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Sample records for invasive ductal carcinomas

  1. Synchronous invasive ductal carcinoma in encapsulated papillary ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Regan, J.P.; Casaubon, J.T.; Genelus-Dominique, E.

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulated papillary ductal carcinoma (EPC) of the breast is a rare form of cancer with defining histopathology of encapsulation. These lesions are typically indolent but may rarely have concomitant, synchronous invasive lesions. This report details a 56-year-old black female who presented with a palpable left breast mass. Adenosis with focal fibrous and ductal hyperplasia characteristics were found on core needle biopsy. Excisional biopsy showed EPC with invasive components. A simple mastectomy was performed and a second lesion was identified as invasive ductal carcinoma. EPC typically has good prognosis and a low incidence of invasion. The risk increases in the presence of a second, synchronous lesion as in our case. Management is typically performed with breast conserving methods; however, missing a second lesion is possible. This report provides an overview of the literature and discussion of the role of MRI in preoperative workup. PMID:27562577

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of ductal and lobular invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, N C S; Gomig, T H B; Milioli, H H; Cordeiro, F; Costa, G G; Urban, C A; Lima, R S; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, E M S F

    2016-04-04

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the first among women. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are the two major histological subtypes, and the clinical and molecular differences between them justify the search for new markers to distinguish them. As proteomic analysis allows for a powerful and analytical approach to identify potential biomarkers, we performed a comparative analysis of IDC and ILC samples by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Twenty-three spots were identified corresponding to 10 proteins differentially expressed between the two subtypes. ACTB, ACTG, TPM3, TBA1A, TBA1B, VIME, TPIS, PDIA3, PDIA6, and VTDB were upregulated in ductal carcinoma compared to in lobular carcinoma samples. Overall, these 10 proteins have a key role in oncogenesis. Their specific functions and relevance in cancer initiation and progression are further discussed in this study. The identified peptides represent promising biomarkers for the differentiation of ductal and lobular breast cancer subtypes, and for future interventions based on tailored therapy.

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of ductal and lobular invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, N C S; Gomig, T H B; Milioli, H H; Cordeiro, F; Costa, G G; Urban, C A; Lima, R S; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, E M S F

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the first among women. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are the two major histological subtypes, and the clinical and molecular differences between them justify the search for new markers to distinguish them. As proteomic analysis allows for a powerful and analytical approach to identify potential biomarkers, we performed a comparative analysis of IDC and ILC samples by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Twenty-three spots were identified corresponding to 10 proteins differentially expressed between the two subtypes. ACTB, ACTG, TPM3, TBA1A, TBA1B, VIME, TPIS, PDIA3, PDIA6, and VTDB were upregulated in ductal carcinoma compared to in lobular carcinoma samples. Overall, these 10 proteins have a key role in oncogenesis. Their specific functions and relevance in cancer initiation and progression are further discussed in this study. The identified peptides represent promising biomarkers for the differentiation of ductal and lobular breast cancer subtypes, and for future interventions based on tailored therapy. PMID:27173185

  4. Monitoring the progression from intraductal carcinoma to invasive ductal carcinoma based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-09-01

    Intraductal carcinoma is a precancerous lesion of the breast and the immediate precursor of invasive ductal carcinoma. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to monitor the progression from intraductal carcinoma to invasive ductal carcinoma, which can improve early detection of precursor lesions and halt progression to invasive neoplastic disease. It was found that MPM has the capability to reveal the qualitative changes in features of cells, structure of basement membranes, and architecture of collagens during the development from intraductal carcinoma to invasive ductal carcinoma, as well as the quantitative alterations in nuclear area, circle length of basement membrane, and collagen density. Combined with intra-fiberoptic ductoscopy or transdermal biopsy needle, MPM has the potential to provide immediate histological diagnosis of tumor progression in the field of breast carcinoma.

  5. Differences between invasive lobular and invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast: results and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Metzger-Filho, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most common histologic subtype of breast cancer (BC): ILC differs from invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in its clinicopathological characteristics and responsiveness to systemic therapy. From the clinical standpoint, data suggest that ILC derives a distinct benefit from systemic therapy compared to IDC. In addition, comprehensive molecular analyses have been reported for ILCs, confirming that these tumors have specific genomic profiles compared to IDC. Despite these differences, clinical trials and practical clinical guidelines tend to treat BC as a single entity. Here we discuss these clinical and molecular data and their therapeutic implications. PMID:27482285

  6. In situ clinical evidence that zinc levels are decreased in breast invasive ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jing; Franklin, Renty B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Altered zinc levels in malignant cells versus their normal cells have important implications in the development and progression of several cancers. Prostate, pancreatic, and hepatocellular carcinomas exhibit consistent marked zinc decrease in situ in the malignant cells, and other cancers (such as kidney, lung, and thyroid) also exhibit decreased tissue zinc levels. However, zinc levels are increased in breast cancer tissue compared to breast normal tissue, and the contemporary dominant view is that zinc is increased in invasive ductal carcinoma. This has important implications regarding the role and effects of zinc in breast malignancy compared to other cancers, which caused us to initiate this study to either confirm or challenge the contemporary view of an increased zinc level in the invasive ductal malignant cells. Methods We employed dithizone staining of breast tissue sections and tissue cores to determine the relative in situ cellular zinc levels specifically in the invasive ductal malignant cells as compared to normal ductal epithelium. This approach had not been employed in any of the reported breast studies. Results The results revealed that the zinc levels are consistently and markedly decreased in the ductal malignant cells as compared with higher prominent zinc levels in the normal ductal epithelium. Decreased zinc is evident in Grade 1 well-differentiated malignancy and in Grade 2 and Grade 3 carcinomas. Among the twenty-five cancer cases in this study, none exhibited increased zinc in the invasive ductal carcinoma compared to the zinc level in the normal ductal epithelium. Conclusions The decreased zinc levels in breast invasive ductal carcinoma is consistent with prostate, pancreatic, and liver carcinomas in which the decrease in zinc is a required event in the development of malignancy to prevent cytotoxicity that would result from the higher zinc levels in the normal cells. This new understanding requires a redirection in elucidating the

  7. Genomic differences between pure ductal carcinoma in situ and synchronous ductal carcinoma in situ with invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung; Baek, In-Pyo; Lee, Sung Hak; Kim, Tae-Min; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Although ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) precedes invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), the related genomic alterations remain unknown. To identify the genomic landscape of DCIS and better understand the mechanisms behind progression to IDC, we performed whole-exome sequencing and copy number profiling for six cases of pure DCIS and five pairs of synchronous DCIS and IDC. Pure DCIS harbored well-known mutations (e.g., TP53, PIK3CA and AKT1), copy number alterations (CNAs) and chromothripses, but had significantly fewer driver genes and co-occurrence of mutation/CNAs than synchronous DCIS-IDC. We found neither recurrent nor significantly mutated genes with synchronous DCIS-IDC compared to pure DCIS, indicating that there may not be a single determinant for pure DCIS progression to IDC. Of note, synchronous DCIS genomes were closer to IDC than pure DCIS. Among the clinicopathologic parameters, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative status was associated with increased mutations, CNAs, co-occurrence of mutations/CNAs and driver mutations. Our results indicate that although pure DCIS has already acquired some drivers, more changes are needed to progress to IDC. In addition, IDC-associated DCIS is more aggressive than pure DCIS at genomic level and should really be considered IDC. Finally, the data suggest that PR-negativity could be used to predict aggressive breast cancer genotypes. PMID:25831047

  8. Grading system for blood vessel tumor emboli of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Michiko; Hasebe, Takahiro; Shimada, Hiroko; Takeuchi, Hideki; Shimizu, Kyoko; Shimizu, Michio; Yasuda, Masanori; Ueda, Shigeto; Shigekawa, Takashi; Osaki, Akihiko; Saeki, Toshiaki

    2015-06-01

    We previously reported that the number of mitotic and apoptotic figures in tumor cells in blood vessel tumor emboli had the greatest significant power for the accurate prediction of the outcome of patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. The purpose of the present study was to devise a grading system for blood vessel tumor emboli based on the mitotic and apoptotic figures of tumor cells in blood vessel tumor emboli, enabling accurate prediction of the outcome of patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. We classified 263 invasive ductal carcinomas into the following 3 grades according to the numbers of mitotic and apoptotic figures in tumor cells located in blood vessels within 1 high-power field: grade 0, no blood vessel invasion; grade 1, absence of mitotic figures and presence of any number of apoptotic figures, or 1 mitotic figure and 0 to 2 apoptotic figures; and grade 2, 1 mitotic figure and 3 or more apoptotic figures, or 2 or more mitotic figures and 1 or more apoptotic figures. Multivariate analyses with well-known prognostic factors demonstrated that grade 2 blood vessel tumor emboli significantly increased the hazard ratios for tumor recurrence independent of the nodal status, pathological TNM stage, hormone receptor status, or HER2 status. The presently reported grading system for blood vessel tumor emboli is the strongest histologic factor for accurate prediction of the outcome of patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

  9. Inflammatory infiltrate in invasive lobular and ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A. H.; Happerfield, L. C.; Millis, R. R.; Bobrow, L. G.

    1996-01-01

    The significance of inflammation in carcinoma of the breast is controversial. Little attention has been paid to different patterns of inflammation or inflammation associated with different histological types of carcinoma. We have looked at the pattern of inflammation in 123 invasive mammary carcinomas (including 46 lobular), and characterised the inflammatory cells with immunohistochemistry in 21. We found different patterns of inflammation in ductal and lobular carcinoma. Diffuse inflammation was seen more in ductal carcinoma, particularly of high grade, and was predominantly composed of macrophages and T cells. It was associated with necrosis, but the correlation was weak, suggesting that other factors are important. Perilobular inflammation was seen most frequently in lobular and high-grade ductal carcinomas, particularly at the tumour edge. Perivascular inflammation was also largely at the tumour edge, but was not more common in any tumour type. In contrast to the diffuse inflammation, the perivascular and perilobular inflammation was composed of T and B cells. Normal lobules at the tumour edge showed consistent expression of HLA-DR, whereas lobules away from the tumour were negative. A combination of perilobular and perivascular inflammation composed of B and T cells with epithelial expression of HLA-DR mimicking lymphocytic lobulitis was seen more frequently in lobular than ductal carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8795584

  10. Invasive ductal carcinoma with in situ pattern: how to avoid this diagnostic pitfall?

    PubMed

    Mohan, Narasimhamurthy; Black, Jennifer O; Schwartz, Mary R; Zhai, Qihui Jim

    2016-01-01

    Although the microscopic features of invasion are usually readily recognized, occasionally invasive ductal carcinoma may mimic the pattern of comedo ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by forming large cellular nests with circumscribed borders, but lacking a definitive myoepithelial cell layer. In these cases, the histologic pattern may appear deceptively noninvasive and the absence of a myoepithelial layer can be easily overlooked. We prospectively examined 10 cases of high grade DCIS. P63, smooth muscle actin, muscle specific actin and calponin immunohistochemical stains were used to identify the presence of myoepithelial cells. In our study, 20% of apparent high grade DCIS cases did not exhibit a myoepithelial layer surrounding large, solid nests with comedo necrosis. Since invasion is defined by the absence of a myoepithelial layer, these results suggest that a DCIS-like pattern may actually represent invasive disease in some cases. Immunohistochemical studies may be essential in making this distinction and in avoiding the potential diagnostic pitfall. PMID:27648124

  11. Invasive ductal carcinoma with in situ pattern: how to avoid this diagnostic pitfall?

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Narasimhamurthy; Black, Jennifer O; Schwartz, Mary R; Zhai, Qihui Jim

    2016-01-01

    Although the microscopic features of invasion are usually readily recognized, occasionally invasive ductal carcinoma may mimic the pattern of comedo ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by forming large cellular nests with circumscribed borders, but lacking a definitive myoepithelial cell layer. In these cases, the histologic pattern may appear deceptively noninvasive and the absence of a myoepithelial layer can be easily overlooked. We prospectively examined 10 cases of high grade DCIS. P63, smooth muscle actin, muscle specific actin and calponin immunohistochemical stains were used to identify the presence of myoepithelial cells. In our study, 20% of apparent high grade DCIS cases did not exhibit a myoepithelial layer surrounding large, solid nests with comedo necrosis. Since invasion is defined by the absence of a myoepithelial layer, these results suggest that a DCIS-like pattern may actually represent invasive disease in some cases. Immunohistochemical studies may be essential in making this distinction and in avoiding the potential diagnostic pitfall.

  12. Risk of subsequent invasive breast cancer after a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

    PubMed

    Cheung, Shan; Booth, Mary E; Kearins, Olive; Dodwell, David

    2014-12-01

    Despite surgical removal of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), recurrences still occur. This retrospective cohort study evaluated the risk of invasive recurrence following surgery and investigated factors which may be predictive of recurrence. We specifically investigated invasive recurrence with respect to mode of detection of DCIS. Patients whose DCIS was detected outside of the NHS Breast Screening Programme have a higher risk of subsequent ipsilateral invasive breast cancer than those whose DCIS is detected through screening. There is no significant difference in risk of subsequent contralateral invasive recurrence according to mode of detection.

  13. Mucinous carcinoma of the breast is genomically distinct from invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type.

    PubMed

    Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Suarez, Paula H; MacKay, Alan; Lambros, Maryou B; Natrajan, Rachael; Savage, Kay; Geyer, Felipe C; Weigelt, Britta; Ashworth, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2010-11-01

    Mucinous carcinomas are a rare entity accounting for up to 2% of all breast cancers, which have been shown to display a gene expression profile distinct from that of invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type (IDC-NSTs). Here, we have defined the genomic aberrations that are characteristic of this special type of breast cancer and have investigated whether mucinous carcinomas might constitute a genomic entity distinct from IDC-NSTs. Thirty-five pure and 11 mixed mucinous breast carcinomas were assessed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, HER2, Ki67, cyclin D1, cortactin, Bcl-2, p53, E-cadherin, basal markers, neuroendocrine markers, and WT1. Fifteen pure mucinous carcinomas and 30 grade- and ER-matched IDC-NSTs were microdissected and subjected to high-resolution microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). In addition, the distinct components of seven mixed mucinous carcinomas were microdissected separately and subjected to aCGH. Pure mucinous carcinomas consistently expressed ER (100%), lacked HER2 expression (97.1%), and showed a relatively low level of genetic instability. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that pure mucinous carcinomas were homogeneous and preferentially clustered together, separately from IDC-NSTs. They less frequently harboured gains of 1q and 16p and losses of 16q and 22q than grade- and ER-matched IDC-NSTs, and no pure mucinous carcinoma displayed concurrent 1q gain and 16q loss, a hallmark genetic feature of low-grade IDC-NSTs. Finally, both components of all but one mixed mucinous carcinoma displayed similar patterns of genetic aberrations and preferentially clustered together with pure mucinous carcinomas on unsupervised clustering analysis. Our results demonstrate that mucinous carcinomas are more homogeneous between themselves at the genetic level than IDC-NSTs. Both components of mixed mucinous tumours are remarkably similar at the

  14. Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma Underneath a Lipoma in a Male Patient

    PubMed Central

    Landero, James; Glick, Bradley P.

    2012-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare malignancy and accounts for less than one percent of all cancers in men. The authors describe the case of a 76-year-old Caucasian man with invasive ductal breast carcinoma who presented with a common lipoma. This paper reviews the current literature on epidemiology, risk factors, etiology, different types of breast cancer, clinical presentation, imaging, diagnostic workup, and treatment. PMID:23125888

  15. A case of renal cell carcinoma metastasizing to invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Di; Lee, Li-Yu

    2014-02-01

    Tumor-to-tumor metastasis is an uncommon but well-documented phenomenon. We present a case of a clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastasizing to an invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. A 74-year-old woman with a past history of clear cell RCC status after radical nephrectomy underwent right modified radical mastectomy for an enlarging breast mass 3 years after nephrectomy. Histological examination revealed a small focus with distinct morphological features similar to clear cell RCC encased in the otherwise typical IDC. Immunohistochemical studies showed that this focus was positive for CD10 and vimentin, in contrast to the surrounding IDC, which was negative for both markers and positive for Her2/neu. Based on the histological and immunohistochemical features, the patient was diagnosed with metastasis of clear cell RCC to the breast IDC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a breast neoplasm as the recipient tumor in tumor-to-tumor metastasis. PMID:24530247

  16. Latissimus Dorsi Flap Invasion by Ductal Breast Carcinoma after Lipofilling

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Muhannad; Garrido, Ignacio; Vaysse, Charlotte; Chavoin, Jean Pierre; Grolleau, Jean Louis

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Autologous fat grafting is commonly performed in reconstructive breast surgery but also increasingly in breast augmentation surgery. On the international level, we are witnessing an important increased confidence for this procedure. Nevertheless, it continues to raise questions on the risks of cancer. A 66-year-old patient benefited from a lipofilling to improve a latissimus dorsi flap breast reconstruction, 7 years after initial cancer management. Two years later, constant pain in the flap leads to reoperation. The flap showed a major retraction with histologically massive infiltration of the muscle by an undifferentiated carcinoma of breast origin. The tumor cells were displayed directly in contact with lipofilling inside the muscle. Without establishing any causal link between these 2 events, this case raises the question once more of the risks of breast cancer and encourages us to continue being careful. PMID:25289263

  17. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of fibrotic focus in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijia; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    During the proliferation of breast cancer, the desmoplastic can evoke a fibrosis response by invading healthy tissue. Fibrotic focus (FF) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast had been reported to be associated with significantly poorer survival rate than IDC without FF. As an important prognosis indicator, it's difficult to obtain the exact fibrotic information from traditional detection method such as mammography. Multiphoton imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) has been recently employed for microscopic examination of unstained tissue. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to image the fibrotic focus in invasive ductal carcinoma tissue. The morphology and distribution of collagen in fibrotic focus can be demonstrated by the SHG signal. Variation of collagen between IDC with and without FF will be examined and further characterized, which may be greatly related to the metastasis of breast cancer. Our result suggested that the MPM can be efficient in identifying and locating the fibrotic focus in IDC. Combining with the pathology analysis and other detecting methods, MPM owns potential in becoming an advanced histological tool for detecting the fibrotic focus in IDC and collecting prognosis information, which may guide the subsequent surgery option and therapy procedure for patients.

  18. Monitoring morphological alterations during invasive ductal breast carcinoma progression using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Chuan; Nie, Yuting; Zheng, Liqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu

    2015-04-01

    Morphological alteration of cells and matrices is critical for tumor initiation and progression. Monitoring these alterations during tumor progression is vitally important for making real-time histological diagnoses of tumor staging. In this study, 20 pairs of normal and cancerous human breast tissues were imaged by multiphoton microscopy (MPM), and nuclear area and collagen density were quantified by LSM 5 software (version 3.2). Comparison of MPM images from normal breast tissue with low- and high-grade invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions clearly showed changes in both cellular features and extracellular matrix architecture during IDC development. Moreover, analysis of nuclear area and collagen density established a quantitative link between these two morphological features and progression of IDC. Present results demonstrated that MPM can provide both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of tumor progression. With additional development, this technique has the potential to make real-time histological diagnoses of tumor staging and guide development of efficacious clinical therapies.

  19. [Clinical-biological differences between invasive ductal carcinomas and breast lobular carcinomas. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Ruibal, A; Núñez, M I; del Río, M f; Arias, J; Martínez, M I; Rabadán, J; Tejerina, A

    1999-01-01

    In order to know the biological differences between both histological types, we have analyzed some clinical and biological parameters in tissues of women having infiltrating carcinomas (247 ductal (IDCs) 17 and lobular (ILCs) of the breast. Our preliminary results led us to suggest the following. 1) In negative axillary lymph node involvement (N-) patients, ILCs were more frequently associated with diploidy and the existence of multiple foci; likewise, they had higher pS2 cytosolic levels than IDC; 2) in N+ patients, ILC were associated with multicentricity and had higher concentrations of progesterone receptors and 3) these findings could help to explain us the clinical and biological peculiarities, as well as, the clinical outcome of both histological types. PMID:10352319

  20. Quantitative changes of collagen in human normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqiang; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging of collagen plays a key role in noninvasive diagnosis of human tissue. During the experiment, we observed an interesting phenomenon which two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal of collagen in human invasive ductal carcinoma of breast tissue becomes much weaker than the normal breast tissue, but the second harmonic generation (SHG) signal of collagen does not get an obvious change . In order to explain the phenomena,this paper emphasizes on the intensity of TPEF and SHG signal from collagen in human invasive ductal carcinoma of breast tissues and normal breast tissue. Further, we respectively obtain the intensity spectral information from collagen in the above two tissues with all parameter unaltered. Our quantitative results show that the intensity of TPEF from collagen in human invasive ductal carcinoma of breast tissue is much lower than the intensity of TPEF from collagen in normal breast tissue. According to the theoretic analysis, it was concluded that the intensity of TPEF declined due to the reduction of the quantum yield when the collagen was intruded by cancer cells. However, the invasion of cancer cells has no effect on decisive factor of SHG. Our theoretical analysis brings more detailed information about intensity of SHG and TPEF from collagen in the above two tissues.

  1. Invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast showing partial reversed cell polarity are associated with lymphatic tumor spread and may represent part of a spectrum of invasive micropapillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Acs, Geza; Esposito, Nicole N; Rakosy, Zsuzsa; Laronga, Christine; Zhang, Paul J

    2010-11-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinomas (IMPC) of the breast are aggressive tumors frequently associated with lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis even when micropapillary (MP) differentiation is very focal within the tumors. We have noticed that some breast carcinomas showing lymphatic spread but lacking histologic features of IMPC have occasional tumor cell clusters reminiscent of those of IMPC without the characteristic prominent retraction artifact. To study the clinicopathologic significance of such features, we prospectively selected 1323 invasive ductal carcinomas and determined the presence and extent of MP differentiation and retraction artifact in the tumors. One representative tumor block per case was used for immunostaining for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). Partial reverse cell polarity (PRCP) was defined as prominent linear EMA reactivity on at least part of the periphery of tumor cell clusters usually associated with decreased cytoplasmic staining. The clinicopathologic features of carcinomas with PRCP were compared with IMPC and invasive ductal (no special type) carcinomas without this feature. Of the 1323 cases, 96 (7.3%) and 92 (7.0%) showed MP features and the presence of PRCP, respectively. We found that the presence of both PRCP and MP features were strongly associated with decreased cytoplasmic EMA immunoreactivity and the presence of lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis, even if such features were present only very focally. Our results suggest that breast carcinomas with PRCP may have the same implication as MP differentiation and these tumors may represent part of a spectrum of IMPC. Complete or partial reversal of cell polarity may play a significant role in lymphatic tumor spread.

  2. Invasive ductal breast carcinoma detector that is robust to image magnification in whole digital slides.

    PubMed

    Balazsi, Matthew; Blanco, Paula; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Levine, Martin D; Burnier, Miguel N

    2016-04-01

    Invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDBCs) are the most frequent and aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, affecting a large number of Canadian women every year. Part of the diagnostic process includes grading the cancerous tissue at the microscopic level according to the Nottingham modification of the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson system. Although reliable, there exists a growing interest in automating the grading process, which will provide consistent care for all patients. This paper presents a solution for automatically detecting regions expressing IDBC in images of microscopic tissue, or whole digital slides. This represents the first stage in a larger solution designed to automatically grade IDBC. The detector first tessellated whole digital slides, and image features were extracted, such as color information, local binary patterns, and histograms of oriented gradients. These were presented to a random forest classifier, which was trained and tested using a database of 66 cases diagnosed with IDBC. When properly tuned, the detector balanced accuracy, F1 score, and Dice's similarity coefficient were 88.7%, 79.5%, and 0.69, respectively. Overall, the results seemed strong enough to integrate our detector into a larger solution equipped with components that analyze the cancerous tissue at higher magnification, automatically producing the histopathological grade. PMID:27226977

  3. [Synchronous and ipsilateral invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast occurring near a phyllodes tumor - a case report].

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Saki; Sakurai, Kenichi; Suzuki, Shuhei; Sakagami, Masashi; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Amano, Sadao; Koshinaga, Tsugumichi

    2014-11-01

    We report 2 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast occurring near a phyllodes tumor. The first case was ofa 58- year-old woman who had a tumor in her right breast and visited our hospital. Following a core needle biopsy (CNB), a malignant phyllodes tumor was diagnosed. We performed a lumpectomy for the phyllodes tumor, with 1.5-cm surgical margins. Pathological diagnosis of the resected specimen confirmed the malignant phyllodes tumor. A ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) was also discovered near the phyllodes tumor. The second case was of another 58-year-old woman who had a big tumor in her right breast and visited our hospital. CNB resulted in pathological diagnosis ofa benign phyllodes tumor. The tumor was removed by a lumpectomy with 1.5-cm surgical margins. The pathological diagnosis from the resected specimen was borderline phyllodes tumor with invasive ductal carcinoma in the proximity. In both cases, DCIS could not have been diagnosed preoperatively. PMID:25731391

  4. Correlation between Ultrasound Findings of Tumor Margin and Clinicopathological Findings in Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Sannomiya, Naoko; Hattori, Yuiko; Ueda, Naoyuki; Kamida, Akira; Koyanagi, Yuki; Nagira, Haruki; Ikunishi, Saeko; Shimabayashi, Kenta; Hashimoto, Yuki; Murata, Aya; Sato, Kengo; Hirooka, Yumi; Hosoya, Keiko; Ishiguro, Kiyosuke; Murata, Yoko; Hirooka, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast ultrasound findings regarding tumor margins are crucial in judging whether a tumor is malignant or benign. However, the relationships between the margins and clinicopathological characteristics remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with invasive ductal carcinoma whose ultrasound images showed either well-defined and rough or indistinct margins. Methods Of all consecutive patients diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma at the Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery of Tottori University Hospital from January 2012 to December 2014, 122 patients whose ultrasound images showed either “well-defined and rough” or “indistinct” tumor margins were included in this study. Mammography and ultrasound images taken at the initial examination were reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups based on ultrasound findings of the tumor margins: the “well-defined and rough group” and the “indistinct group.” The relationships among ultrasound findings, mammography findings and clinicopathological findings were investigated in the two groups. Results The well-defined and rough group was more likely to contain solid-tubular carcinoma, while the indistinct group was more likely to contain scirrhous carcinoma. The MIB-1 index was higher in the well-defined and rough group than in the indistinct group. Additionally, the proportion of patients with nuclear grade 3, estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative, and triple-negative breast cancer was greater in the well-defined and rough group than in the indistinct group. Conclusion Invasive ductal carcinomas with well-defined and rough margins on ultrasound were likely to be malignant and proliferative than those with indistinct margins. PMID:27493488

  5. Expression of melatonin receptor MT1 in cells of human invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, Karolina; Pula, Bartosz; Zemla, Agata; Owczarek, Tomasz; Wojnar, Andrzej; Rys, Janusz; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    In humans, two main types of membrane melatonin receptors have been identified, MT1 and MT2. Expression of MT1 in neoplastic cells seems to increase the efficacy of melatonin's oncostatic activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution and the intensity of MT1 expression in breast cancer cells and to correlate it with clinicopathological factors. Immunohistochemical studies (IHC) were conducted on 190 cases of invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDC) and molecular studies were performed on 29 cases of frozen tumor fragments and selected breast cancer cell lines. Most of the studied tumors manifested a membranous/cytoplasmic IHC expression of MT1. In IDC, the MT1 expression was higher than in fibrocystic breast disease. MT1 expression was higher in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and HER2 positive (HER2+) tumors. Triple negative tumors (TN) manifested the lowest MT1 expression level. The lowest MT1 protein expression level was noted in the TN breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 compared with ER+ cell lines MCF-7 and SK-BR-3. MT1 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the malignancy grade of the studied IDC cases. Moreover, higher MT1 expression was associated with patients' longer overall survival (OS) in the group of ER+ breast cancers and treated with tamoxifen. Multivariate analysis indicated that MT1 was an independent prognostic factor in the ER+ tumors for OS and event-free survival in the ER+ tumors. The results of this study may point to a potential prognostic and therapeutic significance of MT1 in IDC.

  6. Automatic detection of invasive ductal carcinoma in whole slide images with convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; González, Fabio; Gilmore, Hannah; Feldman, Michael; Ganesan, Shridar; Shih, Natalie; Tomaszewski, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a deep learning approach for automatic detection and visual analysis of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tissue regions in whole slide images (WSI) of breast cancer (BCa). Deep learning approaches are learn-from-data methods involving computational modeling of the learning process. This approach is similar to how human brain works using different interpretation levels or layers of most representative and useful features resulting into a hierarchical learned representation. These methods have been shown to outpace traditional approaches of most challenging problems in several areas such as speech recognition and object detection. Invasive breast cancer detection is a time consuming and challenging task primarily because it involves a pathologist scanning large swathes of benign regions to ultimately identify the areas of malignancy. Precise delineation of IDC in WSI is crucial to the subsequent estimation of grading tumor aggressiveness and predicting patient outcome. DL approaches are particularly adept at handling these types of problems, especially if a large number of samples are available for training, which would also ensure the generalizability of the learned features and classifier. The DL framework in this paper extends a number of convolutional neural networks (CNN) for visual semantic analysis of tumor regions for diagnosis support. The CNN is trained over a large amount of image patches (tissue regions) from WSI to learn a hierarchical part-based representation. The method was evaluated over a WSI dataset from 162 patients diagnosed with IDC. 113 slides were selected for training and 49 slides were held out for independent testing. Ground truth for quantitative evaluation was provided via expert delineation of the region of cancer by an expert pathologist on the digitized slides. The experimental evaluation was designed to measure classifier accuracy in detecting IDC tissue regions in WSI. Our method yielded the best quantitative

  7. Increased expression of CD146 and microvessel density (MVD) in invasive micropapillary carcinoma of the breast: Comparative study with invasive ductal carcinoma-not otherwise specified.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Yang, Dongling; Wang, Shuling; Guo, Xiaojing; Lang, Ronggang; Fan, Yu; Gu, Feng; Zhang, Xinmin; Niu, Yun; Yan, Xiyun; Fu, Li

    2011-12-15

    Invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) is a rare variant of ductal carcinoma of the breast, and is characterized by a high metastatic potential and an aggressive clinical course. Studies of CD146 expression and function in breast cancer remain scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of CD146 and microvessel density (MVD) in breast IMPC. CD146 mRNA expression and immunohistochemistry for CD146 and MVD measured by CD31 were assessed in 82 cases of IMPC and 137 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified (IDC-NOS). The mRNA level of CD146 in cancer specimens was higher in IMPC than in IDC-NOS. CD146 expression in tumor cells was up-regulated in IMPC as compared with that in IDC-NOS, and was positively correlated with histological grade, ER, PR status, and P53 expression in IMPC and IDC-NOS. CD146 expression in vascular endothelial cells was significantly higher than that in IDC, and was positively correlated with tumor progression in IMPC and IDC-NOS. MVD in IMPC was significantly higher than that in IDC. CD146 expression in tumor cells was positively correlated with that in vascular endothelial cells of IMPC and IDC-NOS. The association of CD146 expression with MVD and its correlation with progression in breast carcinoma indicated that CD146 is a potentially useful prognostic marker for breast cancer. CD146 could be a new drug target in the treatment of breast cancer.

  8. Zinc presence in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and its correlation with oestrogen receptor status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, M. J.; Al-Ebraheem, A.; Geraki, K.; Leek, R.; Jubb, A.; Harris, A. L.

    2009-07-01

    Zinc is known to play an important role in many cellular processes, and the levels of zinc are controlled by specific transporters from the ZIP (SLC39A) influx transporter group and the ZnT (SLC30A) efflux transporter group. The distribution of zinc was measured in 59 samples of invasive ductal carcinoma of breast using synchrotron radiation micro probe x-ray fluorescence facilities. The samples were formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue micro arrays (TMAs) enabling a high throughput of samples and allowing us to correlate the distribution of trace metals with tumour cell distribution and, for the first time, important biological variables. The samples were divided into two classes, 34 oestrogen receptor positive (ER+ve) and 25 oestrogen receptor negative (ER-ve) based on quantitative immunohistochemistry assessment. The overall levels of zinc (i.e. in tumour and surrounding tissue) in the ER+ve samples were on average 60% higher than those in the ER-ve samples. The zinc levels were higher in the ER+ve tumour areas compared to the ER-ve tumour areas with the mean levels in the ER+ve samples being approximately 80% higher than the mean ER-ve levels. However, the non-tumour tissue regions of the samples contained on average the same levels of zinc in both types of breast cancers. The relative levels of zinc in tumour areas of the tissue were compared with levels in areas of non-tumour surrounding tissue. There was a significant increase in zinc in the tumour regions of the ER+ve samples compared to the surrounding regions (P < 0.001) and a non-significant increase in the ER-ve samples. When comparing the increase in zinc in the tumour regions expressed as a percentage of the surrounding non-tumour tissue zinc level in the same sample, a significant difference between the ER+ve and ER-ve samples was found (P < 0.01).

  9. Correlation of HER2 overexpression with gene amplification and its relation to chromosome 17 aneuploidy: a 5-year experience with invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Aziza; Khoor, Andras; Radhakrishnan, Reshmitha; Radhakrishnan, Anu; Cohen, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The HER2 oncogene shows expression or amplification, or both, in approximately 15% to 20% of breast cancers and has been associated with poor prognosis and a response to trastuzumab therapy. HER2 gene status determines the eligibility of breast cancer patients for trastuzumab therapy and a large fraction (41-56%) of these patients respond to targeted therapy. Several studies have related the increased expression of HER2 to an increased copy number of chromosome 17, rather than amplification of the HER2 gene. We compared the results of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization in both invasive ductal and invasive lobular carcinomas, to determine the frequency of chromosome 17 aneuploidy associated with discordant results. In total, 390 invasive ductal carcinomas and 180 invasive lobular carcinomas diagnosed from January 2000 to December 2005 were included in the study only if results were available for immunohistochemistry (HercepTest; DAKO, Carpinteria, California) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (PathVysion HER2 DNA Probe Kit; Abbott Laboratories, Des Plaines, Illinois). Tumors classified as invasive ductal carcinomas were graded according to the Bloom-Richardson grading system. Correlation between the results of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed for all categories. Among invasive ductal carcinomas, 29% (115/390) showed chromosome 17 aneuploidy, mostly associated with grade 3/HER2 2+ (45%) or grade 2/HER2 3+ (55%) that were not amplified. Also, 34% (12/35) of invasive lobular carcinomas showed chromosome 17 aneuploidy; approximately one-third of these cases were HER2 2+ (33%) and HER2 3+ (37%) that were not amplified. Discordance between the results of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization in both ductal and lobular carcinomas is largely associated with chromosome 17 aneuploidy.

  10. Identification of the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma during breast-conserving surgery using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongxin; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery has become an important way of surgical treatment for breast cancer worldwide nowadays. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has the ability to noninvasively visualize tissue architectures at the cellular level using intrinsic fluorescent molecules in biological tissues without the need for fluorescent dye. In this study, MPM is used to image the microstructures of terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU), invasive ductal carcinoma and the boundary region between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Our study demonstrates that MPM has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the cuboidal epithelium, basement membrane and interlobular stroma but also identify the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, which correspond well to the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) images. Predictably, MPM can monitor surgical margins in real time and provide considerable accuracy for resection of breast cancerous tissues intraoperatively. With the development of miniature, real-time MPM imaging technology, MPM should have great application prospects during breast-conserving surgery.

  11. The phosphorylation status of VASP at serine 322 can be predictive for aggressiveness of invasive ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sahra; Geiger, Xochiquetzal; Storz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) signaling is critical for dynamic actin reorganization processes that define the motile phenotype of cells. Here we show that VASP is generally highly expressed in normal breast tissue and breast cancer. We also show that the phosphorylation status of VASP at S322 can be predictive for breast cancer progression to an aggressive phenotype. Our data indicate that phosphorylation at S322 is gradually decreased from normal breast to DCIS, luminal/ER+, HER2+ and basal-like/TN phenotypes. Similarly, the expression levels of PKD2, the kinase that phosphorylates VASP at this site, are decreased in invasive ductal carcinoma samples of all three groups. Overall, the phosphorylation status of this residue may serve as an indicator of aggressiveness of breast tumors. PMID:26336132

  12. Psychosocial distress affecting patients with ductal carcinoma in situ compared to patients with early invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Loftin, Adam; Seda, Julia S; Ehlenbeck, Chris

    2014-12-01

    Psychological distress in patients with a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or early invasive breast cancer (EIBC) can emanate from perceived risk of recurrence and is accompanied by perceived risk of death from the diseases. These factors can impart a lower quality of life that can result in poorer health outcomes. In addition, inaccurate risk perceptions can have an effect on decision making, psychosocial outcomes, and subsequent health behaviors. The purpose of this study is to assess patients with DCIS and EIBC and their perceived risk of recurrence and perceived risk of dying, and evaluate their outlook for the future, the degree of social support from spouses and significant others of patients who have been diagnosed with DCIS and EIBC, and the relationship to the patient's perceived risk perception of recurrence and dying from the diseases.

  13. The phosphorylation status of VASP at serine 322 can be predictive for aggressiveness of invasive ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Döppler, Heike; Bastea, Ligia; Borges, Sahra; Geiger, Xochiquetzal; Storz, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) signaling is critical for dynamic actin reorganization processes that define the motile phenotype of cells. Here we show that VASP is generally highly expressed in normal breast tissue and breast cancer. We also show that the phosphorylation status of VASP at S322 can be predictive for breast cancer progression to an aggressive phenotype. Our data indicate that phosphorylation at S322 is gradually decreased from normal breast to DCIS, luminal/ER+, HER2+ and basal-like/TN phenotypes. Similarly, the expression levels of PKD2, the kinase that phosphorylates VASP at this site, are decreased in invasive ductal carcinoma samples of all three groups. Overall, the phosphorylation status of this residue may serve as an indicator of aggressiveness of breast tumors. PMID:26336132

  14. Current management of ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Barth, A; Brenner, R J; Giuliano, A E

    1995-10-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ represents a biologically and histologically heterogeneous group of lesions characterized by the proliferation of neoplastic epithelial cells confined to the ducts of the breast. Before screening mammography, ductal carcinoma in situ was considered uncommon; patients were usually diagnosed by a breast mass or bloody nipple discharge, and their treatment was mastectomy. Today it represents 20% to 30% of mammographically detected breast cancers and 10% to 15% of all diagnosed breast cancers in the United States. The invariable progression of this cancer to invasive breast cancer requiring mastectomy has been challenged, but because most patients have been treated with mastectomy, knowledge about ductal carcinoma in situ is limited and primarily based on retrospective data. Further insight will emerge from randomized prospective studies that are near completion. Currently available data indicate that breast-conserving treatments are valid alternatives to mastectomy for most patients with this disease. PMID:7483593

  15. Association between ALDH1+/CD133+ stem-like cells and tumor angiogenesis in invasive ductal breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LV, XINQUAN; WANG, YINGZI; SONG, YIMIN; PANG, XIA; LI, HUIXIANG

    2016-01-01

    The growth and metastasis of tumors is dependent on angiogenesis; however, the association between tumor stem cells (TSCs) and tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of the TSC markers aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) and cluster of differentiation 133 (CD133) in invasive ductal breast carcinoma, and identify their correlation with tumor angiogenesis. Stem-like cells from the breast tissue of 120 patients, who were diagnosed with invasive ductal breast carcinoma at The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University (Zhengzhou, Henan, China) between January 2009 and December 2010, were collected by surgical resection and analyzed using immunohistochemical double staining. The expression of the vascular markers CD34, CD105 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined using single staining. Overall, 25.83% (31/120) of the specimens contained a large number of ALDH1+/CD133+ stem-like cells (ALDH1+/CD133+ tumor). ALDH1+/CD133+ expression is associated with microvessel density, VEGF-positive rate and estrogen receptor expression (P<0.05); however, ALDH1+/CD133+ expression was not associated with age, tumor diameter, lymph node metastasis, histological classification, progesterone receptor expression or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression (P>0.05). The ALDH1+/CD133+ tumor phenotype and expression of VEGF were identified to be correlated in the present study (P=0.020). The present study revealed a close association between breast cancer TSC markers, including ALDH1 and CD133, and tumor angiogenesis. The results of the present study may provide a novel target and treatment strategy for future studies investigating tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26998072

  16. Molecular Features of Subtype-Specific Progression from Ductal Carcinoma In Situ to Invasive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lesurf, Robert; Aure, Miriam Ragle; Mørk, Hanne Håberg; Vitelli, Valeria; Lundgren, Steinar; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela; Wärnberg, Fredrik; Hallett, Michael; Sørlie, Therese

    2016-07-26

    Breast cancer consists of at least five main molecular "intrinsic" subtypes that are reflected in both pre-invasive and invasive disease. Although previous studies have suggested that many of the molecular features of invasive breast cancer are established early, it is unclear what mechanisms drive progression and whether the mechanisms of progression are dependent or independent of subtype. We have generated mRNA, miRNA, and DNA copy-number profiles from a total of 59 in situ lesions and 85 invasive tumors in order to comprehensively identify those genes, signaling pathways, processes, and cell types that are involved in breast cancer progression. Our work provides evidence that there are molecular features associated with disease progression that are unique to the intrinsic subtypes. We additionally establish subtype-specific signatures that are able to identify a small proportion of pre-invasive tumors with expression profiles that resemble invasive carcinoma, indicating a higher likelihood of future disease progression. PMID:27396337

  17. The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) – current definitions and classification

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Sarah E; Ellis, Ian O

    2003-01-01

    Intraductal epithelial proliferations of the breast are at present classified into three groups; distinction is made histologically and clinically between usual epithelial hyperplasia and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and between ADH and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Although evidence indicates that these boundaries are not ideal on a morphological, immunohistochemical, or genetic basis, this three-tier system is accepted and used at present. The current definitions, histological features, and system of classification of ADH and DCIS are described in this manuscript. PMID:12927035

  18. Invasive ductal carcinoma within borderline phyllodes tumor with lymph node metastases: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WU, DI; ZHANG, HAIPENG; GUO, LIANG; YAN, XU; FAN, ZHIMIN

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor (PT) is a rare type of biphasic fibroepithelial neoplasm that may coexist with a breast tumor in rare cases. In the current study, a 52-year-old female presented with a left breast lump. Mammography and sonographic examination results suggested a diagnosis of malignant tumor. Histological analysis revealed a borderline PT with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) within the tumor. Due to the presence of a single micrometastasis in three of the sentinel lymph nodes, the patient underwent modified radical mastectomy. The excised tumor contained triple negative breast cancer; therefore, postoperative treatment included six cycles of chemotherapy and 25 cycles of radiotherapy. The patient exhibited no recurrence and no metastatic disease at the 23-month follow-up examination. Thus, the present study discussed the case of a female patient that presented with IDC within borderline PT and reviewed the literature on this rare type of neoplasm. Various types of breast carcinoma have been identified to coexist with PT in different masses; however, no standard therapeutic regimen has been established for the coexistence of PT and breast cancer in the same mass. The present study indicates that determination of an appropriate treatment strategy predominantly depends on the characteristics of the individual breast tumor. PMID:27073506

  19. Expression of genes responsible for the repair of mispaired bases of the DNA (MLH1) in invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Milanović, Rudolf; Stanec, Sanda; Stanec, Mladen; Korusić, Andelko; Husedzinović, Ino; Razumović, Jasminka Jakić

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases determined and distinguished by cellular type, gene expression and clinical signs and symptoms. Identification of histological and biological markers is of great value in predicting the progression of tumor growth and anticipating the expected response to various treatment options. Due to a high degree of cell proliferation in breast tumors and high genetic instability of these tumors, as a consequence of defective DNA repair mechanisms, chemotherapy as a treatment option often renders very successful results. During our scientific research we wanted to determine the involvement of the genetic polymorphisms of DNA mismatch repair system (MLH1 gene) and the subsequent development of breast carcinoma. This study included 108 patients who were surgically treated for invasive breast cancer at the Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, University Hospital "Dubrava". The expression of the MLH1 gene was determined by immunohistochemical methods. The results showed that 82.9% of tumor cells expressed the MLH1 gene. Analysis of survival rate for patients with invasive ductal breast cancer showed a statistically significant (p = 0.043) correlation with the expression of MLH1 genes. The overall five year survival rate of our patients was 78.7%. These results indicate that there is a possible involvement of MLH1 gene in the progression and development of breast cancer.

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Prediction Model for Underestimated Invasive Breast Cancer in Women with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ at Stereotactic Large Core Needle Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Diepstraten, Suzanne C. E.; van de Ven, Stephanie M. W. Y.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Elias, Sjoerd G.

    2013-01-01

    Background We aimed to develop a multivariable model for prediction of underestimated invasiveness in women with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, that can be used to select patients for sentinel node biopsy at primary surgery. Methods From the literature, we selected potential preoperative predictors of underestimated invasive breast cancer. Data of patients with nonpalpable breast lesions who were diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, drawn from the prospective COBRA (Core Biopsy after RAdiological localization) and COBRA2000 cohort studies, were used to fit the multivariable model and assess its overall performance, discrimination, and calibration. Results 348 women with large core needle biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ were available for analysis. In 100 (28.7%) patients invasive carcinoma was found at subsequent surgery. Nine predictors were included in the model. In the multivariable analysis, the predictors with the strongest association were lesion size (OR 1.12 per cm, 95% CI 0.98-1.28), number of cores retrieved at biopsy (OR per core 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.01), presence of lobular cancerization (OR 5.29, 95% CI 1.25-26.77), and microinvasion (OR 3.75, 95% CI 1.42-9.87). The overall performance of the multivariable model was poor with an explained variation of 9% (Nagelkerke’s R2), mediocre discrimination with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.58-0.73), and fairly good calibration. Conclusion The evaluation of our multivariable prediction model in a large, clinically representative study population proves that routine clinical and pathological variables are not suitable to select patients with large core needle biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ for sentinel node biopsy during primary surgery. PMID:24147085

  1. A Pilot Study of Ultrasound-Guided Cryoablation of Invasive Ductal Carcinomas up to 15 mm With MRI Follow-Up and Subsequent Surgical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Poplack, Steven P.; Levine, Gary M.; Henry, Lisa; Wells, Wendy A.; Heinemann, F. Scott; Hanna, Cheryl M.; Deneen, Daniel R.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Barth, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided cryoablation in treating small invasive ductal carcinoma and to assess the role of contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI in determining the outcome of cryoablation. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Twenty consecutive participants with invasive ductal carcinomas up to 15 mm, with limited or no ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), underwent ultrasound-guided cryoablation. Preablation mammography, ultrasound, and CE-MRI were performed to assess eligibility. Clinical status was evaluated at 1 day, 7–10 days, and 2 weeks after ablation. CE-MRI was performed 25–40 days after ablation, followed by surgical resection within 5 days. RESULTS Ultrasound-guided cryoablation was uniformly technically successful, and postablation clinical status was good to excellent in all participants. Cryoablation was not clinically successful in 15% (three of 20 patients). Three participants had residual cancer at the periphery of the cryoablation site. Two participants had viable nonmalignant tissue within the central zone of cryoablation-induced necrosis. Postablation CE-MRI had a sensitivity of 0% (0/3) and specificity of 88% (15/17). The predictive value of negative findings on CE-MRI was 83% (15/18). Correlations between cancer characteristics, cryoablation procedural variables, postablation CE-MRI findings, and surgical specimen features were not statistically significant. There were also no significant differences in participants with or without residual cancer. CONCLUSION In our pilot experience, ultrasound-guided cryoablation of invasive ductal carcinomas up to 15 mm has a clinical failure rate of 15% but is technically feasible and well tolerated by patients. The majority of cryoablation failures are manifest as DCIS outside the cryoablation field. Postablation CE-MRI does not reliably predict cryoablation outcome. PMID:25905948

  2. Increased breast density correlates with the proliferation-seeking radiotracer (99m)Tc(V)-DMSA uptake in florid epithelial hyperplasia and in mixed ductal carcinoma in situ with invasive ductal carcinoma but not in pure invasive ductal carcinoma or in mild epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Papantoniou, Vassilios; Valsamaki, Pipitsa; Sotiropoulou, Evangelia; Tsaroucha, Angeliki; Tsiouris, Spyridon; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Marinopoulos, Spyridon; Kounadi, Evangelia; Karianos, Theodore; Fothiadaki, Athina; Archontaki, Aikaterini; Syrgiannis, Konstantinos; Ptohis, Nikolaos; Makris, Nikolaos; Limouris, Georgios; Antsaklis, Aris

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of mammographic breast density (BD) and cell proliferation/focal adhesion kinase activation-seeking radiotracer technetium 99m pentavalent dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc(V)-DMSA) uptake in women with different breast histologies, that is, mild epithelial hyperplasia (MEH), florid epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), mixed ductal carcinoma in situ with invasive ductal carcinoma (DCIS + IDC), and pure IDC. Fifty-five women with histologically confirmed mammary pathologies were submitted preoperatively to mammography and 99mTc(V)-DMSA scintimammography. The percentage and intensity of 99mTc(V)-DMSA uptake and the percentage of BD were calculated by computer-assisted methods and compared (t-test) between the breast pathologies. In breasts with increased BD, FEH and DCIS + IDC were found. On the contrary, pure IDC and MEH were identified in breasts with significantly lower BD values. In breasts with increased 99mTc(V)-DMSA area and intensity of uptake, FEH was the main lesion found compared to all other histologies. Linear regression analysis between BD and 99mTc(V)-DMSA uptake area and intensity revealed significant coefficients of correlation (r  =  .689, p < .001 and r  =  .582, p < .001, respectively). Increased BD correlates with the presence of FEH and mixed DCIS + IDC but not with pure IDC or MEH. Its close relationship to 99mTc(V)-DMSA, which also showed an affinity to FEH, indicates that stromal microenvironment may constitute a specific substrate leading to progression to different subtypes of cancerous lesions originating from different pathways.

  3. Phenotypic Drift as a Cause for Intratumoral Morphological Heterogeneity of Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma Not Otherwise Specified

    PubMed Central

    Zavyalova, Marina V.; Tashireva, Lubov A.; Gerashchenko, Tatiana S.; Litviakov, Nikolay V.; Skryabin, Nikolay A.; Vtorushin, Sergey V.; Telegina, Nadezhda S.; Slonimskaya, Elena M.; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V.; Perelmuter, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) not otherwise specified (NOS), the most common type of breast cancer, demonstrates great intratumoral morphological heterogeneity, which encompasses the presence of different types of morphological structures—tubular, trabecular, solid, and alveolar structures and discrete groups of tumor cells, the origins of which remain unclear at present. In this study of 162 IDC NOS patients, we investigated whether the distribution of different types of morphological structures is related to the basic clinicopathological parameters of IDC NOS. Our results showed that in patients with only one type of tumor structure, the presence of any one of the five types was equally probable; however, cases with two types of structures were more likely to contain trabecular structures than the other four types. The development of intratumoral morphological heterogeneity was not associated with menopausal status, tumor size, histological grade, hematogenic metastasis, or recurrence. However, the number of different types of morphological structures was significantly higher in luminal tumors than in triple-negative tumors. An increase in the frequency of lymph node metastasis correlated with the increased number of different types of structures in breast tumors; however, in contrast to premenopausal patients, this association was explained by the presence of alveolar structures in postmenopausal women. In addition, we showed a significant decrease in the numbers of positive lymph nodes in tumors with high numbers of morphological variants. The frequency of lymph node metastases and the number of positive nodes were generally independent features and formed by different mechanisms. Based on the evidence, the term “phenotypic drift” has been designated as the basis for the development of intratumoral morphological heterogeneity of IDC NOS. PMID:23593567

  4. Predictors for local invasive recurrence of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xining; Dai, Hongji; Liu, Ben; Song, Fengju; Chen, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of mammographic screening has considerably increased the detection rate of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which has a high probability of recurrence. We carried out a meta-analysis to evaluate the predictive factors including biomarkers, tumor characteristics, and modes of detection on the risk of local invasive recurrence (LIR) following DCIS. Searches were performed in PubMed and EMBASE up to 8 July 2014. Risk estimates (hazard ratios, odds ratios, and relative risks) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were extracted to calculate the strength of the associations between predictive factors and the risk of LIR after treatment of DCIS. STATA 12.0 was used to combine results in this meta-analysis. A total of 18 articles were included in the analysis. Pooled risk estimates and 95% CIs were 1.36 (1.04-1.69) for the positive margin, 1.38 (1.12-1.63) for the nonscreening detection method, 1.04 (0.84-1.24) for high nuclear grade 1, 1.32 (0.98-1.66) for intermediate nuclear grade 2, 1.18 (0.98-1.37) for comedonecrosis, 1.00 (0.92-1.08) for large tumor size, 1.34 (0.82-1.87) for multifocality, 0.74 (0.36-1.12) for estrogen receptor-positive tumors, 0.89 (0.47-1.31) for progesterone receptor-positive tumors, and 1.25 (0.7-1.81) for HER2/neu-positive tumors. Positive margin and non-screening-detected cancers were associated with a higher risk of LIR following DCIS. These predictive factors, after further validation, could be considered to tailor treatment for individual patients. PMID:25714649

  5. Proteomic analysis of O-GlcNAcylated proteins in invasive ductal breast carcinomas with and without lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kuan; Gao, Yang; Hou, Weiwei; Tian, Fang; Ying, Wantao; Li, Ling; Bai, Bingyang; Hou, Gang; Wang, Peng George; Zhang, Lianwen

    2016-02-01

    The potential role of protein O-GlcNAcylation in cancer has been studied extensively, and the spread of cancer cells to regional lymph nodes is the first step in the dissemination of breast cancer. However, the correlation between O-GlcNAcylation and lymphatic metastasis in breast cancer remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the overall O-GlcNAcylation as well as O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) tends to decrease in response to the augmentation of lymph node metastasis (LNM) in invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDCs). Although accumulating evidence indicates that individual O-GlcNAcylation may be important in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, O-GlcNAcylated proteins in IDCs are still largely unexplored. Herein, O-GlcNAcylated proteins of IDCs were chemo-enzymatically enriched and identified via liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry. In total, 155 O-GlcNAcylated proteins were determined, of which 41 were only observed in LNM tissues, while 40 were unique in non-LNM samples. Gene ontology analysis showed that O-GlcNAc is primarily a nucleocytoplasmic post-translational modification, and most enriched functional terms were related to cancer development in both metastatic and non-metastatic IDCs. Moreover, several O-GlcNAcylated proteins involved in glycolysis and its accessory pathway were identified from LNM and non-LNM groups, respectively. These results indicate that the O-GlcNAcylation statuses of individual proteins were independent of the overall O-GlcNAcylation levels of metastatic and non-metastatic IDCs. Aberrant O-GlcNAc modification of these proteins might be associated with LNM progression.

  6. Myc Promoter-Binding Protein-1 (MBP-1) Is a Novel Potential Prognostic Marker in Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Flavia; Mazzarella, Claudia; Sbacchi, Silvia; Roz, Elena; Lupo, Carmelo; Perconti, Giovanni; Giallongo, Agata; Migliorini, Paola; Marrazzo, Antonio; Feo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Background Alpha-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the formation of phosphoenolpyruvate in the cell cytoplasm. α-Enolase and the predominantly nuclear Myc promoter-binding protein-1 (MBP-1) originate from a single gene through the alternative use of translational starting sites. MBP-1 binds to the P2 c-myc promoter and competes with TATA-box binding protein (TBP) to suppress gene transcription. Although several studies have shown an antiproliferative effect of MBP-1 overexpression on several human cancer cells, to date detailed observations of α-enolase and MBP-1 relative expression in primary tumors versus normal tissues and their correlation with clinicopathological features have not been undertaken. Methodology and Findings We analyzed α-enolase and MBP-1 expression in normal breast epithelium and primary invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC) from 177 patients by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, using highly specific anti-α-enolase monoclonal antibodies. A significant increase in the expression of cytoplasmic α-enolase was observed in 98% of the tumors analysed, compared to normal tissues. Nuclear MBP-1 was found in almost all the normal tissues while its expression was retained in only 35% of the tumors. Statistically significant associations were observed among the nuclear expression of MBP-1 and ErbB2 status, Ki-67 expression, node status and tumor grade. Furthermore MBP-1 expression was associated with good survival of patients with IDC. Conclusions MBP-1 functions in repressing c-myc gene expression and the results presented indicate that the loss of nuclear MBP-1 expression in a large number of IDC may be a critical step in the development and progression of breast cancer and a predictor of adverse outcome. Nuclear MBP-1 appears to be a novel and valuable histochemical marker with potential prognostic value in breast cancer. PMID:20886042

  7. Difference in characteristics and outcomes between medullary breast carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma: a population based study from SEER 18 database

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Jing; Song, Chuan-Gui; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Medullary breast carcinoma (MBC) is a unique histological subtype of breast cancer. Our study was designed to identify difference in characteristics and outcomes between MBC and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and further confirm the prognostic factors of MBC. Utilizing Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER), we identified 84,764 eligible patients, including 309 MBC and 84,455 IDC. Compared with the IDC group, the MBC group was associated with younger age at diagnosis, higher grade, more advanced stage, larger tumor size, and higher proportion of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Kaplan-Meier analysis and univariate Cox proportional hazard regression model showed that patients with IDC had significantly better breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) compared to MBC, but they had similar overall survival (OS). However, MBC histology was no longer a surrogate for worse BCSS or OS after 1:1 matching by age, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, grade and breast subtype. In addition, it was exposed that not married status, high grade, large tumor size, positive nodal status, the subtype of TNBC and no receipt of radiation therapy were significantly associated with poor BCSS and OS. In conclusion, MBC demonstrated more aggressive behavior but similar outcomes compared to IDC, which may be determined by prognostic factors such as breast subtype. These results not only confer deeper insight into MBC but contribute to individualized and tailored therapy, and thereby may improve clinical management and outcomes. PMID:27009810

  8. High Expression of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Is Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Do, Sung-Im; Hyun, Keehoon; Park, Yong Lai; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Chae, Seoung Wan; Sohn, Jin Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we evaluated the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by performing immunohistochemical staining to determine whether they were reliable prognostic markers in patients with breast cancer. Methods Demographic and clinicopathological parameters of 214 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and 80 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who were diagnosed and treated from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed. Tissue microarray was constructed and immunohistochemical staining was performed for each specimen. Results Univariate analyses showed that age at diagnosis, history of hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, skin and chest wall invasion, Paget disease, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor positivity, and triple-negative subtype were significantly associated with patient prognosis (p<0.005). Patients with DCIS showed higher PAI-1 expression than patients with IDC (82.5% and 36.2%, respectively; p=0.012). Lymph node metastasis was more frequent in patients with high uPA levels than in patients with low uPA levels (p=0.001). Conclusion Our results suggested that PAI-1 was involved in tumor progression in the early stages of breast cancer, such as DCIS. In addition, our results suggested that high uPA levels were associated with the lymph node metastasis of IDC. PMID:27382391

  9. Role of preoperative breast MRI in ductal carcinoma in situ for prediction of the presence and assessment of the extent of occult invasive component.

    PubMed

    Nori, Jacopo; Meattini, Icro; Giannotti, Elisabetta; Abdulcadir, Dalmar; Mariscotti, Giovanna; Calabrese, Massimo; Angelino, Francesca; Chiesa, Fabio; Saieva, Calogero; Vanzi, Ermanno; Boeri, Cecilia; Bianchi, Simonetta; Sanchez, Luis; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato; Susini, Tommaso; Livi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a common neoplasm that may be associated with focal invasive breast cancer lesions. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in determining occult invasive presence and disease extent in patients with preoperative diagnosis of pure DCIS. We analyzed 125 patients with postoperative pure DCIS (n = 91) and DCIS plus invasive component (n = 34). Diagnostic mammography (MRX) showed a size underestimation rate of 30.4% while MRI showed an overestimation rate of 28.6%. Comparing the mean absolute error between preoperative MRI and MRX evaluations and final disease extent, MRI showed an improved accuracy of 51.2%. In our analysis preoperative breast MRI showed a better accuracy in predicting postoperative pathologic extent of disease, adding strength to the growing evidences that preoperative MRI can lead to a more appropriate management of DCIS patients. PMID:24750509

  10. Differential copy number aberrations in novel candidate genes associated with progression from in situ to invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shaoxi; Desouki, Mohamed M; Gaile, Daniel P; Shepherd, Lori; Nowak, Norma J; Conroy, Jeffrey; Barry, William T; Geradts, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    Only a minority of intraductal carcinomas of the breast give rise to stromally invasive disease. We microdissected 206 paraffin blocks representing 116 different cases of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Fifty-five were pure DCIS (PD) cases without progression to invasive carcinoma. Sixty-one cases had a small invasive component. DNA was extracted from microdissected sections and hybridized to high-density bacterial artificial chromosome arrays. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of 118 hybridized DNA samples yielded data on 69 samples that were suitable for further statistical analysis. This cohort included 20 pure DCIS cases, 25 mixed DCIS (MD), and 24 mixed invasive carcinoma samples. PD cases had a higher frequency of DNA copy number changes than MD cases, and the latter had similar DNA profiles compared to paired invasive carcinomas. Copy number changes on 13 chromosomal arms occurred at different rates in PD versus MD lesions. Eight of 19 candidate genes residing at those loci were confirmed to have differential copy number changes by quantitative PCR. NCOR2/SMRT and NR4A1 (both on 12q), DYNLRB2 (16q), CELSR1, UPK3A, and ST13 (all on 22q) were more frequently amplified in PD. Moreover, NCOR2, NR4A1, and DYNLRB2 showed more frequent copy number losses in MD. GRAP2 (22q) was more often amplified in MD, whereas TAF1C (16q) was more commonly deleted in PD. A multigene model comprising these candidate genes discriminated between PD and MD lesions with high accuracy. These findings suggest that the propensity to invade the stroma may be encoded in the genome of intraductal carcinomas.

  11. Optical diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma using advanced optical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    Clinical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer mainly include X-ray mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which have respective drawbacks. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a potentially attractive optical technique to bridge the current gap in clinical utility. In this paper, MPM was used to image normal and ductal cancerous breast tissues, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our results showed that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of normal breast tissue, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions at the molecular level comparable to histopathology. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time histological diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma in vivo.

  12. Expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins BUBR1, MAD2, Aurora A, cyclin A and cyclin E in invasive ductal breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Du, Qiang; Zhang, Yang; Sajdik, Constantin; Ruan, Yuan; Tian, Xin-xia; Fang, Wei-gang

    2011-06-01

    Cyclin A, cyclin E, BUBR1, MAD2 and Aurora A are all cell-cycle regulatory proteins and have been proven to play crucial roles in carcinogenesis. However, their expression patterns in invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDBC) are controversial and unclear. In this study, we examined the expression status of these candidate proteins in a set of 117 invasive ductal carcinomas, and evaluated their associations with known clinicopathological parameters and the expressions of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, Ki-67 and Her-2. Univariate and multivariate data analyses both displayed that positive BUBR1 expression was associated with a high Ki-67 labeling index, and negative MAD2 expression was associated with Her-2 overexpression. Positive BUBR1 expression was also associated with a high histological tumor grade in univariate analysis, but not in multivariate analysis. In addition, high Aurora A expression was weakly associated with lymph node metastasis, and cyclin A was strongly associated with the expression of cyclin E in both univariate and multivariate models. In conclusion, this study suggests that evaluation of BUBR1, MAD2 and Aurora A expression levels is likely to improve accuracy of prognostic predictions in IDBC.

  13. Ductal carcinoma in situ - update on risk assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jia-Min B; Gorringe, Kylie L; Fox, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) accounts for ~20-25% of breast cancers. While DCIS is not life-threatening, it may progress to invasive carcinoma over time, and treatment intended to prevent invasive progression may itself cause significant morbidity. Accurate risk assessment is therefore necessary to avoid over- or undertreatment of an individual patient. In this review we will outline the evidence for current management of DCIS, discuss approaches to DCIS risk assessment and challenges facing identification of novel DCIS biomarkers.

  14. Clinical-Pathologic Features and Long-Term Outcomes of Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast Compared With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gene-Fu F.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institutional experience of treating tubular carcinoma of the breast (TC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with conservative surgery and radiation therapy, to compare clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A review of our institution's tumor registry from 1975 to 2007, followed by a central pathology review of available slides, yielded 71 cases of Stage I/II TC and 2,238 cases of Stage I/II IDC treated with breast conservation therapy. Clinical-pathologic features and outcomes were analyzed by subtype to detect significant differences. Results: The median follow-up was 7 years. The TC cohort presented more frequently with pT1 disease (97% vs. 80%, p = 0.0007), pN0 disease (95% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004), hormone-receptor positivity (ER+, 89% vs. 62%, p = 0.0001; PR+, 81% vs. 52%, p = 0.0001), and HER-2 negativity (89% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). Clinical outcomes also favored the TC cohort, with lower rates of breast cancer-related death (1% vs. 10%; p = 0.0109) and distant metastasis (1% vs. 13%; p = 0.0028) and higher rates of 10-year overall (90% vs. 80%; p = 0.033), cause-specific (99% vs. 86%; p = 0.011), and disease-free (99% vs. 82%; p = 0.003) survival. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved breast cancer relapse-free survival for the TC cohort (95% vs. 87%; p = 0.062) but no difference in nodal relapse-free survival or contralateral breast cancer relapse-free survival (all p values >0.05) between the cohorts. Conclusion: Our institutional experience suggests that TC, when compared with IDC, is associated with more favorable clinical-pathologic features and comparable, if not superior, outcomes after breast conservation therapy, suggesting the appropriateness of a conservative approach to this rare subtype.

  15. A comparison of quality of life, disease impact and risk perception in women with invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Y R B M; Voogd, A C; Vingerhoets, A J J M; Mols, F; Nieuwenhuijzen, G A P; van Driel, O J Repelaer; van Berlo, C L H; van de Poll-Franse, L V

    2007-02-01

    We compared the health-related quality of life, impact of the disease, risk perception of recurrence and dying of breast cancer, and understanding of diagnosis of patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer 2-3 years after treatment. We included all women (N=211) diagnosed with DCIS or invasive breast cancer TNM stage I (T1, N0, and M0) in three community hospitals in the southern part of The Netherlands in the period 2002-2003. After verifying the medical files, 180 disease free patients proved eligible for study entry, 47 of whom had DCIS and 133 stage I invasive breast cancer. One-hundred and thirty-five patients returned a completed questionnaire (75% response). No significant differences were found between women with DCIS and invasive breast cancer on the physical and mental component scale of the RAND SF-36, nor on the WHO-5, which assesses well-being. In contrast, women with DCIS reportedly had a better physical health, better sex life and better relationships with friends/acquaintances than women with invasive breast cancer. Despite their better prognosis, the DCIS-group had comparable perceptions of the risk of recurrence and dying of breast cancer as women with invasive breast cancer. However, this did not appear to affect their well-being significantly.

  16. Predictors of disease progression in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast and vascular patterns.

    PubMed

    Adler, Esther H; Sunkara, Jaya L; Patchefsky, Arthur S; Koss, Leopold G; Oktay, Maja H

    2012-04-01

    Breast carcinoma-induced angiogenesis helps meet growing metabolic needs of tumors and progressively increases with malignant transformation of benign ducts to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and ductal carcinoma in situ to invasive carcinoma. There are conflicting data regarding the difference in angiogenesis in low-, intermediate-, and high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. If angiogenesis is related to ductal carcinoma in situ progression, the types of ductal carcinoma in situ with more aggressive biologic potential would have different vascular patterns than the less aggressive ones. In this study, we classified 51 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ as low (10-20 years to progression to invasive carcinoma), moderate, or high aggressive (2-5 years to progression to invasive carcinoma), based on criteria outlined by Tsikitis and Chung (Am J Clin Oncol 2006; 29:305), which takes into account nuclear grade, mitotic rate, Ki-67, Her2Neu, P53, estrogen, and progesterone receptor expression. We correlated these 3 groups of ductal carcinoma in situ with the extent of periductal and stromal vascularity and the presence and type of vascular breaks. No association of aggressive biologic behavior of ductal carcinoma in situ with any vascular pattern was found. Moreover, no correlation was found between vascular patterns and classifiers of aggressiveness, microvascular density, or outcome (local recurrence, invasive carcinoma, or metastatic disease). To validate our cohort, we confirmed expected correlations of all measured parameters of aggressiveness by correlating them with each other. In summary, vascular patterns in ductal carcinoma in situ do not correlate with the predictors of aggressive behavior, suggesting that the biologic potential of ductal carcinoma in situ is independent of angiogenesis.

  17. The lipid-reactive oxygen species phenotype of breast cancer. Raman spectroscopy and mapping, PCA and PLSDA for invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma. Molecular tumorigenic mechanisms beyond Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Surmacki, Jakub; Brozek-Pluska, Beata; Kordek, Radzislaw; Abramczyk, Halina

    2015-04-01

    Vibrational signatures of human breast tissue (invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma) were used to identify, characterize and discriminate structures in normal (noncancerous) and cancerous tissues by confocal Raman imaging, Raman spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy. The most important differences between normal and cancerous tissues were found in regions characteristic for vibrations of carotenoids, fatty acids, proteins, and interfacial water. Particular attention was paid to the role played by unsaturated fatty acids and their derivatives. K-means clustering and basis analysis followed by PCA and PLSDA is employed to analyze Raman spectroscopic maps of human breast tissue and for a statistical analysis of the samples (82 patients, 164 samples). Raman maps successfully identify regions of carotenoids, fatty acids, and proteins. The intensities, frequencies and profiles of the average Raman spectra differentiate the biochemical composition of normal and cancerous tissues. The paper demonstrates that Raman imaging has reached a clinically relevant level in regard to breast cancer diagnosis applications. The sensitivity and specificity obtained directly from PLSLD and cross validation are equal to 90.5% and 84.8% for calibration and 84.7% and 71.9% for cross-validation respectively.

  18. Genomic and mutational profiling of ductal carcinomas in situ and matched adjacent invasive breast cancers reveals intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity and clonal selection

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou B; Campion-Flora, Adriana; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Gauthier, Arnaud; Cabral, Cecilia; Pawar, Vidya; Mackay, Alan; A’Hern, Roger; Marchiò, Caterina; Palacios, Jose; Natrajan, Rachael; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the progression from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast are yet to be fully elucidated. Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the progression from DCIS to IDC, including the selection of a subpopulation of cancer cells with specific genetic aberrations, the acquisition of new genetic aberrations or non-genetic mechanisms mediated by the tumour microenvironment. To determine whether synchronously diagnosed ipsilateral DCIS and IDCs have modal populations with distinct repertoires of gene copy number aberrations and mutations in common oncogenes, matched frozen samples of DCIS and IDCs were retrieved from 13 patients and subjected to microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH), and Sequenom MassARRAY (Oncocarta v1.0 panel). Fluorescence in situ hybridisation and Sanger sequencing were employed to validate the aCGH and Sequenom findings, respectively. Although the genomic profiles of matched DCIS and IDCs were similar, in three of 13 matched pairs amplification of distinct loci (i.e. 1q41, 2q24.2, 6q22.31, 7q11.21, 8q21.2 and 9p13.3) was either restricted to, or more prevalent in, the modal population of cancer cells of one of the components. Sequenom MassARRAY identified PIK3CA mutations restricted to the DCIS component in two cases, and in a third case, the frequency of the PIK3CA mutant allele reduced from 49% in the DCIS to 25% in the IDC component. Despite the genomic similarities between synchronous DCIS and IDC, our data provide strong circumstantial evidence to suggest that in some cases the progression from DCIS to IDC is driven by the selection of non-modal clones that harbour a specific repertoire of genetic aberrations. PMID:22252965

  19. Histopathologcial and clonal study of combined lobular and ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Tazaki, Eri; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Mizutani, Natsuko; Nomura, Sachiyo; Isaka, Hirotsugu; Ito, Hiroki; Imi, Kentaro; Imoto, Shigeru; Kamma, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) clinically constitutes a risk factor for the subsequent development of either invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). In order to approach the possibility of this common precursor of both ILC and IDC, we investigated combined lobular and ductal carcinomas. Thirty-two cases of lobular carcinoma were picked up out of 773 cases of operated breast carcinomas. The histopathological detailed re-examination using immunostain of E-cadherin and β-catenin revealed a rather high frequency of combined lobular carcinomas than previous reports. Clinicopathologically, combined lobular carcinomas were younger and smaller than pure lobular carcinomas, and the cytological atypia was relatively low. These results suggested that combined lobular carcinomas could be detected in the earlier stage of breast cancer. Furthermore, the lobular and ductal components of combined carcinomas coexisted in the neighborhood and were distributed contiguously. The immunohistochemical phenotypes of both components were accorded in most combined cases. A genetic analysis using methylation-specific PCR on the HUMARA gene demonstrated that the same allele was inactivated in both lobular and ductal components in all detectable cases of combined carcinoma. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that both lobular and ductal components of combined carcinomas are clonal and derived from the LCIS as the common precursor lesion, which may contradict the conventional concept that the lobular and ductal carcinomas arise from distinct differentiation pathways.

  20. Large, central acellular zones indicating myoepithelial tumor differentiation in high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas as markers of predisposition to lung and brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, H; Takarabe, T; Hasegawa, F; Fukutomi, T; Hirohashi, S

    2000-02-01

    High-grade invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) of the breast with large, central acellular zones on their cut surfaces are usually associated with the myoepithelial immunophenotype of carcinoma cells, which includes the expression of S-100 protein, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and keratin 14. To clarify the clinical significance of these features of IDCs, the authors compared the incidence of the myoepithelial immunophenotype immunohistochemically, patient prognosis, and metastatic sites of the tumor between 20 high-grade IDCs with large, central acellular zones and 40 control high-grade IDCs without these zones. The myoepithelial immunophenotype was detected in 16 IDCs (80%) with large, central acellular zones but in only seven IDCs (18%) without. The risk ratio of metastasis, especially in the brain and lung, and death from cancer were significantly higher (p = 0.0096 and p = 0.030) for the 20 IDCs with large, central acellular zones than for those without by Cox's univariate analysis. Using Cox's multivariate analysis, large, central acellular zones in IDCs were an indicator of high risk of brain and lung metastases and of death by cancer independent of nodal status and tumor size. Examination of large, central acellular zones and myoepithelial immunophenotype in high-grade IDCs appears helpful in predicting patient prognosis and preferential metastatic sites of the tumors.

  1. Calretinin expression in high-grade invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast is associated with basal-like subtype and unfavorable prognosis.

    PubMed

    Taliano, Ross J; Lu, Shaolei; Singh, Kamaljeet; Mangray, Shamlal; Tavares, Rose; Noble, Lelia; Resnick, Murray B; Yakirevich, Evgeny

    2013-12-01

    Calretinin, a calcium-binding protein, is a widely used marker for mesothelial differentiation. There is accumulating evidence of calretinin expression in epithelial and mesenchymal malignancies, as well. The objectives of this study were to (1) further delineate the expression of calretinin in grade 3 breast carcinomas in the context of molecular subtypes and (2) identify the impact of calretinin expression on overall and disease-free survival. On the basis of immunohistochemical expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), cytokeratin 5/6, and epidermal growth factor receptor, 214 grade 3 invasive ductal carcinomas were stratified into 36 luminal A, 63 luminal B, 24 HER2 positive, 81 basal-like (including 13 metaplastic carcinomas), and 10 unclassified. Tissue microarrays were analyzed for immunohistochemical expression of calretinin. High-level calretinin expression was identified in a significant proportion of basal-like (54.3%), HER2 (33.3%), and unclassified (30%) tumors. In contrast, luminal A and B subtypes demonstrated high-level calretinin expression in only 11.1% and 12.7%, respectively (P < .0001). Within the basal-like group, 38.5% of the metaplastic carcinomas demonstrated high-level expression, associated predominantly with the epithelial component and squamous metaplasia. High-level calretinin expression was strongly associated with decreased overall survival in the entire cohort of grade 3 cancer (P = .0096) and in the basal-like group (P = .039). Multivariate analysis revealed that both tumor stage and high-level calretinin expression were independent predictors of overall survival (P = .0002 and P = .0023, respectively). In conclusion, high-level calretinin expression is most common in grade 3 tumors with a basal-like phenotype and is associated with poor overall survival.

  2. Ductal carcinoma in situ - update on risk assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jia-Min B; Gorringe, Kylie L; Fox, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) accounts for ~20-25% of breast cancers. While DCIS is not life-threatening, it may progress to invasive carcinoma over time, and treatment intended to prevent invasive progression may itself cause significant morbidity. Accurate risk assessment is therefore necessary to avoid over- or undertreatment of an individual patient. In this review we will outline the evidence for current management of DCIS, discuss approaches to DCIS risk assessment and challenges facing identification of novel DCIS biomarkers. PMID:26768032

  3. Possible Prognostic Role of HER2/Neu in Ductal Carcinoma In Situ and Atypical Ductal Proliferative Lesions of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Sahar Aly; Ismail, Wesam Maghawri; Abdelhamid, Mohamed Salah; Nabil, Tamer Mohamed; Daoud, Sahar Aly

    2016-01-01

    HER2/neu is a well-established prognostic and predictive factor for invasive breast cancer. However, the role of HER2/neu in ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is debated and recent data have suggested that it is mainly linked to in situ local recurrence. Although molecular data suggest that atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and duct carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are related lesions, albeit with vastly different clinical implications, the role of HER2/neu expression in atypical ductal hyperplasia is not well defined either. The aim of this study was to evaluate over expression of HER2/neu in DCIS and cases of ADH in comparison with invasive breast carcinoma. Archival primary breast carcinoma paraffin blocks (n=15), DCIS only (n=10) and ductal epithelial hyperplasia and other breast benign lesions (n=25) were analyzed for HER2/neu immunoexpression. Follow up was available for 40% of the patients. HER2/neu was positive in 80%of both DCIS and invasive carcinoma, and 67% of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) cases. Thus at least a subset of patients with preinvasive breast lesions were positive, which strongly suggests a role for Her2/neu in identifying high-risk patients for malignant transformation. Although these are preliminary data, which need further studies of gene amplification within these patients as well as a larger patient cohort with longer periods of follow up, they support the implementation of routine Her2/neu testing in patients diagnosed as pure DCIS and in florid ADH. PMID:27644608

  4. Three-Dimensional Assessment of Automated Breast Volume Scanner Compared with Handheld Ultrasound in Pre-Operative Breast Invasive Ductal Carcinomas: A Pilot Study of 51 Cases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaoli; Wei, Shuping; Xie, Yingdong; Guan, Xiaoxiang; Yang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the work described here was to compare the accuracy of conventional handheld ultrasound (HHUS) with that of an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) in 3-D assessment of pre-operative invasive ductal carcinomas. HHUS and ABVS were used in 51 patients to obtain the largest tumor diameter, tumor volume and tumor surface area. The volumetric measurement was also obtained from ABVS data with medical software. With tumor size and volume on pathology as the gold standard, Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare variability. Correlation coefficients and receiver operating characteristic curves were established for all measurements for T2 classification. The correlation coefficients of all ABVS measurements were stronger than those of HHUS measurements, with the ABVS volumetric measurement significantly different with a higher accuracy of 88.24% (45/51) and predicting T-classification with higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (0.936). Therefore, 3-D measurements provide stronger correlations with pathology in tumor size measurement. However, more clinical trials are needed to confirm our findings.

  5. Correlation of intensity of MT-I/II expression with Ki-67 and MCM-2 proteins in invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wojnar, Andrzej; Pula, Bartosz; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Jethon, Aleksandra; Kujawa, Krzysztof; Kobierzycki, Christopher; Rys, Janusz; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the clinical significance of the intensity of metallothionein (MT-I/II) expression and its relationship to two different proliferation markers, Ki-67 antigen and minichromosome maintaince 2 protein (MCM-2) in 117 patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC). A significantly higher MT-I/II expression was noted in the grade 3 (G3) carcinomas as compared to those of G1 and G2. A positive correlation was observed between the MT-I/II expression and both proliferation markers, Ki-67 (r=0.20, p=0.0343) and MCM-2 (r=0.25, p=0.0065). Also a strong positive correlation was noted between Ki-67 and MCM-2 expression (r=0.52, p<0.0001). No significant correlations were found between the analyzed markers and tumour size, lymph node metastasis, oestrogen expression (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) or human epidermal growth-factor receptor (HER-2) expression. Out of the three studied markers only the high expression of Ki-67 exhibited a negative impact on patient overall and event free survival and was an independent prognostic factor. MT-I/II and MCM-2 protein expression was not correlated with poor patient outcome, although MCM-2 expression correlated (Fisher's exact test) positively with grade of malignancy (p=0.0018) and negatively with ER (p=0.0002) and PR (p=0.0056) expression. To conclude, MT-I/II may play a key role in IDC proliferation, but is not a useful prognostic factor of this disease.

  6. Primary infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the axillary breast with metastasis to the contralateral chest wall.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Meng, Fan-Yun; Chang, Nai-Jen; Lu, Chiao-Yi; Lu, Tsung-Hsien; Liang, Ji-An; Chung, Li-Min

    2013-06-01

    Primary infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the axillary breast is rare and has a high frequency of lymph node (LN) involvement. We report a woman with primary infiltrating ductal carcinoma arising from the right axillary breast with metastasis to the contralateral chest wall. Excisional biopsy of the left chest wall nodule and the right axillary mass was carried out and both showed invasive ductal carcinomas histologically. The lesion of the right axillary mass arose from the breast tissue, rather than the LN. Further surgery proved the right axillary LN metastasis. After further review, a primary infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the right axillary breast with metastasis to axillary LNs and contralateral chest wall was diagnosed. The patient also received chemotherapy and radiation and there was no evidence of tumor recurrence after treatment. The present report demonstrated a rare case with uncommon manifestation. Lesions of uncertain origin around the periphery of the breast should be suspected for breast carcinoma. PMID:23602213

  7. Lectin histochemistry reveals SNA as a prognostic carbohydrate-dependent probe for invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast: a clinicopathological and immunohistochemical auxiliary tool

    PubMed Central

    dos-Santos, Petra B; Zanetti, Juliana S; Vieira-de-Mello, Gabriela S; Rêgo, Moacyr BM; A, Alfredo Ribeiro-Silva; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    Increased sialylation and β1,6-branched oligosaccharides has been associated with a variety of structural changes in cell surface carbohydrates, most notably in tumorigenesis. Lectins are defined as proteins that preferentially recognize and bind carbohydrate complexes protruding from glycolipids and glycoproteins. This interaction with carbohydrates can be as specific as the interaction between antigen and antibody. Due to this type of interaction lectins have been used as experimental auxiliary tools in histopathological diagnosis of cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the differential expression of sialic acids and β1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (MGAT5) in invasive (IDC) and in situ (DCIS) ductal carcinoma of the breast and its possible application as prognostic biomarkers. A possible transition between pre-malign and malign lesions was evaluated using DCIS samples. Biopsies were analyzed regarding the expression of MUC1, p53, Ki-67, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2 and MGAT5. α2,6-linked sialic acids residues recognized by SNA lectin was overexpressed in 33.3% of IDC samples and it was related with Ki-67 (p=0.042), PR (p=0.029), lymphnodes status (p=0.017) and death (p=0.011). Regarding survival analysis SNA was the only lectin able to correlate with specific-disease survival and disease-free survival (p=0.024 and p=0.041, respectively), besides, it presents itself as an independent variable by Cox Regression analysis (p= 0.004). Comparing IDC and DCIS cases, only SNA showed different staining pattern (p=0.034). The presence of sialic acids on tumor cell surface can be an indicative of poor prognosis and our study provides further evidence that SNA lectin can be used as a prognostic probe in IDC and DCIS patients. PMID:24966944

  8. Myoepithelial Cell Differentiation Markers in Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Progression

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tanya D.; Jindal, Sonali; Agunbiade, Samiat; Gao, Dexiang; Troxell, Megan; Borges, Virginia F.; Schedin, Pepper

    2016-01-01

    We describe a preclinical model that investigates progression of early-stage ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and report that compromised myoepithelial cell differentiation occurs before transition to invasive disease. Human breast cancer MCF10DCIS.com cells were delivered into the mouse mammary teat by intraductal injection in the absence of surgical manipulations and accompanying wound-healing confounders. DCIS-like lesions developed throughout the mammary ducts with full representation of human DCIS histologic patterns. Tumor cells were incorporated into the normal mammary epithelium, developed ductal intraepithelial neoplasia and DCIS, and progressed to invasive carcinoma, suggesting the model provides a rigorous approach to study early stages of breast cancer progression. Mammary glands were evaluated for myoepithelium integrity with immunohistochemical assays. Progressive loss of the myoepithelial cell differentiation markers p63, calponin, and α-smooth muscle actin was observed in the mouse myoepithelium surrounding DCIS-involved ducts. p63 loss was an early indicator, calponin loss intermediate, and α-smooth muscle actin a later indicator of compromised myoepithelium. Loss of myoepithelial calponin was specifically associated with gain of the basal marker p63 in adjacent tumor cells. In single time point biopsies obtained from 16 women diagnosed with pure DCIS, a similar loss in myoepithelial cell markers was observed. These results suggest that further research is warranted into the role of myoepithelial cell p63 and calponin expression on DCIS progression to invasive disease. PMID:26343330

  9. The Role of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Predicting the Invasive Component in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Diagnosed on Preoperative Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Chae, Eun Young; Shin, Hee Jung; Kim, Suhkmann; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Siwon; Shim, Ye Eun; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Choi, Woo Jung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hee Jin; Gong, Gyungyub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed on preoperative biopsy. We investigated whether the metabolic profiling of tissue samples using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy could be used to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. Our institutional review board approved this combined retrospective and prospective study. Tissue samples were collected from 30 patients with pure DCIS and from 30 with DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. All patients were diagnosed with DCIS by preoperative core-needle biopsy and underwent surgical resection. The metabolic profiling of tissue samples was performed by HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. All observable metabolite signals were identified and quantified in all tissue samples. Metabolite intensity normalized by total spectral intensities was compared according to the tumor type using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). By univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations of choline-containing compounds obtained with HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy did not differ significantly between the pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma groups. However, the GPC/PC ratio was higher in the pure DCIS group than in the DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma group (p = 0.004, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.064), as well as the concentration of myo-inositol and succinate. By multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles could clearly discriminate between pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. Our preliminary results suggest that HR-MAS MR metabolomics on breast tissue may be able to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. PMID:27560937

  10. The Role of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Predicting the Invasive Component in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Diagnosed on Preoperative Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Suhkmann; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Siwon; Shim, Ye Eun; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Choi, Woo Jung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hee Jin; Gong, Gyungyub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed on preoperative biopsy. We investigated whether the metabolic profiling of tissue samples using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy could be used to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. Our institutional review board approved this combined retrospective and prospective study. Tissue samples were collected from 30 patients with pure DCIS and from 30 with DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. All patients were diagnosed with DCIS by preoperative core-needle biopsy and underwent surgical resection. The metabolic profiling of tissue samples was performed by HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. All observable metabolite signals were identified and quantified in all tissue samples. Metabolite intensity normalized by total spectral intensities was compared according to the tumor type using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). By univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations of choline-containing compounds obtained with HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy did not differ significantly between the pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma groups. However, the GPC/PC ratio was higher in the pure DCIS group than in the DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma group (p = 0.004, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.064), as well as the concentration of myo-inositol and succinate. By multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles could clearly discriminate between pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. Our preliminary results suggest that HR-MAS MR metabolomics on breast tissue may be able to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. PMID:27560937

  11. Current controversies in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Gianluca; Terribile, Daniela; Magno, Stefano; Fabbri, Cristina; D'Alba, Pierfrancesco; Chiesa, Federica; Di Leone, Alba; Scafetta, Ilaria; Masetti, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a noninvasive form of breast cancer, has increased markedly in recent decades, and DCIS now accounts for approximately 20% of breast cancers diagnosed by mammography. Laboratory and patient data suggest that DCIS is a precursor lesion for invasive cancer. Controversy exists with regard to the optimal management of DCIS patients. In the past, mastectomy was the primary treatment for patients with DCIS, but as with invasive cancer, breast-conserving surgery has become the standard approach. A mini-review of the management of ductal carcinoma in situ is presented, and the roles and dilemmas of surgery, radiotherapy and endocrine therapy are discussed. PMID:18958961

  12. Current perspectives of treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Laura G; Alvarez, Isabel; Seguí, Miguel Ángel; Muñoz, Monserrat; Margelí, Mireia; Miró, Cristina; Rubio, Carmen; Lluch, Ana; Tusquets, Ignasi

    2010-11-01

    DCIS is a genetically diverse group of diseases with different prognosis. The similarities between DCIS and ductal infiltrating carcinoma (DIC) suggest that the key step in tumorigenesis is the transformation from high grade ductal hyperplasia to DCIS. The prognostic factors of DCIS include anatomo-pathologic factors, age and molecular factors. The key questions for DCIS management include: which patients are more likely to present an invasive failure; in which an excision is sufficient and who can be spared from radiation therapy. The role of post operative radiation therapy to reduce by 50-60% ipsilateral invasive and non-invasive local failure has been established in four randomized clinical trials. The question whether radiation therapy can be avoided in some patients remains controversial. Treatment with tamoxifen should be recommended to patients with estrogen receptor positive tumors who have been treated with conservative surgery. However, data from randomized trials suggest that addition of tamoxifen to locoregional treatment decreases the recurrence rate of invasive cancer as well as contralateral tumors. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is recommended for patients with clinically palpable, large DCIS in which the risk of microinvasion is high as well as in extensive DCIS requiring mastectomy. Mammography continues to be the best method to detect DCIS. Newer digital mammography improves the detection of microcalcifications. Current ultrasound can detect associated invasive cancer. MRI is also useful in DCIS. Combined with mammography, MRI increases the diagnoses of DCIS. Current trend includes the use of radiology guided-vacuum assisted-large bore needles that allow obtaining larger amounts of tissue, improving diagnostic yield. PMID:20462701

  13. Immunohistochemistry applied to the differential diagnosis between ductal and lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    de Deus Moura, Rafael; Wludarski, Sheila C L; Carvalho, Filomena M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2013-01-01

    The distinction between classic lobular and ductal carcinoma, both in situ and invasive, has important therapeutic and management implications. Most ductal and lobular carcinomas are distinguished readily on hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections because of distinct histomorphologic features. In cases with ambiguous morphologic features, however, categorization in one or another type can be a challenge. Several immunohistochemical markers, including epithelial cadherin, p120, β-catenin, and low-molecular-weight and high-molecular-weight cytokeratins among others, have been introduced to help better discriminate between lobular neoplasia and ductal carcinoma. In this critical review of the literature, we comment about the usefulness and the limitations of these markers to improve the accuracy in the differential diagnosis of breast pathology.

  14. [Ductal carcinoma in situ: the balance between over- and undertreatment].

    PubMed

    Groen, Emma J; Elshof, Lotte E; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Winter-Warnars, Hillegonda A O; Lips, Esther H; Wesseling, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    Since population-based breast cancer screening was implemented in the Netherlands, the incidence of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the breast, regarded as a non-obligate precursor lesion of breast cancer, has strongly increased. However, the incidence of invasive breast cancer has not decreased. This suggests that a percentage of all the DCIS lesions would never have become symptomatic if no screening was performed. This phenomenon is known as 'overdiagnosis'. Nonetheless, almost all DCIS lesions are managed surgically, often followed by radiotherapy in those having breast-conserving treatment, to avoid potential progression to breast cancer. To prevent potential over- or undertreatment, further studies are required to distinguish low from high risk DCIS. Ultimately this could help avoid non-beneficial intensive treatment for women with low risk DCIS.

  15. Current Trends in the Management of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ.

    PubMed

    Park, Tristen S; Hwang, E Shelley

    2016-09-15

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), once a rare entity, now comprises up to 30% of newly diagnosed breast cancers detected on mammography. It is now appreciated as a widely heterogeneous disease, with indolent lesions of minimal clinical significance on one end of the spectrum, and aggressive lesions with malignant invasive potential on the other. Therefore, the traditional guideline-concordant approach to treatment with surgery, radiation, and endocrine therapy may lead to overtreatment of certain patients, and insufficient treatment of others. Risk assessment using clinical and molecular prognostic tools is being investigated, addressing the possibility of delineating subpopulations that may be treated with more tailored therapy. This review will summarize the current trends in the diagnosis and management of DCIS and will highlight ongoing trials that are shaping future management of this entity. PMID:27633413

  16. Predictive factors for invasive cancer in surgical specimens following an initial diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ after stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in microcalcification-only lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gümüş, Hatice; Mills, Philippa; Fish, David; Gümüş, Metehan; Cox, Karina; Devalia, Haresh; Jones, Sue; Jones, Peter; Sever, Ali R.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of invasive breast carcinoma in patients with preoperative diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy (SVAB) performed for microcalcification-only lesions, and to identify the predictive factors of invasion. METHODS From 2000 to 2010, the records of 353 DCIS patients presenting with microcalcification-only lesions who underwent SVAB were retrospectively reviewed. The mammographic size of microcalcification cluster, presence of microinvasion within the cores, the total number of calcium specks, and the number of calcium specks within the retrieved core biopsy specimen were recorded. Patients were grouped as those with or without invasion in the final pathologic report, and variables were compared between the two groups. RESULTS The median age was 58 years (range, 34–88 years). At histopathologic examination of the surgical specimen, 63 of 353 patients (17.8%) were found to have an invasive component, although SVAB cores had only shown DCIS preoperatively. The rate of underestimation was significantly higher in patients with microcalcification covering an area of 40 mm or more, in the presence of microinvasion at biopsy, and in cases where less than 40% of the calcium specks were removed from the lesion. CONCLUSION Invasion might be underestimated in DCIS cases diagnosed with SVAB performed for microcalcification-only lesions, especially when the mammographic size of calcification is equal to or more than 40 mm or if microinvasion is found within the biopsy specimen and less than 40% of the calcifications are removed. At least 40% of microcalcification specks should be removed from the lesion to decrease the rate of underestimation with SVAB. PMID:26509833

  17. Ductal Breast Carcinoma Metastatic to the Stomach Resembling Primary Linitis Plastica in a Male Patient

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Giulia Costanza; Ravaioli, Noemi; De Giglio, Andrea; Brambilla, Marta; Prosperi, Enrico; Ribacchi, Franca; Meacci, Marialuisa; Crinò, Lucio; Maiettini, Daniele; Chiari, Rita; Metro, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer metastases to the gastrointestinal tract are very rare occurrences. Among the histological subtypes of breast cancer, invasive lobular carcinomas have a high capacity of metastasis to uncommon sites including the stomach. Conversely, there has not been sufficient evidence supporting the gastric metastasis of invasive ductal carcinoma. Herein, we report a unique case of metastatic ductal breast carcinoma mimicking primary linitis plastica in a male patient, particularly focusing on the clinical and pathological features of presentation. Moreover, we propose a immunohistochemical panel of selected antibodies including those for cytokeratin 20, cytokeratin 7, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, E-cadherin, gross cystic disease fluid protein 15, and GATA binding protein 3 for an accurate differential diagnosis. PMID:27721883

  18. CD44 expression in intraoral salivary ductal papillomas and oral papillary squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Sarah G; Montague, Lindsay J; Cohen, Donald M; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel

    2013-06-01

    CD44 is a transmembrane adhesion molecule which has been previously shown to be useful in the differentiation of benign papillary lesions from invasive carcinoma in several different areas including sinonasal mucosa and breast tissue. CD44 expression has previously been shown to be lost in invasive carcinoma and retained in benign papillary lesions in both of the above locations. In addition, studies have evaluated oral mucosal lesions for CD44 expression and found a loss with invasive squamous cell carcinoma when compared to normal epithelium, hyperplasia, and squamous papillomas, which stained particularly strongly. To the best of our knowledge, no study has evaluated CD44 expression when comparing salivary ductal papillomas in comparison to oral papillary SCCA. In this study 18 cases of intraductal papilloma were compared to 19 cases of oral papillary SCCA. Within the ductal papilloma group, all cases stained either absent (6%), weakly (33%), or moderately (61%) with 76% expressing the stain diffusely and 24% focally. In comparison, the papillary squamous cell carcinoma cases expressed the CD44 moderately (26%) or strongly (74%) with 100 % showing diffuse staining. Thus, the CD44 expression was contrary to expectation based on previous studies, which we hypothesize is due to the extremely well differentiated nature of papillary SCCA which expressed CD44 staining compatible with levels previously reported with oral squamous papillomas than invasive carcinoma.

  19. Hsp90 in the continuum of breast ductal carcinogenesis: Evaluation in precursors, preinvasive and ductal carcinoma lesions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hsp90 (heat shock protein90) is a chaperone protein essential for preserving and regulating the function of various cellular proteins. Elevated Hsp90 expression seems to be a trait of breast cancer and may be an integral part of the coping mechanisms that cancer cells exhibit vis-à-vis stress. This manuscript tries to examine the immunohistochemical expression of Hsp90 all along the continuum of breast ductal lesions encompassing ductal hyperplasia without atypia (DHWithoutA), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Methods Tissue specimens were taken from 30 patients with DHWithoutA, 31 patients with ADH, 51 with DCIS and 51 with IDC. Immunohistochemical assessment of Hsp90 was performed both in the lesion and the adjacent normal breast ducts and lobules; the latter serving as control. Concerning Hsp90 assessment the percentage of positive cells and the intensity were separately analyzed. Subsequently, the Allred score was calculated. Post hoc analysis on the correlations between Hsp90 Allred score and possible predictors (grade, nodal status, tumor size, ER Allred score, PR Allred score, c-erbB-2 status and triple negative status) was conducted in IDC. Results Hsp90 exhibited mainly cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. Hsp90 Allred score exhibited an increasing trend along the continuum of breast ductal lesions (Spearman's rho = 0.169, p = 0.031). Compared to the adjacent normal ducts and lobules, no statistically significant differences were noted in DHwithoutA, ADH and DCIS. Hsp90 expression (intensity, positive cells, Allred score) was higher in IDC, compared to the adjacent normal tissue. Higher Hsp90 expression was observed in grade 2/3 IDCs (borderline association) and tumors of larger size. At the univariable analysis, higher Hsp90 expression was associated with higher ER Allred score, PR Allred score and c-erbB-2 positivity in IDC. Triple-negative IDCs exhibited significantly lower Hsp90

  20. Collision of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of Anogenital Mammary-like Glands and Vulvar Sarcomatoid Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tien A N; Deavers, Michael T; Carlson, J Andrew; Malpica, Anais

    2015-09-01

    A spectrum of invasive adenocarcinomas presumably arising from the anogenital mammary-like glands of the vulva has been reported. Even rarer are the cases of pure ductal carcinoma in situ that originated from these unique glandular structures. Herein, we report an 81-yr-old woman presented with an invasive well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. Unexpectedly, the underlying dermis demonstrated a cystically dilated structure that displayed a layer of malignant squamous cells in the periphery, and a second centrally located population of neoplastic cells exhibiting glandular differentiation. In addition, a spindle and pleomorphic malignant cell population consistent with a sarcomatoid carcinoma was identified around the cystic structure. Scattered benign anogenital mammary-like glands were present in the adjacent dermis. The histologic and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with those of vulvar squamous cell carcinoma that has undergone sarcomatoid transformation after spreading in a pagetoid fashion into an underlying focus of ductal carcinoma in situ of anogenital mammary-like gland origin.

  1. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, Lara; Hijal, Tarek; Théberge, Valérie; Fortin, Bernard; Vulpe, Horia; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Lambert, Christine; Bahig, Houda; and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

  2. Diagnosis and management of ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amina; Newman, Lisa A

    2004-04-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a preinvasive form of breast cancer that has increased in incidence over the past 25 years, primarily as a result of mammographically detected microcalcifications. Inadequately treated DCIS carries a risk for evolving into the malignant phenotype; however, the magnitude and timeline for this risk are poorly defined. Treatment options include lumpectomy with or without breast irradiation and mastectomy. The overall survival rate is 96% to 98% with any of these strategies, but the risk of local recurrence (LR) is highest after lumpectomy alone. Breast irradiation can reduce this risk from levels in excess of 40% to 10% over a 10-year follow-up period. Approximately 50% of all LR from DCIS are invasive lesions. Therefore, the occurrence of a LR after breast-conserving therapy is a potentially greater threat to the patient with DCIS compared to the patient diagnosed with invasive cancer. In patients diagnosed with invasive cancer, the risk of micrometastatic disease is present from the time of initial diagnosis. In patients with DCIS, the expectation is that a potentially 100% cure rate should be achieved with local therapy alone. Although most DCIS cases complicated by LR will be successfully salvaged with prolonged overall survival, it is critically important to take every precaution that will minimize the risk of locally recurrent disease. Therefore, radiation therapy as an adjunct to lumpectomy is essential. A subset of patients with DCIS with low-volume low-grade disease who can be safely treated by lumpectomy alone has not yet been clearly defined. Prospective studies designed to identify this category are ongoing. Inadequate margin control is the most consistent risk factor for LR that has been reported thus far, but there is no universally accepted definition for what constitutes an optimal negative margin distance. Young age at diagnosis, high nuclear grade, and comedonecrosis are other factors that have been implicated as

  3. A Catalogue of Altered Salivary Proteins Secondary to Invasive Ductal Carcinoma: A Novel In Vivo Paradigm to Assess Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Streckfus, Charles F; Bigler, Lenora

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to introduce a catalogue of salivary proteins that are altered secondary to carcinoma of the breast. The catalogue of salivary proteins is a compilation of twenty years of research by the authors and consists of 233 high and low abundant proteins which have been identified by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry, 2D-gel analysis and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The body of research suggests that saliva is a fluid suffused with solubilized by-products of oncogenic expression and that these proteins may be useful in the study of breast cancer progress, treatment efficacy and the tailoring of individualized patient care.

  4. A Catalogue of Altered Salivary Proteins Secondary to Invasive Ductal Carcinoma: A Novel In Vivo Paradigm to Assess Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Streckfus, Charles F.; Bigler, Lenora

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to introduce a catalogue of salivary proteins that are altered secondary to carcinoma of the breast. The catalogue of salivary proteins is a compilation of twenty years of research by the authors and consists of 233 high and low abundant proteins which have been identified by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry, 2D-gel analysis and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The body of research suggests that saliva is a fluid suffused with solubilized by-products of oncogenic expression and that these proteins may be useful in the study of breast cancer progress, treatment efficacy and the tailoring of individualized patient care. PMID:27477923

  5. Relationship between erb-B2 mRNA Expression in Blood and Tissue of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Breast Cancer Patients and Clinicopathological Characteristics of the Tumors.

    PubMed

    Moazzezy, Neda; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Sisakht, Mahsa Mollapour; Yahyazadeh, Hossein; Bouzari, Saeid; Oloomi, Mana

    2016-01-01

    Molecular detection methods such as RT-PCR for detecting breast cancer-associated gene expression in the peripheral blood have the potential to modify breast cancer (BC) staging and therapy. In this regard, we evaluated the potential of erb-B2 molecular marker in BC detection and analyzed the expression of erb-B2 mRNA in the peripheral blood and fresh tissue samples of 50 pretreated female BC patients and 50 healthy females by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) method. We also assessed the correlation of erb-B2 mRNA marker positivity in peripheral blood and tumor tissue samples with clinical and pathological factors in BC patients in order to evaluate its prognostic value. It was shown that there is a significant difference between healthy females and BC patients with expression of the erb-B2 molecular marker (p<0.01). A significant difference between the expression of erb-B2 in the peripheral blood and tissue samples of BC patients (p<0.01) and the frequency of circulating erb-B2 mRNA expression in peripheral blood and in tissue was detected by RT-PCR. No correlation was found between erb-B2 mRNA expression in blood or tumor tissue samples and lymph node, tumor grade, tumor stage, tumor size, patient's age, ki67, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PGR), P53, and HER-2 status. However, in a small subset of 31 BC patients we found that expression of erb-B2 in peripheral blood or in both peripheral blood and tumor tissue was directly correlated with lympho-vascular invasion and perineural invasion as poor prognostic features. The highest rates of erb-B2 expression in peripheral blood or tumor tissue were in the ER and PR negative and HER-2 positive group. This study suggests that the application of the RT-PCR and immunohistochemical methods for erb-B2 molecular marker detection would provide a higher detection rate, especially in early stage BC.

  6. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: the importance of morphologic and molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Mardekian, Stacey K; Bombonati, Alessandro; Palazzo, Juan P

    2016-03-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a lesion characterized by significant heterogeneity, in terms of morphology, immunohistochemical staining, molecular signatures, and clinical expression. For some patients, surgical excision provides adequate treatment, but a subset of patients will experience recurrence of DCIS or progression to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Recent years have seen extensive research aimed at identifying the molecular events that characterize the transition from normal epithelium to DCIS and IDC. Tumor epithelial cells, myoepithelial cells, and stromal cells undergo alterations in gene expression, which are most important in the early stages of breast carcinogenesis. Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, together with microRNA alterations, play a major role in these genetic events. In addition, tumor proliferation and invasion is facilitated by the lesional microenvironment, which includes stromal fibroblasts and macrophages that secrete growth factors and angiogenesis-promoting substances. Characterization of DCIS on a molecular level may better account for the heterogeneity of these lesions and how this manifests as differences in patient outcome and response to therapy. Molecular assays originally developed for assessing likelihood of recurrence in IDC are recently being applied to DCIS, with promising results. In the future, the classification of DCIS will likely incorporate molecular findings along with histologic and immunohistochemical features, allowing for personalized prognostic information and therapeutic options for patients with DCIS. This review summarizes current data regarding the molecular characterization of DCIS and discusses the potential clinical relevance. PMID:26826418

  7. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: the importance of morphologic and molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Mardekian, Stacey K; Bombonati, Alessandro; Palazzo, Juan P

    2016-03-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a lesion characterized by significant heterogeneity, in terms of morphology, immunohistochemical staining, molecular signatures, and clinical expression. For some patients, surgical excision provides adequate treatment, but a subset of patients will experience recurrence of DCIS or progression to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Recent years have seen extensive research aimed at identifying the molecular events that characterize the transition from normal epithelium to DCIS and IDC. Tumor epithelial cells, myoepithelial cells, and stromal cells undergo alterations in gene expression, which are most important in the early stages of breast carcinogenesis. Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, together with microRNA alterations, play a major role in these genetic events. In addition, tumor proliferation and invasion is facilitated by the lesional microenvironment, which includes stromal fibroblasts and macrophages that secrete growth factors and angiogenesis-promoting substances. Characterization of DCIS on a molecular level may better account for the heterogeneity of these lesions and how this manifests as differences in patient outcome and response to therapy. Molecular assays originally developed for assessing likelihood of recurrence in IDC are recently being applied to DCIS, with promising results. In the future, the classification of DCIS will likely incorporate molecular findings along with histologic and immunohistochemical features, allowing for personalized prognostic information and therapeutic options for patients with DCIS. This review summarizes current data regarding the molecular characterization of DCIS and discusses the potential clinical relevance.

  8. Nodular basement membrane deposits in breast carcinoma and atypical ductal hyperplasia: mimics of collagenous spherulosis.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, T J; Hird, P M; Laing, R W; Davies, J D

    1994-06-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is characterised histologically by the accumulation of hyaline globules containing basement membrane components. Originally described in the breast, it has also been found in skin and salivary gland neoplasms. In the breast it has hitherto always been associated with benign disease and reports have asserted that this is invariably the case, cautioning against the diagnosis of malignancy when the condition is seen. We present here five cases with similar appearances to collagenous spherulosis in routine histology and immunohistochemistry, and ultrastructural studies in one of them, in which the condition was not associated with simple benign breast disease. Two of the cases were associated with invasive carcinomas of unusual histological types, one with intracystic papillary carcinoma, one with comedo ductal carcinoma-in-situ and one with atypical ductal hyperplasia. We suggest that appearances similar to collagenous spherulosis can be associated, either through being formed by a lesion or by collision, with malignancy and warn that on encountering the lesions the pathologist must not assume, as suggested in previous accounts, that it denotes a benign process. This is an important observation since collagenous spherulosis is likely to be encountered more frequently in the range of lesions biopsied in national breast screening programs.

  9. Ductal adenoma of the breast: a lesion which can mimic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, J G; Salm, R

    1984-09-01

    Twenty-four cases of a solid benign tumour of breast ducts are described, for which we propose the name 'ductal adenoma'. The lesion consists of a single nodule or multiple nodules involving medium size and small ducts, but not major subareolar ducts. It presents as a palpable lump, and is not associated with a nipple discharge. Clinically, radiologically and macroscopically, it can simulate malignancy because of its occurrence in older age groups, frequent microcalcification and the firmness and irregularity of many lesions. Fibrous sclerosis sometimes results in distortion with apparent invasion of surrounding tissue. It can be mistaken for carcinoma both on frozen and paraffin sections. Differentiation into epithelial and myoepithelial cells is the most reliable criterion in the recognition of this lesion as benign. It has microscopic affinities with ductal papilloma, on the one hand, and with salivary-type adenoma, on the other. Ductal adenoma constitutes the third major type of adenoma in the breast, in addition to the already widely recognized nipple adenoma and tubular adenoma.

  10. Mammographycally occult high grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) as second primary breast cancer, detected with MRI: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zebic-Sinkovec, Marta; Kadivec, Maksimiljan; Podobnik, Gasper; Skof, Erik; Snoj, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Background Contralateral breast cancer (CLB) is the most common second primary breast cancer in patients diagnosed with breast cancer. The majority of patients harbouring CLB tumours develop the invasive disease. Almost all invasive carcinomas are believed to begin as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions. The sensitivity of MRI for DCIS is much higher than that of mammography. Case report We report the case of a woman who was treated with breast conserving therapy 10 years ago. At that time the invasive medullary carcinoma was diagnosed in the left breast. Ten years later mammographically occult DCIS was diagnosed with MRI-guided core biopsy in contralateral breast. Conclusions There might be a potential role of MRI screening as part of an annual follow-up for patients diagnosed with breast cancer. PMID:22933920

  11. Microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Emre; İdilman, İlkay Sedakat; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular invasion is a crucial histopathologic prognostic factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. We reviewed the literature and aimed to draw attention to clinicopathologic and imaging findings that may predict the presence of microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma. Imaging findings suggesting microvascular invasion are disruption of capsule, irregular tumor margin, peritumoral enhancement, multifocal tumor, increased tumor size, and increased glucose metabolism on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. In the presence of typical findings, microvascular invasion may be predicted. PMID:26782155

  12. Classifying the Progression of Ductal Carcinoma from Single-Cell Sampled Data via Integer Linear Programming: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Daniele; Shackney, Stanley E; Schaffer, Alejandro A; Schwartz, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) is a precursor lesion of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. Investigating its temporal progression could provide fundamental new insights for the development of better diagnostic tools to predict which cases of DCIS will progress to IDC. We investigate the problem of reconstructing a plausible progression from single-cell sampled data of an individual with synchronous DCIS and IDC. Specifically, by using a number of assumptions derived from the observation of cellular atypia occurring in IDC, we design a possible predictive model using integer linear programming (ILP). Computational experiments carried out on a preexisting data set of 13 patients with simultaneous DCIS and IDC show that the corresponding predicted progression models are classifiable into categories having specific evolutionary characteristics. The approach provides new insights into mechanisms of clonal progression in breast cancers and helps illustrate the power of the ILP approach for similar problems in reconstructing tumor evolution scenarios under complex sets of constraints.

  13. Ductal carcinoma in situ in a benign phyllodes tumor of breast: A rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prithwijit; Saha, Kaushik

    2014-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor (PT) is an uncommon tumor of female breast. The tumor clinically, radiologically, cytologically as well as histologically can mimic fibroadenoma which is a common tumor of fibroepithelial group. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in the epithelial component of PT is very rare. We report a rare case of intermediate grade DCIS arising in a benign PT in a 42-year-old lady. The patient presented with a small nodule in right breast along with serosanguineous discharge from nipple. Ultrasonography and cytology failed to distinguish between fibroadenoma and PT. Histopathological examination following wide local excision displayed the biphasic tumor comprising of benign looking cellular stroma and epithelial lining. It also demonstrated the foci of intermediate grade DCIS without any invasive component. Considering the clinicoradiological profile along with histopathological features, the diagnosis of DCIS in a benign PT of breast was made. PMID:25097439

  14. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in clinically detected ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameer, Ahmed Yahia; Al Nefaie, Sahar; Al Johani, Badria; Anwar, Ihab; Al Tweigeri, Taher; Tulbah, Asma; Alshabanah, Mohmmed; Al Malik, Osama

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the indications for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in clinically-detected ductal carcinoma in situ (CD-DCIS). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 20 patients with an initial diagnosis of pure DCIS by an image-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) between June 2006 and June 2012 was conducted at King Faisal Specialist Hospital. The accuracy of performing SLNB in CD-DCIS, the rate of sentinel and non-sentinel nodal metastasis, and the histologic underestimation rate of invasive cancer at initial diagnosis were analyzed. The inclusion criteria were a preoperative diagnosis of pure DCIS with no evidence of invasion. We excluded any patient with evidence of microinvasion or invasion. There were two cases of mammographically detected DCIS and 18 cases of CD-DCIS. All our patients were diagnosed by an image-guided CNB except two patients who were diagnosed by fine needle aspiration (FNA). All patients underwent breast surgery, SLNB, and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) if the SLN was positive. RESULTS: Twenty patients with an initial diagnosis of pure DCIS underwent SLNB, 2 of whom had an ALND. The mean age of the patients was 49.7 years (range, 35-70). Twelve patients (60%) were premenopausal and 8 (40%) were postmenopausal. CNB was the diagnostic procedure for 18 patients, and 2 who were diagnosed by FNA were excluded from the calculation of the underestimation rate. Two out of 20 had a positive SLNB and underwent an ALND and neither had additional non sentinel lymph node metastasis. Both the sentinel visualization rate and the intraoperative sentinel identification rate were 100%. The false negative rate was 0%. Only 2 patients had a positive SLNB (10%) and neither had additional metastasis following an ALND. After definitive surgery, 3 patients were upstaged to invasive ductal carcinoma (3/18 = 16.6%) and 3 other patients were upstaged to DCIS with microinvasion (3/18 = 16.6%). Therefore the histologic underestimation rate of invasive disease was 33

  15. Biomarker signatures of mitochondrial NDUFS3 in invasive breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Suhane, Sonal; Berel, Dror; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} We monitored mitochondrial NDUFS3 expression in clinical breast cancer specimens. {yields} NDUFS3 expression is significantly higher in highly invasive cancer specimens. {yields} Increased NDUFS3 expression correlates with tumor nuclear grade. {yields} NDUFS3 expression in invasive ductal carcinoma is a potential hypoxia marker. -- Abstract: We present evidence for potential biomarker utility of a mitochondrial complex I subunit, (NDUFS3) in discriminating normal and highly invasive breast carcinoma specimens obtained from clinical patients. Besides being a robust indicator of breast cancer aggressiveness, NDUFS3 also shows clear signatures of a hypoxia/necrosis marker in invasive ductal carcinoma specimens. Statistically significant positive correlation was observed between nuclear grade and NDUFS3 expression level in the tumor specimens analyzed. We support these findings with a plausible mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I assembly defects and/or redox buffering induced mitochondrial dysfunction during the process of cancer cell transformation. From a clinical standpoint, this novel observation adds value in augmenting the current receptor-based biomarkers for better accuracy in diagnosis and predicting survival rate in patients with breast carcinoma.

  16. Vascular Invasion in Infiltrating Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas Can Mimic Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A Histopathologic Study of 209 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung-Mo; Goggins, Michael; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Schulick, Richard D.; Edil, Barish H.; Cameron, John L.; Handra-Luca, Adriana; Herman, Joseph M.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2011-01-01

    Although vascular invasion is a well-established indicator of poor prognosis for patients with infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (PDAC), the histopathologic characteristics of vascular invasion are not well described. Hematoxylin and eosin stained slides from 209 surgically resected infiltrating PDACs were systematically evaluated for the presence or absence of microscopic vascular invasion. For the cases with vascular invasion, we further categorized the histologic pattern of invasion into conventional and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like (PanIN-like). In addition, several histopathologic factors in the surrounding blood vessels, including lymphocytic infiltration and luminal fibrosis were carefully accessed. Data were compared to clinicopathologic variables, including patient survival. Microscopic vascular invasion was observed in 136 of the 209 PDACs (65.1%). Vascular invasion mimicking pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN-like invasion) was observed in 94 of the 136 cases (69.1%) with vascular invasion. Microscopic vascular invasion was associated with increased tumor size (p=0.04), higher pT classification (p=0.003), lymph node metastasis (p<0.0001), and perineural invasion (p=0.005). Vascular invasion was inversely correlated with neo-adjuvant therapy (p<0.0001). Examination of adjacent blood vessel revealed that peritumoral blood vessels with intimal lymphocytes (p=0.002), intimal (p=0.007) and medial (p=0.001) fibrosis, and cancer cells in vascular wall (p<0.0001), were all highly associated with intraluminal vascular invasion. In univariate analysis, patients whose cancers had microscopic vascular invasion (median survival, 12.9 months) had a significantly worse survival than did patients with carcinomas without vascular invasion (17.6 months; p=0.01, log-rank test). Microscopic vascular invasion is a poor prognostic indicator and can histologically mimic PanIN. PMID:22082604

  17. Effect of Metformin on Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Proliferation in a Randomized Presurgical Trial.

    PubMed

    DeCensi, Andrea; Puntoni, Matteo; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Cazzaniga, Massimiliano; Serrano, Davide; Lazzeroni, Matteo; Vingiani, Andrea; Gentilini, Oreste; Petrera, Marilena; Viale, Giuseppe; Cuzick, Jack; Bonanni, Bernardo; Pruneri, Giancarlo

    2015-10-01

    Metformin is associated with lower breast cancer risk in epidemiologic studies and showed decreased proliferation in HER2-positive breast cancer in a presurgical trial. To provide insight into its preventive potential, we measured proliferation by Ki-67 labeling index (LI) of intraepithelial lesions surrounding breast cancer. We randomly assigned 200 nondiabetic patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in core biopsies to metformin, 1,700 mg or placebo once daily for 28 days before surgery. Upon surgery, five to seven specimens of cancer adjacent (≤1 cm) and distant (>1 cm) tissue were screened for LCIS, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and ductal hyperplasia (DH). The prevalence of LCIS, DCIS, and DH was 4.5% (9/200), 67% (133/200), and 35% (69/200), respectively. Overall, metformin did not affect Ki-67 LI in premalignant disorders. The median posttreatment Ki-67 LI (IQR) in the metformin and placebo arm was, respectively, 15% (5-15) versus 5% (4-6) in LCIS (P = 0.1), 12% (8-20) versus 10% (7-24) in DCIS (P = 0.9), and 3% (1-4) versus 3% (1-4) in DH (P = 0.5). However, posttreatment Ki-67 in HER2-positive DCIS lesions was significantly lower in women randomized to metformin especially when ER was coexpressed: 22% (11-32) versus 35% (30-40) in HER2-positive DCIS (n = 22, P = .06); 12% (7-18) versus 32% (27-42) in ER-positive/HER2-positive DCIS (n = 15, P = .004). Eight of 22 (36%) HER2-positive DCIS were adjacent to HER2-negative invasive breast cancer. In tissue samples obtained following 4 weeks of study drug, proliferation was lower in HER2-positive DCIS for women randomized to metformin versus placebo. An adjuvant trial incorporating metformin in HER2-positive DCIS is warranted. PMID:26276754

  18. A Molecular Portrait of High-Grade Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Martin C.; Gong, Ting; Lu, Yue; Lee, Jaeho; Zhong, Yi; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Butti, Matias; Takata, Yoko; Gaddis, Sally; Shen, Jianjun; Estecio, Marcos R.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Aldaz, C. Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive precursor lesion to invasive breast carcinoma. We still have no understanding on why only some DCIS lesions evolve to invasive cancer whereas others appear not to do so during the life span of the patient. Here, we performed full exome (tumor vs. matching normal), transcriptome, and methylome analysis of 30 pure high-grade DCIS (HG-DCIS) and 10 normal breast epithelial samples. Sixty-two percent of HG-DCIS cases displayed mutations affecting cancer driver genes or potential drivers. Mutations were observed affecting PIK3CA (21% of cases), TP53 (17%), GATA3 (7%), MLL3 (7%) and single cases of mutations affecting CDH1, MAP2K4, TBX3, NF1, ATM, and ARID1A. Significantly, 83% of lesions displayed numerous large chromosomal copy number alterations, suggesting they might precede selection of cancer driver mutations. Integrated pathway-based modeling analysis of RNA-seq data allowed us to identify two DCIS subgroups (DCIS-C1 and DCIS-C2) based on their tumor-intrinsic subtypes, proliferative, immune scores, and in the activity of specific signaling pathways. The more aggressive DCIS-C1 (highly proliferative, basal-like, or ERBB2+) displayed signatures characteristic of activated Treg cells (CD4+/CD25+/FOXP3+) and CTLA4+/CD86+ complexes indicative of a tumor-associated immunosuppressive phenotype. Strikingly, all lesions showed evidence of TP53 pathway inactivation. Similarly, ncRNA and methylation profiles reproduce changes observed postinvasion. Among the most significant findings, we observed upregulation of lncRNA HOTAIR in DCIS-C1 lesions and hypermethylation of HOXA5 and SOX genes. We conclude that most HG-DCIS lesions, in spite of representing a preinvasive stage of tumor progression, displayed molecular profiles indistinguishable from invasive breast cancer. PMID:26249178

  19. Neural invasion in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mori, M; Adachi, Y; Kamakura, T; Ikeda, Y; Maehara, Y; Sugimachi, K

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To determine whether neural invasion in advanced gastric cancer is of clinicopathological significance. METHODS--The study population comprised 121 cases of primary advanced gastric carcinoma. Two paraffin wax embedded blocks taken from the central tissue slice in each primary tumour were used. For definitive recognition of neural invasion, immunostaining for S-100 protein was applied to one slide; the other slide was stained with haematoxylin and eosin. RESULTS--Neural invasion was recognised in 34 of 121 (28%) primary gastric carcinomas. There were significant differences in tumour size, depth of tumour invasion, stage, and curability between patients with and without neural invasion. The five year survival rates of patients with and without neural invasion were 10 and 50%, respectively. Multivariate analysis, however, demonstrated that neural invasion was not an independent prognostic factor. CONCLUSIONS--Neural invasion could be an additional useful factor for providing information about the malignant potential of gastric carcinoma. This may be analogous to vessel permeation which is thought to be important, but is not an independent prognostic factor. Images PMID:7745113

  20. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for Pure Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Grills, Inga Siiner; Chen, Peter Y.; Kestin, Larry L.; Ghilezan, Michel I.; Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro M.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving therapy using accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: From March 2001 to February 2009, 53 patients with Stage 0 breast cancer were treated with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant APBI. Median age was 62 years. All patients underwent excision with margins negative by {>=}1 mm before adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). A total of 39 MammoSite brachytherapy (MS) patients and 14 three-dimensional conformal external beam RT (3DCRT) patients were treated to the lumpectomy bed alone with 34 Gy and 38.5 Gy, respectively. Of the DCIS cases, 94% were mammographically detected. All patients with calcifications had either specimen radiography or postsurgical mammography confirmation of clearance. Median tumor size was 6 mm, and median margin distance was 5 mm. There were no statistically significant differences according to APBI method for race/ethnicity, tumor detection method, tumor grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, or use of tamoxifen (p = NS). Recurrence and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cosmesis was scored by the Harvard criteria. Results: With a median follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 0.4-6.3 years), the overall and cause-specific survival rates were 98% and 100%, respectively. Three-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 2%. One failure was observed at the resection bed 11 months post-RT. No other elsewhere breast failures, regional recurrences, or distant metastases were noted. Cosmesis was excellent or good in 92.4% of cases, with no statistically significant differences according to the APBI method (92.3% with MammoSite and 92.8% with 3DCRT; p = 0.649). Conclusions: APBI as part of breast-conserving therapy for pure DCIS was associated with excellent local control and survival rates, with the vast majority of patients having good to excellent cosmesis. This finding supports the recent analysis by the

  1. Dietary patterns and risk of ductal carcinoma of the breast: a factor analysis in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Alvaro L; De Stefani, Eduardo; Deneo-Pellegrini, Hugo; Boffetta, Paolo; Aune, Dagfinn; Silva, Cecilia; Landó, Gabriel; Luaces, María E; Acosta, Gisele; Mendilaharsu, María

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) shows very high incidence rates in Uruguayan women. The present factor analysis of ductal carcinoma of the breast, the most frequent histological type of this malignancy both in Uruguay and in the World, was conducted at a prepaid hospital of Montevideo, Uruguay. We identified 111 cases with ductal BC and 222 controls with normal mammograms. A factor analysis was conducted using 39 food groups, allowing retention of six factors analyzed through logistic regression in order to obtain odds ratios (OR) associated with ductal BC. The low fat and non-alcoholic beverage patterns were inversely associated (OR=0.30 and OR=0.45, respectively) with risk. Conversely, the fatty cheese pattern was positively associated (OR=4.17) as well as the fried white meat (OR=2.28) and Western patterns (OR 2.13). Ductal BC shared similar dietary risk patterns as those identified by studies not discriminating between histologic type of breast cancer. PMID:21198261

  2. Identification of lesion subtypes in biopsies of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrea J; Petty, Howard R

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. We now report a retrospective study of human biopsy samples using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM). Using BRIM, micrographs of biomarkers whose expression correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness are divided by micrographs of biomarkers whose expression negatively correlates with aggressiveness to create computed micrographs reflecting aggressiveness. The biomarker pairs CD44/CD24, N-cadherin/E-cadherin, and CD74/CD59 stratified DCIS samples. BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. Our work confirms the existence of distinct subpopulations of DCIS lesions, which will likely have utility in breast cancer research and clinical practice. PMID:27247112

  3. Next-Generation Sequencing: A powerful tool for the discovery of molecular markers in breast ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Hitchintan; Mao, Shihong; Shah, Seema; Gorski, David H.; Krawetz, Stephen A.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Mammographic screening leads to frequent biopsies and concomitant overdiagnosis of breast cancer, particularly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Some DCIS lesions rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma whereas others remain indolent. Because we cannot yet predict which lesions will not progress, all DCIS is regarded as malignant, and many women are overtreated. Thus, there is a pressing need for a panel of molecular markers in addition to the current clinical and pathologic factors to provide prognostic information. Genomic technologies such as microarrays have made major contributions to defining sub-types of breast cancer. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) modalities offer unprecedented depth of expression analysis through revealing transcriptional boundaries, mutations, rare transcripts and alternative splice variants. NGS approaches are just beginning to be applied to DCIS. Here, we review the applications and challenges of NGS in discovering novel potential therapeutic targets and candidate biomarkers in the premalignant progression of breast cancer. PMID:23477556

  4. Identification of lesion subtypes in biopsies of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrea J.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. We now report a retrospective study of human biopsy samples using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM). Using BRIM, micrographs of biomarkers whose expression correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness are divided by micrographs of biomarkers whose expression negatively correlates with aggressiveness to create computed micrographs reflecting aggressiveness. The biomarker pairs CD44/CD24, N-cadherin/E-cadherin, and CD74/CD59 stratified DCIS samples. BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. Our work confirms the existence of distinct subpopulations of DCIS lesions, which will likely have utility in breast cancer research and clinical practice. PMID:27247112

  5. Ductal carcinoma in situ in core needle biopsies and its association with extensive in situ component in the surgical specimen

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We evaluated the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in core needle biopsies (CNB) from invasive ductal lesions. Methods Retrospective study, which analyzed 90 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma lesions. The percentage of DCIS was quantified in each specimens obtained from CNB, which were compared to the surgical specimens. CNB and surgical specimens were evaluated by the same pathologist, and the percentage of DCIS in CNB was evaluated (percentage) and divided into categories. We considered the following parameters regarding the amount of DCIS: 1 = 0; 2 = 1 for 5%; 3 = 6 for 24%; 4 = 25 for 50%; 5 = 51 for 75% and 6 = 76 for 99%. The number of fragments and the histological pattern of DCIS was found. Results We found the following results regarding the distribution of the percentage of DCIS in the CNB: 1 = 63.3%; 2 = 12.2%; 3 = 12.2%; 4 = 5.6%; 5 = 1.1% and 6 = 5.6%. The logistic regression analysis showed that CNB percentages above 45% reflected the presence of DCIS in the surgical specimen in 100% of the cases (p < 0.001), with a specificity of 100%, accuracy of 83.3% and false positive rate of 0% (p <0.001). Conclusion There is direct relationship between extensive intraductal component in the surgical specimen when the core biopsy shows 45% or more of the DCI or microinvasive in the material examined. PMID:22715888

  6. Overview of the randomized trials of radiotherapy in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    PubMed

    Correa, C; McGale, P; Taylor, C; Wang, Y; Clarke, M; Davies, C; Peto, R; Bijker, N; Solin, L; Darby, S

    2010-01-01

    Individual patient data were available for all four of the randomized trials that began before 1995, and that compared adjuvant radiotherapy vs no radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 3729 women were eligible for analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the absolute 10-year risk of any ipsilateral breast event (ie, either recurrent DCIS or invasive cancer) by 15.2% (SE 1.6%, 12.9% vs 28.1% 2 P <.00001), and it was effective regardless of the age at diagnosis, extent of breast-conserving surgery, use of tamoxifen, method of DCIS detection, margin status, focality, grade, comedonecrosis, architecture, or tumor size. The proportional reduction in ipsilateral breast events was greater in older than in younger women (2P < .0004 for difference between proportional reductions; 10-year absolute risks: 18.5% vs 29.1% at ages <50 years, 10.8% vs 27.8% at ages ≥ 50 years) but did not differ significantly according to any other available factor. Even for women with negative margins and small low-grade tumors, the absolute reduction in the 10-year risk of ipsilateral breast events was 18.0% (SE 5.5, 12.1% vs 30.1%, 2P = .002). After 10 years of follow-up, there was, however, no significant effect on breast cancer mortality, mortality from causes other than breast cancer, or all-cause mortality. PMID:20956824

  7. Developing in vitro models of human ductal carcinoma in situ from primary tissue explants.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel D; Dabbs, David J; Lee, Adrian V; McGuire, Kandace P; Ahrendt, Gretchen M; Bhargava, Rohit; Davidson, Nancy E; Brufsky, Adam M; Johnson, Ronald R; Oesterreich, Steffi; McAuliffe, Priscilla F

    2015-09-01

    Because there are currently no reliable predictors for progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive disease, nearly all patients receive comprehensive therapy, leading to over-treatment in many cases. Few in vitro models for studying DCIS progression have been developed. We report here the successful culture and expansion of primary DCIS from surgical specimens using a conditional reprogramming protocol. Patients with percutaneous core-needle biopsy demonstrating DCIS were enrolled in a tissue banking protocol after informed consent was received. Fresh tissue was taken from lumpectomy or mastectomy specimens, mechanically and enzymatically dissociated, cultured in medium conditioned by irradiated mouse fibroblasts and supplemented with rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, and characterized by immunocytochemistry. Out of 33 DCIS cases, 58% (19) were expanded for up to 2 months in culture, and 42% (14) were frozen immediately after mechanical dissociation for future growth. The cultures are almost exclusively composed of cytokeratin 8- and EpCAM-positive luminal and cytokeratin 14-, cytokeratin 5-, and p63-positive basal mammary epithelial cells, suggesting maintenance of heterogeneity in vitro. Furthermore, as assessed by luminal and basal marker expression, these cells retain their cellular identities both in the "conditionally reprogrammed" proliferative state and after conditioned media and ROCK inhibitor withdrawal. When grown to 100 % confluency, the cultures organize into luminal and basal layers as well as luminal compartments surrounded by basal cells. Primary cultures of DCIS derived directly from patient tissues can be generated and may serve as in vitro models for the study of DCIS.

  8. Overview of the randomized trials of radiotherapy in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    PubMed

    Correa, C; McGale, P; Taylor, C; Wang, Y; Clarke, M; Davies, C; Peto, R; Bijker, N; Solin, L; Darby, S

    2010-01-01

    Individual patient data were available for all four of the randomized trials that began before 1995, and that compared adjuvant radiotherapy vs no radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 3729 women were eligible for analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the absolute 10-year risk of any ipsilateral breast event (ie, either recurrent DCIS or invasive cancer) by 15.2% (SE 1.6%, 12.9% vs 28.1% 2 P <.00001), and it was effective regardless of the age at diagnosis, extent of breast-conserving surgery, use of tamoxifen, method of DCIS detection, margin status, focality, grade, comedonecrosis, architecture, or tumor size. The proportional reduction in ipsilateral breast events was greater in older than in younger women (2P < .0004 for difference between proportional reductions; 10-year absolute risks: 18.5% vs 29.1% at ages <50 years, 10.8% vs 27.8% at ages ≥ 50 years) but did not differ significantly according to any other available factor. Even for women with negative margins and small low-grade tumors, the absolute reduction in the 10-year risk of ipsilateral breast events was 18.0% (SE 5.5, 12.1% vs 30.1%, 2P = .002). After 10 years of follow-up, there was, however, no significant effect on breast cancer mortality, mortality from causes other than breast cancer, or all-cause mortality.

  9. Identifying three different architectural subtypes of mammary ductal carcinoma in situ using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-10-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is often considered as the precursor of invasive breast cancer, and the risk of DCIS progression to IBC has been estimated based on the evaluation of pathological features, among which the architectural subtype is the most common one. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is applied to identify three different architectural subtypes of DCIS (solid, cribriform and comedo). It is found that MPM has the capability to visualize the proliferating pattern of tumor cells, the presence of intraluminal necrosis and the morphology of basement membrane, which are all taken into account in subtyping DCIS. In addition, MPM also can be used to quantify the cellular metabolism, for quantitatively identifying tumor staging during tumor progression. This result highlights the potential of MPM as an advanced technique to assess the pathological characters of the breast tumor in real-time and reflect the degree of tumor progression in vivo, by integrating into the intra-fiberoptic ductoscopy or transdermal biopsy needle.

  10. Ploidy differences between hormone- and chemical carcinogen-induced rat mammary neoplasms: comparison to invasive human ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jonathan J; Papa, Dan; Davis, Marilyn F; Weroha, S John; Aldaz, C Marcelo; El-Bayoumy, Karam; Ballenger, Jodi; Tawfik, Ossama; Li, Sara Antonia

    2002-01-01

    To ascertain differences between solely hormone- and chemical carcinogen-induced murine mammary gland tumors (MGTs), a direct comparison of their ploidy status was assessed. Nuclear image cytometry (NIC) was used to evaluate ploidy in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and MGTs induced solely by 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) in female A-strain Copenhagen Irish hooded gene rats (ACI) and E(2) plus testosterone propionate in male Noble rats. These results were compared to ploidy data from primary MGTs induced by two synthetic carcinogens, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]antracene and nitrosomethylurea in female Brown Lewis Norway rats and an environmental carcinogen, 6-nitrochrysene, in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Both DCIS and primary MGTs induced solely by hormones were highly aneuploid (> 84%), whereas MGTs induced by either synthetic or environmental carcinogens were primarily diploid (> 85%). Examination of 76 metaphase plates obtained from eight individual E(2)-induced ACI female rat MGTs revealed the following consistent chromosome alterations: gains in chromosomes 7, 11, 12, 13, 19, and 20 and loss of chromosome 12. On Southern blot analysis, six of nine ACI female rat primary E(2)-induced MGTs (66%) exhibited amplified copy numbers (range: 3.4-6.9 copies) of the c-myc gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of these MGTs revealed specific fluorescent hybridization signals for c-myc (7q33) on all three homologs of a trisomy in chromosome 7. NIC analysis of 140 successive nonfamilial sporadic invasive human ductal breast cancers (BCs) showed an aneuploid frequency of 61%, while 31 DCISs revealed a 71% aneuploid frequency. These results clearly demonstrate that the female ACI rat E(2)-induced MGTs more closely resemble invasive human DCIS and ductal BC in two pertinent aspects: they are highly aneuploid compared with chemical carcinogen-induced MGTs and exhibit a high frequency of c-myc amplification. PMID:11807958

  11. [Sentinel lymph node metastasis in patients with ductal breast carcinoma in situ].

    PubMed

    Ruvalcaba-Limón, Eva; de Jesús Garduño-Raya, María; Bautista-Piña, Verónica; Trejo-Martínez, Claudia; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: en pacientes con carcinoma ductal in situ la biopsia de ganglio centinela es motivo de controversia porque se reportan ganglios positivos en 1.4-12.5% debido al carcinoma invasor oculto en la pieza quirúrgica. Objetivo: conocer la frecuencia de metástasis en ganglio centinela en pacientes con carcinoma ductal in situ e identificar las diferencias entre los casos positivos y negativos. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo, transversal, analítico de pacientes con carcinoma ductal in situ a quienes se realizó una biopsia de ganglio centinela por requerir mastectomía, tener un tumor palpable, lesión radiológica = 5 cm, inadecuada relación mama-tumor o porque la escisión pudiera afectar el flujo linfático. Resultados: de 168 carcinomas in situ, se incluyeron 50 casos con carcinoma ductal in situ y biopsia de ganglio centinela, de pacientes con edad promedio de 51.6 años, 30 (60%) de ellas asintomáticas. Los signos reportados fueron: nódulo palpable (18%), secreción por el pezón (12%) o ambos (8%). Predominaron las microcalcificaciones (72%), comedonecrosis (62%) y grado histológico -2 (44%) con 28% de receptores hormonales negativos. En el estudio transoperatorio 4 (8%) pacientes tuvieron ganglio centinela positivo y un caso en estudio histopatológico definitivo (60% micrometástasis, 40% macrometástasis), todos con carcinoma invasor en la pieza quirúrgica. Las pacientes con ganglio centinela transoperatorio positivo eran más jóvenes (44.5 vs 51 años), con más tumores palpables (50 vs 23.1%), más grandes (3.5 vs 2 cm), más comedonecrosis (75 vs 60.8%), más indiferenciados (75% vs 39.1%) y menos receptores hormonales (50 vs 73.9%), que las que tenían ganglio centinela negativo, sin que estas diferencias tuvieran significación estadística. Conclusiones: puesto que 1 de cada 12 pacientes con carcinoma ductal in situ tiene afectación ganglionar en el ganglio centinela, se recomienda seguir tomando la biopsia para evitar

  12. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciervide, Raquel; Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  13. Regulation of in situ to invasive breast carcinoma transition

    SciTech Connect

    Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min; Yao, Jun; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen, Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Violette, Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Bissell, Mina J.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

    2008-05-07

    The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

  14. Regulation of In Situ to Invasive Breast CarcinomaTransition

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Min; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen,Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Bissell, Mina; Violette,Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

    2007-03-13

    The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

  15. Invasive cystic hypersecretory carcinoma of the breast: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiangyan; Hu, Xiangrong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report a new case of invasive cystic hypersecretory carcinoma. The clinical and pathological characteristics of the lesion and a review of the literature are both described. Methods: A descriptive study of a case of invasive CHC occurring in a 60-yr-old woman is presented. Tumor was standard processed and stained by hematoxylin & eosin, PAS, immunohistochemically examined for ER, PR, C-erbB-2, CEA, thyroglobulin, E-cadherin, S-100 protein, and Cytokeratin5/6. Results: The tumor, which was 4.7×3.7×3.0 cm, was localized in the upper region of the left breast. This tumor revealed multiple cystic spaces, which were filled with PAS. It was positive for CEA, ER, E-cadherin, and S-100 protein, but negative for thyroglobulin, PR, and C-erbB-2. Cytokeratin5/6 was expressed in the cystic hypersecretory hyperplasia region, but not in the invasive area. The ten-month follow-up period was uneventful. Conclusions: Cystic hypersecretory carcinoma of the breast is a rare and distinctive variant of ductal carcinoma in situ. It has the potential for invasive growth. As there are few recorded cases, the prognosis in patients with invasive CHC is still uncertain and a matter of intensive debate. PMID:26261660

  16. Genome and transcriptome delineation of two major oncogenic pathways governing invasive ductal breast cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Aswad, Luay; Yenamandra, Surya Pavan; Ow, Ghim Siong; Grinchuk, Oleg; Ivshina, Anna V.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is a major histo-morphologic type of breast cancer. Histological grading (HG) of IDC is widely adopted by oncologists as a prognostic factor. However, HG evaluation is highly subjective with only 50%–85% inter-observer agreements. Specifically, the subjectivity in the assignment of the intermediate grade (histologic grade 2, HG2) breast cancers (comprising ~50% of IDC cases) results in uncertain disease outcome prediction and sub-optimal systemic therapy. Despite several attempts to identify the mechanisms underlying the HG classification, their molecular bases are poorly understood. We performed integrative bioinformatics analysis of TCGA and several other cohorts (total 1246 patients). We identified a 22-gene tumor aggressiveness grading classifier (22g-TAG) that reflects global bifurcation in the IDC transcriptomes and reclassified patients with HG2 tumors into two genetically and clinically distinct subclasses: histological grade 1-like (HG1-like) and histological grade 3-like (HG3-like). The expression profiles and clinical outcomes of these subclasses were similar to the HG1 and HG3 tumors, respectively. We further reclassified IDC into low genetic grade (LGG = HG1+HG1-like) and high genetic grade (HGG = HG3-like+HG3) subclasses. For the HG1-like and HG3-like IDCs we found subclass-specific DNA alterations, somatic mutations, oncogenic pathways, cell cycle/mitosis and stem cell-like expression signatures that discriminate between these tumors. We found similar molecular patterns in the LGG and HGG tumor classes respectively. Our results suggest the existence of two genetically-predefined IDC classes, LGG and HGG, driven by distinct oncogenic pathways. They provide novel prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers and could open unique opportunities for personalized systemic therapies of IDC patients. PMID:26474389

  17. The MYC oncogene in breast cancer progression: from benign epithelium to invasive carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cristina; Corominas, Josep M; Tusquets, Ignacio; Salido, Marta; Bellet, Meritxell; Fabregat, Xavier; Serrano, Sergio; Solé, Francesc

    2006-03-01

    One hypothesis for breast cancer development suggests that breast carcinogenesis involves a progression of events leading from benign epithelium to hyperplasia (with or without atypia) to carcinoma in situ and then invasive carcinoma. The MYC gene (alias c-Myc) is a transcriptional regulator whose expression is strongly associated with cell proliferation and cell differentiation. The present study is a descriptive analysis of MYC status throughout the hypothesized stages of invasive ductal carcinoma progression. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed including representative selected areas (normal cells, hyperplasia, in situ carcinoma, and invasive carcinoma) from each of 15 patients. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the LSI c-MYC/CEN8/IgH probe was performed. Two cases displayed MYC amplification (13%), showing this amplification only in the invasive carcinoma zones selected. Five cases displayed polysomy of chromosome 8 (33%), detected only in ductal in situ and invasive zones selected. Benign lesions and normal adjacent cells were classified as normal. None of the hyperplasia specimens and normal specimens analyzed showed any alterations in MYC status or any aneusomies of chromosome 8. The presence of MYC amplification only in invasive cells suggests that the finding of MYC amplification could reflect an advanced tumor progression.

  18. Tamoxifen Citrate, Letrozole, Anastrozole, or Exemestane With or Without Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Invasive RxPONDER Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Multicentric Breast Carcinoma; Multifocal Breast Carcinoma; Synchronous Bilateral Breast Carcinoma

  19. Coexistence of lobular granulomatous mastitis and ductal carcinoma: a fortuitous association?

    PubMed

    Limaiem, F; Khadhar, A; Hassan, F; Bouraoui, S; Lahmar, A; Mzabi, S

    2013-12-01

    A 77-year-old female patient with a medical history significant for hypertension and epilepsy presented with right breast pain of 6-months duration. Examination revealed a hard sub-areola tender mass with irregular borders associated with mild right nipple retraction. Mammography showed a 2.2 x 2.4 cm stellate mass of the right breast. Ultrasound-guided core biopsies of the tumour were performed. Pathological examination revealed a grade II infiltrating ductal carcinoma. The patient underwent right radical mastectomy with homolateral axillary lymphadenectomy. Histological examination of the surgical specimen revealed grade II infiltrating ductal carcinoma concomitant with granulomatous lobular mastitis. To the best of our knowledge, the coexistence of granulomatous lobular mastitis and ductal carcinoma has been described only twice in the English language literature. The theory that chronic inflammation leads to cancer is well documented. Whether our patient had developed cancer from granulomatous lobular mastitis or otherwise is a matter of debate until more cases are encountered and more research is done in the area of breast cancer pathogenesis with regards to it arising from granulomatous lobular mastitis.

  20. Outcomes in Patients Treated With Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Dawn; Tyldesley, Scott; Alexander, Cheryl; Speers, Caroline; Truong, Pauline; Nichol, Alan; Wai, Elaine S.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To examine, in a large, population-based cohort of women, the risk factors for recurrence after mastectomy for pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and to identify which patients may benefit from postmastectomy radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed for 637 subjects with pure DCIS, diagnosed between January 1990 and December 1999, treated initially with mastectomy. Locoregional relapse (LRR), breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival were described using the Kaplan-Meier method. Reported risk factors for LRR (age, margins, size, Van Nuys Prognostic Index, grade, necrosis, and histologic subtype) were analyzed by univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox modeling) methods. Results: Median follow-up was 12.0 years. Characteristics of the cohort were median age 55 years, 8.6% aged ≤40 years, 30.5% tumors >4 cm, 42.5% grade 3 histology, 37.7% multifocal disease, and 4.9% positive margins. At 10 years, LRR was 1.0%, breast cancer-specific survival was 98.0%, and overall survival was 90.3%. All recurrences (n=12) involved ipsilateral chest wall disease, with the majority being invasive disease (11 of 12). None of the 12 patients with recurrence died of breast cancer; all were successfully salvaged (median follow-up of 4.4 years). Ten-year LRR was higher with age ≤40 years (7.5% vs 1.5%; P=.003). Conclusion: Mastectomy provides excellent locoregional control for DCIS. Routine use of postmastectomy radiation therapy is not justified. Young age (≤40 years) predicts slightly higher LRR, but possibly owing to the small number of cases with multiple risk factors for relapse, a subgroup with a high risk of LRR (ie, approximately 15%) was not identified.

  1. Predictors of Recurrent Ductal Carcinoma In Situ after Breast-Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Yeon; Kang, Guhyun; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Gwak, Geumhee; Shin, Young-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local recurrence is a major concern in patients who have undergone surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The present study assessed whether the expression levels of hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67, as well as resection margin status, tumor grade, age at diagnosis, and adjuvant hormonal therapy and radiotherapy (RT) are associated with recurrence in women with DCIS. Methods In total, 111 patients with DCIS were included in the present study. The invasive and noninvasive recurrence events were recorded. The clinicopathological features; resection margins; administration of hormonal therapy and RT; expression statuses of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2; Ki-67 expression; and molecular subtypes were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the risk factors for recurrence. Results Recurrence was noted in 27 of 111 cases (24.3%). Involvement of resection margins, low tumor grade, high Ki-67 expression, and RT were independently associated with an increase in the recurrence rate (p<0.05, Pearson chi-square test). The recurrence rate was not significantly associated with patient age; ER, PR, and HER2 statuses; molecular subtype; and hormonal therapy. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that the involvement of resection margins, low tumor grade, high Ki-67 index, and the absence of adjuvant RT were independently associated with increased recurrence in patients with DCIS. Future studies should be conducted in a larger cohort of patients to further improve the identification of patients at high-risk for DCIS recurrence. PMID:27382395

  2. Increased serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in relapsed ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Papantoniou, Vassilios; Tsiouris, Spyridon; Koutsikos, John; Ptohis, Nikolaos; Lazaris, Dimitrios; Zerva, Cherry

    2006-01-01

    Increased serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 is a quite uncommon manifestation of breast cancer both on early disease and on relapse. A 53-year-old woman with invasive ductal breast carcinoma underwent left-sided mastectomy. Two years later she palpated a subcutaneous mass at the mastectomy scar, arousing suspicion of local relapse. Surgery and histopathology revealed infiltration by breast adenocarcinoma and she was treated with chemotherapy. At that time serum tumor markers, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA 15-3 were within normal range. Over the next six months she displayed an increase of serum CEA while serum CA 15-3 remained within normal range. In an attempt to search for a second neoplasm possibly of gastrointestinal (GI) origin, abdominal computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP), endoscopy of the upper GI tract and colonoscopy were performed, as well as measurement of serum CA 19-9. While no indication of a GI neoplasm was detected, she displayed an over 10-fold increase of serum CA 19-9. The patient had also an X-ray mammography and technetium-99m hexakis-2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile ((99m)Tc-MIBI) scintimammography (SM). Whilst mammography was negative for contralateral disease recurrence, SM was suggestive of axillary lymph node involvement. Axillary lymph node dissection confirmed an extensive metastatic infiltration of these nodes by breast adenocarcinoma. Three months later serum CA 19-9 and CEA became normal. The interest of this case lies on the unexpected high serum CA 19-9 values found in a breast relapsed adenocarcinoma and in the important contribution of SM in diagnosing the axillary lymph node metastatic infiltration. PMID:16617392

  3. Telomere length alterations unique to invasive lobular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Heaphy, Christopher M; Asch-Kendrick, Rebecca; Argani, Pedram; Meeker, Alan K; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley

    2015-08-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes located at the extreme ends of eukaryotic chromosomes and protect chromosomal ends from degradation and recombination. Dysfunctional telomeres contribute to genomic instability, promote tumorigenesis, and, in breast cancer, have been associated with increased cancer risk and poor prognosis. Short telomere lengths have been previously associated with triple-negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor (Her2)--positive ductal carcinomas. However, these investigations have not specifically assessed invasive lobular carcinomas (ILCs), which accounts for 5% to 15% of all invasive breast cancers. Here, we evaluate telomere lengths within 48 primary ILCs with complete characterization of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and Her2 status, including 32 luminal/Her2- (ER+/PR+/Her2-), 8 luminal/Her2+ (ER+/PR+/Her2+), 3 Her2+ (ER-/PR-/Her2+), and 5 triple-negative (ER-/PR-/Her2-) carcinomas. A telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization assay, which provides single-cell telomere length resolution, was used to evaluate telomere lengths and compare with standard clinicopathological markers. In contrast to breast ductal carcinoma, in which more than 85% of cases display abnormally short telomeres, approximately half (52%) of the ILCs displayed either normal or long telomeres. Short telomere length was associated with older patient age. Interestingly, 3 cases (6%) displayed a unique telomere pattern consisting of 1 or 2 bright telomere spots among the normal telomere signals within each individual cancer cell, a phenotype that has not been previously described. Additional studies are needed to further evaluate the significance of the unique bright telomere spot phenotype and the potential utility of telomere length as a prognostic marker in ILC.

  4. Outcomes after breast conservation treatment with radiation in women with ductal carcinoma in situ and prior nonbreast malignancy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Deepika N; Vapiwala, Neha; Solin, Lawrence J

    2009-01-01

    Management of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is controversial, as not all patients progress to invasive carcinoma. This report analyzes the outcomes after breast conservation treatment (BCT) with radiation in patients with DCIS following prior malignancy at another anatomic site. The study cohort was comprised of 14 women with DCIS who were treated between 1978 and 2003. The median age at diagnosis of DCIS was 54 years (mean 56; range 37-78) and for the prior nonbreast malignancy was 44 years (mean 47; range 27-76). All patients underwent breast conservation surgery followed by whole breast radiation and tumor bed boost. The median and mean follow-up times after treatment of DCIS were 8.0 and 9.1 years, respectively (range 2-18). The median and mean interval period between the prior malignancy and DCIS was 6.0 and 8.2 years, respectively (range 1-30). There was one (7%) local failure, two (14%) contralateral breast cancers, and one (7%) death from breast cancer that occurred 7 years after BCT following contralateral invasive breast cancer. In this cohort of 14 patients treated for DCIS of the breast after a prior nonbreast malignancy, treatment for DCIS resulted in a high rate of local control and should be considered for curative intent.

  5. Asymptomatic Incidental Ductal Carcinoma in situ in a Male Breast Presenting with Contralateral Gynecomastia

    PubMed Central

    Isley, Laura M.; Leddy, Rebecca J.; Rumboldt, Tihana; Bernard, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in males is rare and usually presents with symptoms on the affected side, such as, palpable mass or bloody nipple discharge. Even as DCIS has been reported in conjunction with gynecomastia in the same breast, we report an unusual case of a 62-year-old Caucasian male, with no family history of breast cancer, who presented with symptomatic side gynecomastia, and was incidentally found to have DCIS in a completely asymptomatic left breast. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first report in literature of asymptomatic, incidentally discovered DCIS in a male patient. PMID:22530182

  6. Improved Outcomes of Breast-Conserving Therapy for Patients With Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Sreedhara, Meera; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Harris, Jay R.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Patients treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) at our center from 1976 to 1990 had a 15% actuarial 10-year local recurrence (LR) rate. Since then, improved mammographic and pathologic evaluation and greater attention to achieving negative margins may have resulted in a lower risk of LR. In addition, clinical implications of hormone receptor and HER-2 status in DCIS remain unclear. We sought to determine the following: LR rates with this more modern approach; the relation between LR and HER-2 status; and clinical and pathologic factors associated with HER-2{sup +} DCIS. Methods and Materials: We studied 246 consecutive patients who underwent BCS and RT for DCIS from 2001 to 2007. Of the patients, 96 (39%) were Grade III and the median number of involved tissue blocks was 3. Half underwent re-excision and 222 (90%) had negative margins (>2 mm). All received whole-breast RT (40-52 Gy) and 99% (244) received a tumor bed boost (8-18 Gy). Routine estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER-2 immunohistochemistry was instituted in 2003. Results: With median follow-up of 58 months, there were no LRs. Seven patients (3%) developed contralateral breast cancer (4 invasive and 3 in situ). Among 163 patients with immunohistochemistry, 124 were ER/PR{sup +}HER-2{sup -}, 27 were ER/PR{sup +}HER-2{sup +}, 6 were ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}HER-2{sup +}, and 6 were ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}HER-2{sup -}. On univariable analysis, HER-2{sup +}was significantly associated with Grade III, ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}, central necrosis, comedo subtype, more extensive DCIS, and postmenopausal status. On multivariable analysis, Grade III and postmenopausal status remained significantly associated with HER-2{sup +}. Conclusions: In an era of mammographically identified DCIS, larger excisions, widely negative margins and the use of a tumor bed boost, we observed no LR regardless of ER/PR/HER-2 status. Factors associated

  7. Is Radiation Indicated in Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ and Close or Positive Mastectomy Margins?

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Linda W.; Rabban, Joseph; Hwang, E. Shelley; Bevan, Alison; Alvarado, Michael; Ewing, Cheryl; Esserman, Laura; Fowble, Barbara

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Resection margin status is one of the most significant factors for local recurrence in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery with or without radiation. However, its impact on chest wall recurrence in patients treated with mastectomy is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine chest wall recurrence rates in women with DCIS and close (<5 mm) or positive mastectomy margins in order to evaluate the potential role of radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2005, 193 women underwent mastectomy for DCIS. Fifty-five patients had a close final margin, and 4 patients had a positive final margin. Axillary surgery was performed in 17 patients. Median follow-up was 8 years. Formal pathology review was conducted to measure and verify margin status. Nuclear grade, architectural pattern, and presence or absence of necrosis was recorded. Results: Median pathologic size of the DCIS in the mastectomy specimen was 4.5 cm. Twenty-two patients had DCIS of >5 cm or diffuse disease. Median width of the close final margin was 2 mm. Nineteen patients had margins of <1 mm. One of these 59 patients experienced a chest wall recurrence with regional adenopathy, followed by distant metastases 2 years following skin-sparing mastectomy. The DCIS was high-grade, 4 cm, with a 5-mm deep margin. A second patient developed an invasive cancer in the chest wall 20 years after her mastectomy for DCIS. This cancer was considered a new primary site arising in residual breast tissue. Conclusions: The risk of chest wall recurrence in this series of patients is 1.7% for all patients and 3.3% for high-grade DCIS. One out of 20 (5%) patients undergoing skin sparing or total skin-sparing mastectomy experienced a chest wall recurrence. This risk of a chest wall recurrence appears sufficiently low not to warrant a recommendation for postmastectomy radiation therapy for patients with margins of <5 mm. There were too few patients

  8. Impact of Boost Radiation in the Treatment of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: A Population-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rakovitch, Eileen; Narod, Steven A.; Nofech-Moses, Sharon; Hanna, Wedad; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Saskin, Refik; Taylor, Carole; Tuck, Alan; Youngson, Bruce; Miller, Naomi; Done, Susan J.; Sengupta, Sandip; Elavathil, Leela; Jani, Prashant A.; Bonin, Michel; Metcalfe, Stephanie; Paszat, Lawrence

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of a population of women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation and to evaluate the independent effect of boost radiation on the development of local recurrence. Methods and Materials: All women diagnosed with DCIS and treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy in Ontario from 1994 to 2003 were identified. Treatments and outcomes were identified through administrative databases and validated by chart review. The impact of boost radiation on the development of local recurrence was determined using survival analyses. Results: We identified 1895 cases of DCIS that were treated by breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy; 561 patients received boost radiation. The cumulative 10-year rate of local recurrence was 13% for women who received boost radiation and 12% for those who did not (P=.3). The 10-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rate among women who did and who did not receive boost radiation was 88% and 87%, respectively (P=.27), 94% and 93% for invasive LRFS (P=.58), and was 95% and 93% for DCIS LRFS (P=.31). On multivariable analyses, boost radiation was not associated with a lower risk of local recurrence (hazard ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.59-1.15) (P=.25). Conclusions: Among a population of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation for DCIS, additional (boost) radiation was not associated with a lower risk of local or invasive recurrence.

  9. Basal cytokeratin phenotypes of myoepithelial cells indicates the origin of ductal carcinomas in situ of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Yin, Xiaona; Lu, Shanshan; Chen, Guorong; Dong, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU) is widely accepted as the origin of ductal carcinoma in situ of breast. The differentiation states of myoepithelial cells of breast ductal system hint the development of breast hyperplastic lesions. Basal cytokeratin (CK) phenotypes indicate the differentiation of myoepithelial cells. Using antibodies of CK5/6, CK14, and CK17, this study reports the basal CK phenotypes of myoepithelial cells in 20 foci of normal breast, 20 usual ductal hyperplasias, 36 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 28 sclerosing adenosis (SA). The results showed that the positive staining of basal CKs of myoepithelial cells in normal ducts were significantly higher than those in normal lobules. The basal CK expression of myoepithelial cells of DCIS and usual ductal hyperplasia was similar to that of normal duct, whereas that of SA was similar to that of normal lobule. We propose a modified model of TDLU origin of intraductal carcinoma that most of DCIS originate from terminal ducts of TDLU, whereas most SA originate from lobules.

  10. Breast ductal carcinoma in situ presenting as recurrent non-puerperal mastitis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liong, Yee Vonne; Hong, Ga Sze; Teo, Jennifer Gek Choo; Lim, Geok Hoon

    2013-08-07

    Breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a preinvasive form of breast cancer. It typically presents as microcalcifications which are picked up on screening mammogram. We report an atypical case of breast DCIS presenting with recurrent non-puerperal mastitis with a normal mammogram and perform a literature review.

  11. Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging and contralateral breast cancer occurrence among older women with ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Yi; Long, Jessica B; Killelea, Brigid K; Evans, Suzanne B; Roberts, Kenneth B; Silber, Andrea; Gross, Cary P

    2016-07-01

    Although preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect mammographically occult contralateral breast cancers (CBCs) among women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the impact of MRI on the incidence of subsequent CBC events is unclear. We examined whether MRI use decreases CBC occurrences and detection of invasive disease among women who develop a CBC. Utilizing the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare dataset, we assessed overall, synchronous (<6 months after primary cancer diagnosis), and subsequent (≥6 months after diagnosis, i.e., metachronous) CBC occurrence in women aged 67-94 years diagnosed with DCIS during 2004-2009, with follow-up through 2011. We applied a matched propensity score approach to compare the stage-specific incidence rate of CBC according to MRI use. Our sample consisted of 9166 beneficiaries, 1258 (13.7 %) of whom received preoperative MRI. After propensity score matching, preoperative MRI use was significantly associated with a higher synchronous CBC detection rate (108.6 vs. 29.7 per 1000 person-years; hazard ratio [HR] = 3.65; p < .001) with no significant differences in subsequent CBC rate (6.7 vs. 6.8 per 1000 person-years; HR = 0.90; p = .71). The 6-year cumulative incidence of any CBC (in situ plus invasive) remained significantly higher among women undergoing MRI, compared with those not undergoing MRI (9 vs. 4 %, p < .001). Women undergoing MRI also had a higher incidence of invasive CBC (4 vs. 3 %, p = .04). MRI use resulted in an increased detection of synchronous CBC but did not prevent subsequent CBC occurrence, suggesting that many of the undetected CBC lesions may not become clinically evident.

  12. Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging and contralateral breast cancer occurrence among older women with ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Yi; Long, Jessica B; Killelea, Brigid K; Evans, Suzanne B; Roberts, Kenneth B; Silber, Andrea; Gross, Cary P

    2016-07-01

    Although preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect mammographically occult contralateral breast cancers (CBCs) among women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the impact of MRI on the incidence of subsequent CBC events is unclear. We examined whether MRI use decreases CBC occurrences and detection of invasive disease among women who develop a CBC. Utilizing the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare dataset, we assessed overall, synchronous (<6 months after primary cancer diagnosis), and subsequent (≥6 months after diagnosis, i.e., metachronous) CBC occurrence in women aged 67-94 years diagnosed with DCIS during 2004-2009, with follow-up through 2011. We applied a matched propensity score approach to compare the stage-specific incidence rate of CBC according to MRI use. Our sample consisted of 9166 beneficiaries, 1258 (13.7 %) of whom received preoperative MRI. After propensity score matching, preoperative MRI use was significantly associated with a higher synchronous CBC detection rate (108.6 vs. 29.7 per 1000 person-years; hazard ratio [HR] = 3.65; p < .001) with no significant differences in subsequent CBC rate (6.7 vs. 6.8 per 1000 person-years; HR = 0.90; p = .71). The 6-year cumulative incidence of any CBC (in situ plus invasive) remained significantly higher among women undergoing MRI, compared with those not undergoing MRI (9 vs. 4 %, p < .001). Women undergoing MRI also had a higher incidence of invasive CBC (4 vs. 3 %, p = .04). MRI use resulted in an increased detection of synchronous CBC but did not prevent subsequent CBC occurrence, suggesting that many of the undetected CBC lesions may not become clinically evident. PMID:27287780

  13. A Self-Folding Hydrogel In Vitro Model for Ductal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kwag, Hye Rin; Serbo, Janna V; Korangath, Preethi; Sukumar, Saraswati; Romer, Lewis H; Gracias, David H

    2016-04-01

    A significant challenge in oncology is the need to develop in vitro models that accurately mimic the complex microenvironment within and around normal and diseased tissues. Here, we describe a self-folding approach to create curved hydrogel microstructures that more accurately mimic the geometry of ducts and acini within the mammary glands, as compared to existing three-dimensional block-like models or flat dishes. The microstructures are composed of photopatterned bilayers of poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA), a hydrogel widely used in tissue engineering. The PEGDA bilayers of dissimilar molecular weights spontaneously curve when released from the underlying substrate due to differential swelling ratios. The photopatterns can be altered via AutoCAD-designed photomasks so that a variety of ductal and acinar mimetic structures can be mass-produced. In addition, by co-polymerizing methacrylated gelatin (methagel) with PEGDA, microstructures with increased cell adherence are synthesized. Biocompatibility and versatility of our approach is highlighted by culturing either SUM159 cells, which were seeded postfabrication, or MDA-MB-231 cells, which were encapsulated in hydrogels; cell viability is verified over 9 and 15 days, respectively. We believe that self-folding processes and associated tubular, curved, and folded constructs like the ones demonstrated here can facilitate the design of more accurate in vitro models for investigating ductal carcinoma.

  14. A Self-Folding Hydrogel In Vitro Model for Ductal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kwag, Hye Rin; Serbo, Janna V; Korangath, Preethi; Sukumar, Saraswati; Romer, Lewis H; Gracias, David H

    2016-04-01

    A significant challenge in oncology is the need to develop in vitro models that accurately mimic the complex microenvironment within and around normal and diseased tissues. Here, we describe a self-folding approach to create curved hydrogel microstructures that more accurately mimic the geometry of ducts and acini within the mammary glands, as compared to existing three-dimensional block-like models or flat dishes. The microstructures are composed of photopatterned bilayers of poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA), a hydrogel widely used in tissue engineering. The PEGDA bilayers of dissimilar molecular weights spontaneously curve when released from the underlying substrate due to differential swelling ratios. The photopatterns can be altered via AutoCAD-designed photomasks so that a variety of ductal and acinar mimetic structures can be mass-produced. In addition, by co-polymerizing methacrylated gelatin (methagel) with PEGDA, microstructures with increased cell adherence are synthesized. Biocompatibility and versatility of our approach is highlighted by culturing either SUM159 cells, which were seeded postfabrication, or MDA-MB-231 cells, which were encapsulated in hydrogels; cell viability is verified over 9 and 15 days, respectively. We believe that self-folding processes and associated tubular, curved, and folded constructs like the ones demonstrated here can facilitate the design of more accurate in vitro models for investigating ductal carcinoma. PMID:26831041

  15. Symmetrical ethmoidal metastases from ductal carcinoma of the breast, suggesting transcribrosal spread.

    PubMed

    Monserez, D; Vlaminck, S; Kuhweide, R; Casselman, J

    2001-01-01

    Symmetrical ethmoidal metastases from ductal carcinoma of the breast, suggesting transcribrosal spread. While half of breast cancers develop metastases, the appearance of metastatic disease in paranasal sinuses from this origin is very rare. Eighteen other cases were found in the literature, dating from 1939 till now. A case of metastatic breastcancer presenting as a subacute therapy-resistant pansinusitis is described. The perfect symmetry was misleading. Bilateral ethmoidal biopsies were compatible with metastases from a ductal adenocarcinoma. Further investigation revealed meningeal carcinomatosis in the supra-orbital region and locoregional recurrence in the mastectomy scar and axilla. Comparing these 19 cases in chronological order, it was noticed that symptoms at time of diagnosis shift from those of space occupying lesions to those suggestive for sinusitis. This shift could be explained by earlier diagnosis. High index of suspicion is the key to diagnosis. Earlier diagnosis does not result in longer survival since in most cases patients have already widespread disease and die within one year. Most authors mention the role of the vertebral venous plexus in hematogeneous spreading of tumor cells. Another pathway of hematogenous spread is via (occult) lung metastases. This case prompts the hypothesis of transcribrosal spread from meningeal involvement.

  16. Health behavior change following a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ: An opportunity to improve health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Amy M; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Dittus, Kim; Hart, Vicki; Vatovec, Christine M; King, John G; James, Ted A; Lakoski, Susan G; Sprague, Brian L

    2015-11-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive breast cancer that comprises approximately 20% of new breast cancer diagnoses. DCIS is predominantly detected by screening mammography prior to the development of any clinical symptoms. Prognosis following a DCIS diagnosis is excellent, due to both the availability of effective treatments and the frequently benign nature of the disease. However, a DCIS diagnosis and its treatment have psychological and physical impacts that often lead to adverse changes in health-related behaviors, including changes in physical activity, body weight, alcohol intake, and smoking, which may represent a greater threat to the woman's overall health than the DCIS itself. Depending on age at diagnosis, women diagnosed with DCIS are 3-13 times more likely to die from non-breast cancer related causes, such as cardiovascular disease, than from breast cancer. Thus, the maintenance and improvement of healthy behaviors that influence a variety of outcomes after diagnosis may warrant increased attention during DCIS management. This may also represent an important opportunity to promote the adoption of healthy behaviors, given that DCIS carries the psychological impact of a cancer diagnosis but also a favorable prognosis. Particular focus is needed to address these issues in vulnerable patient subgroups with pre-existing higher rates of unhealthy behaviors and demonstrated health disparities. PMID:25858806

  17. A review of the management of ductal carcinoma in situ following breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Boxer, M M; Delaney, G P; Chua, B H

    2013-12-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a heterogeneous, pre-malignant disease accounting for 10-20% of all new breast tumours. Evidence shows a statistically significant local control benefit for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following breast conserving surgery (BCS) for all patients. The baseline recurrence risk of individual patients varies according to clinical-pathological criteria and in selected patients, omission of RT may be considered, following a discussion with the patient. The role of adjuvant endocrine therapy remains uncertain. Ongoing studies are attempting to define subgroups of patients who are at sufficiently low risk of recurrence that RT may be safely omitted; investigating RT techniques and dose fractionation schedules; and defining the role of endocrine therapy. Future directions in the management of patients with DCIS will include investigation of prognostic and predictive biomarkers to inform individualised therapy tailored to the risk of recurrence.

  18. Differentiating fibroadenoma and ductal carcinoma in situ from normal breast tissue by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yuting; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA) is the most common benign tumor of the female breast and several studies have reported that women with it have increased risk of breast cancer. While the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a very early form of breast cancer. Thus, early detections of FA and DCIS are critical for improving breast tumor outcome and survival. In this paper, we use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to obtain the high-contrast images of fresh, unfixed, unstained human breast specimens (normal breast tissue, FA and DCIS). Our results show that MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of FA and DCIS including changes of duct architecture and collagen morphology. These results are consistent with the histological results. With the advancement of MPM, the technique has potential ability to serve as a real-time noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of breast tumor.

  19. Glucose Uptake and Intracellular pH in a Mouse Model of Ductal Carcinoma In situ (DCIS) Suggests Metabolic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Rebecca C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Damonte, Patrizia; Mori, Hidetoshi; Pénzváltó, Zsófia; Pham, Cindy; Koehne, Amanda L.; Go, Aiza C.; Anderson, Steve E.; Cala, Peter M.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for the progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive breast carcinoma remain unclear. Previously we showed that the transition to invasiveness in the mammary intraepithelial neoplastic outgrowth (MINO) model of DCIS does not correlate with its serial acquisition of genetic mutations. We hypothesized instead that progression to invasiveness depends on a change in the microenvironment and that precancer cells might create a more tumor-permissive microenvironment secondary to changes in glucose uptake and metabolism. Immunostaining for glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) in tumor, normal mammary gland and MINO (precancer) tissue showed differences in expression. The uptake of the fluorescent glucose analog dye, 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG), reflected differences in the cellular distributions of glucose uptake in normal mammary epithelial cells (nMEC), MINO, and Met1 cancer cells, with a broad distribution in the MINO population. The intracellular pH (pHi) measured using the fluorescent ratio dye 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-155 carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) revealed expected differences between normal and cancer cells (low and high, respectively), and a mixed distribution in the MINO cells, with a subset of cells in the MINO having an increased rate of acidification when proton efflux was inhibited. Invasive tumor cells had a more alkaline baseline pHi with high rates of proton production coupled with higher rates of proton export, compared with nMEC. MINO cells displayed considerable variation in baseline pHi that separated into two distinct populations: MINO high and MINO low. MINO high had a noticeably higher mean acidification rate compared with nMEC, but relatively high baseline pHi similar to tumor cells. MINO low cells also had an increased acidification rate compared with nMEC, but with a more acidic pHi similar to nMEC. These findings

  20. Glucose Uptake and Intracellular pH in a Mouse Model of Ductal Carcinoma In situ (DCIS) Suggests Metabolic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Rebecca C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Damonte, Patrizia; Mori, Hidetoshi; Pénzváltó, Zsófia; Pham, Cindy; Koehne, Amanda L.; Go, Aiza C.; Anderson, Steve E.; Cala, Peter M.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for the progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive breast carcinoma remain unclear. Previously we showed that the transition to invasiveness in the mammary intraepithelial neoplastic outgrowth (MINO) model of DCIS does not correlate with its serial acquisition of genetic mutations. We hypothesized instead that progression to invasiveness depends on a change in the microenvironment and that precancer cells might create a more tumor-permissive microenvironment secondary to changes in glucose uptake and metabolism. Immunostaining for glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) in tumor, normal mammary gland and MINO (precancer) tissue showed differences in expression. The uptake of the fluorescent glucose analog dye, 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG), reflected differences in the cellular distributions of glucose uptake in normal mammary epithelial cells (nMEC), MINO, and Met1 cancer cells, with a broad distribution in the MINO population. The intracellular pH (pHi) measured using the fluorescent ratio dye 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-155 carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) revealed expected differences between normal and cancer cells (low and high, respectively), and a mixed distribution in the MINO cells, with a subset of cells in the MINO having an increased rate of acidification when proton efflux was inhibited. Invasive tumor cells had a more alkaline baseline pHi with high rates of proton production coupled with higher rates of proton export, compared with nMEC. MINO cells displayed considerable variation in baseline pHi that separated into two distinct populations: MINO high and MINO low. MINO high had a noticeably higher mean acidification rate compared with nMEC, but relatively high baseline pHi similar to tumor cells. MINO low cells also had an increased acidification rate compared with nMEC, but with a more acidic pHi similar to nMEC. These findings

  1. Glucose Uptake and Intracellular pH in a Mouse Model of Ductal Carcinoma In situ (DCIS) Suggests Metabolic Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Rebecca C; Hubbard, Neil E; Damonte, Patrizia; Mori, Hidetoshi; Pénzváltó, Zsófia; Pham, Cindy; Koehne, Amanda L; Go, Aiza C; Anderson, Steve E; Cala, Peter M; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for the progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive breast carcinoma remain unclear. Previously we showed that the transition to invasiveness in the mammary intraepithelial neoplastic outgrowth (MINO) model of DCIS does not correlate with its serial acquisition of genetic mutations. We hypothesized instead that progression to invasiveness depends on a change in the microenvironment and that precancer cells might create a more tumor-permissive microenvironment secondary to changes in glucose uptake and metabolism. Immunostaining for glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) in tumor, normal mammary gland and MINO (precancer) tissue showed differences in expression. The uptake of the fluorescent glucose analog dye, 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG), reflected differences in the cellular distributions of glucose uptake in normal mammary epithelial cells (nMEC), MINO, and Met1 cancer cells, with a broad distribution in the MINO population. The intracellular pH (pHi) measured using the fluorescent ratio dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-155 carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) revealed expected differences between normal and cancer cells (low and high, respectively), and a mixed distribution in the MINO cells, with a subset of cells in the MINO having an increased rate of acidification when proton efflux was inhibited. Invasive tumor cells had a more alkaline baseline pHi with high rates of proton production coupled with higher rates of proton export, compared with nMEC. MINO cells displayed considerable variation in baseline pHi that separated into two distinct populations: MINO high and MINO low. MINO high had a noticeably higher mean acidification rate compared with nMEC, but relatively high baseline pHi similar to tumor cells. MINO low cells also had an increased acidification rate compared with nMEC, but with a more acidic pHi similar to nMEC. These findings demonstrate

  2. Efficacy of Contrast-enhanced Harmonic Endoscopic Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uekitani, Toshiyuki; Kaino, Seiji; Harima, Hirofumi; Suenaga, Shigeyuki; Sen-yo, Manabu; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Distinguishing pancreatic ductal carcinoma (DC) from other pancreatic masses remains challenging. This study aims at evaluating the efficacy of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography (CEH-EUS) in the diagnosis of DC. Patients and Methods: Forty-nine patients with solid pancreatic mass lesions underwent CEH-EUS. EUS (B-mode) was used to evaluate the inner echoes, distributions, and borders of the masses. The vascular patterns of the masses were evaluated with CEH-EUS at 30–50 s (early phase) and 70–90 s (late phase) after the administration of Sonazoid®. Results: The final diagnoses included DCs (37), mass-forming pancreatitis (6), endocrine neoplasms (3), a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (1), a metastatic carcinoma (1), and an acinar cell carcinoma (1). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the diagnoses of DC in hypoechoic masses using EUS (B-mode) were 89.2%, 16.7%, and 71.4%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of DC in hypovascular masses using CEH-EUS were 73.0%, 91.7%, and 77.6% in the early phase and 83.8%, 91.7%, and 85.7% in the late phase, respectively. Conclusions: CEH-EUS for the diagnosis of DC is superior to EUS. CEH-EUS in the late phase was particularly efficacious in the diagnosis of DC. PMID:27184637

  3. Primary biliary carcinoma: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsen, M.K.; Quiroz, F.; Lawson, T.L.; Smith, D.F.; Foley, W.D.; Steward, E.T.

    1984-08-01

    Fifty-three patients with documented primary biliary carcinoma were studied with computed tomography. Twenty-six patients had gallbladder carcinoma and 27 patients had carcinoma of the biliary ductal system. Ninety percent of patients with gallbladder cancer had an intraluminal mass. Local invasion into the liver was common. The majority of patients with biliary ductal carcinoma had dilated bile ducts, while only 50% of patients with gallbladder cancer had biliary ductal dilatation. The most common location of tumor involving the extrahepatic biliary ductal system was the distal common bile duct. This occurred in eight patients out of 27, or 30% of the cases.

  4. Myoepithelial carcinoma with contralateral invasive micropapillary carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun Young; Bae, Young Kyung; Cho, Jihyong; Kang, Sun Hee

    2011-09-01

    Adenomyoepithelioma (AME) is a rare benign tumor composed of myoepithelial cells (MECs) which are located beneath the epithelial cells of exocrine glands, especially in breast and salivary glands. These tumor cells show biphasic proliferation of epithelial and MECs. Malignant AME is characterized by distant metastasis, local recurrence, cytologic atypia, high mitotic activity and infiltrating tumor margins. A 51-year-old woman presented with an 8 months growth in the left breast. She underwent core-needle biopsy and consecutively mammotome assisted biopsy at a local clinic. After resection, she complained about re-growing remnant lesion and a newly developed solid mass in the right breast. Finally, the remnant mass in the left breast was diagnosed with myoepithelial carcinoma. Concurrently, contralateral breast mass was diagnosed with invasive micropapillary carcinoma. Herein we report an unusual case of synchronous myoepithelial carcinoma and invasive micropapillary carcinoma of the breast with a review of literatures.

  5. Characteristics and behaviour of screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: comparison with symptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Koh, Valerie Cui Yun; Lim, Jeffrey Chun Tatt; Thike, Aye Aye; Cheok, Poh Yian; Thu, Minn Minn Myint; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee; Ong, Kong Wee; Ho, Gay Hui; Tan, Wai Jin; Tan, Yongcheng; Salahuddin, Ahmed Syed; Busmanis, Inny; Chong, Angela Pek Yoon; Iqbal, Jabed; Thilagaratnam, Shyamala; Wong, Jill Su Lin; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Singapore women. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is the putative, non-obligate precursor of the majority of invasive breast cancers. The efficacy of the Singapore breast-screening pilot project in detecting early stage breast cancer led to the launch of a national breast-screening programme, BreastScreen Singapore (BSS), in January 2002. In this study, we compared clinicopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics, as well as clinical outcomes, between screen-detected and symptomatic DCIS. The study cohort comprised 1202 cases of DCIS diagnosed at Singapore General Hospital from 1994 to 2010. Comparison of clinicopathological parameters, immunohistochemical results of ER, PR, HER2, CK14, EGFR, and 34βE12, and clinical outcomes was carried out between the 2 groups. Amongst 1202 cases, 610 (50.7%) were screen-detected and 592 (49.3%) were symptomatic DCIS. Screen-detected cases were smaller in size (P < 0.001), of lower nuclear grade (P = 0.004), and more frequently expressed ER (P < 0.001). Luminal A phenotype was more frequently observed in screen-detected DCIS, while triple-negative and HER2 phenotypes were more common in symptomatic DCIS (P < 0.001). The basal-like phenotype was also more frequent in symptomatic DCIS (P = 0.041). Mean and median follow-up was 99.7 and 97.8 months, respectively, with a maximum follow-up of 246.0 months. More symptomatic patients developed invasive recurrences compared to screen-detected patients (P = 0.001). A trend for better disease-free survival was observed in screen-detected patients (P = 0.076). Patients who were screen-detected experienced better overall survival than those with symptomatic DCIS (P = 0.007). Our data indicate a more favourable outcome of screen-detected DCIS patients confirming the role of BSS in early identification of this curable disease.

  6. Role of HGF in epithelial–stromal cell interactions during progression from benign breast disease to ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Basal-like and luminal breast cancers have distinct stromal–epithelial interactions, which play a role in progression to invasive cancer. However, little is known about how stromal–epithelial interactions evolve in benign and pre-invasive lesions. Methods To study epithelial–stromal interactions in basal-like breast cancer progression, we cocultured reduction mammoplasty fibroblasts with the isogenic MCF10 series of cell lines (representing benign/normal, atypical hyperplasia, and ductal carcinoma in situ). We used gene expression microarrays to identify pathways induced by coculture in premalignant cells (MCF10DCIS) compared with normal and benign cells (MCF10A and MCF10AT1). Relevant pathways were then evaluated in vivo for associations with basal-like subtype and were targeted in vitro to evaluate effects on morphogenesis. Results Our results show that premalignant MCF10DCIS cells express characteristic gene expression patterns of invasive basal-like microenvironments. Furthermore, while hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) secretion is upregulated (relative to normal, MCF10A levels) when fibroblasts are cocultured with either atypical (MCF10AT1) or premalignant (MCF10DCIS) cells, only MCF10DCIS cells upregulated the HGF receptor MET. In three-dimensional cultures, upregulation of HGF/MET in MCF10DCIS cells induced morphological changes suggestive of invasive potential, and these changes were reversed by antibody-based blocking of HGF signaling. These results are relevant to in vivo progression because high expression of a novel MCF10DCIS-derived HGF signature was correlated with the basal-like subtype, with approximately 86% of basal-like cancers highly expressing the HGF signature, and because high expression of HGF signature was associated with poor survival. Conclusions Coordinated and complementary changes in HGF/MET expression occur in epithelium and stroma during progression of pre-invasive basal-like lesions. These results suggest that

  7. Monoclonal antibody BrE-3 participation in a multivariate prognostic model for infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chan, C M; Baratta, F S; Ozzello, L; Ceriani, R L

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MoAb) BrE-3, an anti-human milk fat globule (HMFG) MoAb, is used here as a novel prognostic indicator for survival and relapse time in patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. A scoring system (4-Score method) was developed to this effect that measured, in a statistically reliable fashion, the level of expression of the epitope for MoAb BrE-3 in the cytoplasm and membranes of breast carcinoma cells in paraffin-embedded sections. In univariate analysis, data obtained by the 4-Score Method as well as data from traditional prognostic indicators (tumor size, axillary node status, and grade of differentiation) were found to be associated with patient survival and relapse. In multivariate analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards regression model, levels of expression of BrE-3 epitope plus tumor size and axillary node status were weighted and combined in an Individual Linear Composite Prognostic Score (ILCPS) that had a high level of association with survival and relapse time in this sample model of patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. This level of association was found to be higher than the level of association for any other combination of traditional or 4-Score method variables. The level of expression of BrE-3 significantly adds to the prognostic capacity of traditional prognostic markers for infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. PMID:7981443

  8. Association between dynamic contrast enhanced MRI imaging features and WHO histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, JUAN; YU, JIANQUN; PENG, YULAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and World Health Organization (WHO) histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. A retrospective analysis on the results of DCE-MRI of 92 patients, who were diagnosed with invasive ductal breast cancer following surgery or biopsy, and these results were correlated with WHO histopathological grade. The statistical analysis demonstrated that the tumor size, shape and characteristics of early enhancement were associated with the WHO histopathological grade: The larger the lesion's long diameter, the higher the WHO histopathological grade; the WHO histopathological grades of round and oval masses were relatively lower, while those of lobulated and irregular masses were higher; and tumors with heterogeneous and ring-like enhancement exhibited higher WHO histopathological grades, while those of homogeneous enhancement were lower. The lesion's margin shape was not associated with the WHO histopathological grade. The present study demonstrates that features of DCE-MRI and WHO histopathological grade in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer are correlated, and these MRI features could be used to evaluate the biological behavior and prognosis of lesions. PMID:27123145

  9. Morphometric grading of invasive ductal breast cancer. I. Thresholds for nuclear grade.

    PubMed Central

    Kronqvist, P.; Kuopio, T.; Collan, Y.

    1998-01-01

    We analysed 170 histological samples of invasive ductal breast cancer from years 1988-91 by computerized nuclear morphometry, to find objective and quantitative thresholds for nuclear grade. Based on Kaplan-Meier curves reflecting survival and recurrence of disease and univariate analysis by Cox's regression, optimal thresholds were determined for features related to nuclear size and size variation. In our material, with mean follow-up time of 5 years 9 months, the determined thresholds for nuclear profile area (32 microm2 and 47 microm2), nuclear diameter (6.4 microm and 7.4 microm) and mean shortest nuclear axis (4.8 microm and 6.4 microm) best separated the cases with favourable, intermediate and unfavourable course of disease. In this material from the era of mammography and adjuvant therapy, the mean shortest nuclear axis was found to be a significant prognostic factor, with a risk ratio (RR) exceeded only by that of tumour size (RRs 2.9- and 3.5-fold respectively). The results suggest that morphometric grading criteria can be developed for application in Bloom-Richardson grading and in the Nottingham Prognostic Index. PMID:9743304

  10. Diagnostic underestimation of atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ at percutaneous core needle and vacuum-assisted biopsies of the breast in a Brazilian reference institution*

    PubMed Central

    Badan, Gustavo Machado; Roveda Júnior, Decio; Piato, Sebastião; Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Campos, Mário Sérgio Dantas; Pecci, Carlos Alberto Ferreira; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Trocoli; D'Ávila, Camila

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of diagnostic underestimation at stereotactic percutaneous core needle biopsies (CNB) and vacuum-assisted biopsies (VABB) of nonpalpable breast lesions, with histopathological results of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subsequently submitted to surgical excision. As a secondary objective, the frequency of ADH and DCIS was determined for the cases submitted to biopsy. Materials and Methods Retrospective review of 40 cases with diagnosis of ADH or DCIS on the basis of biopsies performed between February 2011 and July 2013, subsequently submitted to surgery, whose histopathological reports were available in the internal information system. Biopsy results were compared with those observed at surgery and the underestimation rate was calculated by means of specific mathematical equations. Results The underestimation rate at CNB was 50% for ADH and 28.57% for DCIS, and at VABB it was 25% for ADH and 14.28% for DCIS. ADH represented 10.25% of all cases undergoing biopsy, whereas DCIS accounted for 23.91%. Conclusion The diagnostic underestimation rate at CNB is two times the rate at VABB. Certainty that the target has been achieved is not the sole determining factor for a reliable diagnosis. Removal of more than 50% of the target lesion should further reduce the risk of underestimation. PMID:26929454

  11. Bilateral ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast after radiation therapy for Ewing's sarcoma of the vertebra in a young woman: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Keskek, Mehmet; Kilic, Mehmet; Ertan, Tamer; Erdem, Adnan; Yoldas, Omer

    2008-01-01

    Thoracic radiation in the early years of life is a known risk factor for breast cancer later in life. A 21-year-old woman who had received thoracic radiation therapy for Ewing's sarcoma of the vertebra 9 years earlier was referred to our hospital for investigation of a palpable mass in her left breast. Ultrasonography and excisional biopsy showed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the left breast, with no detectable pathology in the right breast except that it was more hypoplastic than the left breast. Considering the known risk factors for invasive breast cancer in both breasts, we performed bilateral skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction using subpectoral implants. The final histopathological diagnosis was bilateral DCIS. PMID:18668319

  12. Expression of CD151/Tspan24 and integrin alpha 3 complex in aid of prognostication of HER2-negative high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Romanska, Hanna M; Potemski, Piotr; Kusinska, Renata; Kopczynski, Janusz; Sadej, Rafal; Kordek, Radzislaw

    2015-01-01

    The pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic functions of the tetraspanin protein CD151 (Tspan24) are thought to be dependent on its ability to form complexes with laminin-binding integrin receptors (i.e. alpha6beta1, alpha3beta1, alpha6beta4). We have previously reported that in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), CD151/alpha3beta1 complex was of prognostic value in patients with HER2-negative tumors. Extrapolating these findings to the pre-invasive setting, we aimed to make an assessment of a potential relationship between expression of the CD151/alpha3beta1 complex in DCIS and Van Nuys prognostic index (VNPI) in high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in relation to the HER2 status. Protein distributions were analyzed in 49 samples of pure DCIS using immunohistochemistry. For each case immunoreactivity was assessed in at least 5 ducts (325 ducts in total) and an average score was taken for statistical analyses. When analyzed in the whole cohort, there was no statistical association between the VNPI and any of the proteins scored either separately or in combination. When stratified according to the HER2 status, in the HER2-negative subgroup, CD151 assessed in combination with alpha3beta1 was significantly correlated with VNPI (P = 0.044), while neither protein analyzed individually showed any significant link with the prognostic index. Expression of the CD151/alpha3beta1 complex in HER2-negative DCIS might reflect tumor behavior relevant to the patient outcome and thus might aid prognostication of the disease. PMID:26464707

  13. Does contrast-enhanced ultrasound reveal tumor angiogenesis in pancreatic ductal carcinoma? A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Mutsumi; Koito, Kazumitsu; Hirokawa, Naoki; Hori, Masakazu; Satoh, Taishi; Hareyama, Masato

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate tumor vascularity of pancreatic carcinoma noninvasively by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) and clarify the diagnostic value of tumor vascularity in subjects with nonresectable advanced pancreatic carcinoma. The study was approved by our institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Twenty-seven subjects with advanced pancreatic ductal carcinoma were treated by chemoradiotherapy. Contrast-enhanced US, US guided biopsies and dynamic computed tomography (CT) were performed before and after the therapy. We assigned the intratumoral enhancement pattern of US as an enhanced ultrasound (EU) score, from 1 to 4, according to the degree of enhancement area. Intratumoral microvessel density (IMD) and average vessel diameter (AVD) were calculated by means of CD 34 immunostaining. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) staining was graded on a scale of 1 to 3. EU scores before chemoradiotherapy were compared with IMD, AVD, VEGF, histological grading and hepatic metastasis. After the therapy, local treatment response was evaluated by dynamic CT calculating the maximum area of the tumor, by comparing it with its size in pre- therapy. Subjects who had at least a 50% or more decrease of tumor size lasting more than 4 wk were estimated as partial response (PR), more than a 50% of increase progressive disease (PD) and if neither PR nor PD criteria were met, they were classified as stabled disease (SD). Next, EU scores were compared with IMD, AVD, VEGF and treatment response. Statistically significant differences were evaluated by Pearson's correlation, post-hoc, Spearman's rank correlation, Wilcoxon rank sum and Student's t-test. A p < 0.05 was defined as being statistically significant. Before the therapy, the EU score and IMD were significantly correlated (r = 0.50, p < 0.02), as was VEGF (r = 0.45, p < 0.05). The EU score and AVD were negatively correlated (r = - 0.56, p < 0.02). Significant

  14. Long-term Survival after Resection of HER2+ Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma Metastasis to the Brainstem.

    PubMed

    Awad, Al-Wala; Zaidi, Hasan A; Awad, Al-Homam; Spetzler, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is a common site of metastatic spread from neoplasms in distant organs, including breast, bone, and lung. The decision to surgically treat these metastatic lesions is often challenging, especially in the setting of systemic disease or when eloquent brain regions are involved. Treating metastatic disease in the brainstem can be technically difficult, and in many institutions, considered a contraindication to surgical intervention, given the relatively high risk of new postoperative neurological deficits. Herein, we report a case of metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast with spread to the pontine-medullary junction that was treated with aggressive surgical resection and chronic hormonal therapy. After surgical excision of the brainstem lesion, the patient remained asymptomatic and was maintained on trastuzumab therapy over a 10-year follow-up period, with no radiographic or clinical evidence of recurrent disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient treated for a solitary metastasis to the brainstem with long-term survival. PMID:26929889

  15. Proteomic profiling of 13 paired ductal infiltrating breast carcinomas and non-tumoral adjacent counterparts.

    PubMed

    Pucci-Minafra, Ida; Cancemi, Patrizia; Marabeti, Maria Rita; Albanese, Nadia Ninfa; Di Cara, Gianluca; Taormina, Pietra; Marrazzo, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    According to recent statistics, breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of death among women in Western countries. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease, presently classified into several subtypes according to their cellular origin. Among breast cancer histotypes, infiltrating ductal carcinoma represents the most common and potentially aggressive form. Despite the current progress achieved in early cancer detection and treatment, including the new generation of molecular therapies, there is still need for identification of multiparametric biomarkers capable of discriminating between cancer subtypes and predicting cancer progression for personalized therapies. One established step in this direction is the proteomic strategy, expected to provide enough information on breast cancer profiling. To this aim, in the present study we analyzed 13 breast cancer tissues and their matched non-tumoral tissues by 2-DE. Collectively, we identified 51 protein spots, corresponding to 34 differentially expressed proteins, which may represent promising candidate biomarkers for molecular-based diagnosis of breast cancer and for pattern discovery. The relevance of these proteins as factors contributing to breast carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:21136615

  16. Basaloid ductal carcinoma in situ arising in salivary gland metaplasia of the breast: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Jeong; Kang, Su Hwan; Bae, Young Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland metaplasia is a newly recognized, adenosis-like lesion which could not be classified according to known categories of adenosis of the breast. We report a case of basaloid ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) arising in a background of salivary gland metaplasia in a 49-year old woman who visited our hospital for a right breast mass. Breast ultrasonography showed a multi-lobulating mixed hypoechoic and isoechoic mass measuring 2.9 cm in size at the periareolar area. Histologically, the lesion showed a well-defined DCIS with basaloid tumor cells and central comedo-type necrosis surrounded by salivary gland metaplasia composed of glands or ducts not specific to the breast, ducts with cribriform proliferation of luminal epithelial cells, and ducts with varying degrees of proliferation of basaloid cells including solid nests of basaloid cells. Salivary gland metaplasia is a most unusual lesion of the breast characterized by salivary gland-type acini and ducts with various proliferations of luminal and basaloid cells, and accompanied by malignant tumor of basal cell type.

  17. The impact of surgery on ductal carcinoma in situ outcomes: the use of mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, E Shelley

    2010-01-01

    Mastectomy has been the historical mainstay of treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), but over time, there have been significant changes in its use for preinvasive breast cancer. Although there was an early reduction in mastectomy rates for DCIS with the introduction of breast-conserving surgery, in some groups, the rates of both mastectomy and contralateral mastectomy for DCIS have increased in recent years. Due to advances in breast cancer screening as well as improvements in breast reconstruction, mastectomy will continue to be an important and acceptable treatment option. Recurrence is rare following mastectomy for DCIS. Nevertheless, there remains a need to follow patients for in-breast, nodal, or contralateral breast events, which can occur long after the index DCIS has been treated. Since up to 70% of women with newly diagnosed DCIS have disease that can be managed with breast-conserving surgery, patient counseling is imperative to ensure the best use of this option for DCIS, given that mastectomy does not significantly impact survival in this setting. PMID:20956829

  18. Surgical Excision Without Radiation for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ of the Breast: 12-Year Results From the ECOG-ACRIN E5194 Study

    PubMed Central

    Solin, Lawrence J.; Gray, Robert; Hughes, Lorie L.; Wood, William C.; Lowen, Mary Ann; Badve, Sunil S.; Baehner, Frederick L.; Ingle, James N.; Perez, Edith A.; Recht, Abram; Sparano, Joseph A.; Davidson, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the 12-year risk of developing an ipsilateral breast event (IBE) for women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast treated with surgical excision (lumpectomy) without radiation. Patients and Methods A prospective clinical trial was performed for women with DCIS who were selected for low-risk clinical and pathologic characteristics. Patients were enrolled onto one of two study cohorts (not randomly assigned): cohort 1: low- or intermediate-grade DCIS, tumor size 2.5 cm or smaller (n = 561); or cohort 2: high-grade DCIS, tumor size 1 cm or smaller (n = 104). Protocol specifications included excision of the DCIS tumor with a minimum negative margin width of at least 3 mm. Tamoxifen (not randomly assigned) was given to 30% of the patients. An IBE was defined as local recurrence of DCIS or invasive carcinoma in the treated breast. Median follow-up time was 12.3 years. Results There were 99 IBEs, of which 51 (52%) were invasive. The IBE and invasive IBE rates increased over time in both cohorts. The 12-year rates of developing an IBE were 14.4% for cohort 1 and 24.6% for cohort 2 (P = .003). The 12-year rates of developing an invasive IBE were 7.5% and 13.4%, respectively (P = .08). On multivariable analysis, study cohort and tumor size were both significantly associated with developing an IBE (P = .009 and P = .03, respectively). Conclusion For patients with DCIS selected for favorable clinical and pathologic characteristics and treated with excision without radiation, the risks of developing an IBE and an invasive IBE increased through 12 years of follow-up, without plateau. These data help inform the treatment decision-making process for patients and their physicians. PMID:26371148

  19. The Polycomb group protein RING1B is overexpressed in ductal breast carcinoma and is required to sustain FAK steady state levels in breast cancer epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Almudena; Panoutsopoulou, Konstantina; Corominas, Josep Maria; Gimeno, Ramón; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Morales, Saleta; Lobato, Tania; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Farias, Eduardo F.; Mayol, Xavier; Cano, Amparo; Hernández-Muáoz, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    In early stages of metastasis malignant cells must acquire phenotypic changes to enhance their migratory behavior and their ability to breach the matrix surrounding tumors and blood vessel walls. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression allows the acquisition of these features that, once tumoral cells have escape from the primary tumor, can be reverted. Here we report that the expression of the Polycomb epigenetic repressor Ring1B is enhanced in tumoral cells that invade the stroma in human ductal breast carcinoma and its expression is coincident with that of Fak in these tumors. Ring1B knockdown in breast cancer cell lines revealed that Ring1B is required to sustain Fak expression in basal conditions as well as in Tgfβ-treated cells. Functionally, endogenous Ring1B is required for cell migration and invasion in vitro and for in vivo invasion of the mammary fat pad by tumoral cells. Finally we identify p63 as a target of Ring1B to regulate Fak expression: Ring1B depletion results in enhanced p63 expression, which in turns represses Fak expression. Importantly, Fak downregulation upon Ring1B depletion is dependent on p63 expression. Our findings provide new insights in the biology of the breast carcinoma and open new avenues for breast cancer prognosis and therapy. PMID:24742605

  20. Predictors of Microvascular Invasion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Shirabe, Ken; Aishima, Shinichi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-09-01

    This chapter covers a range of important topics in the evaluation of the microvascular invasion (MVI) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) before treatment. The malignant potential of HCC is reflected by the types of MVI such as portal venous (vp), hepatic vein (vv) or bile duct (b) infiltration. The identification of the type of MVI in HCC has a key role in decisions regarding the effective treatment of HCC. Here, we describe the possible and important predictors of MVI in HCC. PMID:26398341

  1. Clonality of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and metachronous invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aulmann, Sebastian; Penzel, Roland; Longerich, Thomas; Funke, Benjamin; Schirmacher, Peter; Sinn, Hans Peter

    2008-02-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) of the breast is generally considered an indicator for a bilaterally increased risk of invasive breast cancer (IBC). However, as recent studies suggested a clonal relationship between a subset of synchronous LCIS and invasive lobular carcinomas (ILC), we aimed to examine a possible precursor role for LCIS and IBC occurring in the same breast at a later time. Out of a consecutive series of 88 LCIS, nine patients developed IBC (5 ILC and 4 invasive ductal carcinomas) between 2 and 10 years after initial biopsy. For each case, mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy was analyzed in normal mammary gland epithelia, LCIS and IBC by PCR, direct DNA sequencing and phylogenetic tree clustering. Two cases of LCIS and ILC showed identical patterns of heteroplasmy. In one further case, additional mtDNA mutations were present in the ILC following LCIS. The remaining two cases of ILC and all 4 IDC were clonally unrelated to the previously diagnosed LCIS. While the overall risk for the development of invasive breast cancer following LCIS is relatively low and the majority of cases are clonally unrelated, our data clearly show that some LCIS eventually do progress to ILC. Thus, LCIS represents both an indicator lesion for an increased risk of subsequent invasive breast cancer and in some cases a precursor of ILC. PMID:17380381

  2. MAST2 and NOTCH1 translocations in breast carcinoma and associated pre-invasive lesions.

    PubMed

    Clay, Michael R; Varma, Sushama; West, Robert B

    2013-12-01

    There are several mutations and structural variations common to breast cancer. Many of these genomic changes are thought to represent driver mutations in oncogenesis. Less well understood is how and when these changes take place in breast cancer development. Previous studies have identified gene rearrangements in the microtubule-associated serine-threonine kinase (MAST) and NOTCH gene families in 5% to 7% of invasive breast cancers. Some of these translocations can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowing for examination of the correlation between these genomic changes and concurrent morphologic changes in early breast neoplasia. NOTCH and MAST gene rearrangements were identified by FISH in a large series of breast cancer cases organized on tissue microarrays (TMA). When translocations were identified by TMA, we performed full cross-section FISH to evaluate concurrent pre-invasive lesions. FISH break-apart assays were designed for NOTCH1 and MAST2 gene rearrangements. Translocations were identified in 16 cases of invasive carcinoma; 10 with MAST2 translocations (2.0%) and 6 cases with NOTCH1 translocations (1.2%). Whole section FISH analysis of these cases demonstrated that the translocations are present in the majority of concurrent ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (6/8). When DCIS wasn't associated with an invasive component, it was never translocated (0/170, P=.0048). We have confirmed the presence of MAST and NOTCH family gene rearrangements in invasive breast carcinoma, and show that FISH studies can effectively be used with TMAs to screen normal, pre-invasive, and coexisting invasive disease. Our findings suggest that these translocations occur during the transition to DCIS and/or invasive carcinoma.

  3. Axillary evaluation and lymphedema in women with ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Coromilas, Ellie J; Wright, Jason D; Huang, Yongmei; Feldman, Sheldon; Neugut, Alfred I; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Chen, Ling; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-07-01

    Axillary evaluation in women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is increasing; however, this may introduce additional morbidity with unclear benefit. Our objective was to examine the morbidity and mortality associated with axillary evaluation in DCIS. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 10,504 women aged 65-90 years with DCIS who underwent breast conserving surgery between 2002 and 2012 using SEER-Medicare database. Patients were categorized by receipt of axillary evaluation with either sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) or axillary node dissection (ALND). We determined the incidence of lymphedema treatment as defined by diagnostic and procedural codes, as well as 10-year breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. 18.3 % of those treated with BCS and 69.4 % of those treated with mastectomy had an axillary evaluation. One year after treatment, 8.2 % of women who had an axillary evaluation developed lymphedema, compared to 5.9 % of those who did not. In a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model, the incidence of lymphedema was higher among those who underwent axillary evaluation (HR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.04-1.45). Overall 10-year breast cancer-specific survival was similar between both groups (HR 0.83, 95 % CI 0.40-1.74). Only 44 (0.40 %) women died of breast cancer; receipt of axillary evaluation did not alter overall survival. Axillary evaluation is commonly performed in women with DCIS, especially those undergoing mastectomy. However, women who receive an axillary evaluation have higher rates of lymphedema, without breast cancer-specific or overall survival benefit. Efforts should be made to determine the population of women with DCIS who benefit from this procedure.

  4. Prospective Multicenter Trial Evaluating Balloon-Catheter Partial-Breast Irradiation for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Andrea M.; Portschy, Pamela R.; Lee, Chung; Le, Chap T.; Han, Linda K.; Washington, Tara; Kinney, Michael; Bretzke, Margit; Tuttle, Todd M.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine outcomes of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) with MammoSite in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective, multicenter trial between 2003 and 2009. Inclusion criteria included age >18 years, core needle biopsy diagnosis of DCIS, and no prior breast cancer history. Patients underwent breast-conserving surgery plus MammoSite placement. Radiation was given twice daily for 5 days for a total of 34 Gy. Patients were evaluated for development of toxicities, cosmetic outcome, and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Results: A total of 41 patients (42 breasts) completed treatment in the study, with a median follow up of 5.3 years. Overall, 28 patients (68.3%) experienced an adverse event. Skin changes and pain were the most common adverse events. Cosmetic outcome at 6 months was judged excellent/good by 100% of physicians and by 96.8% of patients. At 12 months, 86.7% of physicians and 92.3% of patients rated the cosmetic outcome as excellent/good. Overall, 4 patients (9.8%) developed an IBTR (all DCIS), with a 5-year actuarial rate of 11.3%. All IBTRs were outside the treatment field. Among patients with IBTRs, the mean time to recurrence was 3.2 years. Conclusions: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using MammoSite seems to provide a safe and cosmetically acceptable outcome; however, the 9.8% IBTR rate with median follow-up of 5.3 years is concerning. Prospective randomized trials are necessary before routine use of APBI for DCIS can be recommended.

  5. Evaluation of automated breast volume scanner for breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Anqian; Zhu, Luoxi; Tan, Yanjuan; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Qingqing; Bao, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    The present is a retrospective study examining the use of automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) for guiding breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 142 patients with pathologically confirmed DCIS were initially included in the study. The patients underwent preoperative examination by conventional ultrasound and by ABVS. The BI-RADS category system was used to identify benign and malignant lesions, after which breast conservation surgery was performed, and the therapeutic effects were compared. DCIS lesions were found in each quadrant of the breasts. Typical symptoms included: Duct ectasia and filling in 23 cases, mass (mainly solid, occasionally cystic, with or without calcification) in 38 cases, hypoechoic area (with or without calcification) in 33 cases, calcifications (simple) in 23 cases, and architectural distortion in 17 cases. In addition, 110 cases (82.1%) were detected as grade ≥4 according to the BI-RADS category, and 92 cases (68.7%) were considered malignant lesions following conventional ultrasound scanning. The detection rate of ABVS was significantly higher than that of conventional ultrasound (χ2=268.000, P<0.001). The average tumor diameter was 2.5±0.8 cm using ABVS and 2.0±0.9 cm using conventional ultrasound (the former being significantly higher than the latter; t=6.325, P=0.034). Eight patients (5.6%) had recurrences of the cancer, and the tumor diameter in the 8 patients was significantly larger using ABVS as compared to conventional ultrasound. In the diagnosis of DCIS, ABVS was superior to conventional ultrasound scanner in guiding breast conservation surgery and predicting recurrence. However, large-scale studies are required for confirmation of the findings.

  6. Rates of Second Malignancies After Definitive Local Treatment for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; Ye Hong; Nandalur, Sirisha; Huang Jiayi; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We analyzed the risk of second malignancies developing in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) undergoing surgery and radiotherapy (S+RT) vs. surgery alone. Methods and Materials: The S+RT cohort consisted of 256 women treated with breast-conserving therapy at William Beaumont Hospital. The surgery alone cohort consisted of 2,788 women with DCIS in the regional Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database treated during the same time period. A matched-pair analysis was performed in which each S+RT patient was randomly matched with 8 surgery alone patients (total of 2,048 patients). Matching criteria included age {+-} 2 years. The rates of second malignancies were analyzed overall and as contralateral breast vs. non-breast cancers and by organ system. Results: Median follow-up was 13.7 years for the S+RT cohort and 13.3 years for the surgery alone cohort. The overall 10-/15-year rates of second malignancies among the S+RT and surgery alone cohorts were 14.2%/24.2% and 16.4%/22.6%, respectively (p = 0.668). The 15-year second contralateral breast cancer rate was 14.2% in the S+RT cohort and 10.3% in the surgery alone cohort (p = 0.439). The 15-year risk of a second non-breast malignancy was 14.2% for the S+RT cohort and 13.4% for the surgery alone cohort (p = 0.660). When analyzed by organ system, the 10- and 15-year rates of second malignancies did not differ between the S+RT and surgery alone cohorts for pulmonary, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, gynecologic, genitourinary, lymphoid, sarcomatoid, head and neck, or unknown primary tumors. Conclusions: Compared with surgery alone, S+RT is not associated with an overall increased risk of second malignancies in women with DCIS.

  7. Evaluation of automated breast volume scanner for breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Anqian; Zhu, Luoxi; Tan, Yanjuan; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Qingqing; Bao, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    The present is a retrospective study examining the use of automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) for guiding breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 142 patients with pathologically confirmed DCIS were initially included in the study. The patients underwent preoperative examination by conventional ultrasound and by ABVS. The BI-RADS category system was used to identify benign and malignant lesions, after which breast conservation surgery was performed, and the therapeutic effects were compared. DCIS lesions were found in each quadrant of the breasts. Typical symptoms included: Duct ectasia and filling in 23 cases, mass (mainly solid, occasionally cystic, with or without calcification) in 38 cases, hypoechoic area (with or without calcification) in 33 cases, calcifications (simple) in 23 cases, and architectural distortion in 17 cases. In addition, 110 cases (82.1%) were detected as grade ≥4 according to the BI-RADS category, and 92 cases (68.7%) were considered malignant lesions following conventional ultrasound scanning. The detection rate of ABVS was significantly higher than that of conventional ultrasound (χ2=268.000, P<0.001). The average tumor diameter was 2.5±0.8 cm using ABVS and 2.0±0.9 cm using conventional ultrasound (the former being significantly higher than the latter; t=6.325, P=0.034). Eight patients (5.6%) had recurrences of the cancer, and the tumor diameter in the 8 patients was significantly larger using ABVS as compared to conventional ultrasound. In the diagnosis of DCIS, ABVS was superior to conventional ultrasound scanner in guiding breast conservation surgery and predicting recurrence. However, large-scale studies are required for confirmation of the findings. PMID:27698816

  8. Expression of SATB1 protein in the ductal breast carcinoma tissue microarrays - preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kobierzycki, Christopher; Wojnar, Andrzej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 (SATB1) is a nuclear matrix protein which interacts with specific regions of DNA, ensuring its proper organization and function in the cell. The expression of SATB1 was primarily found in thymocytes, but its increased levels were observed in various types of cancers. However, the knowledge of the function and application possibilities of this protein is still limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of SATB1 protein using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarray (TMA) technique and determine its possible relationship with the proliferative marker Ki-67, estrogen a (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors as well as grade of histological malignancy (G). The study was performed on material of 48 archival invasive ductal breast cancers (IDC). The TMAs were prepared with the use of 0.6 mm diameter punches. Immunohistochemical reactions were carried out using antibodies against Ki-67, ER, PR and SATB1 proteins. The intensity of the nuclear reaction was evaluated using a light microscope and computer-assisted image analysis. Expression of Ki-67 and SATB1 protein was observed in 89.58% and 31.25% of cancer cases, respectively. 62.5% of tumors were classified as ER-positive, and 47.92% as PR-positive. Statistical analysis showed a moderate positive correlation between Ki-67 and SATB1 expression (r = 0.291, p = 0.045 independently on the receptor status, and r = 0.392, p = 0.032 in ER-negative tumors). The expression of the Ki-67 antigen increased with higher grade of histological malignancy (G). The results suggest that SATB1 protein may play an indirect role in the cell proliferation and should be evaluated in relation to the other markers. Further studies concerning determination of its role in cancer progression and metastasis, in terms of application as therapeutic target and prognostic marker, are recommended.

  9. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingbing; Wang, Xiaolin; Guo, Rongfang; Li, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT) features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14) of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14) had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14) and 7.1% (1/14), respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU) before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation. PMID:27660464

  10. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingbing; Wang, Xiaolin; Guo, Rongfang; Li, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT) features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14) of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14) had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14) and 7.1% (1/14), respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU) before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation.

  11. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingbing; Wang, Xiaolin; Guo, Rongfang; Li, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT) features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14) of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14) had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14) and 7.1% (1/14), respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU) before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation. PMID:27660464

  12. Integration of transcript expression, copy number and LOH analysis of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A major challenge in the interpretation of genomic profiling data generated from breast cancer samples is the identification of driver genes as distinct from bystander genes which do not impact tumorigenesis. One way to assess the relative importance of alterations in the transcriptome profile is to combine parallel analyses that assess changes in the copy number alterations (CNAs). This integrated analysis permits the identification of genes with altered expression that map within specific chromosomal regions which demonstrate copy number alterations, providing a mechanistic approach to identify the 'driver genes'. Methods We have performed whole genome analysis of CNAs using the Affymetrix 250K Mapping array on 22 infiltrating ductal carcinoma samples (IDCs). Analysis of transcript expression alterations was performed using the Affymetrix U133 Plus2.0 array on 16 IDC samples. Fourteen IDC samples were analyzed using both platforms and the data integrated. We also incorporated data from loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis to identify genes showing altered expression in LOH regions. Results Common chromosome gains and amplifications were identified at 1q21.3, 6p21.3, 7p11.2-p12.1, 8q21.11 and 8q24.3. A novel amplicon was identified at 5p15.33. Frequent losses were found at 1p36.22, 8q23.3, 11p13, 11q23, and 22q13. Over 130 genes were identified with concurrent increases or decreases in expression that mapped to these regions of copy number alterations. LOH analysis revealed three tumors with whole chromosome or p arm allelic loss of chromosome 17. Genes were identified that mapped to copy neutral LOH regions. LOH with accompanying copy loss was detected on Xp24 and Xp25 and genes mapping to these regions with decreased expression were identified. Gene expression data highlighted the PPARα/RXRα Activation Pathway as down-regulated in the tumor samples. Conclusion We have demonstrated the utility of the application of integrated analysis using high

  13. Eliminating "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) terminology in clinical breast practice: The cognitive psychology point of view.

    PubMed

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Yoder, Whitney R; Riva, Silvia; Mazzocco, Ketti; Arnaboldi, Paola; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    There is evidence from the literature that the terms "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) should be eliminated in clinical breast cancer practice and replaced with the new "ductal intraepithelial neoplasia" (DIN) and "lobular intraepithelial neoplasia" (LIN) terminology. The main purpose of the present article is to expand on this argument from a cognitive psychology perspective and offer suggestions for further research, emphasizing how the elimination of the term "carcinoma" in "in situ" breast cancer diagnoses has the potential to reduce both patient and health care professional confusion and misperceptions that are often associated with the DCIS and LCIS diagnoses, as well as limit the adverse psychological effects of women receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis. We comment on the recent peer-reviewed literature on the clinical implications and psychological consequences for breast cancer patients receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis and we use a cognitive perspective to offer new insight into the benefits of embracing the new DIN and LIN terminology. Using cognitive psychology and cognitive science in general, as a foundation, further research is advocated in order to yield data in support of changing the terminology and therefore, offer a chance to significantly improve the lives and psychological sequelae of women facing such a diagnosis. Typology: Controversies/Short Commentary. PMID:26614547

  14. Eliminating "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) terminology in clinical breast practice: The cognitive psychology point of view.

    PubMed

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Yoder, Whitney R; Riva, Silvia; Mazzocco, Ketti; Arnaboldi, Paola; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    There is evidence from the literature that the terms "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) should be eliminated in clinical breast cancer practice and replaced with the new "ductal intraepithelial neoplasia" (DIN) and "lobular intraepithelial neoplasia" (LIN) terminology. The main purpose of the present article is to expand on this argument from a cognitive psychology perspective and offer suggestions for further research, emphasizing how the elimination of the term "carcinoma" in "in situ" breast cancer diagnoses has the potential to reduce both patient and health care professional confusion and misperceptions that are often associated with the DCIS and LCIS diagnoses, as well as limit the adverse psychological effects of women receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis. We comment on the recent peer-reviewed literature on the clinical implications and psychological consequences for breast cancer patients receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis and we use a cognitive perspective to offer new insight into the benefits of embracing the new DIN and LIN terminology. Using cognitive psychology and cognitive science in general, as a foundation, further research is advocated in order to yield data in support of changing the terminology and therefore, offer a chance to significantly improve the lives and psychological sequelae of women facing such a diagnosis. Typology: Controversies/Short Commentary.

  15. Initiation of Metastatic Breast Carcinoma by Targeting of the Ductal Epithelium with Adenovirus-Cre: A Novel Transgenic Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Svoronos, Nikolaos; Tesone, Amelia J.; Stephen, Tom L.; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Nguyen, Jenny; Zhang, Paul J.; Fiering, Steven N.; Tchou, Julia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease involving complex cellular interactions between the developing tumor and immune system, eventually resulting in exponential tumor growth and metastasis to distal tissues and the collapse of anti-tumor immunity. Many useful animal models exist to study breast cancer, but none completely recapitulate the disease progression that occurs in humans. In order to gain a better understanding of the cellular interactions that result in the formation of latent metastasis and decreased survival, we have generated an inducible transgenic mouse model of YFP-expressing ductal carcinoma that develops after sexual maturity in immune-competent mice and is driven by consistent, endocrine-independent oncogene expression. Activation of YFP, ablation of p53, and expression of an oncogenic form of K-ras was achieved by the delivery of an adenovirus expressing Cre-recombinase into the mammary duct of sexually mature, virgin female mice. Tumors begin to appear 6 weeks after the initiation of oncogenic events. After tumors become apparent, they progress slowly for approximately two weeks before they begin to grow exponentially. After 7-8 weeks post-adenovirus injection, vasculature is observed connecting the tumor mass to distal lymph nodes, with eventual lymphovascular invasion of YFP+ tumor cells to the distal axillary lymph nodes. Infiltrating leukocyte populations are similar to those found in human breast carcinomas, including the presence of αβ and γδ T cells, macrophages and MDSCs. This unique model will facilitate the study of cellular and immunological mechanisms involved in latent metastasis and dormancy in addition to being useful for designing novel immunotherapeutic interventions to treat invasive breast cancer. PMID:24748051

  16. Strong adverse effect of epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression on prognosis of patients with invasive lobular breast cancer: a comparative study with invasive ductal breast cancer in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Liang; Liu, Hong; Chen, Meixuan; Niu, Ruifang

    2015-08-01

    The data on the outcome of breast invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are conflicting. In addition, the prognostic effect of molecular subtypes on ILC remains unclear. In this study, the clinicopathological and prognostic data between 269 ILC and 816 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases in a Chinese population were extensively compared, with a median follow-up time of 7.8 years. Compared with the IDC group, ILC tumors had more lymph node invasion, hormonal receptor positivity, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negativity. ILC patients showed overall survival (OS) and recurrence/metastasis-free survival (RFS) rates similar to those of IDC patients but exhibited worse disease-free survival (DFS) rate because of the higher rate of contralateral breast cancer (BC). Further analysis showed that OS, RFS, and DFS were similar between ILC and IDC patients in the subgroups of luminal A and triple-negative BC with HER2 negativity but were worse in ILC patients than those in IDC patients in the subgroups of luminal B and HER2 overexpression with positive HER2 expression. Multivariate analysis indicated HER2 positivity as an independent risk factor for OS, RFS, and DFS of ILC patients, which increased the risk in the ILC group than that in IDC group. The interaction of HER2 and ILC was also defined as an independent risk factor for OS, RFS, and DFS of the entire population. In conclusion, overexpression of HER2 exhibited stronger negative effect on the prognosis of ILC patients than that in IDC patients, suggesting that treatment targeting HER2 is crucial for this BC subgroup. PMID:25804795

  17. Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Lead the Invasion of Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Cells by Creating an Invasive Track

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Jia, Zhuqiang; Kong, Jing; Zhang, Fuyin; Fang, Shimeng; Li, Xiaojie; Li, Wuwei; Yang, Xuesong; Luo, Yong; Lin, Bingcheng; Liu, Tingjiao

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are critical in determining tumor invasion and metastasis. However the role of CAFs in the invasion of salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is poorly understood. In this study, we isolated primary CAFs from two ACC patients. ACC-derived CAFs expressed typical CAF biomarkers and showed increased migration and invasion activity. Conditioned medium collected from CAFs significantly promoted ACC cell migration and invasion. Co-culture of CAFs with ACC cells in a microfluidic device further revealed that CAFs localized at the invasion front and ACC cells followed the track behind the CAFs. Interfering of both matrix metalloproteinase and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway inhibited ACC invasion promoted by CAFs. Overall, our study demonstrates that ACC-derived CAFs exhibit the most important defining feature of CAFs by promoting cancer invasion. In addition to secretion of soluble factors, CAFs also lead ACC invasion by creating an invasive track in the ECM. PMID:26954362

  18. Challenges in ductal carcinoma in situ risk communication and decision-making: report from an American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute workshop.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Ann H; Elmore, Joann G; Saslow, Debbie; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Schnitt, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute convened a conference to review current issues in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) risk communication and decision-making and to identify directions for future research. Specific topics included patient and health care provider knowledge and attitudes about DCIS and its treatment, how to explain DCIS to patients given the heterogeneity of the disease, consideration of nomenclature changes, and the usefulness of decision tools/aids. This report describes the proceedings of the workshop in the context of the current literature and discusses future directions. Evidence suggests that there is a lack of clarity about the implications and risks of a diagnosis of DCIS among patients, providers, and researchers. Research is needed to understand better the biology and mechanisms of the progression of DCIS to invasive breast cancer and the factors that predict those subtypes of DCIS that do not progress, as well as efforts to improve the communication and informed decision-making surrounding DCIS.

  19. Co-Expression of p16, Ki67 and COX-2 Is Associated with Basal Phenotype in High-Grade Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Perez, Amanda Arantes; Balabram, Débora; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; da Silva Souza, Átila; Gobbi, Helenice

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the co-expression of cell cycle-related biomarkers in a series of 121 consecutive cases of high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), pure or associated with invasive carcinoma, and their associations with the different immunoprofiles of DCIS. Cases were identified from the histopathology files of the Breast Pathology Laboratory, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2003 to 2008. The expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2 overexpression, cytokeratin 5, epidermal growth factor receptor 1, cyclooxygenase-2, p16 and Ki67 were assessed. Tumors were placed into five subgroups according to their immunohistochemical profile: luminal A, luminal B, HER2, basal-like and "not classified". We found that the basal phenotype was associated with a higher frequency of p16-positive cases (83%) and the luminal A phenotype showed a higher frequency of p16-negative cases (93%; p=0.000). The association of biomarkers p16(+)/Ki67(+)/COX2(+) was expressed in 02/06 cases (33.3%) of the basal phenotype but in only 01/70 cases (1.4%) of the luminal A phenotype (p=0.01). The co-expression of p16(+)/Ki67(+)/COX2(-) was associated with a basal phenotype (p=0.004). P16 expression, p16(+)/Ki67(+)/COX2(+) and p16(+)/Ki67(+)/COX2(-) co-expression showed significant associations with the basal phenotype and these profiles could be used to guide more aggressive treatment strategies in patients with high-grade DCIS.

  20. Co-Expression of p16, Ki67 and COX-2 Is Associated with Basal Phenotype in High-Grade Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Amanda Arantes; Balabram, Débora; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; da Silva Souza, Átila; Gobbi, Helenice

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the co-expression of cell cycle-related biomarkers in a series of 121 consecutive cases of high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), pure or associated with invasive carcinoma, and their associations with the different immunoprofiles of DCIS. Cases were identified from the histopathology files of the Breast Pathology Laboratory, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2003 to 2008. The expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2 overexpression, cytokeratin 5, epidermal growth factor receptor 1, cyclooxygenase-2, p16 and Ki67 were assessed. Tumors were placed into five subgroups according to their immunohistochemical profile: luminal A, luminal B, HER2, basal-like and “not classified”. We found that the basal phenotype was associated with a higher frequency of p16-positive cases (83%) and the luminal A phenotype showed a higher frequency of p16-negative cases (93%; p=0.000). The association of biomarkers p16+/Ki67+/COX2+ was expressed in 02/06 cases (33.3%) of the basal phenotype but in only 01/70 cases (1.4%) of the luminal A phenotype (p=0.01). The co-expression of p16+/Ki67+/COX2- was associated with a basal phenotype (p=0.004). P16 expression, p16+/Ki67+/COX2+ and p16+/Ki67+/COX2- co-expression showed significant associations with the basal phenotype and these profiles could be used to guide more aggressive treatment strategies in patients with high-grade DCIS. PMID:25711229

  1. A Prognostic Dilemma of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Intravascular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Niumsawatt, Vachara; Castley, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy; however, it very rarely metastasizes. Despite the low mortality caused by this cancer, once it spreads, it has dim prognosis. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma with rare intravascular invasion and review the literature for risk factors and management of metastasis.

  2. Matricellular protein CCN1 (CYR61) expression is associated with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Saglam, Ozlen; Dai, Feng; Husain, Seema; Zhan, Yilei; Toruner, Gokce; Haines, G Kenneth

    2014-06-01

    Cysteine-rich protein 61, connective tissue growth factor, and nephroblastoma overexpressed gene (CCN) comprise a family of matricellular proteins that have multiple physiologic functions including development, tissue repair, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. The expression of CCN1, cyclin D1, β-catenin, and p53 was explored by immunohistochemistry in different grades of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) cases. These cases did not contain any infiltrating carcinoma components. In addition, all cysteine-rich protein 61 gene exons (encoding the CCN1 protein) were sequenced in 30 samples. Allred and H-scores were calculated for expression in both DCIS and the surrounding benign breast tissue. All cases of DCIS showed degrees of cytoplasmic CCN1 staining with median H-scores of 170, 160, and 60 in grades 3, 2, and 1, respectively (P = .043). Twelve of 28 DCIS 3, 1 of 15 DCIS 2, and 0 of 18 DCIS 1 also showed nuclear staining for CCN1. The cytoplasmic staining difference was preserved when the cases were divided into estrogen receptor (ER)+/DCIS grade 1, ER+/DCIS 2 and 3, and ER-/DCIS 2 and 3 by the H-score (P = .037). Cyclin D1 expression was positively correlated with the CCN1 cytoplasmic H-score in all DCIS samples (P = .038). Membranous β-catenin expression correlated with the grade of intraepithelial carcinoma by both H-score (P = .047) and Allred score (P = .026). Our results suggest that CCN1 has a role in the development of intraepithelial carcinoma. CCN1 expression correlates with grade of DCIS independent of ER status. It can induce cell cycle progression through cyclin D1. It is warranted to study high expression of CCN1 in DCIS as an independent risk factor in a larger cohort.

  3. Disease Free Probability after the First Primary Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast: A Comparison between African-American and White-American Women

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Azadeh; Stapp, Robert; Raghunathan, Aditya; Yan, Xiaowei; Kirchner, H. Lester; Griggs, Jennifer; Newman, Lisa; Chitale, Dhananjay; Dick, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Compelling evidence about the differences in the biology and behavior of invasive breast cancer between African-American (AA) and White-American (WA) women motivate inquiry into comparing the clinicopathology of non-invasive breast cancer (ductal carcinoma in situ, DCIS). METHODS AA and WA women diagnosed with their first primary DCIS between 1990 and1999 were identified from the institutional tumor registry. Data on method of presentation, treatment, pateint characteristics were retreived from electronic medical records. Patients were followed up through the medical records until the diagnosis of a subsequent cancer or the last-day of contact with the institution. RESULTS A total of 100 (29.6%) AAs and 236 (70.4%) WAs with the mean age of 60 (SD±13) and 57 (SD±12), respectively, contributed to this study. DCIS was detected during routine screening mammography for 81% (n=81) of AAs and 88.4% (n=206) of WAs (P=0.073). Differences in the distributions of grade, margin status, necrosis, or treatment modalities were not statistically significant between AAs and WAs. Analysis of competing risks Cox proportional hazard multivariate modeling yielded a significant 8-year cumulative risk of a second cancer for AAs but only in the ipsilateral breast (HR=3.96, 95% CI 1.42–11.04, P=.01). CONCLUSION Despite comparable clinical presentation and treatment, 8 years after the initial treatment, AAs expereinced a higher risk of second breast cancer in ipsilateral but not in the contralateral breast. The observed excess risk of a second cancer in the ipsilateral breast may suggest of intrinsic differences in the biology of cancer. PMID:21874310

  4. Implications of the Notch1-Snail/Slug-epithelial to mesenchymal transition axis for lymph node metastasis in infiltrating ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu-Wen; Wan, Guo-Xing; Sun, Jian-Ping; Cui, Xiao-Bin; Hu, Jian-Ming; Liang, Wei-Hua; Zheng, Yu-Qin; Li, Wen-Qin; Li, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that activation of the Notch1 signaling pathway inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) mediated by Snail/Slug promotes invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro. However, the implication of the Notch1-Snail/Slug-EMT axis in breast cancer patients remains unclear. A total of 200 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and 37 adjacent non-neoplastic tissue (ANNT) samples from patients who had not been treated with neoadjuvant therapy were examined. Expression of Notch1, Slug, Snail, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and vimentin was determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays (TMAs). The correlation between protein expression and clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer patients was also evaluated. Results showed that a significantly high percentage of cases with high expression of Notch1 (74%, 148/200), Slug (36%, 72/200), Snail (62%, 124/200), and N-cadherin (77%, 153/200) and a low percentage of cases with high expression of E-cadherin (27%, 54/200) were observed in IDC compared to those in ANNTs. High Notch1, Slug, Snail, and N-cadherin expression and low E-cadherin expression in patients with IDC were significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis. In addition, correlation analysis results revealed that high Notch1 expression was significantly associated with high Slug, Snail, and N-cadherin expression and low E-cadherin expression in IDC. Furthermore, a high Snail expression was significantly associated with low E-cadherin expression, and a high Slug expression was found to be significantly associated with increased N-cadherin expression in patients with IDC. Hence, our study suggested that the Notch1-Snail/Slug-EMT axis may be implicated in the lymph node metastasis affecting patients with IDC. PMID:25645984

  5. Invasive lobular carcinoma of the male breast: A rare histology of an uncommon disease.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Rituraj; Kumar, Pavnesh; Sharma, D N; Haresh, K P; Gupta, Subhash; Julka, P K; Rath, G K; Bhankar, Himani

    2016-03-01

    Male breast carcinoma is a rare malignancy comprising less than 1% of all breast cancers. It is a serious disease with most patients presenting in advanced stages. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most common histology while lobular carcinoma represents less than 1% of all these tumors. We report a case of locally advanced lobular carcinoma of breast in a 60 year old male. PMID:26530727

  6. Metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast to the thyroid gland diagnosed with fine needle aspiration: A case report with emphasis on morphologic and immunophenotypic features.

    PubMed

    Magers, Martin J; Dueber, Julie C; Lew, Madelyn; Pang, Judy C; Davenport, Robertson D

    2016-06-01

    Metastases to the thyroid are uncommon [<0.2% of thyroid fine needle aspirations (FNA)]. Of metastases to the thyroid, breast carcinoma is relatively common. The diagnosis of metastasis to the thyroid has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. To our knowledge, a morphologic and immunophenotypic comparison of metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast and primary thyroid carcinomas has not been reported. Here, we report the case of a 37-year-old female with a history of metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast (modified Bloom-Richardson grade 2; ER+, PgR+, HER2+) diagnosed 6 years prior. She developed hoarseness, prompting a CT scan. Multiple thyroid nodules were found, including a 1.5 cm hypoechoic, solid, irregularly-shaped nodule. On FNA, cells were arranged singly and in crowded groups, varied in size and degree of pleomorphism, and exhibited rare nuclear grooves, inconspicuous nucleoli, and rare intracytoplasmic lumina with no nuclear pseudoinclusions or colloid (Figs. 1A and B). These findings raised the differential of papillary thyroid carcinoma (Fig. 1C), follicular neoplasm (Fig. 1D), medullary carcinoma (Fig. 1E), parathyroid (Fig. 1F), and metastatic breast carcinoma. Immunostaining for GATA-3 (+), ER (+), PAX-8 (-), and TTF-1 (-) was consistent with metastatic breast carcinoma (Fig. 2). We conclude that metastatic breast carcinoma to the thyroid may morphologically mimic primary thyroid carcinoma on FNA; a panel of immunomarkers, such as GATA-3, hormonal marker(s), PAX-8, and TTF-1, may be useful in some cases. GATA-3 immunostaining for metastatic breast carcinoma was helpful in our case and has not been previously reported in a thyroid metastasis sampled by FNA. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:530-534. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Successful Salvage Chemotherapy with FOLFIRINOX for Recurrent Mixed Acinar Cell Carcinoma and Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas in an Adolescent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pfrommer, Sarah; Weber, Achim; Dutkowski, Philipp; Schäfer, Niklaus G.; Müllhaupt, Beat; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Breitenstein, Stefan; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C.; Stenner, Frank; Renner, Christoph; D'Addario, Giannicola; Graf, Hans-Jörg; Knuth, Alexander; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Samaras, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are rare in children and adolescents. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a mixed acinar cell carcinoma/ductal adenocarcinoma with blastomatous components. He received multimodal treatment including various chemotherapy regimens and multistep surgery including liver transplantation. Introduction of FOLFIRINOX after relapse repeatedly achieved a durable metabolic and clinical response with good quality of life. PMID:24163668

  8. Successful Salvage Chemotherapy with FOLFIRINOX for Recurrent Mixed Acinar Cell Carcinoma and Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas in an Adolescent Patient.

    PubMed

    Pfrommer, Sarah; Weber, Achim; Dutkowski, Philipp; Schäfer, Niklaus G; Müllhaupt, Beat; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Breitenstein, Stefan; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Stenner, Frank; Renner, Christoph; D'Addario, Giannicola; Graf, Hans-Jörg; Knuth, Alexander; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Samaras, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are rare in children and adolescents. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a mixed acinar cell carcinoma/ductal adenocarcinoma with blastomatous components. He received multimodal treatment including various chemotherapy regimens and multistep surgery including liver transplantation. Introduction of FOLFIRINOX after relapse repeatedly achieved a durable metabolic and clinical response with good quality of life. PMID:24163668

  9. Mandibular Destruction Secondary to Invasion by Carcinoma Cuniculatum.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael C; Wong, Brian; O'Brien, Michael J; Salama, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoma cuniculatum is a rare form of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma that is often misdiagnosed. It has a propensity for local invasion and rarely metastasizes. Oral carcinoma cuniculatum is exceedingly rare, with very few reported cases in the English-language literature. Classically, its presentation mimics osteomyelitis or a dental abscess, resulting in misdiagnosis, multiple biopsy examinations, and procedures before a final diagnosis of carcinoma cuniculatum. This case report describes the case of a 71-year-old woman who was referred to the authors' clinic for evaluation of persistent pain and swelling of the mandible. Multiple biopsy examinations were negative for malignancy, and the patient was misdiagnosed with osteomyelitis and dental abscess before obtaining an accurate diagnosis of carcinoma cuniculatum. The aim of this report is to provide a thorough clinical and histopathologic report of carcinoma cuniculatum of the mandible, provide a brief review of the literature, and highlight the difficulties in arriving at this uncommon diagnosis.

  10. Clinical Outcomes Using Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Invasive Lobular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, J. Ben; Shaitelman, Simona; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Vicini, Frank

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We compared clinical outcomes of women diagnosed with either invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with ILC received APBI as part of their breast-conservation therapy (BCT) and were compared with 410 patients with IDC that received APBI as part of their BCT. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment related variables were analyzed including age, tumor size, hormone receptor status, surgical margins, lymph node status, adjuvant hormonal therapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, and APBI modality. Clinical outcomes including local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 3.8 years for the ILC patients and 6.0 years for the IDC patients. ILC patients were more likely to have positive margins (20.0% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.006), larger tumors (14.1 mm vs. 10.9 mm, p = 0.03) and less likely to be node positive (0% vs. 9.5%, p < 0.001) when compared with patients diagnosed with IDC. The 5-year rate of LR was 0% for the ILC cohort and 2.5% for the IDC cohort (p = 0.59). No differences were seen in the rates of RR (0% vs. 0.7%, p = 0.80), distant metastases (0% vs. 3.5%, p = 0.54), DFS (100% vs. 94%, p = 0.43), CSS (100% vs. 97%, p = 0.59), or OS (92% vs. 89%, p = 0.88) between the ILC and IDC patients, respectively. Additionally, when node-positive patients were excluded from the IDC cohort, no differences in the rates of LR (0% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.62), RR (0% vs. 0%), DFS (100% vs. 95%, p = 0.46), CSS (100% vs. 98%, p = 0.63), or OS (92% vs. 89%, p = 0.91) were noted between the ILC and IDC patients. Conclusion: Women with ILC had excellent clinical outcomes after APBI. No difference in local control was seen between patients with invasive lobular versus invasive ductal histology.

  11. Cardiac morbidity and mortality in women with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast conservation therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Catherine K; Li, Xiaohong; Starr, Jason; Harris, Eleanor E R

    2011-01-01

    Left-sided breast irradiation has been associated with increased risk of cardiac morbidity and mortality in some studies. This study examines the cardiac toxicity of irradiation in left- versus right-sided patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The medical records of 129 patients with DCIS treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) at the Moffitt Cancer Center from 1986 to 2002 were reviewed and data regarding subsequent breast cancer and cardiac events were recorded. There were 59 left-sided and 70 right-sided patients treated. Mean age was 55 years. At 8 years, there was no significant difference observed between right- and left-sided breast cancer patients in the development of coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, valvular disease, cardiomyopathy, or cardiac-related death. Among those patients with left-sided breast cancer, 13.5% of patients developed a cardiovascular event compared to 7% of right-sided patients (p = 0.25). The overall survival at 8 years was 96% and the relapse-free survival was 85%. There were no significant differences in cardiac mortality or morbidity between right- and left-sided DCIS patients treated with BCT. Longer follow-up will be required to ascertain whether late events are more prevalent in left-sided patients.

  12. Peritumoral lymphatic invasion in patients with node-negative mammary duct carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Clemente, C G; Boracchi, P; Andreola, S; Del Vecchio, M; Veronesi, P; Rilke, F O

    1992-03-15

    Five hundred six consecutive cases of ductal infiltrating carcinoma of the breast (T1-T2,N0,M0) were evaluated to define the frequency of peritumoral lymphatic invasion (PLI) and verify its possible prognostic significance. Histologically, PLI was characterized by the presence of neoplastic emboli within vascular lumina lined by recognizable endothelial cells, adjacent to but outside the margins of the carcinoma. In routine histopathologic assessment the frequency of PLI was 68% whereas in a randomly selected group of 234 reviewed cases the frequency rose to 20%. Patients with routinely evaluated PLI had a worse prognosis than those without PLI with reference both to disease-free survival (P = 0.0001) and total survival rates (P = 0.0001). The difference for local recurrences was prognostically highly significant (P = 0.0001) and also significant for the development of metastases (P = 0.0576). In the reviewed material the difference in prognosis between PLI-positive and PLI-negative cases was not confirmed for total survival whereas the significance for the disease-free interval persisted. The assessment of PLI, carried out following strict histopathologic criteria, appears to select a group of node-negative breast cancer patients who have an increased risk of recurrences and might benefit from a treatment different from that reserved for node-negative and PLI-negative patients.

  13. Pancreatic mixed ductal-islet tumors. Is this an entity?

    PubMed

    Permert, J; Mogaki, M; Andrén-Sandberg, A; Kazakoff, K; Pour, P M

    1992-02-01

    Thirty-eight human pancreatic cancer specimens were studied for the reactivity of cancer cells with monoclonal antibodies against insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin, calcitonin, and with argyrophilic reactivity. Immunoreactivity with one or several antibodies or argyrophilic reactivity were found in 30 (79%) cases. In 17 cases, the number of endocrine cells was excessive and morphologically consistent with the mixed ductal-islet tumor. Although most immunoreactive cells were located at the base of the malignant glands, some had intraepithelial location and were also present in the invasive portion of cancers, indicating their malignant nature. Endocrine cell proliferation were found in the pancreatic tissue adjacent to the carcinoma in 8 out of 12 specimens examined. In these cases, the immunoreactive cells were either distributed among the acinar cells or ductal cells. More endocrine cells were found in the hyperplastic ducts; however, no correlation was found between the degree of hyperplasia and the occurrence of any type of immunoreactive cells. Although several types of endocrine cells occurred in different pancreatic regions (head, body, and tail), PP cells were restricted to tissues taken from the head of the pancreas. Experimental data and similar observations by other investigators led us to conclude that participation of endocrine cells in ductal-type carcinomas is a general phenomenon and does not justify the classification of these lesions to mixed ductal-islet entity. However, because immunoreactive cells were more common and numerous in well-differentiated carcinomas, they may have some prognostic values. PMID:1316418

  14. Fine-needle aspiration of gray zone lesions of the breast: fibroadenoma versus ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xin; Normolle, Daniel; Michael, Claire W

    2013-09-01

    While breast lesions have characteristic cytological features, some lesions, particularly adenocarcinoma and fibroadenoma, may present with overlapping features causing erroneous diagnoses. The current study aimed to define significant cytomorphologic features predictive of fibroadenoma and adenocarcinoma, respectively. Further, we intended to evaluate the predictive characteristics for differentiation between gray zone lesions and to identify root causes contributing to misdiagnoses. First, direct smears prepared from 14 histology-confirmed fibroadenomas and 14 adenocarcinomas were reviewed and characteristics of commonly encountered morphologic features were assessed. We then retrospectively and blindly reviewed nine cytohistologic discrepant cases using the significant characteristic as a guideline, in order to assess whether these discrepant cases could be correctly categorized. Morphologic characteristics predictive of fibroadenoma included moderate cellularity, large, folded cellular sheets/aggregates, staghorn projections, smooth and round borders, monolayers, honeycomb arrangement, smaller nuclear size, and background bipolar cells. Predictive characteristics of adenocarcinoma included high cellularity, loose cohesive sheets/aggregates, pointed projections, irregular borders, larger nuclear size, irregular nuclear membrane, prominent nucleoli, and single atypical epithelial cells. Retrospective, blind review correctly re-classified seven out of nine cytohistologic discrepant cases, including five false negative cases and two false positive cases. Root causes contributing to the misdiagnoses were large branching sheets of carcinoma mimicking folded sheets of fibroadenoma; fibroblasts mimicking myoepithelial cells; apocrine cells mimicking carcinoma cells; and not recognizing the loose myxoid matrix presenting as soap bubbles in fibroadenoma. In conclusion, this study identified significant characteristics that can assist in achieving accurate diagnosis in a

  15. Fine-needle aspiration of gray zone lesions of the breast: fibroadenoma versus ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xin; Normolle, Daniel; Michael, Claire W

    2013-09-01

    While breast lesions have characteristic cytological features, some lesions, particularly adenocarcinoma and fibroadenoma, may present with overlapping features causing erroneous diagnoses. The current study aimed to define significant cytomorphologic features predictive of fibroadenoma and adenocarcinoma, respectively. Further, we intended to evaluate the predictive characteristics for differentiation between gray zone lesions and to identify root causes contributing to misdiagnoses. First, direct smears prepared from 14 histology-confirmed fibroadenomas and 14 adenocarcinomas were reviewed and characteristics of commonly encountered morphologic features were assessed. We then retrospectively and blindly reviewed nine cytohistologic discrepant cases using the significant characteristic as a guideline, in order to assess whether these discrepant cases could be correctly categorized. Morphologic characteristics predictive of fibroadenoma included moderate cellularity, large, folded cellular sheets/aggregates, staghorn projections, smooth and round borders, monolayers, honeycomb arrangement, smaller nuclear size, and background bipolar cells. Predictive characteristics of adenocarcinoma included high cellularity, loose cohesive sheets/aggregates, pointed projections, irregular borders, larger nuclear size, irregular nuclear membrane, prominent nucleoli, and single atypical epithelial cells. Retrospective, blind review correctly re-classified seven out of nine cytohistologic discrepant cases, including five false negative cases and two false positive cases. Root causes contributing to the misdiagnoses were large branching sheets of carcinoma mimicking folded sheets of fibroadenoma; fibroblasts mimicking myoepithelial cells; apocrine cells mimicking carcinoma cells; and not recognizing the loose myxoid matrix presenting as soap bubbles in fibroadenoma. In conclusion, this study identified significant characteristics that can assist in achieving accurate diagnosis in a

  16. Outcomes of Low-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Southeast Asian Women Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Fuh Yong; Wang, Fuqiang; Chen, John Ju; Tan, Chiew Har; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of Southeast Asian (SEA) women with low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart reviews of patients treated with BCS for DCIS from 1995 to 2011 were performed. Patients meeting the selection criteria from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 5194 were included. Most patients received adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) consisting of whole-breast RT delivered to 50 Gy followed by a 10-Gy boost to the tumor bed. Results: Of 744 patients with pathologic diagnosis of pure DCIS identified, 273 met the selection criteria: low-intermediate grade (LIG), n=219; high grade (HG), n=54. Median follow-up for these patients was 60 months. There were 8 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) in total, 7 of which were DCIS. The estimated actuarial IBTR rates at 5 and 10 years for the entire cohort are 1.8% and 4.3%, respectively. Of the 219 patients with LIG DCIS, 210 received RT and 9 did not. There were 7 IBTRs in LIG DCIS, 2 among the 9 patients who did not receive RT. The IBTR rates in LIG DCIS at 5 and 10 years are 2.3% and 4.2%, respectively. All patients with HG DCIS received RT. There was only 1 IBTR occurring beyond 5 years, giving an estimated IBTR rate of 4.5% at 10 years. Conclusions: SEA women with screen-detected DCIS have exceedingly low rates of IBTR after BCS, comparable to that observed in reports of similar patients with low-risk DCIS treated with adjuvant radiation.

  17. Different Biological Action of Oleic Acid in ALDHhigh and ALDHlow Subpopulations Separated from Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hoe Suk; Jung, Minji; Choi, Sul Ki; Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Seung Ja

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying breast cancer progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) associated with fatty acids are largely unknown. In the present study, we compared the action of oleic acid (OA) on two human DCIS cell lines, MCF10DCIS.COM (ER/PR/HER2-negative) and SUM225 (HER2 overexpressed). OA led to a significant increase in proliferation, migration, lipid accumulation and the expression of lipogenic proteins, such as SREBP-1, FAS and ACC-1, in MCF10DCIS.COM cells but not SUM225 cells. The ALDHhigh subpopulation analyzed by the ALDEFLUOR assay was approximately 39.2±5.3% of MCF10DCIS.COM cells but was small (3.11±0.9%) in SUM225 cells. We further investigated the different biological action of OA in the distinct ALDHlow and ALDHhigh subpopulations of MCF10DCIS.COM cells. OA led to an increase in the expression of ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2 and ALDH1A3 in MCF10DCIS.COM cells. SREBP-1 and ACC-1 were highly expressed in ALDHhigh cells relative to ALDHlow cells, whereas FAS was higher in ALDHlow cells. In the presence of OA, ALDHhigh cells were more likely to proliferate and migrate and displayed significantly high levels of SREBP-1 and FAS and strong phosphorylation of FAK and AKT relative to ALDHlow cells. This study suggests that OA could be a critical risk factor to promote the proliferation and migration of ALDHhigh cells in DCIS, leading to breast cancer progression. PMID:27589390

  18. Different Biological Action of Oleic Acid in ALDHhigh and ALDHlow Subpopulations Separated from Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoe Suk; Jung, Minji; Choi, Sul Ki; Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Seung Ja

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying breast cancer progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) associated with fatty acids are largely unknown. In the present study, we compared the action of oleic acid (OA) on two human DCIS cell lines, MCF10DCIS.COM (ER/PR/HER2-negative) and SUM225 (HER2 overexpressed). OA led to a significant increase in proliferation, migration, lipid accumulation and the expression of lipogenic proteins, such as SREBP-1, FAS and ACC-1, in MCF10DCIS.COM cells but not SUM225 cells. The ALDHhigh subpopulation analyzed by the ALDEFLUOR assay was approximately 39.2±5.3% of MCF10DCIS.COM cells but was small (3.11±0.9%) in SUM225 cells. We further investigated the different biological action of OA in the distinct ALDHlow and ALDHhigh subpopulations of MCF10DCIS.COM cells. OA led to an increase in the expression of ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2 and ALDH1A3 in MCF10DCIS.COM cells. SREBP-1 and ACC-1 were highly expressed in ALDHhigh cells relative to ALDHlow cells, whereas FAS was higher in ALDHlow cells. In the presence of OA, ALDHhigh cells were more likely to proliferate and migrate and displayed significantly high levels of SREBP-1 and FAS and strong phosphorylation of FAK and AKT relative to ALDHlow cells. This study suggests that OA could be a critical risk factor to promote the proliferation and migration of ALDHhigh cells in DCIS, leading to breast cancer progression. PMID:27589390

  19. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation through Brachytherapy for Ductal Carcinoma in situ: Factors Influencing Utilization and Risks of Second Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Schloemann, Derek T.; Lian, Min; Colditz, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine influencing factors and outcomes of accelerated partial breast irradiation through brachytherapy (APBIb) versus whole breast irradiation (WBI) for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Patients and Methods From the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results program, we identified 40749 women who were diagnosed with first primary DCIS between 2002 and 2011 and treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy. A multi-level logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate odds ratios of APBIb use. Hazard ratios (HRs) of developing ipsilateral breast tumors (IBTs) and contralateral breast tumors (CBTs) were analyzed in 1962 patients with APBIb and 7203 propensity score-matched patients with WBI, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Overall, 2212 (4.5%) of 40749 women (the whole cohort) received APBIb. Factors associated with the increased use of APBIb included older age, non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity, smaller tumor size, hormone receptor positivity, comedo subtypes and urban residence. During the 46-month follow-up, 74 (0.8%) and 131 (1.4%) of 9165 propensity score-matched patients developed IBTs and CBTs, respectively. Compared with WBI, APBIb was associated with a significantly increased risk of IBTs (HR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.85) but not CBTs (OR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.41). Conclusion This population-based study suggests that APBIb use for DCIS was influenced by patient and tumor characteristics as well as urbanization of residence. We observed a moderately increased IBT risk associated with APBIb versus WBI, suggesting that APBIb should be used with caution for DCIS before data from randomized controlled trials with long-term followups are available. PMID:25893591

  20. Pedunculated-type T1 colorectal carcinoma with lung carcinoma metastasis at the deepest invasive portion.

    PubMed

    Asayama, Naoki; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Hirano, Daiki; Sumimoto, Kyoku; Ninomiya, Yuki; Tamaru, Yuzuru; Shigita, Kenjiro; Hayashi, Nana; Shimamoto, Fumio; Arihiro, Koji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-08-01

    We present a rare case of colorectal T1 carcinoma with metastasis of previous lung carcinoma found at the deepest invasive portion. A 61-year-old man presented with cervical lymphadenopathy 18 years after undergoing surgery for right lung carcinoma [poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma stage IIb (T3N0M0)]. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed enlarged lymph nodes (LNs) in the neck and mediastinal regions. Combined hybrid-F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission-computerized tomography showed increased radionuclide uptake in multiple cervical LNs and mediastinal LNs. LN biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, suspected to be a metastatic tumor of the lung. Subsequent colonoscopy revealed a pedunculated-type lesion with a depressed area in the ascending colon. We performed polypectomy as total excisional biopsy; this tumor was composed mainly of moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, partially mixed with mucinous adenocarcinoma. The pathological findings of the invasive front of the colorectal carcinoma showed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with a morphological pattern similar to that of the previous lung carcinoma. Furthermore, immunohistochemical results for the histological type of the deepest invasive portion of the tissue specimen were positive for thyroid transcription factor-1 but negative for Caudal-type homeobox 2. From these morphological and immunohistochemical findings, the final diagnosis was moderately differentiated lung carcinoma, pTX N3 M1b (LN, colon) Stage IV. PMID:27259703

  1. Management of periorbital basal cell carcinoma with orbital invasion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Michelle T; Wu, Albert; Figueira, Edwin; Huilgol, Shyamala; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common eyelid malignancy; however, orbital invasion by periocular BCC is rare, and management remains challenging. Established risk factors for orbital invasion by BCC include male gender, advanced age, medial canthal location, previous recurrences, large tumor size, aggressive histologic subtype and perineural invasion. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach with orbital exenteration remaining the treatment of choice. Globe-sparing treatment may be appropriate in selected patients and radiotherapy and chemotherapy are often used as adjuvant therapies for advanced or inoperable cases, although the evidence remains limited. We aim to summarize the presentation and treatment of BCC with orbital invasion to better guide the management of this complex condition. PMID:26437207

  2. Preliminary results of centralized HER2 testing in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): NSABP B-43

    PubMed Central

    Siziopikou, Kalliopi P.; Anderson, Stewart J.; Cobleigh, Melody A.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Zheng, Ping; Mamounas, Eleftherios P.; Pajon, Eduardo R.; Behrens, Robert J.; Eakle, Janice F.; Leasure, Nick C.; Atkins, James N.; Polikoff, Jonathan A.; Seay, Thomas E.; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta J.; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Costantino, Joseph P.; Wolmark, Norman

    2016-01-01

    NSABP B-43 is the first prospective, randomized phase III multi-institution clinical trial targeting high-risk, HER2-positive DCIS. It compares whole breast irradiation alone with WBI given concurrently with trastuzumab in women with HER2-positive DCIS treated by lumpectomy. The primary aim is to determine if trastuzumab plus radiation will reduce in-breast tumor recurrence. HER2-positive DCIS was previously estimated at >50 %, occurring primarily in ER-negative, comedo-type DCIS of high nuclear grade. There has been no documented centralized multi-institutional HER2 analysis of DCIS. NSABP B-43 provides a unique opportunity to evaluate this in a large cohort of DCIS patients. Patients undergoing lumpectomy for DCIS without evidence of an invasive component are eligible. A central review of each patient’s pure DCIS lesion is carried out by immunohistochemistry analysis. If the lesion is 2+, FISH analysis is performed. Patients whose tumors are HER2 3+ or FISH-positive are randomly assigned to receive two doses of trastuzumab during WBI or WBI alone. NSABP B-43 opened 11/9/08. As of 7/31/2013, 5,861 patients have had specimens received centrally, and 5,645 of those had analyzable blocks; 1,969 (34.9 %) were HER2 positive. A total of 1,428 patients have been accrued, 1,137 (79.6 %) of whom have follow-up information. The average follow-up time for the 1,137 patients is 23.3 months. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity has been observed. In NSABP B-43 the HER2-positive rate for pure DCIS among patients undergoing breast-preserving surgery is 34.9 %, lower than the previously reported rate. No trastuzumab-related safety signals have been observed. Interest in this trial has been robust. PMID:24202240

  3. Preliminary results of centralized HER2 testing in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): NSABP B-43.

    PubMed

    Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Anderson, Stewart J; Cobleigh, Melody A; Julian, Thomas B; Arthur, Douglas W; Zheng, Ping; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Pajon, Eduardo R; Behrens, Robert J; Eakle, Janice F; Leasure, Nick C; Atkins, James N; Polikoff, Jonathan A; Seay, Thomas E; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta J; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Costantino, Joseph P; Wolmark, Norman

    2013-11-01

    NSABP B-43 is the first prospective, randomized phase III multi-institution clinical trial targeting high-risk, HER2-positive DCIS. It compares whole breast irradiation alone with WBI given concurrently with trastuzumab in women with HER2-positive DCIS treated by lumpectomy. The primary aim is to determine if trastuzumab plus radiation will reduce in-breast tumor recurrence. HER2-positive DCIS was previously estimated at >50 %, occurring primarily in ER-negative, comedo-type DCIS of high nuclear grade. There has been no documented centralized multi-institutional HER2 analysis of DCIS. NSABP B-43 provides a unique opportunity to evaluate this in a large cohort of DCIS patients. Patients undergoing lumpectomy for DCIS without evidence of an invasive component are eligible. A central review of each patient's pure DCIS lesion is carried out by immunohistochemistry analysis. If the lesion is 2+, FISH analysis is performed. Patients whose tumors are HER2 3+ or FISH-positive are randomly assigned to receive two doses of trastuzumab during WBI or WBI alone. NSABP B-43 opened 11/9/08. As of 7/31/2013, 5,861 patients have had specimens received centrally, and 5,645 of those had analyzable blocks; 1,969 (34.9 %) were HER2 positive. A total of 1,428 patients have been accrued, 1,137 (79.6 %) of whom have follow-up information. The average follow-up time for the 1,137 patients is 23.3 months. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity has been observed. In NSABP B-43 the HER2-positive rate for pure DCIS among patients undergoing breast-preserving surgery is 34.9 %, lower than the previously reported rate. No trastuzumab-related safety signals have been observed. Interest in this trial has been robust. PMID:24202240

  4. Primary esophageal small cell carcinoma with concomitant invasive squamous cell carcinoma or carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Junya; Ohshima, Koichi; Ikeda, Seiyou; Iwashita, Akinori; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    2003-11-01

    Esophageal small cell carcinoma (SmCC) is a rarer, more highly aggressive, and more rapidly growing neoplasm than esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC). SmCC and SqCC also differ in terms of chemotherapy of choice, response to therapy, and prognosis. Accordingly, it is important to differentiate the 2 carcinomas. We studied the histology and immunohistochemical profiles of 6 cases of esophageal SmCC to elucidate the correct diagnosis of this tumor. We performed immunohistochemical analysis antibodies against cytokeratins (CKAE1/AE3, CKCAM5.2, CK34betaE12, CK7, CK8, CK10/13, and CK19), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM; CD56), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), chromogranin-A, S-100 protein, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), E-cadherin, thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), and p53. In 3 of the 6 SmCCs, heterogeneous components of in situ or invasive SqCC were observed. SqCC was found in the mucosa adjacent to the main SmCC, and the boundary between SmCC and SqCC was distinct, with no transitional features. Staining for NCAM, NSE, and chromogranin-A was positive in SmCCs, but negative in SqCCs. Both SmCCs and SqCCs were positive for CKAE1/AE3, CKCAM5.2, CK8, and EMA, but only SqCCs were positive for CK34betaE12 and CK19. Moreover, SmCCs containing SqCC components were positive for CEA and E-cadherin, whereas SmCCs without SqCC were negative. Our study suggests that NCAM and NSE are useful markers in diagnosing esophageal SmCC, and CK34betaE12 and CK19 are useful for differentiating SqCC components from SmCC.

  5. Bronchogenic Carcinoma with Cardiac Invasion Simulating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anirban; Das, Sibes K.; Pandit, Sudipta; Karmakar, Rathindra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac metastases in bronchogenic carcinoma may occur due to retrograde lymphatic spread or by hematogenous dissemination of tumour cells, but direct invasion of heart by adjacent malignant lung mass is very uncommon. Pericardium is frequently involved in direct cardiac invasion by adjacent lung cancer. Pericardial effusion, pericarditis, and tamponade are common and life threatening presentation in such cases. But direct invasion of myocardium and endocardium is very uncommon. Left atrial endocardium is most commonly involved in such cases due to anatomical contiguity with pulmonary hilum through pulmonary veins, and in most cases left atrial involvement is asymptomatic. But myocardial compression and invasion by adjacent lung mass may result in myocardial ischemia and may present with retrosternal, oppressive chest pain which clinically may simulate with the acute myocardial infarction (AMI). As a result, it leads to misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis of lung cancer. Here we report a case of non-small-cell carcinoma of right lung which was presented with asymptomatic invasion in left atrium and retrosternal chest pain simulating AMI due to myocardial compression by adjacent lung mass, in a seventy-four-year-old male smoker. PMID:27042370

  6. Invasive lobular carcinoma: a rare presentation in the male breast.

    PubMed

    Melo Abreu, Elisa; Pereira, Pedro; Marques, José Carlos; Esteves, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in men is uncommon, accounting for <1% of all breast cancers. Even though lobular structures are quite infrequent in the male breast, rare cases of invasive lobular breast carcinoma have been described, representing 1-2% of all breast cancers in men. Risk factors include undescended testes, congenital inguinal hernia, orchiectomy, orchitis, testicular injury, infertility and Klinefelter's syndrome, previous thoracic radiotherapy, alterations of the oestrogen-testosterone ratio and familial history (BRCA 2 and 1). The authors present a case of a 52-year-old man with no relevant predisposing factors to breast cancer, who presented with a painless, firm nodule, fixed to the nipple on the left breast, associated with nipple retraction and ulceration, and fully characterised by mammogram and ultrasound. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed the diagnosis of invasive lobular breast carcinoma and the patient underwent left radical mastectomy, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy. A brief review of the literature is presented. PMID:27151060

  7. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2-ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  8. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization

    PubMed Central

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2–ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  9. RTOG 9804: A Prospective Randomized Trial for Good-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Comparing Radiotherapy With Observation

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Beryl; Winter, Kathryn; Hudis, Clifford; Kuerer, Henry Mark; Rakovitch, Eileen; Smith, Barbara L.; Sneige, Nour; Moughan, Jennifer; Shah, Amit; Germain, Isabelle; Hartford, Alan C.; Rashtian, Afshin; Walker, Eleanor M.; Yuen, Albert; Strom, Eric A.; Wilcox, Jeannette L.; Vallow, Laura A.; Small, William; Pu, Anthony T.; Kerlin, Kevin; White, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9804 study identified good-risk patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a breast cancer diagnosis found frequently in mammographically detected cancers, to test the benefit of radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery compared with observation. Patients and Methods This prospective randomized trial (1998 to 2006) in women with mammographically detected low- or intermediate-grade DCIS, measuring less than 2.5 cm with margins ≥ 3 mm, compared RT with observation after surgery. The study was designed for 1,790 patients but was closed early because of lower than projected accrual. Six hundred thirty-six patients from the United States and Canada were entered; tamoxifen use (62%) was optional. Ipsilateral local failure (LF) was the primary end point; LF and contralateral failure were estimated using cumulative incidence, and overall and disease-free survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Median follow-up time was 7.17 years (range, 0.01 to 11.33 years). Two LFs occurred in the RT arm, and 19 occurred in the observation arm. At 7 years, the LF rate was 0.9% (95% CI, 0.0% to 2.2%) in the RT arm versus 6.7% (95% CI, 3.2% to 9.6%) in the observation arm (hazard ratio, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.47; P < .001). Grade 1 to 2 acute toxicities occurred in 30% and 76% of patients in the observation and RT arms, respectively; grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred in 4.0% and 4.2% of patients, respectively. Late RT toxicity was grade 1 in 30%, grade 2 in 4.6%, and grade 3 in 0.7% of patients. Conclusion In this good-risk subset of patients with DCIS, with a median follow-up of 7 years, the LF rate was low with observation but was decreased significantly with the addition of RT. Longer follow-up is planned because the timeline for LF in this setting seems protracted. PMID:25605856

  10. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ With Microinvasion: Prognostic Implications, Long-Term Outcomes, and Role of Axillary Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, Rahul R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Lannin, Donald; Moran, Meena S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes for women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) vs. DCIS with microinvasion (DCISM) treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT), to assess the impact of microinvasion. Patients and Methods: A total of 393 patients with DCIS/DCISM from our database were analyzed to assess differences in clinical-pathologic features and outcomes for the two cohorts. Results: The median follow-up was 8.94 years, and the mean age was 55.8 years for the entire group. The DCISM cohort was comprised of 72 of 393 patients (18.3%). Surgical evaluation of the axilla was performed in 58.3% (n = 42) of DCISM vs. 18.1% (n = 58) of DCIS, with only 1 of 42 DCISM (2.3%) vs. 0 of 58 DCIS with axillary metastasis. Surgical axillary evaluation was not an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR), distant relapse-free survival (DRFS), or overall survival (OS) in Cox proportional hazards analysis (p > 0.05). For the DCIS vs. DCISM groups, respectively, the 10-year breast relapse-free survival was 89.0% vs. 90.7% (p = 0.36), DRFS was 98.5% vs. 97.9% (p = 0.78), and OS was 93.2% vs. 95.7% (p = 0.95). The presence of microinvasion did not correlate with LRR, age, presentation, race, family history, margin status, and use of adjuvant hormonal therapy (all p > 0.05). In univariate analysis, pathology (DCIS vs. DCISM) was not an independent predictor of LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-4.30; p = 0.36), DRFS (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.07-6.95; p = 0.77), or OS (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.28-3.82; p = 0.95). Conclusions: Our data imply that the natural history of DCISM closely resembles that of DCIS, with a low incidence of local-regional and distant failures. On the basis of our large dataset, the incidence of axillary metastasis in DCISM appears to be small and not appear to correlate to outcomes, and thus, microinvasion alone should not be the sole criterion for more aggressive treatment.

  11. The impact of sentinel lymph node biopsy and magnetic resonance imaging on important outcomes among patients with ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, Todd M; Shamliyan, Tatyana; Virnig, Beth A; Kane, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to determine the impact of sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on important outcomes for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ. We identified no study that directly evaluated important outcomes for SLN biopsy. So, we determined the incidence of SLN metastases among patients with ductal carcinoma in situ. Using American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria, the incidence of pN1 and pN1(mic) SLN metastases were 0.9% and 1.5%, respectively. Because the incidence of SLN metastasis is very low, SLN biopsy is not likely to affect important outcomes. We identified one study that directly evaluated important outcomes after breast MRI. In this study, the use of MRI did not affect local recurrence rates after breast-conserving surgery and radiation. Although MRI may identify occult multicentric or contralateral breast cancer in some patients, it may also lead to unnecessary biopsies and overtreatment. PMID:20956814

  12. Comparison of adjuvant ED and EC-D regimens in operable breast invasive ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liyu; Jing, Chuyu; Kong, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoyan; Ma, Tingting; Huo, Qiang; Chen, Junfei; Wang, Xiaoting; Yang, Qifeng

    2016-01-01

    In China, the adjuvant epirubicin and docetaxel (ED) regimen is widely used as a substitute for the epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by docetaxel (EC-D) regimen in patients with operable breast cancer. However, their equivalence has not yet been demonstrated. This retrospective study compared these two adjuvant regimens as regards feasibility, safety and efficacy. Data on consecutive patients who received either ED (70/75 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for 6 cycles) or EC-D (70/600 mg/m2 epirubicin/cyclophosphamide followed by 75 mg/m2 docetaxel every 3 weeks for 4 cycles each) as their adjuvant chemotherapy in our center from January 2009 to January 2014, were analyzed. A total of 374 patients was enrolled, among whom 250 patients received the ED regimen, and 124 patients received the EC-D regimen. The overall median follow-up time was 38.6 months. In total, 90 and 94.4% of patients in the ED and EC-D groups, respectively, completed full cycles of chemotherapy (P=0.174). There was no difference in efficacy in terms of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) (DFS, P=0.919; OS, P=0.069). The incidence of neutropenia in the ED group was similar to that in the EC-D group (81.2 vs. 78.9%, P=0.660) with a similar utilization rate of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF; 76.9 vs. 75.2%, P=0.850). However, grade 3/4 gastrointestinal reactions were more frequently observed in the patients who received the EC-D regimen (42.0 vs. 29.2%, P=0.058). The findings of our study indicate that with similar feasibility, safety and mid-term efficacy, the adjuvant ED regimen for 6 cycles may be an alternative to the EC-D regimen in operable breast cancer. PMID:27446451

  13. Clinical Significance of Microcalcifications Detection in Invasive Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Murata, Aya; Miyamoto, Naoki; Takamori, Toshihiro; Hosoda, Yuta; Endo, Yukari; Kodani, Yuka; Sato, Kengo; Hosoya, Keiko; Ishiguro, Kiyosuke; Hirooka, Yasuaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, a lot of cases with microcalcifications of the breast are pointed by the images of mammography (MG), because breast screening using MG become common. Although MG is a gold standard modality for detecting microcalcifications, images of ultrasonography (US) are now feasible to detect microcalcifications with recent improvements to ultrasound diagnostic devices. In this report, we analyzed clinical significance of microcalcifications detected with US images in invasive breast carcinoma. Methods Eighty-eight patients with invasive breast carcinoma who underwent MG and US before surgery at the Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery of Tottori University Hospital between January 2012 and August 2013. After reviewing US images, the association between the presence of echogenic spots that indicate microcalcifications and images of MG or pathological findings was assessed. Results Patients without microcalcifications on US images were significantly more likely to have the Luminal A subtype and a lower nuclear grading. Conversely, patients with microcalcifications on US images were significantly more likely to have higher level of MIB-1 index, lymphovascular invasion, comedonecrosis and lymph node metastasis. The rate of detecting microcalcifications on US images was relatively good, with 81.8% of sensitivity, 94.5% of specificity and 89.8% of diagnostic accuracy. Among the calcifications detected by MG images, detected rate of calcifications with US images was higher in necrotic type (92.6%) than secretory type (33.3%). Conclusion This study suggest that microcalcifications of tumors detected by US images could serve as an useful prediction to evaluate the degree of malignancy for patients with invasive breast carcinoma. PMID:26306060

  14. Angiogenesis and inflammation in invasive carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A H; Happerfield, L C; Bobrow, L G; Millis, R R

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relation between angiogenesis and inflammation in invasive carcinoma of the breast. METHODS: Sections from 75 invasive carcinomas of the breast were stained using immunohistochemistry for von Willebrand factor, CD3, CD8, CD45RO, CD45RA, CD20, CD68, and c-erbB-2. Tumour vascularity was assessed by counting vessels in the three most vascular areas, and calculating the average (x 400 magnification, field 0.168 mm2). Each pattern of inflammation was scored semiquantitatively. RESULTS: The main pattern of inflammation was a diffuse infiltrate of macrophages, and to a lesser extent T cells. Perivascular and perilobular clusters of B and T cells were noted at the edge of the carcinomas, but were less prominent than the diffuse inflammation. Diffuse inflammation, particularly macrophages, was associated with high tumour grade, tumour necrosis, large tumour size, and c-erbB-2 expression. Perivascular and perilobular inflammation also increased with tumour grade. Tumour vascularity increased slightly with intensity of diffuse inflammation (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rs = 0.17, p = 0.08), and was inversely related to perilobular inflammation (rs = -0.23, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The correlations between inflammation and vascularity were weak in this study (r2 about 0.04) and thus there was no evidence of an important relation. Discrepancies between this and other studies may be resolved by studying expression of angiogenic cytokines and proteolytic enzymes by tumour infiltrating inflammatory cells, and their relation to tumour vascularity. PMID:9301551

  15. Polarity gene alterations in pure invasive micropapillary carcinomas of the breast

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pure invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) is a special type of breast carcinoma characterised by clusters of cells presenting polarity abnormalities. The biological alterations underlying this pattern remain unknown. Methods Pangenomic analysis (n = 39), TP53 (n = 43) and PIK3CA (n = 41) sequencing in a series of IMPCs were performed. A subset of cases was also analysed with whole-exome sequencing (n = 4) and RNA sequencing (n = 6). Copy number variation profiles were compared with those of oestrogen receptors and grade-matched invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) of no special type. Results Unsupervised analysis of genomic data distinguished two IMPC subsets: one (Sawtooth/8/16) exhibited a significant increase in 16p gains (71%), and the other (Firestorm/Amplifier) was characterised by a high frequency of 8q (35%), 17q (20% to 46%) and 20q (23% to 30%) amplifications and 17p loss (74%). TP53 mutations (10%) were more frequently identified in the amplifier subset, and PIK3CA mutations (4%) were detected in both subsets. Compared to IDC, IMPC exhibited specific loss of the 6q16-q22 region (45%), which is associated with downregulation of FOXO3 and SEC63 gene expression. SEC63 and FOXO3 missense mutations were identified in one case each (2%). Whole-exome sequencing combined with RNA sequencing of IMPC allowed us to identify somatic mutations in genes involved in polarity, DNAH9 and FMN2 (8% and 2%, respectively) or ciliogenesis, BBS12 and BBS9 (2% each) or genes coding for endoplasmic reticulum protein, HSP90B1 and SPTLC3 (2% each) and cytoskeleton, UBR4 and PTPN21 (2% each), regardless of the genomic subset. The intracellular biological function of the mutated genes identified by gene ontology analysis suggests a driving role in the clinicopathological characteristics of IMPC. Conclusion In our comprehensive molecular analysis of IMPC, we identified numerous genomic alterations without any recurrent fusion genes. Recurrent somatic mutations of genes

  16. Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A; Jud, Sebastian M; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Kerin, Michael J; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, Kconfab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Sherman, Mark E; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-04-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18), P = 6.0 × 10(-10); P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4)). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03); and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04). In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365) and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7). In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity

  17. Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N.; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Kerin, Michael J.; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, kConFab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona A.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Sherman, Mark E.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J.; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M.; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10–15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09–1.18), P = 6.0×10−10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8×10−4). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03); and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04). In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365) and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7). In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there

  18. Downregulation of FOXP2 promoter human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xia; Zhou, Huiling; Zhang, Tingting; Xu, Pan; Zhang, Shusen; Huang, Wei; Yang, Linlin; Gu, Xingxing; Ni, Runzhou; Zhang, Tianyi

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health concern with a high morbidity and mortality rate worldwide. However, the mechanism underlying hepatocarcinogenesis remains unclear. Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) has been implicated in various human cancer types. However, the role of FOXP2 in HCC remains unknown. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to measure the expression of FOXP2 protein in HCC and adjacent normal tissues in 50 patients. Wound healing and transwell assays were used to determine the cell invasion ability. We showed that the level of FOXP2 was significantly reduced in HCC compared with the adjacent non-tumorous tissue. There was statistical significance between the expression of FOXP2 and vein invasion (P = 0.017), number of tumor nodes (P = 0.028), and AFP (P = 0.033). Low expression of FOXP2 correlated with poor survival. Moreover, wound healing and transwell assays showed that FOXP2 could decrease cell invasion and affect the expression of vimentin and E-cadherin. Our results suggested that FOXP2 expression was downregulated in HCC tumor tissues, and reduced FOXP2 expression was associated with poor overall survival. In addition, downregulation of FOXP2 significantly enhanced cell invasiveness. These findings uncover that FOXP2 might be a new prognostic factor and be closely correlated with HCC cell invasion.

  19. Minimally invasive image-guided therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Mohamed E; Murthy, Ravi; Avritscher, Rony; Mahvash, Armeen; Wallace, Michael J; Kaseb, Ahmed O; Odisio, Bruno C

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequently occurring cancer globally and predominantly develops in the setting of various grades of underlying chronic liver disease, which affects management decisions. Image-guided percutaneous ablative or transarterial therapies have acquired wide acceptance in HCC management as a single treatment modality or combined with other treatment options in patients who are not amenable for surgery. Recently, such treatment modalities have also been used for bridging or downsizing before definitive treatment (ie, surgical resection or liver transplantation). This review focuses on the use of minimally invasive image-guided locoregional therapies for HCC. Additionally, it highlights recent advancements in imaging and catheter technology, embolic materials, chemotherapeutic agents, and delivery techniques; all lead to improved patient outcomes, thereby increasing the interest in these invasive techniques. PMID:27785450

  20. An analysis of predictive biomarkers in routine histopathological reporting of infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia with a focus on limitations and directions for future development.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Kean-Hooi; Looi, Lai-Meng; Sabaratnam, Subathra; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Nazarina, Abdul Rahman; Mun, Kein-Seong

    2011-06-01

    Predictive biomarkers such as oestrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors and c-erbB-2 oncoprotein have become a staple in breast cancer reports in the country as they increasingly play an important role in the treatment and prognosis of women with breast cancers. This study reviews the practice of histopathology reporting of these biomarkers in a Malaysian tertiary hospital setting. Retrospective data on demographic, pathological and biomarker profiles of patients with invasive ductal carcinoma who had undergone mastectomy or lumpectomy with axillary node clearance from 2005 to 2006 were retrieved from the Department of Pathology, Penang Hospital and analysed. The prevalence of ER positivity (55.8%), PR positivity (52.5%), c-erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression (24%) and triple negativity (ER negative, PR negative, c-erbB-2 negative) (15%) by immunohistochemistry were comparable with other studies. Notably, c-erbB-2 overexpression was equivocal (2+) in 15% of cases. Since about a quarter of equivocal (2+) cases usually show amplification by FISH, a small but certain percentage of patients would miss the benefit of anti-c-erbB-2 antibody therapy if FISH is not performed. New ASCO/CAP guidelines on the quantitation of ER and PR will probably increase the prevalence of ER/PR positivity, invariably leading to significant ramifications on the management of patients as more patients would be deemed eligible for endocrine therapy, as well as categorisation of triple negative breast cancers.

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is related to nuclear grade in ductal carcinoma in situ and is increased in its normal adjacent epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shim, Veronica; Gauthier, Mona L.; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Mantei, Kristin; Chew, Karen L.; Moore, Dan H.; Cha, Imok; Tlsty, Thea D.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is emerging as an important cancer biomarker and is now an experimental target for solid tumor treatment.However, no study has exclusively focused on COX-2 expression in early lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We examined COX-2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 46 cases of women undergoing surgical resection for DCIS. We found that COX-2 expression was detected in 85% of all DCIS specimens, with increased COX-2 staining correlating with higher nuclear grade. Strikingly, COX-2 staining intensity in the normal adjacent epithelium was stronger than in the DCIS lesion itself. Our observations demonstrate that COX-2 is up-regulated in the normal adjacent epithelium and supports the hypothesis that the surrounding epithelial tissue is part of the disease process in DCIS.

  2. The invasive lobular carcinoma as a prototype luminal A breast cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most frequent histologic subtype in Western countries, its incidence is much lower in Asia, and its characteristics are less well known. Methods We assessed the clinical characteristics and outcomes of 83 Korean patients (2.8%) with ILC for comparison with 2,833 (97.2%) with the invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), including 1,088 (37.3%) with the luminal A subtype (LA-IDC). Results The mean age of all patients was 48.2 years, with no significant differences among the groups. Compared to IDC, ILC showed a larger tumor size (≥T2, 59.8% vs. 38.8%, P = 0.001), a lower histologic grade (HG 1/2, 90.4% vs. 64.4%, P < 0.001), more frequent estrogen receptor positive (90.4% vs. 64.4%, P < 0.001), progesterone receptor positive (71.1% vs. 50.1%, P < 0.001) and HER2 negative (97.5% vs. 74.6%, P < 0.001) status, and lower Ki-67 expression (10.3% ± 10.6% vs. 20.6% ± 19.8%, P < 0.001), as well as being more likely to be of the luminal A subtype (91.4% vs. 51.2%, P < 0.001). Six (7.2%) ILC and 359 (12.7%) IDC patients developed disease recurrence, with a median follow-up of 56.4 (range 4.9-136.6) months. The outcome of ILC was close to LA-IDC (HR 0.77 for recurrence, 95% CI 0.31-1.90, P = 0.57; HR 0.75 for death, 95% CI 0.18-3.09, P = 0.70) and significantly better than for the non-LA-IDC (HR 1.69 for recurrence, 95% CI 1.23-2.33, P = 0.001; HR 1.50 for death, 95% CI 0.97-2.33, P = 0.07). Conclusions ILC, a rare histologic type of breast cancer in Korea, has distinctive clinicopathological characteristics similar to those of LA-IDC. PMID:21126378

  3. Factors associated with local recurrence and cause-specific survival in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry; Go, Nel; Krauss, Daniel; Chen, Peter; Goldstein, Neal; Martinez, Alvaro; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast to determine risk factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and cause-specific survival (CSS) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy. Materials and Methods: Between 1981 and 1999, 410 cases of DCIS (405 patients) were treated at our institution; 367 were managed with breast-conserving surgery (54 with lumpectomy alone and 313 with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) [median dose, 45 Gy]). Of these 313 patients, 298 received also a supplemental boost of RT to the lumpectomy cavity (median dose, 16 Gy). Forty-three patients underwent mastectomy; 2 (5%) received adjuvant RT to the chest wall. A true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM) IBTR was defined as failure within or adjacent to the tumor bed in patients undergoing BCT. Median follow-up for all patients was 7 years (mean: 6.1 years). Results: Thirty patients (8.2%) experienced an IBTR after BCT (25 [8%] after RT, 5 [9.3%] after no RT), and 2 patients (4.7%) developed a chest wall recurrence after mastectomy. Of the 32 local failures, 20 (63%) were invasive (18/30 [60%] after BCT and 2/2 [100%] after mastectomy), and 37% were DCIS alone. Twenty-four (80%) of the IBTRs were classified as TR/MM. The 10-year freedom from local failure, CSS, and overall survival after BCT or mastectomy were 89% vs. 90% (p = 0.4), 98% vs. 100% (p = 0.7), and 89% vs. 100% (p = 0.3), respectively. Factors associated with IBTR on Cox multivariate analysis were younger age (p = 0.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.06 per year), electron boost energy {<=}9 MeV (p = 0.03, HR 1.41), final margins {<=}2 mm (p = 0.007; HR, 3.65), and no breast radiation (p = 0.002, HR 5.56). On Cox univariate analysis for BCT patients, IBTR, TR/MM failures, and predominant nuclear Grade 3 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases and a reduced CSS. Conclusions: After treatment for DCIS, 10-year rates of local control

  4. Final results from a multicenter prospective study ( JROSG 05–5) on postoperative radiotherapy for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ with an involved surgical margin or close margin widths of 1 mm or less

    PubMed Central

    Shikama, Naoto; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nakamura, Naoki; Sekine, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Yuko; Imanaka, Kazufumi; Akiba, Takeshi; Aoki, Masahiko; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ogo, Etsuyo; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Kawashima, Miho; Karasawa, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter prospective study ( Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group: JROSG 05-5) aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with an involved surgical margin or close margin widths of ≤1 mm or less. PORT consisted of whole-breast irradiation (50 Gy in 25 fractions) followed by boost irradiation (10 Gy in 5 fractions). Eligibility criteria were as follows: (i) DCIS without an invasive carcinoma component, (ii) age between 20 and 80 years old, (iii) involved margin or close margin widths of ≤1 mm, (iv) refusal of re-resection, (v) performance status of 0–2, and (vi) written informed consent. The primary endpoint was ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), and secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), recurrence patterns, and adverse events. A total of 37 patients from 12 institutions were enrolled from January 2007 to May 2009. The median follow-up time was 62 months (range, 28–85 months). The median pathological tumor size was 2.5 cm (range, 0.3–8.5 cm). Of the 37 patients, 21 had involved margins, and 16 had close margins. The 5-year IBTR, OS and RFS rates were 6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2–21), 97% (95% CI: 83–99) and 91% (95% CI: 77–97), respectively. Two patients developed local recurrence at the original site after 39 and 58 months. No severe adverse events were found. Our study suggests that this PORT regimen could be a treatment option for patients with DCIS with involved margin or close margin who don't desire re-resection. PMID:26093369

  5. Downregulation of CCR1 inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaofeng; Fan Jia; E-mail: jiafan99@yahoo.com; Wang Xiaoying; Zhou Jian; Qiu Shuangjian; Yu Yao; Liu Yinkun; Tang Zhaoyou

    2007-04-20

    CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) has an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. The migration and metastasis of tumor cells shares many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is mainly regulated by chemokine receptor-ligand interactions. CCR1 is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and tissues with unknown functions. In this study, we silenced CCR1 expression in the human HCC cell line HCCLM3 using artificial microRNA (miRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and examined the invasiveness and proliferation of CCR1-silenced HCCLM3 cells and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The miRNA-mediated knockdown expression of CCR1 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HCCLM3 cells, but had only a minor effect on the cellular proliferation rate. Moreover, CCR1 knockdown significantly reduced the secretion of MMP-2. Together, these findings indicate that CCR1 has an important role in HCCLM3 invasion and that CCR1 might be a new target of HCC treatment.

  6. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Survival Outcomes in Invasive Papillary Carcinoma of the Breast: A SEER Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi-Zi; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of invasive papillary carcinoma (IPC), we identified 233,171 female patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database who had IPC (n = 524) or infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) (n = 232,647). Generally, IPCs occurred in older women (≥ 50 years old) and presented with smaller sizes, lower grades, higher rates of oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) positivity, and reduced lymph node (LN) involvement and were less likely to be treated with mastectomy than patients with IDC. The five-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were significantly better in IPC than in IDC (97.5% vs. 93%, respectively; P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, patients with IPC showed a DSS that was similar to that of IDC (hazard ratio = 0.556, 95% confidence interval 0.289-1.070, P = 0.079). No significant difference was observed in DSS between matched IPC and IDC groups (P = 0.085). Differences in outcomes may be partially explained by differences in tumour grade, LN status, and ER and PR status between the 2 groups. Gaining an improved clinical and biological understanding of IPC might result in more tailored and effective therapies in breast cancer patients. PMID:27053333

  7. Mitotic figure counts are significantly overestimated in resection specimens of invasive breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Rochat, Candice; Schaper, Cornelia; Nobile, Antoine; Shanouda, Sherien; Vijgen, Sandrine; Gauthier, Arnaud; Obermann, Ellen; Leuba, Susana; Schmidt, Marcus; C, Curzio Ruegg; Delaloye, Jean-Francois; Simiantonaki, Nectaria; Schaefer, Stephan C

    2013-03-01

    Several authors have demonstrated an increased number of mitotic figures in breast cancer resection specimen when compared with biopsy material. This has been ascribed to a sampling artifact where biopsies are (i) either too small to allow formal mitotic figure counting or (ii) not necessarily taken form the proliferating tumor periphery. Herein, we propose a different explanation for this phenomenon. Biopsy and resection material of 52 invasive ductal carcinomas was studied. We counted mitotic figures in 10 representative high power fields and quantified MIB-1 immunohistochemistry by visual estimation, counting and image analysis. We found that mitotic figures were elevated by more than three-fold on average in resection specimen over biopsy material from the same tumors (20±6 vs 6±2 mitoses per 10 high power fields, P=0.008), and that this resulted in a relative diminution of post-metaphase figures (anaphase/telophase), which made up 7% of all mitotic figures in biopsies but only 3% in resection specimen (P<0.005). At the same time, the percentages of MIB-1 immunostained tumor cells among total tumor cells were comparable in biopsy and resection material, irrespective of the mode of MIB-1 quantification. Finally, we found no association between the size of the biopsy material and the relative increase of mitotic figures in resection specimen. We propose that the increase in mitotic figures in resection specimen and the significant shift towards metaphase figures is not due to a sampling artifact, but reflects ongoing cell cycle activity in the resected tumor tissue due to fixation delay. The dwindling energy supply will eventually arrest tumor cells in metaphase, where they are readily identified by the diagnostic pathologist. Taken together, we suggest that the rapidly fixed biopsy material better represents true tumor biology and should be privileged as predictive marker of putative response to cytotoxic chemotherapy.

  8. Evaluation of fascin-1 expression as a marker of invasion in urothelial carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Badwal, Sonia; Dutta, Vibha; Basu, Atoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background Prognostication and therapeutic evaluation of urothelial carcinomas significantly depends on the depth of invasion. The assessment of invasion on routine histopathological sections may be difficult in some cases. Fascin is an actin-bundling protein involved in tumor cell migration with enhanced expression associated with invasive tumors. The data available on fascin-1 expression in urothelial carcinoma however is limited. To characterize fascin-1 expression in urothelial neoplasms and its correlation with invasiveness in urothelial carcinomas. Methods A descriptive study design wherein fascin-1 immunoreactivity was studied in 126 urothelial neoplasms using monoclonal antibody against fascin by immunohistochemistry. 52/126 (41.26%) were low grade carcinomas (48/52 stage pTa and 4/52 stage pT1), 46/126 (36.5%) high grade carcinomas (13/46 stage pTa, 8/46 stage pT1 and 25/46 stage pT2), 02/126 carcinoma-in-situ, 03/126 papilloma, 12/126 papillary urothelial neoplasm of uncertain malignant potential and 11/126 were other variants of urothelial carcinomas. Fascin-1 cytoplasmic immunoreactivity was assessed semiquantitatively in terms of extent, intensity and a combined immunoreactivity score. Correlation between immunoreactivity scores and invasiveness was evaluated using Pearson's chi-square (χ2) and Nonparametric Spearman rho (ρ) correlation coefficient two tailed. Results The scores for intensity, extent and combined immunoreactivity were significantly higher in invasive carcinomas. In addition, strong staining was observed exclusively in invasive carcinomas. None of the pTa tumors demonstrated intense staining, including those categorized as high grade carcinomas. Conclusion Fascin-1 overexpression may be used as a marker in urothelial carcinomas where it is morphologically difficult to determine the status of invasion. PMID:24843202

  9. Soft Tissue Myoepithelial Carcinoma of the Neck with Spinal Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Moussaly, Elias; Nazha, Bassel; Kedia, Shiksha; Chang, Qing; Forte, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue myoepithelial neoplasms are a rare yet diverse group of tumors, ranging from benign to malignant lesions. Their presentation in the head and neck region is uncommon and represents a challenging diagnosis. Early identification of myoepithelial carcinoma is crucial given its more aggressive course compared to its benign counterpart, although the histopathological distinction between the two can be difficult. EWSR1 gene rearrangement is found in half the cases and has a speculative role in pathogenesis. Complete excision remains the treatment of choice. The roles of chemotherapy and radiation are unclear. We report the hospital course of a 33-year-old female who presented to our institution with a posterior neck mass with spinal invasion, diagnosed as myoepithelial cancer. A literature review of these rare tumors is discussed here. PMID:27746887

  10. Molecular genesis of non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma (NMIUC)

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Courtney; Smith, Steven C.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) is the most common type of bladder cancer in Western nations. Most patients present with the non-muscle-invasive (NMIUC) form of the disease, while up to a third harbour the invasive form (MIUC). Specifically, the aetiology of NMIUC appears to be multifactorial and very different from that of MIUC. Loss of specific tumour suppressor genes as well as gain-of-function mutations in proteins within defined cellular signalling pathways have been implicated in NMIUC aetiology. The regions of chromosome 9 that harbour CDKN2A, CDKN2B, TSC1, PTCH1 and DBC1 are frequently mutated in NMIUC, resulting in functional loss; in addition, HRAS and FGFR3, which are both proto-oncogenes encoding components of the Ras–MAPK signalling pathway, have been found to harbour activating mutations in a large number of NMIUCs. Interestingly, some of these molecular events are mutually exclusive, suggesting functional equivalence. Since several of these driving changes are amenable to therapeutic targeting, understanding the signalling events in NMIUC may offer novel approaches to manage the recurrence and progression of this disease. PMID:20334706

  11. The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: Promise of new technologies in understanding pre-invasive breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Pollack, Jonathan R

    2003-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization, RNA expression profiling, and proteomic analyses are new molecular technologies used to study breast cancer. Invasive breast cancers were originally evaluated because they provided ample quantities of DNA, RNA, and protein. The application of these technologies to pre-invasive breast lesions is discussed, including methods that facilitate their implementation. Data indicate that atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ are precursor lesions molecularly similar to adjacent invasive breast cancer. It is expected that molecular technologies will identify breast tissue at risk for the development of unfavorable subtypes of invasive breast cancer and reveal strategies for targeted chemoprevention or eradication. PMID:14580250

  12. Chromosome 1 aneusomy with 1p36 under-representation is related to histologic grade, DNA aneuploidy, high c-erb B-2 and loss of bcl-2 expression in ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Farabegoli, F; Ceccarelli, C; Santini, D; Trerè, D; Baldini, N; Taffurelli, M; Derenzini, M

    1996-10-21

    Chromosome 1 abnormalities with loss of 1p36 have been investigated in 95 breast-cancer samples by means of a dual-target fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) technique using the pUC 1.77 and p1-79 probes, specific for the 1q12 and 1p36 regions, respectively. Abnormalities for one or both probes were detected in 83/95 samples. Relative 1p36 under-representation was found in 79/95. The clinical relevance of these alterations was studied by comparing the FISH results with several parameters currently used in breast-cancer pathology. Distinct patterns of chromosome 1 abnormalities were found among the histologic types of breast carcinoma. Lobular or mucinous samples showed few or no alterations, whereas most ductal samples had high chromosome 1 polysomy with under-representation of 1p36. In ductal carcinomas, chromosome 1 alterations increased with histologic grade, DNA aneuploidy, loss of bcl-2 and high c-erb B-2 expression. These associations were found to be statistically significant. No correlation between chromosome 1 alterations and nuclear grade, age, size, lymph-node involvement, hormonal receptor presence, proliferation activity or p53 protein expression was detected. These results indicate the utility of this FISH technique for a better definition of the biological characteristics of ductal carcinomas.

  13. Uroplakin II Expression in Breast Carcinomas Showing Apocrine Differentiation: Putting Some Emphasis on Invasive Pleomorphic Lobular Carcinoma as a Potential Mimic of Urothelial Carcinoma at Metastatic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Shogo; Koda, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Uroplakin II antibody is exclusively specific for urothelial carcinoma. Nonurothelial carcinoma has not been reported to be immunoreactive for uroplakin II. In the present study, we hypothesized that breast carcinoma showing apocrine differentiation, such as invasive pleomorphic lobular carcinoma (IPLC) and apocrine carcinoma (AC), stains positive for uroplakin II. We identified 6 cases of IPLC between 2000 and 2014 by searching a computerized pathological database. We randomly selected 10 cases of each classic invasive lobular carcinoma (cILC) and AC and five cases of apocrine metaplasia (AM) that coexisted in a surgically resected breast carcinoma specimen. Immunohistochemistry was performed for uroplakin II, GATA3, CK7, CK20, and other representative markers positive for urothelial carcinoma. All cases of IPLC, AC, and AM, except those of cILC, showed immunoreactivity for uroplakin II. Poorly differentiated urothelial carcinoma sometimes shows similar morphology to IPLC with the following immunophenotype: CK7+, CK20−, GATA3+, and uroplakin II+. In the present study, this immunophenotype was observed in all the cases of IPLC and AC. Therefore, when studying metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinoma showing the aforementioned immunophenotype, we should consider the possibility of it being IPLC in addition to metastatic urothelial carcinoma.

  14. Tenascin-C and carcinoma cell invasion in oral and urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Alexander; Richter, Petra; Kosmehl, Hartwig; Franz, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma invasion is a complex process regulated by genetic and epigenetic factors as well. A relevant supportive condition for cancer cell migration is the reorganization of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is realized in an orchestrated multicellular manner including carcinoma cells and stromal fibroblasts. An important key player in the process of ECM reorganization is Tenascin-C (Tn-C). The molecule occurs as different isoforms generated by alternative splicing and de novo glycosylation. Large variants of Tn-C are abundantly re-expressed in the invasive front of many carcinoma types. A special role for initiating migration and accompanied epithelial to mesenchymal transition has been suggested. Here, we review the current knowledge concerning the tumor biological importance of Tn-C, the synthesis and alternative splicing during the invasive process in general, and give an overview on the impact of Tn-C in urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder (UBC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).

  15. Effective treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ with a HER-2- targeted alpha-particle emitting radionuclide in a preclinical model of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takahiro; Jin, Kideok; Song, Hong; Park, Sunju; Huso, David L; Zhang, Zhe; Liangfeng, Han; Zhu, Charles; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2016-05-31

    The standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is surgical resection, followed by radiation. Here, we tested localized therapy of DCIS in mice using the immunoconjugate 225Ac linked-trastuzumab delivered through the intraductal (i.duc) route. Trastuzumab targets HER-2/neu, while the alpha-emitter 225Ac (half-life, 10 days) delivers highly cytotoxic, focused doses of radiation to tumors. Systemic 225Ac, however, elicits hematologic toxicity and at high doses free 213Bi, generated by its decay, causes renal toxicity. I.duc delivery of the radioimmunoconjugate could bypass its systemic toxicity. Bioluminescent imaging showed that the therapeutic efficacy of intraductal 225Ac-trastuzumab (10-40 nCi per mammary gland; 30-120 nCi per mouse) in a DCIS model of human SUM225 cancer cells in NSG mice was significantly higher (p<0.0003) than intravenous (120 nCi per mouse) administration, with no kidney toxicity or loss of body weight. Our findings suggest that i.duc radioimmunotherapy using 225Ac-trastuzumab deserves greater attention for future clinical development as a treatment modality for early breast cancer.

  16. Reflex Estrogen Receptor (ER) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) Analysis of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) in Breast Needle Core Biopsy Specimens: An Unnecessary Exercise That Costs the United States $35 Million/y.

    PubMed

    VandenBussche, Christopher J; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Park, Ben Ho; Emens, Leisha A; Tsangaris, Theodore N; Argani, Pedram

    2016-08-01

    Most institutions reflexively test all breast core needle biopsy specimens showing ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) for estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR). However, 5 factors suggest that this reflex testing unnecessarily increases costs. First, ER/PR results do not currently impact the next step in standard therapy; namely, surgical excision. Second, a subset of surgical excisions performed for DCIS diagnosed on core needle biopsy will harbor infiltrating mammary carcinoma, which will then need to be retested for ER/PR. Third, because ER and PR labeling is often heterogeneous in DCIS, negative results for ER/PR on small core needle biopsy specimens should logically be repeated on surgical excision specimens with larger amounts of DCIS to be sure that the result is truly negative. Fourth, many patients with pure ER/PR-positive DCIS after surgical excision will decline hormone therapy, so any ER/PR testing of their DCIS is unnecessary. Fifth, PR status in DCIS has no proven independent value. We now examine the unnecessary added costs associated with reflex ER/PR testing of DCIS on core needle biopsy specimens due to these factors. We reviewed 58 core needle biopsies showing pure DCIS that also had a resulting surgical excision specimen at our institution over a period of 2 years. No patient received neoadjuvant hormone therapy. On surgical excision, 5 (8.6%) had only benign findings, 44 (75.9%) had pure DCIS, and 9 (15.5%) had DCIS with invasive mammary carcinoma. The 9 cases with invasive mammary carcinoma in the surgical excision specimen (16%) and the 4 pure DCIS in surgical excision specimens that were ER/PR negative on core needle biopsy would need repeat ER/PR testing. The total unnecessary increased cost of core needle biopsy specimen testing of these 13 cases was $8148.92 ($140/patient for the 58 patients in the study). We found that ER/PR testing results impacted patient management in only 16/49 pure DCIS cases after surgical excision (33

  17. Management of thyroid gland invasion in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arslanoğlu, Seçil; Eren, Erdem; Özkul, Yılmaz; Ciğer, Ejder; Kopar, Aylin; Önal, Kazım; Etit, Demet; Tütüncü, G Yazgı

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of thyroid gland invasion in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma; and the association between clinicopathological parameters and thyroid gland invasion. Medical records of 75 patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent total laryngectomy with thyroidectomy were reviewed, retrospectively. Preoperative computed tomography scans, clinical and operative findings, and histopathological data of the specimens were evaluated. There were 73 male and two female patients with an age range of 41-88 years (mean 60.4 years). Hemithyroidectomy was performed in 62 (82.7 %) and total thyroidectomy was performed in 13 patients (17.3 %). Four patients had histopathologically proven thyroid gland invasion (5.3 %). In three patients, thyroid gland involvement was by means of direct invasion. Thyroid gland invasion was significantly correlated with thyroid cartilage invasion. Therefore, prophylactic thyroidectomy should not be a part of the treatment policy for these tumors.

  18. Low dynamin 2 expression is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis in invasive squamous cell carcinoma of cervix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo-Young; Do, In-Gu; Park, Young Ae; Choi, Jung-Joo; Song, Sang Yong; Kim, Chul Jung; Kim, Min Kyu; Song, Tae Jong; Park, Hwang Shin; Choi, Chel Hun; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2010-08-15

    Dynamin 2 is known as a protein involved in cell migration and endocytosis. We aimed to investigate the association between dynamin 2 expressions and tumor progression in early cervical carcinoma (IB1-IIA). Dynamin 2 expression was evaluated at protein level in thirty seven paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed tissues including four normal cervix tissues and compared with pathologic risk factors for recurrence after surgery in thirty three patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. The expression of dynamin 2 was not different according to clinical stage and lympho-vascular space invasion. However, there were inverse correlations between dynamin 2 expression and the depth of invasion in cervix (p = 0.003) and lymph node (LN) metastasis (p = 0.001). To evaluate the mechanism of dynamin 2 in tumor invasion and metastasis, we performed an in vitro experiment with dynamin 2 siRNA using several cervical carcinoma cell lines such as HeLa, MS751 and SiHa cells. We found the inhibition of dynamin 2 using specific siRNA enhanced the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2. These results suggested that dynamin 2 might be involved in preventing tumor invasion and LN metastasis, possibly in relation with extracellular matrix degradation, and may be a prognostic marker for these risk factors in early squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.

  19. Effect of N-CAM on in vitro invasion of human adenoid cystic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    França, C M; Jaeger, R G; Freitas, V M; Araújo, N S; Jaeger, M M

    2001-12-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma of salivary glands is characterised by aggressive behaviour, high rate of local recurrences, neurotropism and late metastasis. In a previous work we demonstrated that adenoid cystic carcinoma cultured cells (CAC2 cells) expressed N-CAM. It was suggested that this expression, modulated by extracellular matrix, would be correlated to cell movement. The aim of our study was to verify whether CAC2 cells presented invasion capacity. Moreover, we tested whether the neural adhesion molecule (N-CAM) would participate in this process. CAC2 cells were either previously treated, or not (control), with a monoclonal antibody against N-CAM. Invasion assays were carried out using a modified Boyden chamber (Transwell chamber). CAC2 cells (10(5)) were dispensed into Transwell upper chamber on the top of Matrigel coated filter. The cells that invaded the filters in the first 8 h were counted under light microscopy, yielding data for the invasion rates (%). Control CAC2 cells presented an invasion rate of 5.28+/-0.04%. The invasion rate raised to 6.53+/-0.2% when N-CAM was blocked with monoclonal antibody. N-CAM impaired the adenoid cystic carcinoma cell invasion in vitro. Therefore, we suggest an anti-invasive role for N-CAM in adenoid cystic carcinoma.

  20. Breast Cancer Heterogeneity Examined by High-Sensitivity Quantification of PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, and BRAF Mutations in Normal Breast and Ductal Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Myers, Meagan B; Banda, Malathi; McKim, Karen L; Wang, Yiying; Powell, Michael J; Parsons, Barbara L

    2016-04-01

    Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to derail durable patient responses to molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics, yet the prevalence and size of such subpopulations are largely unexplored. We employed the sensitive and quantitative Allele-specific Competitive Blocker PCR approach to characterize mutant cancer subpopulations in ductal carcinomas (DCs), examining five specific hotspot point mutations (PIK3CA H1047R, KRAS G12D, KRAS G12V, HRAS G12D, and BRAF V600E). As an approach to aid interpretation of the DC results, the mutations were also quantified in normal breast tissue. Overall, the mutations were prevalent in normal breast and DCs, with 9/9 DCs having measureable levels of at least three of the five mutations. HRAS G12D was significantly increased in DCs as compared to normal breast. The most frequent point mutation reported in DC by DNA sequencing, PIK3CA H1047R, was detected in all normal breast tissue and DC samples and was present at remarkably high levels (mutant fractions of 1.1 × 10(-3) to 4.6 × 10(-2)) in 4/10 normal breast samples. In normal breast tissue samples, PIK3CA mutation levels were positively correlated with age. However, the PIK3CA H1047R mutant fraction distributions for normal breast tissues and DCs were similar. The results suggest PIK3CA H1047R mutant cells have a selective advantage in breast, contribute to breast cancer susceptibility, and drive tumor progression during breast carcinogenesis, even when present as only a subpopulation of tumor cells. PMID:27108388

  1. Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Carl; Bai, Harrison; Neboori, Hanmanth; Takita, Cristiane; Motwani, Sabin; Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges; Haffty, Bruce G.; Jones, Tiffanie; Goyal, Sharad; Moran, Meena S.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

  2. Screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ found on stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy of suspicious microcalcifications without mass: radiological-histological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzak, Piotr; Biecek, Przemyslaw; Halon, Agnieszka; Matkowski, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Commonly identified on screening mammography breast microcalcifications are the predominant manifestation of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between clinico-radiological features and histological findings in patients with screen-detected DCIS. Patients and methods Consecutive 127 patients with pure DCIS found on stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy of screen-detected suspicious microcalcifications without mass entered the study. Patient age, type and distribution of microcalcifications, DCIS nuclear grade (NG) and the presence of comedonecrosis were investigated. Association between parameters was statistically analysed with P < 0.05 as a significance level. Results. Powdery microcalcifications were most often clustered while regional were most common of casting-type (P < 0.001). High, intermediate and low NG of DCIS was significantly related to casting-type, crushed stone-like and powdery microcalcifications, respectively (P < 0.01). Low and intermediate NG DCIS were the most common in clustered and grouped microcalcifications while high NG DCIS was the most often when regional distribution was observed (P < 0.05). Comedonecrosis was significantly more common in high NG DCIS (P < 0.01). The association between comedonecrosis and type of microcalcifications was not significant, but with their distribution was close to the significance level (P = 0.07). Patient age was not significantly related to imaging or histological findings. Conclusions The association between pattern of mammographic microcalcifications and histological findings related to more aggressive disease can be helpful in optimal surgery planning in patients with screen-detected DCIS, regarding the extent of breast intervention and consideration of synchronous sentinel node biopsy. PMID:27247546

  3. Carcinoma Arising in Microglandular Adenosis: An Immunohistochemical Analysis of 20 Intraepithelial and Invasive Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Christopher; Dadmanesh, Farnaz; Bratthauer, Gary L.; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A.

    2000-10-01

    Microglandular adenosis (MGA) of the breast is an uncommon, benign lesion that may mimic invasive carcinoma and has recently been recognized as having significant premalignant potential. When carcinomas arise in MGA, there is often a transition from ordinary MGA to atypical MGA (AMGA) to carcinoma. Nineteen cases of carcinoma arising in MGA are reported: 7 invasive carcinomas, 7 intraductal carcinomas (DCIS), and 5 with both invasive and intraductal carcinoma. A single case of AMGA without carcinoma is also reported. The 20 patients ranged in age from 36 to 81 years (mean 52). The most common clinical presentation was either a palpable mass (13 patients) or a mammographic abnormality (4 patients). All 20 cases contained AMGA, and in some cases AMGA was the predominant lesion. In 18 of the 19 cases with carcinoma, there was a clear transition from AMGA to the carcinoma. Twelve cases contained ordinary MGA, but in only 2 cases was MGA a prominent component of the lesion. In contrast to ordinary MGA, the glands of AMGA were more irregularly shaped, closely packed, and cytologically atypical and tended to lack secretions. A solid, occlusive proliferation of cells in the tubules was seen in 10 cases. All 12 examples of in situ carcinoma were either grade 2 or 3 and typically showed a solid proliferation of severely atypical cells within the glands; a cribrifrom pattern was also present in 1 case. The invasive carcinomas were morphologically diverse and included 2 with a basaloid morphology and 2 metaplastic carcinomas. Various immunostains were performed, and each lesion (AMGA, in situ, and invasive carcinoma) was separately assessed for immunoreactivity. As expected, S-100 was positive in the vast majority of AMGA and in situ carcinomas and in all 12 invasive carcinomas. S-100beta was also positive in the majority of cases although the staining was weaker. Laminin and type IV collagen highlighted the basement membrane around the AMGA and in situ carcinoma and are

  4. The invasive front of carcinomas. The most important area for tumour prognosis?

    PubMed

    Bryne, M; Boysen, M; Alfsen, C G; Abeler, V M; Sudbø, J; Nesland, J M; Kristensen, G B; Piffko, J; Bankfalvi, A

    1998-01-01

    Various molecular events of importance in tumour spread, like the gain and loss of adhesion molecules, secretion of proteolytic enzymes, increased cell proliferation, and the initiation of angiogenesis occur at the tumour-host interface (invasive front). We have hypothesised that molecular or morphological characteristics at the invasive front area of various carcinomas may reflect tumour prognosis better than other parts of the tumour. Consequently, we recently developed a simple malignancy grading system restricted to the deep invasive front area of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. This grading system proved to have additional prognostic value over the established prognostic factors. All similar studies performed so far have confirmed the high prognostic significance of the invasive front grading in squamous cell carcinomas at different locations. In this review paper we describe the system and the hypothesis on which it has been developed. The reproducibility of the grading is acceptable for further extended studies. Interestingly, observations of similar invasive front alterations in different adenocarcinomas suggest that the invasive tumour front may underlie the biological aggressiveness of carcinomas of glandular origin, as well. PMID:9891553

  5. Transcriptional differences of the human papillomavirus type 16 genome between precancerous lesions and invasive carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Tomita, Yoshimi; Kubota, Koichi; Kasai, Tokuzo; Sekiya, Souei; Takamizawa, Hiroyoshi; Simizu, Bunsiti )

    1988-03-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) genome DNA and its transcripts in biopsied cervical neoplasias were analyzed by simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from one biopsied sample. Southern blot analysis revealed that 5 of 20 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) contained HPV16 DNAs existing primarily as episomes and two of seven invasive carcinomas harbored HPV16 genome sequences integrated into the host DNA. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed that the HPV16 genome sequences were transcriptionally active in the five CINs, as well as in the two invasive carcinomas. The pattern of HPV16-specific transcripts in the CINs was uniform, and the major transcripts were 4.2, 2.2, 1.6, and 1.4 kilobases in size. However, the pattern of HPV16-specific transcripts in the invasive carcinomas was variable and different from that in CINs, suggesting that the alteration of transcriptional pattern might play a key role in the development of malignancy.

  6. Sphenoid mucocele with intracranial invasion secondary to nasopharyngeal acinic cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, P; Redaelli de Zinis, L O; Tomenzoli, D; Maroldi, R; Antonelli, A R

    1991-01-01

    We present a case of sphenoid mucocele with large invasion of the middle cranial fossa, secondary to a nasopharyngeal acinic cell carcinoma, occurring in a 52-year-old man. To the best of our knowledge, this association has not been reported so far. We discuss the importance of imaging techniques in delineating the relationship between the two lesions, as long as the clinical and therapeutic problems related both to sphenoid mucocele and acinic cell carcinoma.

  7. Bile duct invasion can be an independent prognostic factor in early stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ye-Rang; Kim, Hyeyoung; Lee, Jeong-Moo; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), bile duct invasion occurs far more rarely than vascular invasion and is not well characterized. In addition, the pathologic finding of bile duct invasion is not considered an independent prognostic factor for HCC following surgery. In this study, we determined the characteristics of HCC with bile duct invasion, and assessed the clinical significance of bile duct invasion. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 363 patients who underwent hepatic resection for HCC at Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH) from January 2009 to December 2011. Preoperative, operative, and pathological data were collected. The risk factors for recurrence and survival were analyzed. Subsequently, the patients were divided into 2 groups according to disease stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer 7th edition): early stage (T1 and 2) and advanced stage (T3 and 4) group; and risk factors in the sub-groups were analyzed. Results Among 363 patients, 13 showed bile duct invasion on pathology. Patients with bile duct invasion had higher preoperative total bilirubin levels, greater microvascular invasion, and a higher death rate than those without bile duct invasion. In multivariate analysis, bile duct invasion was not an independent prognostic factor for survival for the entire cohort, but, was an independent prognostic factor for early stage. Conclusions Bile duct invasion accompanied microvascular invasion in most cases, and could be used as an independent prognostic factor for survival especially in early stage HCC (T1 and T2). PMID:26693236

  8. Increased N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 expression is associated with breast atypia-to-carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao-Yun; Fan, Chui-Feng; Wei, Jing; Liu, Cong; Zheng, Hua-Chuan; Yao, Fan; Jin, Feng

    2011-12-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) has been identified as a protein involved in the differentiation of epithelial cells. As a newly metastasis suppressor gene, whether it contributes to carcinogenesis of breast cancer is still unknown. This study aimed to clarify the possible role of NDRG1 for breast cancer carcinogenesis, and further to investigate its clinicopathological significance in invasive breast cancer. We examined the expression of NDRG1 in normal epithelium of breast (n = 35), usual ductal hyperplasia (n = 22), atypical ductal hyperplasia (n = 33), atypical lobular hyperplasia (n = 8), ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 16), lobular carcinoma in situ (n = 6), invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 50), and invasive lobular carcinoma (n = 45) by immunohistochemistry and analyzed the correlation between NDRG expression and clinicopathological features of invasive breast cancer. Western blot analysis was carried out to investigate the expression of NDRG1 in 20 invasive ductal breast cancer and the paired non-tumor portion of the same case. NDRG1 expression in invasive breast cancer (70/95, 73.7%) was higher than that in noninvasive breast lesions (29/85, 34.1%; p < 0.05) which was higher than that in normal breast epithelium (5/35, 14.3%; p < 0.05). Statistical analysis revealed a significant correlation between NDRG1 expression with tumor stage in invasive breast cancer, and its expression in invasive ductal carcinoma is significantly higher than invasive lobular carcinoma (p < 0.05). It was not associated with age, menopausal status, tumor size, and lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 protein levels were significantly higher in invasive ductal breast cancer compared to the paired non-tumor portion of the same case by Western blot analysis (p < 0.05). Increased NDRG-1 expression is associated with breast atypia-to-carcinoma progression. NDRG1 expression might participate in the carcinogenesis and progression of invasive

  9. Non-invasive diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Warszawik-Hendzel, Olga; Olszewska, Małgorzata; Maj, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Czuwara, Joanna; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2015-12-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cutaneous malignancy after basal cell carcinoma. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for squamous cell carcinoma is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Dermoscopy has become one of the basic diagnostic methods in clinical practice. The most common dermoscopic features of squamous cell carcinoma include clustered vascular pattern, glomerular vessels and hyperkeratosis. Under reflectance confocal microscopy, squamous cell carcinoma shows an atypical honeycomb or disarranged pattern of the spinous-granular layer of the epidermis, round nucleated bright cells in the epidermis and round vessels in the dermis. High frequency ultrasound and optical coherence tomography may be helpful in predominantly in pre-surgical evaluation of tumor size. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, lip, oral mucosa, vulva or other tissues include high-definition optical coherence tomography, in vivo multiphoton tomography, direct oral microscopy, electrical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elastic scattering spectroscopy, differential path-length spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry.

  10. Non-invasive diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Warszawik-Hendzel, Olga; Olszewska, Małgorzata; Maj, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Czuwara, Joanna; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2015-12-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cutaneous malignancy after basal cell carcinoma. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for squamous cell carcinoma is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Dermoscopy has become one of the basic diagnostic methods in clinical practice. The most common dermoscopic features of squamous cell carcinoma include clustered vascular pattern, glomerular vessels and hyperkeratosis. Under reflectance confocal microscopy, squamous cell carcinoma shows an atypical honeycomb or disarranged pattern of the spinous-granular layer of the epidermis, round nucleated bright cells in the epidermis and round vessels in the dermis. High frequency ultrasound and optical coherence tomography may be helpful in predominantly in pre-surgical evaluation of tumor size. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, lip, oral mucosa, vulva or other tissues include high-definition optical coherence tomography, in vivo multiphoton tomography, direct oral microscopy, electrical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elastic scattering spectroscopy, differential path-length spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. PMID:26848316

  11. Analysis of alterations adjacent to invasive vulvar carcinoma and their relationship with the associated carcinoma: a study of 67 cases.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, C; Cavelier-Balloy, B; Nogues, C; Trassard, M; Le Doussal, V

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of histological lesions adjacent to 67 invasive vulvar squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) was undertaken to analyse their nature, as well as their relationship to SCC. Patient age, clinical presentation and histological type of carcinoma, ISSVD classification of its adjacent lesions, disease-free and overall survival were reviewed. Severe undifferentiated vulvar intra-epithelial neoplasia (VIN3) was found in 19.4% of cases and vulvar lichen sclerosus (VLS) in 76.1% of cases. All VLS, except 2 cases, were associated with squamous cell hyperplasia (SCH), and a concomitant differentiated VIN was found in 76.6% of cases. Undifferentiated VIN3 was never associated with VLS. VLS was significantly associated with a keratinizing, well-differentiated SCC (98% of cases), while undifferentiated VIN3, was linked preferentially to 2 other types of SCC: in 77% of cases, a moderately-differentiated SCC with the same histological features as the so-called basaloid carcinoma and, in 23% of cases, a well-differentiated SCC with a variable extent of koilocytic atypia, similar to the so-called warty carcinoma. Carcinoma of the fourchette was more often associated with undifferentiated VIN3. Disease-free and overall survival were significantly better for carcinoma associated with undifferentiated VIN3 (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively). These findings suggest invasive vulvar SCC occurs on 2 distinct types of vulvar lesions: differentiated VIN and/or SCH associated with VLS and undifferentiated VIN3. Furthermore, the histological type of the carcinoma seems to differ according to adjacent lesions.

  12. Tumor characteristics of ductal carcinoma in situ of breast visualized on [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography: Results from a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Tomoyuki; Kubota, Kazunori; Toriihara, Akira; Machida, Youichi; Okazawa, Kaori; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify clinicopathological features of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) visualized on [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT). METHODS This study retrospectively reviewed 52 consecutive tumors in 50 patients with pathologically proven pure DCIS who underwent [F-18] FDG-PET/CT before surgery. [F-18] FDG-PET/CT was performed after biopsy in all patients. The mean interval from biopsy to [F-18] FDG-PET/CT was 29.2 d. [F-18] FDG uptake by visual analysis and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was compared with clinicopathological characteristics. RESULTS [F-18] FDG uptake was visualized in 28 lesions (53.8%) and the mean and standard deviation of SUVmax was 1.63 and 0.90. On univariate analysis, visual analysis and the SUVmax were associated with symptomatic presentation (P = 0.012 and 0.002, respectively), palpability (P = 0.030 and 0.024, respectively), use of core-needle biopsy (CNB) (P = 0.023 and 0.012, respectively), ultrasound-guided biopsy (P = 0.040 and 0.006, respectively), enhancing lesion ≥ 20 mm on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (P = 0.001 and 0.010, respectively), tumor size ≥ 20 mm on histopathology (P = 0.002 and 0.008, respectively). However, [F-18] FDG uptake parameters were not significantly associated with age, presence of calcification on mammography, mass formation on MRI, presence of comedo necrosis, hormone status (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2), and nuclear grade. The factors significantly associated with visual analysis and SUVmax were symptomatic presentation (P = 0.019 and 0.001, respectively), use of CNB (P = 0.001 and 0.031, respectively), and enhancing lesion ≥ 20 mm on MRI (P = 0.001 and 0.049, respectively) on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION Although DCIS of breast is generally non-avid tumor, symptomatic and large tumors (≥ 20 mm) tend to be visualized on [F-18] FDG-PET/CT. PMID:27648168

  13. Long-term Outcomes of Hypofractionation Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lalani, Nafisha; Paszat, Lawrence; Sutradhar, Rinku; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Hanna, Wedad; Slodkowska, Elzbieta; Done, Susan J.; Miller, Naomi; Youngson, Bruce; Tuck, Alan; Sengupta, Sandip; Elavathil, Leela; Chang, Martin C.; Jani, Prashant A.; Bonin, Michel; and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Whole-breast radiation therapy (XRT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) may decrease the risk of local recurrence, but the optimal dose regimen remains unclear. Past studies administered 50 Gy in 25 fractions (conventional); however, treatment pattern studies report that hypofractionated (HF) regimens (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) are frequently used. We report the impact of HF (vs conventional) on the risk of local recurrence after BCS for DCIS. Methods and Materials: All women with DCIS treated with BCS and XRT in Ontario, Canada from 1994 to 2003 were identified. Treatment and outcomes were assessed through administrative databases and validated by chart review. Survival analyses were performed. To account for systematic differences between women treated with alternate regimens, we used a propensity score adjustment approach. Results: We identified 1609 women, of whom 971 (60%) received conventional regimens and 638 (40%) received HF. A total of 489 patients (30%) received a boost dose, of whom 143 (15%) received conventional radiation therapy and 346 (54%) received HF. The median follow-up time was 9.2 years. The median age at diagnosis was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 49-65 years). On univariate analyses, the 10-year actuarial local recurrence–free survival was 86% for conventional radiation therapy and 89% for HF (P=.03). On multivariable analyses, age <45 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.6-3.4; P<.0001), high (HR=2.9; 95% CI: 1.2-7.3; P=.02) or intermediate nuclear grade (HR=2.7; 95% CI: 1.1-6.6; P=.04), and positive resection margins (HR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.0-2.1; P=.05) were associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. HF was not significantly associated with an increased risk of local recurrence compared with conventional radiation therapy on multivariate analysis (HR=0.8; 95% CI: 0.5-1.2; P=.34). Conclusions: The risk of local recurrence among individuals treated with HF regimens

  14. Saracatinib Impairs Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion by Disrupting Invadopodia Function

    PubMed Central

    Ammer, Amanda Gatesman; Kelley, Laura C.; Hayes, Karen E.; Evans, Jason V.; Lopez-Skinner, Lesly Ann; Martin, Karen H.; Frederick, Barbara; Rothschild, Brian L.; Raben, David; Elvin, Paul; Green, Tim P.; Weed, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated Src kinase activity is linked to the progression of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Src regulates HNSCC proliferation and tumor invasion, with the Src-targeted small molecule inhibitor saracatinib displaying potent anti-invasive effects in preclinical studies. However, the pro-invasive cellular mechanism(s) perturbed by saracatinib are unclear. The anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects of saracatinib on HNSCC cell lines were therefore investigated in pre-clinical cell and mouse model systems. Saracatinib treatment inhibited growth, cell cycle progression and transwell Matrigel invasion in HNSCC cell lines. Dose-dependent decreases in Src activation and phosphorylation of the invasion-associated substrates focal adhesion kinase, p130 CAS and cortactin were also observed. While saracatinib did not significantly impact HNSCC tumor growth in a mouse orthotopic model of tongue squamous cell carcinoma, impaired perineural invasion and cervical lymph node metastasis was observed. Accordingly, saracatinib treatment displayed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on invadopodia formation, extracellular matrix degradation and matrix metalloprotease 9 activation. These results suggest that inhibition of Src kinase by saracatinib impairs the pro-invasive activity of HNSCC by inhibiting Src substrate phosphorylation important for invadopodia formation and associated matrix metalloprotease activity. PMID:20505783

  15. Pancreatic mucinous noncystic (colloid) carcinomas and intraductal papillary mucinous carcinomas are usually microsatellite stable.

    PubMed

    Lüttges, Jutta; Beyser, Kurt; Pust, Susanne; Paulus, Anja; Rüschoff, Josef; Klöppel, Günter

    2003-06-01

    Pancreatic mucinous noncystic (colloid) carcinomas (MNCC) differ from the usual ductal adenocarcinomas in their mucin expression profile and share with many extrapancreatic mucinous carcinomas the expression of MUC2. Because mucinous carcinomas are frequently associated with mutations of the DNA mismatch repair genes, causing them to exhibit the so-called mutator phenotype, we decided to investigate whether MNCCs of the pancreas are characterized by microsatellite instability (MSI). Twelve carcinomas with a mucinous phenotype (8 mucinous noncystic carcinomas, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous carcinomas with an invasive muconodular component, and 1 ductal adenocarcinoma with an extensive mucinous noncystic component) and 11 ductal adenocarcinomas were immunostained with monoclonal antibodies to the mismatch repair gene products hMLH1, hMSH2, and hMSH6. For MSI analysis, DNA was isolated from microdissected tissue, and five primary microsatellites (BAT 25, BAT 26, D5S346, D17S250, and D2S123) were analyzed. MSI was diagnosed in case a novel allele was found, compared with the normal tissue. The criterion for LOH was a 75% signal reduction. All carcinomas tested exhibited nuclear expression of mismatch repair gene products, except for one MNCC that also showed MSI at the molecular level. The data suggest that pancreatic carcinomas with a mucinous phenotype (MUC2+/MUC1-) do not appear to normally exhibit mutations in the mismatch repair genes and therefore differ in their carcinogenesis from those in other organs.

  16. Ductal barriers in mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Mark B; Hill, Arnold DK; Hopkins, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Tissue barriers play an integral role in the biology and pathobiology of mammary ductal epithelium. In normal breast physiology, tight and adherens junctions undergo dynamic changes in permeability in response to hormonal and other stimuli, while several of their proteins are directly involved in mammary tumorigenesis. This review describes first the structure of mammary ductal epithelial barriers and their role in normal mammary development, examining the cyclical changes in response to puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. It then examines the role of adherens and tight junctions and the participation of their constituent proteins in mammary tumorigenic functions such as migration, invasion and metastasis. Finally, it discusses the potential of these adhesion proteins as both prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:24665412

  17. Normal mammary epithelial cells promote carcinoma basement membrane invasion by inducing microtubule-rich protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Horng; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Gilkes, Daniele; Aifuwa, Ivie; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the dissemination of tumor cells may occur in parallel with, and even preceed, tumor growth. The mechanism for this early invasion is largely unknown. Here, we find that mammary epithelial cells (MECs) induce neighboring breast carcinoma cells (BCCs) to cross the basement membrane by secreting soluble laminin. Laminin continuously produced by MECs induce long membrane cellular protrusions in BCCs that promote their contractility and invasion into the surrounding matrix. These protrusions depend on microtubule bundles assembled de novo through laminin-integrin β1 signaling. These results describe how non-cancerous MECs can actively participate in the invasive process of BCCs. PMID:26334095

  18. A seven year review of invasive carcinoma of the cervix treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    PubMed

    Inalsingh, C H; Chandrasekaran, M S; Julian, C; Hazra, T

    1976-10-01

    172 cases of invasive carcinoma of the cervix treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital are reviewed. Failure rates are examined by stage, demonstrating a high percentage of local recurrences in patients with late stage disease treated by a traditional regime of radiotherapy. Reasons for these failures are explored and a proposal for a more individualized approach to therapy is made. PMID:978858

  19. PDIA3 and PDIA6 gene expression as an aggressiveness marker in primary ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramos, F S; Serino, L T R; Carvalho, C M S; Lima, R S; Urban, C A; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, E M S F

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the expression of the protein disulfide isomerase genes PDIA3 and PDIA6 may increase endoplasmic reticulum stress, leading to cellular instability and neoplasia. We evaluated the expression of PDIA3 and PDIA6 in invasive ductal carcinomas. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we compared the mRNA expression level in 45 samples of invasive ductal carcinoma with that in normal breast samples. Increased expression of the PDIA3 gene in carcinomas (P = 0.0009) was observed. In addition, PDIA3 expression was increased in tumors with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.009) and with grade III (P < 0.02). The PDIA6 gene showed higher expression levels in the presence of lymph node metastasis (U = 99.00, P = 0.0476) and lower expression for negative hormone receptors status (P = 0.0351). Our results suggest that alterations in PDIA3/6 expression levels may be involved in the breast carcinogenic process and should be further investigated as a marker of aggressiveness. PMID:26125904

  20. Primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea with thyroid invasion: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Dianjun; Feng, Liang; Li, Jian; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Primary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the trachea with thyroid invasion is very rare. In this report, we present a 46-year-old man with primary ACC of the trachea with thyroid invasion. ACC invasion of the thyroid is very rare and is easily misdiagnosed. The patient sought consultation due to a 6-month history of dysphagia and associated dyspnea. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan obtained at the time of admission revealed bilateral thyroid masses and tracheal wall thickening. The thyroid masses were fused to the trachea and the esophagus without discernible borders, intraoperatively. Frozen pathology suggested poorly differentiated cancer, and a bilateral partial thyroidectomy was performed. Postoperative pathology revealed primary tracheal ACC with thyroid invasion. The patient died 1 month after surgery. We have also summarized the literature on the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of thyroid-invasive ACC. PMID:27785076

  1. The diagnostic utility of the minimal carcinoma triple stain in breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ross, Dara S; Liu, Yi-Fang; Pipa, Jennifer; Shin, Sandra J

    2013-01-01

    Pathologists are expected to accurately diagnose increasingly smaller breast carcinomas. Correct classification (ie, lobular vs ductal or in situ vs invasive) directly affects subsequent management, especially when the focus is near a surgical margin or present in a needle core biopsy and is further challenging if the lesion is morphologically ambiguous. We assessed the diagnostic utility of a multiplex, trichromogen immunostain of 3 commonly employed antibodies (CK7, p63, and E-cadherin) developed in our laboratory to evaluate these small lesions. Of the 147 specimens containing minimal (defined as ≤3 mm in size) invasive carcinoma, 81 also contained in situ carcinoma. In each case, the Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain was prepared with a parallel H&E-stained slide. Observations of staining characteristics in the focus of interest were recorded. The Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain was diagnostically useful in all but 1 case. In a case of invasive lobular carcinoma in an excisional biopsy, the Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain stained only the surrounding breast tissue (appropriately) and not the focus of interest. Also, a subset of 29 of 81 excisional biopsies had minimal invasive carcinoma located 2 mm or less from the inked surgical margin, in which in all cases the Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain was fully interpretable despite morphologic distortion due to concomitant cautery artifact and tissue disruption in some cases. The Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain offers an accurate and tissue-conserving method to diagnose small, morphologically problematic foci of breast carcinoma while ideally leaving more tissue for additional adjunctive studies.

  2. Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma of the palate composed of invasive micropapillary salivary duct carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma components: an unusual case with immunohistochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Sedassari, Bruno T; da Silva Lascane, Nelise A; Tobouti, Priscila L; Pigatti, Fernanda M; Franco, Maria I F; de Sousa, Suzana C O M

    2014-12-01

    Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is an unusual epithelial malignancy that develops from a primary or recurrent pleomorphic adenoma (PA), the most common tumor of salivary glands, and constitutes about 11.5% of all carcinomas that affect these glands. Intraoral minor salivary glands and seromucous glands of the oropharynx are uncommon locations of CXPA. On histopathological examination, the tumor comprises a wide morphological spectrum with a variable proportion between the benign and malignant components with the latter often predominating and overlapping the PA, which may cause misdiagnosis. Here, we report a case of palatal minor salivary gland CXPA composed of invasive micropapillary salivary duct carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma components with multiple nodal metastases in a 74-year-old woman. Neoplastic cells showed heterogeneous immunohistochemical profile with both luminal and myoepithelial differentiation. The invasive micropapillary salivary duct carcinoma component demonstrated overexpression of the oncoprotein human epidermal growth factor receptor-2. This feature should be considered and evaluated as a possible target for adjuvant therapy in case of metastatic disease.

  3. Definitive Radiotherapy for Skin and Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma with Perineural Invasion.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, William M; Dagan, Roi; Bryant, Curtis M; Amdur, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) and, to a lesser extent, cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas may exhibit perineural invasion (PNI). A subset of patients have tumors with extensive PNI tracking to the skull base that are incompletely resectable and are treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). RT may be administered with intensity-modulated RT or proton RT. Patients with ACC may also be considered for neutron RT, although the number of available neutron facilities is limited. A substantial proportion of patients with incompletely resectable ACCs and cutaneous carcinomas may be cured with definitive RT. Proton RT provides a more conformal dose distribution compared with other modalities and is likely associated with a lower risk of complications. PMID:27123393

  4. Pokemon and MEF2D co-operationally promote invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Hong, Xing-Yu; Li, Tao; He, Cheng-Yan

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human malignancy, and frequent invasion and metastasis is closely associated with its poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion is still not completely elucidated. Pokemon is a well-established oncogene for HCC growth, but its contribution to HCC invasion has not been studied yet. In this paper, Pokemon was found to be overexpressed in MHCC-97H HCC cell line, which possesses higher invasiveness. Downregulation of Pokemon abolished the invasion of MHCC-97H HCC cell lines. Pokemon overexpression was able to enhance the invasion of MHCC-97L cells with lower invasiveness. MEF2D, an oncogene promoting the invasion of HCC cells, was further detected to be upregulated and downregulated when Pokemon was overexpressed and silenced, respectively. Online database analysis indicated that one Pokemon recognition site was located within the promoter of MEF2D. Chromatin co-precipitation, luciferase, and qPCR assays all proved that Pokemon can promote the expression of MEF2D in HCC cells. Restoration of MEF2D expression can prevent the impaired invasion of HCC cells with Pokemon silencing, while suppression of MEF2D abolished the effect of Pokemon overexpression on HCC invasion. More interestingly, MEF2D was also found to increase the transcription of Pokemon by binding myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) sites within its promoter region, implying an auto-regulatory circuit consisting of these two oncogenes that can promote HCC invasion. Our findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion, and provided evidence that targeting this molecular loop may be a promising strategy for anti-invasion therapy. PMID:26164003

  5. Pokemon and MEF2D co-operationally promote invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Hong, Xing-Yu; Li, Tao; He, Cheng-Yan

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human malignancy, and frequent invasion and metastasis is closely associated with its poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion is still not completely elucidated. Pokemon is a well-established oncogene for HCC growth, but its contribution to HCC invasion has not been studied yet. In this paper, Pokemon was found to be overexpressed in MHCC-97H HCC cell line, which possesses higher invasiveness. Downregulation of Pokemon abolished the invasion of MHCC-97H HCC cell lines. Pokemon overexpression was able to enhance the invasion of MHCC-97L cells with lower invasiveness. MEF2D, an oncogene promoting the invasion of HCC cells, was further detected to be upregulated and downregulated when Pokemon was overexpressed and silenced, respectively. Online database analysis indicated that one Pokemon recognition site was located within the promoter of MEF2D. Chromatin co-precipitation, luciferase, and qPCR assays all proved that Pokemon can promote the expression of MEF2D in HCC cells. Restoration of MEF2D expression can prevent the impaired invasion of HCC cells with Pokemon silencing, while suppression of MEF2D abolished the effect of Pokemon overexpression on HCC invasion. More interestingly, MEF2D was also found to increase the transcription of Pokemon by binding myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) sites within its promoter region, implying an auto-regulatory circuit consisting of these two oncogenes that can promote HCC invasion. Our findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion, and provided evidence that targeting this molecular loop may be a promising strategy for anti-invasion therapy.

  6. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Survival Outcomes of Invasive Cribriform Carcinoma of Breast: A SEER Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Yu; Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Liu, Yi-Rong; Zuo, Wen-Jia; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Invasive cribriform carcinoma (ICC) is a rare histologic subtype of breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of ICC.Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 233,337 female patients diagnosed with ICC (n = 618) or infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) (n = 232,719). Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were utilized to calculate and compare disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS). A 1:1 paired match was carried out on age, tumor stage, tumor grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, and progesterone receptor (PR) status. Baseline characteristics and survival outcomes were also analyzed in ER-positive tumors. Subgroup analyses summarized the hazard ratio (HR) of IDC versus ICC using a forest plot.ICCs presented smaller size, lower grade, higher ER and PR positive rate, less nodal metastasis, and were less likely to be treated with mastectomy compared to IDCs. Five-year DSS rates were significantly better for patients with ICC than for patients with IDC (98.8% vs. 93%, P < 0.001). Five-year OS rates were 95.3% versus 90.1% (P < 0.001). After adjustment for common clinicopathological factors in the multivariate analysis, patients with ICC showed limited DSS advantage over the IDC group (HR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.38-1.51, P = 0.421). No significant difference in DSS nor OS was observed in matched groups between ICC and IDC. Analysis among ER-positive patients revealed similar prognostic factors as among all patients. Survival analysis in different tumor grade subgroups showed no significant difference between ICC and IDC.ICCs have unique clinicopathological characteristics, higher rates of breast-conserving surgery, and more favorable prognosis compared to the overall IDC population. Difference in tumor grade between the 2 groups may partially explain the different outcome. Improved clinical and biological understanding of ICC

  7. Alterations in vascular gene expression in invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Parker, Belinda S; Argani, Pedram; Cook, Brian P; Liangfeng, Han; Chartrand, Scott D; Zhang, Mindy; Saha, Saurabh; Bardelli, Alberto; Jiang, Yide; St Martin, Thia B; Nacht, Mariana; Teicher, Beverly A; Klinger, Katherine W; Sukumar, Saraswati; Madden, Stephen L

    2004-11-01

    The molecular signature that defines tumor microvasculature will likely provide clues as to how vascular-dependent tumor proliferation is regulated. Using purified endothelial cells, we generated a database of gene expression changes accompanying vascular proliferation in invasive breast cancer. In contrast to normal mammary vasculature, invasive breast cancer vasculature expresses extracellular matrix and surface proteins characteristic of proliferating and migrating endothelial cells. We define and validate the up-regulated expression of VE-cadherin and osteonectin in breast tumor vasculature. In contrast to other tumor types, invasive breast cancer vasculature induced a high expression level of specific transcription factors, including SNAIL1 and HEYL, that may drive gene expression changes necessary for breast tumor neovascularization. We demonstrate the expression of HEYL in tumor endothelial cells and additionally establish the ability of HEYL to both induce proliferation and attenuate programmed cell death of primary endothelial cells in vitro. We also establish that an additional intracellular protein and previously defined metastasis-associated gene, PRL3, appears to be expressed predominately in the vasculature of invasive breast cancers and is able to enhance the migration of endothelial cells in vitro. Together, our results provide unique insights into vascular regulation in breast tumors and suggest specific roles for genes in driving tumor angiogenesis. PMID:15520192

  8. Jugular Vein Invasion Diagnosis and Prognosis in Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Marcy, Pierre Yves; Thariat, Juliette; Chevenet, Carole; Lacout, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diagnosis of venous jugular invasion by means of traditional imaging is very rarely reported in the literature. Doppler ultrasound definitively helps to diagnose the tumor thrombus, the extent, and helps in redefining the TNM stage of such an aggressive thyroid tumor. PMID:27354880

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Completion of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Can Accurately Discriminate between No Residual Carcinoma and Residual Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seho; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Sohn, Joohyuk; Park, Hyung Seok; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate evaluation of favorable response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is critical to determine the extent of surgery. We investigated independent clinicopathological and radiological predictors to discriminate no residual carcinoma (ypT0) from residual ductal carcinoma in situ (ypTis) in breast cancer patients who received NCT. Patients and Methods Parameters of 117 patients attaining pathological complete response (CR) in the breast after NCT between January 2010 and December 2013 were retrospectively evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. All patients underwent mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after NCT. Results There were 67 (57.3%) patients with ypT0. These patients were associated with hormone receptor-negative status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-negative tumors, and a higher likelihood of breast-conservation surgery. Baseline mammographic and MRI presentation of the main lesion, absence of associated microcalcifications, shape, posterior features, and absence of calcifications on ultrasound were significantly associated with ypT0. CR in mammography, ultrasound, or MRI after NCT was also related to ypT0. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of ypT0 were the triple-negative subtype [Odds ratio (OR), 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11–16.09] and CR in MRI after NCT (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.53–17.85). Stratified analysis by breast cancer subtype demonstrated that MRI well predicted ypT0 in all subtypes except the HER2-positive subtype. In particular, of 40 triple-negative subtypes, 22 showed CR in MRI and 21 (95.5%) were ypT0 after NCT. Conclusion Among imaging modalities, breast MRI can potentially distinguish between ypT0 and ypTis after NCT, especially in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. This information can help clinicians evaluate tumor response to NCT and plan surgery for breast cancer patients of all subtypes except for those with HER2

  10. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  11. Metastasis Update: Human Prostate Carcinoma Invasion via Tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Raymond B.; Cress, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes that human prostate carcinoma primarily invades as a cohesive cell collective through a mechanism similar to embryonic tubulogenesis, instead of the popular epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) model. Evidence supporting a tubulogenesis model is presented, along with suggestions for additional research. Additionally, observations documenting cell adhesion molecule changes in tissue and stromal components are reviewed, allowing for comparisons between the current branching morphogenesis models and the tubulogenesis model. Finally, the implications of this model on prevailing views of therapeutic and diagnostic strategies for aggressive prostatic disease are considered. PMID:21949592

  12. Morphological heterogeneity of the simultaneous ipsilateral invasive tumor foci in breast carcinoma: a retrospective study of 418 cases of carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Boros, Monica; Marian, Cristina; Moldovan, Cosmin; Stolnicu, Simona

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this paper was to assess whether the morphological appearance (i.e. histological tumor type and histological grade) of simultaneous invasive breast carcinoma foci is heterogeneous, since it is known that adjuvant therapy is established according to these parameters. Patients with simultaneous breast tumors in which only the features of the largest neoplastic focus are reported could thus be undertreated. A retrospective study of 418 cases of breast carcinomas was conducted over a 3-year period. The histological tumor types and histological grades of multifocal/multicentric carcinomas in each tumor focus were compared, and mismatches among foci were recorded. Ninety-one of the 418 cases reviewed had multiple carcinomas (21.77%). A comparison between multiple synchronous tumor foci revealed that their histological type was different in 12.08% of the cases. Mismatches among foci were also observed in 9.89% of the cases when evaluating the histological grade, and 5 out of 9 additional tumor foci with a different grade from the largest (index) tumor (55.55%) displayed a higher grade compared to the index tumor. Since the histological tumor type and histological grade of the individual foci may vary considerably within the same tumor and the additional foci may be of higher grade than the index tumor, we believe that reporting morphologic parameters with more unfavorable characteristics in addition to the parameters of the index tumor is imperative.

  13. Resistin-Like Molecule-β Promotes Invasion and Migration of Gastric Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rui; Zhao, Chunming; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Shengxi; Sun, Xiaogang; Tian, Yang; Song, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistin-like molecule-β (RELMβ) is a novel secretory protein from intestinal goblet cells and participates in epithelial differentiation, tumor occurrence, and immune response. RELMβ is absent in normal gastric mucosa but is abundantly expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues, and is correlated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important mechanism governing tumor cell invasion. This study thus investigated the modulation of RELMβ in gastric cancer metastasis and its correlation with EMT. Material/Methods We used RELMβ-low expression AGS cell line of gastric cancer and normal mucosa cell line GES1 as in vitro models, on which RELMβ0-expressing vector was transfected. The invasion and migration of cells were quantified by Transwell assay. EMT-related protein including E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Snail, and Vimentin were detected by Western blotting in transfected AGS cells. Results RELMβ transfection significantly potentiated invasion and migration abilities of AGS cells, whose RELMβ protein level was significantly elevated compared to those in untransfected AGS or GES1 cells. After RELMβ transfection, EMT-related proteins, including N-cadherin, Snail, and Vimentin levels, were elevated, but E-cadherin expression was depressed. Conclusions RELMβ-overexpression can facilitate invasion and migration of gastric carcinoma cells and it increases the expression of EMT-related proteins, such as N-cadherin, Snail, Vimentin, but decreases E-cadherin level, thus promoting the progression of EMT. PMID:27001185

  14. Golgi protein 73 activation of MMP-13 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jin, Di; Tao, Jun; Li, Dan; Wang, Yanan; Li, Li; Hu, Zhongdong; Zhou, Zhenzhen; Chang, Xiuli; Qu, Chunfeng; Zhang, Hongbing

    2015-10-20

    Golgi Protein 73 (GP73) is a serum biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however its role in HCC is not clear. We report that GP73 promotes cell invasion, the hallmark of malignancy, through the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). GP73 enhances MMP-13 expression through cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB)-mediated transcription activation. Levels of GP73 and MMP-13 are increased and positively correlated in human HCC tissues. Augmented MMP-13 potentiates HCC cell metastasis. Thus, the GP73-CREB-MMP-13 axis potentiates cancer cell invasion and may be a target for HCC treatment. PMID:26378022

  15. Golgi protein 73 activation of MMP-13 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Wang, Yanan; Li, Li; Hu, Zhongdong; Zhou, Zhenzhen; Chang, Xiuli; Qu, Chunfeng; Zhang, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Golgi Protein 73 (GP73) is a serum biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however its role in HCC is not clear. We report that GP73 promotes cell invasion, the hallmark of malignancy, through the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). GP73 enhances MMP-13 expression through cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB)-mediated transcription activation. Levels of GP73 and MMP-13 are increased and positively correlated in human HCC tissues. Augmented MMP-13 potentiates HCC cell metastasis. Thus, the GP73-CREB-MMP-13 axis potentiates cancer cell invasion and may be a target for HCC treatment. PMID:26378022

  16. Carcinomas contain an MMP-resistant isoform of type I collagen exerting selective support to invasion

    PubMed Central

    Makareeva, Elena; Han, Sejin; Vera, Juan Carlos; Sackett, Dan L.; Holmbeck, Kenn; Phillips, Charlotte L.; Visse, Robert; Nagase, Hideaki; Leikin, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    Collagen fibers affect metastasis in two opposing ways, by supporting invasive cells but also generating a barrier to invasion. We hypothesized that these functions might be performed by different isoforms of type I collagen. Carcinomas are reported to contain α1(I)3 homotrimers, a type I collagen isoform normally not present in healthy tissues, but the role of the homotrimers in cancer pathophysiology is unclear. In this study, we found that these homotrimers were resistant to all collagenolytic matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are massively produced and utilized by cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts for degrading stromal collagen at the leading edge of tumor invasion. The MMP-resistant homotrimers were produced by all invasive cancer cell lines tested, both in culture and in tumor xenografts, but they were not produced by cancer-associated fibroblasts, thereby comprising a specialized fraction of tumor collagen. We observed the homotrimer fibers to be resistant to pericellular degradation, even upon stimulation of the cells with pro-inflammatory cytokines. Further, we confirmed an enhanced proliferation and migration of invasive cancer cells on the surface of homotrimeric vs. normal (heterotrimeric) type I collagen fibers. In summary, our findings suggest that invasive cancer cells may utilize homotrimers for building MMP-resistant invasion paths, supporting local proliferation and directed migration of the cells while surrounding normal stromal collagen is cleaved. Because the homotrimers are universally secreted by cancer cells and deposited as insoluble, MMP-resistant fibers, they offer an appealing target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. PMID:20460529

  17. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 66 from an invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed Central

    Tawheed, A R; Beaudenon, S; Favre, M; Orth, G

    1991-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences coexisting with HPV16 and HPV45 were cloned from an invasive cervical carcinoma. The cloned HPV was shown to be a novel type, named HPV66, and is related to HPV56 (an HPV detected in cervical cancer). After screening 160 anogenital biopsies, four specimens exhibited histological features of intraepithelial neoplasia and contained HPV66 sequences. Of these, three were found to be associated with another HPV type. Images PMID:1663515

  18. Stromal CEA immunoreactivity is correlated with lymphatic invasion of human esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kijima, H; Oshiba, G; Kenmochi, T; Kise, Y; Tanaka, H; Chino, O; Shimada, H; Ueyama, Y; Tanaka, M; Makuuchi, H

    2000-04-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a good marker of colorectal cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated that CEA may function as a metastatic potentiator by different pathways; i.e. modulation of immune responses, facilitation of intercellular adhesion and cellular migration. However, expression patterns of CEA have not yet been established in human esophageal carcinomas. In this study, we examined CEA expression in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its clinicopathological significance. CEA immunoreactivity was frequently detected in the cancer cells (cytoplasmic type; 81.1%, 43/53) as well as in the cancer stroma (stromal type; 32.1%, 17/53), regardless of the depth of tumor invasion. Lymphatic invasion of cancer cells was frequently found in the stromal CEA-positive esophageal cancer (44.4%, 16/36), compared to stromal CEA-negative cancer (5.9%, 1/17) (p<0.05). These observations suggested that stromal CEA expression plays important roles in lymphatic invasion of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  19. Active matrix metalloproteinase-7 is associated with invasion in buccal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hui-Ching; Su, Chih-Ying; Huang, Hsuang-Ying; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Chien, Chih-Yen; Du, Yung-Ying; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2008-12-01

    Protein microarrays have shown that matrix metalloproteinase-7 is upregulated in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, but its role in local tissue invasion is still uncertain. We investigated the expression of active matrix metalloproteinase-7, using tissue microarray, immunohistochemistry, and western blotting, in oral tissues from 24 patients with buccal squamous cell carcinoma, and correlated the findings with clinicopathological features. Normal buccal tissue samples from the same patients, obtained at sites at least 1 cm from tumor tissue, served as normal controls. Total matrix metalloproteinase-7 was detected on western blots in 9 of 15 (60%) tumor tissue samples and in 2 of 15 (13%) normal mucosal samples; this difference was significant (P=0.008). Moreover, the active matrix metalloproteinase-7 was expressed only in eight of the nine (89%) tumor samples that expressed matrix metalloproteinase-7, and in none of the normal tissue samples, regardless of the expression status of the pro-matrix metalloproteinase-7. Immunostaining of matrix metalloproteinase-7 was observed histologically in both tumor and nonneoplastic epithelium, but immunostaining of active matrix metalloproteinase-7 was present only in tumor nests. Expression of active matrix metalloproteinase-7 was associated with larger tumor size (P=0.022) and was significantly higher in buccal squamous cell carcinoma with adjacent skin or bone invasion (P=0.036). In conclusion, active matrix metalloproteinase-7 expression was associated with more aggressive buccal squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:18931651

  20. Slug down-regulation by RNA interference inhibits invasion growth in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most aggressive carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract. We assessed the relevance of Slug in measuring the invasive potential of ESCC cells in vitro and in vivo in immunodeficient mice. Methods We utilized RNA interference to knockdown Slug gene expression, and effects on survival and invasive carcinoma were evaluated using a Boyden chamber transwell assay in vitro. We evaluated the effect of Slug siRNA-transfection and Slug cDNA-transfection on E-cadherin and Bcl-2 expression in ESCC cells. A pseudometastatic model of ESCC in immunodeficient mice was used to assess the effects of Slug siRNA transfection on tumor metastasis development. Results The EC109 cell line was transfected with Slug-siRNA to knockdown Slug expression. The TE13 cell line was transfected with Slug-cDNA to increase Slug expression. EC109 and TE13 cell lines were tested for the expression of apoptosis-related genes bcl-2 and metastasis-related gene E-cadherin identified previously as Slug targets. Bcl-2 expression was increased and E-cadherin was decreased in Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells. Bcl-2 expression was increased and E-cadherin was decreased in Slug cDNA-transfected TE13 cells. Invasion of Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells was reduced and apoptosis was increased whereas invasion was greater in Slug cDNA-transfected cells. Animals injected with Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells exhihited fewer seeded nodes and demonstrated more apoptosis. Conclusions Slug down-regulation promotes cell apoptosis and decreases invasion capability in vitro and in vivo. Slug inhibition may represent a novel strategy for treatment of metastatic ESCC. PMID:21599940

  1. Primary ductal adenocarcinoma of the lacrimal gland, associated with abundant intracytoplasmic lumens containing some eosinophilic hyaline globules: cytological, histological and ultrastructural findings.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyueng-Whan; Park, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Wook Youn; Kim, Wan-Seop; Lim, So Dug; Han, Hye Seung; Hwang, Tae Sook

    2014-10-01

    A primary ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) of the lacrimal gland is a rare distinct subtype of an epithelial tumor arising in the lacrimal gland. PDA is the counterpart of salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) resembling an invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. In our case, PDA revealed histopathological and immunohistochemical results corresponding to SDC. Interestingly, the tumor cells showed intracytoplasmic vacuoles containing dense eosinophilic hyaline globules at light microscopy. Ultrastructurally, the tumor cells exhibited microvilli-lined intracytoplasmic lumen containing homogenous electron-dense secretory products. A previous study demonstrated that numerous intracytoplasmic lumens of tumor cells are favored breast malignant tumor, similar to the histopathology of PDA, rather than benign lesion. This characteristic finding may be meaningful to diagnose high grade epithelial tumors including PDA.

  2. Anastrozole versus tamoxifen for the prevention of locoregional and contralateral breast cancer in postmenopausal women with locally excised ductal carcinoma in situ (IBIS-II DCIS): a double-blind, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, John F; Sestak, Ivana; Howell, Anthony; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bundred, Nigel; Levy, Christelle; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Eiermann, Wolfgang; Neven, Patrick; Stierer, Michael; Holcombe, Chris; Coleman, Robert E; Jones, Louise; Ellis, Ian; Cuzick, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Third-generation aromatase inhibitors are more effective than tamoxifen for preventing recurrence in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive invasive breast cancer. However, it is not known whether anastrozole is more effective than tamoxifen for women with hormone-receptor-positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Here, we compare the efficacy of anastrozole with that of tamoxifen in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive DCIS. Methods In a double-blind, multicentre, randomised placebo-controlled trial, we recruited women who had been diagnosed with locally excised, hormone-receptor-positive DCIS. Eligible women were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio by central computer allocation to receive 1 mg oral anastrozole or 20 mg oral tamoxifen every day for 5 years. Randomisation was stratified by major centre or hub and was done in blocks (six, eight, or ten). All trial personnel, participants, and clinicians were masked to treatment allocation and only the trial statistician had access to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was all recurrence, including recurrent DCIS and new contralateral tumours. All analyses were done on a modified intention-to-treat basis (in all women who were randomised and did not revoke consent for their data to be included) and proportional hazard models were used to compute hazard ratios and corresponding confidence intervals. This trial is registered at the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN37546358. Results Between March 3, 2003, and Feb 8, 2012, we enrolled 2980 postmenopausal women from 236 centres in 14 countries and randomly assigned them to receive anastrozole (1449 analysed) or tamoxifen (1489 analysed). Median follow-up was 7·2 years (IQR 5·6–8·9), and 144 breast cancer recurrences were recorded. We noted no statistically significant difference in overall recurrence (67 recurrences for anastrozole vs 77 for tamoxifen; HR 0·89 [95% CI 0·64–1·23]). The non-inferiority of

  3. MicroRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Do Canto, Luisa Matos; Marian, Catalin; Willey, Shawna; Sidawy, Mary; Da Cunha, Patricia A; Rone, Janice D; Li, Xin; Gusev, Yuriy; Haddad, Bassem R

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that microRNAs show promise as excellent biomarkers for breast cancer; however there is still a high degree of variability between studies making the findings difficult to interpret. In addition to blood, ductal lavage (DL) and nipple aspirate fluids represent an excellent opportunity for biomarker detection because they can be obtained in a less invasive manner than biopsies and circumvent the limitations of evaluating blood biomarkers with regards to tissue of origin specificity. In this study, we have investigated for the first time, through a real-time PCR array, the expression of 742 miRNAs in the ductal lavage fluid collected from 22 women with unilateral breast tumors. We identified 17 differentially expressed miRNAs between tumor and paired normal samples from patients with ductal breast carcinoma. Most of these miRNAs have various roles in breast cancer tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis, therapeutic response, or are associated with several clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors. Moreover, some miRNAs were also detected in other biological fluids of breast cancer patients such as serum (miR-23b, -133b, -181a, 338-3p, -625), plasma (miR-200a), and breast milk (miR-181a). A systems biology analysis of these differentially expressed miRNAs points out possible pathways and cellular processes previously described as having an important role in breast cancer such as Wnt, ErbB, MAPK, TGF-β, mTOR, PI3K-Akt, p53 signaling pathways. We also observed a difference in the miRNA expression with respect to the histological type of the tumors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid is feasible and potentially very useful for the detection of breast cancer.

  4. Fundamental differences in the neural invasion behavior of pancreatic endocrine tumors: relevance for local recurrence rates?

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Frank; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Rieker, Ralf J; Esposito, Irene; Fischer, Lars; Herpel, Esther; Friess, Helmut; Schirmacher, Peter; Kern, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Neural invasion represents an important prognostic factor in pancreatic cancer, and it is thought to be one of the main causes for the high rate of postoperative local recurrences in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. In contrast to the latter, systematic investigations of the mode and extent of neural invasion in pancreatic endocrine tumors have not yet been carried out, although this process represents an important feature in the classification of these tumors. In the present study, a total of 48 pancreatic endocrine tumors were analyzed including 10 well-differentiated endocrine tumors of uncertain behavior, 33 well-differentiated endocrine carcinomas, and 5 poorly differentiated endocrine carcinomas. Neural invasion was found in a large subset (73%) of pancreatic endocrine tumors. The frequency of neural invasion correlated with the grade of malignancy but occurred irrespective of functional activity, hormone phenotype, or histomorphology. Analogous to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and nerve growth factor, which were expressed in 50% and 100% of the tumors, respectively, seemed to be associated with the frequency of neural invasion. However, in contrast to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, neural invasion in pancreatic endocrine tumors was only detected within the tumor boundaries and did not reach beyond the tumor invasion front. This phenomenon may explain the low rate of local relapses after tumor resection in pancreatic endocrine tumors despite the high frequency of neural invasion.

  5. Development of tissue-engineered models of oral dysplasia and early invasive oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colley, H E; Hearnden, V; Jones, A V; Weinreb, P H; Violette, S M; MacNeil, S; Thornhill, M H; Murdoch, C

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current organotypic models of dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) lack the complexity that mimics in vivo tissue. Here we describe a three-dimensional in vitro model of the oral epithelium that replicates tumour progression from dysplasia to an invasive phenotype. Methods: The OSCC cell lines were seeded as a cell suspension (D20, Cal27) or as multicellular tumour spheroids (FaDu) with oral fibroblasts on to a de-epidermised acellular dermis to generate tissue-engineered models and compared with patient biopsies. Results: The D20 and Cal27 cells generated a model of epithelial dysplasia. Overtime Cal27 cells traversed the basement membrane and invaded the connective tissue to reproduce features of early invasive OSCC. When seeded onto a model of the normal oral mucosa, FaDu spheroids produced a histological picture mimicking carcinoma in situ with severe cellular atypia juxtaposed to normal epithelium. Conclusion: It is possible to culture in vitro models with the morphological appearance and histological characteristics of dysplasia and tumour cell invasion seen in vivo using native dermis. Such models could facilitate study of the molecular processes involved in malignant transformation, invasion and tumour growth as well as in vitro testing of new treatments, diagnostic tests and drug delivery systems for OSCC. PMID:21989184

  6. Artemisinin inhibits in vitro and in vivo invasion and metastasis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Weifeng, Tan; Feng, Shen; Xiangji, Luo; Changqing, Su; Zhiquan, Qiu; Huazhong, Zeng; Peining, Yan; Yong, Yu; Mengchao, Wu; Xiaoqing, Jiang; Wan-Yee, Lau

    2011-01-15

    Artemisinin (ART) is isolated from the medicinal plant Artemisia annua L. To determine its effects on the invasion and metastasis of tumors, the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines HepG2 and SMMC-7721 were treated with different concentrations of ART. Starting at 12.5μM, ART had inhibitory effects in migration and invasion assays that increased at higher concentrations. The inhibitory effect also became stronger with time, from 24 to 72h. ART significantly inhibited the in vivo metastatic abilities of the HepG2 HCC cell line. ART inhibited the invasion and metastasis of HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo by reducing the level of the MMP2 metalloproteinase, and by inducing the TIMP2 protein. ART activated Cdc42, which enhanced E-cadherin activity, resulting in greater cell-cell adhesion, and significantly reduced metastasis. PMID:20739158

  7. Three-dimensional reconstruction and quantification of cervical carcinoma invasion fronts from histological serial sections.

    PubMed

    Braumann, Ulf-Dietrich; Kuska, Jens-Peer; Einenkel, Jens; Horn, Lars-Christian; Löffler, Markus; Höckel, Michael

    2005-10-01

    The analysis of the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of tumoral invasion fronts of carcinoma of the uterine cervix is the prerequisite for understanding their architectural-functional relationship. The variation range of the invasion patterns known so far reaches from a smooth tumor-host boundary surface to more diffusely spreading patterns, which all are supposed to have a different prognostic relevance. As a very decisive limitation of previous studies, all morphological assessments just could be done verbally referring to single histological sections. Therefore, the intention of this paper is to get an objective quantification of tumor invasion based on 3-D reconstructed tumoral tissue data. The image processing chain introduced here is capable to reconstruct selected parts of tumor invasion fronts from histological serial sections of remarkable extent (90-500 slices). While potentially gaining good accuracy and reasonably high resolution, microtome cutting of large serial sections especially may induce severe artifacts like distortions, folds, fissures or gaps. Starting from stacks of digitized transmitted light color images, an overall of three registration steps are the main parts of the presented algorithm. By this, we achieved the most detailed 3-D reconstruction of the invasion of solid tumors so far. Once reconstructed, the invasion front of the segmented tumor is quantified using discrete compactness.

  8. The activation of protease-activated receptor 1 mediates proliferation and invasion of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingyao; Luo, Jianchao; Wang, Tao; Ren, Jinghua; Hu, Kai; Wu, Gang

    2012-07-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) is a G-coupled membrane protein, which is involved in physiological and malignant invasion processes. It is activated by serine proteases such as thrombin through a unique form or by specific synthetic peptides. In this study, we determined the expression of PAR-1 in five nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines with different characteristics of invasiveness and metastasis, and found that the levels of PAR-1 expression were higher in invasive or metastatic cell lines than those in low invasive or metastatic ones. Of the five NPC cell lines, CNE1-LMP1 cells had the highest expression levels of PAR-1, which was mainly distributed at the membrane and in the cytoplasm of tumor cells. Further study showed that the thrombin receptor synthetic activating peptide SFLLRN could stimulate the growth of CNE1-LMP1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, thrombin itself had a dual effect on the proliferation of NPC cells. Concentrations of thrombin in the range of 0.1-0.5 U/ml promoted cell growth, but concentrations higher than 0.5 U/ml impaired cell growth. Moreover, thrombin and SFLLRN also enhanced the invasive capabilities of CNE1-LMP1 cells in vitro, and this was partly due to enhancing the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our findings suggest that PAR-1 may contribute to the growth and invasive potential of NPC cells. PMID:22562397

  9. Macrophages Modulate Migration and Invasion of Human Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pirilä, Emma; Väyrynen, Otto; Sundquist, Elias; Päkkilä, Kaisa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Pääkkönen, Virve; Pesonen, Paula; Dayan, Dan; Vered, Marilena; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Salo, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) has a high mortality rate and the incidence is rising worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, the disease lacks specific prognostic markers and treatment modality. The spreading of OTSCC is dependent on the tumor microenvironment and involves tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Although the presence of TAMs is associated with poor prognosis in OTSCC, the specific mechanisms underlying this are still unknown. The aim here was to investigate the effect of macrophages (Mfs) on HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells and NF-kappaB activity. We polarized THP-1 cells to M1 (inflammatory), M2 (TAM-like) and R848 (imidazoquinoline-treated) type Mfs. We then investigated the effect of Mfs on HSC-3 cell migration and NF-kappaB activity, cytokine production and invasion using several different in vitro migration models, a human 3D tissue invasion model, antibody arrays, confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry and a mouse invasion model. We found that in co-culture studies all types of Mfs fused with HSC-3 cells, a process which was partially due to efferocytosis. HSC-3 cells induced expression of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta in co-cultures with M2 Mfs. Direct cell-cell contact between M2 Mfs and HSC-3 cells induced migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells while M1 Mfs reduced HSC-3 cell invasion. M2 Mfs had an excess of NF-kappaB p50 subunit and a lack of p65 subunits both in the presence and absence of HSC-3 cells, indicating dysregulation and pro-tumorigenic NF-kappaB activation. TAM-like cells were abundantly present in close vicinity to carcinoma cells in OTSCC patient samples. We conclude that M2 Mfs/TAMs have an important role in OTSCC regulating adhesion, migration, invasion and cytokine production of carcinoma cells favouring tumor growth. These results demonstrate that OTSCC patients could benefit from therapies targeting TAMs, polarizing TAM-like M2 Mfs to inflammatory macrophages and modulating NF

  10. Development of poorly differentiated invasive squamous cell carcinoma in giant Bowen’s disease: a case report with dermatoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Bengu Nisa; Maden, Aysenur; Kocak, Oguzhan; Bostanci, Seher; Boyvat, Ayşe; Kocyigit, Pelin; Heper, Aylin Okcu

    2016-01-01

    Bowen’s disease (BD) is an in situ form of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), often occurring in the chronically UV-damaged skin of elderly people. The risk of progression of BD to invasive SCC varies between 3% and 5%, and one-third of invasive tumors may metastasize. Herein we discuss the dermatoscopic findings of a case of giant Bowen’s disease, which progressed to poorly differentiated invasive SCC. PMID:27222765

  11. Armc8 regulates the invasive ability of hepatocellular carcinoma through E-cadherin/catenin complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Peng, Songlin; Jia, Changjun; Xu, Feng; Xu, Yongqing; Dai, Chaoliu

    2016-08-01

    Armc8 (armadillo-repeat-containing protein 8) was proved to promote disruption of E-cadherin complex through regulating α-catenin degradation. In this study, we investigated Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The positive rate of Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma was 53.9 % and higher than that in normal hepatic tissues (9.2 %) (p < 0.05). Clinicopathological analysis shows that Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma was significantly associated with larger tumor size (≥5 cm), multiple tumor numbers, higher pathological grade (media and poor), advanced TNM stages (II/III), and advanced BCLC stages (B/C). Western blot study also detected higher Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells including HepG2, HCC97L, and SMMC-7721 than in human hepatic cell Bel-7402. We further use specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to knock down Armc8 expression in HepG2 cells and found that knockdown of Armc8 expression significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HepG2 cells. Downregulation of Armc8 expression significantly upregulated α-catenin, β-catenin, and E-cadherin expression in HepG2 cells. Immunofluorescent study shows that knockdown of Armc8 expression restored E-cadherin expression in membrane of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that Armc8 may be a potential cancer marker in hepatocellular carcinoma and may regulate cancer invasion through E-cadherin/catenin complex. PMID:26944057

  12. Smoking Is Not Associated with Severe Dysplasia or Invasive Carcinoma in Resected Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Neda; Khalifian, Saami; Cameron, John L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Makary, Martin A.; Lennon, Anne Marie; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Weiss, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are precursor lesions that progress to invasive cancer through progressively worsening dysplasia. Although smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, potential associations with IPMN grade of dysplasia remain unclear. Methods Pancreatic resections for IPMN from 1995 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 446 patients in which the smoking status was documented were identified. Results Smoking history was positive in 47 % of patients. Of smokers, 50 % had branch-duct, 14 % had main-duct, and 36 % had mixed-type IPMN. Patients with main-duct IPMN were more commonly smokers (65 %), compared to smoking history in 46 % with mixed and 44 % with branch-duct IPMN (p=0.03). High-grade dysplasia occurred in 25 % of smokers and 21 % of nonsmokers (p=0.32), and invasive carcinoma in 25 % of smokers and 25 % nonsmokers (p= 0.95). On multivariate analysis, duct size was independently associated with high-grade dysplasia (OR=3.17, 95 %CI= 1.79–5.64, p<0.001). Presence of mural nodules (OR=3.34, 95 %CI=1.82–6.12, p<0.001), duct size (OR=3.87, 95 %CI=2.21–6.75, p<0.001), and symptoms (OR=7.10, 95 %CI=3.80–13.08, p<0.001), but not smoking history (OR=1.10, 95 %CI=0.64–1.88, p=0.73), were independent predictors of invasive carcinoma. Median overall survival was 70 months for smokers and 88 months for nonsmokers (p=0.68). Conclusion Positive smoking history correlated with duct type classification but does not appear to be a risk factor for harboring high-grade dysplasia or invasive carcinoma in IPMNs. PMID:25477314

  13. CT-scan prediction of thyroid cartilage invasion for early laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Dana M; Landry, Guillaume; Bidault, François; Hans, Stéphane; Julieron, Morbize; Mamelle, Gérard; Janot, François; Brasnu, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    Treatment choice for laryngeal cancer may be influenced by the diagnosis of thyroid cartilage invasion on preoperative computed tomography (CT). Our objective was to determine the predictive value of CT for thyroid cartilage invasion in early- to mid-stage laryngeal cancer. Retrospective study (1992-2008) of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with open partial laryngectomy and resection of at least part of the thyroid cartilage. Previous laser surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and second primaries were excluded. CT prediction of thyroid cartilage invasion was determined by specialized radiologists. Tumor characteristics and pathologic thyroid cartilage invasion were compared to the radiologic assessment. 236 patients were treated by vertical (20 %), supracricoid (67 %) or supraglottic partial laryngectomy (13 %) for tumors staged cT1 (26 %), cT2 (55 %), and cT3 (19 %). The thyroid cartilage was invaded on pathology in 19 cases (8 %). CT's sensitivity was 10.5 %, specificity 94 %, positive predictive value 13 %, and negative predictive value 92 %. CT correctly predicted thyroid cartilage invasion in only two cases for an overall accuracy of 87 %. Among the false-positive CT's, tumors involving the anterior commissure were significantly over-represented (61.5 % vs. 27 %, p = .004). Tumors with decreased vocal fold (VF) mobility were significantly over-represented in the group of false-negatives (41 vs. 13 %, p = .0035). Preoperative CT was not effective in predicting thyroid cartilage invasion in these early- to mid-stage lesions, overestimating cartilage invasion for AC lesions and underestimating invasion for lesions with decreased VF mobility.

  14. 3-D reconstruction and virtual ductoscopy of high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with casting type calcifications using refraction-based X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami; Maksimenko, Anton; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Eiko; Yamasaki, Katsuhito; Mori, Kensaku; Arai, Yoshinori; Endo, Tokiko

    2008-01-01

    Stereomicroscopic observations of thick sections, or three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions from serial sections, have provided insights into histopathology. However, they generally require time-consuming and laborious procedures. Recently, we have developed a new algorithm for refraction-based X-ray computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study is to apply this emerging technology to visualize the 3-D structure of a high-grade ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS) of the breast. The high-resolution two-dimensional images of the refraction-based CT were validated by comparing them with the sequential histological sections. Without adding any contrast medium, the new CT showed strong contrast and was able to depict the non-calcified fine structures such as duct walls and intraductal carcinoma itself, both of which were barely visible in a conventional absorption-based CT. 3-D reconstruction and virtual endoscopy revealed that the high-grade DCIS was located within the dichotomatous branches of the ducts. Multiple calcifications occurred in the necrotic core of the continuous DCIS, resulting in linear and branching (casting type) calcifications, a hallmark of high-grade DCIS on mammograms. In conclusion, refraction-based X-ray CT approaches the low-power light microscopic view of the histological sections. It provides high quality slice data for 3-D reconstruction and virtual ductosocpy.

  15. Expression of Girdin in primary hepatocellular carcinoma and its effect on cell proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ke; Lu, Can; Han, Shuang; Zou, Qiong; Li, Jingjing; Xie, Dingfang; He, Siqi; Yu, Li; Zhou, Jianda; Peng, Xiaowei; Cao, Peiguo

    2015-01-01

    Girdin has been proven to play a vital role in the process of proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion in various cancer cells, yet the underlying molecular mechanism in primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not yet been clarified. Thereafter, we performed immunohistochemistry to detect the expression of Girdin in 40 primary HCC tissues and 30 matched adjacent tissues using hepatic carcinoma tissue microarray. Our data showed that the positive expression rate of Girdin in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues was 67.5%, higher than that found in adjacent tissues of 16.7% (P < 0.05). It closely correlates to tumor size, T stage, TNM stage and Edmondson-Steiner stage (P < 0.05) of HCC patients. After specific small interfering RNA of Girdin was transfected into HepG2 and Huh7.5.1 cells, the proliferation and invasion ability of tumor cells were significantly inhibited. In summary, we suggest that the oncogenic role of Girdin could provide new molecular target for the treatment of HCC.

  16. Carcinoma arising in microglandular adenosis of the breast: triple negative phenotype with variable morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Fangfang; Bi, Rui; Yu, Baohua; Cheng, Yufan; Xu, Xiaoli; Shui, Ruohong; Yang, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoma arising in microglandular adenosis (MGACA) is an extremely rare subtype of breast carcinoma. In this study, clinicopathological analysis of MGACA from 11 Chinese patients was conducted. Microscopically, all cases showed a spectrum of structure and glandular proliferations ranging from microglandular adenosis (MGA) to atypical MGA (AMGA) to MGACA. Carcinoma components were composed of high grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in 1 case and invasive carcinoma in 10 cases. Invasive carcinomas were grade 3 in 10 tumors and grade 2 in 1. Invasive components in 5 of 10 cases were composed of invasive carcinoma of no special type (NST), and 1 case showed partially acinic cell differentiation. In 5 cases, invasive components were mixed of NST and matrix-producing carcinoma (MPC). All epitheliums in 11 cases were triple negative (ER-, PR-, HER2-), and diffuse positive for CK and S-100 protein. No myoepithelial cells were demonstrable from MGA to invasive components with immunohistochemical staining for P63 and calponin. PAS or reticulin stain showed the presence of a basement membrane around glands in MGA, AMGA, DCIS, and its absence in invasive components. Follow-up time ranged from 10 to 64 months. One patient developed a lung metastasis 24 months after surgery, 10 patients have been alive without recurrence. Our study revealed that MGACA is a distinct subset of breast carcinoma, with triple negative phenotype, high grade nuclear and variable morphology. Despite histopathologic and immunohistochemical features usually associated with a poor prognosis, MGACA seems to have a relatively favorable outcome.

  17. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma at Invasion Front

    PubMed Central

    Shimazu, Yoshihito; Yagishita, Hisao; Soeno, Yuuichi; Sato, Kaori; Taya, Yuji; Aoba, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    We conducted three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) using serial histological sections to visualize the architecture of invasive tumors. Fourteen OTSCC cases were collected from archival paraffin-embedded specimens. Based on a pathodiagnostic survey of whole cancer lesions, a core tissue specimen (3 mm in diameter) was dissected out from the deep invasion front using a paraffin tissue microarray. Serial sections (4 μm thick) were double immunostained with pan-cytokeratin and Ki67 antibodies and digitized images were acquired using virtual microscopy. For 3D reconstruction, image registration and RGB color segmentation were automated using ImageJ software to avoid operator-dependent subjective errors. Based on the 3D tumor architecture, we classified the mode of invasion into four types: pushing and bulky architecture; trabecular architecture; diffuse spreading; and special forms. Direct visualization and quantitative assessment of the parenchymal-stromal border provide a new dimension in our understanding of OTSCC architecture. These 3D morphometric analyses also ascertained that cell invasion (individually and collectively) occurs at the deep invasive front of the OTSCC. These results demonstrate the advantages of histology-based 3D reconstruction for evaluating tumor architecture and its potential for a wide range of applications. PMID:24228031

  18. Arachidonate 5 Lipoxygenase Expression in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Promotes Invasion via MMP-9 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Nicolas T.; Nowicki, Theodore S; Azzi, Jean Paul; Reyes, Ismael; Iacob, Codrin; Xie, Suqing; Swati, Ismatun; Suslina, Nina; Schantz, Stimson; Tiwari, Raj K.; Geliebter, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) expression and activity has been implicated in tumor pathogenesis, yet its role in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has not been characterized. ALOX5 protein and mRNA were upregulated in PTC compared to matched, normal thyroid tissue, and ALOX5 expression correlated with invasive tumor histopathology. Evidence suggests that PTC invasion is mediated through the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that can degrade and remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). A correlation between MMP-9 and ALOX5 protein expression was established by immunohistochemical analysis of PTC and normal thyroid tissues using a tissue array. Transfection of ALOX5 into a PTC cell line (BCPAP) increased MMP-9 secretion and cell invasion across an ECM barrier. The ALOX5 product, 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid also increased MMP-9 protein expression by BCPAP in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of MMP-9 and ALOX5 reversed ALOX5-enhanced invasion. Here we describe a new role for ALOX5 as a mediator of invasion via MMP-9 induction; this ALOX5/MMP9 pathway represents a new avenue in the search for functional biomarkers and/or potential therapeutic targets for aggressive PTC. PMID:22253131

  19. Gas6/Axl pathway promotes tumor invasion through the transcriptional activation of Slug in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsin-Jung; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chen, Yu-Ling; Chung, Ling; Yuan, Ray-Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common fatal cancers worldwide. Other than the sorafenib treatment, no effective systemic therapy has been available thus far. Most targets in molecularly targeted therapy for cancer are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Therefore, identifying activated RTKs in HCC is critical for developing new molecularly targeted therapies. Using a phospho-RTK array, we found that Axl is one of the most frequently activated RTKs in liver cancer cell lines. The knockdown of Axl by RNA interference significantly reduced cell migration and invasion in the HCC cell lines HA22T and Mahlavu. Stimulation of HCC cell lines by Axl ligand growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6) enhanced cell migration and invasion. The Gas6/Axl pathway enhanced the expression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor Slug, which is essential for the invasion-promoting activity of Axl. Treating HCC cells with the Axl inhibitor bosutinib suppressed Slug expression and decreased the invasiveness of HCC cell lines. These findings indicate that Gas6/Axl regulates tumor invasion through the transcriptional activation of Slug.

  20. Novel Use for DOG1 in Discriminating Breast Invasive Carcinoma from Noninvasive Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Henghui; Qu, Zhiling; Zhou, Sheng; Ruan, Qiurong

    2016-01-01

    Aims. DOG1 has proven to be a useful marker of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Recently, DOG1 expression has also been reported in some non-GIST malignant tumors, but the details related to DOG1 expression in breast tissue remain unclear. The aim of this study was to detect the expression of DOG1 in the human breast and to evaluate the feasibility of using DOG1 to discriminate between invasive breast carcinoma and noninvasive breast lesions. Methods and Results. A total of 210 cases, including both invasive and noninvasive breast lesions, were collected to assess DOG1 expression immunohistochemically. DOG1 expression was consistently positive in breast myoepithelial cells (MECs), which was similar to the results obtained for three other MEC markers: calponin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC), and P63 (P > 0.05 in all). Importantly, DOG1 was useful in discriminating invasive breast carcinoma from noninvasive breast lesions (P < 0.05). Conclusions. DOG1 is a useful marker of breast MECs, and adding DOG1 to the MEC identification panel will provide more sophisticated information when diagnosing uncertain cases in the breast. PMID:27041791

  1. Role of heparanase in radiation-enhanced invasiveness of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Meirovitz, Amichay; Hermano, Esther; Lerner, Immanuel; Zcharia, Eyal; Pisano, Claudio; Peretz, Tamar; Elkin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by very low survival rates because of high intrinsic resistance to conventional therapies. Ionizing radiation (IR)-enhanced tumor invasiveness is emerging as one mechanism responsible for the limited benefit of radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we establish the role of heparanase - the only known mammalian endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate - in modulating the response of pancreatic cancer to radiotherapy. We found that clinically relevant doses of IR augment the invasive capability of pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo by upregulating heparanase. Changes in the levels of the transcription factor Egr-1 occurred in pancreatic cancer cells following radiation, underlying the stimulatory effect of IR on heparanase expression. Importantly, the specific heparanase inhibitor SST0001 abolished IR-enhanced invasiveness of pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro, while combined treatment with SST0001 and IR, but not IR alone, attenuated the spread of orthotopic pancreatic tumors in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that combining radiotherapy with heparanase inhibition is an effective strategy to prevent tumor resistance and dissemination, observed in many IR-treated pancreatic cancer patients. Further, the molecular mechanism underlying heparanase upregulation in pancreatic cancer that we identified in response to IR may help identify patients in which radiotherapeutic intervention may confer increased risk of metastatic spread, where anti-heparanase therapy may be particularly beneficial. PMID:21447736

  2. Downregulation of Connective Tissue Growth Factor by Three-Dimensional Matrix Enhances Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Barbolina, Maria V.; Adley, Brian P.; Kelly, David L.; Shepard, Jaclyn; Fought, Angela J.; Scholtens, Denise; Penzes, Peter; Shea, Lonnie D.; Sharon Stack, M

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) is a leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, due mainly to the prevalence of undetected metastatic disease. The process of cell invasion during intra-peritoneal anchoring of metastatic lesions requires concerted regulation of many processes, including modulation of adhesion to the extracellular matrix and localized invasion. Exploratory cDNA microarray analysis of early response genes (altered after 4 hours of 3-dimensional collagen culture) coupled with confirmatory real-time RT-PCR, multiple three-dimensional cell culture matrices, Western blot, immunostaining, adhesion, migration, and invasion assays were used to identify modulators of adhesion pertinent to EOC progression and metastasis. cDNA microarray analysis indicated a dramatic downregulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in EOC cells placed in invasion-mimicking conditions (3-dimensional type I collagen). Examination of human EOC specimens revealed that CTGF expression was absent in 46% of the tested samples (n=41), but was present in 100% of normal ovarian epithelium samples (n=7). Reduced CTGF expression occurs in many types of cells and may be a general phenomenon displayed by cells encountering a 3D environment. CTGF levels were inversely correlated with invasion such that downregulation of CTGF increased, while its upregulation reduced, collagen invasion. Cells adhered preferentially to a surface comprised of both collagen I and CTGF relative to either component alone using α6β1 and α3β1 integrins. Together these data suggest that downregulation of CTGF in EOC cells may be important for cell invasion through modulation of cell-matrix adhesion. PMID:19382180

  3. GP73 N-glycosylation at Asn144 reduces hepatocellular carcinoma cell motility and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kai; Li, Wei; Zhang, Qinle; Yan, Guoquan; Guo, Kun; Zhang, Shu; Liu, Yinkun

    2016-01-01

    Golgi Protein 73 (GP73) is a potential liver disease glycobiomarker warranting comprehensive analyses of its glycan structure and glycosylation function. In this study, we used mass spectrometry to identify glycosylation sites and the glycan structure, high-throughput lectin microarray to provide rapid and sensitive profiling of glycoconjugates, and site-directed mutagenesis to clarify the impact of glycans on target glycoproteins in vivo. We identified three GP73 N-glycosylation sites: Asn109, Asn144 and Asn398. We found five glycoforms on Asn144, including biantennary, triantennary and fucosylated glycans. Removal of N-glycans at Asn144 enhanced the motility and invasiveness of hepatocellular carcinoma cells, possibly due to inhibition of cell adhesion related to the changes of cell membrane glycosylation. This study increases our understanding of the functional relevance of GP73 glycosylation and suggests that Asn144-deleted GP73 can influence the progression and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26993603

  4. RNA interference targeting CD147 inhibits the invasion of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells by downregulating MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaobin; Wu, Weiguang; Shi, Haixia; Han, Jianqiu

    2013-07-01

    Cervical squamous carcinoma is a highly invasive tumour that has a great capacity to metastasise. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN or CD147), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein. It is highly expressed on malignant tumour cell surfaces, including human cervical squamous carcinoma. It also plays a critical role in the invasive and metastatic activity of malignant cells by stimulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The anti-invasive effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against CD147 on human cervical squamous carcinoma cells and its possible pathways has been investigated. The downregulation of CD147 by transfection with siRNA resulted in MMP-9 expression and decreased activity in the cervical squamous carcinoma cell line SiHa. In vitro analysis showed that the invasive capacity of SiHa cells decreased. Thus CD147 inhibition and subsequent MMP-9 deletion may have anti-tumour effects by inhibiting the invasiveness of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells.

  5. Invasive Stratified Mucin-producing Carcinoma and Stratified Mucin-producing Intraepithelial Lesion (SMILE): 15 Cases Presenting a Spectrum of Cervical Neoplasia With Description of a Distinctive Variant of Invasive Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lastra, Ricardo R; Park, Kay J; Schoolmeester, J Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Stratified mucin-producing intraepithelial lesion (SMILE) is a cervical intraepithelial lesion, distinct from conventional squamous or glandular counterparts, believed to arise from embryonic cells at the transformation zone by transdifferentiation during high-risk HPV-associated carcinogenesis. It is characterized by stratified, immature epithelial cells displaying varying quantities of intracytoplasmic mucin throughout the majority of the lesional epithelium. We identified a distinct form of invasive cervical carcinoma with morphologic features identical to those in SMILE, which we have termed "invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma." Fifteen cases from 15 patients (mean 36 y; range, 22 to 64 y) were retrieved from the pathology archives of multiple institutions with a diagnosis of either SMILE or invasive cervical carcinoma with a description or comment about the invasive tumor's resemblance to SMILE. Seven cases had solely intraepithelial disease with a component of SMILE (mean 29 y; range, 22 to 40 y). The 8 other cases had invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma (mean 44; range, 34 to 64 y) in which SMILE was identified in 7. All cases of invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma demonstrated stratified, immature nuclei with intracytoplasmic mucin, which morphologically varied between cases from "mucin-rich" to "mucin-poor" in a similar manner to SMILE. All cases had mitotic figures and apoptotic debris, and an intralesional neutrophilic infiltrate was seen in the majority of cases. In cases of invasive carcinoma, the depth of invasion ranged from <1 to 19 mm. Follow-up information was available in 8 cases and ranged from 1 to 36 months (mean 11 mo). Three cases of invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma had biopsy or resection-proven metastatic carcinoma on follow-up. These 15 cases of cervical stratified mucin-producing lesions show a combination of intraepithelial and invasive growth patterns. Given that SMILE is well rooted as a

  6. [A case of partial hepatectomy and gastrectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma with direct invasion to the stomach].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuta; Murakami, Masahiro; Shimizu, Junzo; Kawada, Masahiro; Yasuyama, Akinobu; Yoshikawa, Yukihiro; Watase, Chikashi; Nishigaki, Takahiko; Kim, Ho Min; Hitora, Toshiki; Oda, Naofumi; Hirota, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Masato; Morishima, Hirotaka; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Mikata, Shoki; Matsunami, Nobuteru; Hasegawa, Junichi

    2014-11-01

    An 81-year-old man treated with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was diagnosed in 2010 with HCC recurrence (subclass S2) on computed tomography (CT). He refused surgery and was followed up without treatment. In 2012, he was admitted to our hospital because of hematemesis. Gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a large tumor in the upper gastric corpus, and pathological examination of the tumor revealed HCC; hence, we diagnosed the patient with direct HCC invasion to the stomach. Although active bleeding from the tumor was controlled, he experienced repeated episodes of hematemesis, and the tumor increased in size. Therefore, partial hepatectomy and gastrectomy were performed. It was confirmed that the tumor invaded the stomach wall. Although surgery was effective for gastrointestinal bleeding caused by HCC invasion, the patient died 12 months after surgery because of multiple liver metastases and exacerbated liver failure.

  7. Rab25 upregulation correlates with the proliferation, migration, and invasion of renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanyuan; Jia, Qingzhu; Zhang, Qian; Wan, Ying

    2015-03-20

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common urological cancer with a poor prognosis. A recent cohort study revealed that the median survival of RCC patients was only 1.5 years and that <10% of the patients in the study survived up to 5 years. In tumor development, Rab GTPase are known to play potential roles such as regulation of cell proliferation, migration, invasion, communication, and drug resistance in multiple tumors. However, the correlation between Rabs expression and the occurrence, development, and metastasis of RCC remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional levels of 52 Rab GTPases in RCC patients. Our results showed that high levels of Rab25 expression were significantly correlated with RCC invasion classification (P < 0.01), lymph-node metastasis (P < 0.001), and pathological stage (P < 0.01). Conversely, in 786-O and A-498 cells, knocking down Rab25 protein expression inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Our results also demonstrated that Rab25 is a target gene of let-7d, and further suggested that Rab25 upregulation in RCC is due to diminished expression of let-7d. These findings indicate that Rab25 might be a novel candidate molecule involved in RCC development, thus identifying a potential biological therapeutic target for RCC. - Highlights: • The transcriptional levels of 52 Rab GTPases were analyzed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). • High levels of Rab25 expression were significantly correlated with clinicopathological factors of RCC. • Knockdown of Rab25 protein expression reduced RCC cells proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Rab25 is a target gene of let-7d in RCC.

  8. Anatomic Invasive Depth Predicts Delayed Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis of Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sohei; Tomioka, Toshifumi; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ugumori, Toru; Hato, Naohito; Fujii, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Delayed cervical lymph node metastasis (CLNM) is the most negative prognostic factor of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study analyzed the relationship between clinicopathologic factors, including anatomic invasive depth (AID), and CLNM. A total of 212 patients with clinically node-negative (cN0) tongue SCC who had undergone partial glossectomy through the mouth were eligible for this retrospective study. The deepest portions where tongue SCC cells invaded as determined by microscopic analyses were classified into 5 categories, including epithelial and submucosal tissue, lateral extrinsic tongue muscle (ETM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), paralingual and sublingual spaces, and medial ETM according to AID. We examined the relationship between clinicopathologic factors including AID and delayed CLNM. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that AID was an independent predictive factor for delayed CLNM (P=0.0022; odds ratio=7.1). Deeper invasion than ITM, including ITM, paralingual and sublingual spaces, and medial ETM, had high sensitivity and negative predictive value for delayed CLNM (94.4% and 95.7%, respectively). Precise elucidation of AID may be useful for the preoperative decision for performing elective neck dissection. None of 11 patients in whom the deepest portion where tumor invaded to lateral ETM (according to AID) showed delayed CLNM, although tongue SCC T4a tumor is defined by the presence of invasion of cancer cells to ETM. Tumors with invasion to lateral ETM might have to be excluded from the pathologic T4a category. PMID:27186852

  9. Silencing cathepsin S gene expression inhibits growth, invasion and angiogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Qi; Wang, Xuedi; Zhang, Hanguang; Li, Chuanwei; Fan, Junhua; Xu, Jing

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cat S is highly expressed in HCC cells with high metastatic potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Cat S inhibits growth and invasion of HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Cat S inhibits HCC-associated angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy. -- Abstract: Cathepsin S (Cat S) plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis by its ability to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM). Our previous study suggested there could be a potential association between Cat S and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis. The present study was designed to determine the role of Cat S in HCC cell growth, invasion and angiogenesis, using RNA interference technology. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequences for the Cat S gene were synthesized and transfected into human HCC cell line MHCC97-H. The Cat S gene targeted siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cat S expression, leading to potent suppression of MHCC97-H cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis. These data suggest that Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy.

  10. [A Case of Invasive Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Carcinoma, Penetrating the Stomach, Colon, and Jejunum].

    PubMed

    Goto, Tadahiro; Toyama, Hirochika; Asari, Sadaki; Terai, Sachio; Kinoshita, Hisoka; Matsumoto, Taku; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Tanaka, Motofumi; Takebe, Atsushi; Kido, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Ippei; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman was admitted to a nearby clinic complaining of abdominal pain. Abdominal CT showed a 10 cm diameter huge cystic lesion in the body and tail of the pancreas. The patient was referred to our institution for treatment. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) revealed a cystic mass with a solid lesion. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP) demonstrated mucous at the opening of the papilla of Vater and dilatation of the pancreatic duct with a solid nodule. Contrast radiography revealed a fistula from the tumor to the jejunum. A biopsy specimen from the lesion showed adenocarcinoma. Intraoperative findings showed a tumor occupying the pancreas body and tail with suspected invasion to the stomach, jejunum, and transverse colon. We performed distal pancreatectomy with partial resection of stomach, jejunum, and colon. Pathological findings showed an invasive type of IPMC, with invasion to the subserosal layer of the stomach and colon and the mucous layer of the jejunum. While IPMC is recognized as a slow growing malignancy, some cases of invasive carcinoma with fistulation into adjacent organs have been reported. To our knowledge, a case of IPMC penetrating to 3 adjacent organs is rare.

  11. MicroRNA-92b represses invasion-metastasis cascade of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Gang; Jing, Chao; Li, Lin; Huang, Furong; Ding, Fang; Wang, Baona; Lin, Dongmei; Luo, Aiping; Liu, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis are major contributors to cancer-caused death in patients suffered from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). To explore the microRNAs involved in regulating invasion-metastasis cascade of ESCC, we established two pairs of sublines (30-U/D and 180-U/D) with distinct motility capacity from two ESCC cell lines (KYSE30 and KYSE180). Screening of the differentially expressed microRNAs identified that microRNA-92b-3p (miR-92b) could dramatically inhibit invasion and metastasis of ESCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Subsequent studies showed that miR-92b exerted its inhibitory function through suppressing the expression of integrin αV (ITGAV), which further reduced phosphrylated FAK and impaired Rac1 activation. Moreover, higher expression of miR-92b in ESCC tissues correlated inversely with lymph node metastasis and indicated better prognosis. Together, these results for the first time describe how miR-92b suppresses the motility of ESCC cells and provide a promise for diagnosis or therapy of ESCC invasion and metastasis. PMID:26934001

  12. Overexpression of gelsolin reduces the proliferation and invasion of colon carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Xiang; Yang, Meng-Xuan; Hong, Xin-Qiang; Dong, Tian-Geng; Yi, Tuo; Lin, Sheng-Li; Qin, Xin-Yu; Niu, Wei-Xin

    2016-01-01

    The enhanced motility of cancer cells via the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is crucial in the process of cancer cell invasion and metastasis. It was previously demonstrated that gelsolin (GSN) may be involved as a tumor or a metastasis suppressor, depending on the cell lines and model systems used. In the present study, the effect of GSN on the growth and invasion of human colon carcinoma (CC) cells was investigated using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. It was observed that upregulation of the expression of GSN in human CC cells significantly reduced the invasiveness of these cells. The expression levels of GSN were observed to be reduced in CC cells, and the reduced expression level of GSN was often associated with a poorer metastasis-free survival rate in patients with CC (P=0.04). In addition, the overexpression of GSN inhibited the invasion of CC cells in vitro. Furthermore, GSN was observed to inhibit signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 signaling in CC cells. Together, these results suggested that GSN is critical in regulating cytoskeletal events and inhibits the invasive and/or metastatic potential of CC cells. The results obtained in the present study may improve understanding of the functional and mechanistic links between GSN as a possible tumor suppressor and the STAT3 signaling pathway, with respect to the aggressive nature of CC. In addition, the present study demonstrated the importance of GSN in regulating the invasion and metastasis of CC cells at the molecular level, suggesting that GSN may be a potential predictor of prognosis and treatment success in CC. PMID:27573444

  13. Overexpression of Csk-binding protein decreases growth, invasion, and migration of esophageal carcinoma cells by controlling Src activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dong; Dong, Peng; Li, Yu-Min; Guo, Fa-Cai; Zhang, An-Ping; Song, Run-Ze; Zhang, Ya-Min; Li, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Dong; Yang, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanisms by which Csk-binding protein (CBP) inhibits tumor progression in esophageal carcinoma. METHODS: A CBP overexpressing esophageal carcinoma cell line (TE-1) was established. The growth, invasion, and migration of CBP-TE-1 cells, as well as the expression of Src were then determined and compared with those in normal TE-1 cells. RESULTS: The expression of Src was decreased by the overexpression of CBP in TE-1 cells. The growth, invasion, and migration of TE-1 cells were decreased by the overexpression of CBP. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that CBP may decrease the metastasis of esophageal carcinoma by inhibiting the activation of Src. CBP may be a potential tumor suppressor and targeting the CBP gene may be an alternative strategy for the development of therapies for esophageal carcinoma. PMID:25684946

  14. Immunohistochemical localization of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins in in situ and invasive duct breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kapucuoglu, N; Losi, L; Eusebi, V

    1997-01-01

    Bcl-2 and Bax proteins are coded by a family of genes that take part in the manteinance of the balance between cell proliferation rate and programmed cell death in multicellular organisms. The Bax gene acts as promoter of cell death by opposing the death protector effect of the Bcl-2 gene. Expression of the Bcl-2 and Bax proteins has been investigated in 58 cases of duct carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and duct invasive and invasive lobular carcinomas (IC) of the breast. While both proteins were expressed at the same time in normal and benign epithelium, different staining patterns were observed according to the degree of differentiation of the neoplastic epithelium. In well-differentiated DCIS and grade I IC there was a predominance of Bcl-2 protein staining. Grade II lesions co-expressed both proteins. Poorly differentiated DCIS displayed a predominantly Bax protein staining pattern. Therefore, it appears that Bax protein expression, especially in DCIS, relates to more aggressive neoplasms while Bcl-2 protein expression is associated with less aggressive malignant lesions.

  15. The role of tumor-associated macrophages in breast carcinoma invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ju; Li, Xiaojing; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Yongjuan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in normal and malignant breast tissue and the draining lymph nodes, and to explore its effect on breast cancer invasion and metastasis. The infiltration densities of TAMs was observed using immunohistochemical staining of CD68 in 100 cases of breast cancer specimens and its paired adjacent non-cancer breast tissues and draining lymph modes, and then to evaluate the relation of TAMs to various clinicopathological features including patients prognosis in breast carcinoma. We observed the infiltration densities of TAMs were significantly higher in breast carcinoma tissue than in adjacent normal tissue and significantly higher in much larger size and higher stage cases. Furthermore, infiltration densities of TAMs have negative correlation with the 5-year survival rates of breast cancer patients. But in matched lymph-nodes, the infiltration densities of TAMs were significantly lower in cancerous metastatic lymph-node samples than in non-metastatic one. Therefore, our data suggests that TAMs infiltration in primary tumor promote invasion and lymphatic metastasis of breast cancer and have negative correlation with patients prognosis in breast cancer, but in lymph-node TAMs may play another role and need further study in the future.

  16. Identification of Prognostic Biomarkers for Progression of Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell; Carcinoma, Squamous; Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Lung Cancer; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms

  17. Relationship between indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity and lymphatic invasion propensity of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Engin, Atilla; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Engin, Ayse Basak; Karamercan, Ahmet; Sepici Dincel, Aylin; Dursun, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether serum and tumor indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activities can predict lymphatic invasion (LI) or lymph node metastasis in colorectal carcinoma. METHODS: The study group consisted of 44 colorectal carcinoma patients. The patients were re-grouped according to the presence or absence of LI and lymph node metastasis. Forty-three cancer-free subjects without any metabolic disturbances were included into the control group. Serum neopterin was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Urinary neopterin and biopterin, serum tryptophan (Trp) and kynurenine (Kyn) concentrations of all patients were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Kyn/Trp was calculated and its correlation with serum neopterin was determined to estimate the serum indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. Tissue sections from the studied tumors were re-examined histopathologically and were stained by immunohistochemistry with indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase antibodies. RESULTS: Neither serum nor urinary neopterin was significantly different between the patient and control groups (both P > 0.05). However, colorectal carcinoma patients showed a significant positive correlation between the serum neopterin levels and Kyn/Trp (r = 0.450, P < 0.01). Urinary biopterin was significantly higher in cancer cases (P < 0.05). Serum Kyn/Trp was significantly higher in colorectal carcinoma patients (P < 0.01). Lymphatic invasion was present in 23 of 44 patients, of which only 12 patients had lymph node metastasis. Eleven patients with LI had no lymph node metastasis. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase intensity score was significantly higher in LI positive cancer group (44.56% ± 6.11%) than negative colorectal cancer patients (24.04% ± 6.90%), (P < 0.05). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression correlated both with the presence of LI and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). A significant difference between the accuracy of diagnosis by using either total indoleamine-2

  18. Expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers at the invasive front of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    COSTA, Liana Cristina Melo Carneiro; LEITE, Camila Ferreira; CARDOSO, Sérgio Vitorino; LOYOLA, Adriano Mota; de FARIA, Paulo Rogério; SOUZA, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; HORTA, Martinho Campolina Rebello

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common malignances. In epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), epithelial cells switch to mesenchymal-like cells exhibiting high mobility. This migratory phenotype is significant during tumor invasion and metastasis. Objective : The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of the EMT markers E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin in OSCC. Material and Methods : Immunohistochemical detection of E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin was performed on 20 OSCC samples. Differences in the expression of each protein at the invasive front (IF) and in the central/superficial areas (CSA) of the tumor were assessed. Differences in the expression of each protein at the IF of both histologically high- and low-invasive OSCCs were evaluated. Associations among expression of proteins at the IF were assessed. Correlations between the expression levels of each protein at the IF and the tumor stage and clinical nodal status were also evaluated. Results : Reduced expression of E-cadherin was detected in 15 samples (75%). E-cadherin expression was reduced at the IF when compared to the CSA and in high-invasive tumors when compared to low-invasive tumors. All samples were negative for N-cadherin, even though one sample showed an inconspicuous expression. Positive expression of vimentin was observed in 6 samples (30%). Nevertheless, there was no difference in vimentin expression between the IF and the CSA regions or between the low- and high-invasive tumors. Furthermore, no association was observed among protein expression levels at the IF. Finally, no correlations were observed between each protein’s expression levels and tumor stage or clinical nodal status. Conclusions : Reduced E-cadherin expression at the IF and its association with histological invasiveness suggest that this protein is a noteworthy EMT marker in OSCC. Although vimentin was also detected as an EMT marker, its expression was neither limited to the IF nor was

  19. Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinomas with Central Bile Duct Invasion: Safety, Prognosis, and Predictive Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jin Woo; Chung, Jin Wook; Cho, Yun Ku; Kim, Yoon Jun; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Jae, Hwan Jun

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo assess the safety and effectiveness of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of patients who have hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) with central bile duct invasion.Materials and MethodsThe institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. Fifty-three patients, initially treated with TACE for HCCs with central bile duct invasion from January 1999 to September 2012, were included. Clinical, laboratory, and survival data were reviewed. Complications and hospitalization length were evaluated using the χ{sup 2} test, Fisher’s exact test, and logistic regression analysis. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method with log-rank test and Cox proportional hazard model.ResultsSeven patients experienced TACE-related major complications (severe post-embolization syndrome in 3, non-fatal sepsis in 3, and secondary bacterial peritonitis in 1). The overall major complication rate was 13.2 %, but there were no permanent adverse sequelae or deaths within 30 days. Serum total bilirubin ≥3.0 mg/dL was the only significant risk factor for long hospitalization [hazard ratio (HR) = 4.341, p = .022]. The median survival was 12.2 months. Extrahepatic metastasis (HR = 6.145, p < .001), international normalized ratio (PT-INR) ≥1.20 (HR = 4.564, p < .001), vascular invasion (HR = 3.484, p = .001), and intermediate tumor enhancement (HR = 2.417, p = .019) were significantly associated with shorter survival.ConclusionTACE can be a safe and effective treatment for patients who have HCCs with central bile duct invasion. In particular, long-term survival can be expected if patients have strongly enhancing tumors without poor prognostic factors such as extrahepatic metastasis, PT-INR prolongation, and vascular invasion.

  20. Stat3 promotes invasion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through up-regulation of MMP2.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Xaioyan; Li, Shanshan; Lou, Xi; Zheng, Xianzhao; Li, Yunyun; Wang, Feng; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Hongyan; He, Hongliu; Zeng, Qingru

    2015-05-01

    Stat3 alters the expression of its downstream genes and is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis in several human cancers. Its role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not been well characterized. We examined the tumor sections of 100 cases of ESCC by immunohistochemistry and observed significant overexpression of Stat3 in the cytoplasm of 89% of ESCC cells and of phosphorylated Stat3 (p-Stat3) in the nuclei of 71% of ESCC when compare with normal esophageal mucosa (72%, p = 0.02; and 31%, p = 0.001). Overexpression of Stat3 and p-Stat3 positively correlated with that of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2), a known regulator for cell migration, in 65% of ESCC while only 26% shown in benign esophageal mucosa. To further investigate the association of Stat3 with tumor metastasis in vitro, invasion of EC-1 cells (a human ESCC cell line) were investigated with Boyden chambers. The results showed that transfection of Stat3 not only promoted invasion of EC-1 cells but also significantly induced MMP2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, suppressing expression of endogenous Stat3 mRNA and protein by Stat3 siRNA significantly reduced EC-1 cell invasion and MMP2 expression. A high-affinity Stat3-binding element was localized to the positions of 648-641 bp (TTCTCGAA) in the MMP2 promoter with electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Our results suggest that Stat3, p-Stat3, and MMP2 were overexpressed in ESCC and associated with invasion of ESCC; and Stat3 up-regulated expression of MMP2 in ESCC through directly binding to the MMP2 promoter.

  1. CEACAM1 Long Cytoplasmic Domain Isoform is Associated with Invasion and Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kiriyama, Shigehisa; Yokoyama, Shozo; Ueno, Masaki; Hayami, Shinya; Ieda, Junji; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Shunsuke; Mitani, Yasuyuki; Nakamura, Yasushi; Tani, Masaji; Mishra, Lopa; Shively, John E.; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Background The two isoforms of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), 1 with a long cytoplasmic domain (CEACAM1-L) and 1 with a short (CEACAM1-S), are involved in different signaling pathways. β2-spectrin (β2SP) is an adaptor protein that plays critical roles in the proper control of Smad access to activate receptors involved in regulation of TGF-β signaling. In this study, we examined the association between CEACAM1 isoform balance and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) malignant potential and investigated the possibility of a molecular interaction between CEACAM1 and β2SP. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out with CEACAM1-L or CEACAM1-S antibodies on 154 HCC tissues to correlate with the factors of malignancy. Invasion assay was performed for the effect of CEACAM1 expression on HCC cell lines. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis and immunoprecipitation analysis were performed to investigate the association between CEACAM1 isoform balance and β2SP. Results In immunohistochemical analysis, CEACAM1-L expression dominance was a risk factor for HCC recurrence (p = 0.04) and was significantly associated with a shorter survival compared with CEACAM1-S expression dominance. Invasion assay indicated that CEACAM1-4L-transfected HLF and PLC/PRF/5 cells showed significantly increased invasion (p<0.0001) and CEACAM1-4S-transfected HLF cells showed significantly decreased invasion. Immunohistochemical analysis of β2SP suggested that the HCCs with CEACAM1-L-dominant expression were more strongly stained with β2SP than the HCCs with CEACAM1-S-dominant expression (p = 0.013), and coprecipitation assays indicated that CEACAM1-L could bind to β2SP. Conclusions CEACAM1-L may enhance the HCC invasiveness through an interaction with β2SP and subsequent effects on TGF-β signaling. PMID:24390710

  2. Results of salvage radiotherapy after inadequate surgery in invasive cervical carcinoma patients: A retrospective analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saibishkumar, Elantholi P. . E-mail: drsaibish@rediffmail.com; Patel, Firuza D.; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kumar, Vinay; Karunanidhi, Gunaseelan; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of salvage radiotherapy (RT) after inadequate surgery in patients with invasive carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2001, 105 invasive cervical carcinoma patients were treated at our center with external beam RT with or without intracavitary RT after having undergone total/subtotal hysterectomy at outside institutions. Results: The median follow-up was 34 months. The gap between surgery and RT was 23-198 days (median, 80). Clinically visible residual disease was present in 81 patients (77.1%). Total hysterectomy had been done in 82 patients (78%) and subtotal hysterectomy in 23 patients (22%). The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and pelvic control rates of all patients were 55.2%, 53.3%, and 72.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis, older age, total hysterectomy, hemoglobin level >10 g% before RT, nonsquamous histologic type, use of intracavitary RT, a shorter gap between surgery and RT, and the absence of, or a small volume of, residual disease favorably affected the outcome. The 5-year actuarial rate of late toxicity (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Criteria) was 19% in the rectum, 4.8% in the bladder, 24.8% in the skin, and 14.3% in the small intestine. Conclusions: Inadequate and inappropriate surgery in invasive cervical cancer with resulting gross residual disease is common in India. Factors such as the use of intracavitary RT, the correction of anemia, and a shorter gap between surgery and RT will enable postoperative RT to achieve acceptable results with minimal morbidity.

  3. MSX2 in pancreatic tumor development and its clinical application for the diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Kennichi; Hamada, Shin; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    MSX2, a member of the homeobox genes family, is demonstrated to be the downstream target for ras signaling pathway and is expressed in a variety of carcinoma cells, suggesting its relevance to the development of ductal pancreatic tumors since pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasia (IPMN) harbor frequent K-ras gene mutations. Recent studies revealed the roles of MSX2 in the development of carcinoma of various origins including pancreas. Among gastrointestinal tumors, PDAC is one of the most malignant. PDAC progresses rapidly to develop metastatic lesions, frequently by the time of diagnosis, and these tumors are usually resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The molecular mechanisms regulating the aggressive behavior of PDAC still remain to be clarified. On the other hand, IPMN of the pancreas is distinct from PDAC because of its intraductal growth in the main pancreatic duct or secondary branches with rare invasion and metastasis to distant organs. However, recent evidence indicated that once IPMN showed stromal invasion, it progresses like PDAC. Therefore, it is important to determin how IPMN progresses to malignant phenotype. In this review, we focus on the involvement of MSX2 in the enhancement of malignant behavior in PDAC and IPMN, and further highlight the clinical approach to differentiate PDAC from chronic pancreatitis by evaluating MSX2 expression level. PMID:23162473

  4. Matrine inhibits the migratory and invasive properties of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Xu, Min

    2015-06-01

    Matrine is a widely used Chinese herbal medicine that has historically been used in the treatment of inflammation and cancer. However, the antimetastatic effects and associated molecular mechanisms of matrine on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to assess the antimetastatic effects of matrine on NPC, and identify the underlying mechanisms. Matrine inhibited the proliferation of NPC cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, matrine inhibited the migration and invasion of NPC tumor cells at doses below the toxic range. Following treatment with matrine for 24 h, there was a decrease in the protein expression levels and activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 in NPC‑039 cells. In addition, matrine markedly reduced the expression levels of p65 and p50 in the nuclei. Combined treatment of matrine with helenalin, a nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) inhibitor resulted in a synergistic reduction in MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 expression levels, and the invasive capabilities of the NPC‑039 cells were also reduced. In conclusion, matrine inhibits NPC cell migration and invasion by suppressing the NF‑κB pathway. These results suggest that matrine may be a potential therapeutic agent for NPC.

  5. Fisetin inhibits migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of LMP1-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Zhao, Yinhai; Chen, Jin; Shao, Songjun; Zhang, Xiujuan

    2014-02-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone) has been reported to possess certain anticancer properties. It may inhibit tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and induce apoptosis. However, the effects of fisetin in preventing the metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells remain to be determined. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in several metastatic malignancies including NPC. It has been reported that the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1) induced EMT and is associated with the metastasis of NPC. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of fisetin in preventing the migration and invasion of LMP1-expressing NPC cells (CNE1-LMP1 cells), as well as to investigate whether fisetin may inhibit the molecular changes associated with EMT induced by LMP1. The investigation demonstrated that fisetin suppressed the migration and invasion of CNE1-LMP1 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Fisetin inhibited molecular changes associated with EMT induced by LMP1, upregulated the epithelial marker, E-cadherin protein, and downregulated the mesenchymal marker, vimentin protein, levels. Fisetin also significantly reduced the levels of Twist protein, an EMT regulator. The investigation suggested that fisetin inhibits the migration and invasion of LMP1-positive NPC cells, and the molecular mechanism involves fisetin reversing the EMT induced by LMP1 and downregulates the expression of Twist. This study indicated that fisetin serves as a potential candidate for the treatment of cancer metastasis.

  6. Consensus and conflict in invasive micropapillary carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Li; Zhang, Huina; Zhang, Xinhai Bob; Lonser, Roland; Thompson, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) is an aggressive histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma that has been gaining increased attention over the past twenty years. It is important to recognize IMPC due to its strong association with early lymphovascular invasion (LVI), high risk of lymph node metastasis, perineural invasion and poor prognosis. Controversies regarding IMPC include differentiating from retraction artifact and mimics, clinical significance of proportion of micropapillary component (MC), pathogenesis, biologic nature of the entity and consequently terminology, etc. We herein present a case of rectal IMPC arising from a tubulovillous adenoma. Since HER2 over-expression has been reported in IMPC of the breast and the bladder but never in the colorectum, given the availability of HER2 targeted therapy, HER2 protein expression in our case is examined by immunohistochemical study which shows weak incomplete membrane staining in less than 5% of cells. Literature is reviewed with emphasis on colorectal IMPC as well as aforementioned controversial topics. In summary, more study is needed to resolve the conflicts and build consensus on IMPC. PMID:27034813

  7. Overexpression of transcriptional coactivator AIB1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression by enhancing cell proliferation and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Chen, Q; Li, W; Su, X; Chen, T; Liu, Y; Zhao, Y; Yu, C

    2010-06-10

    Amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1) is a transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. AIB1 has an important role in malignancy of several cancers such as breast and prostate cancers. However, its involvement in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression remains unclear. Here, we found that AIB1 protein was overexpressed in 23 of 34 human HCC specimens (68%). Down-regulation of AIB1 reduced HCC cell proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation ability and tumorigenic potential in nude mice. These phenotypic changes caused by AIB1 knockdown correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1/Waf1) and decreased Akt activation and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and matrix metallopeptidase MMP-9. In agreement with these findings, clinical AIB1-positive HCC expressed higher levels of PCNA than AIB1-negative HCC. A positive correlation was established between the levels of AIB1 protein and PCNA protein in HCC, suggesting that AIB1 may contribute to HCC cell proliferation. In addition, MMP-9 expression in AIB1-postive HCC was significantly higher than that in AIB1-negative HCC, suggesting that AIB1-postive HCC may be more invasive. Collectively, our results show that overexpression of AIB1 promotes human HCC progression by enhancing cell proliferation and invasiveness. Therefore, AIB1 is a master regulator of human HCC growth and might be a useful molecular target for HCC prognosis and treatment.

  8. Differential expression of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 in breast carcinoma and its biological significance.

    PubMed

    Lien, Huang-Chun; Wang, Chung-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Hung; Lu, Yen-Shen; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hsiao, Li-Ping; Yao, Yu-Tung

    2013-09-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that hydrolyzes ubiquitin. Previous reports have shown both tumorigenic and antitumorigenic roles for UCHL1. However, the expression patterns of UCHL1 protein, an area that is critical for validating its clinicopathologic roles among subtypes of breast cancer, is still lacking. Here we examined the expression of UCHL1 by immunohistochemistry in 243 breast carcinomas of various subtypes. We found expression of UCHL1 in 8.3% of invasive ductal carcinomas but not in other carcinoma subtypes, except for metaplastic carcinomas of the breast, which showed UCHL1 staining in 61.9% of cases, with the sarcomatous components being more intensely stained. UCHL1 expression in invasive ductal carcinomas significantly correlated with a high histologic grade (P = .001), the triple-negative phenotype (P = .02), and the basal-like phenotype (P <.001); furthermore, it was associated with poorer overall survival by univariate and multivariate analyses. Knockdown of UCHL1 in an invasive Snail variant-transfected MCF7 cells with high endogenous UCHL1 protein level significantly reduced invasion and anchorage-independent growth. Conclusively, our results demonstrate a role for UCHL1 in aggressive phenotypes in breast carcinoma. The high expression of UCHL1 in metaplastic carcinomas of the breast, which is pathogenically related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, may implicate an association between UCHL1 expression and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

  9. Metastatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Breast Identified by Tc-99m-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Claimon, Apichaya; Chuthapisith, Suebwong; Samarnthai, Norasate; Pusuwan, Pawana

    2015-08-01

    The authors reported an uncommon presentation of metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma to the breast detected by Tc-99m-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT in a 49 years old woman who, previously, had carcinoid tumor of left main bronchus and invasive ductal carcinoma of the right breast. Later, the patient developed left breast mass. Core needle biopsy of the mass revealed poorly differentiated invasive ductal carcinoma. The disease remained stable for 12 years without any treatment on that left breast (due to patient's rejection). On the later investigation using Tc-99m-HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy examination, rather than invasive ductal carcinoma, metastatic neuroendocrine cancer was suggested. The final diagnosis was confirmed by pathological examination after surgical excision. Multiple metastatic lesions of neuroendocrine carcinoma at lung, liver, ovaries, and bones were also depicted. Due to the good behavior of the disease, patient had been doing well for eight months, without specific treatment. This report confirmed the advantage and the accuracy of Tc-99m-HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy in detection of neuroendocrine carcinoma. Furthermore, metastatic neuroendocrine tumor should be in differential diagnosis for patient with breast mass together with history of neuroendocrine tumor

  10. Galangin inhibits cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and inducing apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CAO, JINGYI; WANG, HAINAN; CHEN, FEIFEI; FANG, JIANZHENG; XU, AIMING; XI, WEI; ZHANG, SHENGLI; WU, GANG; WANG, ZENGJUN

    2016-01-01

    Galangin, a flavonoid extracted from the root of the Alpinia officinarum Hence, has been shown to have anticancer properties against several types of cancer cells. However, the influence of galangin on human renal cancer cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, proliferation of 786-0 and Caki-1 cells was suppressed following exposure to various doses of galangin. Cell invasion and wound healing assays were used to observe the effect of galangin on invasion and migration. The results demonstrated that Galangin inhibited cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), with an increase in the expression of E-cadherin and decreased expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin. The apoptosis induced by galangin was analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that galangin induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important contributing factor for the apoptosis of various types of cancer cell. The dichlorofluorescein-diacetate method was used to determine the level of ROS. Galangin induced the accumulation of intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde, and decreased the activities of total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase in renal cell carcinoma cells. Galangin exerted an antiproliferative effect and inhibited renal cell carcinoma invasion by suppressing the EMT. This treatment also induced apoptosis, accompanied by the production of ROS. Therefore, the present data suggested that galangin may have beneficial effects by preventing renal cell carcinoma growth, inhibiting cell invasion via the EMT and inducing cell apoptosis. PMID:27035542

  11. Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland consisting of high-grade salivary duct carcinoma and keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Magaki, Shino D; Bhuta, Sunita; Abemayor, Elliot; Nabili, Vishad; Sepahdari, Ali R; Lai, Chi K

    2015-09-01

    Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is a rare salivary gland malignancy that presents diagnostic difficulties partly because of its wide range of histologic presentations. We report a case of a 77-year-old man, who presented with a 6-year history of a parotid mass that had undergone rapid growth within weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an infiltrative mass in the parotid gland, and the fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy result was highly suspicious for carcinoma. Subsequent excision of the tumor demonstrated a poorly differentiated epithelial neoplasm consisting of keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma with regions of both ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive salivary duct carcinoma (SDC). Only focal areas exhibited a benign pleomorphic adenoma component. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a CXPA that consists of both a high-grade SDC and a keratinizing SCC in the parotid gland.

  12. Cytohesin-3 is upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and contributes to tumor growth and vascular invasion

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Li, Jun; Feng, Ming-Xuan; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Ya-Hui; Zhang, Yan-Li; Qin, Wenxin; Xia, Qiang; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignant tumor with high morbidity and mortality, and is characterized by high potential for metastasis and recurrence. The outcome of it is still poor due to lacking of targeted therapeutic strategies. There is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets for interventions against HCC metastasis and recurrence. In the present study, we found cytohesin-3, a member of the cytohesin family, was upregulated in HCC tissues, and its expression was negatively correlated with the overall survival and relapse-free survival of HCC patients. Further clinicopathological correlation analysis revealed that cytohesin-3 expression was related with tumor size and vascular invasion. And in vitro studies revealed that knock-down of cytohesin-3 suppressed HCC cells proliferation and migration. These results suggest that cytohesin-3 may act as a novel prognostic factor of HCC, and it might also be useful to exploit targeted therapeutic drugs against HCC growth and metastasis. PMID:24966920

  13. Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: cytometric and immunohistochemical characteristics of 96 cases.

    PubMed

    Skotnicki, Piotr; Ryś, Janusz; Blecharz, Paweł; Reinfuss, Marian; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Kruczak, Anna; Lackowska, Bożena

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to present microscopic, cytometric and immunohistochemical characteristics of a group of 96 invasive lobular carcinomas (ILC) of the breast. Ninety six patients treated surgically at the Department of Surgical Oncology, Centre of Oncology - Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Cracow Branch, between 1983 and 1996, were included into the study. In 56 (58.3%) cases, a classical pattern of ILC was diagnosed, whereas atypical variants (solid, pleomorphic, pleomorphic with signet ring cells, signet ring cell, and tubulolobular) were recognized in 40 (41.7%) cases. ILC was characterized by lack of E-cadherin expression, high rate of steroid receptor expression, low rate of P53 and c-erb-B2 expressing tumours, low MIB-1 labelling index, and low S phase fraction, as well as high rate of diploid lesions.

  14. Molecular classifications of breast carcinoma with similar terminology and different definitions: are they the same?

    PubMed

    Tang, Ping; Wang, Jianmin; Bourne, Patria

    2008-04-01

    There are 4 major molecular classifications in the literature that divide breast carcinoma into basal and nonbasal subtypes, with basal subtypes associated with poor prognosis. Basal subtype is defined as positive for cytokeratin (CK) 5/6, CK14, and/or CK17 in CK classification; negative for ER, PR, and HER2 in triple negative (TN) classification; negative for ER and negative or positive for HER2 in ER/HER2 classification; and positive for CK5/6, CK14, CK17, and/or EGFR; and negative for ER, PR, and HER2 in CK/TN classification. These classifications use similar terminology but different definitions; it is critical to understand the precise relationship between them. We compared these 4 classifications in 195 breast carcinomas and found that (1) the rates of basal subtypes varied from 5% to 36% for ductal carcinoma in situ and 14% to 40% for invasive ductal carcinoma. (2) The rates of basal subtypes varied from 19% to 76% for HG carcinoma and 1% to 7% for NHG carcinoma. (3) The rates of basal subtypes were strongly associated with tumor grades (P < .001) in all classifications and associated with tumor types (in situ versus invasive ductal carcinomas) in TN (P < .001) and CK/TN classifications (P = .035). (4) These classifications were related but not interchangeable (kappa ranges from 0.140 to 0.658 for HG carcinoma and from 0.098 to 0.654 for NHG carcinoma). In conclusion, although these classifications all divide breast carcinoma into basal and nonbasal subtypes, they are not interchangeable. More studies are needed to evaluate to their values in predicting prognosis and guiding individualized therapy.

  15. Neoplastic extracellular matrix environment promotes cancer invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sundquist, Elias; Renko, Outi; Salo, Sirpa; Magga, Johanna; Cervigne, Nilva K; Nyberg, Pia; Risteli, Juha; Sormunen, Raija; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Zandonadi, Flávia; Paes Leme, Adriana F; Coletta, Ricardo D; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Salo, Tuula

    2016-06-10

    The invasion of carcinoma cells is a crucial feature in carcinogenesis. The penetration efficiency not only depends on the cancer cells, but also on the composition of the tumor microenvironment. Our group has developed a 3D invasion assay based on human uterine leiomyoma tissue. Here we tested whether human, porcine, mouse or rat hearts as well as porcine tongue tissues could be similarly used to study carcinoma cell invasion in vitro. Three invasive human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-3, SCC-25 and SCC-15), melanoma (G-361) and ductal breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231) cell lines, and co-cultures of HSC-3 and carcinoma-associated or normal oral fibroblasts were assayed. Myoma tissue, both native and lyophilized, promoted invasion and growth of the cancer cells. However, the healthy heart or tongue matrices were unable to induce the invasion of any type of cancer cells tested. Moreover, when studied in more detail, small molecular weight fragments derived from heart tissue rinsing media inhibited HSC-3 horizontal migration. Proteome analysis of myoma rinsing media, on the other hand, revealed migration enhancing factors. These results highlight the important role of matrix composition for cancer invasion studies in vitro and further demonstrate the unique properties of human myoma organotypic model. PMID:27090016

  16. Tumor and Stromal-Based Contributions to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, Steven M.; Weed, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages with evident loco-regional and/or distal metastases. The prevalence of metastatic lesions directly correlates with poor patient outcome, resulting in high patient mortality rates following metastatic development. The progression to metastatic disease requires changes not only in the carcinoma cells, but also in the surrounding stromal cells and tumor microenvironment. Within the microenvironment, acellular contributions from the surrounding extracellular matrix, along with contributions from various infiltrating immune cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells facilitate the spread of tumor cells from the primary site to the rest of the body. Thus far, most attempts to limit metastatic spread through therapeutic intervention have failed to show patient benefit in clinic trails. The goal of this review is highlight the complexity of invasion-promoting interactions in the HNSCC tumor microenvironment, focusing on contributions from tumor and stromal cells in order to assist future therapeutic development and patient treatment. PMID:25734659

  17. A Case of Orbital Myiasis in Recurrent Eyelid Basal Cell Carcinoma Invasive into the Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gulshan Bahadur; (Sitaula), Ranju Kharel; Shah, Dev Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Orbital myiasis is the infestation of the orbital tissues by fly larvae or maggots. Compromise of periorbital tissues by malignant disease, surgery, ischemia, or infection may predispose the patient to orbital myiasis. Case Report. A 73-year-old male patient with neglected recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid invasive into the orbit presented with complaints of intense itching and crawling sensation with maggots wriggling and falling from the wound of left orbit. The patient improved following manual removal of the maggots along with oral Ivermectin treatment. Recurrence of the basal cell carcinoma was confirmed by punch biopsy from the wound and extended exenteration of the orbit followed by reconstructive surgery was done. Conclusion. Orbital myiasis is a rare and preventable ocular morbidity that can complicate the malignancies resulting in widespread tissue destruction. The broad spectrum antiparasitic agent, Ivermectin, can be used as noninvasive means to treat orbital myiasis. In massive orbital myiasis and those associated with malignancies, exenteration of the orbit must be seriously considered.

  18. A Case of Orbital Myiasis in Recurrent Eyelid Basal Cell Carcinoma Invasive into the Orbit.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Triptesh Raj; Shrestha, Gulshan Bahadur; Sitaula, Ranju Kharel; Shah, Dev Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Orbital myiasis is the infestation of the orbital tissues by fly larvae or maggots. Compromise of periorbital tissues by malignant disease, surgery, ischemia, or infection may predispose the patient to orbital myiasis. Case Report. A 73-year-old male patient with neglected recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid invasive into the orbit presented with complaints of intense itching and crawling sensation with maggots wriggling and falling from the wound of left orbit. The patient improved following manual removal of the maggots along with oral Ivermectin treatment. Recurrence of the basal cell carcinoma was confirmed by punch biopsy from the wound and extended exenteration of the orbit followed by reconstructive surgery was done. Conclusion. Orbital myiasis is a rare and preventable ocular morbidity that can complicate the malignancies resulting in widespread tissue destruction. The broad spectrum antiparasitic agent, Ivermectin, can be used as noninvasive means to treat orbital myiasis. In massive orbital myiasis and those associated with malignancies, exenteration of the orbit must be seriously considered. PMID:27595028

  19. A Case of Orbital Myiasis in Recurrent Eyelid Basal Cell Carcinoma Invasive into the Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gulshan Bahadur; (Sitaula), Ranju Kharel; Shah, Dev Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Orbital myiasis is the infestation of the orbital tissues by fly larvae or maggots. Compromise of periorbital tissues by malignant disease, surgery, ischemia, or infection may predispose the patient to orbital myiasis. Case Report. A 73-year-old male patient with neglected recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid invasive into the orbit presented with complaints of intense itching and crawling sensation with maggots wriggling and falling from the wound of left orbit. The patient improved following manual removal of the maggots along with oral Ivermectin treatment. Recurrence of the basal cell carcinoma was confirmed by punch biopsy from the wound and extended exenteration of the orbit followed by reconstructive surgery was done. Conclusion. Orbital myiasis is a rare and preventable ocular morbidity that can complicate the malignancies resulting in widespread tissue destruction. The broad spectrum antiparasitic agent, Ivermectin, can be used as noninvasive means to treat orbital myiasis. In massive orbital myiasis and those associated with malignancies, exenteration of the orbit must be seriously considered. PMID:27595028

  20. Endostatin induces proliferation of oral carcinoma cells but its effect on invasion is modified by the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Alahuhta, Ilkka; Aikio, Mari; Väyrynen, Otto; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Suojanen, Juho; Teppo, Susanna; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Salo, Tuula; Nyberg, Pia

    2015-08-01

    The turnover of extracellular matrix liberates various cryptic molecules with novel biological activities. Endostatin is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that is derived from the non-collagenous domain of collagen XVIII. Although there are a large number of studies on its anti-tumor effects, the molecular mechanisms are not yet completely understood, and the reasons why endostatin has not been successful in clinical trials are unclear. Research has mostly focused on its anti-angiogenic effect in tumors. Here, we aimed to elucidate how endostatin affects the behavior of aggressive tongue HSC-3 carcinoma cells that were transfected to overproduce endostatin. Endostatin inhibited the invasion of HSC-3 cells in a 3D collagen–fibroblast model. However, it had no effect on invasion in a human myoma organotypic model, which lacks vital fibroblasts. Recombinant endostatin was able to reduce the Transwell migration of normal fibroblasts, but had no effect on carcinoma associated fibroblasts. Surprisingly, endostatin increased the proliferation and decreased the apoptosis of cancer cells in organotypic models. Also subcutaneous tumors overproducing endostatin grew bigger, but showed less local invasion in nude mice xenografts. We conclude that endostatin affects directly to HSC-3 cells increasing their proliferation, but its net effect on cancer invasion seem to depend on the cellular composition and interactions of tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Endostatin affects not only angiogenesis, but also carcinoma cells and fibroblasts. • Endostatin increased carcinoma cell proliferation, but decreased 3D invasion. • The invasion inhibitory effect was sensitive to the microenvironment composition. • Fibroblasts may be a factor regulating the fluctuating roles of endostatin.

  1. The role of miR-21 in proliferation and invasion capacity of human tongue squamous cell carcinoma in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Zhu, Yu; Lv, Pin; Li, Longjiang

    2015-01-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common cancers, which has the highest incidence in oral maxillofacial malignant tumors. MiR-21 may promote tumorigeness by down-regulating tumor suppressing genes and/or controlling the genes for cell differentiation and apoptosis, and it has been identified as the most expressive and unusual in a number of profiling experiments. The study shows there are high expressions of miR-21 in tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (Tca8113 and its high metastatic lines), especially in high metastatic lines. miR-21 silencing could suppress the capacity of proliferation, migration and invasion, arrest the cell cycle and induce apoptosis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (Tca8113 and its high metastatic lines). All the results indicate that miR-21 will probably open a new path to the gene therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26191145

  2. GATA3 expression in breast carcinoma: utility in triple-negative, sarcomatoid, and metastatic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Subhawong, Andrea P; Illei, Peter B; Sharma, Rajni; Halushka, Marc K; Vang, Russell; Fetting, John H; Park, Ben Ho; Argani, Pedram

    2013-07-01

    GATA3 plays an integral role in breast luminal cell differentiation and is implicated in breast cancer progression. GATA3 immunohistochemistry is a useful marker of breast cancer; however, its use in specific subtypes is unclear. Here, we evaluate GATA3 expression in 86 invasive ductal carcinomas including triple-negative, Her-2, and luminal subtypes, in addition to 13 metaplastic carcinomas and in 34 fibroepithelial neoplasms. In addition, we report GATA3 expression in matched primary and metastatic breast carcinomas in 30 patients with known estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and Her-2 status, including 5 with ER and/or PR loss from primary to metastasis. Tissue microarrays containing 5 to 10 cores per tumor were stained for GATA3, scored as follows: 0 (0-5%), 1+ (6%-25%), 2+ (26%-50%), 3+ (51%-75%), and 4+ (>75%). GATA3 labeling was seen in 67% (66/99) of primary ductal carcinomas including 43% of triple-negative and 54% of metaplastic carcinomas. In contrast, stromal GATA3 labeling was seen in only 1 fibroepithelial neoplasm. GATA3 labeling was seen in 90% (27/30) of primary breast carcinomas in the paired cohort, including 67% of triple-negative carcinomas. GATA3 labeling was overwhelmingly maintained in paired metastases. Notably, GATA3 was maintained in all "luminal loss" metastases, which showed ER and/or PR loss. In conclusion, GATA3 expression is maintained between matched primary and metastatic carcinomas including ER-negative cases. GATA3 can be particularly useful as a marker for metastatic breast carcinoma, especially triple-negative and metaplastic carcinomas, which lack specific markers of mammary origin. Finally, GATA3 labeling may help distinguish metaplastic carcinoma from malignant phyllodes tumors.

  3. Carvacrol suppresses proliferation and invasion in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Sun, Changfu; Huang, Shaohui; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, as a novel antitumor agent, has been implicated in several types of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of carvacrol in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain unclear. Here, we report that carvacrol significantly inhibits tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and invasion, and induces apoptosis in OSCC. Our results demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of the effect of carvacrol in Tca-8113 induces G1/S cell cycle arrest through downregulation of CDK regulator CCND1 and CDK4, and upregulation of CDK inhibitor P21. Further analysis demonstrated that carvacrol also inhibited Tca-8113 cells’ clone formation in clonogenic cell survival assay. Student’s t-test (two-tailed) was used to compare differences between groups, and the significance level was P<0.01. Then, treatment of Tca-8113 cells with carvacrol resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2, Cox2, and upregulation of Bax. Carvacrol significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of human OSCC cells by blocking the phosphorylation of FAK and MMP-9 and MMP-2, transcription factor ZEB1, and β-catenin proteins’ expression. Taken together, these results provide novel insights into the mechanism of carvacrol and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for human OSCC. PMID:27143925

  4. Deciphering Genomic Underpinnings of Quantitative MRI-based Radiomic Phenotypes of Invasive Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yitan; Li, Hui; Guo, Wentian; Drukker, Karen; Lan, Li; Giger, Maryellen L.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been routinely used for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. However, the relationship between the MRI tumor phenotypes and the underlying genetic mechanisms remains under-explored. We integrated multi-omics molecular data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) with MRI data from The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA) for 91 breast invasive carcinomas. Quantitative MRI phenotypes of tumors (such as tumor size, shape, margin, and blood flow kinetics) were associated with their corresponding molecular profiles (including DNA mutation, miRNA expression, protein expression, pathway gene expression and copy number variation). We found that transcriptional activities of various genetic pathways were positively associated with tumor size, blurred tumor margin, and irregular tumor shape and that miRNA expressions were associated with the tumor size and enhancement texture, but not with other types of radiomic phenotypes. We provide all the association findings as a resource for the research community (available at http://compgenome.org/Radiogenomics/). These findings pave potential paths for the discovery of genetic mechanisms regulating specific tumor phenotypes and for improving MRI techniques as potential non-invasive approaches to probe the cancer molecular status. PMID:26639025

  5. Quercetin suppresses cellular migration and invasion in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

    PubMed

    Chan, Chien-Yi; Lien, Chia-Hsien; Lee, Ming-Fen; Huang, Chun-Yin

    2016-06-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is often associated with a poor prognosis and a low survival rate. Hence, efficient inhibition of the EGFR signaling-mediated malignancy would improve survival rate. In a previous study, we demonstrated that quercetin appears to be a potent anti-tumorigenic agent through its inhibition of the EGFR/Akt pathway in oral cancer, but its anti-metastatic potential in HNSCC remains unclear [1]. Here, we have hypothesized that quercetin might be effective in metastatic inhibition in EGFR-overexpressing HNSCC cells. Quercetin treatment with 10 μM (half concentration of IC50) suppressed cell migration and invasion in EGFR-overexpressing HSC-3 and FaDu HNSCC cells. Quercetin also inhibited the colony growth of HSC-3 cells embedded in a Matrigel matrix. Among matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the secreted gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 are responsible for the degradation of gelatin in the extracellular matrix and type IV collagen in the basement membrane; and this degradation event is crucial for the migration from the origin and the invasion into the bone in HNSCC. Quercetin (10 μM) treatment also suppressed the expression and proteolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Taken together, our data indicate that quercetin is an effective anti-cancer agent against MMP-2- and MMP-9-mediated metastasis in EGFR-overexpressing HNSCC. PMID:27510965

  6. Carvacrol suppresses proliferation and invasion in human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Sun, Changfu; Huang, Shaohui; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, as a novel antitumor agent, has been implicated in several types of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of carvacrol in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain unclear. Here, we report that carvacrol significantly inhibits tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and invasion, and induces apoptosis in OSCC. Our results demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of the effect of carvacrol in Tca-8113 induces G1/S cell cycle arrest through downregulation of CDK regulator CCND1 and CDK4, and upregulation of CDK inhibitor P21. Further analysis demonstrated that carvacrol also inhibited Tca-8113 cells' clone formation in clonogenic cell survival assay. Student's t-test (two-tailed) was used to compare differences between groups, and the significance level was P<0.01. Then, treatment of Tca-8113 cells with carvacrol resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2, Cox2, and upregulation of Bax. Carvacrol significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of human OSCC cells by blocking the phosphorylation of FAK and MMP-9 and MMP-2, transcription factor ZEB1, and β-catenin proteins' expression. Taken together, these results provide novel insights into the mechanism of carvacrol and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for human OSCC. PMID:27143925

  7. MMP14 regulates cell migration and invasion through epithelial-mesenchymal transition in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tinghua; Lin, Zhonghao; Jiang, Jinhua; Lu, Suiwan; Chen, Miaoan; Que, Huaxing; He, Xiangsheng; Que, Ganbo; Mao, Jianfeng; Xiao, Jinan; Zheng, Qingwei

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) has been shown to play a significant role in several types of cancers, but little is known about the function of MMP14 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MMP14 in NPC using NPC tumor samples or tissue microarray. We have shown that MMP14 was increased in NPC samples compared with normal nasopharynx (NP) tissues in microarray data (GSE13597). Both MMP14 mRNA and protein expression were markedly higher in NPC tissues than in NP tissues. High levels of MMP14 protein were found positively correlate with the status of late clinical stages of tumor and tumor with lymph node metastasis. Moreover, we have shown that MMP14 expression promoted the cell migration and invasion of NPC cells in vitro and regulated the expression of EMT-associated genes. Our data demonstrated that MMP14 plays an important role in regulation of migration and invasion of NPC cells, and constitutes a potential novel therapeutic target for NPC. PMID:26175856

  8. Deciphering Genomic Underpinnings of Quantitative MRI-based Radiomic Phenotypes of Invasive Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yitan; Li, Hui; Guo, Wentian; Drukker, Karen; Lan, Li; Giger, Maryellen L; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been routinely used for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. However, the relationship between the MRI tumor phenotypes and the underlying genetic mechanisms remains under-explored. We integrated multi-omics molecular data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) with MRI data from The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA) for 91 breast invasive carcinomas. Quantitative MRI phenotypes of tumors (such as tumor size, shape, margin, and blood flow kinetics) were associated with their corresponding molecular profiles (including DNA mutation, miRNA expression, protein expression, pathway gene expression and copy number variation). We found that transcriptional activities of various genetic pathways were positively associated with tumor size, blurred tumor margin, and irregular tumor shape and that miRNA expressions were associated with the tumor size and enhancement texture, but not with other types of radiomic phenotypes. We provide all the association findings as a resource for the research community (available at http://compgenome.org/Radiogenomics/). These findings pave potential paths for the discovery of genetic mechanisms regulating specific tumor phenotypes and for improving MRI techniques as potential non-invasive approaches to probe the cancer molecular status. PMID:26639025

  9. Cytoplasmic Expression of Pontin in Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Tumor Invasion, Metastasis and Patients’ Survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Ren, Juchao; Yan, Lei; Tang, Yueqing; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dawei; Zang, Yuanwei; Kong, Feng; Xu, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most lethal of all genitourinary malignancies. Distant metastasis represents the major cause of death in patients with RCC. Recent studies have implicated the AAA+ ATPase pontin in many cellular activities that are highly relevant to carcinogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that pontin was up-regulated in RCC, and plays a previously unknown pro-invasive role in the metastatic progression of RCC through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway. 28 pairs of freshly frozen clear cell RCC samples and the matched normal renal tissues analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting demonstrated that pontin was up-regulated in clear cell RCC tissues than in normal renal tissues. In addition, immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate subcellular pontin expression in 95 RCC patients, and found that overexpression of pontin in cytoplasm positively correlated with the metastatic features, predicting unfavorable outcomes of RCC patients. Furthermore, in vitro experiments show pontin was predominantly expressed in cytoplasm of RCC cell lines, and a significant suppression of cell migration and invasion in pontin siRNA treated RCC cell lines was observed. Mechanistic studies show that pontin depletion up-regulated the E-cadherin protein and down-regulated vimentin protein, and decreased nuclear β-catenin expression, suggesting the involvement of EMT in pontin induced metastatic progression. Together, our data suggest pontin as a potential prognostic biomarker in RCC, and provide new promising therapeutic targets for clinical intervention of kidney cancers. PMID:25751257

  10. Patient-tailored conservative surgical treatment of invasive uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. A review.

    PubMed

    Menczer, J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to review currently available data regarding the results of a more conservative, patient-tailored surgical approach in selected cases of early invasive uterine squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A PubMed search of investigations in the English language published from January 2000 to September 2012 containing the terms conservative surgery, conservative treatment, trachelectomy, parametrectomy, lymphadenectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and fertility sparing surgery in combination with SCC was made. Conization only is optimal for women with stage Ia1 disease mainly in tumors without lymph vascular space involvement (LVSI). In stage Ib1 patients interested to maintain reproductive capacity, vaginal or abdominal radical trachelectomy are the procedures of choice. Patients with small tumors (<2 cm), no deep invasion, no LVSI, and negative pelvic nodes are at very low risk of parametrial involvement and parametrectomy may be omitted in them. Such patients may benefit from less radical surgery and may be candidates for simple hysterectomy, simple trachelectomy, or conization with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is apparently a good predictor of node metastases and allows the performance of lymphadenectomy only in SLN positive cases. Thus lymphadenectomy may also be omitted in some patients. In young women with locally advanced tumors, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility-sparing surgery may also be a feasible treatment. A more conservative, patient-tailored surgical approach in selected cases of early SCC is possible resulting in lower morbidity and preservation of fertility without compromising the outcome. PMID:24051940

  11. Biliary Adenofibroma with Invasive Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Godambe, Anjali; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Fulling, Keith H.; Reza Kermanshahi, Taher

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of biliary adenofibroma with an invasive carcinoma in a 71-year-old female who presented with bilateral upper abdominal pain. Imaging revealed a 6.3 cm heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left lateral segment of the liver. Histologically, the adenofibroma showed the characteristic components as previously described of biliary adenofibromata, namely, cystic and tubular structures lined by cuboidal to low columnar biliary type epithelium and a dense fibrous stroma composed of spindled cells. Intimately admixed with the adenofibroma was a distinct tumor composed of malignant clear cells which demonstrated stromal and vascular invasion. Although mitotic figures were inconspicuous, Ki67 was brisk and p53 demonstrated 25–50% positivity. Sections also showed a von Meyenberg complex located adjacent to the tumor. This case expands the understanding of this rare tumor and proves two important assertions from previous case reports. First, the presence of an associated von Meyenberg complex with similar morphology and immunohistochemical staining pattern suggests that biliary adenofibromata and von Meyenberg complexes may share related histogenesis. Second, biliary adenofibromata harbor malignant potential and may show malignant transformation. Furthermore, this case highlights the need for these rare tumors to be followed aggressively, as their biological behavior is poorly understood. PMID:26885426

  12. Comparison of SPECT/CT, MRI and CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-xu; Han, Peng-hui; Zhang, Guo-qian; Wang, Rui-hao; Ge, Yong-bin; Ren, Zhi-gang; Li, Jian-sheng; Fu, Wen-hai

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is crucial for correct staging, assessing treatment response and contouring the tumor target in radiotherapy planning, as well as improving the patient's prognosis. To compare the diagnostic efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for the detection of skull base invasion in NPC. Sixty untreated patients with histologically proven NPC underwent SPECT/CT imaging, contrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Of the 60 patients, 30 had skull base invasion confirmed by the final results of contrast-enhanced MRI, CT and six-month follow-up imaging (MRI and CT). The diagnostic efficacy of the three imaging modalities in detecting skull base invasion was evaluated. The rates of positive findings of skull base invasion for SPECT/CT, MRI and CT were 53.3%, 48.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3%, 86.7% and 90.0% for SPECT/CT fusion imaging, 96.7%, 100.0% and 98.3% for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 66.7%, 100.0% and 83.3% for contrast-enhanced CT. MRI showed the best performance for the diagnosis of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, followed closely by SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT had poorer specificity than that of both MRI and CT, while CT had the lowest sensitivity.

  13. Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate: histogenesis, biology and clinicopathological features.

    PubMed

    Seipel, Amanda H; Delahunt, Brett; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Egevad, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate (DAC) is recognised as a subtype of prostatic adenocarcinoma, but its diagnostic criteria and biology remain controversial. DAC was first thought to stem from Müllerian duct remnants, but further studies suggest a prostatic origin. DAC is composed of tall, columnar, pseudostratified epithelium with a papillary, cribriform, glandular or solid architecture. The diagnosis is based on morphology alone with papillary architecture being the most helpful diagnostic feature. The tumour is rare in a pure form and most cases are combined with acinar adenocarcinoma. The most common differential diagnoses of DAC are intraductal carcinoma of the prostate and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Patients often present at an advanced clinicopathological stage. High rates of extra-prostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, local and regional metastases, and positive surgical margins are seen after radical prostatectomy. DAC metastasises to sites that are less commonly seen for prostate cancer such as lung, brain, testis and penis. The morphology and the unusual metastatic locations make the accurate diagnosis of metastases challenging, but a positive immunostain for prostate specific markers may be helpful. The correct identification of DAC has implications for treatment as well as outcome. PMID:27321992

  14. miR-101 Inhibiting Cell Proliferation, Migration and Invasion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Downregulating Girdin.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ke; Li, Jingjing; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Qinghai; He, Siqi; Yu, Li; Zhou, Jianda; Cao, Peiguo

    2016-02-01

    miR-101 is considered to play an important role in hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC), but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here, we aimed to confirm whether Girdin is a target gene of miR-101 and determine the tumor suppressor of miR-101 through Girdin pathway. In our previous studies, we firstly found Girdin protein was overexpressed in HCC tissues, and it closely correlated to tumor size, T stage, TNM stage and Edmondson-Steiner stage of HCC patients. After specific small interfering RNA of Girdin was transfected into HepG2 and Huh7.5.1 cells, the proliferation and invasion ability of tumor cells were significantly inhibited. In this study, we further explored the detailed molecular mechanism of Girdin in HCC. Interestingly, we found that miR-101 significantly low-expressed in HCC tissues compared with that in matched normal tissues while Girdin had a relative higher expression, and miR-101 was inversely correlated with Girdin expression. In addition, after miR-101 transfection, the proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of HepG2 cells were weakened. Furthermore, we confirmed that Girdin is a direct target gene of miR-101. Finally we confirmed Talen-mediated Girdin knockout markedly suppressed cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HCC while down-regulation of miR-101 significantly restored the inhibitory effect. Our findings suggested that miR-101/Girdin axis could be a potential application of HCC treatment.

  15. miR-101 Inhibiting Cell Proliferation, Migration and Invasion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Downregulating Girdin

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ke; Li, Jingjing; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Qinghai; He, Siqi; Yu, Li; Zhou, Jianda; Cao, Peiguo

    2016-01-01

    miR-101 is considered to play an important role in hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC), but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here, we aimed to confirm whether Girdin is a target gene of miR-101 and determine the tumor suppressor of miR-101 through Girdin pathway. In our previous studies, we firstly found Girdin protein was overexpressed in HCC tissues, and it closely correlated to tumor size, T stage, TNM stage and Edmondson-Steiner stage of HCC patients. After specific small interfering RNA of Girdin was transfected into HepG2 and Huh7.5.1 cells, the proliferation and invasion ability of tumor cells were significantly inhibited. In this study, we further explored the detailed molecular mechanism of Girdin in HCC. Interestingly, we found that miR-101 significantly low-expressed in HCC tissues compared with that in matched normal tissues while Girdin had a relative higher expression, and miR-101 was inversely correlated with Girdin expression. In addition, after miR-101 transfection, the proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of HepG2 cells were weakened. Furthermore, we confirmed that Girdin is a direct target gene of miR-101. Finally we confirmed Talen-mediated Girdin knockout markedly suppressed cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HCC while down-regulation of miR-101 significantly restored the inhibitory effect. Our findings suggested that miR-101/Girdin axis could be a potential application of HCC treatment. PMID:26743900

  16. The Combination of Periostin Overexpression and Microvascular Invasion Is Related to a Poor Prognosis for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se Young; Park, Soo Young; Lee, Hye Won; Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Park, Keun-Gyu; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Hur, Keun; Lee, Won Kee

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein and is known to be related to the metastatic potential and prognosis of cancer. However, few studies have investigated the expression level of periostin and its association with prognoses in hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, we analyzed periostin overexpression in hepatocellular carcinoma and its implication for prognoses. Methods We evaluated 149 patients who underwent surgical resection between 2006 and 2010. Tissue microarrays were constructed from hepatocellular carcinoma tissue and adjacent nontumor tissue, and immunohistochemistry was performed. Results A high periostin level was observed more frequently in cases of multiple tumors (odds ratio [OR], 2.826; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.224 to 6.527; p=0.013), positive microvascular invasion (OR, 2.974; 95% CI, 1.431 to 6.181; p=0.003), and advanced stage disease (OR, 3.032; 95% CI, 1.424 to 6.452; p=0.003). Patients with high periostin expression had significantly (p=0.002) lower overall survival rates than those with low periostin expression (90.3%, 66.1%, and 56.2% vs 97.7%, 85.1%, and 77.5% at 1, 3, and 5 years). Conclusions We found that a combination of periostin overexpression and microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma was correlated with a poor prognosis and can be a good prognostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27458178

  17. Hypofractionated Image Guided Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Central Nervous System Metastases; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma With Predominant in Situ Component; Liver Metastases; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  18. Lymph node metastasis and lymph vascular space invasion in microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Lee, K B M; Lee, J M; Park, C Y; Lee, K B; Cho, H Y; Ha, S Y

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the depth of invasion was related to lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI) and lymph node metastasis and whether there was a correlation between LVSI and lymph node metastasis in stage IA cervical cancer. The medical records, including surgical notes and pathologic reports, of 202 patients with microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reviewed retrospectively. There was a positive correlation between the depth of invasion and the LVSI, and the incidence of lymph node metastasis was slightly higher than those reported hitherto for stage IA1 cervical cancer, especially in the depth of invasion of 1-3 mm group. However, among four patients with lymph node metastasis, only two patients had positive LVSI. There was no definite correlation between LVSI and lymph node metastasis. LVSI could not identify the patients with high risk for lymph node metastasis.

  19. Clinical experience of MRI in two dogs with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kija; Choi, Sooyoung; Choi, Hojung; Lee, Youngwon

    2016-09-01

    This study described high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) characteristics of muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) in two dogs. Ultrasonography revealed a urinary bladder mass with ambiguous result about invasion to the muscular layer. Contrast-enhanced CT showed that the bladder wall in which the mass was attached was more intensely enhanced than the normal bladder walls, supporting invasion to the muscular layer. The mass revealed an intermediate signal intensity with interruption of the hypointense muscular layer on T2-weighted MRI and showed greater enhancement compared with the normal bladder wall on postcontrast T1-weighted images. T2-weighted MRI, postcontrast T1-weighted MRI and contrast-enhanced dual-phasic CT were useful for evaluating muscle-invasive bladder TCC in dogs. PMID:27149892

  20. Aurora-A/STK-15 is a predictive factor for recurrent behaviour in non-invasive bladder carcinoma: a study of 128 cases of non-invasive neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Compérat, E; Camparo, P; Haus, R; Chartier-Kastler, E; Radenen, B; Richard, F; Capron, F; Paradis, V

    2007-04-01

    Aurora-A, a member of serine/threonine kinase, is implied in mitosis and centrosome maturation. Increasing levels of Aurora-A have been shown to be present in several malignancies and especially in bladder cancer. No immunohistochemical marker has shown to be able to predict the clinical outcome of patients with superficial bladder cancer, except MIB-1, as a predictive marker of relapse and progression. The aim was to investigate the expression of Aurora-A and MIB-1 in tissue micro arrays of superficial bladder cancer representative of pTa papillary urothelial neoplasm with different degrees of aggressiveness (low malignant potential [PUNLMP], non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma low grade [NILGC], non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma high grade [NIHGC] and carcinoma in situ). We analysed predictive values of both markers, their specificity and sensitivity in tumor recurrence. Aurora-A was a sensitive marker to predict tumor recurrence especially for pTa (PUNLMP, NILGC; PUNLMP p<0.001, NILGC p<0.001) with statistical significant correlation between immunohistochemical staining and clinical outcome. MIB-1 expression displayed statistical difference p=0.002 in the PUNLMP group and p=0.03 in the NILGC group. Aurora-A is a more sensitive marker than MIB-1 to predict relapse in pTa bladder neoplasias. The combination of both markers seems to have a very powerful predictive value of recurrence (p<0.001).

  1. Knockdown of Histone Methyltransferase hSETD1A Inhibits Progression, Migration, and Invasion in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin-Sheng; Sun, Shi-Bo; Zhong, Feng; He, Kun; Zhou, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to study the expression of human SET domain containing protein 1A (hSETD1A) in hepatocellular carcinoma patients and its relationship with human hepatocellular carcinoma cell function. A total of 30 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were enrolled in this study. The expression of hSETD1A was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting. The immortalized normal human liver cell line including SMMC-7721 was subjected to real-time PCR for hSETD1A mRNA. Furthermore, hSETD1A-small hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to knock down hSETD1A expression in SMMC-7721 cells. Cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and cell migration were determined by CCK8, flow cytometry, and Transwell assays. The positive expression rate level of hSETD1A mRNA and protein in liver carcinoma tissues was 73.33%. hSETD1A knockdown using a specific hSETD1A-shRNA inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells. It was also found that downregulation of hSETD1A inhibited cell migration ability but did not affect cell invasion. In conclusion, the expression of hSETD1A occurs at a high rate in hepatocellular carcinoma patients. The expression state of hSETD1A may be a prognostic factor in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27656834

  2. Application of direct oral microscopy in evaluating mucosal margins around invasive oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Michcik, Adam; Michajłowski, Igor; Starzyńska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Direct oral microscopy constitutes a novel, non-invasive diagnostic technique, which aids clinical examination of the oral cavity. The oral mucosa is examined at multiple magnifications and features such as sub-epithelial mucosal vessels, surface patterns, colour tone, transparency and the exact demarcation of mucosal lesions are estimated. The incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) oscillates between 1.9% and 3.5%, which makes it the eighth most common carcinoma occurring around the world and in Poland. The 5-year survival rates oscillate between 20% and 30%. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate clinically unchanged mucosal margins around OSCC by direct oral microscopy. The authors approached the question whether the borders of mucosal margins around OSCC established via direct oral microscopy differ from those established based on clinical examination. Material and methods Fifteen patients diagnosed with OSCC were enrolled. Patients were first clinically examined to evaluate the extent of the tumour and to plan resection margins. Eventually, direct oral microscopy was performed to establish the width of the subclinically unchanged mucosal margins based on a standard picture of healthy oral mucosae, followed by comparison with those established by clinical evaluation. Results Histopathologic results of biopsies from areas indicated by direct oral microscopy revealed dysplasia in 86.7% of patients, whereas biopsies from areas indicated by clinical examination revealed dysplasia only in 40% of individuals, resulting in the need for widening of mucosal margins. Conclusions Direct oral microscopy enables detection of dysplasia within clinically unaltered mucosal margins around OSCC, which results in more precise establishing of resection boundaries, contributing to improvement of resection totality. PMID:26759543

  3. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast With Close or Focally Involved Margins Following Breast-Conserving Surgery: Treatment With Reexcision or Radiotherapy With Increased Dosage

    SciTech Connect

    Monteau, Amelie; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Kirova, Youlia M.; Fourchotte, Virginie; Bollet, Marc A.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Asselain, Bernard; Salmon, Remy J. M.D.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Following breast-conserving surgery for DCIS, reexcision before radiotherapy is recommended when margins are close or involved. We investigated whether an additional radiation dose could replace reexcision. Methods: We selected 208 women with DCIS of the breast treated with breast-conserving surgery between 1992 and 2002 who had either close margins (< 2 mm) (89 pts) or focally (< 1 mm) or minimally (1-15 mm) involved margins (119 pts). Sixty-one patients (29%) underwent reexcision before irradiation and 147 patients (71%) received breast irradiation with boost, without reexcision. Results: Median follow-up was 89 months. Median age was 53 years with 7 patients less than 41. Involved margins were less frequent in the non reexcision group than in the reexcised group (50% vs. 74%, p = 0.0019). All other clinical and histological features were comparable. Median whole-breast radiation dose was 50 Gy. Median total doses to the tumour bed were 67 Gy (range, 45-77) and 60 Gy (range, 46-74), respectively (p < 0.0001). Of the 61 reexcised patients, 56% had residual DCIS and 6% had invasive cancer. Six underwent a mastectomy for persistent margin involvement. Seven-year locoregional failure rates were 9.3% without, and 9.6% with reexcision (ns). No differences were observed when adjusting for margin status. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with close (< 2 mm) or focally/minimally involved margins, reexcision may be avoided and satisfactory local control achieved by increasing the radiation dose to the tumour bed to at least 66 Gy. These results only apply to patients older than 40 and would need confirmation in independent series.

  4. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  5. BCAT1 promotes tumor cell migration and invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng; Liu, Qingquan; Jia, Yuli; Tu, Kangsheng; Yao, Yingmin; Liu, Qingguang; Guo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) has been associated with numerous types of tumors; however, few previous studies have evaluated the expression and role of BCAT1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, the expression of BCAT1 was detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting in six HCC cell lines and 74 pairs of HCC and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. In addition, the correlation between the expression levels of c-Myc and BCAT1 was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, RNA silencing was performed using c-Myc-specific or BCAT1-specific small interfering RNA, after which wound healing and Transwell cell invasion assays were performed. Finally, the clinicopathological characteristics of BCAT1 in patients with HCC were analyzed. It was shown that the expression of BCAT1 was significantly higher in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues (P<0.001), and in HCC cell lines compared within the L-02 hepatic cell line (P<0.001). In addition, immunohistochemical analyses indicated that the expression of BCAT1 was positively correlated with c-Myc (r=0.706, P<0.001). BCAT1 expression was shown to be downregulated in c-Myc-knockdown cells, and silencing of BCAT1 expression reduced the invasion and migration of HCC cells. Furthermore, a clinical analysis indicated that BCAT1 expression in HCC tissues was significantly associated with the tumor-node-metastasis stage, tumor number and tumor differentiation (all P<0.05), and that BCAT1 was able to predict the 5-year survival and disease-free survival rates of patients with HCC (both P<0.001). The results of the present study suggested that BCAT1 expression is upregulated in patients with HCC, and that BCAT1 may serve as a potential molecular target for the diagnosis and treatment of HCC.

  6. Long-term eradication of locally recurrent invasive follicular thyroid carcinoma after taxane-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tulloch-Reid, Marshall; Skarulis, Monica C; Sherman, Steven I; Sarlis, Nicholas J; Santarpia, Libero

    2009-11-01

    A 46-year-old woman with history of radioiodine-refractory follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) presented with locally recurrent, high-risk, invasive disease. She was treated with paclitaxel/carboplatin concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), which was well tolerated, resulting in complete remission and freedom from residual or recurrent FTC for longer than 5 years until her last follow-up at age 52. This case highlights the possibility of combining taxane-based chemotherapy with definitive radiotherapy (as CRT) for the management of locally aggressive recurrences in poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma, thereby resulting in rapid and persistent disease eradication. Even in the light of recent data on the potential benefit of novel targeted therapy agents in poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma, this approach in similar clinical settings deserves future investigation. PMID:20032418

  7. Spiclomazine Induces Apoptosis Associated with the Suppression of Cell Viability, Migration and Invasion in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuojia; Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2013-01-01

    The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and liver (HL-7702) cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion. PMID:23840452

  8. Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy After Pancreatic Resection for Invasive Carcinoma Associated With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Michael J.; Hsu, Charles C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guler, Mehmet; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. One-third are associated with invasive carcinoma. We examined the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for this cohort. Methods and Materials: Patients who had undergone pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1999 and 2004 were reviewed. Of these patients, 83 with a resected pancreatic mass were found to have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma, 70 of whom met inclusion criteria for the present analysis. Results: The median age at surgery was 68 years. The median tumor size was 3.3 cm, and invasive carcinoma was present at the margin in 16% of the patients. Of the 70 patients, 50% had metastases to the lymph nodes and 64% had Stage II disease. The median survival was 28.0 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57% and 45%, respectively. Of the 70 patients, 40 had undergone adjuvant CRT. Those receiving CRT were more likely to have lymph node metastases, perineural invasion, and Stage II-III disease. The 2-year survival rate after surgery with vs. without CRT was 55.8% vs. 59.3%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with lymph node metastases or positive surgical margins benefited significantly from CRT (p = .047 and p = .042, respectively). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant CRT was associated with improved survival, with a relative risk of 0.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.95; p = .044) after adjusting for major confounders. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT conferred a 57% decrease in the relative risk of mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with an associated invasive component after adjusting for major confounders. Patients with lymph node metastases or positive margins appeared to particularly benefit from CRT after definitive surgery.

  9. Identification of serologic biomarkers for predicting microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yun; Zhou, Jia-Le; Geng, Yan-Hua; Jin, Xing; Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Yang, Jun-Jie; Qian, Cheng-Ming; Zhou, Dong-Er; Liu, Da-Ren; Peng, Shu-You; Luo, Yan; Zheng, Lei; Li, Jiang-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular invasion (MVI) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major risk factor for early recurrence and poor survival after curative surgical therapies. However, MVI can only be diagnosed by pathological examination following resection. The aim of this study is to identify serologic biomarkers for predicting MVI preoperatively to help facilitate treatment decisions. We used the sero-proteomic approach to identify antigens that induce corresponding antibody responses either specifically in the serum from MVI (+) patients or from MVI (−) patients. Six antigens were subsequently identified as HSP 70, HSP 90, alpha-enolase (Eno-1), Annexin A2, glutathione synthetase and beta-actin by mass spectrometry. The antibodies titers in sera corresponding to four of these six antigens were measured by ELISA and compared between 35 MVI (+) patients and 26 MVI (−) patients. The titers of anti-HSP 70 antibodies were significantly higher in MVI (−) patients than those in MVI (+) patients; and the titers of anti-Eno-1 antibodies were significantly lower in MVI (−) patients than those in MVI (+) patients. The results were subjected to multivariate analysis together with other clinicopathologic factors, suggesting that antibodies against HSP 70 and Eno-1 in sera are potential biomarkers for predicting MVI in HCC prior to surgical resection. These biomarkers should be further investigated as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26918350

  10. Value of MR histogram analyses for prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Qin; Liang, He-Yue; Yang, Zhao-Xia; Ding, Ying; Zeng, Meng-Su; Rao, Sheng-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective is to explore the value of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) histogram analyses in predicting microvascular invasion (MVI) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Fifty-one patients with histologically confirmed HCC who underwent diffusion-weighted and contrast-enhanced MR imaging were included. Histogram analyses were performed and mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis, 1th, 10th, 50th, 90th, and 99th percentiles were derived. Quantitative histogram parameters were compared between HCCs with and without MVI. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses were generated to compare the diagnostic performance of tumor size, histogram analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and MR enhancement. The mean, 1th, 10th, and 50th percentiles of ADC maps, and the mean, variance. 1th, 10th, 50th, 90th, and 99th percentiles of the portal venous phase (PVP) images were significantly different between the groups with and without MVI (P <0.05), with area under the ROC curves (AUCs) of 0.66 to 0.74 for ADC and 0.76 to 0.88 for PVP. The largest AUC of PVP (1th percentile) showed significantly higher accuracy compared with that of arterial phase (AP) or tumor size (P <0.001). MR histogram analyses—in particular for 1th percentile for PVP images—held promise for prediction of MVI of HCC. PMID:27368028

  11. A minimally invasive immunocytochemical approach to early detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma and dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Scott, I S; Odell, E; Chatrath, P; Morris, L S; Davies, R J; Vowler, S L; Laskey, R A; Coleman, N

    2006-01-01

    Squamous dysplasia of the oral cavity indicates increased risk of progression to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). An important advance would be the development of a minimally invasive assay for identification of oral SCC and dysplasia. We have investigated the suitability in this context of immunostaining oral smears for minichromosome maintainance proteins (MCMs), sensitive and specific biomarkers of cell cycle entry. Immunohistochemical examination of 66 oral tissue samples showed a greater frequency of Mcm-2 expression in surface layers of moderate/severe dysplasia and SCC compared to benign keratosis/mild dysplasia. Immunocytochemistry for Mcm-2/Mcm-5 was performed on 101 oral smears. Conventional smears included 23 from normal mucosa, benign proliferative disease and mild dysplasia, all of which were MCM negative. Of 52 conventional smears of SCC tissue samples, 18 were inadequate. However, MCM-positive cells were present in 33/34 adequate samples. Of 26 liquid-based cytology smears, 19 out of 20 smears from SCC were adequate and all were MCM positive. Six smears from benign lesions were adequate and MCM negative. We conclude that MCMs are promising markers for early detection of oral SCC and dysplasia, particularly in a liquid-based cytology platform. Detection of MCMs would be amenable to automation and potentially applicable in the developing world. Further studies are now warranted. PMID:16622441

  12. Prediction of clinical phenotypes in invasive breast carcinomas from the integration of radiomics and genomics data

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wentian; Li, Hui; Zhu, Yitan; Lan, Li; Yang, Shengjie; Drukker, Karen; Morris, Elizabeth; Burnside, Elizabeth; Whitman, Gary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Ji, Yuan; TCGA Breast Phenotype Research Group

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Genomic and radiomic imaging profiles of invasive breast carcinomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas and The Cancer Imaging Archive were integrated and a comprehensive analysis was conducted to predict clinical outcomes using the radiogenomic features. Variable selection via LASSO and logistic regression were used to select the most-predictive radiogenomic features for the clinical phenotypes, including pathological stage, lymph node metastasis, and status of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Cross-validation with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was employed as the prediction metric. Higher AUCs were obtained in the prediction of pathological stage, ER, and PR status than for lymph node metastasis and HER2 status. Overall, the prediction performances by genomics alone, radiomics alone, and combined radiogenomics features showed statistically significant correlations with clinical outcomes; however, improvement on the prediction performance by combining genomics and radiomics data was not found to be statistically significant, most likely due to the small sample size of 91 cancer cases with 38 radiomic features and 144 genomic features. PMID:26835491

  13. Tri-modal confocal mosaics detect residual invasive squamous cell carcinoma in Mohs surgical excisions.

    PubMed

    Gareau, Dan; Bar, Anna; Snaveley, Nicholas; Lee, Ken; Chen, Nathaniel; Swanson, Neil; Simpson, Eric; Jacques, Steve

    2012-06-01

    For rapid, intra-operative pathological margin assessment to guide staged cancer excisions, multimodal confocal mosaic scan image wide surgical margins (approximately 1 cm) with sub-cellular resolution and mimic the appearance of conventional hematoxylin and eosin histopathology (H&E). The goal of this work is to combine three confocal imaging modes: acridine orange fluorescence (AO) for labeling nuclei, eosin fluorescence (Eo) for labeling cytoplasm, and endogenous reflectance (R) for marking collagen and keratin. Absorption contrast is achieved by alternating the excitation wavelength: 488 nm (AO fluorescence) and 532 nm (Eo fluorescence). Superposition and false-coloring of these modes mimics H&E, enabling detection of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). The sum of mosaic Eo+R is false-colored pink to mimic the appearance of eosin, while the AO mosaic is false-colored purple to mimic the appearance of hematoxylin in H&E. In this study, mosaics of 10 Mohs surgical excisions containing invasive SCC, and five containing only normal tissue were subdivided for digital presentation equivalent to 4 × histology. Of the total 50 SCC and 25 normal sub-mosaics presented, two reviewers made two and three type-2 errors (false positives), respectively. Limitations to precisely mimic H&E included occasional elastin staining by AO. These results suggest that confocal mosaics may effectively guide staged SCC excisions in skin and other tissues. PMID:22734774

  14. Tri-modal confocal mosaics detect residual invasive squamous cell carcinoma in Mohs surgical excisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Dan; Bar, Anna; Snaveley, Nicholas; Lee, Ken; Chen, Nathaniel; Swanson, Neil; Simpson, Eric; Jacques, Steve

    2012-06-01

    For rapid, intra-operative pathological margin assessment to guide staged cancer excisions, multimodal confocal mosaic scan image wide surgical margins (approximately 1 cm) with sub-cellular resolution and mimic the appearance of conventional hematoxylin and eosin histopathology (H&E). The goal of this work is to combine three confocal imaging modes: acridine orange fluorescence (AO) for labeling nuclei, eosin fluorescence (Eo) for labeling cytoplasm, and endogenous reflectance (R) for marking collagen and keratin. Absorption contrast is achieved by alternating the excitation wavelength: 488 nm (AO fluorescence) and 532 nm (Eo fluorescence). Superposition and false-coloring of these modes mimics H&E, enabling detection of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). The sum of mosaic Eo+R is false-colored pink to mimic the appearance of eosin, while the AO mosaic is false-colored purple to mimic the appearance of hematoxylin in H&E. In this study, mosaics of 10 Mohs surgical excisions containing invasive SCC, and five containing only normal tissue were subdivided for digital presentation equivalent to 4× histology. Of the total 50 SCC and 25 normal sub-mosaics presented, two reviewers made two and three type-2 errors (false positives), respectively. Limitations to precisely mimic H&E included occasional elastin staining by AO. These results suggest that confocal mosaics may effectively guide staged SCC excisions in skin and other tissues.

  15. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva: A case report.

    PubMed

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Kaliki, Swathi; Mishra, Dilip Kumar; Reddy, Vijay Anand; Naik, Milind N

    2015-12-01

    A 40-year-old male presented with an orbital extension of conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The orbital mass was seen protruding outward from the left palpebral fissure overhanging the lower eyelid, completely obscuring the globe and lower lid. The patient gave a history of excision biopsy, which was histopathologically diagnosed as ocular surface squamous neoplasia. He also gave a history of tumor recurrence, which gradually progressed to assume the form of the presently visible orbital mass. Computed tomography of the orbits showed the mass extending into the left orbit causing superior displacement of the globe. After a negative locoregional and systemic metastatic screening, neoadjuvant intravenous systemic chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil were initiated in an attempt to reduce the size of the tumor. Three cycles of tri-weekly chemotherapy resulted in a significant reduction of the orbital tumor size with the globe and the lower lid being visible, thus making a lid-sparing orbital exenteration possible. The patient subsequently underwent an orbital exenteration and at 6-month follow-up, the patient was free from local and regional disease. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case where systemic neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been used to reduce the size of invasive SCC with orbital extension, thereby permitting a lid-sparing orbital exenteration. PMID:26862101

  16. Lycopene inhibits the cell proliferation and invasion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min; Wu, Qundan; Zhang, Min; Huang, Jinbei

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene has been shown to be associated with anticancer effects in numerous tumor types. However, the underlying mechanisms of lycopene in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remain to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of lycopene overload and the cytotoxic effects of lycopene on HNSCC cells, and to determine the possible mechanisms involved. Treatment with lycopene at a dose of >10 µM for >24 h inhibited the growth of FaDu and Cal27 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The clearest increase in growth inhibition was due to the apoptotic population being significantly increased. The invasion abilities decreased with 25 µM lycopene exerting significant inhibitory effects (P<0.01). Mechanistic studies revealed that lycopene induced the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma-associated X protein, and therefore, resulted in the inhibition of the protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. These data provided insights into the antitumor activity of lycopene in HNSCC cells. PMID:27510325

  17. PHENOTYPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF BREAST INVASIVE CARCINOMA VIA TRANSFERABLE TISSUE MORPHOMETRIC PATTERNS LEARNED FROM GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ju; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Wang, Yunfu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Chang, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of whole slide images (WSIs) in a large cohort may provide predictive models of clinical outcome. However, the performance of the existing techniques is hindered as a result of large technical variations (e.g., fixation, staining) and biological heterogeneities (e.g., cell type, cell state) that are always present in a large cohort. Although unsupervised feature learning provides a promising way in learning pertinent features without human intervention, its capability can be greatly limited due to the lack of well-curated examples. In this paper, we explored the transferability of knowledge acquired from a well-curated Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) dataset through its application to the representation and characterization of tissue histology from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Breast Invasive Carcinoma (BRCA) cohort. Our experimental results reveals two major phenotypic subtypes with statistically significantly different survival curves. Further differential expression analysis of these two subtypes indicates enrichment of genes regulated by NF-kB in response to TNF and genes up-regulated in response to IFNG. PMID:27390615

  18. Breast cancer subtype-specific interactions with the microenvironment dictate mechanisms of invasion

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Tuyen T.; Prechtl, Amanda M.; Pearson, Gray W.

    2011-01-01

    Most ductal breast carcinoma cells are weakly invasive in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that components of their microenvironment may facilitate a transition from in situ to invasive stages during progression. Here we report that co-culture of mammary fibroblasts specifically triggers invasive behavior in basal-type breast cancer cells through a ligand independent mechanism. When cultured alone in organotypic culture, both basal and luminal-type breast cancer cells formed noninvasive spheroids with characteristics of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). In contrast, when co-cultured with mammary fibroblasts, basal-type spheroids exhibited invasive character whereas the luminal-type spheroids retained a benign and noninvasive duct-like architecture. Real-time imaging and functional studies revealed that the specificity of invasion was linked to a unique capacity of basal-type breast cancer cells to move within spheroids. Mammary fibroblasts induced invasion by triggering basal-type breast cancer cells to convert from a noninvasive program of mammary epithelial morphogenesis, to an invasive program of sprouting endothelial angiogenesis. Contrary to existing invasion models, soluble ligands produced by the fibroblasts were not sufficient to trigger invasion. Instead, basal-type invasion relied upon a Cdc42-dependent reorganization of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix by fibroblasts. Inhibiting basal-type cell movement with clinically relevant drugs blocked invasion in organotypic culture and in animals, suggesting a new treatment strategy for early-stage patients. Together our findings establish that fibroblast recruitment by basal-type breast cancer cells into early-stage tumors is sufficient to trigger their conversion from a benign, non-invasive DCIS-like stage to a malignant invasive stage. Further, our findings suggest that different subtypes of breast cancer may require distinct types of contributions from the microenvironment to undergo malignant

  19. Evaluation of Lymphatic and Vascular Invasion in Relation to Clinicopathological Factors and Treatment Outcome in Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Adel, Mohamad; Kao, Huang-Kai; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Huang, Jung-Ju; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Yenlin; Browne, Timothy; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Chang, Yu-Liang; Chang, Kai-Ping

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the associations between lymphatic and vascular invasion of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and clinicopathological manifestations, as well as their impact on patient outcomes after treatment.In total, 571 patients with primary OSCC who underwent surgery with or without adjuvant therapy were enrolled.Lymphatic and vascular invasion were found in 28 (5%) and 16 (3%) patients, respectively. Significant associations were found between lymphatic and vascular invasion and overall stage (P < 0.001 and P = 0.020, respectively), tumor stage (P = 0.009 and P = 0.025, respectively), nodal metastasis (both P < 0.001), extracapsular spread (both P < 0.001), perineural invasion (both P < 0.001), bone invasion (P = 0.004 and P = 0.001, respectively), depth of invasion (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively), and pathologic differentiation (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). In the analysis of adverse events during follow-up, neither lymphatic nor vascular invasion was statistically associated with local recurrence, neck recurrence, and distant metastasis. Although lymphatic invasion exhibited significant associations with poorer overall survival (P < 0.001), disease-specific survival (P < 0.001), and disease-free survival (P = 0.01), it was not demonstrated to be an independent prognostic factor in all multivariate analyses.Although both lymphatic and vascular invasion are associated with many clinicopathological manifestations, neither affects the occurrence of locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis in patients with OSCC after treatment. PMID:26512553

  20. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  1. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  2. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  3. Metastatic Male Ductal Breast Cancer Mimicking Obstructing Primary Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  4. Breast cancer subtype-specific interactions with the microenvironment dictate mechanisms of invasion.

    PubMed

    Dang, Tuyen T; Prechtl, Amanda M; Pearson, Gray W

    2011-11-01

    Most ductal breast carcinoma cells are weakly invasive in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that components of their microenvironment may facilitate a transition from in situ to invasive stages during progression. Here, we report that coculture of mammary fibroblasts specifically triggers invasive behavior in basal-type breast cancer cells through a ligand independent mechanism. When cultured alone in organotypic culture, both basal- and luminal-type breast cancer cells formed noninvasive spheroids with characteristics of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). In contrast, when cocultured with mammary fibroblasts, basal-type spheroids exhibited invasive character whereas the luminal-type spheroids retained a benign and noninvasive duct-like architecture. Real-time imaging and functional studies revealed that the specificity of invasion was linked to a unique capacity of basal-type breast cancer cells to move within spheroids. Mammary fibroblasts induced invasion by triggering basal-type breast cancer cells to convert from a noninvasive program of mammary epithelial morphogenesis to an invasive program of sprouting endothelial angiogenesis. Contrary to the existing invasion models, soluble ligands produced by the fibroblasts were not sufficient to trigger invasion. Instead, basal-type invasion relied upon a Cdc42-dependent reorganization of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix by fibroblasts. Inhibiting basal-type cell movement with clinically relevant drugs blocked invasion both in organotypic culture and in animals, suggesting a new treatment strategy for early-stage patients. Together our findings establish that fibroblast recruitment by basal-type breast cancer cells into early-stage tumors is sufficient to trigger their conversion from a benign, noninvasive DCIS-like stage to a malignant invasive stage. Furthermore, our findings suggest that different subtypes of breast cancer may require distinct types of contributions from the microenvironment to undergo

  5. Marriage, cohabitation and incidence trends of invasive penile squamous cell carcinoma in Denmark 1978-2010.

    PubMed

    Ulff-Møller, Constance J; Simonsen, Jacob; Frisch, Morten

    2013-09-01

    Few population-based studies have investigated the relation between living arrangements and risk of invasive penile squamous cell carcinoma (iP-SCC). Using long-term national cancer registry data in Denmark we examined incidence trends of iP-SCC. Furthermore, we examined the relation between marital status, cohabitation status and risk of iP-SCC using hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) obtained in Cox proportional hazards regression analyses as our measure of relative risk. Overall, 1,292 cases of iP-SCC were identified during 65.6 million person-years of observation between 1978 and 2010. During this period, the WHO world age-standardized incidence remained relatively stable (p-trend = 0.41) with an average incidence of 1.05 cases per 100,000 person-years. When compared to married men, those who were unmarried (HR 1.37; 95% CI: 1.13-1.66), divorced (HR 1.49; 95% CI: 1.24-1.79) or widowed (HR 1.36; 95% CI: 1.13-1.63) were at increased risk of iP-SCC. Regarding cohabitation status, single-living men were at increased risk of iP-SCC compared to men in opposite-sex cohabitation (HR 1.43; 95% CI: 1.26-1.62). Risk increased with increasing numbers of prior opposite-sex (p-trend = 0.02) and same-sex (p-trend < 0.001) cohabitations. In conclusion, single-living Danish men and men who are not currently married are at increased risk of iP-SCC, and the risk increases with the number of prior cohabitations, perhaps reflecting less stable sexual relations in these subgroups.

  6. Future Imaging Alternatives: The Clinical Non-invasive Modalities in Diagnosis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Esam

    2015-01-01

    Background : Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a remarkably high incidence worldwide, and a fairly serious prognosis. This is encouraging further research into advanced technologies for non-invasive methods of making early diagnoses, ideally in primary care settings. Method : In this article, the available objective Non-imaging methods for diagnosing OSCC have been reviewed. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL have been searched for advanced technologies of non-invasive methods in diagnosis of OSCC, including oral brush biopsy, optical biopsy, saliva-based oral cancer diagnosis and others. Results : Toluidine blue, one of the oldest non-invasive methods for diagnosing OSCC, is unreliable because of its subjectivity, as it is dependent on the experience of the examiner. The diagnosis of Oral carcinoma by Oral brush biopsy with exfoliative cytology based on nano-bio-chip sensor platform shows 97–100% sensitivity and 86% specificity. Another promising non-invasive technique for OSCC diagnosis is saliva-based oral cancer diagnosis, which is an alternative to serum testing. Optical biopsy, which uses the technology of spectroscopy, can be used to detect changes at a sub-cellular level; thus, it provides information that may not be available with conventional histology with reliable sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion : It is clearly evident that screening and early effective detection of cancer and pre-cancerous lesions have the potential to reduce the morbidity and mortality of this disease. The imaging technologies are subjective procedures since all of them require interpretation and significantly affected by the examiner experience. These make further research for advanced objective procedures. Saliva-based oral cancer diagnosis and optical biopsy are promising objective non-invasive methods for diagnosing OSCC. They are easy to perform clinically at primary care set. They show promising pathways for future development of more effective

  7. TGF-β1 promotes the migration and invasion of bladder carcinoma cells by increasing fascin1 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Naiwen; Bi, Xiaojun; Zeng, Yu; Zhu, Yuyan; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Xuejie; Bi, Jianbin; Kong, Chuize

    2016-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a multifunctional cytokine that is reported to regulate cellular motility and invasive capability during tumor progression. Fascin1, an actin-bundling protein, increases cell motility, migration and adhesion. To investigate the function of TGF-β1 and test whether fascin1 is an important mediator of the tumor response to TGF-β1 in bladder carcinoma cells, real-time RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to test changes in fascin1 expression after TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) treatment in T24 and BIU87 cells. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique was performed to silence fascin1. Cell viability and biological behavior changes were evaluated by cell growth (MTT), wound-healing and Matrigel invasion assays. In the present study, we found that the mRNA and protein levels of fascin1 in the T24 and BIU87 cells were significantly increased after 10 ng/ml TGF-β1 treatment (p<0.05). The proliferation of T24 cells (p=0.005) was also significantly increased, while no significant change was observed in BIU87 cells (p=0.318). In addition, the migratory and invasive potential of the two cell lines were promoted. Furthermore, we successfully silenced fascin1, and observed that fascin1 siRNA significantly attenuated the migration and invasiveness induced by TGF-β1. The findings suggested that TGF-β1 can promote invasion and migration of T24 and BIU87 bladder carcinoma cells, and the increase in fascin1 expression may be the key point of this impact of TGF-β1.

  8. Piperlongumine selectively kills hepatocellular carcinoma cells and preferentially inhibits their invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Ju Mei; Xiong, Xin Xin; Qiu, Xin Yao; Pan, Feng; Liu, Di; Lan, Shu Jue; Jin, Si; Yu, Shang Bin; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) are highly malignant and aggressive tumors lack of effective therapeutic drugs. Piperlongumine (PL), a natural product isolated from longer pepper plants, is recently identified as a potent cytotoxic compound highly selective to cancer cells. Here, we reported that PL specifically suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway. PL selectively killed HCC cells but not normal hepatocytes with an IC50 of 10-20 μM while PL at much lower concentrations only suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion. PL selectively elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HCC cells, which activated or up-regulated downstream PERK/Ire 1α/Grp78, p38/JNK/Erk and CHOP subsequently. Administration of antioxidants completely abolished PL's effects on cell death and migration/invasion. However, pharmacological inhibition of ER stress-responses or MAPKs signaling pathways with corresponding specific inhibitors only reversed PL's effect on cell migration/invasion but not on cell death. Consistently, knocking-down of CHOP by RNA interference only reversed PL-suppressed HCC cell migration. Finally, PL significantly suppressed HCC development and activated the ER-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway in HCC xenografts in vivo. Taken together, PL selectively killed HCC cells and preferentially inhibited HCC cell migration/invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP axis, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy for the highly malignant and aggressive HCC clinically. PMID:25788268

  9. Downregulation of VANGL1 Inhibits Cellular Invasion Rather than Cell Motility in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Without Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Toylu, Asli; Atabey, Nese; Sercan, Zeynep; Sakizli, Meral

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The Wnt planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is one of the Wnt pathways which plays a critical role in cell proliferation and fate. The VANGL1 protein is one of Wnt-PCP pathway components. It is known that Wnt-PCP pathway has major roles in cell motility but its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression through invasion and metastasis needs to be clarified. Methods: We silenced VANGL1 gene expression in the HepG2 HCC cell line by stable transfection with a vector containing siRNA template for VANGL1 and investigated the change in cell invasion and motility. Results: Transfected cells with the siRNA template showed significantly suppressed invasive capacity when compared to controls although cellular motility was only slightly affected. Conclusion: Our study showed a basal role for VANGL1 with respect to the invasive capacity of HCC cells. This suggests that the Wnt-PCP pathway may play a role in progression of HCC through cellular invasion but further studies are needed to clarify its role in cell motility. PMID:25874746

  10. miR-4295 promotes cell proliferation and invasion in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma via CDKN1A

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Mingchen; Geng, Yiwei; Lu, Peng; Xi, Ying; Wei, Sidong; Wang, Liuxing; Fan, Qingxia; Ma, Wang

    2015-09-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), has remained elusive. Here, we identified that miR-4295 promotes ATC cell proliferation by negatively regulates its target gene CDKN1A. In ATC cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-4295, while miR-4295 inhibitor significantly inhibited the cell proliferation. Transwell assay showed that miR-4295 mimics significantly promoted the migration and invasion of ATC cells, whereas miR-4295 inhibitors significantly reduced cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-4295 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of CDKN1A, and western blotting showed that miR-4295 suppressed the expression of CDKN1A at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A and promotes proliferation and invasion of ATC cell lines. Thus, miR-4295 may represent a potential therapeutic target for ATC intervention. - Highlights: • miR-4295 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 targets 3′UTR of CDKN1A in ATC cells. • miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A in ATC cells.

  11. S100A4 accelerates the proliferation and invasion of endometrioid carcinoma and is associated with the "MELF" pattern.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Shinichiro; Nojima, Satoshi; Ohshima, Kenji; Hori, Yumiko; Kurashige, Masako; Wada, Naoki; Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Morii, Eiichi

    2016-09-01

    Endometrioid carcinoma (EC) is one of the most common malignancies of the female genital system. Although the behavior of EC ranges from an excellent prognosis to aggressive disease with a poor outcome, the factors that determine its diversity have not been determined. Here, we show that S100A4, a calcium-binding protein of the EF-hand type, is correlated with the proliferation and invasion ability of EC. We demonstrated previously that EC cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity were more tumorigenic than ALDH-lo cells. Screening by shotgun proteomics demonstrated that the expression level of S100A4 in ALDH-hi EC cells was significantly higher than that in ALDH-lo cells. S100A4-knockout cells generated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system showed reduced proliferation and invasion. These cells showed impaired AKT phosphorylation and matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, accounting for their impaired proliferation and invasion, respectively. Furthermore, in clinical EC samples, elevated expression of S100A4 was highly related to myometrial and lymphatic invasion in well to moderately differentiated EC. Notably, strong and diffuse expression of S100A4 was observed in tumor tissues with a microcystic, elongated and fragmented ("MELF") pattern, which is associated with a highly invasive EC phenotype. Collectively, our results demonstrate not only that high expression of S100A4 contributes to an aggressive phenotype of EC, but also that its elevated expression is closely related to the MELF histopathological pattern. PMID:27348205

  12. miR-940 Suppresses Tumor Cell Invasion and Migration via Regulation of CXCR2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dong; Zhang, Yaodong; Yang, Renjie; Wang, Xing; Ji, Guwei; Huo, Liqun; Shao, Zicheng

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the expression of miR-940 in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its impact on function and biological mechanism in the HCC cells. Methods. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to quantify miR-940 expression in 46 cases of tissues and cells. Transfection of HCC cell lines was performed by miR-940 mimics; the abilities of invasion and migration were assessed through Transwell array. Western blot represents the alteration in expression of CXCR2 by miR-940 mimics. Results. miR-940 expression was decreased significantly in the HCC tissues and the relevant cell lines. miR-940 upregulation suppressed the invasion and migration of HCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, the CXCR2 was downregulated to suppress invasion and migration after miR-940 mimics. Moreover, decreased miR-940 expression was negatively correlated with Edmondson grade (P = 0.008), tumor microsatellite or multiple tumors (P = 0.04), vascular invasion (P = 0.035), and recurrence and metastasis (P = 0.038). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that decreased miR-940 expression contributed to poor overall survival (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Our findings present that miR-940 acts as a pivotal adaptor of CXCR2 and its transcription downregulated CXCR2 expression to decrease HCC invasion and migration in vitro. Our study suggests that miR-940 may be a novel poor prognostic biomarker for HCC. PMID:27807540

  13. Reflectance confocal microscopy and dermoscopy for in vivo, non-invasive skin imaging of superficial basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GHITA, MIHAELA A.; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; ROSCA, ADRIAN E.; KALESHI, HARILLAQ; CARUNTU, ANA; MORARU, LILIANA; DOCEA, ANCA OANA; ZURAC, SABINA; BODA, DANIEL; NEAGU, MONICA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC) is the second most frequent histological type of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), usually requiring a skin biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. It usually appears on the upper trunk and shoulders as erythematous and squamous lesions. Although it has a slow growth and seldom metastasizes, early diagnosis and management are of crucial importance in preventing local invasion and subsequent disfigurement. Dermoscopy is nowadays an indispensable tool for the dermatologist when evaluating skin tumors. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a novel imaging technique that allows the non-invasive, in vivo quasi-microscopic morphological and dynamic assessment of superficial skin tumors. Moreover, it offers the advantage of performing infinite repeatable determinations to monitor disease progression and non-surgical treatment for sBCC. Herein, we present three lesions of sBCC evaluated using in vivo and non-invasive imaging techniques, emphasizing the usefulness of combining RCM with dermoscopy for increasing the diagnostic accuracy of sBCC. PMID:27123056

  14. Reduced 5-Methylcytosine Level as a Potential Progression Predictor in Patients with T1 or Non-Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chi-Jung; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chuu, Chih-Pin; Yang, Chi-Rei; Chang, Yi-Huei; Huang, Chi-Ping; Chen, Wen-Chi; Chung, Mu-Chi; Chang, Han

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the level of DNA methylation in urothelial carcinomas (UCs) using 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) immunohistochemistry (IHC). We examined the relationship among 5-MeC levels, DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) immunostaining levels, and clinicopathologic features. Tissue samples included 23 normal urothelia and 150 urothelial neoplasia, which comprised 40 non-invasive and 110 invasive UCs. The levels of 5-MeC and DNMT1 were assessed based on their immunoreactivities and then divided into low and high levels. In addition, we collected information on clinical variables, pathologic features, and recurrent status from patient questionnaires and medical records. Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression model were used for analyses. Results showed that 5-MeC levels were positively associated with DNMT1 levels in UC (p = 0.0288). Both 5-MeC and DNMT1 were low in approximately 50% (76/150) of UC. The percentage of low 5-MeC levels was higher in invasive UC (65/110; 59%) than in normal urothelia (2/23; 13%) and non-invasive UC (18/40; 45%). Clinical factors were independently associated with low 5-MeC levels after adjusting for age and sex, including cancer stages II–IV, presence of UC in situ, and marked inflammation. Low 5-MeC levels in stage I invasive UC were not significantly different from those of non-invasive tumors (p = 0.8478). Low DNMT1 levels were only associated with UC with squamous differentiation (p = 0.0365). Neither 5-MeC nor DNMT1 levels were associated with UC recurrence. In conclusion, a low 5-MeC level could predict the progression of UC invasion into muscle. PMID:25561224

  15. The cell-cell adhesion receptor Mel-CAM acts as a tumor suppressor in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Shih, L. M.; Hsu, M. Y.; Palazzo, J. P.; Herlyn, M.

    1997-01-01

    Mel-CAM (MUC18 or CD146) is a cell adhesion molecule sharing sequence homology with members of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. Mel-CAM was originally described as a marker associated with invasion and metastasis in melanoma. We determined here the distribution and biological significance of Mel-CAM in normal, benign proliferative, and neoplastic breast ductal epithelium. Using a Mel-CAM-specific monoclonal antibody, we, immunohistochemically demonstrate Mel-CAM expression in 14 of 14 (100%) normal breast epithelia and benign proliferative ductal epithelial lesions, whereas Mel-CAM expression can only be focally detected in 12 of 72 (17%) breast carcinomas. Solid-phase cell adhesion assay revealed that breast carcinoma cells in culture express the ligand for Mel-CAM. Transfection of Mel-CAM cDNA into breast carcinoma cells induces a more cohesive cell growth pattern and establishes smaller tumors in immunocompromised mice than mock transfectants. In conclusion, Mel-CAM is distributed throughout normal and benign proliferative mammary ductal epithelium, but it is frequently lost in carcinomas; it functions as a heterophilic cell-cell adhesion molecule in breast epithelium, and loss of Mel-CAM expression in breast carcinoma may be an important step for tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:9284823

  16. The association of the microcystic, elongated and fragmented (MELF) invasion pattern in endometrial carcinomas with deep myometrial invasion, lymphovascular space invasion and lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Dogan Altunpulluk, M; Kir, G; Topal, C S; Cetiner, H; Gocmen, A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of microcystic, elongated and fragmented (MELF) pattern of invasion in endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinomas (EA) and its association with prognostic factors. Stained tissue sections from 121 cases of EA (total hysterectomy and pelvic, with or without para-aortic, lymphadenectomy specimens) were reviewed to identify cases showing MELF-type invasion. The prognostic factors of low tumour grade, deep myometrial invasion (MI), cervical stromal involvement, lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI), lymph node (LN) metastasis and advanced clinical stage were more frequently observed in MELF-positive cases (p < 0.05). Thus, MELF-positive cases had an increased frequency (28/121) of these prognostic factors, which has implications in routine clinical practice, as it signals the importance of recognising MELF pattern invasion. In univariate analysis, MELF positivity, deep MI, cervical stroma involvement and LVSI were significantly related to LN metastasis (p < 0.05). However, in multivariate analysis, only MELF pattern invasion and cervical stroma involvement were independent factors for LN metastasis. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of MELF pattern of invasion in endometrial adenocarcinoma.

  17. A case of concomitant occurrence of solitary fibrous tumor and urothelial high-grade invasive carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Spairani, Cinzia; Squillaci, Salvatore; Pitino, Antonio; Ferrari, Mauro; Montefiore, Franco; Rossi, Cristina; Fusco, Walter; Bigatti, Gian Luigi

    2014-05-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm, most commonly arising from the pleura. It has also been recently described to occur in extrapleural sites. To our knowledge, only 16 cases of SFT have been reported in the urinary bladder to date. We report the clinicopathological features of a vesical SFT occurring in a 60-year-old man who presented a concomitant invasive high-grade urothelial cell carcinoma. No similar association has been found in the accessible literature. The morphologic and immunohistochemical clues leading to the correct diagnosis of SFT have been correlated with the data of the literature, and the differential diagnosis is briefly discussed.

  18. MicroRNA-373 promotes migration and invasion in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by inhibiting TIMP3 expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenzhi; Li, Mengkao; Chen, Xiangming; Zhang, Dakai; Wei, Lin; Zhang, Zicheng; Wang, Shuang; Meng, Li; Zhu, Shan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant pathological type of esophageal carcinoma in Asia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 19-22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs acting on target mRNAs that function as either oncogenes or anti-oncogenes. It has been confirmed that miR-373 expression varies among different tumor types. However, its mechanism is still unclear in ESCC. In our current study, we found that miR-373 expression was upregulated in ESCC tissues compared with matched adjacent normal tissues, as well as in the plasma of ESCC patients compared with that of healthy volunteers. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 cells enhanced proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion. On the other hand, suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 cells decreased proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion and also improved cell apoptosis. Moreover, we found that TIMP3, which was reported to suppress invasion and metastasis of ESCC, was a direct target of miR-373. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 caused a reduction of TIMP3 mRNA and protein, whereas suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 led to an increase of TIMP3 mRNA and protein. Introducing TIMP3 in miR-373 over-expressed cells or knocking down TIMP3 in miR-373 suppressed cells could partially abrogate the effect of miR-373 on migration and invasion. Therefore, these results prove that as an oncogene, miRNA-373 would be an important and reliable biomarker for ESCC diagnosis and treatment by targeting TIMP3.

  19. MicroRNA-373 promotes migration and invasion in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by inhibiting TIMP3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhi; Li, Mengkao; Chen, Xiangming; Zhang, Dakai; Wei, Lin; Zhang, Zicheng; Wang, Shuang; Meng, Li; Zhu, Shan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant pathological type of esophageal carcinoma in Asia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 19-22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs acting on target mRNAs that function as either oncogenes or anti-oncogenes. It has been confirmed that miR-373 expression varies among different tumor types. However, its mechanism is still unclear in ESCC. In our current study, we found that miR-373 expression was upregulated in ESCC tissues compared with matched adjacent normal tissues, as well as in the plasma of ESCC patients compared with that of healthy volunteers. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 cells enhanced proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion. On the other hand, suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 cells decreased proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion and also improved cell apoptosis. Moreover, we found that TIMP3, which was reported to suppress invasion and metastasis of ESCC, was a direct target of miR-373. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 caused a reduction of TIMP3 mRNA and protein, whereas suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 led to an increase of TIMP3 mRNA and protein. Introducing TIMP3 in miR-373 over-expressed cells or knocking down TIMP3 in miR-373 suppressed cells could partially abrogate the effect of miR-373 on migration and invasion. Therefore, these results prove that as an oncogene, miRNA-373 would be an important and reliable biomarker for ESCC diagnosis and treatment by targeting TIMP3. PMID:27429858

  20. MicroRNA-373 promotes migration and invasion in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by inhibiting TIMP3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhi; Li, Mengkao; Chen, Xiangming; Zhang, Dakai; Wei, Lin; Zhang, Zicheng; Wang, Shuang; Meng, Li; Zhu, Shan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant pathological type of esophageal carcinoma in Asia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 19-22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs acting on target mRNAs that function as either oncogenes or anti-oncogenes. It has been confirmed that miR-373 expression varies among different tumor types. However, its mechanism is still unclear in ESCC. In our current study, we found that miR-373 expression was upregulated in ESCC tissues compared with matched adjacent normal tissues, as well as in the plasma of ESCC patients compared with that of healthy volunteers. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 cells enhanced proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion. On the other hand, suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 cells decreased proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion and also improved cell apoptosis. Moreover, we found that TIMP3, which was reported to suppress invasion and metastasis of ESCC, was a direct target of miR-373. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 caused a reduction of TIMP3 mRNA and protein, whereas suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 led to an increase of TIMP3 mRNA and protein. Introducing TIMP3 in miR-373 over-expressed cells or knocking down TIMP3 in miR-373 suppressed cells could partially abrogate the effect of miR-373 on migration and invasion. Therefore, these results prove that as an oncogene, miRNA-373 would be an important and reliable biomarker for ESCC diagnosis and treatment by targeting TIMP3. PMID:27073718

  1. Co-Expression of Ezrin-CLIC5-Podocalyxin Is Associated with Migration and Invasiveness in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Téllez, Teresita N. J.; Lopez, Tania V.; Vásquez Garzón, Verónica Rocío; Villa-Treviño, Saúl

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Prognostic markers are important for predicting the progression and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Ezrin (EZR) and Podocalyxin (PODXL) are proteins associated with invasion, migration and poor prognosis in various types of cancer. Recently, it has been observed that chloride intracellular channel 5 (CLIC5) forms a complex with EZR and PODXL and that it is required for podocyte structure and function. In this study, we evaluated the overexpression of EZR, PODXL and CLIC5 in HCC. Methods The modified resistant hepatocyte model (MRHR), human biopsies and HCC cell lines (HepG2, Huh7 and SNU387) were used in this study. Gene and protein expression levels were evaluated in the MRHR by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses, and protein expression in the human biopsies was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Protein expression in the HCC cell lines was evaluated by immunofluorescence and Western blot, also the migration and invasive abilities of Huh7 cells were evaluated using shRNA-mediated inhibition. Results Our results indicated that these genes and proteins were overexpressed in HCC. Moreover, when the expression of CLIC5 and PODXL was inhibited in Huh7 cells, we observed decreased migration and invasion. Conclusion This study suggested that EZR, CLIC5 and PODXL could be biological markers to predict the prognosis of HCC and that these proteins participate in migration and invasion processes. PMID:26135398

  2. JQ1, a small molecule inhibitor of BRD4, suppresses cell growth and invasion in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limei; Wu, Xiuyin; Huang, Ping; Lv, Zhijun; Qi, Yuping; Wei, Xiujuan; Yang, Pishan; Zhang, Fenghe

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate whether bromodomain 4 (BRD4) is expressed in Cal27 cells and to assess the effect of JQ1 on cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and BRD4, C-Myc and Twist expression in Cal27 cells. Immunofluorescence staining was used to determine whether BRD4 was expressed in Cal27 cells. Cell viability and proliferation were evaluated using CCK-8 assay. Flow cytometry was used to determine the apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. The cell invasion was evaluated using Transwell plate. The expression levels of BRD4, C-Myc and Twist were determined by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blotting. BRD4 was highly expressed in Cal27 cells. JQ1 inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis, induced cell cycle arrest, and inhibited cell invasion. Gene and protein expression levels of BRD4, C-Myc and Twist were downregulated in cells treated with JQ1. JQ1 inhibited Cal27 cell growth and invasion, and downregulated expression of several oncogenes. JQ1 may be a new drug for oral squamous cell carcinoma treatment. PMID:27573714

  3. Multi-photon imaging of tumor cell invasion in an orthotopic mouse model of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gatesman Ammer, Amanda; Hayes, Karen E; Martin, Karen H; Zhang, Lingqing; Spirou, George A; Weed, Scott A

    2011-07-25

    Loco-regional invasion of head and neck cancer is linked to metastatic risk and presents a difficult challenge in designing and implementing patient management strategies. Orthotopic mouse models of oral cancer have been developed to facilitate the study of factors that impact invasion and serve as model system for evaluating anti-tumor therapeutics. In these systems, visualization of disseminated tumor cells within oral cavity tissues has typically been conducted by either conventional histology or with in vivo bioluminescent methods. A primary drawback of these techniques is the inherent inability to accurately visualize and quantify early tumor cell invasion arising from the primary site in three dimensions. Here we describe a protocol that combines an established model for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue (SCOT) with two-photon imaging to allow multi-vectorial visualization of lingual tumor spread. The OSC-19 head and neck tumor cell line was stably engineered to express the F-actin binding peptide LifeAct fused to the mCherry fluorescent protein (LifeAct-mCherry). Fox1(nu/nu) mice injected with these cells reliably form tumors that allow the tongue to be visualized by ex-vivo application of two-photon microscopy. This technique allows for the orthotopic visualization of the tumor mass and locally invading cells in excised tongues without disruption of the regional tumor microenvironment. In addition, this system allows for the quantification of tumor cell invasion by calculating distances that invaded cells move from the primary tumor site. Overall this procedure provides an enhanced model system for analyzing factors that contribute to SCOT invasion and therapeutic treatments tailored to prevent local invasion and distant metastatic spread. This method also has the potential to be ultimately combined with other imaging modalities in an in vivo setting.

  4. Integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} effectors p130Cas, Src and talin regulate carcinoma invasion and chemoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Sansing, Hope A.; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Berrier, Allison L.

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Proteomics of clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinoma. {yields} p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin regulate oral carcinoma invasion. {yields} p130Cas, talin, Src and zyxin regulate oral carcinoma resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Ligand engagement by integrins induces receptor clustering and formation of complexes at the integrin cytoplasmic face that controls cell signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics critical for adhesion-dependent processes. This study searches for a subset of integrin effectors that coordinates both tumor cell invasion and resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin in oral carcinomas. Candidate integrin effectors were identified in a proteomics screen of proteins recruited to clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta} or {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinomas. Proteins with diverse functions including microtubule and actin binding proteins, and factors involved in trafficking, transcription and translation were identified in oral carcinoma integrin complexes. Knockdown of effectors in the oral carcinoma HN12 cells revealed that p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin were required for invasion through Matrigel. Disruption of talin or p130Cas by RNA interference increased resistance to cisplatin, whereas targeting Dek, Src or zyxin reduced HN12 resistance to cisplatin. Analysis of the spreading of HN12 cells on collagen I and laminin I revealed that a decrease in p130Cas or talin expression inhibited spreading on both matrices. Interestingly, a reduction in zyxin expression enhanced spreading on laminin I and inhibited spreading on collagen I. Reduction of Dek, Src, talin or zyxin expression reduced HN12 proliferation by 30%. Proliferation was not affected by a reduction in p130Cas expression. We conclude that p130Cas, Src and talin function in both oral carcinoma invasion and resistance to cisplatin.

  5. Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Acidic Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Roland, Christina L.; Deng, Defeng; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Moshnikova, Anna; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the USA, accounting for ~40,000 deaths annually. The dismal prognosis for PDAC is largely due to its late diagnosis. Currently, the most sensitive diagnosis of PDAC requires invasive procedures, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, which has inherent risks and accuracy that is highly operator dependent. Here we took advantage of a general characteristic of solid tumors, the acidic microenvironment that is generated as a by-product of metabolism, to develop a novel approach of using pH (Low) Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) for imaging of PDAC. We show that fluorescently labeled pHLIPs can localize and specifically detect PDAC in human xenografts as well as PDAC and PanIN lesions in genetically engineered mouse models. This novel approach may improve detection, differential diagnosis and staging of PDAC.

  6. Prognosis of Minimally Invasive Carcinoma Arising in Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gloria H.; Wang, Huamin; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Klein, Alison P.; Askin, Frederic B.; Schwartz, Lauren Ende; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Cameron, John L.; O’Reilly, Eileen M.; Yu, Kenneth H.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2012-01-01

    While patients with surgically resected non-invasive mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) of the pancreas are cured, the behavior of surgically resected minimally invasive adenocarcinomas arising in MCN has not been well established. We report 16 surgically resected MCNs with minimal invasion defined as unifocal or multifocal microscopic invasive adenocarcinoma confined to the ovarian stroma of the MCN without capsular or pancreatic parenchymal invasion. Pathological findings were correlated with patient demographics, type of surgery, and long-term follow-up. Our study included 15 females and 1 male ranging in age from 25–66 years. The patients were followed for a mean of 48.6 months (range 12–148 months). The MCNs ranged in size from 3.5–25 cm and were all located in the body/tail of the gland. Lymphovascular invasion was not identified in any of the cases and all lymph nodes were negative for tumor. Ten neoplasms had unifocal invasion, while 6 had multifocal invasion. Twelve of the neoplasms were partially submitted for microscopic examination while 4 were submitted entirely. Only one of the 16 minimally invasive MCNs recurred, and that tumor had been minimally sampled pathologically. Our study demonstrates that the majority of patients with minimally invasive adenocarcinoma arising in MCN are cured by surgery, particularly if the neoplasms are completely examined histologically. PMID:23388125

  7. Elevated GAPDH expression is associated with the proliferation and invasion of lung and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lihong; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Shuqing; Sun, Mingzhong; Song, Yang; Du, Sha; Sun, Bing; Guo, Chunmei; Gong, Linlin; Hu, Jun; Guan, Hongwei; Shao, Shujuan

    2015-09-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, is one of the most investigated housekeeping genes and widely used as an internal control in analysis of gene expression levels. The present study was designed to assess whether GAPDH is associated with cancer cell growth and progression and, therefore may not be a good internal control in cancer research. Our results from clinical tissue studies showed that the levels of GAPDH protein were significantly up-regulated in lung squamous cell carcinoma tissues, compared with the adjacent normal lung tissues, and this was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. GAPDH knockdown by siRNA resulted in significant reductions in proliferation, migration, and invasion of lung squamous carcinoma cells in vitro. In a nude mouse cancer xenograft model, GAPDH knockdown significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and migration/invasion in vivo. In summary, GAPDH may not be an appropriate internal control for gene expression studies, especially in cancer research. The role of GAPDH in cancer development and progression should be further examined in pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:25944651

  8. Modeling invasive lobular breast carcinoma by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Annunziato, Stefano; Kas, Sjors M; Nethe, Micha; Yücel, Hatice; Del Bravo, Jessica; Pritchard, Colin; Bin Ali, Rahmen; van Gerwen, Bas; Siteur, Bjørn; Drenth, Anne Paulien; Schut, Eva; van de Ven, Marieke; Boelens, Mirjam C; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; Huijbers, Ivo J; van Miltenburg, Martine H; Jonkers, Jos

    2016-06-15

    Large-scale sequencing studies are rapidly identifying putative oncogenic mutations in human tumors. However, discrimination between passenger and driver events in tumorigenesis remains challenging and requires in vivo validation studies in reliable animal models of human cancer. In this study, we describe a novel strategy for in vivo validation of candidate tumor suppressors implicated in invasive lobular breast carcinoma (ILC), which is hallmarked by loss of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. We describe an approach to model ILC by intraductal injection of lentiviral vectors encoding Cre recombinase, the CRISPR/Cas9 system, or both in female mice carrying conditional alleles of the Cdh1 gene, encoding for E-cadherin. Using this approach, we were able to target ILC-initiating cells and induce specific gene disruption of Pten by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic gene editing. Whereas intraductal injection of Cas9-encoding lentiviruses induced Cas9-specific immune responses and development of tumors that did not resemble ILC, lentiviral delivery of a Pten targeting single-guide RNA (sgRNA) in mice with mammary gland-specific loss of E-cadherin and expression of Cas9 efficiently induced ILC development. This versatile platform can be used for rapid in vivo testing of putative tumor suppressor genes implicated in ILC, providing new opportunities for modeling invasive lobular breast carcinoma in mice. PMID:27340177

  9. Vascular and ductal elastotic changes in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Sakellariou, Stratigoula; Evangelou, Kostantinos; Liapis, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Delladetsima, Ioanna

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to identify and define the type and frequency of elastotic alterations of vessels and ducts in pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) and evaluate its diagnostic significance. Representative tissue from 36 Whipple specimens, stained with Verhoeff's Van-Gieson, was studied focusing on the density and distribution of elastic fibers in walls of vessels and ducts, in perivascular and periductal tissue and in tumor stroma. Vessels and ducts within the carcinoma, at tumor periphery and in non-tumoral pancreas were grouped and examined separately. Vimentin and α-SMA immunostains were used for the depiction of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Histochemistry revealed mild to severe elastotic changes of vessels and ducts in all examined cases. Vascular and ductal elastosis was more prominent within the tumor and diminished at tumor periphery. In tumor stroma and non-tumoral pancreatic tissue mild or no elastosis was identified. α-SMA+ cells were observed in large numbers in tumor stroma and as a ring around carcinomatous structures. There were scant α-SMA+ cells around elastotic and non-elastotic vessels. Conclusively, vascular and ductal elastosis is a tumor-associated phenomenon in PDAC. Its presence is indicative of benignity acquiring a possible diagnostic role. PMID:26619815

  10. Loss of heterozygosity occurs at the D11S29 locus on chromosome 11q23 in invasive cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Bethwaite, P. B.; Koreth, J.; Herrington, C. S.; McGee, J. O.

    1995-01-01

    Allelotypic detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) has been used to identify putative tumour-suppressor genes. Loci on human chromosome 11q23 are frequently altered in malignant disease, and LOH has been reported at an anonymous D11S29 locus at 11q23 in a proportion of breast and ovarian cancers and malignant melanomas. Previous studies have reported a high frequency of LOH in cervical carcinoma mapping to 11q23. Using polymerase chain reaction techniques employing probes for a recently described polymorphic dinucleotide microsatellite within this locus, we have searched for LOH in 69 cases of invasive cervical carcinoma. Genomic material was microdissected from sections cut from archival paraffin-embedded material, using the patients' constitutional genotype as a control Sixty-two (90%) of the cases were informative, and LOH occurred in 25/62 (40%) of tumours. Loss of an arm or single chromosome 11 is a well-recognised event in cervical carcinoma, and by employing other microsatellite polymorphisms mapping to 11q13 and 11p11-p12 we excluded those cases with widespread allelic loss. By doing so, LOH at D11S29 was found in 16/53 (30%) of tumours. The findings suggest a putative tumour-suppressor gene on 11q involved in cervical carcinogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7710949

  11. Downregulation of LSD1 suppresses the proliferation, tumorigenicity and invasion of papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cells

    PubMed Central

    KONG, LING-LING; MAN, DONG-MEI; WANG, TIAN; ZHANG, GUO-AN; CUI, WEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) downregulation, induced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection, on the proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion of the papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cell line. The siRNA targeting LSD1 and scrambled non-targeting siRNA were each transfected into papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cells. Downregulation of LSD1 mRNA and protein level was evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemical (ICC) analysis and western blotting, respectively. A Cell Counting kit-8 assay was applied to estimate the effect of LSD1-siRNA on cell growth. Migration and invasion abilities were estimated by Transwell chamber assay. A soft agar colony formation assay was performed to estimate the effect of LSD1-siRNA on tumorigenicity in vitro. ICC data showed that LSD1 protein was strongly expressed in the blank and control K1 cells compared with the LSD1-siRNA cells (F=15.192, P<0.01). Compared with the control cells, cells transfected with siRNA targeting LSD1 exhibited significant downregulation of LSD1 mRNA (t=6.845, P<0.01) and protein (F=53.764, P<0.01) levels. siRNA targeting LSD1 also downregulated cell proliferation following transfection for 24, 48 and 72 h (t=4.777, P<0.001; t=3.302, P=0.003; and t=3.017, P=0.006, respectively). Compared with the control group, the amount of cell invasion was gradually reduced in the LSD1-siRNA group (t=12.301, P<0.01). The number of migrating cells was significantly higher in the negative control group compared with the LSD1-siRNA group (t=7.911, P<0.01), and the ability of colony formation in the LSD1-siRNA cells was notably reduced in the soft agar formation assay (t=3.612, P=0.005). siRNA targeting LSD1 efficiently inhibits the proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion of papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cells. PMID:27073501

  12. The Pattern of Myometrial Invasion As a Predictor of Lymph Node Metastasis or Extrauterine Disease in Low Grade Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Euscher, Elizabeth; Fox, Patricia; Bassett, Roland; Al-Ghawi, Hayma; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Barbuto, Denise; Djordjevic, Bojana; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth; Kim, Insun; Hong, Sun Rang; Montiel, Delia; Moschiano, Elizabeth; Roma, Andres; Silva, Elvio; Malpica, Anais

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of lymph node metastases (LN+) or extrauterine disease (ED) in low grade (FIGO grades 1 or 2) endometrioid carcinoma (LGEC) in a multi institutional setting. For LGEC with and without LNM or ED, each of the 9 participating institutions evaluated patients age, tumor size, myometrial invasion (MI), FIGO grade, % solid component, the presence or absence of papillary architecture, microcystic elongated and fragmented glands (MELF) and single cell/cell cluster invasion (SCI), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), lower uterine segment (LUS) and cervical stromal (CX) involvement and numbers of pelvic (PLN) and para-aortic (PALN) LNs sampled.302 cases were reviewed: LN+ or ED +, 96; LN-/ED-, 208. Patients' ages ranged from 23-91 yrs (median 61). Table 1 summarizes the histopathologic variables that were noted for the LN+ or ED+ group: tumor size ≥2cm, 93/96 (97%), MI >50%, 54/96 (56%), MELF, 67/96 (70%), SCI, 33/96 (34%), LVI, 79/96 (82%), >20% solid, 65/96 (68%), papillary architecture present, 68/96 (72%), LUS involved, 64/96 (67%) and CX involved, 31/96 (32%). For the LN-/ED- group, the results were as follows: tumor size ≥2cm, 152/208 (73%), MI >50%, 56/208 (27%), MELF, 79/208 (38%), single cell invasion, 19/208 (9%) , LVI, 56/208 (27%), >20% solid, 160/208 (77%), papillary architecture present, 122/208 (59%), LUS involved, 77/208 (37%), CX involved, 31/208 (15%). There was no evidence of a difference in the number of pelvic or para-aortic LNs sampled between groups (p=0.9 and 0.1, respectively). Following multivariate analysis, depth of myometrial invasion, cervical stromal involvement, lymphovascular space invasion, and the single cell pattern of invasion emerged as significant predictors of advanced stage disease. Although univariate analysis pointed to LUS involvement, MELF pattern of invasion, and papillary architecture as possible predictors of advanced stage disease, these were not shown to be significant by

  13. Breast carcinoma and phyllodes tumour: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sin, Eliza I-Lin; Wong, Chow Yin; Yong, Wei Sean; Ong, Kong Wee; Madhukumar, Preetha; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Thike, Aye Aye; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee

    2016-04-01

    Malignant transformation of the epithelial component of phyllodes tumours (PT) is rare and only reported in literature as sporadic cases of carcinoma associated with PTs. We report the clinicopathological characteristics of in situ and invasive carcinoma coexisting with PT in 10 patients treated in our institution over an 11-year period from 1992 to 2012. Ten patients with coexisting PT and in situ or invasive carcinoma were identified from our records. Six had carcinoma found within the PT. All were female with a median age of 47 (43-72) years. One patient had a history of PT in the same breast while another had a history of PT in the same breast as well as invasive ductal carcinoma in the contralateral breast. The rest did not have any risk factors of breast cancer. Five patients had a preoperative core needle biopsy performed with the report of a fibroepithelial lesion. The rest of the patients had surgery upfront for their breast masses. Two patients who had ER/PR positive invasive carcinoma received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Patients were followed up for a mean of 3.6 years (9 months-10 years) and all patients were alive and recurrence free. PT associated with carcinoma is rare, and we present a series of cases that add to the limited current literature. It is often difficult to detect the presence of the carcinomatous component preoperatively. Hence, close examination of resected PT specimens must be carried out to allow prompt detection of any associated carcinomas, however rare, such that adequate treatment can be given.

  14. Study on the molecular regulatory mechanism of MicroRNA-195 in the invasion and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Tan, Zhigang; Song, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to identify the target gene of hsa-miR-195 and to research the molecular mechanism of hsa-miR-195 which is through its target genes in the colorectal cancer invasion and metastasis. Methods: We used biological informatics (RNAhybrid and Target Scan analysis database) to predict the target genes of hsa-miR-195. Collected colon cancer tissues from clinical colorectal cancer patients by surgical removal of the carcinoma and control tissues, and researched the expression of Bcl-2 in tissues by immunohistochemical. Next, Real-time PCR was used to research the expression of hsa-miR-195 in Caco-2 and NCM460 cell line. hsa -miR-195 Mimics was transient transfered to Caco-2 cells, western blot was used to analysis the expression changes of Bcl-2. To analysis the possibility that hsa-miR-195 can affect the invasive ability of tumor cells by Bcl-2, we transferred hsa-miR-195 Mimics and Bcl-2 expression plasmid, and used the cell invasion experiment to discusses hsa-miR-195 effect on the ability of tumor cell invasion. Results: the immunohistochemical results showed that, the semi-quantitative parameters for the Bcl-2: control by 0.89 ± 0.51, 6 colon cancer by 31 ± 0.79. The expression of has-miR-195 in Caco-2 is 0.39 ± 1.5 while the value in control is2.01 ± 0.2, **P < 0.01. Conclusion: In colorectal cancer, has-miR-195 can promote cell apoptosis and inhibit the invasion and metastasis by inhibiting the expression of Bcl-2. PMID:26064276

  15. MiR-625-3p promotes cell migration and invasion via inhibition of SCAI in colorectal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qizhi; Zhang, Pei; Li, Dapeng; Wang, Qiangwu; Wang, Jianchao; Li, Huabin; Liu, Hao; Wang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in controlling tumor invasion and metastasis via regulating the expression of a variety of targets, which act as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Abnormally expressed miR-625-3p has been observed in several types of human cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of miR-625-3p-mediated tumorigenesis are largely elusive. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the biological function and molecular insight on miR-625-3p-induced oncogenesis in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The effects of miR-625-3p in cell migration and invasion were analyzed by wound healing assay and transwell assay, respectively. In addition, the expression of miR-625-3p and its targets was detected in five human CRC cell lines. In the present study, we found that overexpression of miR-625-3p promoted migration and invasion in SW480 cells, whereas downregulation of miR-625-3p inhibited cell motility in SW620 cells. More importantly, we observed potential binding sites for miR-625-3p in the 3′-untranslated region of suppressor of cancer cell invasion (SCAI). Notably, we identified that overexpression of miR-625-3p inhibited the expression of SCAI, while depletion of miR-625-3p increased SCAI level, suggesting that SCAI could be a target of miR-625-3p. Additionally, we revealed that miR-625-3p exerts its oncogenic functions through regulation of SCAI/E-cadherin/MMP-9 pathways. Our findings indicate the pivotal role of miR-625-3p in invasion that warrants further exploration whether targeting miR-625-3p could be a promising approach for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26314959

  16. Targeting MACC1 by RNA interference inhibits proliferation and invasion of bladder urothelial carcinoma in T24 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Song-Tao; Ding, Xiang; Ni, Qing-Feng; Jin, Shao-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to research on whether MACC1 can serve as a potential target for gene therapy of human bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC). In this study, the expression of MACC1 gene was knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi) in the T24 cell (human BUC cell). The transcription level of MACC1 was detected by RT-PCR. Activities of MACC1, caspase-3, caspase-8, Bax and Met (mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor) protein were measured by Western blot. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected by MTT and flow cytometry. The cell’s invasion ability was performed on Matrigel transwell assay. We also detect MMP2 (metalloproteinase-2) proteins by ELISA. The results showed that the level of MACC1 mRNA and protein was significantly reduced after RNAi. MTT assay showed that the proliferation of T24 cell was decreased due to RNA interference. Apoptosis studies also showed that MACC1 gene interference in T24 loses its anti-apoptotic effects. The expression of apoptosis proteins (Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Bax) increased significantly due to the MACC1 RNAi. The level of Met protein was down-regulated obviously due to RNAi. Transwell assay showed that invasion abilities of T24 cells were reduced obviously due to MACC1 RNAi. Further studies showed that the secretion of MMP-2 was reduced by RNAi. It can conclude that the ability of proliferation and invasion in T24 cells can be inhibited by RNAi-targeting MACC1. As a result, MACC1 can serve as a potential target for gene therapy of human bladder urothelial carcinoma. PMID:26339359

  17. Two case reports of breast carcinoma associated with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Strungs, I; Gray, R A; Rigby, H B; Strutton, G

    1997-08-01

    Two cases of breast carcinoma associated with prolactinoma are presented. Literature review reveals only five previous case reports of this association. Both of our cases occurred in women, aged 55 and 34. Both were typical of the reported cases in that they had long histories of amenorrhea before diagnosis of prolactinomas and breast carcinomas. One patient had a three and a half year history of atypical ductal hyperplasia and a prominent intraduct component in the invasive tumor. Both had axillary lymph node metastases. The significance of the association of breast carcinoma with prolactinoma is discussed. Whereas studies in animals have shown prolactin to be an initiator and promoter of breast carcinoma, studies in humans have been inconclusive. Some studies have shown raised levels of prolactin in patients with breast carcinoma and their daughters, while others have not. The paucity of case reports linking breast carcinoma and prolactinoma may indicate that the association is mere coincidence, but studies evaluating the relationship between breast carcinoma and all forms of hyperprolactinemia need to be conducted before a causal link is dismissed. Prolactin may act as a cofactor with, for example, estrogen or stress, to induce breast carcinoma.

  18. PD 098059, an inhibitor of ERK1 activation, attenuates the in vivo invasiveness of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Simon, C; Hicks, M J; Nemechek, A J; Mehta, R; Jr, B W O'Malley; Goepfert, H; Flaitz, C M; Boyd, D

    1999-01-01

    Increased mortality of patients with oral cancer largely reflects the local and regional spread of the disease. The invasiveness of these tumours requires hydrolases which are regulated through AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. Since the amount/activity of transcription factors bound to the AP-1 motif are regulated partly through the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/ERK2), we determined the effect of PD 098059, an inhibitor of ERK1/ERK2 activation, on the in vivo invasiveness of a human squamous cell carcinoma cell line (UM-SCC-1) derived from the oral cavity. We utilized the floor of mouth musculature consisting of the mylohyoid, geniohyoid and genioglossus muscle (which are sequentially arranged), as a natural barrier to assess tumour spread in vivo in the nude mouse. Mice were inoculated with tumour cells superficial to the mylohyoid muscle. After 18 days, tumours were injected with either empty liposomes (control) or liposomes containing 5 μM PD 098059 and, after an additional 22 days, the jaws of mice examined histologically. Highly infiltrative tumours, which had penetrated the genioglossus muscle, were evident in 10/12 control mice. In contrast, in 9/12 mice in which the tumours were injected with PD 098059, tumours did not extend beyond the mylohyoid or geniohyoid muscles. Tumours penetrated bone nutrient canals in 7/12 control mice but in only 3/12 PD 098059-treated mice. Neurotropism, characteristic of aggressive oral squamous cell carcinoma, was evident in 6/12 control mice but was completely abolished (0/12 mice) in the PD 098059-treated mice. Using a staging system based on the muscle layer involved, neurotropism, as well as bone involvement, we found the inhibition of invasion to be statistically significant (P < 0.01). The reduced invasiveness of the PD 098059-liposome-treated oral cancers was associated with diminished 92-kDa type IV collagenase and ERK1/ERK2 activities but was not a consequence of a slower tumour growth rate

  19. miR-1179 promotes cell invasion through SLIT2/ROBO1 axis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lixin; Wang, Yongfang; Rong, Yaxiong; Xu, Lianhong; Chu, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Yao, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    MiR-1179, a new identified miRNA highly associated with metastasis of colorectal cancer which was never reported in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Here we measured the expression levels of miR-1179 and the candidate target gene in tissues from 40 patients with ESCC. Transwell, Dual-luciferase reporter assay and immunocytochemistry assay were employed to detect the function role of miR-1179 in vitro. We found that miR-1179 was up-regulated in human ESCC tumor tissues. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that SLIT2 acting as a new potential target of miR-1179 which was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay. Down-regulation of miR-1179 suppressed cell invasion in vitro with an increasing level of SLIT2 and ROBO1, besides, the up-regulation of SLIT2 decreased cell invasion through ROBO1. Taken together, these findings will shed light the role to mechanism of miR-1179 in regulating cell invasion via SLIT2/ROBO1 axis.

  20. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell proliferation, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fei; Wu, Duoguang; He, Xiaotian; Wang, Wenjian; Xi, Jingle; Wang, Minghui

    2016-08-01

    The biology of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains poorly understood. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are found to be dysregulated in a variety of cancers, including ESCC. SPRY4-IT1 has been recently revealed as oncogenic regulator or tumor suppressors in different cancers; however, whether SPRY4-IT1 is involved in ESCC remains poorly understood. To investigate the role of SPRY4-IT1 in ESCC, we evaluated the SPRY4-IT1 expression levels in a series of ESCC patients and a panel of ESCC cell line using qRT-PCR. CCK8 and colony formation assay were performed to assess the effect of SPRY4-IT1siRNA on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of ESCC cell lines. SPRY4-IT1 expression was upregulated in ESCC tissues and the higher expression of SPRY4-IT1 was significantly correlated with tumor grade, depth of invasion, and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, silencing of SPRY4-IT1 expression inhibited ESCC cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion. Therefore, our study indicates that SPRY4-IT1 promotes proliferation and migration of ESCC cells and is a potential oncogene of ESCC.

  1. C1GALT1 Promotes Invasive Phenotypes of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells by Modulating Integrin β1 Glycosylation and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chiung-Hui; Hu, Rey-Heng; Huang, Miao-Juei; Lai, I-Rue; Chen, Chia-Hua; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Wu, Yao-Ming; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell invasion and metastasis are the primary causes of treatment failure and death in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We previously reported that core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) is frequently overexpressed in HCC tumors and its expression is associated with advanced tumor stage, metastasis, and poor survival. However, the underlying mechanisms of C1GALT1 in HCC malignancy remain unclear. In this study, we found that overexpression of C1GALT1 enhanced HCC cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, migration, and invasion, whereas RNAi-mediated knockdown of C1GALT1 suppressed these phenotypes. The promoting effect of C1GALT1 on the metastasis of HCC cells was demonstrated in a mouse xenograft model. Mechanistic investigations showed that the C1GALT1-enhanced phenotypic changes in HCC cells were significantly suppressed by anti-integrin β1 blocking antibody. Moreover, C1GALT1 was able to modify O-glycans on integrin β1 and regulate integrin β1 activity as well as its downstream signaling. These results suggest that C1GALT1 could enhance HCC invasiveness through integrin β1 and provide novel insights into the roles of O-glycosylation in HCC metastasis. PMID:25089569

  2. miR-182 targets CHL1 and controls tumor growth and invasion in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hongling; Fang, Jin; Zhang, Jichen; Zhao, Zefei; Liu, Lianyong; Wang, Jingnan; Xi, Qian; Gu, Mingjun

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • miR-182 and CHL1 expression patterns are negatively correlated. • CHL1 is a direct target of miR-182 in PTC cells. • miR-182 suppression inhibits PTC cell growth and invasion. • CHL1 is involved in miR-182-mediated cell behavior. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the role and underlying mechanism of action of miR-182 in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Bioinformatics analysis revealed close homolog of LI (CHL1) as a potential target of miR-182. Upregulation of miR-182 was significantly correlated with CHL1 downregulation in human PTC tissues and cell lines. miR-182 suppressed the expression of CHL1 mRNA through direct targeting of the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR). Downregulation of miR-182 suppressed growth and invasion of PTC cells. Silencing of CHL1 counteracted the effects of miR-182 suppression, while its overexpression mimicked these effects. Our data collectively indicate that miR-182 in PTC promotes cell proliferation and invasion through direct suppression of CHL1, supporting the potential utility of miR-182 inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy against PTC.

  3. MiRNA-211 suppresses cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting SPARC in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Biao; Qu, Lei; Li, Jinfang; Fang, Jiaqing; Yang, Shouwen; Cao, Zhongwei; Mei, Zhechuan; Sun, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the expression of miR-211 was downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecular function and mechanism of miR-211 in HCC growth and invasion are largely unclear. We found that miR-211 is downregulated in HCC tissues and cell lines, respectively. Further results showed that low miR-211 associated with TNM stage, vein invasion status, and poor prognosis. Ectopic expression of miR-211 effectively suppressed HCC cell proliferation, migration and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. We identified SPARC as a bona fide target of miR-211, and overexpression of miR-211 decreased the mRNA and protein expression of SPARC. Finally, we confirmed that the overexpression of SPARC in miR-211-expressing HCC cells can partially restore the inhibitory effect of miR-211. Taken together, our results demonstrated that loss of miR-211 expression and thus uncontrolled SPARC overexpression might drive progression of HCC, which may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of HCC. PMID:27230656

  4. Relative Effectiveness of Letrozole Compared With Tamoxifen for Patients With Lobular Carcinoma in the BIG 1-98 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Metzger Filho, Otto; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Mallon, Elizabeth; Gusterson, Barry; Viale, Giuseppe; Winer, Eric P.; Thürlimann, Beat; Gelber, Richard D.; Colleoni, Marco; Ejlertsen, Bent; Debled, Marc; Price, Karen N.; Regan, Meredith M.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative effectiveness of letrozole compared with tamoxifen for patients with invasive ductal or lobular carcinoma. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with early-stage invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) or classic invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) who were randomly assigned onto the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial and who had centrally reviewed pathology data were included (N = 2,923). HER2-negative IDC and ILC were additionally classified as hormone receptor–positive with high (luminal B [LB] –like) or low (luminal A [LA] –like) proliferative activity by Ki-67 labeling index. Survival analyses were performed with weighted Cox models that used inverse probability of censoring weighted modeling. Results The median follow-up time was 8.1 years. In multivariable models for disease-free survival (DFS), significant interactions between treatment and histology (ILC or IDC; P = .006) and treatment and subgroup (LB like or LA like; P = .01) were observed. In the ILC subset, there was a 66% reduction in the hazard of a DFS event with letrozole for LB (hazard ratio [HR], 0.34; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.55) and a 50% reduction for LA subtypes (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.78). In the IDC subset, there was a significant 35% reduction in the hazard of a DFS event with letrozole for the LB subtype (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.79), but no difference between treatments was noted for IDC and the LA subtype (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.20). Conclusion The magnitude of benefit of adjuvant letrozole is greater for patients diagnosed with lobular carcinoma versus ductal carcinoma. PMID:26215945

  5. Association of tumour necrosis factor alpha and its receptors with thymidine phosphorylase expression in invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Leek, R. D.; Landers, R.; Fox, S. B.; Ng, F.; Harris, A. L.; Lewis, C. E.

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential requirement for tumour growth and metastasis and is regulated by a complex network of factors produced by both stromal cells and neoplastic cells within solid tumours. The cytokine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and the enzyme thymidine phosphorylase (TP) are two factors known to promote tumour angiogenesis. We have demonstrated recently that high numbers of tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) are significantly associated with increased tumour angiogenesis and poor prognosis in invasive carcinoma of the breast. We have also shown that TAMs are a major source of TNF-alpha in invasive breast carcinomas, and that macrophage-like stromal cells as well as tumour cells synthesize TP in such tumours. However, little is known of the factors that regulate the production or activity of these factors in the tumour microenvironment. As TNF-alpha has been shown to up-regulate TP expression in tumour cells in vitro we performed an immunohistochemical study to investigate the possibility that TNF-alpha may be involved in the regulation of TP expression by malignant breast epithelial cells in vivo. To do this, we used a cocktail of non-neutralizing monoclonal anti-TNF-alpha antibodies to visualize both TNF-alpha-expressing macrophages and TNF-alpha bound to its receptors on tumour cells and endothelial cells in a series of 93 invasive carcinomas of the breast. A semiquantitative grading system was then used to compare these staining patterns with that for TP in the same biopsies. TNF-alpha immunoreactivity was also compared with various important tumour variables known to relate to outcome in this disease (microvessel density, node status, grade, stage, receptor status and macrophage infiltration), as well as relapse-free and overall survival data for these patients. Our data show significant positive correlations between TNF-alpha bound to its receptors on tumour cells and: (1) TP protein production by tumour cells, and (2) axillary lymph

  6. Trimodality Therapy for an Advanced Thymic Carcinoma With Both Aorta and Vena Cava Invasion.

    PubMed

    Momozane, Tohru; Inoue, Masayoshi; Shintani, Yasushi; Funaki, Soichiro; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Minami, Masato; Shirakawa, Yukitoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Okumura, Meinoshin

    2016-08-01

    A case of locally advanced thymic carcinoma that was successfully resected with the great vessels after chemoradiation therapy is reported. A 57-year-old man with Masaoka stage III thymic carcinoma received two cycles of cisplatin/docetaxel and 60 Gy irradiation. The response was stable disease with 19% size reduction, and a radical resection with the ascending aorta and superior vena cava with the patient under circulatory arrest with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient has been free of disease for 28 months. Trimodality therapy with use of a cardiovascular surgical procedure might be a valuable option in locally advanced thymic carcinoma. PMID:27449450

  7. Invasive Squamous Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma of an Unreconstructed Exstrophic Bladder with HPV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Altan, Mesut; Çıtamak, Burak; Haberal, Hakan Bahadır; Söğütdelen, Emrullah; Bozaci, Ali Cansu; Baydar, Dilek Ertoy; Doğan, Hasan Serkan; Tekgül, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Bladder exstrophy is a complex abnormality and is traditionally treated within the early years of life. It is associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer, with 95% of the arising tumors being adenocarcinomas and 3 to 5% being squamous cell carcinomas. HPV infections are also associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. This case represents a patient with bladder exstrophy that gave rise to coinciding squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Final pathology results showed an infection with HPV. We presented the management of the case and discussed the diagnosis and treatment methods for this patient. PMID:27390585

  8. Epb41l3 suppresses esophageal squamous cell carcinoma invasion and inhibits MMP2 and MMP9 expression.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rong; Huang, Jun-Peng; Li, Xu Feng; Xiong, Wei-Bin; Wu, Gang; Jiang, Zhao-Jing; Song, Shu-Jie; Li, Ji-Qiang; Zheng, Yan-Fang; Zhang, Ji-Ren

    2016-04-01

    EPB41L3 may play a role as a metastasis suppressor by supporting regular arrangements of actin stress fibres and alleviating the increase in cell motility associated with enhanced metastatic potential. Downregulation of epb41l3 has been observed in many cancers, but the role of this gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains unclear. Our study aimed to determine the effect of epb41l3 on ESCC cell migration and invasion. We investigated epb41l3 protein expression in tumour and non-tumour tissues by immunohistochemical staining. Expression in the non-neoplastic human esophageal cell line Het-1a and four ESCC cell lines - Kyse150, Kyse510, Kyse450 and Caes17 - was assessed by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) and Western blotting. Furthermore, an EPB41L3 overexpression plasmid and EPB41L3-specific small interfering RNA were used to upregulate EPB41L3 expression in Kyse150 cells and to downregulate EPB41L3 expression in Kyse450 cells, respectively. Cell migration and invasion were evaluated by wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. The expression levels of p-AKT, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 were evaluated. Expression of epb41l3 was significantly lower in tumour tissues than in non-tumour tissues and in ESCC cell lines compared with the Het-1a cell line. Kyse450 and Caes17 cells exhibited higher expression of epb41l3 than Kyse150 and Kyse510 cells. Overexpressing epb41l3 decreased Kyse150 cell migration and invasion, whereas EPB41L3-specific small interfering RNA silencing increased these functions in Kyse450 cells. Furthermore, overexpressing epb41l3 led to downregulation of MMP2 and MMP9 in Kyse150 and Kyse510 cells. Our findings reveal that EPB41L3 suppresses tumour cell invasion and inhibits MMP2 and MMP9 expression in ESCC cells.

  9. Regulation of Motility, Invasion and Metastatic Potential of Squamous Cell Carcinoma by 1,25D3

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyu; Yu, Wei-Dong; Su, Bing; Seshadri, Mukund; Luo, Wei; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND 1,25D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, has been shown to exhibit broad spectrum anti-tumor activity in xenograft animal models. However, its activity against metastatic disease has not been extensively investigated. METHODS Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or 1,25D3-resistant variant SCC-DR cells were treated with 1,25D3. Actin organization was examined by immunofluorescence assay. Cell migration was assessed by “wound” healing and chemotactic migration assay. Cell invasion was assessed by Matrigel-based invasion assay and in situ zymography. MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and secretion was examined by immunoblot analysis and ELISA, respectively. E-cadherin expression was assessed by flow cytometry, immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Knockdown of E-cadherin was achieved by siRNA. Experimental metastasis mouse model was done by intravenous injection of tumor cells. Lung tumor development was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, gross observation and histology. RESULTS SCC cellular morphology and actin organization were altered by 10 nM of 1,25D3. 1,25D3 inhibited SCC cell motility and invasion, which was associated with reduced expression and secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. 1,25D3 promoted the expression of E-cadherin. These findings were not observed in SCC-DR cells. Knock down of E-cadherin rescued 1,25D3-inhibited cell migration. Intravenous injection of SCC or SCC-DR cells resulted in the establishment of extensive pulmonary lesions in saline-treated C3H mice. Treatment with 1,25D3 resulted in a marked reduction in the formation of lung tumor colonies in animals injected with SCC but not SCC-DR cells. CONCLUSIONS 1,25D3 suppresses SCC cell motility, invasion and metastasis, partially through the promotion of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22833444

  10. Downregulation of VEGFA inhibits proliferation, promotes apoptosis, and suppresses migration and invasion of renal clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Chang; Zeng, Ming-Qiang; Huang, Liang; Li, Yong-Lin; Gao, Ben-Min; Chen, Jun-Jie; Xue, Rui-Zhi; Tang, Zheng-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) on cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion in renal clear cell carcinoma (RCCC). Methods Between June 2012 and June 2015, RCCC tissues were obtained for the experimental group, and RCCC adjacent tumor-free kidney parenchyma tissues were obtained for the control group. VEGFA mRNA and protein expressions and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, serine/threonine-specific protein kinase (AKT), and phosphorylated-AKT protein expressions were detected. The chemically synthesized specific siRNA using RNA interference technology was used to inhibit VEGFA gene expression in human RCCC 786-O cells. The negative control (NC) group was transfected with NC sequence, and the blank group was transfected with no sequence. Flow cytometry, scratch test, and cell-penetrating experiment were used to detect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion of 786-O cells. Results Positive expression of VEGFA protein was 60.62% in RCCC tissue and 18.34% in adjacent tissue with statistically significant difference (P<0.001). VEGFA protein and mRNA expressions were higher in RCCC tissue than those in adjacent tissue (both P<0.01). VEGF expression in RCCC tissue was associated with Fuhrman grading and American Joint Committee on Cancer staging (both P<0.05). After RCCC 786-O cells transfecting the VEGFA siRNA, the VEGFA mRNA and protein expressions and phosphoinositide 3-kinase and phosphorylated-AKT protein expressions were significantly decreased, cell proliferation was remarkably inhibited, cell apoptotic ratio was obviously increased, and migration distance and invasive cell number were markedly decreased compared to those in the NC group and the blank group (all P<0.05). Conclusion Inhibition of VEGFA inhibited proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and suppressed migration and invasion of RCCC 786-O cells. VEGF has a potential role in diagnosis and therapy of RCCC

  11. DJ-1 Is Upregulated in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Promotes Oral Cancer Cell Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuaimei; Ma, Dandan; Zhuang, Rui; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Ying; Wen, Jun; Cui, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a multistep process that involves in both genetic alterations and epigenetic modifications. DJ-1, a negative regulator of tumor suppressor PTEN, functions as an oncogene in many types of cancers. However, its role in OSCC is poorly known. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the expression level of DJ-1 in oral leukoplakia (OLK) and OSCC tissues respectively. Then lentiviral mediated DJ-1 shRNA was constructed and used to infect the OSCC cell lines (Tca8113 and CAL-27). MTT, cell counting, and Matrigel invasion assay were utilized to examine the effects of DJ-1 down-regulation on proliferation and invasion capacity of oral cancer cells. Results: The immunoreactivity and expression level of DJ-1 protein was significantly increased in OLK and OSCC tissues compared with the controls. Lentiviral-delivered shRNA targeting DJ-1 could effectively knock down DJ-1 at mRNA and protein level (P<0.01). The proliferative and invasion ability of OSCC cell lines was significantly suppressed following DJ-1 inhibition (P<0.01). Conclusions: Our study indicated that DJ-1 is over-expressed in both oral precancer and cancer tissues and shRNA inhibition of DJ-1 expression led to decreased proliferation and invasion capability of oral cancer cells. These findings suggest that DJ-1 might be actively involved in the development of OSCC. Future studies will investigate the potential of DJ-1 as a biomarker for early detection of OSCC. PMID:27313793

  12. Coexistence of intracytoplasmic lumens and membrane-bound vesicles in an invasive carcinoma arising in a cystosarcoma phyllodes.

    PubMed

    Gilks, B; Tavassoli, F A

    1988-01-01

    An unusual invasive breast carcinoma, arising in a cystosarcoma phyllodes and characterized by a variable cytoplasmic appearance and mucin content, was evaluated to determine the nature of the secretory material within the cells as well as the type of secretory organelle at the ultrastructural level. Histochemical studies revealed both acidic (sialic acid) and neutral mucin within the tumor cells. Ultrastructural analysis revealed secretory material within membrane-bound vesicles in some cells and within intracytoplasmic lumens in others; some cells contained both membrane-bound vesicles and intracytoplasmic lumens simultaneously. The Golgi derivation of the intracytoplasmic lumens was supported by their presence within or near hyperplastic Golgi complexes. The histochemical characteristics of the secretory material is correlated with their ultrastructural site of accumulation.

  13. Human Schlafen 5 (SLFN5) Is a Regulator of Motility and Invasiveness of Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sassano, Antonella; Mavrommatis, Evangelos; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Kroczynska, Barbara; Beauchamp, Elspeth M.; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Ten-Leong; Green, Kathleen J.; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.; Verma, Amit K.

    2015-01-01

    We provide evidence that human SLFN5, an interferon (IFN)-inducible member of the Schlafen (SLFN) family of proteins, exhibits key roles in controlling motility and invasiveness of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. Our studies define the mechanism by which this occurs, demonstrating that SLFN5 negatively controls expression of the matrix metalloproteinase 1 gene (MMP-1), MMP-13, and several other genes involved in the control of malignant cell motility. Importantly, our data establish that SLFN5 expression correlates with a better overall survival in a large cohort of patients with RCC. The inverse relationship between SLFN5 expression and RCC aggressiveness raises the possibility of developing unique therapeutic approaches in the treatment of RCC, by modulating SLFN5 expression. PMID:26012550

  14. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in histological sections of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical carcinoma in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical specimens from the city of Madrid (Spain), as a contribution to the knowledge of Human Papillomavirus genotype distribution and prevalence of carcinogenic HPV types in cervical lesions in Spain. Methods A total of 533 abnormal specimens, from the Hospital General Universitario “Gregorio Marañón” of Madrid, were studied. These included 19 benign lesions, 349 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias 1 (CIN1), 158 CIN2-3 and 7 invasive cervical carcinomas (ICC). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results We detected 20 different HPV types: 13 carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (HR-HPVs), 2 probably carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (PHR-HPVs) and 5 carcinogenic low-risk HPV types (LR-HPVs). The most frequent HPV genotypes found in all specimens were HPV16 (26.0%), 31 (10.7%) and 58 (8.0%). HPV 18 was only detected in 5.0%. Co-infections were found in 30.7% of CIN 1 and 18.4% cases of CIN2-3. The highest percentage of HR HPVs was found in those specimens with a CIN2-3 lesion (93.7%). Conclusion As our study shows the current tetravalent vaccine could be effective in our geographical area for preventing all the invasive cervical carcinomas. In addition, upon the estimates of the important presence of other HR-HPV types – such as 31, 58, 33 and 52 – in different preneoplasic lesions the effectiveness of HPV vaccination in our geographical area, and others with similar genotype distribution, should be limited. PMID:23167826

  15. Recurrent High-Grade Invasive Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of Larynx: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    King, Whitney; Ko, Stephen; Miller, Daniel

    2016-06-28

    Recurrent invasive high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx is a rare occurrence. These tumors have been commonly associated with salivary gland tumors, most commonly the parotid gland. The patient usually presents with the following symptoms: hoarseness (if larynx is involved), or changes in voice character, sore throat, cough, odynophagia, dysphagia, otalgia, difficulty breathing, weight loss, lymphadenopathy. Here we present a case of a recurrent invasive high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of larynx and hypopharynx. The patient was a 67-year-old male that originally presented in 2006. At that time he underwent a wide field laryngectomy, right thyroid lobectomy, and biopsy of the right digastric node. He was a clinical stage III, pT3N0M0. No adjuvant radiation therapy was given at that time. The patient remained asymptomatic until February 2014, when he presented with dysphagia and neck swelling. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography showed evidence of recurrence. The patient was treated with definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy. Treatment for this disease is gathered by scattered case reports. If surgery is a possibility it is considered as first line therapy. Post-surgical radiation is then offered. However, in this case the recurrent tumor was located near the carotid artery, and thus surgery was not a possibility. Therefore, concurrent chemotherapy and radiation with IMRT and weekly cis-platinum was given. While the optimum combination of treatment has not yet been established because of the rarity of this cancer's location site, the current patient appeared to have an excellent response from the definitive IMRT and chemotherapy treatment. PMID:27441076

  16. Recurrent High-Grade Invasive Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of Larynx: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    King, Whitney; Ko, Stephen; Miller, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent invasive high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx is a rare occurrence. These tumors have been commonly associated with salivary gland tumors, most commonly the parotid gland. The patient usually presents with the following symptoms: hoarseness (if larynx is involved), or changes in voice character, sore throat, cough, odynophagia, dysphagia, otalgia, difficulty breathing, weight loss, lymphadenopathy. Here we present a case of a recurrent invasive high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of larynx and hypopharynx. The patient was a 67-year-old male that originally presented in 2006. At that time he underwent a wide field laryngectomy, right thyroid lobectomy, and biopsy of the right digastric node. He was a clinical stage III, pT3N0M0. No adjuvant radiation therapy was given at that time. The patient remained asymptomatic until February 2014, when he presented with dysphagia and neck swelling. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography showed evidence of recurrence. The patient was treated with definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy. Treatment for this disease is gathered by scattered case reports. If surgery is a possibility it is considered as first line therapy. Post-surgical radiation is then offered. However, in this case the recurrent tumor was located near the carotid artery, and thus surgery was not a possibility. Therefore, concurrent chemotherapy and radiation with IMRT and weekly cis-platinum was given. While the optimum combination of treatment has not yet been established because of the rarity of this cancer’s location site, the current patient appeared to have an excellent response from the definitive IMRT and chemotherapy treatment. PMID:27441076

  17. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  18. Estrogen receptor beta rs1271572 polymorphism and invasive ovarian carcinoma risk: pooled analysis within the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R; Thompson, Pamela J; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Matsuno, Rayna K; Carney, Michael E; Palmieri, Rachel T; Wu, Anna H; Pike, Malcolm C; Pearce, Celeste L; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Whittemore, Alice S; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Pharoah, Paul D P; Song, Honglin; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Berchuck, Andrew; Krüger Kjær, Susanne; Høgdall, Estrid; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hein, Alexander; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Webb, Penelope M; Beesley, Jonathan; Goodman, Marc T

    2011-01-01

    The association of ovarian carcinoma risk with the polymorphism rs1271572 in the estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) gene was examined in 4946 women with primary invasive ovarian carcinoma and 6582 controls in a pooled analysis of ten case-control studies within the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). All participants were non-Hispanic white women. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for site and age. Women with the TT genotype were at increased risk of ovarian carcinoma compared to carriers of the G allele (OR = 1.10; 95%; CI: 1.01-1.21; p = 0.04); the OR was 1.09 (CI: 0.99-1.20; p = 0.07) after excluding data from the center (Hawaii) that nominated this SNP for OCAC genotyping A stronger association of rs1271572 TT versus GT/GG with risk was observed among women aged ≤50 years versus older women (OR = 1.35; CI: 1.12-1.62; p = 0.002; p for interaction = 0.02) that remained statistically significant after excluding Hawaii data (OR = 1.34; CI: 1.11-1.61; p = 0.009). No heterogeneity of the association was observed by study, menopausal status, gravidity, parity, use of contraceptive or menopausal hormones, tumor histological type, or stage at diagnosis. This pooled analysis suggests that rs1271572 might influence the risk of ovarian cancer, in particular among younger women.

  19. MicroRNA-126 inhibits invasion in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.; Brawner, E.; Batte, K.; Yu, L.; Hunter, M.G.; Otterson, G.A.; Nuovo, G.; Marsh, C.B.; Nana-Sinkam, S.P.

    2008-09-05

    Crk is a member of a family of adaptor proteins that are involved in intracellular signal pathways altering cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Increased expression of Crk has been described in lung cancer and associated with increased tumor invasiveness. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNAs (approximately 21-25 nt long) that are capable of targeting genes for either degradation of mRNA or inhibition of translation. Crk is a predicted putative target gene for miR-126. Over-expression of miR126 in a lung cancer cell line resulted in a decrease in Crk protein without any alteration in the associated mRNA. These lung cancer cells exhibit a decrease in adhesion, migration, and invasion. Decreased cancer cell invasion was also evident following targeted knockdown of Crk. MiR-126 alters lung cancer cell phenotype by inhibiting adhesion, migration, and invasion and the effects on invasion may be partially mediated through Crk regulation.

  20. Should All Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma with Paranasal Sinus Invasion Be Staged as T3 in the Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Era? A Study of 1811 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Peng, Hao; Guo, Rui; Li, Wen-Fei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Xu; Tang, Ling-Long; Liu, Li-Zhi; Li, Li; Liu, Qing; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently, there is no uniform consensus regarding the appropriate staging for invasion of the paranasal sinuses in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In the current AJCC staging system for NPC, paranasal sinus invasion is defined within the T3 classification. However, according to the Chinese 2008 staging system, which is also widely used in the regions where NPC is endemic in China, paranasal sinus invasion is classified as T4 disease. Methods: Patients (n = 1811) with non-metastatic, histologically-proven NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Paranasal sinus invasion was identified in 289/1811 patients (16.0%). Multivariate analysis revealed ethmoid sinus invasion (HR, 2.889; 95% CI, 1.362-6.131; P = 0.006) and maxillary sinus invasion (HR, 3.110; 95% CI, 1.439-6.721; P = 0.004) were independent prognostic factors for local relapse-free survival (LRFS). T3 patients with ethmoid sinus or maxillary sinus invasion had similar 3-year LRFS (83.6% vs. 92.2%, P = 0.132) as T4 patients, and had poorer LRFS (83.6% vs. 98.3%, P = 0.006) than T3 patients with sphenoid sinus invasion alone. Also, T3 patients with sphenoid sinus invasion alone had similar 3-year LRFS (98.3 vs. 96.4%, P = 0.391) as T3 patients without paranasal sinus invasion, and a trend toward higher LRFS (98.3% vs. 92.2%, P = 0.065) than T4 patients. Conclusion: In patients underwent IMRT, tumors with ethmoid sinus or maxillary sinus invasion had a higher risk of local failure than those with sphenoid sinus invasion alone. Sphenoid sinus invasion alone should be classified as T3 disease and ethmoid sinus or maxillary sinus involvement as T4 disease in the current AJCC staging system for NPC. PMID:27390611

  1. PGE2 Promotes Renal Carcinoma Cell Invasion through Activated RalA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Zhang, Yushan; Kim, Wanju; Daaka, Yehia

    2012-01-01

    Incidence of kidney cancer is on the rise, and a better understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the cancer invasion and metastasis is required for the development of curative therapeutics. In this study, we report that the proinflammatory cytokine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induces the malignant SN12C, but not benign HK2 kidney cell invasion. The PGE2 increases SN12C cell invasion through a signal pathway that encompasses EP2 and EP4, Akt, small GTPase RalA and Ral GTP inactivator RGC2. The results support the idea that targeted interference of EP2/EP4 signal to RalA GTP may provide benefit to patients diagnosed with advanced kidney cancer. PMID:22580611

  2. Metabolites from invasive pests inhibit mitochondrial complex II: A potential strategy for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Guerra, Flora; Felline, Serena; Rimoli, Maria Grazia; Mollo, Ernesto; Zara, Vincenzo; Terlizzi, Antonio

    2016-05-13

    The red pigment caulerpin, a secondary metabolite from the marine invasive green algae Caulerpa cylindracea can be accumulated and transferred along the trophic chain, with detrimental consequences on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Despite increasing research efforts to understand how caulerpin modifies fish physiology, little is known on the effects of algal metabolites on mammalian cells. Here we report for the first time the mitochondrial targeting activity of both caulerpin, and its closely related derivative caulerpinic acid, by using as experimental model rat liver mitochondria, a system in which bioenergetics mechanisms are not altered. Mitochondrial function was tested by polarographic and spectrophotometric methods. Both compounds were found to selectively inhibit respiratory complex II activity, while complexes I, III, and IV remained functional. These results led us to hypothesize that both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in cell lines with defects in mitochondrial complex I. Ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells are a good example of cell lines with a defective complex I function on which these molecules seem to have a toxic effect on proliferation. This provided novel insight toward the potential use of metabolites from invasive Caulerpa species for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma cisplatin-resistant cells. PMID:27091429

  3. Decreased FOXF1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma tumorigenesis, invasion, and stemness and is associated with poor clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen-guo; Wang, De-qiang; Hu, De-fei; Li, You-sheng; Liu, Shuang-hai

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box F1 (FOXF1), a member of the forkhead transcription factor superfamily, plays critical roles in the progression of certain types of cancers. However, the expression and function of FOXF1 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still unclear. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry detected the relatively lower expression status of FOXF1 in HCC cases. Soft agar and transwell assays clearly demonstrated that FOXF1-knockdown cells showed significantly increased in vitro cell tumorigenesis and invasion, and FOXF1-overexpressing cells had significantly reduced growth and invasion potential. Our study also examined the role of FOXF1 in HCC cell stemness by sphere formation, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1) activity, and CD44/133-positive cell analysis. Enforced FOXF1 expression decreased HCC cell stemness, and the downregulation of FOXF1 promoted cancer cell stemness. The in vivo study showed that overexpressed FOXF1 inhibits nude mouse tumorigenicity with downregulation of CD44 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. More importantly, loss of FOXF1 expression was linked to poor overall survival time by Kaplan–Meier analysis. PMID:27042124

  4. XBP1 induces MMP-9 expression to promote proliferation and invasion in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Tong, Song; Fan, Kai; Zhai, Wei; Fang, Bin; Wang, Si-Hua; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) was found to be overexpressed in glioma and breast cancers, suggesting that XBP1 might act as a potent oncogenic protein. However, the clinical significance and biological role of XBP1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain unknown. In this study, we report that XBP1 is markedly overexpressed in ESCC cell lines and clinical samples. XBP1 overexpression was significantly correlated with ESCC tumor stage, lymph node metastasis and poor outcome. A functional study demonstrated that XBP1 promoted cell growth and cell invasion both in vitro and in vivo. Further study found that the XBP1-mediated invasion and proliferation of cancer cells requires the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Importantly, a significant correlation between XBP1 and MMP-9 levels was observed in ESCC clinical samples. Our findings demonstrate that XBP1 is an oncogene that plays an important role in the development of ESCC by activating MMP-9 expression. PMID:27725908

  5. MicroRNA-588 suppresses tumor cell migration and invasion by targeting GRN in lung squamous cell carcinoma