trauma patients. Methods: A retrospective review of all trauma laparotomies between 01/2004-12/2009 was performed. ACoT (+) was defined as an arrival INR ≥1.5, ACoT (-) defined as INR<1.5. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: Of 1218 patients, 337 (27%) were ACoT (+) and 881 (73%) were ACoT (-) upon presentation. Groups were similar in demographics, ED fluid administration, GCS scores, and admission temperatures. Admission base deficit (8.5 vs. 4, p<0.001) and ISS (median 25 vs. 16, p<0.001) were higher in the ACoT (+) group, as were intra-operative RBC (median 4 vs. 0 U) and plasma (3 vs. 0 U) transfusions; both p<0.001. Multiple-linear regression revealed INR values were independently associated with arrival base deficit and pre-hospital fluid volumes (both p<0.001). On logistic regression, the development of ACoT (+) was associated with base deficit (OR 0.92, p=0.013) as well as ISS (OR 1.05, p<0.001). However, blunt mechanism alone was not an independent predictor of ACoT. Conclusion: The current study revealed that ACoT is independently associated with both shock (base deficit) and tissue injury. Additionally, tissue injury is a significant contributor to the development of early ACoT regardless of blunt or penetrating mechanism. PMID:23272297

  20. The efficacy of combined regional nerve blocks in awake orotracheal fiberoptic intubation

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Sharan, Radhe; Jain, Payal; Bala, Anju; Ranjana; Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Aims of Study: To evaluate the efficacy, hemodynamic changes, and patient comfort during awake fiberoptic intubation done under combined regional blocks. Materials and Methods: In the present observational study, 50 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists ( ASA) Grade I–II, Mallampati Grade I–IV were given nerve blocks - bilateral glossopharyngeal nerve block, bilateral superior laryngeal nerve block, and recurrent laryngeal nerve block before awake fiberoptic intubation using 2% lidocaine. Results: Procedure was associated with minimal increases in hemodynamic parameters during the procedure and until 3 min after it. Most of the intubations were being carried out within 3 min. Patient comfort was satisfactory with 90% of patients having favorable grades. Discussion: The most common cause of mortality and serious morbidity due to anesthesia is from airway problems. One-third of all anesthetic deaths are due to failure to intubate and ventilate. Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation under local anesthesia is now an accepted technique for managing such situations. In awake patient's anatomy, muscle tone, airway protection, and ventilation are preserved, but it is essential to sufficiently anesthetize the upper airway before the performance of awake fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided intubation to ensure patient comfort and cooperation for which in our study we used the nerve block technique. Conclusion: A properly performed technique of awake fiberoptic intubation done under combined regional nerve blocks provides good intubating conditions, patient comfort and safety and results in minimal hemodynamic changes. PMID:27212757

  1. Temporomandibular joint sounds and disc dislocations incidence after orotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Estela T; Suazo, Iván C; Guimarães, Antonio S

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement and articular sounds incidence after orotracheal intubation. A prospective cohort study was conducted in the Hospital Universitário do Oeste do Paraná (HUOP), in Cascavel, Brazil. 100 patients (aged 14-74 years, mean 44 years), 34 male and 66 female, in need of surgical procedure with orotracheal intubation were evaluated. The anterior disc displacement with reduction incidence and the nonclassifiable sounds incidence by the Research Diagnostic Criteria Axis I was evaluated in all patients after orotracheal intubation. The patients was evaluated one day before and until two days after the procedure. Eight percent present with anterior disc displacement with reduction and 10% presented nonclassifiable sounds after the orotracheal intubation. There was no correlation of any kind regarding gender related influence in the incidence of disc dislocations (P = 0.2591) and TMJ sounds (P = 0.487). Although anterior disc dislocations and TMJ sounds after anesthetic with orotracheal intubation presented a low incidence (8%-10%), it is recommended that the evaluation of TMJ signs and symptoms be done before the anesthetic procedure to take care with susceptible patients manipulation.

  2. Endotracheal Administration of Sufentanil and Tetracaine During Awake Fiberoptic Intubation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Meng; Tao, Jun; Cheng, Min; Wang, Qingli

    2016-01-01

    Combined use of local anesthetics and low-dose opioids enhances the effects of local anesthetics. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of combined administration of sufentanil and tetracaine through the cricothyroid membrane during awake nasal intubation using fiberoptic bronchoscopy in patients with difficult airways. Forty patients were divided into 2 groups: group A received endotracheal administration of 25 μg of sufentanil and 2 mL of 1% tetracaine mixture; group B received endotracheal administration of 2 mL 1% tetracaine and routine local anesthetic sprays followed by slow intravenous injection of 25 μg of sufentanil. The results showed that endotracheal intubation was safely completed in all patients and vital signs including blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse oxygen saturation were not significantly different between groups A and B. However, time required for local anesthesia to take effect, time required to complete intubation, cough reflex, patient tolerance during intubation, and hemodynamic indices were significantly better in group A than in group B. In conclusion, our results suggest that endotracheal administration of sufentanil combined with tetracaine is safe, effective, and feasible in the context of awake nasal intubation using fiberoptic bronchoscopy.

  3. A Civilian/Military Trauma Institute: National Trauma Coordinating Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Hg) upon arrival 5. Resuscitation Endotracheal intubation GCS score 8 upon initial assessment 6. Head injuries FFP or PCC Intracranial bleed AND INR...bleed on head CT AND endotracheal intubation 15. Fracture management I&D in operating room Open fracture femur OR tibia 16. Fracture management...and Fig. 1). Compliance in 90% or more eligible patients was achieved in only three T-POC: blood transfusion in hypotensive patients, endotracheal

  4. Thoracoabdominal Computed Tomography in Trauma Patients: A Cost-Consequences Analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, Raoul; Kool, Digna R.; Brink, Monique; Dekker, Helena M.; Deunk, Jaap; Edwards, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: CT is increasingly used during the initial evaluation of blunt trauma patients. In this era of increasing cost-awareness, the pros and cons of CT have to be assessed. Objectives: This study was performed to evaluate cost-consequences of different diagnostic algorithms that use thoracoabdominal CT in primary evaluation of adult patients with high-energy blunt trauma. Materials and Methods: We compared three different algorithms in which CT was applied as an immediate diagnostic tool (rush CT), a diagnostic tool after limited conventional work-up (routine CT), and a selective tool (selective CT). Probabilities of detecting and missing clinically relevant injuries were retrospectively derived. We collected data on radiation exposure and performed a micro-cost analysis on a reference case-based approach. Results: Both rush and routine CT detected all thoracoabdominal injuries in 99.1% of the patients during primary evaluation (n = 1040). Selective CT missed one or more diagnoses in 11% of the patients in which a change of treatment was necessary in 4.8%. Rush CT algorithm costed € 2676 (US$ 3660) per patient with a mean radiation dose of 26.40 mSv per patient. Routine CT costed € 2815 (US$ 3850) and resulted in the same radiation exposure. Selective CT resulted in less radiation dose (23.23 mSv) and costed € 2771 (US$ 3790). Conclusions: Rush CT seems to result in the least costs and is comparable in terms of radiation dose exposure and diagnostic certainty with routine CT after a limited conventional work-up. However, selective CT results in less radiation dose exposure but a slightly higher cost and less certainty. PMID:25337521

  5. Accuracy of continuous noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring for the prediction of blood transfusions in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Galvagno, Samuel M; Hu, Peter; Yang, Shiming; Gao, Cheng; Hanna, David; Shackelford, Stacy; Mackenzie, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Early detection of hemorrhagic shock is required to facilitate prompt coordination of blood component therapy delivery to the bedside and to expedite performance of lifesaving interventions. Standard physical findings and vital signs are difficult to measure during the acute resuscitation stage, and these measures are often inaccurate until patients deteriorate to a state of decompensated shock. The aim of this study is to examine a severely injured trauma patient population to determine whether a noninvasive SpHb monitor can predict the need for urgent blood transfusion (universal donor or additional urgent blood transfusion) during the first 12 h of trauma patient resuscitation. We hypothesize that trends in continuous SpHb, combined with easily derived patient-specific factors, can identify the immediate need for transfusion in trauma patients. Subjects were enrolled if directly admitted to the trauma center, >17 years of age, and with a shock index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure) >0.62. Upon admission, a Masimo Radical-7 co-oximeter sensor (Masimo Corporation, Irvine, CA) was applied, providing measurement of continuous non-invasive hemoglobin (SpHb) levels. Blood was drawn and hemoglobin concentration analyzed and conventional pulse oximetry photopletysmograph signals were continuously recorded. Demographic information and both prehospital and admission vital signs were collected. The primary outcome was transfusion of at least one unit of packed red blood cells within 24 h of admission. Eight regression models (C1-C8) were evaluated for the prediction of blood use by comparing area under receiver operating curve (AUROC) at different time intervals after admission. 711 subjects had continuous vital signs waveforms available, to include heart rate (HR), SpHb and SpO2 trends. When SpHb was monitored for 15 min, SpHb did not increase AUROC for prediction of transfusion. The highest ROC was recorded for model C8 (age, sex, prehospital shock index, admission

  6. Swallowing dysfunction following endotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Min-Hsuan; Ku, Shih-Chi; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Hsiao, Tzu-Yu; Lee, Jang-Jaer; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Huang, Guan-Hua; Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate postextubation swallowing dysfunction (PSD) 21 days after endotracheal extubation and to examine whether PSD is time-limited and whether age matters. For this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 151 adult critical care patients (≥20 years) who were intubated for at least 48 hours and had no pre-existing neuromuscular disease or swallowing dysfunction. Participants were assessed for time (days) to pass bedside swallow evaluations (swallow 50 mL of water without difficulty) and to resume total oral intake. Outcomes were compared between younger (20–64 years) and older participants (≥65 years). PSD, defined as inability to swallow 50 mL of water within 48 hours after extubation, affected 92 participants (61.7% of our sample). At 21 days postextubation, 17 participants (15.5%) still failed to resume total oral intake and were feeding-tube dependent. We found that older participants had higher PSD rates at 7, 14, and 21 days postextubation, and took significantly longer to pass the bedside swallow evaluations (5.0 vs 3.0 days; P = 0.006) and to resume total oral intake (5.0 vs 3.0 days; P = 0.003) than their younger counterparts. Older participants also had significantly higher rates of subsequent feeding-tube dependence than younger patients (24.1 vs 5.8%; P = 0.008). Excluding patients with pre-existing neuromuscular dysfunction, PSD is common and prolonged. Age matters in the time needed to recover. Swallowing and oral intake should be monitored and interventions made, if needed, in the first 7 to 14 days postextubation, particularly for older patients. PMID:27310972

  7. The Prehospital assessment of severe trauma patients` performed by the specialist ambulance nurse in Sweden – a phenomenographic study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A common feature of prehospital emergency care is the short and fragmentary patient encounters with increased demands for efficient and rapid treatment. Crucial decisions are often made and the premise is the specialist ambulance nurse’s ability to capture the situation instantaneously. The assessment is therefore a pre-requisite for decisions about appropriate actions. However, the low exposure to severe trauma cases in Sweden leads to vulnerability for the specialist ambulance nurse, which makes the assessment more difficult. Our objective was to describe specialist ambulance nurses’ perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma. Methods This study had a phenomenographic approach and was performed in 2011 as an interview study. 15 specialist ambulance nurses with a minimum of 2.5 years of experience from praxis were included. The analysis of data was performed using phenomenography according to Marton. Results The perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma were divided into: To be prepared for emergency situations, Confidence in one’s own leadership and Developing professional knowledge. Conclusions This study reveals that the specialist ambulance nurse, on the scene of accident, finds the task of assessment of severe trauma patients difficult and complicated. In some cases, even exceeding what they feel competent to accomplish. The specialist ambulance nurses feel that no trauma scenarios are alike and that more practical skills, more training, exercise and feedback are needed. PMID:22985478

  8. Laryngeal Fracture after Blunt Cervical Trauma in Motorcycle Accident and Its Management

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro Sousa, Pedro; Abreu Pereira, Diogo; Azevedo, Paula; Duarte, Delfim

    2017-01-01

    Laryngeal fracture is a rare traumatic injury, potentially fatal, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 30,000 patients admitted to severe trauma centers. Because of the rarity of this injury, physician may be not aware of its existence, leading to a late diagnosis of this entity. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman admitted to the emergency room after a motorcycle accident with cervical trauma. The patient presented with dysphonia, hemoptysis, cervical subcutaneous emphysema, and increasing respiratory distress that led to the intubation of the patient. CT-scan demonstrated displaced fracture of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage. The patient was submitted to tracheostomy and the fracture was surgically repaired. Tracheostomy was removed in third postoperative month. The patient presented a good recovery, reporting only hoarseness but without swallowing or breathing problems at 6-month follow-up. PMID:28261512

  9. Airtraq® versus Macintosh laryngoscope: A comparative study in tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Geeta; Shahi, K. S.; Asad, Mohammad; Bhakuni, Rajani

    2013-01-01

    Background: The curved laryngoscope blade described by Macintosh in 1943 remains the most widely used device to facilitate tracheal intubation. The Airtraq® (Prodol Meditec S.A, Vizcaya, Spain) is a new, single use, indirect laryngoscope introduced into clinical practice in 2005. It has wan exaggerated blade curvature with internal arrangement of optical lenses and a mechanism to prevent fogging of the distal lens. A high quality view of the glottis is provided without the need to align the oral, pharyngeal and tracheal axis. We evaluated Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes for success rate of tracheal intubation, overall duration of successful intubation, optimization maneuvers, POGO (percentage of glottic opening) score, and ease of intubation. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomly allocated by computer-generated random table to one of the two groups, comprising 40 patients each, group I (Airtraq) and group II (Macintosh). After induction of general anesthesia, tracheal intubation was attempted with the Airtraq or the Macintosh laryngoscope as per group. Primary end points were overall success rate of tracheal intubation, overall duration of successful tracheal intubation, optimization maneuvers, POGO score and ease of intubation between the two groups. Results: We observed that Airtraq was better than the Macintosh laryngoscope as duration of successful intubation was shorter in Airtraq 18.15 seconds (±2.74) and in the Macintosh laryngoscope it was 32.72 seconds (±8.31) P < 0.001. POGO was also better in the Airtraq group 100% grade 1 versus 67.5% in the Macintosh group, P < 0.001. Ease of intubation was also better in the Airtraq group. It was easy in 97.5% versus 42.5% in the Macintosh group, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Both Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes are equally effective in tracheal intubation in normal airways. Duration of successful tracheal intubation was shorter in the Airtraq group which was statistically significant. PMID:25885839

  10. A Derivation and Validation Study of an Early Blood Transfusion Needs Score for Severe Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Umejiego, Johnbosco; Robinson, Richard D.; Schrader, Chet D.; Leuck, JoAnna; Barra, Michael; Buca, Stefan; Shedd, Andrew; Bui, Andrew; Zenarosa, Nestor R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no existing adequate blood transfusion needs determination tool that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel can use for prehospital blood transfusion initiation. In this study, a simple and pragmatic prehospital blood transfusion needs scoring system was derived and validated. Methods Local trauma registry data were reviewed retrospectively from 2004 through 2013. Patients were randomly assigned to derivation and validation cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the independent approachable risks associated with early blood transfusion needs in the derivation cohort in which a scoring system was derived. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the derivation and validation data. Results A total of 24,303 patients were included with 12,151 patients in the derivation and 12,152 patients in the validation cohorts. Age, penetrating injury, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) were risks predictive of early blood transfusion needs. An early blood transfusion needs score was derived. A score > 5 indicated risk of early blood transfusion need with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 80%. A sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 80% were also found in the validation study and their AUC showed no statistically significant difference (AUC of the derivation = 0.87 versus AUC of the validation = 0.86, P > 0.05). Conclusions An early blood transfusion scoring system was derived and internally validated to predict severe trauma patients requiring blood transfusion during prehospital or initial emergency department resuscitation. PMID:27429680

  11. Psychiatric Features in Neurotic Excoriation Patients: The Role of Childhood Trauma

    PubMed Central

    YALÇIN, Murat; TELLİOĞLU, Evrim; YILDIRIM, Deniz Uluhan; SAVRUN, B. Mert; ÖZMEN, Mine; AYDEMİR, Ertuğrul H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neurotic excoriation is a psychodermatological disease of primary psychological/psychiatric genesis, responsible for self-induced dermatological disorders. Childhood traumatic events are closely related with self-injurious behaviors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the psychiatric features of neurotic excoriation and to investigate the effect of childhood traumatic events on the disease. Methods Thirty-eight neurotic excoriation patients who did not receive any psychiatric treatment within the past year and 40 healthy individuals having similar sociodemographic features were included in the study. For clinical evaluation, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form were applied to all the individuals. Results In this study, we observed that 78.9% of neurotic excoriation patients were diagnosed with at least one Axis I psychiatric disorder, the most frequent diagnoses of which were major depressive disorders and anxiety disorders. The anxiety and depression levels were significantly higher in the patient group than in the healthy individuals. Regarding the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, emotional neglect, emotional abuse, and physical abuse subscales and weighted average total scores were found to be significantly higher in the patient group (p<.05). Conclusion Our study has shown a close relationship between neurotic excoriation and childhood traumatic events as well as the accompanying psychiatric problems. We suppose that early interventions by both dermatologists and psychiatrists and especially a detailed investigation of childhood traumatic events by establishing a therapeutic collaboration are highly important and that using psychotherapeutic interventions can result in better treatment outcomes in many patients. PMID:28360736

  12. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA): a population based gap analysis of trauma patients in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Edward Benjamin Graham; Morrison, Jonathan James; Madureira, Ricardo Mondoni; Lendrum, Robbie; Fragoso-Iñiguez, Marisol; Edwards, Antoinette; Lecky, Fiona; Bouamra, Omar; Lawrence, Thomas; Jansen, Jan Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-compressible torso haemorrhage (NCTH) carries a high mortality in trauma as many patients exsanguinate prior to definitive haemorrhage control. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) is an adjunct that has the potential to bridge patients to definitive haemostasis. However, the proportion of trauma patients in whom REBOA may be utilised is unknown. Methods We conducted a population based analysis of 2012–2013 Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN) data. We identified the number of patients in whom REBOA may have been utilised, defined by an Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3 to abdominal solid organs, abdominal or pelvic vasculature, pelvic fracture with ring disruption or proximal traumatic lower limb amputation, together with a systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg. Patients with non-compressible haemorrhage in the mediastinum, axilla, face or neck were excluded. Results During 2012–2013, 72 677 adult trauma patients admitted to hospitals in England and Wales were identified. 397 patients had an indication(s) and no contraindications for REBOA with evidence of haemorrhagic shock: 69% men, median age 43 years and median Injury Severity Score 32. Overall mortality was 32%. Major trauma centres (MTCs) received the highest concentration of potential REBOA patients, and would be anticipated to receive a patient in whom REBOA may be utilised every 95 days, increasing to every 46 days in the 10 MTCs with the highest attendance of this injury type. Conclusions This TARN database analysis has identified a small group of severely injured, resource intensive patients with a highly lethal injury that is theoretically amenable to REBOA. The highest density of these patients is seen at MTCs, and as such a planned evaluation of REBOA should be further considered in these hospitals. PMID:26598631

  13. The Relation Between Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome and Trauma Severity in Patients With Distal Tibia Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Bahador, Reza; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Arbab, Sara; Derakhshan, Pooya; Gholizadeh, Amirmohammad; Abedi, Sadegh

    2016-01-01

    Background Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) syndrome is a multifactorial disorder with clinical features of neurogenic inflammation that causes hypersensitivity to pain or severe allodynia as well as blood flow problems, swelling, skin discoloration and maladaptive neuroplasticity due to vasomotor disorders. Patients with major trauma are prone to homeostasis leading to inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ distress syndrome. Several studies have investigated the etiology of this condition, but the cause remains unknown. The role of associated factors such as the limb immobilization technique and genetics has been reported in the development of this complication, but, so far, there is no information regarding the effect of trauma severity on the risk of RSD occurrence. Objectives Given the importance of diagnosing and treating this condition, we aimed to study the effect of trauma severity on the prevalence of RSD. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, we examined patients with distal tibial fracture who visited Rasht Poursina hospital from 2010 to 2013. Exclusion criteria included associated fractures, underlying musculoskeletal diseases and mental and cognitive problems. To assess the severity of the initial injury in patients, the Hannover Fracture Scale 98 (HFS98) scoring checklist was used. The diagnosis of RSD was made on the basis of the IASP criterion. Demographic data, HFS98 scores, and information regarding RSD prevalence were analyzed using SPSS version 20. The Mann Whitney U nonparametric test was used for variables that were not normally distributed; the chi-square test was used to compare the qualitative variables. Results Among the 488 patients, 292 (59.83%) were male. The mean age of the study population was 44 ± 9.82 years. During the 6-month follow-up, RSD occurred in 45 patients, of whom 28 (62.22%) were female and 17 (37.77%) were male; there was thus a significant difference in the prevalence of RSD in terms of

  14. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  15. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia in a patient taking anticoagulant drugs who has sustained facial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kamiński, Bartłomiej; Olek-Hrab, Karolina; Sokalski, Jerzy; Witmanowski, Henryk

    2013-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 41-year-old patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), who in the past had an aortic valve replacement surgery, currently takes anticoagulant drugs and has sustained an extensive trauma to the nose as a result of a dog bite. The HHT is diagnosed basing on the presence of at least three out of four symptoms or signs: spontaneous epistaxis, vascular lesions in the internal organs, skin telangiectasias and a family history of the disease. The presented patient showed hepatic angioma, history of recurrent bleeding from the tongue and spontaneous epistaxis as well as numerous skin telangiectasias. In his case, HHT coincided with chronic treatment with coagulants implemented after an implantation of the artificial aortic replacement valve, what substantially modified the clinical picture and course of treatment. PMID:24278075

  16. Planning Fireworks Trajectories for Steerable Medical Needles to Reduce Patient Trauma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jijie; Duindam, Vincent; Alterovitz, Ron; Pouliot, Jean; Cunha, J Adam M; Hsu, I-Chow; Goldberg, Ken

    Accurate insertion of needles to targets in 3D anatomy is required for numerous medical procedures. To reduce patient trauma, a "fireworks" needle insertion approach can be used in which multiple needles are inserted from a single small region on the patient's skin to multiple targets in the tissue. In this paper, we explore motion planning for "fireworks" needle insertion in 3D environments by developing an algorithm based on Rapidly-exploring Random Trees (RRTs). Given a set of targets, we propose an algorithm to quickly explore the configuration space by building a forest of RRTs and to find feasible plans for multiple steerable needles from a single entry region. We present two path selection algorithms with different optimality considerations to optimize the final plan among all feasible outputs. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm with a simulation based on a prostate cancer treatment environment.

  17. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery segmentectomy by non-intubated or intubated anesthesia: a comparative analysis of short-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhihua; Yin, Weiqiang; Pan, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Xin; Shao, Wenlong; Chen, Hanzhang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to reveal the short-term outcomes of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) segmentectomy without tracheal intubation compared with intubated general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation (OLV). Methods We performed a retrospective review of our institutional database of consecutive 140 patients undergoing VATS anatomical segmentectomy from July 2011 to June 2015. Among them, 48 patients were treated without tracheal intubation using a combination of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA), intrathoracic vagal blockade, and sedation (non-intubated group). The other 92 patients were treated with intubated general anesthesia (intubated group). Safety and feasibility was evaluated by comparing the perioperative profiles and short-term outcomes of these two groups. Results Two groups had comparable surgical durations, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative chest tube drainage volume, and numbers of dissected lymph nodes (P>0.05). Patients who underwent non-intubated segmentectomy had higher peak end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) during operation (44.81 vs. 33.15 mmHg, P<0.001), less white blood cell changes before and after surgery (△WBC) (6.08×109 vs. 7.75×109, P=0.004), earlier resumption of oral intake (6.76 vs. 17.58 hours, P<0.001), shorter duration of postoperative chest tube drainage (2.25 vs. 3.16 days, P=0.047), less cost of anesthesia (¥5,757.19 vs. ¥7,401.85, P<0.001), and a trend toward shorter postoperative hospital stay (6.04 vs. 7.83 days, P=0.057). One patient (2.1%) in the non-intubated group required conversion to intubated OLV since a significant mediastinal movement. In the intubated group, there was one patient (1.1%) required conversion to thoracotomy due to uncontrolled bleeding. The incidence difference of postoperative complications between groups was not significant (P=0.248). There was no in-hospital death in either group. Conclusions Compared with intubated general anesthesia, non-intubated

  18. [Accidents a matter of chance? The significance of lunar phases and biorhythms in trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Nijsten, M W; Willemsen, S E

    1991-12-21

    The belief that supernatural forces influence man's fate appears to be increasing. Many people are convinced that unknown forces can cause injuries. From a multitude of proposed possibilities, we selected two factors that are claimed to affect the incidence of accidents. The first theory holds that more accidents occur at the time of full moon. The second theory concerns the three so-called biorhythms with their supposedly critical days (physical, emotional, intellectual). The effect of the lunar phase and the three biorhythms on accidents was determined from the dates of accident and birth of trauma patients admitted to the University Hospital in Groningen. We analysed data on all 29085 patients who were seen at the outpatient department in the years 1981-1983 and on 930 severely injury patients admitted in the years 1985-1989. At full moon even slightly fewer patients than expected (24 percent vs 25 percent) were seen at the emergency department. The number of severely injured patients was the same during the four moon phases. The 'critical' biorhythm days were not associated with increased number of accidents, neither for the patients seen at the emergency department, nor for the severely injured patients.

  19. Comparison of the Laryngeal View during Tracheal Intubation Using Airtraq and Macintosh Laryngoscopes by Unskillful Anesthesiology Residents: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Carlos; Aguilar, Gerardo; Belda, F. Javier

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective. The Airtraq laryngoscope (Prodol Meditec, Vizcaya, Spain) is a novel tracheal intubation device. Studies, performed until now, have compared the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, concluding that it reduces the intubation times and increase the success rate at first intubation attempt, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. The aim of the study was to evaluate if, in unskillful anesthesiology residents during the laryngoscopy, the Airtraq compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope improves the laryngeal view, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. Methods. A prospective, randomized, crossed-over trial was carried out on 60 patients. Each one of the patients were intubated using both devices by unskillful (less than two hundred intubations with the Macintosh laryngoscope and 10 intubations using the Airtraq) anesthesiology residents. The Cormack-Lehane score, the success rate at first intubation attempt, and the laryngoscopy and intubation times were compared. Results. The Airtraq significantly decreased the Cormack-Lehane score (P = 0.04). On the other hand, there were no differences in times of laryngoscopy (P = 0.645; IC 95% 3.1, +4.8) and intubation (P = 0.62; C95%  −6.1, +10.0) between the two devices. No relevant complications were found during the maneuvers of intubation using both devices. Conclusions. The Airtraq is a useful laryngoscope in unskillful anesthesiology residents improving the laryngeal view and, therefore, facilitating the tracheal intubation. PMID:22162683

  20. 78 FR 6820 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Ryder Trauma Center

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Relinquishment From Ryder Trauma Center AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION... accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from Ryder Trauma Center of its status as a PSO, and... PSOs. AHRQ has accepted a notification from Ryder Trauma Center, PSO number P0019, which is a...

  1. Differences in trauma history and psychopathology between PTSD patients with and without co-occurring dissociative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wabnitz, Pascal; Gast, Ursula; Catani, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Background The interplay between different types of potentially traumatizing events, posttraumatic symptoms, and the pathogenesis of PTSD or major dissociative disorders (DD) has been extensively studied during the last decade. However, the phenomenology and nosological classification of posttraumatic disorders is currently under debate. The current study was conducted to investigate differences between PTSD patients with and without co-occurring major DD with regard to general psychopathology, trauma history, and trauma-specific symptoms. Methods Twenty-four inpatients were administered the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV (CAPS) and the Mini-Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (MINI-SKID-D) to assess DD and PTSD. Additionally, participants completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology and health status. Results Symptom profiles and axis I comorbidity were similar in all patients. Traumatic experiences did not differ between the two groups, with both reporting high levels of childhood trauma. Only trauma-specific avoidance behavior and dissociative symptoms differed between groups. Conclusion Results support the view that PTSD and DD are affiliated disorders that could be classified within the same diagnostic category. Our results accord with a typological model of dissociation in which profound forms of dissociation are specific to DD and are accompanied with higher levels of trauma-specific avoidance in DD patients. PMID:24298325

  2. Chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Budassi, S A

    1978-09-01

    For any patient with obvious or suspected chest trauma, one must first assure an adequate airway and adequate ventilation. One should never hesitate to administer oxygen to a victim with a chest injury. The nurse should be concerned with adequate circulation--this may mean the administration of intravenous fluids, specifically volume expanders, via large-bore cannulae. Any obvious open chest wound should be sealed, and any fractures should be splinted. These patients should be rapidly transported to the nearest Emergency Department capable of handling this type of injury. The majority of patients who arrive in the Emergency Department following blunt or penetrating trauma should be considered to be in critical condition until proven otherwise. On presentation, it is essential to recognize those signs, symptoms, and laboratory values that identify the patient's condition as life-threatening. Simple recognition of these signs and symptoms and early appropriate intervention may alter an otherwise fatal outcome.

  3. Short-Term Effect of Gabapentin on Subjective Tinnitus in Acoustic Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Goljanian Tabrizi, Ali; Safavi Naini, Abbas; Baradaran, Nima

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although several treatment approaches have been proposed for tinnitus, there are currently no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved agents available to treat this condition. In this study, we evaluated the effect of gabapentin on the sensation of subjective tinnitus in patients with acoustic trauma referring to the ear, nose and throat (ENT) clinic of Taleghani Hospital during 2014. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind, randomized clinical trial, 103 patients with tinnitus due to acoustic trauma who were referred to the ENT clinic of Taleghani Hospital during 2014 were randomized to the gabapentin (300 mg bid, n=55) or control (n=48) groups. The two groups were then compared before and after 6 weeks of treatment using a visual analog scale (VAS). At least a 30% reduction in VAS was considered a response to treatment. Results: Differences between the two groups regarding sex, age, duration of disease, and audiometry results was not significant (P>0.05). After 6 weeks’ treatment, the VAS significantly decreased in both groups (P<0.001), but the reduction was significantly greater in the gabapentin group compared with control (P<0.001). Forty-nine patients (89%) in the gabapentin group and 28 control patients (58.3%) responded to treatment (≥30% reduction in VAS), with the difference between the two groups being statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: We conclude that gabapentin 300 mg bid for 6 weeks is an effective treatment for acoustic tinnitus. In addition, the placebo effect in relieving tinnitus is remarkable. PMID:28393057

  4. Does vitamin C prevent the occurrence of complex regional pain syndrome in patients with extremity trauma requiring surgery?

    PubMed

    Cabrolier, Jorge; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-07-29

    The complex regional pain syndrome is a neuroinflammatory pathology that affects the central and peripheral nervous system, characterized by disproportional pain in relation to the trauma experimented by the patient. It has been proposed that vitamin C could prevent the development of this syndrome in patients with limb trauma and surgery. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified two systematic reviews that indentified four primary studies, including one randomized controlled trial. We generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is uncertain whether vitamin C prevents complex regional pain syndrome because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of bedside tests for predicting difficult intubation in Indian population: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Dhanger, Sangeeta; Gupta, Suman Lata; Vinayagam, Stalin; Bidkar, Prasanna Udupi; Elakkumanan, Lenin Babu; Badhe, Ashok Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unanticipated difficult intubation can be challenging to anesthesiologists, and various bedside tests have been tried to predict difficult intubation. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of difficult intubation in the Indian population and also to determine the diagnostic accuracy of bedside tests in predicting difficult intubation. Settings and Design: In this study, 200 patients belonging to age group 18–60 years of American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II, scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation were enrolled. Patients with upper airway pathology, neck mass, and cervical spine injury were excluded from the study. Materials and Methods: An attending anesthesiologist conducted preoperative assessment and recorded parameters such as body mass index, modified Mallampati grading, inter-incisor distance, neck circumference, and thyromental distance (NC/TMD). After standard anesthetic induction, laryngoscopy was performed, and intubation difficulty assessed using intubation difficulty scale on the basis of seven variables. Statistical Analysis: The Chi-square test or student t-test was performed when appropriate. The binary multivariate logistic regression (forward-Wald) model was used to determine the independent risk factors. Results: Among the 200 patients, 26 patients had difficult intubation with an incidence of 13%. Among different variables, the Mallampati score and NC/TMD were independently associated with difficult intubation. Receiver operating characteristic curve showed a cut-off point of 3 or 4 for Mallampati score and 5.62 for NC/TMD to predict difficult intubation. Conclusion: The diagnostic accuracy of NC/TM ratio and Mallampatti score were better compared to other bedside tests to predict difficult intubation in Indian population. PMID:26957691

  6. Is radiography justified for the evaluation of patients presenting with cervical spine trauma?

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Chatzakis, Georgios; Damilakis, John

    2009-10-15

    Conventional radiography has been for decades the standard method of evaluation for cervical spine trauma patients. However, currently available helical multidetector CT scanners allow multiplanar reconstruction of images, leading to increased diagnostic accuracy. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative benefit/risk ratio between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography and between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography, followed by CT as an adjunct for positive findings. A decision analysis model for the determination of the optimum imaging technique was developed. The sensitivity and specificity of CT and radiography were obtained by dedicated meta-analysis. Lifetime attributable risk of mortal cancer from CT and radiography was calculated using updated organ-specific risk coefficients and organ-absorbed doses. Patient organ doses from radiography were calculated using Monte Carlo techniques, simulated exposures performed on an anthropomorphic phantom, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. A prospective patient study was performed regarding helical CT scans of the cervical spine. Patient doses were calculated based on the dose-length-product values and Monte Carlo-based CT dosimetry software program. Three groups of patient risk for cervical spine fracture were incorporated in the decision model on the basis of hypothetical trauma mechanism and clinical findings. Radiation effects were assessed separately for males and females for four age groups (20, 40, 60, and 80 yr old). Effective dose from radiography amounts to 0.050 mSv and from a typical CT scan to 3.8 mSv. The use of CT in a hypothetical cohort of 10{sup 6} patients prevents approximately 130 incidents of paralysis in the low risk group (a priori fracture probability of 0.5%), 500 in the moderate risk group (a priori fracture probability of 2%), and 5100 in the high risk group (a priori fracture probability of 20%). The expense of this CT-based prevention is 15-32 additional

  7. Diurnal salivary cortisol measurement in the neurosurgical-surgical intensive care unit in critically ill acute trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Bartanusz, Viktor; Corneille, Michael G; Sordo, Salvador; Gildea, Marianne; Michalek, Joel E; Nair, Prakash V; Stewart, Ronald M; Jezova, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Acute trauma patients represent a specific subgroup of the critically ill population due to sudden and dramatic changes in homeostasis and consequently extreme demands on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Salivary cortisol is an accepted surrogate for serum free cortisol in the assessment of HPA axis function. The purpose of this study was (1) to establish the feasibility of salivary cortisol measurement in acute trauma patients in the neurosurgical-surgical intensive care unit (NSICU), and (2) to determine the diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol in the acute phase after injury. Saliva from 50 acute trauma patients was prospectively collected twice a day at 6AM and 4PM during the first week after injury in the NSICU. Mean PM cortisol concentrations were significantly higher in subjects versus controls (p<0.001). Subjects failed to develop the expected PM versus AM decrease in cortisol concentration seen in controls (p=0.005). Salivary cortisol did not vary significantly with baseline Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Injury Severity Score, sex, injury type, ethnicity, or age. When comparing mean AM and PM salivary cortisol by GCS severity category (GCS ⩽8 and GCS >8) the AM salivary cortisol was significantly higher in patients with GCS ⩽8 (p=0.002). The results show a loss of diurnal cortisol variation in acute trauma patient in the NSICU during the first week of hospitalization. Patients with severe brain injury had higher morning cortisol levels than those with mild/moderate brain injury.

  8. The Bullard laryngoscope. Reports of two cases of difficult intubation.

    PubMed

    Midttun, M; Laerkholm Hansen, C; Jensen, K; Pedersen, T

    1994-04-01

    The Bullard laryngoscope is a new combination of a fibreoptic light source and an anatomically shaped rigid blade, to aid visualization of the larynx. We present two patients with expected severe difficult endotracheal intubation and describe their anaesthetic management. Our experience confirms previous observations which showed that the Bullard laryngoscope provides an excellent view of the vocal cords in patients with severe difficult airways.

  9. Association between Serum Malondialdehyde Levels and Mortality in Patients with Severe Brain Trauma Injury

    PubMed Central

    Martín, María M.; Abreu-González, Pedro; Ramos, Luis; Argueso, Mónica; Cáceres, Juan J.; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Lorenzo, José M.; Molina, Ismael; Jiménez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is a hyperoxidative state in patients with trauma brain injury (TBI). Malondialdehyde (MDA) is an end-product formed during oxidative stress, concretely lipid peroxidation. In small studies (highest sample size 50 patients), higher levels of MDA have been found in nonsurviving than surviving patients with TBI. An association between serum MDA levels and mortality in patients with TBI, however, has not been reported. Thus, the objective of this prospective, observational, multicenter study, performed in six Spanish intensive care units, was to determine whether MDA serum levels are associated with early mortality in a large series of patients with severe TBI. Serum MDA levels were measured in 100 patients with severe TBI on day 1 and in 75 healthy controls. The end-point of the study was 30-day mortality. We found higher serum MDA levels in patients with severe TBI than in healthy controls (p<0.001). Nonsurviving patients with TBI (n=27) showed higher serum MDA levels (p<0.001) than survivors (n=73). Logistic regression analysis showed that serum MDA levels were associated with 30-day mortality (odds ratio [OR]=4.662; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.466–14.824; p=0.01), controlling for Glasgow Coma Score, age, and computed tomography findings. Survival analysis showed that patients with serum MDA levels higher than 1.96 nmol/mL presented increased 30-day mortality than patients with lower levels (hazard ratio=3.5; 95% CI=1.43–8.47; p<0.001). Thus, the most relevant new finding of our study, the largest to date on serum MDA levels in patients with severe TBI, was an association between serum MDA levels and early mortality. PMID:25054973

  10. Clot formation is associated with fibrinogen and platelet forces in a cohort of severely-injured Emergency Department trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    White, Nathan J.; Newton, Jason C.; Martin, Erika J.; Mohammed, Bassem M.; Contaifer, Daniel; Bostic, Jessica L.; Brophy, Gretchen M.; Spiess, Bruce D.; Pusateri, Anthony E.; Ward, Kevin R.; Brophy, Donald F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Anticoagulation, fibrinogen consumption, fibrinolytic activation, and platelet dysfunction all interact to produce different clot formation responses after trauma. However, the relative contributions of these coagulation components to overall clot formation remains poorly defined. We examined for sources of heterogeneity in clot formation responses after trauma. Methods Blood was sampled in the Emergency Department from patients meeting trauma team activation criteria at an urban trauma center. Plasma prothrombin time (PT) ≥ 18 sec was used to define traumatic coagulopathy. Mean kaolin-activated thrombelastography (TEG) parameters were calculated and tested for heterogeneity using Analysis of Means (ANOM). Discriminant analysis and forward stepwise variable selection with linear regression were used to determine if PT, fibrinogen, platelet contractile force (PCF), and D-Dimer concentration, representing key mechanistic components of coagulopathy, each contribute to heterogeneous TEG responses after trauma. Results Of 95 subjects, 16% met criteria for coagulopathy. Coagulopathic subjects were more severely injured with greater shock, and received more blood products in the first 8 hours compared to non-coagulopathic subjects. Mean (SD) TEG maximal amplitude (MA) was significantly decreased in the coagulopathic group=57.5 (4.7) mm, vs. 62.7 (4.7), T test p<0.001. The MA also exceeded the ANOM predicted upper decision limit for the non-coagulopathic group and the lower decision limit for the coagulopathic group at alpha=0.05, suggesting significant heterogeneity from the overall cohort mean. Fibrinogen and PCF best discriminated TEG MA using discriminant analysis. Fibrinogen, PCF, and D-Dimer were primary covariates for TEG MA using regression analysis. Conclusion Heterogeneity in TEG-based clot formation in Emergency Department trauma patients was linked to changes in MA. Individual parameters representing fibrin polymerization, platelet contractile

  11. The Tanzanian trauma patients' prehospital experience: a qualitative interview-based study

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Kristin; Lim, Andrew George; Kepha, Bernard; Nalitolela, Neema Evelyne; Reynolds, Teri A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to characterise the prehospital experience of Tanzanian trauma patients, and identify barriers and facilitators to implement community-based emergency medical systems (EMS). Settings Our study was conducted in the emergency department of an urban national referral hospital in Tanzania. Participants A convenience sample of 34 adult trauma patients, or surrogate family members, presenting or referred to an urban referral emergency department in Tanzania for treatment of injury, participated in the study. Interventions Participation in semistructured, iteratively developed interviews until saturation of responses was reached. Outcomes A grounded theory-based approach to qualitative analysis was used to identify recurrent themes. Results We characterised numerous deficiencies within the existing clinic-to-hospital referral network, including missed/delayed diagnoses, limited management capabilities at pre-referral facilities and interfacility transfer delays. Potential barriers to EMS implementation include patient financial limitations and lack of insurance, limited public infrastructure and resources, and the credibility of potential first aid responders. Potential facilitators of EMS include communities’ tendency to pool resources, individuals’ trust of other community members to be first aid responders, and faith in community leaders to organise EMS response. Participants expressed a strong desire to learn first aid. Conclusions The composite themes generated by the data suggest that there are myriad structural, financial, institutional and cultural barriers to the implementation of a formal prehospital system. However, our analysis also revealed potential facilitators to a first-responder system that takes advantage of close-knit local communities and the trust of recognised leaders in society. The results suggest favourable acceptability for community-based response by trained lay people. There is significant opportunity for care

  12. Clinical and translational aspects of hypothermia in major trauma patients: from pathophysiology to prevention, prognosis and potential preservation.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil

    2014-04-01

    The human body strives at maintaining homeostasis within fairly tight regulated mechanisms that control vital regulators such as core body temperature, mechanisms of metabolism and endocrine function. While a wide range of medical conditions can influence thermoregulation the most common source of temperature loss in trauma patients includes: exposure (environmental, as well as cavitary), the administration of i.v. fluids, and anaesthesia/loss of shivering mechanisms, and blood loss per se. Loss of temperature can be classified either according to the aetiology (i.e. accidental/spontaneous versus trauma/haemorrhage-induced temperature loss), or according to an unintended, accidental induction in contrast to a medically intended therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia occurs infrequently (prevalence<10% of all injured), but more often (30-50%) in the severely injured. Hypothermia usually come together with and may aggravate acidosis and coagulopathy (the "lethal triad of trauma"), which again may be associated with a high mortality. However, recent studies disagree in the independent predictive role of hypothermia and mortality. Prevention of hypothermia is imperative through all phases of trauma care and must be an interest among all team members. Hypothermia in the trauma setting has attracted focus in the past from a pathophysiological, preventive and prognostic perspective; yet recent focus has shifted towards the potential for using hypothermia for pre-emptive and cellular protective purposes. This paper gives a brief update on some of the clinically relevant aspects of hypothermia in the injured patient.

  13. Acute Muscle Trauma due to Overexercise in an Otherwise Healthy Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Henning; Wirth, Clemens; Ruf, Katharina; Hebestreit, Helge; Beer, Meinrad

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common inherited diseases and is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene. Although the pulmonary and gastrointestinal manifestations of the disease remain in the focus of treatment, recent studies have shown expression of the CFTR gene product in skeletal muscle cells and observed altered intramuscular Ca2+ release dynamics in CFTR-deficient animal models. Physical exercise is beneficial for maintaining fitness and well-being in CF patients and constitutes one aspect of modern multimodal treatment, which has considerably increased life span and reduced morbidity. We report on a case of acute muscle trauma resulting from excessive dumbbell exercise in a young adult with cystic fibrosis and describe clinical, laboratory and imaging characteristics of acute exercise-induced muscle injury. PMID:22606534

  14. Planning Fireworks Trajectories for Steerable Medical Needles to Reduce Patient Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jijie; Duindam, Vincent; Alterovitz, Ron; Pouliot, Jean; Cunha, J. Adam M.; Hsu, I-Chow; Goldberg, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Accurate insertion of needles to targets in 3D anatomy is required for numerous medical procedures. To reduce patient trauma, a “fireworks” needle insertion approach can be used in which multiple needles are inserted from a single small region on the patient’s skin to multiple targets in the tissue. In this paper, we explore motion planning for “fireworks” needle insertion in 3D environments by developing an algorithm based on Rapidly-exploring Random Trees (RRTs). Given a set of targets, we propose an algorithm to quickly explore the configuration space by building a forest of RRTs and to find feasible plans for multiple steerable needles from a single entry region. We present two path selection algorithms with different optimality considerations to optimize the final plan among all feasible outputs. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm with a simulation based on a prostate cancer treatment environment. PMID:25946259

  15. Damage control surgery in patient with delayed rupture of pseudoaneurysm after blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Yong; Ju, Jae Kyun

    2012-01-01

    Delayed rupture of post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the visceral arteries, especially the pancreaticoduodenal artery, is uncommon. Here, we describe a 55-year-old man hemorrhaging from a pseudoaneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). Computed tomography of the abdomen showed active bleeding in the IPDA and large amounts of hemoperitoneum and hemoretroperitoneum. Selective mesenteric angiography showed that the pseudoaneurysm arose from the IPDA, and treatment by angioembolization failed because the involved artery was too tortuous to fit with a catheter. Damage control surgery with surgical ligation and pad packing was successfully performed. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and was discharged 19 days after the operation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ruptured pseudoaneurysm of an IPDA after blunt abdominal trauma from Korea. PMID:22880189

  16. Damage control surgery in patient with delayed rupture of pseudoaneurysm after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Yong; Ju, Jae Kyun; Kim, Jung Chul

    2012-08-01

    Delayed rupture of post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the visceral arteries, especially the pancreaticoduodenal artery, is uncommon. Here, we describe a 55-year-old man hemorrhaging from a pseudoaneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). Computed tomography of the abdomen showed active bleeding in the IPDA and large amounts of hemoperitoneum and hemoretroperitoneum. Selective mesenteric angiography showed that the pseudoaneurysm arose from the IPDA, and treatment by angioembolization failed because the involved artery was too tortuous to fit with a catheter. Damage control surgery with surgical ligation and pad packing was successfully performed. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and was discharged 19 days after the operation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ruptured pseudoaneurysm of an IPDA after blunt abdominal trauma from Korea.

  17. Readability of Patient Education Materials on the American Association for Surgery of Trauma Website

    PubMed Central

    Eltorai, Adam E. M.; Ghanian, Soha; Adams, Charles A.; Born, Christopher T.; Daniels, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Because the quality of information on the Internet is of dubious worth, many patients seek out reliable expert sources. As per the American Medical Association (AMA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommendations, readability of patient education materials should not exceed a sixth-grade reading level. The average reading skill of U.S. adults is at the eighth-grade level. Objectives: This study evaluates whether a recognized source of expert content, the American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) website’s patient education materials, recommended readability guidelines for medical information. Materials and Methods: Using the well-validated Flesch-Kincaid formula to analyze grade level readability, we evaluated the readability of all 16 of the publicly-accessible entries within the patient education section of the AAST website. Results: Mean ± SD grade level readability was 10.9 ± 1.8 for all the articles. All but one of the articles had a readability score above the sixth-grade level. Readability of the articles exceeded the maximum recommended level by an average of 4.9 grade levels (95% confidence interval, 4.0-5.8; P < 0.0001). Readability of the articles exceeded the eighth-grade level by an average of 2.9 grade levels (95% confidence interval, 2.0-3.8; P < 0.0001). Only one of the articles had a readability score below the eighth-grade level. Conclusions: The AAST’s online patient education materials may be of limited utility to many patients, as the readability of the information exceeds the average reading skill level of adults in the U.S. Lack of patient comprehension represents a discrepancy that is not in accordance with the goals of the AAST’s objectives for its patient education efforts. PMID:25147778

  18. Risk Factors for Deep Venous Thrombosis Following Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery: An Analysis of 56,000 patients

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Paul S.; White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A.; Greenberg, Sarah E.; VanHouten, Jacob P.; Avilucea, Frank R.; Obremskey, William T.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are recognized as major causes of morbidity and mortality in orthopaedic trauma patients. Despite the high incidence of these complications following orthopaedic trauma, there is a paucity of literature investigating the clinical risk factors for DVT in this specific population. As our healthcare system increasingly emphasizes quality measures, it is critical for orthopaedic surgeons to understand the clinical factors that increase the risk of DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Objectives: Utilizing the ACS-NSQIP database, we sought to determine the incidence and identify independent risk factors for DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Patients and Methods: Using current procedural terminology (CPT) codes for orthopaedic trauma procedures, we identified a prospective cohort of patients from the 2006 to 2013 ACS-NSQIP database. Using Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests where appropriate, patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative factors were compared between patients who developed a DVT within 30 days of surgery and those who did not. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and identify independent risk factors for DVT. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: 56,299 orthopaedic trauma patients were included in the analysis, of which 473 (0.84%) developed a DVT within 30 days. In univariate analysis, twenty-five variables were significantly associated with the development of a DVT, including age (P < 0.0001), BMI (P = 0.037), diabetes (P = 0.01), ASA score (P < 0.0001) and anatomic region injured (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified several independent risk factors for development of a DVT including use of a ventilator (OR = 43.67, P = 0.039), ascites (OR = 41.61, P = 0.0038), steroid use (OR = 4.00, P < 0.001), and alcohol use (OR = 2.98, P = 0.0370). Compared to patients with upper extremity trauma, those with lower

  19. Poisonings Associated with Intubation: US National Poison Data System Exposures 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, G A; Giffin, S L; Horowitz, B Z; Laurie, A L; Fu, R; Hendrickson, R G

    2016-06-01

    Patients may be intubated after exposure to a variety of substances because of respiratory failure, CNS sedation, pulmonary pathology, or cardiovascular instability. However, there is little data describing the types of substances that are associated with endotracheal intubation or the rates of intubation after these exposures. Evaluation of this association may inform future research on intubation after exposures to specific substances and guide poison prevention education. Our objective was to determine which exposures were commonly associated with intubation using the data from National Poison Data System (NPDS). The NPDS tracks data from potential exposures to substances reported to all American Association of Poison Control Centers. We performed a retrospective analysis of NPDS data from January 1st, 2000 to December 31st, 2013 to identify human exposures to substances that were associated with endotracheal intubation. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. There were 93,474 single substance exposures and 228,507 multiple substance exposures that were associated with intubation. The most common exposures to substances that were associated with intubation were atypical antipsychotics (7.4 %) for single exposures and benzodiazepines (27.4 %) for multiple exposures. Within each age group, the most common known exposures to substances were for patients under 6 years, clonidine for single and multiple exposures; for patients aged 6-12 years, clonidine for single exposures and atypical antipsychotics for multiple exposures; for patients aged 13-19 years, atypical antipsychotics for single and multiple exposures; and for patients over 19 years, atypical antipsychotics for single exposures and benzodiazepines for multiple exposures. From 2000-2013, the exposures to substances most commonly associated with intubation varied by single versus multiple exposures and by age. This study helps clarify the exposures to substances that are associated with

  20. Alcohol-related hospitalisations of trauma patients in Southern Taiwan: a cross-sectional study based on a trauma registry system

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Liu, Hang-Tsung; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Cho, Tzu-Yu; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To provide an overview of the demographic characteristics of patients with positive blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and to investigate the performance of brain CT scans in these patients. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Taiwan. Participants 2192 patients who had undergone a test for blood alcohol of 13 233 patients registered in the Trauma Registry System between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2012. A BAC level of 50 mg/dL was defined as the cut-off value. Detailed information was retrieved from the patients with positive BAC (n=793) and was compared with information from those with a negative BAC (n=1399). Main outcome measures Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and Injury Severity Score (ISS) as well as the performance and findings of obtained brain CT scans. Results Patients with positive BAC had a higher rate of face injury, but a lower GCS score, a lower rate of head and neck injury, a lower ISS and New Injury Severity Score. Alcohol use was associated with a shorter length of hospital stay (8.6 vs 11.4 days, p=0.000) in patients with an ISS of <16. Of 496 patients with positive BAC who underwent brain CT, 164 (33.1%) showed positive findings on CT scan. In contrast, of 891 patients with negative BAC who underwent brain CT, 389 (43.7%) had positive findings on CT scan. The lower percentage of positive CT scan findings in patients with positive BAC was particularly evident in patients with an ISS <16 (18.0% vs 28.8%, p=0.001). Conclusions Patients who consumed alcohol tended to have a low GCS score and injuries that were less severe. However, given the significantly low percentage of positive findings, brain CT might be overused in these patients with less severe injuries. PMID:25361838

  1. Short-term outcomes of sport- and recreation-related concussion in patients admitted to a pediatric trauma service.

    PubMed

    Bramley, Harry; Mcfarland, Carol; Lewis, Mechelle M; Shaffer, Michele L; Cilley, Robert; Engbrecht, Brett; Santos, Mary; Rzucidlo, Susan; Shirk, Beverly; Simmons, Lynn; Dias, Mark S

    2014-07-01

    The outcomes of patients admitted to the hospital following a sport-related concussion are largely unknown. Medical records of patients admitted to the pediatric trauma service between 2008 and 2011 after sustaining a sport-related concussion were reviewed. In all, 59 participants were in the high-velocity activities group, and 21 in the field or court sport group. Abnormal CT scans were found in 14 patients in the high-velocity group and 2 in the field or court sport group. The majority of participants in the field or court sport group were football players, all of whom had normal CT scans. Headache was predictive of an abnormal CT scan. Among the patients, 56% clinically improved and were discharged the following day. Patients with field or court sport-related concussion admitted to a pediatric trauma service appear to be at low risk for clinically significant intracranial pathology and do well in the acute setting.

  2. Comparative trial of succinylcholine vs low dose atracurium-lidocaine combination for intubation in short outpatient procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Luyk, N. H.; Weaver, J. M.; Quinn, C.; Wilson, S.; Beck, F. M.

    1990-01-01

    Despite its many disadvantages, succinylcholine is the most commonly used drug for intubation of patients for short out-patient procedure. This double blind trial compared a low dose atracurium/lidocaine combination to succinylcholine for intubation in 40 ASA1 adult patients. Low dose atracurium/lidocaine provided clinical intubating conditions at two minutes and cardiovascular stability equivalent to succinylcholine with significantly less myalgia. Spontaneous respiration was slower after low dose atracurium/lidocaine relative to succinylcholine. Low dose atracurium/lidocaine may provide an acceptable alternative to succinylcholine for intubation in short outpatient procedures. PMID:2096747

  3. Comparison of GlideScope video laryngoscope with Macintosh laryngoscope in adult patients undergoing elective surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Parasa, Mrunalini; Yallapragada, Srivishnu Vardhan; Vemuri, Nagendra Nath; Shaik, Mastan Saheb

    2016-01-01

    Background: GlideScope (GS) is a video laryngoscope that allows a real-time view of the glottis and endotracheal intubation. It provides a better view of the larynx without the need for alignment of the airway axes. Aim: This prospective randomized comparative study is designed to compare the intubation time, hemodynamic response, and complications associated with intubation using a GS or Macintosh laryngoscope (ML) in adult subjects undergoing elective surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1–2 patients were included in this prospective randomized comparative study. Patients were randomized to be intubated using either a GS or an ML. The primary outcome measure was the intubation time. The secondary outcome measures were the hemodynamic response to intubation and the incidence of mucosal injury. Statistical Analysis: Mean and standard deviation were calculated for different parameters under the study. The observed results were analyzed using Student's t-test for quantitative data and Z-test of proportions. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Intubation time was longer in GS group (45.7033 ± 11.649 s) as compared to ML (27.773 ± 5.122 s) P< 0.0001 with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) −13.2794 to −22.5806. GS provided better Cormack and Lehane laryngoscopic view (P = 0.0016 for grade 1 view) with 95% CI −0.1389 to −0.5951. GS group exhibited more laryngoscopic response than ML group with more increase in blood pressure and heart rate, but the difference was not statistically significant. More cases of mucosal trauma were documented in GS group. Conclusion: Use of GS to facilitate intubation led to better glottic view but took a longer time to achieve endotracheal intubation. GS was associated with more hemodynamic response to intubation and mucosal injury in comparison with an ML. PMID:27212755

  4. Standardized mortality ratio analysis on a sample of severely injured patients from a large Canadian city without regionalized trauma care.

    PubMed

    Sampalis, J S; Lavoie, A; Williams, J I; Mulder, D S; Kalina, M

    1992-08-01

    Flora's Z statistic and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) as indicators of excess mortality were calculated for a sample of 355 patients with major trauma. A statistically significant overall excess mortality was observed in this sample (Z = 6.77, SMR = 1.81, p less than 0.05). Advanced life support provided by physicians at the scene (MD-ALS) was not associated with reduced excess mortality. A significant trend toward lower excess mortality was associated with a higher level of trauma care at the receiving hospital (p less than 0.05). Total prehospital time over 60 minutes was associated with a significant increase in excess mortality (p less than 0.001). These results support regionalization of trauma care and failed to show any benefit associated with MD-ALS.

  5. [Comparative efficiency of nootropic drugs in complex treatment of patients with remote consequences of closed craniocereberal trauma].

    PubMed

    Hliebova, O S; Tkachenko, O V

    2008-01-01

    Main data of the research were data obtained after a complex treatment of 120 persons with late consequences of closed craniocereberal trauma (CCRCT). The treatment included administration of one of nootropic agents (noophen, aminolon or entropil), magnesium sulfate, group B vitamins. All patients have passed a complex examination: specially developed questionnaire, anamnesis gathering, neurologic status, neuropsychological status with the use of multiple-aspect scales and questionnaires, examination of fundus of eye, rheoencephalography, echoencephalography, brain MRT. Results of a complex examination proved positive effect of the use of nootropic agents, in particular noophen, entropil and aminolon in complex treatment of late consequences of closed craniocereberal trauma. For optimisation of the use of nootropic agents in the treatment of late consequences of closed craniocereberal trauma it is recommended to consider features of influence of nootropic agents on certain clinical aspects of the disease.

  6. Current Opinion on Catheter-based Hemorrhage Control in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    ubiquitous, and robotics and damage-control surgery are commonplace. When combined with ever-advancing imaging technology, all these tools will...and the Catheter-Based Hemorrhage Control Study Group, Houston, Texas KEY WORDS: Hemorrhage control; bleeding; injury; trauma; catheter. Surgery has...continue to change the face of trauma surgery . Accordingly, the University of Texas Health Science at Houston, the Memorial Hermann Texas Trauma Institute

  7. [Tracheal rupture after orotracheal intubation in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Hayi-Slayman, D; Page, M; Ben Cheikh, A; Christin, F; Ber, C-E; Rimmelé, T

    2007-06-01

    We report a case of an iatrogenic tracheal rupture following an endotracheal intubation. The 78-year-old patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of an acute respiratory failure related to a severe nosocomial pneumonia occurring 21 days after an abdominal aorta surgery. His main antecedent was a cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Immediately after being intubated, a traumatic tracheobronchial rupture was suspected because of the sudden appearance of cervicothoracic subcutaneous emphysema. A thoracic computed tomography with multiplanar reformations confirmed the diagnosis and the evolution was unfortunately rapidly unfavourable. Risk factors, clinical and radiological aspects, and management of this rare but serious complication of endotracheal intubation will be discussed.

  8. Predictive Factors of Survival and 6-Month Favorable Outcome of Very Severe Head Trauma Patients; a Historical Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Vathanalaoha, Karin; Oearsakul, Thakul; Tunthanathip, Thara

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Very severe head trauma cases, defined as Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of less than 6, have a higher mortality rate and poorer outcome. The purpose of this study was to recognize factors associated with survival and 6-month favorable outcome of very severe head trauma patients presenting to emergency department. Methods: In this historical cohort study, the authors retrospectively reviewed medical records of head trauma patients who were admitted to the emergency department with post-resuscitation GCS scores of less than 6. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were used to test the association between various parameters with survival and 6-month outcome. Results: 103 cases with the mean age of 39 ± 16.5 years were studied (80% male). The overall survival rate was 41.7% and the rate of 6-month favorable outcome was 28.2%. In multivariate analysis, brisk pupil light reaction on admission and patent basal cistern on brain computed tomography (CT) scan were significant factors associated with both survival (OR 5.20, 95% CI 1.57-17.246, p = 0.007 and OR 3.65, 95% CI 1.22-10.91, p=0.02 respectively) and favorable outcome (OR 4.07, 95% CI 1.35-12.24, p=0.01 and OR 3.54, 95% CI 1.22-10.26, p 0.02), respectively. Conclusion: Based on the results of present study, the survival rate of patients with very severe head trauma (GCS < 6) was 41.7%. The strong predictors of survival and 6-month favorable outcome of these patients were brisk pupillary reactivity and patent cistern on brain CT scan. It seems that very severe head trauma patients still have a reasonable chance to survive and aggressive management should be continued. PMID:28286831

  9. Tracheal intubation with a camera embedded in the tube tip (Vivasight(™) ).

    PubMed

    Huitink, J M; Koopman, E M; Bouwman, R A; Craenen, A; Verwoert, M; Krage, R; Visser, I E; Erwteman, M; van Groeningen, D; Tijink, R; Schauer, A

    2013-01-01

    We studied tracheal intubation in manikins and patients with a camera embedded in the tip of the tracheal tube (Vivasight(™) ). Four people in two teams and two individuals attempted intubation of a manikin through an i-gel(™) 10 times each. The tracheas of 12 patients with a Mallampati grade of 1 were intubated with a Vivasight tracheal tube through a Berman airway, passed over a Frova(™) introducer. All 60 manikin intubations were successful, taking a mean (SD) time of 1.4 (0.5) s. The fastest intubation was performed in 0.5 s. All 12 participants' tracheas were successfully intubated in a median (IQR [range]) time of 90 (70-120 [50-210]) s. Seven participants complained of a sore throat, comparable with earlier findings for standard laryngoscopy and intubation: five mild; one moderate; and one severe. Tracheal intubation with the Vivasight through the i-gel or Berman airway is an alternative to existing techniques, against which it should be compared in randomised controlled trials in human participants. It has potential as a fast airway rescue technique.

  10. Distance Learning Can Be as Effective as Traditional Learning for Medical Students in the Initial Assessment of Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Farahmand, Shervin; Jalili, Ebrahim; Arbab, Mona; Sedaghat, Mojtaba; Shirazi, Mandana; Keshmiri, Fatemeh; Azizpour, Arsalan; Valadkhani, Somayeh; Bagheri-Hariri, Shahram

    2016-09-01

    Distance learning is expanding and replacing the traditional academic medical settings. Managing trauma patients seems to be a prerequisite skill for medical students. This study has been done to evaluate the efficiency of distance learning on performing the initial assessment and management in trauma patients, compared with the traditional learning among senior medical students. One hundred and twenty senior medical students enrolled in this single-blind quasi-experimental study and were equally divided into the experimental (distance learning) and control group (traditional learning). All participants did a written MCQ before the study. The control group attended a workshop with a 50-minute lecture on initial management of trauma patients and a case simulation scenario followed by a hands-on session. On the other hand, the experimental group was given a DVD with a similar 50-minute lecture and a case simulation scenario, and they also attended a hands-on session to practice the skills. Both groups were evaluated by a trauma station in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) after a month. The performance in the experimental group was statistically better (P=0.001) in OSCE. Distance learning seems to be an appropriate adjunct to traditional learning.

  11. Factorial validity of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire in Italian psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Innamorati, Marco; Erbuto, Denise; Venturini, Paola; Fagioli, Francesca; Ricci, Federica; Lester, David; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio

    2016-11-30

    Early adverse experiences are associated with neurobiological changes and these may underlie the increased risk of psychopathology. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-SF) is the most commonly used instrument for assessing childhood maltreatment. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the factorial validity of an Italian version of the CTQ-SF in a sample of psychiatric inpatients by means of confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses. The sample was composed of 471 psychiatric in-patients and out-patients (206 males and 265 females) aged 16-80 years (mean age=34.4 years [SD=16.3]) consecutively admitted to two psychiatric departments. All patients were administered the Italian version of the CTQ-SF. We tested five different factor models which lacked good fit, while the exploratory factor analysis supported the adequacy of a solution with three factors (Emotional Neglect/Abuse, Sexual Abuse, Physical Neglect/Abuse). The three factors had satisfactory internal consistency (ordinal Cronbach alphas >0.90). Our study supports results from previous research indicating the lack of structural invariance of the CTQ-SF in cross-cultural adaptations of the test, and the fact that, when measuring different types of childhood maltreatment, the difference between abuse and neglect may be not valid.

  12. Helicopter Emergency Ambulance Service (HEAS) Transfer: An Analysis of Trauma Patient Case-Mix, Injury Severity and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Melton, JTK; Jain, S; Kendrick, B; Deo, SD

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A retrospective review of all patients transferred by helicopter ambulance to the Great Western Hospital over a 20-month period between January 2003 and September 2004 was undertaken to establish the case-mix of patients (trauma and non-trauma) transferred and the outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS Details of all Helicopter Emergency Ambulance Service (HEAS) transfers to this unit in the study time period were obtained from the three HEAS providers in the area and case notes were reviewed. RESULTS There were 156 trauma patients transferred (total 193) in the study period with 111 cases identified for analysis with a mean age of 33 years (range, 1–92 years). Average Injury Severity Score on admission was 12 (range, 1–36). Forty-five patients were discharged home from the emergency department, 24 cases had operation, 10 patients required ICU care and 2 were pronounced dead in the emergency department. Average hospital stay following HEAS transfer was 2.97 days (range, 0–18 days). DISCUSSION Helicopter ambulance transfer in the acute setting is of debated value. Triage criteria are at fault if as many as 41% of patients transferred are being discharged home from casualty having incurred the financial cost of helicopter transfer. We suggest that the triage criteria for helicopter emergency transfer should be reviewed. PMID:17688727

  13. An unusual presentation of Hoffa's disease in an elderly patient with no trauma history: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hoon; Park, Ji Hun; Lee, An Hee; Lee, Dae Hee

    2011-01-01

    Hoffa' s fat pad disease usually occurs in young active patients participating in activities involving repetitive microtrauma to the knee joint. No specific radiographic findings associated with the disease has yet been defined. We report an elderly patient who presented with a 12-month anterior knee pain and limited knee extension, without any trauma history. Radiographs showed a calcified soft tissue mass in the Hoffa's fat pad. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the lesion had a generalized heterogeneous hypointensity on T1- and T2-weighted images and a poorly defined margin. The lesion was excised arthroscopically, and histopathological examination revealed fat pad adipocyte necrosis, mucoid degeneration, and dystrophic calcification, suggesting Hoffa's disease. The present report indicates that Hoffa's disease can occur in elderly patients with no trauma history, can be associated with a calcified lesion on radiographs, and can be linked to infrapatellar fat pad degeneration in such patients.

  14. Cervical spine collar clearance in the obtunded adult blunt trauma patient: A systematic review and practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mayur B.; Humble, Stephen S.; Cullinane, Daniel C.; Day, Matthew A.; Jawa, Randeep S.; Devin, Clinton J.; Delozier, Margaret S.; Smith, Lou M.; Smith, Miya A.; Capella, Jeannette M.; Long, Andrea M.; Cheng, Joseph S.; Leath, Taylor C.; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Haut, Elliott R.; Como, John J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND With the use of the framework advocated by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group, our aims were to perform a systematic review and to develop evidence-based recommendations that may be used to answer the following PICO [Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcomes] question: In the obtunded adult blunt trauma patient, should cervical collar removal be performed after a negative high-quality cervical spine (C-spine) computed tomography (CT) result alone or after a negative high-quality C-spine CT result combined with adjunct imaging, to reduce peri-clearance events, such as new neurologic change, unstable C-spine injury, stable C-spine injury, need for post-clearance imaging, false-negative CT imaging result on re-review, pressure ulcers, and time to cervical collar clearance? METHODS Our protocol was registered with the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews on August 23, 2013 (Registration Number: CRD42013005461). Eligibility criteria consisted of adult blunt trauma patients 16 years or older, who underwent C-spine CT with axial thickness of less than 3 mm and who were obtunded using any definition. Quantitative synthesis via meta-analysis was not possible because of pre-post, partial-cohort, quasi-experimental study design limitations and the consequential incomplete diagnostic accuracy data. RESULTS Of five articles with a total follow-up of 1,017 included subjects, none reported new neurologic changes (paraplegia or quadriplegia) after cervical collar removal. There is a worst-case 9% (161 of 1,718 subjects in 11 studies) cumulative literature incidence of stable injuries and a 91% negative predictive value of no injury, after coupling a negative high-quality C-spine CT result with 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging, upright x-rays, flexion-extension CT, and/or clinical follow-up. Similarly, there is a best-case 0% (0 of 1,718 subjects in 11 studies) cumulative

  15. [Standardisation of the Initial Treatment of Severely Burned Patients: The Necessary Transfer of Concepts from Trauma Care].

    PubMed

    Münzberg, M; Harbers, T; Kneser, U; Grützner, P A; Reichert, B; Kremer, T; Wölfl, C G; Horter, J; Hirche, C

    2016-12-01

    The initial treatment of severely burned patients remains a huge challenge for first responders in emergency services as well as emergency doctors who do not work in a centre for severe burn injuries. The reason for this is the low number of cases in developed countries and a lack of training concepts for the specific aspects of the initial treatment of severe burn injuries. Because of guidelines with limited evidence (S1, S2k) and a lack of structured treatment approaches, uncertainties with respect to initial treatment are still visible. Even within the professional societies and on international comparison, controversial aspects remain. In contrast, optimised and standardised procedures are available for the treatment of severely injured (trauma) patients, based on PHTLS® (Pre Hospital Trauma Life Support) for preclinical and ATLS® (Advanced Trauma Life Support) for in-hospital first aid. This article takes stock of the current structure of care and the relevant evidence for the initial treatment of severe burns. Also it discusses a possible transfer and further development of concepts for primary trauma care by all disciplines involved. Nine essential steps in the primary care of burned patients are identified and evaluated. The need for the introduction of a uniform treatment algorithm is illustrated. The treatment algorithm presented in this article addresses all first responders who are faced with initial treatment in the first 24 hours outside of burn centres. As an essential, new aspect, it offers a transfer and adaptation of concepts from trauma care to standardise the care of severely burned patients.

  16. Trauma system development.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, R A; Lockey, D J

    2013-01-01

    The word 'trauma' describes the disease entity resulting from physical injury. Trauma is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and deaths due to injury look set to increase. As early as the 1970s, it became evident that centralisation of resources and expertise could reduce the mortality rate from serious injury and that organisation of trauma care delivery into formal systems could improve outcome further. Internationally, trauma systems have evolved in various forms, with widespread reports of mortality and functional outcome benefits when major trauma management is delivered in this way. The management of major trauma in England is currently undergoing significant change. The London Trauma System began operating in April 2010 and others throughout England became operational this year. Similar systems exist internationally and continue to be developed. Anaesthetists have been and continue to be involved with all levels of trauma care delivery, from the provision of pre-hospital trauma and retrieval teams, through to chronic pain management and rehabilitation of patients back into society. This review examines the international development of major trauma care delivery and the components of a modern trauma system.

  17. [Challenges in care of trauma patient in Spain. The need for implementation of scientific evidence including secondary prevention].

    PubMed

    Fernández Mondéjar, E; Alvarez, F J; González Luque, J C

    2014-01-01

    The mortality of trauma patients has improved significantly in recent decades due to a combination of factors: medical care, educational campaigns and structural changes. Generalization of out-of hospital emergence medical services and the hospital care in specific centers for traumatized has undoubtedly contributed to this decline, but other factors such as periodic campaigns to prevent workplace and traffic accidents, as well as improvements in the road network have played a key role. The challenge now is to continue to decrease mortality, for which is essential an analysis of the situation to detect potential areas of improvement. The application of diagnostic or therapeutic actions with scientific evidence is associated with lower mortality, but as in other areas of medicine, the application of scientific evidence in trauma patients is barely 50%. Moreover, nearly 90% of trauma deaths occur in the crash site or in the first 72h of hospitalization, the vast majority as a result of injuries incompatible with life. In these circumstances it is clear that prevention is the most cost-effective activity. As medical practitioners, our role in prevention is mainly focused on the secondary prevention to avoid recidivism, for which it is necessary to identify risk factor (frequently alcohol, illegal drugs, psychotropic medication etc.) and implement a brief motivational intervention. This activity can reduce recidivism by nearly 50%. In Spain, the activity in this field is negligible therefore measures should be implemented for dissemination of secondary prevention in trauma.

  18. A Retrospective Study on Clinical Features and Visual Outcome of Patients Hospitalized for Ocular Trauma in Cangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To describe clinical features and to analyze visual outcome of ocular trauma in Cangzhou in 2012–2015, China. Methods. A retrospective study of ocular trauma cases admitted to Cangzhou Central Hospital from January 2012 till December 2015 was performed. Results. This study included a total of 507 eyes from 478 patients. Four hundred (83.7%) patients were male, with a male-to-female ratio of 5.1 : 1. Mean age was 43.6 ± 18.3 years (5–95 years). The largest age group was 45–59 years old, followed by 30–44 years old, presenting two peaks of the age distribution and accounting for 28.5% and 27.2%, respectively. The most frequent type of injuries was work-related (194, 40.6%) followed by home-related (123, 25.7%). Initial visual acuity (VA) correlated with final VA (Spearman's test, r = 0.703, p = 0.001). The Ocular Trauma Score also correlated with the final VA significantly (Spearman's test, r = 0.802, p = 0.001). Conclusions. Susceptible population of eye injuries were middle- and young-aged working groups, and the proportion of males was higher. The leading two types of ocular trauma were work-related and home-related. Initial VA was a significant predictor of the final VA and the OTS possibly had predictive value in the final VA. PMID:28386477

  19. Dissociative symptoms are associated with reduced neuropsychological performance in patients with recurrent depression and a history of trauma exposure

    PubMed Central

    Frewen, Paul A.; Oremus, Carolina; Lanius, Ruth A.; McKinnon, Margaret C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although preliminary work suggests that dissociative symptoms may impact neuropsychological performance in trauma-exposed populations, the relation between dissociation and cognitive performance has not been explored in patients with depression. Objective The present study examined dissociative symptoms in relation to neuropsychological performance in participants with a primary diagnosis of recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) and a history of trauma exposure. Method Twenty-three participants with MDD and 20 healthy controls who did not differ in age, sex, education, or IQ were assessed. In addition to a standardized neuropsychological battery assessing frontotemporally mediated cognitive processes, participants completed clinical measures assessing dissociative symptoms, illness severity, and past history of trauma exposure. Results Among participants with MDD, greater severity of derealization was associated with reduced performance on measures of delayed visuospatial recall and recognition on a task of verbal memory recognition. In addition, more severe depersonalization was associated with slower processing speed and a response style lending itself toward better performance in a less active environment. Conclusions These findings point toward dissociative symptoms as a transdiagnostic factor associated with neuropsychological dysfunction in patients with depression and a history of trauma. Limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:26927902

  20. Rapid Identification of Yeast Isolates from Clinical Specimens in Critically Ill Trauma ICU Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neetu; Mathur, Purva; Misra, Mahesh Chandra; Behera, Bijayini; Xess, Immaculata; Sharma, Satya Priya

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate the performance of a commercially available chromogenic Candida speciation media and the Vitek 2 ID system for the identification of medically important yeasts and yeast-like organisms in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory. Materials and Methods: A total of 429 non duplicate, consecutive yeast strains were included during the 3.5-year study period. The performance of the Vitek 2 ID system and a chromogenic agar medium was evaluated against the gold standard conventional phenotypic and biochemical identification method for speciation of yeast isolates from trauma patients. Results: Candida tropicalis (64%) was the most common Candida species, followed by Candida albicans (14%), Candida rugosa (7%), and Candida parapsilosis (6.5%). Of the 429 isolates, 183 could be identified to species level by all the three methods. Agreement between the chromogenic agar method and conventional methods was 80% for Candida tropicalis, 100% for Candida rugosa, 89% for Candida albicans, and 77% for Candida parapsilosis. Vitek 2 had lower sensitivity, with agreement of 49% for Candida tropicalis, 100% for Candida rugosa, 39% for Candida albicans, and 31% for Candida parapsilosis. Conclusion: Thus, in long-term ICU patients, an increasing trend of isolating nonalbicans Candida spp. continues. The chromogenic agar medium is a convenient and economic method to identify commonly isolated species in busy clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:22923919

  1. Pelvic Arterial Embolisation in a Trauma Patient with a Pre-Existing Aortobifemoral Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Abulaban, Osama; Hopkins, Jonathan; Willis, Andrew P.; Jones, Robert G.

    2011-02-15

    Pelvic fractures secondary to blunt trauma are associated with a significant mortality rate due to uncontrolled bleeding. Interventional radiology (IR) can play an important and central role in the management of such patients, offering definitive minimally invasive therapy and avoiding the need for high-risk surgery. Rapid access to whole-body computed tomography has been shown to improve survival in polytrauma patients and allows rapid diagnosis of vascular injury and assessment of suitability for endovascular therapy. IR can then target and treat the specific area of bleeding. Embolisation of bleeding pelvic arteries has been shown to be highly effective and should be the treatment of choice in this situation. The branches of the internal iliac artery (IIA) are usually involved, and these arteries are accessed by way of IIA catheterisation after abdominal aortography. Occasionally these arteries cannot be accessed by way of this conventional route because of recent IIA ligation carried out surgically in an attempt to stop the bleeding or because (in the rare situation we describe here) these vessels are excluded secondary to previous aortoiliac repair. In this situation, knowledge of pelvic arterial collateral artery pathways is important because these will continue to supply pelvic structures whilst making access to deep pelvic branches challenging. We describe a rare case, which has not been previously reported in the literature, in which successful embolisation of a bleeding pelvic artery was carried out by way of the collateral artery pathways.

  2. USE OF TRANEXAMIC ACID IN TRAUMA PATIENTS: AN ANALYSIS OF COST-EFFECTIVENESS FOR USE IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    PINTO, Marcelo A.; da SILVA, Jair G.; CHEDID, Aljamir D.; CHEDID, Marcio F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Use of tranexamic acid (TXA) in trauma has been the subject of growing interest by researchers and health professionals. However, there are still several open questions regarding its use. In some aspects medical literature is controversial. The points of disagreement among experts include questions such as: Which patients should receive TXA in trauma? Should treatment be performed in the pre-hospital environment? Is there any need for laboratory parameters before starting TXA treatment? What is the drug safety profile? The main issue on which there is still no basis in literature is: What is the indication for treatment within massive transfusion protocols? Objective: Answer the questions proposed based on critical evaluation of the evidence gathered so far and carry out a study of cost-effectiveness of TXA use in trauma adapted to the Brazilian reality. Methods: A literature review was performed through searching Pubmed.com, Embase and Cab Abstract by headings "tranexamic AND trauma", in all languages, yielding 426 articles. Manuscripts reporting on TXA utilization for elective procedures were excluded, remaining 79 articles. Fifty-five articles were selected, and critically evaluated in order to answer study questions. The evaluation of cost effectiveness was performed using CRASH-2 trial data and Brazilian official population data. Results: TXA is effective and efficient, and should be administered to a wide range of patients, including those with indication evaluated in research protocols and current indication criteria for TXA should be expanded. As for the cost-effectiveness, the TXA proved to be cost-effective with an average cost of R$ 61.35 (currently US$16) per year of life saved. Conclusion: The use of TXA in trauma setting seems to be effective, efficient and cost-effective in the various groups of polytrauma patients. Its use in massive transfusion protocols should be the subject of further investigations. PMID:28076488

  3. Developing competency in interns for endotracheal intubation: An educational article

    PubMed Central

    Makwana, Harsha Dhirubhai; Suthar, Nilay N; Gajjar, Mehul P; Thakor, Advait V

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our existing undergraduate curriculum lacks developing competency for endotracheal intubation. Even though it is a lifesaving procedure, interns are exposed only during their posting in anesthesia or emergency medicine and so, when need arises, they fail to perform endotracheal intubation and it leads to catastrophes. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop competency in interns for endotracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted on fifty interns of medical college. Lecture and demonstration were used for cognitive domain and one-to-one training and practice on manikin for affective and psychomotor domains, respectively. Live demonstration on patients was done whenever possible. Gain in knowledge was evaluated by pre- and post-test using standardized validated questionnaire. Skills were assessed by direct observation of procedural skill on manikin, split in steps: Laryngoscopy, intubation, and ventilation. Session was evaluated using feedback questionnaire and Likert scale. Results: Interns showed mean marks of 8.12 ± 1.63 in pretest compared to 13.86 ± 1.06 of posttest with a gain of 34.8% (P = 0.0001), which is highly significant. Twenty-two percent interns completed all steps correctly in the first attempt, 62% in the second attempt, while 16% required third attempt to correctly complete all steps. Conclusion: This training developed competency for basic knowledge and practice of endotracheal intubation in interns adequately on manikin. Training for endotracheal intubation should be carried out at the beginning of internship before they go for clinical practice and repeated during their rotation of Anesthesia and Emergency Medicine Department, so they can retain their competency for it and can do later on whenever required. PMID:27563588

  4. Long-term outcome and quality of life of patients treated in surgical intensive care: a comparison between sepsis and trauma

    PubMed Central

    Korošec Jagodič, Helena; Jagodič, Klemen; Podbregar, Matej

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to determine long-term survival and quality of life of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (ICU) because of sepsis or trauma. Methods This was an observational study conducted in an 11-bed, closed surgical ICU at a 860-bed teaching general hospital over a 1-year period (January 2003 to December 2003). Patients were divided into two groups according to admission diagnoses: group 1 included patients with sepsis; and group 2 included patients with trauma (polytrauma, multiple trauma, head injury, or spinal injury). Quality of life was assessed after 2 years following ICU admission using the EuroQol 5D questionnaire. Results A total of 164 patients (98 trauma patients and 66 patients with sepsis) were included in the study. Trauma patients were younger than patients with sepsis (53 ± 21 years versus 64 ± 13 years; P ≤ 0.001). There was no significant difference between groups in Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score or length of stay in the surgical SICU. Trauma patients stayed longer on the general ward (35 ± 44 days versus 17 ± 24 days; P < 001). Surgical ICU survival, in-hospital survival, and post-hospital and cumulative 2-year survival were lower in the sepsis group than in the trauma group (surgical ICU survival: 60% versus 74%; in-hospital survival: 42% versus 62%; post-hospital survival: 78% versus 92%; cumulative 2-year survival: 33% versus 57%; P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in quality of life in all five dimensions of the EuroQol 5D between groups: 60% of patients had signs of depression, almost 60% had problems in usual activities and 56% had pain. Conclusion Patients with sepsis treated in a surgical ICU have higher short-term and long-term mortality than do trauma patients. However, quality of life is reduced to the same level in both groups. PMID:16978417

  5. Impact of the body mass on complications and outcome in multiple trauma patients: what does the weight weigh?

    PubMed

    Andruszkow, Hagen; Veh, Juliane; Mommsen, Philipp; Zeckey, Christian; Hildebrand, Frank; Frink, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is known as an independent risk factor for various morbidities. The influence of an increased body mass index (BMI) on morbidity and mortality in critically injured patients has been investigated with conflicting results. To verify the impact of weight disorders in multiple traumatized patients, 586 patients with an injury severity score >16 points treated at a level I trauma center between 2005 and 2011 were differentiated according to the BMI and analyzed regarding morbidity and outcome. Plasma levels of interleukin- (IL-) 6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured during clinical course to evaluate the inflammatory response to the "double hit" of weight disorders and multiple trauma. In brief, obesity was the highest risk factor for development of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (OR 4.209, 95%-CI 1.515-11.692) besides injury severity (OR 1.054, 95%-CI 1.020-1.089) and APACHE II score (OR 1.059, 95%-CI 1.001-1.121). In obese patients as compared to those with overweight, normal weight, and underweight, the highest levels of CRP were continuously present while increased systemic IL-6 levels were found until day 4. In conclusion, an altered posttraumatic inflammatory response in obese patients seems to determine the risk for multiple organ failure after severe trauma.

  6. Concomitant Sternal Fracture in Flail Chest: An Analysis of 21,741 Polytrauma Patients from the TraumaRegister DGU®.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Drost, Stefan; Krinner, Sebastian; Langenbach, Andreas; Oppel, Pascal; Lefering, Rolf; Taylor, Dominic; Hennig, Friedrich F; Mauerer, Andreas

    2017-02-10

    Background Isolated sternal fractures (SFs) rarely show complications, but their influence in a thorax trauma of the seriously injured still remains unclear. Methods A retrospective analysis of the TraumaRegister DGU(®) was performed involving the years 2009 to 2013 (Injury Severity Score [ISS] ≥ 16, primary admission to a trauma center). Cohort formation: Unilateral and bilateral flail chest (FC) injuries with and without a concomitant SF, respectively. Results In total, 21,741 patients (25% female) met the inclusion criteria, with 3,492 (16.1%) showing SF. Unilateral FC patients were on average 53.6 ± 18.4 years old, and bilateral FC patients were on average 55.2 ± 17.7 years old. The ISS in unilateral FC and bilateral FC amounted to 31.2 ± 13.0 and 43.4 ± 13.1 points, respectively. FC with an SF occurred more frequently as an injury to car occupants and less frequently as an injury to motorcyclists or in injuries due to falls. Conclusion Patients with an SF additional to an FC had longer hospital and intensive care unit stays and were longer artificially respirated than those patients without an SF. SF indicates possible cardiac and thoracic spine injuries.

  7. Endotracheal intubation without muscle relaxants in children using remifentanil and propofol: Comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Freshteh; Amiri, Hakimeh Alereza; Rabiee, Mozaffar; Banihashem, Nadia; Nejad, Farhad Mohammad; Shirkhani, Ziba; Solimanian, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Endotracheal intubation is essential during general anesthesia and muscle relaxant drugs provide ideal conditions for this purpose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the intubating condition of remifentanil combined with propofol without muscle relaxant. Materials and Methods: In this prospective randomized study, 60 children aged 3-12 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II were included. All the children were premedicated with 0.05 mg/kg midazolam and 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine 5 min before the induction of anesthesia with 3 mg/kg propofol. Then, they were allocated randomly to receive either 2 μg/kg remifentanil (group R) or 1.5 mg/kg succinylcholine (group S). Tracheal intubation was attempted 90 s after the administration of propofol. The quality of intubation was assessed by using Copenhagen score based on jaw relaxation, ease of laryngoscopy, position of vocal cord, coughing and limb movement. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded before and after induction, and 1, 3, 5 min after intubation. Results: There was no significant difference in intubating condition between the two groups (P = 0.11). Intubation condition was excellent in 26 of 30 (86.7%) patients in the group R compared with 30 (100%) patients in the group S. We observed significant difference in heart rate and systolic blood pressure over time between two groups (P = 0.02, P = 0.03 respectively). After intubation, we had higher heart rate and systolic blood pressure with a significant difference in group S compared with group R (P = 0.006, P = 0.018). None of the children had a chest rigidity, laryngospasm, and hypoxia. Conclusions: In premedicated children, propofol-remifentanil combination provides adequate conditions for tracheal intubation that is comparable with succinylcholine. Hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation was controlled better in group R. PMID:26543458

  8. Airway management using submental intubation in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Szantyr, Aleksandra; Szuta, Mariusz; Zapała, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In 1995 the first tracheosubmental intubation (TSI) in Poland was performed in the Clinic and De- partment of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery at Jagiellonian University Medical College in Kraków. Our 20 years of experience with using TSI in the eld of cranio-maxillofacial surgery, with 316 successfully performed intubations, resulted in one of the largest bodies of material analysed in the literature so far. The aim of this study was to evaluate the eficacy and complications of TSI in the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery in patients where orotracheal or nasotracheal intubation is contraindicated and tracheostomy can be avoided. To fulfil this objective we present our own experience with the use of TSI in the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. This retrospective study included 316 patients who were operated on with general anaesthesia via TSI in the Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, from 1995 to 2014 (20 years). Indications for TSI were as follows: multifragmentaric fractures of the bones of mid- and lower face in 262 patients (82.9%), simultaneous osteotomies of the maxilla and mandible due to mandibular prognathism with maxillary compression in 62 patients (19.6%), extensive facial cancer infiltrating both the nose and lips in 4 patients (1.2%) and posttraumatic deformities of the nose and jaws in 4 patients (1.2%). In all 316 patients TSI was successfully performed and proved to be the optimal method of airway management, providing a comfortable surgical approach with the operating field free from an intubation tube. Complications were observed in 12 patients (3.8%) and included wound infection in 7 patients (2.21%), transitory salivary fistula in 3 patients (0.95%), and hypertrophic scarring in 2 patients (0.63%). TSI is considered to be a safe and simple technique of intubation, which makes it possible to to avoid tracheotomy complications when it is difficult or impossible to perform

  9. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. Objectives To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. Patients and Methods This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. Results There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed. PMID:24350154

  10. Endotracheal intubation using the C-MAC® video laryngoscope or the Macintosh laryngoscope: A prospective, comparative study in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endotracheal intubation in the ICU is a challenging procedure and is frequently associated with life-threatening complications. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the C-MAC® video laryngoscope on laryngeal view and intubation success compared with direct laryngoscopy. Methods In a single-center, prospective, comparative before-after study in an anesthetist-lead surgical ICU of a tertiary university hospital, predictors of potentially difficult tracheal intubation, number of intubation attempts, success rate and glottic view were evaluated during a 2-year study period (first year, Macintosh laryngoscopy (ML); second year, C-MAC®). Results A total of 274 critically ill patients requiring endotracheal intubation were included; 113 intubations using ML and 117 intubations using the C-MAC® were assessed. In patients with at least one predictor for difficult intubation, the C-MAC® resulted in more successful intubations on first attempt compared with ML (34/43, 79% vs. 21/38, 55%; P = 0.03). The visualization of the glottis with ML using Cormack and Lehane (C&L) grading was more frequently rated as difficult (20%, C&L grade 3 and 4) compared with the C-MAC® (7%, C&L grade 3 and 4) (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Use of the C-MAC® video laryngoscope improved laryngeal imaging and improved the intubating success rate on the first attempt in patients with predictors for difficult intubation in the ICU setting. Video laryngoscopy seems to be a useful tool in the ICU where potentially difficult endotracheal intubations regularly occur. PMID:22695007

  11. Specific Radiological Findings of Traumatic Gastrointestinal Tract Injuries in Patients With Blunt Chest and Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kokabi, Nima; Harmouche, Elie; Xing, Minzhi; Shuaib, Waqas; Mittal, Pardeep K; Wilson, Kenneth; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal hollow viscus injury after blunt chest and abdominal trauma is uncommon and complicates 0.6%-1.2% of all cases of trauma. Early recognition of such injuries significantly decreases morbidity and mortality. Since physical examination is not accurate in detecting such injuries, contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the mainstay for diagnosis in many emergency departments. This pictorial essay aims to review the incidence, mechanisms, and signs of gastrointestinal hollow viscus injuries in the setting of blunt chest and abdominal trauma.

  12. The Perception of Trauma Patients from Social Support in Adjustment to Lower-Limb Amputation: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Sousan; Dadkhah, Behrouz; Mohammadi, Eissa; Hassankhani, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The effect of amputation on an individual's psychological condition as well as family and social relationships is undeniable because physical disability not just affects the psycho-social adjustment, but also the mental health. When compared to normal people, such people are mostly experiencing social isolation. On the other hand, social support is known as the most powerful force to cope with stressful situations and it allows patients to withstand problems. The present study aims to explain understanding the trauma of patients and the experience of support sources during the process of adaptation to a lower limb amputation. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted using qualitative content analysis. Participants included 20 patients with lower limb amputation due to trauma. Sampling was purposive initially and continued until data saturation. Unstructured interviews were used as the main method of data collection. Collected data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis and constant comparison methods. Results: The main theme extracted from the data was support sources. The classes include “supportive family”, “gaining friends’ support”, “gaining morale from peers”, and “assurance and satisfaction with the workplace.” Conclusion: Given the high number of physical, mental and social problems in trauma patients, identifying and strengthening support sources can be effective in their adaptation with the disease and improvement of the quality of their life. PMID:25191013

  13. Epidemiology and outcomes of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Burkholderia cepacia infections among trauma patients of India: a five year experience

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumari, Nonika; Gupta, Amit K; Sharma, Kumkum; Misra, Mahesh C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infections by uncommon non-fermenting Gram negative bacteria are on the rise, but little is known about the risk factors and drug resistance in trauma patients in India. This study explored the infections caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and/or Burkholderia cepacia in trauma patients over a period of 5 years. Material and methods: Patients admitted for trauma care with S. maltophilia and/or B. cepacia isolated from clinical specimens were enrolled. Characteristics regarding the strain isolation, drug sensitivity pattern, multidrug resistance (MDR), patient, outcomes, and differentiation of true infection from colonisation were observed. Results: Of the total 233 isolates, 102 were S. maltophilia and 131 were B. cepacia; 4.3% were responsible for polymicrobial infections with other bacteria. There were more B. cepacia MDR isolates than S. maltophilia. Maximum resistance was found to tetracycline (86.7%) and tobramycin (86.7%) in B. cepacia and to co-trimoxazole (68.7%) in S. maltophilia. Of these, 21 (16.03%) had a fatal outcome and the remaining 111 (84.7%) were discharged healthy. The in-hospital mortality rate associated with B. cepacia was much (16%) higher than S. maltophilia (13%) at this centre. Conclusion: The analysis of epidemiology and outcome of these infections will help to inform their management and treatment.

  14. Length of stay, wait time to surgery and 30-day mortality for patients with hip fractures after the opening of a dedicated orthopedic weekend trauma room

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michel; Hopman, Wilma; Yach, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background In September 2011, Kingston General Hospital (KGH) opened a dedicated orthopedic weekend trauma room. Previously, 1 weekend operating room (OR) was used by all surgical services. We assessed the impact this dedicated weekend trauma room had on hospital length of stay (LOS), time to surgery and 30-day mortality for patients with hip fractures. Methods Patients admitted between Oct. 1, 2009, and Sept. 30, 2012, were identified through our trauma registry, representing the 2 years before and 1 year after the opening of the orthopedic weekend trauma room. We documented type of fracture, mode of fixation, age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, time to OR, LOS, discharge disposition and 30-day mortality. We excluded patients with multiple fractures, open fractures and those requiring trauma team activation. Results Our study included 609 patients (405 pre- and 204 post–trauma room opening). Mean LOS decreased from 11.6 to 9.4 days (p = 0.005) and there was a decreasing trend in mean time to OR from 31.5 to 28.5 hours (p = 0.16). There was no difference in 30-day mortality (p = 0.24). The LOS decreased by an average of 2 days following opening of the weekend trauma room (p = 0.031) and by an average of 2.2 additional days if the patient was admitted on the weekend versus during the week (p = 0.024). Conclusion The weekend trauma OR at KGH significantly decreased the LOS and appears to have decreased wait times to surgery. Further analysis is needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of the current strategy, the long-term outcome of this patient population and the impact the additional orthopedic weekend trauma room has had on other surgical services (i.e., general surgery) and their patients. PMID:27668332

  15. Betahistine Dihydrochloride With and Without Early Vestibular Rehabilitation for the Management of Patients With Balance Disorders Following Head Trauma: A Preliminary Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Naguib, Maged B.; Madian, Yasser T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of betahistine dihydrochloride alone and in combination with vestibular rehabilitation for the management of patients with balance disorders following head trauma. Methods In this preliminary clinical trial, a group of patients with head trauma was referred to our university-based tertiary care balance unit over a 1-year period. The study included 60 patients with balance disorder following head trauma. Patients were randomly divided into 3 groups with 20 patients each. The first group was treated by betahistine dihydrochloride tablets 48 mg/d alone. The second group was treated with a standard vestibular rehabilitation program. The third group was given betahistine dihydrochloride tablets (48 mg/d) in addition to the early standard vestibular rehabilitation program. Videonystagmography was used in the diagnosis, characterization, and monitoring of all patients with balance disorders, with improvement of the pretreatment objective results taken as a marker for treatment progress. Results Recovery time was within the first 3 months following head trauma in 57 (95%) of the patients. Recovery was faster after mild head trauma than after moderate and severe traumas. Patients who underwent vestibular rehabilitation immediately after the onset of head trauma (with or without addition of betahistine dihydrochloride) recovered earlier than those treated with betahistine dihydrochloride alone. Conclusion Based on these preliminary findings in a small group of patients, early vestibular rehabilitation with the concomitant use of betahistine dihydrochloride showed better results than the other 2 treatments alone in patients with balance disorders following head trauma. Early vestibular rehabilitation seemed to improve recovery that was enhanced by the use of betahistine dihydrochloride, and may have depressed the associated adverse effects such as nausea and vomiting. PMID:24711780

  16. [When the patient chooses death. One's own patient's suicide--a trauma for the physician].

    PubMed

    Waern, Margda

    2003-06-12

    Patient suicide is one of the most stressful events that can occur during the professional life of the psychiatrist. International studies suggest that every other psychiatrist will have at least one patient who commits suicide. The author provides a personal account of her reaction to one patient's death. The somewhat limited literature on psychiatrists' reactions to suicide is reviewed. One third of those who experience suicide in a patient in their own care may develop low mood, sleep disturbance or irritability in the weeks that follow. The author discusses why suicide can have such a profound effect on the psychiatrist. As young doctors are more prone to stress reactions following suicide, training programs should prepare them for this event. Informal support from colleagues and team members can mitigate the doctor's reactions in the aftermath.

  17. Use of Respiratory Impedance in Prehospital Care of Hypotensive Patients Associated with Hemorrhage and Trauma: A Case Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Use of respiratory impedance in prehospital care of hypotensive patients associated with hemorrhage and trauma: A case series Victor A. Convertino...J.Z., D.L.), Toledo , Ohio; Cypress Creek Emergency Medical Services (K.T., L.V.), Spring, Texas; Em- press EmergencyMedical Services (D.B.), Yonkers...Minneapolis, Minnesota. Address for reprints: Victor A. Convertino, PhD, United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3698 Chambers Pass, Fort Sam

  18. The Matching of Sinus Arrhythmia to Respiration: Are Trauma Patients without Serious Injury Comparable to Healthy Laboratory Subjects?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    the correlation between sinus arrhythmia (SA) rate, heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR). Most segments with 2.4 ≤ HR/RR < 4.8 exhibited SA...variation (sinus arrhythmia [SA]; rhythmic fluctuations in heart rate [HR]) is wholly driven by the respiratory rate (RR), such that their rates will be...The Matching of Sinus Arrhythmia to Respiration: Are Trauma Patients without Serious Injury Comparable to Healthy Laboratory Subjects? Xiaoxiao

  19. Prolonged Prothrombin Time After Recombinant Activated Factor VII Therapy in Critically Bleeding Trauma Patients Is Associated With Adverse Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    aggravated by dilution caused by fluid and RBC administration and by hypothermia and acidosis, which may adversely impact coagulation.22,23 Twenty-five...patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm : evaluating a change in transfusion practice. Transfusion. 2007;47:593–598. 14. Johansson PI, Swiatek...Mackersie RC, Pittet JF. Early coagulopathy after traumatic brain injury: the role of hypoperfu- sion and the protein C pathway. J Trauma. 2007;63:1254

  20. A Multidisciplinary Clinical Pathway Decreases Rib Fracture-Associated Infectious Morbidity and Mortality in High-Risk Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    monitored bed (Surgical Intermediate Care Unit or Shock Trauma Intensive Care Unit) where they received patient-controlled analgesia and incentive ...cough. Pain was assessed during incentive spirometry or coughing using a visual analogue scale (score from 1 to 10) with failure being a score...greater thann 6. Inspiratory volume was determined using the in- centive spirometer . A volume less than 15 mL/kg was con- sidered failure [14]. For the

  1. Orotracheal Intubation Using the Retromolar Space: A Reliable Alternative Intubation Approach to Prevent Dental Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Sudip D.; Truong, Angela T.; Truong, Dam-Thuy

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in airway management, perianesthetic dental injury remains one of the most common anesthesia-related adverse events and cause for malpractice litigation against anesthesia providers. Recommended precautions for prevention of dental damage may not always be effective because these techniques involve contact and pressure exerted on vulnerable teeth. We describe a novel approach using the retromolar space to insert a flexible fiberscope for tracheal tube placement as a reliable method to achieve atraumatic tracheal intubation. Written consent for publication has been obtained from the patient. PMID:28116174

  2. Trauma Simulation Training Increases Confidence Levels in Prehospital Personnel Performing Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Archita D.; Meurer, David A.; Shuster, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Limited evidence is available on simulation training of prehospital care providers, specifically the use of tourniquets and needle decompression. This study focused on whether the confidence level of prehospital personnel performing these skills improved through simulation training. Methods. Prehospital personnel from Alachua County Fire Rescue were enrolled in the study over a 2- to 3-week period based on their availability. Two scenarios were presented to them: a motorcycle crash resulting in a leg amputation requiring a tourniquet and an intoxicated patient with a stab wound, who experienced tension pneumothorax requiring needle decompression. Crews were asked to rate their confidence levels before and after exposure to the scenarios. Timing of the simulation interventions was compared with actual scene times to determine applicability of simulation in measuring the efficiency of prehospital personnel. Results. Results were collected from 129 participants. Pre- and postexposure scores increased by a mean of 1.15 (SD 1.32; 95% CI, 0.88–1.42; P < 0.001). Comparison of actual scene times with simulated scene times yielded a 1.39-fold difference (95% CI, 1.25–1.55) for Scenario 1 and 1.59 times longer for Scenario 2 (95% CI, 1.43–1.77). Conclusion. Simulation training improved prehospital care providers' confidence level in performing two life-saving procedures. PMID:27563467

  3. High plasma levels of high mobility group box 1 is associated with the risk of sepsis in severe blunt chest trauma patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a late mediator of systemic inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 play a central pathogenic role in critical illness. The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between plasma HMGB1 concentrations and the risk of poor outcomes in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Methods The plasma concentrations of HMGB1 in patients with severe blunt chest trauma (AIS ≥ 3) were measured by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at four time points during seven days after admission, and the dynamic release patterns were monitored. The biomarker levels were compared between patients with sepsis and non-sepsis, and between patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and non-MODS. The related factors of prognosis were analyzed by using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The short-form 36 was used to evaluate the quality of life of patients at 12 months after injury. Results Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly higher both in sepsis and MODS group on post-trauma day 3, 5, and 7 compared with the non-sepsis and non-MODS groups, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that HMGB1 levels and ISS were independent risk factors for sepsis and MODS in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Conclusions Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly elevated in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. HMGB1 levels were associated with the risk of poor outcome in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Daily HMGB1 levels measurements is a potential useful tool in the early identification of post-trauma complications. Further studies are needed to determine whether HMGB1 intervention could prevent the development of sepsis and MODS in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. PMID:25085006

  4. Biofilms and persistent wound infections in United States military trauma patients: a case–control analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complex traumatic injuries sustained by military personnel, particularly when involving extremities, often result in infectious complications and substantial morbidity. One factor that may further impair patient recovery is the persistence of infections. Surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, may play a role in hindering the management of infections; however, clinical data associating biofilm formation with persistent or chronic infections are lacking. Therefore, we evaluated the production of bacterial biofilms as a potential risk factor for persistent infections among wounded military personnel. Methods Bacterial isolates and clinical data from military personnel with deployment-related injuries were collected through the Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study. The study population consisted of patients with diagnosed skin and soft-tissue infections. Cases (wounds with bacterial isolates of the same organism collected 14 days apart) were compared to controls (wounds with non-recurrent bacterial isolates), which were matched by organism and infectious disease syndrome. Potential risk factors for persistent infections, including biofilm formation, were examined in a univariate analysis. Data are expressed as odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval [CI]). Results On a per infected wound basis, 35 cases (representing 25 patients) and 69 controls (representing 60 patients) were identified. Eight patients with multiple wounds were utilized as both cases and controls. Overall, 235 bacterial isolates were tested for biofilm formation in the case–control analysis. Biofilm formation was significantly associated with infection persistence (OR: 29.49; CI: 6.24-infinity) in a univariate analysis. Multidrug resistance (OR: 5.62; CI: 1.02-56.92), packed red blood cell transfusion requirements within the first 24 hours (OR: 1.02; CI: 1.01-1.04), operating room visits prior to and on the date of infection diagnosis (OR: 2.05; CI: 1

  5. [Effects of combined action of radon baths and transcranial magnetotherapy on cerebral circulation in patients in an intermediate period of a mild craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Moliavchikova, O V; Cherevashchenko, L A; Grinzaĭd, Iu M; Aĭvazov, V N; Zhuravlev, M E

    2007-01-01

    The authors propose combined therapy improving cerebral circulation in patients in an intermediate period of a mild craniocerebral trauma. The combination consists of radon baths and transcranial magnetotherapy which raise blood volume filling, relieve vascular resistance, improve venous outflow.

  6. Stylet angulation for routine endotracheal intubation with McGrath videolaryngoscope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Jong Yeop; Kang, Se Yoon; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Dongchul; Lee, Sook Young

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The McGrath videolaryngoscope (VL) provides excellent laryngoscopic views, but directing an endotracheal tube can be difficult, and thus the routine use of a stylet is recommended. The goal of this study is to determine the appropriate angle (60° vs 90°) of the stylet when using the McGrath VL by comparing the time to intubation (TTI). Methods: One hundred and forty patients aged 19 to 70 years (American Society of Anesthesiologists classification I or II) who required tracheal intubation for elective surgery were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 groups, at the 60° angle (n = 70) or the 90° angle (n = 70). Anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl, and rocuronium. The primary outcome was TTI assessed by a blind observer. Glottic grade, use of optimal external laryngeal manipulation, failed intubation at first attempt, ease of intubation, and severity of oropharyngeal bleeding were also recorded. Results: The mean TTI was significantly shorter in the 60° group than in the 90° group (29.3 ± 6.4 vs 32.5 ± 9.4 s, P = 0.022). The glottic grade and degree of intubation difficulty were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Conclusions: When intubating the patients with the McGrath videolaryngoscope, the 60° angled stylet allowed for faster orotracheal intubation than did the 90° angled stylet. PMID:28207549

  7. Characteristics of Patients with Lower Extremity Trauma with Improved and Not Improved Pain During Hospitalization: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, Mari A; Johantgen, Meg; Von Rueden, Kathryn; Greenspan, Joel D.; Dorsey, Susan G.; Renn, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Up to 62% of patients report chronic pain at the injury site 6-12 months after blunt trauma, with pain from lower extremity fractures exceeding that from other sites. High pain intensity at time of injury is a risk factor for chronic pain, but it is not clear what patient characteristics influence the pain intensity level during the immediate hospitalization following injury. Aim The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of collecting pain scores from medical records, to calculate pain trajectories, and to determine whether it is possible to examine patient characteristics by classifying them into those whose pain improved and those whose pain did not improve. Design This descriptive study retrospectively reviewed medical records of 18 randomly chosen patients admitted to an academic trauma center. Methods Patient characteristics and pain scores were collected form electronic and handwritten medical records. Results The pain trajectories calculated from routinely collected pain scores during the in-patient stay showed that for 44% of the patients the pain improved during the hospitalization, for 39% the pain remained the same and for 17% the pain worsened. Variables age, smoking, weight, abbreviated injury scores, length of hospital stay, mean pain score and opioid equianalgesic dose differed based on pain trajectory. Conclusion While patient characteristics differed based on pain trajectory, any significant effects seen from individual tests should be considered tentative, given the number of analyses conducted on this data set. However, feasibility and significance of conducting a larger study has been established. PMID:26545732

  8. Ultrasound in trauma.

    PubMed

    Rippey, James C R; Royse, Alistair G

    2009-09-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound is well suited for use in the emergency setting for assessment of the trauma patient. Currently, portable ultrasound machines with high-resolution imaging capability allow trauma patients to be imaged in the pre-hospital setting, emergency departments and operating theatres. In major trauma, ultrasound is used to diagnose life-threatening conditions and to prioritise and guide appropriate interventions. Assessment of the basic haemodynamic state is a very important part of ultrasound use in trauma, but is discussed in more detail elsewhere. Focussed assessment with sonography for Trauma (FAST) rapidly assesses for haemoperitoneum and haemopericardium, and the Extended FAST examination (EFAST) explores for haemothorax, pneumothorax and intravascular filling status. In regional trauma, ultrasound can be used to detect fractures, many vascular injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, testicular injuries and can assess foetal viability in pregnant trauma patients. Ultrasound can also be used at the bedside to guide procedures in trauma, including nerve blocks and vascular access. Importantly, these examinations are being performed by the treating physician in real time, allowing for immediate changes to management of the patient. Controversy remains in determining the best training to ensure competence in this user-dependent imaging modality.

  9. Children and Facial Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... up after Facial trauma: A prospective study. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1997: 117:72-75 Kim MK, Buchman ... trauma in children: An urban hospital’s experience. Otolaryngoly–Head Neck Surgery 2000: 123: 439-43 Patient Health Home ...

  10. The evolution of computed tomography from organ-selective to whole-body scanning in managing unconscious patients with multiple trauma: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Cheng-Jueng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chan, De-Chuan; Chou, Yu-Ching; Liang, Chia-Ming; Hsu, Sheng-Der

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate the benefit of whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) scanning for unconscious adult patients suffering from high-energy multiple trauma compared with the conventional stepwise approach of organ-selective CT.Totally, 144 unconscious patients with high-energy multiple trauma from single level I trauma center in North Taiwan were enrolled from January 2009 to December 2013. All patients were managed by a well-trained trauma team and were suitable for CT examination. The enrolled patients are all transferred directly from the scene of an accident, not from other medical institutions with a definitive diagnosis. The scanning regions of WBCT include head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. We analyzed differences between non-WBCT and WBCT groups, including gender, age, hospital stay, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, Revised Trauma Score, time in emergency department (ED), medical cost, and survival outcome.Fifty-five patients received the conventional approach for treating trauma, and 89 patients received immediate WBCT scanning after an initial examination. Patients' time in ED was significantly shorter in the WBCT group in comparison with the non-WBCT group (158.62 ± 80.13 vs 216.56 ± 168.32 min, P = 0.02). After adjusting for all possible confounding factors, we also found that survival outcome of the WBCT group was better than that of the non-WBCT group (odds ratio: 0.21, 95% confidence interval: 0.06-0.75, P = 0.016).Early performing WBCT during initial trauma management is a better approach for treating unconscious patients with high-energy multiple trauma.

  11. Elevated specific peripheral cytokines found in major depressive disorder patients with childhood trauma exposure: a cytokine antibody array analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaojia; Peng, Hongjun; Wang, Lifeng; Vasish, Seewoobudul; Zhang, Yan; Gao, Weijia; Wu, Weiwei; Liao, Mei; Wang, Mi; Tang, Hao; Li, Wenping; Li, Weihui; Li, Zexuan; Zhou, Jiansong; Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Lingjiang

    2013-10-01

    Taking into consideration the previous evidence of revealing the relationship of early life adversity, major depressive disorder (MDD), and stress-linked immunological changes, we recruited 22 MDD patients with childhood trauma exposures (CTE), 21 MDD patients without CTE, and 22 healthy controls without CTE, and then utilized a novel cytokine antibody array methodology to detect potential biomarkers underlying MDD in 120 peripheral cytokines and to evaluate the effect of CTE on cytokine changes in MDD patients. Although 13 cytokines were identified with highly significant differences in expressions between MDD patients and normal controls, this relationship was significantly attenuated and no longer significant after consideration of the effect of CTE in MDD patients. Depressed individuals with CTE (TD patients) were more likely to have higher peripheral levels of those cytokines. Severity of depression was associated with plasma levels of certain increased cytokines; meanwhile, the increased cytokines led to a proper separation of TD patients from normal controls during clustering analyses. Our research outcomes add great strength to the relationship between depression and cytokine changes and suggest that childhood trauma may play a vital role in the co-appearance of cytokine changes and depression.

  12. Childhood trauma and health outcom