Science.gov

Sample records for inverse problem arising

  1. Things arising from electrocardiographic imaging: toward a theory of partial inverse problems.

    PubMed

    Greensite, Fred

    2006-01-01

    The task of Electrocardiographic Imaging is an ill-posed inverse problem, requiring regularization. However, it has special features, firstly because it is a "non-stationary" inverse problem, and secondly because the inherent dynamical variety (e.g., epicardial breakthroughs, arrhythmias, ischemic changes) may preclude a fruitful nontrivial process model. Importantly, its structure places it in the category of "partial inverse problems" - a theory that arises from this setting. Surprising features of the resulting regularization methodology include the ability to fashion nontrivial regularization matrices in part (and sometimes entirely) from the data. There is evidence that these theoretical results can have significant practical benefits.

  2. An inverse problem for a semilinear parabolic equation arising from cardiac electrophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Elena; Cavaterra, Cecilia; Cerutti, M. Cristina; Manzoni, Andrea; Ratti, Luca

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we develop theoretical analysis and numerical reconstruction techniques for the solution of an inverse boundary value problem dealing with the nonlinear, time-dependent monodomain equation, which models the evolution of the electric potential in the myocardial tissue. The goal is the detection of an inhomogeneity \

  3. Analytical study and numerical solution of the inverse source problem arising in thermoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Benjamin R.

    In recent years, revolutionary "hybrid" or "multi-physics" methods of medical imaging have emerged. By combining two or three different types of waves these methods overcome limitations of classical tomography techniques and deliver otherwise unavailable, potentially life-saving diagnostic information. Thermoacoustic (and photoacoustic) tomography is the most developed multi-physics imaging modality. Thermo- and photo- acoustic tomography require reconstructing initial acoustic pressure in a body from time series of pressure measured on a surface surrounding the body. For the classical case of free space wave propagation, various reconstruction techniques are well known. However, some novel measurement schemes place the object of interest between reflecting walls that form a de facto resonant cavity. In this case, known methods cannot be used. In chapter 2 we present a fast iterative reconstruction algorithm for measurements made at the walls of a rectangular reverberant cavity with a constant speed of sound. We prove the convergence of the iterations under a certain sufficient condition, and demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the algorithm in numerical simulations. In chapter 3 we consider the more general problem of an arbitrarily shaped resonant cavity with a non constant speed of sound and present the gradual time reversal method for computing solutions to the inverse source problem. It consists in solving back in time on the interval [0, T] the initial/boundary value problem for the wave equation, with the Dirichlet boundary data multiplied by a smooth cutoff function. If T is sufficiently large one obtains a good approximation to the initial pressure; in the limit of large T such an approximation converges (under certain conditions) to the exact solution.

  4. Numerical Approximation of Solutions of a Nonlinear Inverse Problem Arising in Olfaction Experimentation

    PubMed Central

    French, Donald A.; Flannery, Richard J.; Groetsch, Charles W.; Krantz, Willam B.; Kleene, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    Identification of detailed features of neuronal systems is an important challenge in the biosciences today. Cilia are long thin structures that extend from the olfactory receptor neurons into the nasal mucus. Transduction of an odor into an electrical signal occurs in the membranes of the cilia. The cyclic-nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels which reside in the ciliary membrane and are activated by adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) allow a depolarizing influx of Ca2+ and Na+ and are thought to initiate the electrical signal. In this paper, a mathematical model consisting of two nonlinear differential equations and a constrained Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is developed to model experiments involving the diffusion of cAMP into cilia and the resulting electrical activity. The unknowns in the problem are the concentration of cAMP, the membrane potential and, the quantity of most interest in this work, the distribution of CNG channels along the length of a cilium. A simple numerical method is derived that can be used to obtain estimates of the spatial distribution of CNG ion channels along the length of a cilium. Certain computations indicate that this mathematical problem is ill-conditioned. PMID:17401452

  5. Inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlande, Helcio Rangel Barreto

    We present the solution of the following inverse problems: (1) Inverse Problem of Estimating Interface Conductance Between Periodically Contacting Surfaces; (2) Inverse Problem of Estimating Interface Conductance During Solidification via Conjugate Gradient Method; (3) Determination of the Reaction Function in a Reaction-Diffusion Parabolic Problem; and (4) Simultaneous Estimation of Thermal Diffusivity and Relaxation Time with Hyperbolic Heat Conduction Model. Also, we present the solution of a direct problem entitled: Transient Thermal Constriction Resistance in a Finite Heat Flux Tube. The Conjugate Gradient Method with Adjoint Equation was used in chapters 1-3. The more general function estimation approach was treated in these chapters. In chapter 1, we solve the inverse problem of estimating the timewise variation of the interface conductance between periodically contacting solids, under quasi-steady-state conditions. The present method is found to be more accurate than the B-Spline approach for situations involving small periods, which are the most difficult on which to perform the inverse analysis. In chapter 2, we estimate the timewise variation of the interface conductance between casting and mold during the solidification of aluminum. The experimental apparatus used in this study is described. In chapter 3, we present the estimation of the reaction function in a one dimensional parabolic problem. A comparison of the present function estimation approach with the parameter estimation technique, wing B-Splines to approximate the reaction function, revealed that the use of function estimation reduces the computer time requirements. In chapter 4 we present a finite difference solution for the transient constriction resistance in a cylinder of finite length with a circular contact surface. A numerical grid generation scheme was used to concentrate grid points in the regions of high temperature gradients in order to reduce discretization errors. In chapter 6, we

  6. Boundary estimation problems arising in thermal tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Kojima, Fumio; Winfree, W. P.

    1989-01-01

    Problems on the identification of two-dimensional spatial domains arising in the detection and characterization of structural flaws in materials are considered. For a thermal diffusion system with external boundary input, observations of the temperature on the surface are used in a output least squares approach. Parameter estimation techniques based on the method of mappings are discussed and approximation schemes are developed based on a finite element Galerkin approach. Theoretical convergence results for computational techniques are given and the results are applied to experimental data for the identification of flaws in the thermal testing of materials.

  7. Inverse problems in mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasko, V. B.

    Procedures for the correct formulation and solution of inverse problems, which usually belong to the class of ill-posed problems, are discussed. Attention is given to the concept of the conditionally correct statement of a problem, the concept of quasi-solution, and the fundamentals of regularization theory. The discussion also covers the uniqueness of solutions to inverse problems in mathematical physics, with consideration given to problems involving layered media, impedance problems, gravimetric problems, and inverse problems of heat conduction. The problem of stability and regularizing operators are also discussed.

  8. Aneesur Rahman Prize: The Inverse Ising Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swendsen, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Many methods are available for carrying out computer simulations of a model Hamiltonian to obtain thermodynamic information by generating a set of configurations. The inverse problem consists of recreating the parameters of the Hamiltonian, given a set of configurations. The problem arises in a variety of contexts, and there has been much interest recently in the inverse Ising problem, in which the configurations consist of Ising spins. I will discuss an efficient method for solving the problem and what it can tell us about the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model.

  9. Riemann Zeros and the Inverse Phase Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourigny, David S.

    2013-10-01

    Finding a universal method of crystal structure solution and proving the Riemann hypothesis are two outstanding challenges in apparently unrelated fields. For centro-symmetric crystals however, a connection arises as the result of a statistical approach to the inverse phase problem. It is shown that parameters of the phase distribution are related to the non-trivial Riemann zeros by a Mellin transform.

  10. RIEMANN ZEROS AND THE INVERSE PHASE PROBLEM.

    PubMed

    Tourigny, David S

    2013-10-20

    Finding a universal method of crystal structure solution and proving the Riemann hypothesis are two outstanding challenges in apparently unrelated fields. For centrosymmetric crystals however, a connection arises as the result of a statistical approach to the inverse phase problem. It is shown that parameters of the phase distribution are related to the non-trivial Riemann zeros by a Mellin transform.

  11. RIEMANN ZEROS AND THE INVERSE PHASE PROBLEM

    PubMed Central

    TOURIGNY, DAVID S.

    2013-01-01

    Finding a universal method of crystal structure solution and proving the Riemann hypothesis are two outstanding challenges in apparently unrelated fields. For centrosymmetric crystals however, a connection arises as the result of a statistical approach to the inverse phase problem. It is shown that parameters of the phase distribution are related to the non-trivial Riemann zeros by a Mellin transform. PMID:24293780

  12. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  13. Inversion Algorithms for Geophysical Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-16

    ktdud* Sccumy Oass/Kjoon) Inversion Algorithms for Geophysical Problems (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lanzano, Paolo 13 «. TYPE OF REPORT Final 13b...spectral density. 20. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 13 UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED D SAME AS RPT n OTIC USERS 22a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...Research Laboratory ’^^ SSZ ’.Washington. DC 20375-5000 NRLrMemorandum Report-6138 Inversion Algorithms for Geophysical Problems p. LANZANO Space

  14. Mathematical problems arising in interfacial electrohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseluiko, Dmitri

    In this work we consider the nonlinear stability of thin films in the presence of electric fields. We study a perfectly conducting thin film flow down an inclined plane in the presence of an electric field which is uniform in its undisturbed state, and normal to the plate at infinity. In addition, the effect of normal electric fields on films lying above, or hanging from, horizontal substrates is considered. Systematic asymptotic expansions are used to derive fully nonlinear long wave model equations for the scaled interface motion and corresponding flow fields. For the case of an inclined plane, higher order terms are need to be retained to regularize the problem in the sense that the long wave approximation remains valid for long times. For the case of a horizontal plane the fully nonlinear evolution equation which is derived at the leading order, is asymptotically correct and no regularization procedure is required. In both physical situations, the effect of the electric field is to introduce a non-local term which arises from the potential region above the liquid film, and enters through the electric Maxwell stresses at the interface. This term is always linearly destabilizing and produces growth rates proportional to the cubic power of the wavenumber - surface tension is included and provides a short wavelength cut-off, that is, all sufficiently short waves are linearly stable. For the case of film flow down an inclined plane, the fully nonlinear equation can produce singular solutions (for certain parameter values) after a finite time, even in the absence of an electric field. This difficulty is avoided at smaller amplitudes where the weakly nonlinear evolution is governed by an extension of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (KS) equation. Global existence and uniqueness results are proved, and refined estimates of the radius of the absorbing ball in L2 are obtained in terms of the parameters of the equations for a generalized class of modified KS equations. The

  15. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    A fundamental part of geophysics is to make inferences about the interior of the earth on the basis of data collected at or near the surface of the earth. In almost all cases these measured data are only indirectly related to the properties of the earth that are of interest, so an inverse problem must be solved in order to obtain estimates of the physical properties within the earth. In February of 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a workshop that was intended to examine the methods currently being used to solve geophysical inverse problems and to consider what new approaches should be explored in the future. The interdisciplinary area between inverse problems in geophysics and optimization methods in mathematics was specifically targeted as one where an interchange of ideas was likely to be fruitful. Thus about half of the participants were actively involved in solving geophysical inverse problems and about half were actively involved in research on general optimization methods. This report presents some of the topics that were explored at the workshop and the conclusions that were reached. In general, the objective of a geophysical inverse problem is to find an earth model, described by a set of physical parameters, that is consistent with the observational data. It is usually assumed that the forward problem, that of calculating simulated data for an earth model, is well enough understood so that reasonably accurate synthetic data can be generated for an arbitrary model. The inverse problem is then posed as an optimization problem, where the function to be optimized is variously called the objective function, misfit function, or fitness function. The objective function is typically some measure of the difference between observational data and synthetic data calculated for a trial model. However, because of incomplete and inaccurate data, the objective function often incorporates some additional form of regularization, such as a measure of smoothness

  16. Kapteyn series arising in radiation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, I.; Tautz, R. C.

    2008-01-01

    In discussing radiation from multiple point charges or magnetic dipoles, moving in circles or ellipses, a variety of Kapteyn series of the second kind arises. Some of the series have been known in closed form for a hundred years or more, others appear not to be available to analytic persuasion. This paper shows how 12 such generic series can be developed to produce either closed analytic expressions or integrals that are not analytically tractable. In addition, the method presented here may be of benefit when one has other Kapteyn series of the second kind to consider, thereby providing an additional reason to consider such series anew.

  17. EDITORIAL: Inverse Problems in Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert M.; Lesnic, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Presented here are 11 noteworthy papers selected from the Fifth International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice held in Cambridge, UK during 11-15 July 2005. The papers have been peer-reviewed to the usual high standards of this journal and the contributions of reviewers are much appreciated. The conference featured a good balance of the fundamental mathematical concepts of inverse problems with a diverse range of important and interesting applications, which are represented here by the selected papers. Aspects of finite-element modelling and the performance of inverse algorithms are investigated by Autrique et al and Leduc et al. Statistical aspects are considered by Emery et al and Watzenig et al with regard to Bayesian parameter estimation and inversion using particle filters. Electrostatic applications are demonstrated by van Berkel and Lionheart and also Nakatani et al. Contributions to the applications of electrical techniques and specifically electrical tomographies are provided by Wakatsuki and Kagawa, Kim et al and Kortschak et al. Aspects of inversion in optical tomography are investigated by Wright et al and Douiri et al. The authors are representative of the worldwide interest in inverse problems relating to engineering applications and their efforts in producing these excellent papers will be appreciated by many readers of this journal.

  18. Statistical inference for inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissantz, Nicolai; Holzmann, Hajo

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we study statistical inference for certain inverse problems. We go beyond mere estimation purposes and review and develop the construction of confidence intervals and confidence bands in some inverse problems, including deconvolution and the backward heat equation. Further, we discuss the construction of certain hypothesis tests, in particular concerning the number of local maxima of the unknown function. The methods are illustrated in a case study, where we analyze the distribution of heliocentric escape velocities of galaxies in the Centaurus galaxy cluster, and provide statistical evidence for its bimodality.

  19. Computationally efficient Bayesian inference for inverse problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Marzouk, Youssef M.; Najm, Habib N.; Rahn, Larry A.

    2007-10-01

    Bayesian statistics provides a foundation for inference from noisy and incomplete data, a natural mechanism for regularization in the form of prior information, and a quantitative assessment of uncertainty in the inferred results. Inverse problems - representing indirect estimation of model parameters, inputs, or structural components - can be fruitfully cast in this framework. Complex and computationally intensive forward models arising in physical applications, however, can render a Bayesian approach prohibitive. This difficulty is compounded by high-dimensional model spaces, as when the unknown is a spatiotemporal field. We present new algorithmic developments for Bayesian inference in this context, showing strong connections with the forward propagation of uncertainty. In particular, we introduce a stochastic spectral formulation that dramatically accelerates the Bayesian solution of inverse problems via rapid evaluation of a surrogate posterior. We also explore dimensionality reduction for the inference of spatiotemporal fields, using truncated spectral representations of Gaussian process priors. These new approaches are demonstrated on scalar transport problems arising in contaminant source inversion and in the inference of inhomogeneous material or transport properties. We also present a Bayesian framework for parameter estimation in stochastic models, where intrinsic stochasticity may be intermingled with observational noise. Evaluation of a likelihood function may not be analytically tractable in these cases, and thus several alternative Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) schemes, operating on the product space of the observations and the parameters, are introduced.

  20. Estimating uncertainties in complex joint inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Sources of uncertainty affecting geophysical inversions can be classified either as reflective (i.e. the practitioner is aware of her/his ignorance) or non-reflective (i.e. the practitioner does not know that she/he does not know!). Although we should be always conscious of the latter, the former are the ones that, in principle, can be estimated either empirically (by making measurements or collecting data) or subjectively (based on the experience of the researchers). For complex parameter estimation problems in geophysics, subjective estimation of uncertainty is the most common type. In this context, probabilistic (aka Bayesian) methods are commonly claimed to offer a natural and realistic platform from which to estimate model uncertainties. This is because in the Bayesian approach, errors (whatever their nature) can be naturally included as part of the global statistical model, the solution of which represents the actual solution to the inverse problem. However, although we agree that probabilistic inversion methods are the most powerful tool for uncertainty estimation, the common claim that they produce "realistic" or "representative" uncertainties is not always justified. Typically, ALL UNCERTAINTY ESTIMATES ARE MODEL DEPENDENT, and therefore, besides a thorough characterization of experimental uncertainties, particular care must be paid to the uncertainty arising from model errors and input uncertainties. We recall here two quotes by G. Box and M. Gunzburger, respectively, of special significance for inversion practitioners and for this session: "…all models are wrong, but some are useful" and "computational results are believed by no one, except the person who wrote the code". In this presentation I will discuss and present examples of some problems associated with the estimation and quantification of uncertainties in complex multi-observable probabilistic inversions, and how to address them. Although the emphasis will be on sources of uncertainty related

  1. Optimization based inversion method for the inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Huaiping; Li, Jingtao; Wang, Xueyao; Liu, Shi

    2017-05-01

    Precise estimation of the thermal physical properties of materials, boundary conditions, heat flux distributions, heat sources and initial conditions is highly desired for real-world applications. The inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP) analysis method provides an alternative approach for acquiring such parameters. The effectiveness of the inversion algorithm plays an important role in practical applications of the IHCP method. Different from traditional inversion models, in this paper a new inversion model that simultaneously highlights the measurement errors and the inaccurate properties of the forward problem is proposed to improve the inversion accuracy and robustness. A generalized cost function is constructed to convert the original IHCP into an optimization problem. An iterative scheme that splits a complicated optimization problem into several simpler sub-problems and integrates the superiorities of the alternative optimization method and the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) algorithm is developed for solving the proposed cost function. Numerical experiment results validate the effectiveness of the proposed inversion method.

  2. Inverse problem in radionuclide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste must comply with the performance objectives set forth in 10 CFR 61 for low-level waste (LLW) and 10 CFR 60 for high-level waste (HLW). To determine probable compliance, the proposed disposal system can be modeled to predict its performance. One of the difficulties encountered in such a study is modeling the migration of radionuclides through a complex geologic medium for the long term. Although many radionuclide transport models exist in the literature, the accuracy of the model prediction is highly dependent on the model parameters used. The problem of using known parameters in a radionuclide transport model to predict radionuclide concentrations is a direct problem (DP); whereas the reverse of DP, i.e., the parameter identification problem of determining model parameters from known radionuclide concentrations, is called the inverse problem (IP). In this study, a procedure to solve IP is tested, using the regression technique. Several nonlinear regression programs are examined, and the best one is recommended. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Minimax approach to inverse problems of geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, P. I.; Dolgal, A. S.; Balk, T. V.; Khristenko, L. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new approach is suggested for solving the inverse problems that arise in the different fields of applied geophysics (gravity, magnetic, and electrical prospecting, geothermy) and require assessing the spatial region occupied by the anomaly-generating masses in the presence of different types of a priori information. The interpretation which provides the maximum guaranteed proximity of the model field sources to the real perturbing object is treated as the best interpretation. In some fields of science (game theory, economics, operations research), the decision-making principle that lies in minimizing the probable losses which cannot be prevented if the situation develops by the worst-case scenario is referred to as minimax. The minimax criterion of choice is interesting as, instead of being confined to the indirect (and sometimes doubtful) signs of the "optimal" solution, it relies on the actual properties of the information in the results of a particular interpretation. In the hierarchy of the approaches to the solution of the inverse problems of geophysics ordered by the volume and quality of the retrieved information about the sources of the field, the minimax approach should take special place.

  4. Parabolic Perturbation of a Nonlinear Hyperbolic Problem Arising in Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, P.; Grasselli, M.

    We study a transport-diffusion initial value problem where the diffusion codlicient is "small" and the transport coefficient is a time function depending on the solution in a nonlinear and nonlocal way. We show the existence and the uniqueness of a weak solution of this problem. Moreover we discuss its asymptotic behaviour as the diffusion coefficient goes to zero, obtaining a well-posed first-order nonlinear hyperbolic problem. These problems arise from mathematical models of muscle contraction in the framework of the sliding filament theory.

  5. L∞ fitting for inverse problems with uniform noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clason, Christian

    2012-10-01

    For inverse problems where the data are corrupted by uniform noise such as arising from quantization errors, the L∞ norm is a more robust data-fitting term than the standard L2 norm. Well-posedness and regularization properties for linear inverse problems with L∞ data fitting are shown, and the automatic choice of the regularization parameter is discussed. After introducing an equivalent reformulation of the problem and a Moreau-Yosida approximation, a superlinearly convergent semi-smooth Newton method becomes applicable for the numerical solution of L∞ fitting problems. Numerical examples illustrate the performance of the proposed approach as well as the qualitative behavior of L∞ fitting.

  6. Inverse Problem for Electromagnetic Propagation in a Dielectric Medium using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Method (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0397 INVERSE PROBLEM FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC PROPAGATION IN A DIELECTRIC MEDIUM USING MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO METHOD ...SUBTITLE INVERSE PROBLEM FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC PROPAGATION IN A DIELECTRIC MEDIUM USING MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO METHOD (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT...a stochastic inverse methodology arising in electromagnetic imaging. Nondestructive testing using guided microwaves covers a wide range of

  7. Inverse problems using reduced basis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralla, Phil

    Inverse Problems is a field of great interest for many applications, such as parameter identification and image reconstruction. The underlying models of inverse problems in many applications often involve Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). A Reduced Basis (RB) method for solving PDE based inverse problems is introduced in this thesis. The RB has been rigorously established as an efficient approach for solving PDEs in recent years. In this work, we investigate whether the RB method can be used as a regularization for solving ill-posed and nonlinear inverse problems using iterative methods. We rigorously analyze the RB method and prove convergence of the RB approximation to the exact solution. Furthermore, an iterative algorithm is proposed based on gradient method with RB regularization. We also implement the proposed method numerically and apply the algorithm to the inverse problem of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) which is known to be a notoriously ill-posed and nonlinear. For the EIT example, we provide all necessary details and carefully explain each step of the RB method. We also investigate the limitations of the RB method for solving nonlinear inverse problems in general. We conclude that the RB method can be used to solve nonlinear inverse problems with appropriate assumptions however the assumptions are somewhat restrictive and may not be applicable for a wide range of problems.

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Inverse Problems. Activities for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    This book is a valuable introduction to inverse problems. In particular, from the educational point of view, the author addresses the questions of what constitutes an inverse problem and how and why we should study them. Such an approach has been eagerly awaited for a long time. Professor Groetsch, of the University of Cincinnati, is a world-renowned specialist in inverse problems, in particular the theory of regularization. Moreover, he has made a remarkable contribution to educational activities in the field of inverse problems, which was the subject of his previous book (Groetsch C W 1993 Inverse Problems in the Mathematical Sciences (Braunschweig: Vieweg)). For this reason, he is one of the most qualified to write an introductory book on inverse problems. Without question, inverse problems are important, necessary and appear in various aspects. So it is crucial to introduce students to exercises in inverse problems. However, there are not many introductory books which are directly accessible by students in the first two undergraduate years. As a consequence, students often encounter diverse concrete inverse problems before becoming aware of their general principles. The main purpose of this book is to present activities to allow first-year undergraduates to learn inverse theory. To my knowledge, this book is a rare attempt to do this and, in my opinion, a great success. The author emphasizes that it is very important to teach inverse theory in the early years. He writes; `If students consider only the direct problem, they are not looking at the problem from all sides .... The habit of always looking at problems from the direct point of view is intellectually limiting ...' (page 21). The book is very carefully organized so that teachers will be able to use it as a textbook. After an introduction in chapter 1, sucessive chapters deal with inverse problems in precalculus, calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. In order to let one gain some insight

  9. An inverse problem in thermal imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt; Caudill, Lester F., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines uniqueness and stability results for an inverse problem in thermal imaging. The goal is to identify an unknown boundary of an object by applying a heat flux and measuring the induced temperature on the boundary of the sample. The problem is studied both in the case in which one has data at every point on the boundary of the region and the case in which only finitely many measurements are available. An inversion procedure is developed and used to study the stability of the inverse problem for various experimental configurations.

  10. Inverse Born series for the Calderon problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, Simon; Moskow, Shari; Schotland, John C.

    2012-03-01

    We propose a direct reconstruction method for the Calderon problem based on inversion of the Born series. We characterize the convergence, stability and approximation error of the method and illustrate its use in numerical reconstructions.

  11. An Inverse Problem Statistical Methodology Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-12

    R. Vogel, Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, SIAM, Philadelphia, 2002. [36] D. D. Wackerly, W. Mendenhall III, and R. L. Scheaffer , Mathematical Statistics with Applications, Duxbury Thompson Learning, USA, 2002. 56

  12. Some inverse problems arising from elastic scattering by rigid obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guanghui; Kirsch, Andreas; Sini, Mourad

    2013-01-01

    In the first part of this paper, it is proved that a C2-regular rigid scatterer in { {R}}^3 can be uniquely identified by the shear part (i.e. S-part) of the far-field pattern corresponding to all incident shear waves at any fixed frequency. The proof is short and it is based on a kind of decoupling of the S-part of scattered wave from its pressure part (i.e. P-part) on the boundary of the scatterer. Moreover, uniqueness using the S-part of the far-field pattern corresponding to only one incident plane shear wave holds for a ball or a convex Lipschitz polyhedron. In the second part, we adapt the factorization method to recover the shape of a rigid body from the scattered S-waves (resp. P-waves) corresponding to all incident plane shear (resp. pressure) waves. Numerical examples illustrate the accuracy of our reconstruction in { {R}}^2. In particular, the factorization method also leads to some uniqueness results for all frequencies excluding possibly a discrete set.

  13. Inverse problem solution in ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabashta, Lubov A.; Zabashta, Oleg I.

    1995-11-01

    Interactive graphic system 'ELLA' is described which is an integrated program packet for reverse problem solution in ellipsometry. The solutions stable to experimental errors are found by two algorithms: a simplex method under constraints and a regularizing iteration method. A developed graphic procedure kit includes display of graphic surface layers, their optical parameters, and all main results of intermediate calculations. Specialized graphic input functions allow us to change the parameters of a chosen solution method, the basic data, to enter new additional information, etc. On the examples of model structure of GaAs-oxide MAI capabilities in ellipsometry for determination of multilayer structure optical parameters are studied.

  14. Molecular seismology: an inverse problem in nanobiology.

    PubMed

    Hinow, Peter; Boczko, Erik M

    2007-05-07

    The density profile of an elastic fiber like DNA will change in space and time as ligands associate with it. This observation affords a new direction in single molecule studies provided that density profiles can be measured in space and time. In fact, this is precisely the objective of seismology, where the mathematics of inverse problems have been employed with success. We argue that inverse problems in elastic media can be directly applied to biophysical problems of fiber-ligand association, and demonstrate that robust algorithms exist to perform density reconstruction in the condensed phase.

  15. The Inverse Problem in Jet Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooddruff, S. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The inverse problem for jet acoustics, or the determination of noise sources from far-field pressure information, is proposed as a tool for understanding the generation of noise by turbulence and for the improved prediction of jet noise. An idealized version of the problem is investigated first to establish the extent to which information about the noise sources may be determined from far-field pressure data and to determine how a well-posed inverse problem may be set up. Then a version of the industry-standard MGB code is used to predict a jet noise source spectrum from experimental noise data.

  16. Linear inverse problem of the reactor dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, N. P.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study transient processes in nuclear reactors. The mathematical model of the reactor dynamics excluding reverse thermal coupling is investigated. This model is described by a system of integral-differential equations, consisting of a non-stationary anisotropic multispeed kinetic transport equation and a delayed neutron balance equation. An inverse problem was formulated to determine the stationary part of the function source along with the solution of the direct problem. The author obtained sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of a generalized solution of this inverse problem.

  17. Estimating nuisance parameters in inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravkin, Aleksandr Y.; van Leeuwen, Tristan

    2012-11-01

    Many inverse problems include nuisance parameters which, while not of direct interest, are required to recover primary parameters. The structure of these problems allows efficient optimization strategies—a well-known example is variable projection, where nonlinear least-squares problems which are linear in some parameters can be very efficiently optimized. In this paper, we extend the idea of projecting out a subset over the variables to a broad class of maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori likelihood problems with nuisance parameters, such as variance or degrees of freedom (d.o.f.). As a result, we are able to incorporate nuisance parameter estimation into large-scale constrained and unconstrained inverse problem formulations. We apply the approach to a variety of problems, including estimation of unknown variance parameters in the Gaussian model, d.o.f. parameter estimation in the context of robust inverse problems, and automatic calibration. Using numerical examples, we demonstrate improvement in recovery of primary parameters for several large-scale inverse problems. The proposed approach is compatible with a wide variety of algorithms and formulations, and its implementation requires only minor modifications to existing algorithms.

  18. A Stochastic Problem Arising in the Storage of Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2004-07-15

    Nuclear waste drums can contain a collection of radioactive components of uncertain activity and randomly dispersed in position. This implies that the dose-rate at the surface of different drums in a large assembly of similar drums can have significant variations according to the physical makeup and configuration of the waste components. The present paper addresses this problem by treating the drum, and its waste, as a stochastic medium. It is assumed that the sources in the drum contribute a dose-rate to some external point. The strengths and positions are chosen by random numbers, the dose-rate is calculated and, from several thousand realizations, a probability distribution for the dose-rate is obtained. It is shown that a very close approximation to the dose-rate probability function is the log-normal distribution. This allows some useful statistical indicators, which are of environmental importance, to be calculated with little effort.As an example of a practical situation met in the storage of radioactive waste containers, we study the problem of 'hotspots'. These arise in drums in which most of the activity is concentrated on one radioactive component and hence can lead to the possibility of large surface dose-rates. It is shown how the dose-rate, the variance, and some other statistical indicators depend on the relative activities on the sources. The results highlight the importance of such hotspots and the need to quantify their effect.

  19. Inverse Problems in Hyperspectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisha, Sebastian

    In hyperpsectral imaging, multiple images of the same scene are obtained over a contiguous range of wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum. Hyperspectral images represent observations of a scene at many different wavelengths and most importantly associate to each pixel in the imaged scene a full spectral vector or spectral signature. However, due to the presence of spectral mixtures (at different scales) in the scene and/or low spatial resolution of the hyperspectral sensor, the acquired spectral vectors of each pixel are actually a mixture of the spectra of the various materials present in the spatial coverage area of the corresponding pixel, and they also contain additional degradations caused by atmospheric blurring.We present a numerical approach for deblurring and sparse unmixing of space objects taken by ground based telescopes. A major challenge for deblurring hyperspectral images is that of estimating the overall blurring operator, taking into account the fact that the blurring operator point spread function (PSF) can be wavelength dependent and depend on the imaging system as well as the effects of atmospheric turbulence. We formulate the PSF estimation as a nonlinear least squares problem, which is solved using a variable projection Gauss-Newton method. Our analysis shows that the Jacobian can be potentially very ill-conditioned. To deal with this ill-conditioning, we use a combination of subset selection and regularization. We then incorporate the PSF estimation scheme with a preconditioned alternating direction method of multipliers to solve the deblurring and sparse unmixing problem. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of the resulting numerical schemes.

  20. An inverse blow-up problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Yutaka; Usami, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies an inverse problem to determine a nonlinearity of an autonomous equation from blow-up time of solutions to the equation. Firstly we prove a global continuation result showing that a nonlinearity realizing blow-up time for large initial data can be continued in the direction of smaller data as long as the blow-up time is Lipschitz continuous. Secondly we develop a method based upon a Wiener-Hopf structure by which the existence and uniqueness of a nonlinearity realizing blow-up time for large initial data is shown. These enable us to establish a global existence and uniqueness result for the inverse problem.

  1. Solving inversion problems with neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamgar-Parsi, Behzad; Gualtieri, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A class of inverse problems in remote sensing can be characterized by Q = F(x), where F is a nonlinear and noninvertible (or hard to invert) operator, and the objective is to infer the unknowns, x, from the observed quantities, Q. Since the number of observations is usually greater than the number of unknowns, these problems are formulated as optimization problems, which can be solved by a variety of techniques. The feasibility of neural networks for solving such problems is presently investigated. As an example, the problem of finding the atmospheric ozone profile from measured ultraviolet radiances is studied.

  2. Inverse problem of electro-seismic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Yang, Yang

    2013-11-01

    When a porous rock is saturated with an electrolyte, electrical fields are coupled with seismic waves via the electro-seismic conversion. Pride (1994 Phys. Rev. B 50 15678-96) derived the governing models, in which Maxwell equations are coupled with Biot's equations through the electro-kinetic mobility parameter. The inverse problem of the linearized electro-seismic conversion consists in two steps, namely the inversion of Biot's equations and the inversion of Maxwell equations. We analyze the reconstruction of conductivity and electro-kinetic mobility parameter in Maxwell equations with internal measurements, while the internal measurements are provided by the results of the inversion of Biot's equations. We show that knowledge of two internal data based on well-chosen boundary conditions uniquely determines these two parameters. Moreover, a Lipschitz-type stability is proved based on the same sets of well-chosen boundary conditions.

  3. Inverse Problems in Classical and Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almasy, Andrea A.

    2009-12-01

    The subject of this thesis is in the area of Applied Mathematics known as Inverse Problems. Inverse problems are those where a set of measured data is analysed in order to get as much information as possible on a model which is assumed to represent a system in the real world. We study two inverse problems in the fields of classical and quantum physics: QCD condensates from tau-decay data and the inverse conductivity problem. We use a functional method which allows us to extract within rather general assumptions phenomenological parameters of QCD (the condensates) from a comparison of the time-like experimental data with asymptotic space-like results from theory. The price to be paid for the generality of assumptions is relatively large errors in the values of the extracted parameters. Although we do not claim that our method is superior to other approaches, we hope that our results lend additional confidence to the numerical results obtained with the help of methods based on QCD sum rules. In this thesis, also two approaches of EIT image reconstruction are proposed. The first is based on reformulating the inverse problem in terms of integral equations. This method uses only a single set of measurements for the reconstruction. The second approach is an algorithm based on linearisation which uses more then one set of measurements. A promising result is that one can qualitatively reconstruct the conductivity inside the cross-section of a human chest. Even though the human volunteer is neither two-dimensional nor circular, such reconstructions can be useful in medical applications: monitoring for lung problems such as accumulating fluid or a collapsed lung and noninvasive monitoring of heart function and blood flow.

  4. Urban surface water pollution problems arising from misconnections.

    PubMed

    Revitt, D Michael; Ellis, J Bryan

    2016-05-01

    The impacts of misconnections on the organic and nutrient loadings to surface waters are assessed using specific household appliance data for two urban sub-catchments located in the London metropolitan region and the city of Swansea. Potential loadings of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), soluble reactive phosphorus (PO4-P) and ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4-N) due to misconnections are calculated for three different scenarios based on the measured daily flows from specific appliances and either measured daily pollutant concentrations or average pollutant concentrations for relevant greywater and black water sources obtained from an extensive review of the literature. Downstream receiving water concentrations, together with the associated uncertainties, are predicted from derived misconnection discharge concentrations and compared to existing freshwater standards for comparable river types. Consideration of dilution ratios indicates that these would need to be of the order of 50-100:1 to maintain high water quality with respect to BOD and NH4-N following typical misconnection discharges but only poor quality for PO4-P is likely to be achievable. The main pollutant loading contributions to misconnections arise from toilets (NH4-N and BOD), kitchen sinks (BOD and PO4-P) washing machines (PO4-P and BOD) and, to a lesser extent, dishwashers (PO4-P). By completely eliminating toilet misconnections and ensuring misconnections from all other appliances do not exceed 2%, the potential pollution problems due to BOD and NH4-N discharges would be alleviated but this would not be the case for PO4-P. In the event of a treatment option being preferred to solve the misconnection problem, it is shown that for an area the size of metropolitan Greater London, a sewage treatment plant with a Population Equivalent value approaching 900,000 would be required to efficiently remove BOD and NH4-N to safely dischargeable levels but such a plant is unlikely to have the capacity to deal

  5. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: New developments for Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    2006 has proved to be a very successful year for Inverse Problems. After an increase for the fourth successive year, we achieved our highest impact factor to date, 1.541 (Source: 2005 ISI® Journal Citation Report), and the Editorial Board is keen to build on this success by continuing to improve the service we offer to our readers and authors. The Board has observed that Inverse Problems receives very few Letters to the Editor submissions, and that moreover those that we do receive rarely conform to the requirements for Letters to the Editor set out in the journal's editorial policy. The Board has therefore decided to merge the current Letters to the Editor section into our regular Papers section, which will now accommodate all research articles that meet the journal's high quality standards. Any submissions that would previously have been Letters to the Editor are still very welcome as Papers, and can be submitted by e-mail to ip@iop.org or online using our online submissions form at authors.iop.org/submit. Inverse Problems' processing times are already among the fastest in the field—on average, authors receive our decision on their paper in less than three months. Thanks to our easy-to-use online refereeing system, publishing a Paper is now just as fast as publishing a Letter to the Editor, and we are striving to ensure that the journal's high standards are applied consistently to all our Papers, maintaining Inverse Problems' position as the leading journal in the field. Our highly acclaimed Topical Review section will also continue and grow; providing timely insights into the development of all topical fields within Inverse Problems. We have many exciting Topical Reviews currently in preparation for 2007 and will continue to commission articles at the cutting edge of research. We look forward to receiving your contributions and to continuing to provide the best publication service available.

  6. An efficient method for inverse problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daripa, Prabir

    1987-01-01

    A new inverse method for aerodynamic design of subcritical airfoils is presented. The pressure distribution in this method can be prescribed in a natural way, i.e. as a function of arclength of the as yet unknown body. This inverse problem is shown to be mathematically equivalent to solving a single nonlinear boundary value problem subject to known Dirichlet data on the boundary. The solution to this problem determines the airfoil, the free stream Mach number M(sub x) and the upstream flow direction theta(sub x). The existence of a solution for any given pressure distribution is discussed. The method is easy to implement and extremely efficient. We present a series of results for which comparisons are made with the known airfoils.

  7. A Reassessment of the Groundwater Inverse Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Dennis; Townley, Lloyd R.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents a functional formulation of the groundwater flow inverse problem that is sufficiently general to accommodate most commonly used inverse algorithms. Unknown hydrogeological properties are assumed to be spatial functions that can be represented in terms of a (possibly infinite) basis function expansion with random coefficients. The unknown parameter function is related to the measurements used for estimation by a "forward operator" which describes the measurement process. In the particular case considered here, the parameter of interest is the large-scale log hydraulic conductivity, the measurements are point values of log conductivity and piezometric head, and the forward operator is derived from an upscaled groundwater flow equation. The inverse algorithm seeks the "most probable" or maximum a posteriori estimate of the unknown parameter function. When the measurement errors and parameter function are Gaussian and independent, the maximum a posteriori estimate may be obtained by minimizing a least squares performance index which can be partitioned into goodness-of-fit and prior terms. When the parameter is a stationary random function the prior portion of the performance index is equivalent to a regularization term which imposes a smoothness constraint on the estimate. This constraint tends to make the problem well-posed by limiting the range of admissible solutions. The Gaussian maximum a posteriori problem may be solved with variational methods, using functional generalizations of Gauss-Newton or gradient-based search techniques. Several popular groundwater inverse algorithms are either special cases of, or variants on, the functional maximum a posteriori algorithm. These algorithms differ primarily with respect to the way they describe spatial variability and the type of search technique they use (linear versus nonlinear). The accuracy of estimates produced by both linear and nonlinear inverse algorithms may be measured in terms of a Bayesian

  8. Inverse problems biomechanical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-03-01

    It is now well recognized that a host of imaging modalities (a list that includes Ultrasound, MRI, Optical Coherence Tomography, and optical microscopy) can be used to "watch" tissue as it deforms in response to an internal or external excitation. The result is a detailed map of the deformation field in the interior of the tissue. This deformation field can be used in conjunction with a material mechanical response to determine the spatial distribution of material properties of the tissue by solving an inverse problem. Images of material properties thus obtained can be used to quantify the health of the tissue. Recently, they have been used to detect, diagnose and monitor cancerous lesions, detect vulnerable plaque in arteries, diagnose liver cirrhosis, and possibly detect the onset of Alzheimer's disease. In this talk I will describe the mathematical and computational aspects of solving this class of inverse problems, and their applications in biology and medicine. In particular, I will discuss the well-posedness of these problems and quantify the amount of displacement data necessary to obtain a unique property distribution. I will describe an efficient algorithm for solving the resulting inverse problem. I will also describe some recent developments based on Bayesian inference in estimating the variance in the estimates of material properties. I will conclude with the applications of these techniques in diagnosing breast cancer and in characterizing the mechanical properties of cells with sub-cellular resolution.

  9. Inverse scattering problem for quantum graph vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Taksu; Turek, Ondrej; Exner, Pavel

    2011-06-15

    We demonstrate how the inverse scattering problem of a quantum star graph can be solved by means of diagonalization of the Hermitian unitary matrix when the vertex coupling is of the scale-invariant (or Fueloep-Tsutsui) form. This enables the construction of quantum graphs with desired properties in a tailor-made fashion. The procedure is illustrated on the example of quantum vertices with equal transmission probabilities.

  10. Inverse problem of radiofrequency sounding of ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, E. N.; Yu. Grishentsev, A.; Korobeynikov, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    An algorithm for the solution of the inverse problem of vertical ionosphere sounding and a mathematical model of noise filtering are presented. An automated system for processing and analysis of spectrograms of vertical ionosphere sounding based on our algorithm is described. It is shown that the algorithm we suggest has a rather high efficiency. This is supported by the data obtained at the ionospheric stations of the so-called “AIS-M” type.

  11. Variational Bayesian Approximation methods for inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) methods are recent tools for effective Bayesian computations. In this paper, these tools are used for inverse problems where the prior models include hidden variables and where where the estimation of the hyper parameters has also to be addressed. In particular two specific prior models (Student-t and mixture of Gaussian models) are considered and details of the algorithms are given.

  12. Riemann–Hilbert problem approach for two-dimensional flow inverse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Agaltsov, A. D.; Novikov, R. G.

    2014-10-15

    We consider inverse scattering for the time-harmonic wave equation with first-order perturbation in two dimensions. This problem arises in particular in the acoustic tomography of moving fluid. We consider linearized and nonlinearized reconstruction algorithms for this problem of inverse scattering. Our nonlinearized reconstruction algorithm is based on the non-local Riemann–Hilbert problem approach. Comparisons with preceding results are given.

  13. Heuristics for the inversion median problem

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study of genome rearrangements has become a mainstay of phylogenetics and comparative genomics. Fundamental in such a study is the median problem: given three genomes find a fourth that minimizes the sum of the evolutionary distances between itself and the given three. Many exact algorithms and heuristics have been developed for the inversion median problem, of which the best known is MGR. Results We present a unifying framework for median heuristics, which enables us to clarify existing strategies and to place them in a partial ordering. Analysis of this framework leads to a new insight: the best strategies continue to refer to the input data rather than reducing the problem to smaller instances. Using this insight, we develop a new heuristic for inversion medians that uses input data to the end of its computation and leverages our previous work with DCJ medians. Finally, we present the results of extensive experimentation showing that our new heuristic outperforms all others in accuracy and, especially, in running time: the heuristic typically returns solutions within 1% of optimal and runs in seconds to minutes even on genomes with 25'000 genes--in contrast, MGR can take days on instances of 200 genes and cannot be used beyond 1'000 genes. Conclusion Finding good rearrangement medians, in particular inversion medians, had long been regarded as the computational bottleneck in whole-genome studies. Our new heuristic for inversion medians, ASM, which dominates all others in our framework, puts that issue to rest by providing near-optimal solutions within seconds to minutes on even the largest genomes. PMID:20122203

  14. Modelling and inversion -progress, problems, and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiche, Art

    1994-03-01

    Researchers in the field of electromagnetic modelling and inversion have taken advantage of the impressive improvements of new computer hardware to explore exciting new initiatives and solid extensions of older ideas. Finite-difference time-stepping methods have been successfully applied to full-domain 3D models. Another new method combines time-stepping with spatial frequency solutions. The 2D model 3D source (2.5D) problem is also receiving fresh attention both for continental and sea floor applications. The 3D inversion problem is being attacked by several researchers using distorted Born approximation methods. Q-domain inversions using transformation to pseudo-wave field and travel time tomography have also been successfully tested for low contrast problems. Subspace methods have been successful in dramatically reducing the computational burden of the under-determined style of inversion. Static magnetic field interpretation methods are proving useful for delineating the position of closely-spaced multiple targets. Novel (“appeals to nature”) methods are also being investigated. Neural net algorithms have been tested for determining the depth and offset of buried pipes from EM ellipticity data. Genetic algorithms and simulated annealing have been tested for extremal model construction. The failure of researchers to take adequate account of the properties of the mathematical transformation from algorithms to the number domain represented by the computing process remains a major stumbling block. Structured programming, functional languages, and other software tools and methods are presented as an essential part of the serial process leading from EM theory to geological interpretation.

  15. A-optimal encoding weights for nonlinear inverse problems, with application to the Helmholtz inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crestel, Benjamin; Alexanderian, Alen; Stadler, Georg; Ghattas, Omar

    2017-07-01

    The computational cost of solving an inverse problem governed by PDEs, using multiple experiments, increases linearly with the number of experiments. A recently proposed method to decrease this cost uses only a small number of random linear combinations of all experiments for solving the inverse problem. This approach applies to inverse problems where the PDE solution depends linearly on the right-hand side function that models the experiment. As this method is stochastic in essence, the quality of the obtained reconstructions can vary, in particular when only a small number of combinations are used. We develop a Bayesian formulation for the definition and computation of encoding weights that lead to a parameter reconstruction with the least uncertainty. We call these weights A-optimal encoding weights. Our framework applies to inverse problems where the governing PDE is nonlinear with respect to the inversion parameter field. We formulate the problem in infinite dimensions and follow the optimize-then-discretize approach, devoting special attention to the discretization and the choice of numerical methods in order to achieve a computational cost that is independent of the parameter discretization. We elaborate our method for a Helmholtz inverse problem, and derive the adjoint-based expressions for the gradient of the objective function of the optimization problem for finding the A-optimal encoding weights. The proposed method is potentially attractive for real-time monitoring applications, where one can invest the effort to compute optimal weights offline, to later solve an inverse problem repeatedly, over time, at a fraction of the initial cost.

  16. Finite element based inversion for time-harmonic electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzbach, Christoph; Haber, Eldad

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we address the inverse problem and present some recent advances in numerical methods to recover the subsurface electrical conductivity from time-harmonic electromagnetic data. We rigorously formulate and discretize both the forward and the inverse problem in the finite element framework. To solve the forward problem, we derive a finite element discretization of the first-order system of Maxwell's equations in terms of the electric field and the magnetic induction. We show that our approach is equivalent to the standard discretization of the vector Helmholtz equation in terms of the electric field and that the discretization of magnetic induction of the same approximation order is hidden in the standard discretization. We implement the forward solver on unstructured tetrahedral meshes using edge elements. Unstructured meshes are not only capable of representing complex geometry. They can also reduce the overall problem size and, thus, the size of the system of linear equations arising from the forward problem such that direct methods for its solution using a sparse matrix factorization become feasible. The inverse problem is formulated as a regularized output least squares problem. We consider two regularization functions. First, we derive a smoothness regularizer using a primal-dual mixed finite element formulation which generalizes the standard Laplacian operator for a piecewise constant conductivity model on unstructured meshes. Secondly, we derive a total variation regularizer for the same class of models. For the choice of the regularization parameter we revisit the so-called dynamic regularization and compare it to a standard regularization scheme with fixed regularization parameter. The optimization problem is solved by the Gauss-Newton method which can be efficiently implemented using sparse matrix-vector operations and exploiting the sparse matrix factorization of the forward problem system matrix. A synthetic data example from marine

  17. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gelfand-Levitan-Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory. The last of these applies to transmission and reflection in an active medium. The theory of turbulent magnetic fluctuations does not refer to such quantities. It requires a somewhat different formulation. We reduce the theory to the measurement of the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum, which is not the turbulent spectral energy density. The inverse theory in this form enables obtaining information about the turbulent response function of the medium. The dynamic causes of the electromagnetic fluctuations are implicit to it. Thus, it is of vital interest in low-frequency magnetic turbulence. The theory is developed until presentation of the equations in applicable form to observations of turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations as input from measurements. Solution of the final integral equation should be done by standard numerical methods based on iteration. We point to the possibility of treating power law fluctuation spectra as an example. Formulation of the problem to include observations of spectral power densities in turbulence is not attempted. This leads to severe mathematical problems and requires a reformulation of inverse scattering theory. One particular aspect of the present inverse theory of turbulent fluctuations is that its structure naturally leads to spatial information which is obtained from the temporal information that is inherent to the observation of time series. The Taylor assumption is not needed here. This is a consequence of Maxwell's equations, which couple space and time evolution. The inversion procedure takes advantage of a particular

  18. Network connections that evolve to circumvent the inverse optics problem.

    PubMed

    Ng, Cherlyn; Sundararajan, Janani; Hogan, Michael; Purves, Dale

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem in vision science is how useful perceptions and behaviors arise in the absence of information about the physical sources of retinal stimuli (the inverse optics problem). Psychophysical studies show that human observers contend with this problem by using the frequency of occurrence of stimulus patterns in cumulative experience to generate percepts. To begin to understand the neural mechanisms underlying this strategy, we examined the connectivity of simple neural networks evolved to respond according to the cumulative rank of stimulus luminance values. Evolved similarities with the connectivity of early level visual neurons suggests that biological visual circuitry uses the same mechanisms as a means of creating useful perceptions and behaviors without information about the real world.

  19. Posterior population expansion for solving inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggli, C.; Straubhaar, J.; Renard, P.

    2017-04-01

    Solving inverse problems in a complex, geologically realistic, and discrete model space and from a sparse set of observations is a very challenging task. Extensive exploration by Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) methods often results in considerable computational efforts. Most optimization methods, on the other hand, are limited to linear (continuous) model spaces and the minimization of an objective function, what often proves to be insufficient. To overcome these problems, we propose a new ensemble-based exploration scheme for geostatistical prior models generated by a multiple-point statistics (MPS) tool. The principle of our method is to expand an existing set of models by using posterior facies information for conditioning new MPS realizations. The algorithm is independent of the physical parametrization. It is tested on a simple synthetic inverse problem. When compared to two existing McMC methods (iterative spatial resampling (ISR) and Interrupted Markov chain Monte Carlo (IMcMC)), the required number of forward model runs was divided by a factor of 8-12.

  20. ITOUGH2: Solving TOUGH inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K.

    1995-03-01

    ITOUGH2 is a program that provides inverse modeling capabilities for the TOUGH2 code. While the main purpose of ITOUGH2 is to estimate two-phase hydraulic properties of calibrating a TOUGH2 model to laboratory or field data, the information obtained by evaluating parameter sensitivities can also be used to optimize the design of an experiment, and to analyze the uncertainty of model predictions. ITOUGH2 has been applied to a number of laboratory and field experiments on different scales. Three examples are discussed in this paper, demonstrating the code`s capability to support test design, data analysis, and model predictions for a variety of TOUGH problems.

  1. Multigrid Algorithms for the Solution of Linear Complementarity Problems Arising from Free Boundary Problems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    THE SOLUTION OF LINEAR COMPLEMENTARITY PROBLEMS ARISING FROM FREE BOUNDARY PROBLEMS Achi Brandt*’ ( 1 ) and Colin W. Cryer’ (2 1.1 INTRODUCTION...University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Madison, WI 53706. ( 1 )Sponsored by the United States Army under Contract No. DAAG29-80-C-0041. (2)Sponsored by...multi- plying (1.3a) by - 1 . For example, if t is the Laplace operator in R 2 , then a possible choice for L would be the classical five-point difference

  2. EDITORIAL: Inverse Problems' 25th year of publication Inverse Problems' 25th year of publication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    2009 is Inverse Problems' 25th year of publication. In this quarter-century, the journal has established itself as the premier publication venue for inverse problems research. It has matured from its beginnings as a niche journal serving the emerging field of inverse and ill-posed problems to a monthly publication in 2009 covering all aspects of a well-established, vibrant and still-expanding subject. Along with its core readership of pure and applied mathematicians and physicists, Inverse Problems has become widely known across a broad range of researchers in areas such as geophysics, optics, radar, acoustics, communication theory, signal processing and medical imaging, amongst others. The journal's appeal to the inverse problems community and those researchers from the varied fields that encounter such problems can be attributed to our commitment to publishing only the very best papers, and to offering unique services to the community. Besides our regular research papers, which average a remarkably short five months from submission to electronic publication, we regularly publish heavily cited topical review papers and topic-specific special sections, which first appeared in 2004. These highly-downloaded invited articles focus on the latest developments and hot topics in all areas of inverse problems. No other journal in the field offers these features. I am very pleased to take Inverse Problems into its 25th year as Editor-in-Chief. The journal has an impressive tradition of scholarship, established at its inception by the founder and first Editor-in-Chief, Professor Pierre Sabatier. Professor Sabatier envisioned the journal in 1985 as providing a medium for publication of exemplary research in our intrinsically interdisciplinary field. I am glad to say that the support of our authors, readers, referees, Editors-in-Chief, Editorial Boards and Advisory Panels over the years, has resulted in Inverse Problems becoming the top publication in this field, publishing

  3. Index Theory-Based Algorithm for the Gradiometer Inverse Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-28

    based gravity gradiometer inverse problem algorithm. This algorithm relates changes in the index value computed on a closed curve containing a line...account for the bounds. Key Words: Gravity Gradiometer, Inverse Problem, Index Theory Mathematics Subject Classification 31A99...Theory based gravity gradiometer inverse problem algorithm. This algorithm relates changes in the index value computed on a closed curve containing a

  4. An inverse problem by boundary element method

    SciTech Connect

    Tran-Cong, T.; Nguyen-Thien, T.; Graham, A.L.

    1996-02-01

    Boundary Element Methods (BEM) have been established as useful and powerful tools in a wide range of engineering applications, e.g. Brebbia et al. In this paper, we report a particular three dimensional implementation of a direct boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation and its application to numerical simulations of practical polymer processing operations. In particular, we will focus on the application of the present boundary element technology to simulate an inverse problem in plastics processing.by extrusion. The task is to design profile extrusion dies for plastics. The problem is highly non-linear due to material viscoelastic behaviours as well as unknown free surface conditions. As an example, the technique is shown to be effective in obtaining the die profiles corresponding to a square viscoelastic extrudate under different processing conditions. To further illustrate the capability of the method, examples of other non-trivial extrudate profiles and processing conditions are also given.

  5. Intermediate simulation of the inverse seismic problem

    SciTech Connect

    Brolley, J.E.

    1980-03-01

    An introductory study of the inverse seismic problem is performed. The complex cepstrum of a seismogram generated by the convolution of three factors, the Seggern-Blandford source function of an explosion, the Futterman mantle transfer function, and the SRO seismometer transfer function, is used. For a given Q and yield, a synthetic seismogram is computed. Arbitrary values of Q and yield are introduced, and a search is conducted to find that pair of values that minimized the cepstral difference between the original and arbitrary seismograms. The original values are accurately recovered. Spectral and amplitude characteristics of the various factors are presented. Possible application to the problem of studying a medium intervening between a source and receiver is discussed. 25 figures, 1 table.

  6. Inverse Variational Problem for Nonstandard Lagrangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, A.; Talukdar, B.

    2014-06-01

    In the mathematical physics literature the nonstandard Lagrangians (NSLs) were introduced in an ad hoc fashion rather than being derived from the solution of the inverse problem of variational calculus. We begin with the first integral of the equation of motion and solve the associated inverse problem to obtain some of the existing results for NSLs. In addition, we provide a number of alternative Lagrangian representations. The case studies envisaged by us include (i) the usual modified Emden-type equation, (ii) Emden-type equation with dissipative term quadratic in velocity, (iii) Lotka-Volterra model and (vi) a number of the generic equations for dissipative-like dynamical systems. Our method works for nonstandard Lagrangians corresponding to the usual action integral of mechanical systems but requires modification for those associated with the modified actions like S =∫abe L(x ,x˙ , t) dt and S =∫abL 1 - γ(x ,x˙ , t) dt because in the latter case one cannot construct expressions for the Jacobi integrals.

  7. The inverse gravimetric problem in gravity modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanso, F.; Tscherning, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main purposes of geodesy is to determine the gravity field of the Earth in the space outside its physical surface. This purpose can be pursued without any particular knowledge of the internal density even if the exact shape of the physical surface of the Earth is not known, though this seems to entangle the two domains, as it was in the old Stoke's theory before the appearance of Molodensky's approach. Nevertheless, even when large, dense and homogeneous data sets are available, it was always recognized that subtracting from the gravity field the effect of the outer layer of the masses (topographic effect) yields a much smoother field. This is obviously more important when a sparse data set is bad so that any smoothing of the gravity field helps in interpolating between the data without raising the modeling error, this approach is generally followed because it has become very cheap in terms of computing time since the appearance of spectral techniques. The mathematical description of the Inverse Gravimetric Problem (IGP) is dominated mainly by two principles, which in loose terms can be formulated as follows: the knowledge of the external gravity field determines mainly the lateral variations of the density; and the deeper the density anomaly giving rise to a gravity anomaly, the more improperly posed is the problem of recovering the former from the latter. The statistical relation between rho and n (and its inverse) is also investigated in its general form, proving that degree cross-covariances have to be introduced to describe the behavior of rho. The problem of the simultaneous estimate of a spherical anomalous potential and of the external, topographic masses is addressed criticizing the choice of the mixed collection approach.

  8. Boundary layer problem on a hyperbolic system arising from chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qianqian; Wang, Zhi-An; Zhao, Kun

    2016-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the boundary layer problem for a hyperbolic system transformed via a Cole-Hopf type transformation from a repulsive chemotaxis model with logarithmic sensitivity proposed in [23,34] modeling the biological movement of reinforced random walkers which deposit a non-diffusible (or slowly moving) signal that modifies the local environment for succeeding passages. By prescribing the Dirichlet boundary conditions to the transformed hyperbolic system in an interval (0 , 1), we show that the system has the boundary layer solutions as the chemical diffusion coefficient ε → 0, and further use the formal asymptotic analysis to show that the boundary layer thickness is ε 1 / 2. Our work justifies the boundary layer phenomenon that was numerically found in the recent work [25]. However we find that the original chemotaxis system does not possess boundary layer solutions when the results are reverted to the pre-transformed system.

  9. Inverse spectral problems for differential operators on spatial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurko, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    A short survey is given of results on inverse spectral problems for ordinary differential operators on spatial networks (geometrical graphs). The focus is on the most important non-linear inverse problems of recovering coefficients of differential equations from spectral characteristics when the structure of the graph is known a priori. The first half of the survey presents results related to inverse Sturm-Liouville problems on arbitrary compact graphs. Results on inverse problems for differential operators of arbitrary order on compact graphs are then presented. In the conclusion the main results on inverse problems on non-compact graphs are given. Bibliography: 55 titles.

  10. The inverse problem for Schwinger pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebenstreit, Florian

    2016-02-01

    The production of electron-positron pairs in time-dependent electric fields (Schwinger mechanism) depends non-linearly on the applied field profile. Accordingly, the resulting momentum spectrum is extremely sensitive to small variations of the field parameters. Owing to this non-linear dependence it is so far unpredictable how to choose a field configuration such that a predetermined momentum distribution is generated. We show that quantum kinetic theory along with optimal control theory can be used to approximately solve this inverse problem for Schwinger pair production. We exemplify this by studying the superposition of a small number of harmonic components resulting in predetermined signatures in the asymptotic momentum spectrum. In the long run, our results could facilitate the observation of this yet unobserved pair production mechanism in quantum electrodynamics by providing suggestions for tailored field configurations.

  11. Stochastic inverse problems: Models and metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, Elias H.; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Aldrin, John C.; Annis, Charles; Knopp, Jeremy S.

    2015-03-31

    In past work, we introduced model-based inverse methods, and applied them to problems in which the anomaly could be reasonably modeled by simple canonical shapes, such as rectangular solids. In these cases the parameters to be inverted would be length, width and height, as well as the occasional probe lift-off or rotation. We are now developing a formulation that allows more flexibility in modeling complex flaws. The idea consists of expanding the flaw in a sequence of basis functions, and then solving for the expansion coefficients of this sequence, which are modeled as independent random variables, uniformly distributed over their range of values. There are a number of applications of such modeling: 1. Connected cracks and multiple half-moons, which we have noted in a POD set. Ideally we would like to distinguish connected cracks from one long shallow crack. 2. Cracks of irregular profile and shape which have appeared in cold work holes during bolt-hole eddy-current inspection. One side of such cracks is much deeper than other. 3. L or C shaped crack profiles at the surface, examples of which have been seen in bolt-hole cracks. By formulating problems in a stochastic sense, we are able to leverage the stochastic global optimization algorithms in NLSE, which is resident in VIC-3D®, to answer questions of global minimization and to compute confidence bounds using the sensitivity coefficient that we get from NLSE. We will also address the issue of surrogate functions which are used during the inversion process, and how they contribute to the quality of the estimation of the bounds.

  12. Inverse Problem in Self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, Alexei

    2012-02-01

    By decorating colloids and nanoparticles with DNA, one can introduce highly selective key-lock interactions between them. This leads to a new class of systems and problems in soft condensed matter physics. In particular, this opens a possibility to solve inverse problem in self-assembly: how to build an arbitrary desired structure with the bottom-up approach? I will present a theoretical and computational analysis of the hierarchical strategy in attacking this problem. It involves self-assembly of particular building blocks (``octopus particles''), that in turn would assemble into the target structure. On a conceptual level, our approach combines elements of three different brands of programmable self assembly: DNA nanotechnology, nanoparticle-DNA assemblies and patchy colloids. I will discuss the general design principles, theoretical and practical limitations of this approach, and illustrate them with our simulation results. Our crucial result is that not only it is possible to design a system that has a given nanostructure as a ground state, but one can also program and optimize the kinetic pathway for its self-assembly.

  13. The relativistic inverse stellar structure problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, Lee

    2014-01-14

    The observable macroscopic properties of relativistic stars (whose equations of state are known) can be predicted by solving the stellar structure equations that follow from Einstein’s equation. For neutron stars, however, our knowledge of the equation of state is poor, so the direct stellar structure problem can not be solved without modeling the highest density part of the equation of state in some way. This talk will describe recent work on developing a model independent approach to determining the high-density neutron-star equation of state by solving an inverse stellar structure problem. This method uses the fact that Einstein’s equation provides a deterministic relationship between the equation of state and the macroscopic observables of the stars which are composed of that material. This talk illustrates how this method will be able to determine the high-density part of the neutron-star equation of state with few percent accuracy when high quality measurements of the masses and radii of just two or three neutron stars become available. This talk will also show that this method can be used with measurements of other macroscopic observables, like the masses and tidal deformabilities, which can (in principle) be measured by gravitational wave observations of binary neutron-star mergers.

  14. The inverse problem of estimating the gravitational time dilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. V.; Litvinov, D. A.; Rudenko, V. N.

    2016-11-01

    Precise testing of the gravitational time dilation effect suggests comparing the clocks at points with different gravitational potentials. Such a configuration arises when radio frequency standards are installed at orbital and ground stations. The ground-based standard is accessible directly, while the spaceborne one is accessible only via the electromagnetic signal exchange. Reconstructing the current frequency of the spaceborne standard is an ill-posed inverse problem whose solution depends significantly on the characteristics of the stochastic electromagnetic background. The solution for Gaussian noise is known, but the nature of the standards themselves is associated with nonstationary fluctuations of a wide class of distributions. A solution is proposed for a background of flicker fluctuations with a spectrum (1/ f)γ, where 1 < γ < 3, and stationary increments. The results include formulas for the error in reconstructing the frequency of the spaceborne standard and numerical estimates for the accuracy of measuring the relativistic redshift effect.

  15. The inverse problem of estimating the gravitational time dilation

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, A. V. Litvinov, D. A.; Rudenko, V. N.

    2016-11-15

    Precise testing of the gravitational time dilation effect suggests comparing the clocks at points with different gravitational potentials. Such a configuration arises when radio frequency standards are installed at orbital and ground stations. The ground-based standard is accessible directly, while the spaceborne one is accessible only via the electromagnetic signal exchange. Reconstructing the current frequency of the spaceborne standard is an ill-posed inverse problem whose solution depends significantly on the characteristics of the stochastic electromagnetic background. The solution for Gaussian noise is known, but the nature of the standards themselves is associated with nonstationary fluctuations of a wide class of distributions. A solution is proposed for a background of flicker fluctuations with a spectrum (1/f){sup γ}, where 1 < γ < 3, and stationary increments. The results include formulas for the error in reconstructing the frequency of the spaceborne standard and numerical estimates for the accuracy of measuring the relativistic redshift effect.

  16. Direct and Inverse Problems in Statistical Wavefields

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Emil

    2002-09-01

    In this report account is presented of research carried out during the period September 1, 1999-August 31, 2002 under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, grant DE-FG02-90ER14119. The research covered several areas of modern optical physics, particularly propagation of partially coherent light and its interaction with deterministic and with random media, spectroscopy with partially coherent light, polarization properties of statistical wave fields, effects of moving diffusers on coherence and on the spectra of light transmitted and scattered by them, reciprocity inequalities involving spatial and angular correlations of partially coherent beams, spreading of partially coherent beams in-random media, inverse source problems, computed and diffraction tomography and partially coherent solitons. We have discovered a new phenomenon in an emerging field of physical optics, known as singular optics; specifically we found that the spectrum of light changes drastically in the neighborhood of points where the intensity has zero value and where, consequently, the phase becomes singular, We noted some potential applications of this phenomenon. The results of our investigations were reported in 39 publications. They are listed on pages 3 to 5. Summaries of these publications are given on pages 6-13. Scientists who have participated in this research are listed on page 14.

  17. PREFACE: International Conference on Inverse Problems 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Yiu-Chung; Ling, Leevan

    2011-03-01

    Following the first International Conference on Inverse Problems - Recent Theoretical Development and Numerical Approaches held at the City University of Hong Kong in 2002, the fifth International Conference was held again at the City University during December 13-17, 2010. This fifth conference was jointly organized by Professor Yiu-Chung Hon (Co-Chair, City University of Hong Kong, HKSAR), Dr Leevan Ling (Co-Chair, Hong Kong Baptist University, HKSAR), Professor Jin Cheng (Fudan University, China), Professor June-Yub Lee (Ewha Womans University, South Korea), Professor Gui-Rong Liu (University of Cincinnati, USA), Professor Jenn-Nan Wang (National Taiwan University, Taiwan), and Professor Masahiro Yamamoto (The University of Tokyo, Japan). It was agreed to alternate holding the conference among the above places (China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) once every two years. The next conference has been scheduled to be held at the Southeast University (Nanjing, China) in 2012. The purpose of this series of conferences is to establish a strong collaborative link among the universities of the Asian-Pacific regions and worldwide leading researchers in inverse problems. The conference addressed both theoretical (mathematics), applied (engineering) and developmental aspects of inverse problems. The conference was intended to nurture Asian-American-European collaborations in the evolving interdisciplinary areas and it was envisioned that the conference would lead to long-term commitments and collaborations among the participating countries and researchers. There was a total of more than 100 participants. A call for the submission of papers was sent out after the conference, and a total of 19 papers were finally accepted for publication in this proceedings. The papers included in the proceedings cover a wide scope, which reflects the current flourishing theoretical and numerical research into inverse problems. Finally, as the co-chairs of the Inverse Problems

  18. Inverse Problem;Litho_Inversion; Geology and Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Guillen; Gabriel, Courrioux; Bernard, Bourgine

    2015-04-01

    Subsurface modeling is a key tool to describe, understand and quantify geological processes. As the subsurface is inaccessible and its observation is limited by acquisition methods, 3D models of the subsurface are usually built from the interpretation of sparse data with limited resolution. Therefore, uncertainties occur during the model building process, due to possible cognitive human biais, natural variability of geological objects and intrinsic uncertainties of data. In such context, the predictibility of models is limited by uncertainties, which must be assessed in order to reduce economical and human risks linked to the use of models. This work focuses more specifically on uncertainties about geological structures. In this context, a stochastic method is developed for generating structural models with various fault and horizon geometries as well as fault connections. Realistic geological objects are obtained using implicit modeling that represents a surface by an equipotential of a volumetric scalar field. Faults have also been described by a reduced set of uncertain parameters, which opens the way to the inversion of structural objects using geophysical data by baysian methods.

  19. Iterated preconditioned LSQR method for inverse problems on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, S. R.; Betcke, M. M.; Harhanen, L.

    2014-06-01

    This article presents a method for solving large-scale linear inverse imaging problems regularized with a nonlinear, edge-preserving penalty term such as total variation or the Perona-Malik technique. Our method is aimed at problems defined on unstructured meshes, where such regularizers naturally arise in unfactorized form as a stiffness matrix of an anisotropic diffusion operator and factorization is prohibitively expensive. In the proposed scheme, the nonlinearity is handled with lagged diffusivity fixed point iteration, which involves solving a large-scale linear least squares problem in each iteration. Because the convergence of Krylov methods for problems with discontinuities is notoriously slow, we propose to accelerate it by means of priorconditioning (Bayesian preconditioning). priorconditioning is a technique that, through transformation to the standard form, embeds the information contained in the prior (Bayesian interpretation of a regularizer) directly into the forward operator and thence into the solution space. We derive a factorization-free preconditioned LSQR algorithm (MLSQR), allowing implicit application of the preconditioner through efficient schemes such as multigrid. The resulting method is also matrix-free i.e. the forward map can be defined through its action on a vector. We illustrate the performance of the method on two numerical examples. Simple 1D-deblurring problem serves to visualize the discussion throughout the paper. The effectiveness of the proposed numerical scheme is demonstrated on a three-dimensional problem in fluorescence diffuse optical tomography with total variation regularization derived algebraic multigrid preconditioner, which is the type of large scale, unstructured mesh problem, requiring matrix-free and factorization-free approaches that motivated the work here.

  20. A Riemann-Hilbert approach to the inverse problem for the Stark operator on the line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Its, A.; Sukhanov, V.

    2016-05-01

    The paper is concerned with the inverse scattering problem for the Stark operator on the line with a potential from the Schwartz class. In our study of the inverse problem, we use the Riemann-Hilbert formalism. This allows us to overcome the principal technical difficulties which arise in the more traditional approaches based on the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equations, and indeed solve the problem. We also produce a complete description of the relevant scattering data (which have not been obtained in the previous works on the Stark operator) and establish the bijection between the Schwartz class potentials and the scattering data.

  1. A Forward Glimpse into Inverse Problems through a Geology Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a forward approach to an inverse problem related to detecting the nature of geological substrata which makes use of optimization techniques in a multivariable calculus setting. The true nature of the related inverse problem is highlighted. (Contains 2 figures.)

  2. Solutions of inverse problems for biodegradation of xenobiotic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masaji; Kawai, Fusako

    2016-02-01

    Mathematical techniques are applied to a microbial depolymerization process. A mathematical model for the transition of the weight distribution and the microbial population is described. Inverse problems for a molecular factor and a time factor of a degradation rate are derived. Numerical techniques to solve the inverse problems are illustrated, and numerical results are presented.

  3. A Forward Glimpse into Inverse Problems through a Geology Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a forward approach to an inverse problem related to detecting the nature of geological substrata which makes use of optimization techniques in a multivariable calculus setting. The true nature of the related inverse problem is highlighted. (Contains 2 figures.)

  4. Inverse Modelling Problems in Linear Algebra Undergraduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will offer an analysis from a theoretical point of view of mathematical modelling, applications and inverse problems of both causation and specification types. Inverse modelling problems give the opportunity to establish connections between theory and practice and to show this fact, a simple linear algebra example in two different…

  5. Inverse Modelling Problems in Linear Algebra Undergraduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will offer an analysis from a theoretical point of view of mathematical modelling, applications and inverse problems of both causation and specification types. Inverse modelling problems give the opportunity to establish connections between theory and practice and to show this fact, a simple linear algebra example in two different…

  6. Geometric MCMC for infinite-dimensional inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskos, Alexandros; Girolami, Mark; Lan, Shiwei; Farrell, Patrick E.; Stuart, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    Bayesian inverse problems often involve sampling posterior distributions on infinite-dimensional function spaces. Traditional Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms are characterized by deteriorating mixing times upon mesh-refinement, when the finite-dimensional approximations become more accurate. Such methods are typically forced to reduce step-sizes as the discretization gets finer, and thus are expensive as a function of dimension. Recently, a new class of MCMC methods with mesh-independent convergence times has emerged. However, few of them take into account the geometry of the posterior informed by the data. At the same time, recently developed geometric MCMC algorithms have been found to be powerful in exploring complicated distributions that deviate significantly from elliptic Gaussian laws, but are in general computationally intractable for models defined in infinite dimensions. In this work, we combine geometric methods on a finite-dimensional subspace with mesh-independent infinite-dimensional approaches. Our objective is to speed up MCMC mixing times, without significantly increasing the computational cost per step (for instance, in comparison with the vanilla preconditioned Crank-Nicolson (pCN) method). This is achieved by using ideas from geometric MCMC to probe the complex structure of an intrinsic finite-dimensional subspace where most data information concentrates, while retaining robust mixing times as the dimension grows by using pCN-like methods in the complementary subspace. The resulting algorithms are demonstrated in the context of three challenging inverse problems arising in subsurface flow, heat conduction and incompressible flow control. The algorithms exhibit up to two orders of magnitude improvement in sampling efficiency when compared with the pCN method.

  7. Local regularization of linear inverse problems via variational filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamm, Patricia K.

    2017-08-01

    We develop local regularization methods for ill-posed linear inverse problems governed by general Fredholm integral operators. The methods are executed as filtering algorithms which are simple to implement and computationally efficient for a large class of problems. We establish a convergence theory and give convergence rates for such methods, and illustrate their computational speed in numerical tests for inverse problems in geomagnetic exploration and imaging.

  8. Research on the Inverse Problem of Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Levitan equation for the r)ne- dimensional and radial Schroedinger equations., ( b ) provided a vuiri•jtiona1 prine.l pie, and (c) extended inverse techniques...Variational Principle for the Gelfand- Levitan Equation and the Korteweg-deVries Equation (with M . Kanal), J. Math. Phys., 18, 2445 (1977). 3. A...Operators are Identical (with P. B . Abraham and B . DeFaclo), Studies in App. Math. (in press). 9. The Ceifand- Levitan Equation can Give Simple Examples of

  9. An Inverse Problem for a Class of Conditional Probability Measure-Dependent Evolution Equations.

    PubMed

    Mirzaev, Inom; Byrne, Erin C; Bortz, David M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the inverse problem of identifying a conditional probability measure in measure-dependent evolution equations arising in size-structured population modeling. We formulate the inverse problem as a least squares problem for the probability measure estimation. Using the Prohorov metric framework, we prove existence and consistency of the least squares estimates and outline a discretization scheme for approximating a conditional probability measure. For this scheme, we prove general method stability. The work is motivated by Partial Differential Equation (PDE) models of flocculation for which the shape of the post-fragmentation conditional probability measure greatly impacts the solution dynamics. To illustrate our methodology, we apply the theory to a particular PDE model that arises in the study of population dynamics for flocculating bacterial aggregates in suspension, and provide numerical evidence for the utility of the approach.

  10. An inverse problem for a class of conditional probability measure-dependent evolution equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaev, Inom; Byrne, Erin C.; Bortz, David M.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the inverse problem of identifying a conditional probability measure in measure-dependent evolution equations arising in size-structured population modeling. We formulate the inverse problem as a least squares problem for the probability measure estimation. Using the Prohorov metric framework, we prove existence and consistency of the least squares estimates and outline a discretization scheme for approximating a conditional probability measure. For this scheme, we prove general method stability. The work is motivated by partial differential equation models of flocculation for which the shape of the post-fragmentation conditional probability measure greatly impacts the solution dynamics. To illustrate our methodology, we apply the theory to a particular PDE model that arises in the study of population dynamics for flocculating bacterial aggregates in suspension, and provide numerical evidence for the utility of the approach.

  11. Numerical solution of an inverse conductive boundary value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaman, F.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we derive a numerical solution of an inverse obstacle scattering problem with conductive boundary condition. The aim of the direct problem is the computation of the scattered field for a given arbitrarily shaped cylinder with conductive boundary condition on its surface.The inverse problem considered here is the reconstruction of the conductivity function of the scatterer from meausurements of the far field. A potential approach is used to obtain boundary layer integral equations both for the solution of the direct and the inverse problem. The numerical solutions of the integral equations which contain logarithmically singular kernels are evaluated by a Nyström method and Tikhonov regularization is used to solve the first kind of integral equations occuring in the solution of the inverse problem. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to test the applicability and the effectiveness of the method.

  12. Inverse backscattering problem for perturbations of biharmonic operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyni, Teemu; Harju, Markus

    2017-10-01

    We consider the inverse backscattering problem for a biharmonic operator with two lower order perturbations in two and three dimensions. The inverse Born approximation is used to recover jumps and singularities of an unknown combination of potentials. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the practical usefulness of the method.

  13. On Linear Infeasibility Arising in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Inverse Planning.

    PubMed

    Censor, Yair; Ben-Israel, Adi; Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James M

    2008-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) gives rise to systems of linear inequalities, representing the effects of radiation on the irradiated body. These systems are often infeasible, in which case one settles for an approximate solution, such as an {α, β}-relaxation, meaning that no more than α percent of the inequalities are violated by no more than β percent. For real-world IMRT problems, there is a feasible {α, β}-relaxation for sufficiently large α, β > 0, however large values of these parameters may be unacceptable medically.The {α, β}-relaxation problem is combinatorial, and for given values of the parameters can be solved exactly by Mixed Integer Programming (MIP), but this may be impractical because of problem size, and the need for repeated solutions as the treatment progresses.As a practical alternative to the MIP approach we present a heuristic non-combinatorial method for finding an approximate relaxation. The method solves a Linear Program (LP) for each pair of values of the parameters {α, β} and progresses through successively increasing values until an acceptable solution is found, or is determined non-existent. The method is fast and reliable, since it consists of solving a sequence of LP's.

  14. Spectral solution of the inverse Mie problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Andrey V.; Konokhova, Anastasiya I.; Yastrebova, Ekaterina S.; Gilev, Konstantin V.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Maltsev, Valeri P.; Yurkin, Maxim A.

    2017-10-01

    We developed a fast method to determine size and refractive index of homogeneous spheres from the power Fourier spectrum of their light-scattering patterns (LSPs), measured with the scanning flow cytometer. Specifically, we used two spectral parameters: the location of the non-zero peak and zero-frequency amplitude, and numerically inverted the map from the space of particle characteristics (size and refractive index) to the space of spectral parameters. The latter parameters can be reliably resolved only for particle size parameter greater than 11, and the inversion is unique only in the limited range of refractive index with upper limit between 1.1 and 1.25 (relative to the medium) depending on the size parameter and particular definition of uniqueness. The developed method was tested on two experimental samples, milk fat globules and spherized red blood cells, and resulted in accuracy not worse than the reference method based on the least-square fit of the LSP with the Mie theory. Moreover, for particles with significant deviation from the spherical shape the spectral method was much closer to the Mie-fit result than the estimated uncertainty of the latter. The spectral method also showed adequate results for synthetic LSPs of spheroids with aspect ratios up to 1.4. Overall, we present a general framework, which can be used to construct an inverse algorithm for any other experimental signals.

  15. Inverse Scattering Problems for Acoustic Waves in AN Inhomogeneous Medium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierawski, Andrzej Wladyslaw

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation considers the inverse scattering problem of determining either the absorption of sound in an inhomogeneous medium or the surface impedance of an obstacle from a knowledge of the far-field patterns of the scattered fields corresponding to many incident time -harmonic plane waves. First, we consider the inverse problem in the case when the scattering object is an inhomogeneous medium with complex refraction index having compact support. Our approach to this problem is the orthogonal projection method of Colton-Monk (cf. The inverse scattering problem for time acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium, Quart. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 41 (1988), 97-125). After that, we prove the analogue of Karp's Theorem for the scattering of acoustic waves through an inhomogeneous medium with compact support. We then generalize some of these results to the case when the inhomogeneous medium is no longer of compact support. If the acoustic wave penetrates the inhomogeneous medium by only a small amount then the inverse medium problem leads to the inverse obstacle problem with an impedance boundary condition. We solve the inverse impedance problem of determining the surface impedance of an obstacle of known shape by using both the methods of Kirsch-Kress and Colton-Monk (cf. R. Kress, Linear Integral Equations, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1989).

  16. Some Numerical Results of Multipoints Bomndary Value Problems Arise in Environmental Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Daniel N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate two problems arise in pollutant transport in rivers, and we give some numerical results to approximate this solutions. We determined the approximate solutions using two numerical methods: 1. B-splines combined with Runge-Kutta methods, 2. BVP4C solver of MATLAB and then we compare the run-times.

  17. Inverse kinematics problem in robotics using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Lawrence, Charles

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, Multilayer Feedforward Networks are applied to the robot inverse kinematic problem. The networks are trained with endeffector position and joint angles. After training, performance is measured by having the network generate joint angles for arbitrary endeffector trajectories. A 3-degree-of-freedom (DOF) spatial manipulator is used for the study. It is found that neural networks provide a simple and effective way to both model the manipulator inverse kinematics and circumvent the problems associated with algorithmic solution methods.

  18. On three dimensional magnetic inverse problems solution for stellar bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyshko, Petr S.; Martyshko, Maxim P.

    2017-07-01

    The new 3D magnetic inverse problem equations for stellar bodies have been derived (of interior and outside fields). We take into account demagnetization factor. Due to choice of special parametric set we have suggested stable algorithm for equations solving. Based on these equations it is possible to use method which does not require trial-and-error forward modeling and allows us to construct inverse problem solutions. Using borehole data we can determine the unique solution.

  19. Inverse Problems for Nonlinear Delay Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    outlined here, or it may be included implicitly in the problem formulation through Tikhonov regularization as discussed for example by Kravaris and...Seinfeld [KS], Vogel [Vog] and widely by many others. In the regularization approach one restricts consideration to a subset Q1 of parameters which has...routine ways: fixed point theorem arguments [JKH4] or Picard iteration arguments. Either of these ap- proaches can be used to establish existence

  20. Globally Convergent Numerical Methods for Coefficient Inverse Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-23

    Problems , 18, 209-219, 2002. 50. A.N. Tikhonov and V. Ya. Arsenin , Solutions of Ill - Posed Problems Winston & Sons. Washington...is because solutions of PDEs depend nonlinearly on their coefficients. The ill - posedness is a well known feature of inverse problems . This means that...ut (x, 0)‖L2(Ω) ≤ CK. Theorem 8.5 enables us to prove convergence of our method. Following the Tikhonov concept for ill - posed problems [50], we

  1. Inverse scattering problems for acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierawski, Andrzej Wladyslaw

    The inverse scattering problem is considered of determining either the absorption of sound in an inhomogeneous medium or the surface impedance of an obstacle from a knowledge of the far field patterns of the scattered field corresponding to many incident time-harmonic plane waves. First, the inverse problem is studied in the case when the scattering object is an inhomogeneous medium with complex refractive index having compact support. The approach to this problem is the orthogonal projection method of Colton-Monk (1988). After that, the analogue is proven of Karp's Theorem for the scattering of acoustic waves through an inhomogeneous medium with compact support. Some of these results are then generalized to the case when the inhomogeneous medium is no longer of compact support. If the acoustic wave penetrates the inhomogeneous medium by only a small amount then the inverse medium problem leads to the inverse obstacle problem with an impedance boundary condition. The inverse impedance problem is solved of determining the surface impedance of an obstacle of known shape by using both the methods of Kirsch-Kress and Colton-Monk (1989).

  2. Inverse Scattering Problems for Electromagnetic Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-20

    medical imaging . The main accomplishments were: (1) The discovery of a linear method for determining the support of aberrant inhomogeneities without any a priori assumptions on either the frequency or magnitude of the inhomogeneity; (2) The application of this new linear method to problems in microwave medical imaging ; (3) The analysis and numerical implementation of a method of perfectly matched lay for the solution of Maxwell’s equations; and (4) The derivation of an adaptive method for mesh refinement to produce a far field pattern of

  3. On a recursive inverse eigenvalue problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikramov, Kh. D.

    2009-05-01

    Let s 1, ..., s n be arbitrary complex scalars. It is required to construct an n × n normal matrix A such that s i is an eigenvalue of the leading principal submatrix A i , i = 1, 2, ..., n. It is shown that, along with the obvious diagonal solution diag( s 1, ..., s n ), this problem always admits a much more interesting nondiagonal solution A. As a rule, this solution is a dense matrix; with the diagonal solution, it shares the property that each submatrix A i is itself a normal matrix, which implies interesting connections between the spectra of the neighboring submatrices A i and A i + 1.

  4. Minimax theory for a class of nonlinear statistical inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Kolyan; Schmidt-Hieber, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    We study a class of statistical inverse problems with nonlinear pointwise operators motivated by concrete statistical applications. A two-step procedure is proposed, where the first step smoothes the data and inverts the nonlinearity. This reduces the initial nonlinear problem to a linear inverse problem with deterministic noise, which is then solved in a second step. The noise reduction step is based on wavelet thresholding and is shown to be minimax optimal (up to logarithmic factors) in a pointwise function-dependent sense. Our analysis is based on a modified notion of Hölder smoothness scales that are natural in this setting.

  5. Solving inverse problems of identification type by optimal control methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S.; Protopopescu, V.; Jiongmin Yong

    1997-06-01

    Inverse problems of identification type for nonlinear equations are considered within the framework of optimal control theory. The rigorous solution of any particular problem depends on the functional setting, type of equation, and unknown quantity (or quantities) to be determined. Here the authors present only the general articulations of the formalism. Compared to classical regularization methods (e.g. Tikhonov coupled with optimization schemes), their approach presents several advantages, namely: (i) a systematic procedure to solve inverse problems of identification type; (ii) an explicit expression for the approximations of the solution; and (iii) a convenient numerical solution of these approximations.

  6. Correct averaging in transmission radiography: Analysis of the inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Michael; Hampel, Uwe; Bieberle, Martina

    2016-05-01

    Transmission radiometry is frequently used in industrial measurement processes as a means to assess the thickness or composition of a material. A common problem encountered in such applications is the so-called dynamic bias error, which results from averaging beam intensities over time while the material distribution changes. We recently reported on a method to overcome the associated measurement error by solving an inverse problem, which in principle restores the exact average attenuation by considering the Poisson statistics of the underlying particle or photon emission process. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the inverse problem and its optimal regularized numerical solution. As a result we derive an optimal parameter configuration for the inverse problem.

  7. Inverse problem in nondestructive testing using arrayed eddy current sensors.

    PubMed

    Zaoui, Abdelhalim; Menana, Hocine; Feliachi, Mouloud; Berthiau, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    A fast crack profile reconstitution model in nondestructive testing is developed using an arrayed eddy current sensor. The inverse problem is based on an iterative solving of the direct problem using genetic algorithms. In the direct problem, assuming a current excitation, the incident field produced by all the coils of the arrayed sensor is obtained by the translation and superposition of the 2D axisymmetric finite element results obtained for one coil; the impedance variation of each coil, due to the crack, is obtained by the reciprocity principle involving the dyadic Green's function. For the inverse problem, the surface of the crack is subdivided into rectangular cells, and the objective function is expressed only in terms of the depth of each cell. The evaluation of the dyadic Green's function matrix is made independently of the iterative procedure, making the inversion very fast.

  8. Analytic semigroups: Applications to inverse problems for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rebnord, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Convergence and stability results for least squares inverse problems involving systems described by analytic semigroups are presented. The practical importance of these results is demonstrated by application to several examples from problems of estimation of material parameters in flexible structures using accelerometer data.

  9. Accounting for correlated errors in inverse radiation transport problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.; Stork, Christopher Lyle; Thomas, Edward Victor

    2010-11-01

    Inverse radiation transport focuses on identifying the configuration of an unknown radiation source given its observed radiation signatures. The inverse problem is solved by finding the set of transport model variables that minimizes a weighted sum of the squared differences by channel between the observed signature and the signature predicted by the hypothesized model parameters. The weights per channel are inversely proportional to the sum of the variances of the measurement and model errors at a given channel. In the current treatment, the implicit assumption is that the errors (differences between the modeled and observed radiation signatures) are independent across channels. In this paper, an alternative method that accounts for correlated errors between channels is described and illustrated for inverse problems based on gamma spectroscopy.

  10. Numerical study of a parametric parabolic equation and a related inverse boundary value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustonen, Lauri

    2016-10-01

    We consider a time-dependent linear diffusion equation together with a related inverse boundary value problem. The aim of the inverse problem is to determine, based on observations on the boundary, the nonhomogeneous diffusion coefficient in the interior of an object. The method in this paper relies on solving the forward problem for a whole family of diffusivities by using a spectral Galerkin method in the high-dimensional parameter domain. The evaluation of the parametric solution and its derivatives is then completely independent of spatial and temporal discretizations. In the case of a quadratic approximation for the parameter dependence and a direct solver for linear least squares problems, we show that the evaluation of the parametric solution does not increase the complexity of any linearized subproblem arising from a Gauss-Newtonian method that is used to minimize a Tikhonov functional. The feasibility of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by diffusivity reconstructions in two and three spatial dimensions.

  11. Optimized constraints for the linearized geoacoustic inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Megan S; Becker, Kyle M

    2011-02-01

    A geoacoustic inversion scheme to estimate the depth-dependent sound speed characteristics of the shallow-water waveguide is presented. The approach is based on the linearized perturbative technique developed by Rajan et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 82, 998-1017 (1987)]. This method is applied by assuming a background starting model for the environment that includes both the water column and the seabed. Typically, the water column properties are assumed to be known and held fixed in the inversion. Successful application of the perturbative inverse technique lies in handling issues of stability and uniqueness associated with solving a discrete ill-posed problem. Conventionally, such problems are regularized, a procedure which results in a smooth solution. Past applications of this inverse technique have been restricted to cases for which the water column sound speed profile was known and sound speed in the seabed could be approximated by a smooth profile. In this work, constraints that are better suited to specific aspects of the geoacoustic inverse problem are applied. These techniques expand on the original application of the perturbative inverse technique by including the water column sound speed profile in the solution and by allowing for discontinuities in the seabed sound speed profile.

  12. From inverse problems in mathematical physiology to quantitative differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Zenker, Sven; Rubin, Jonathan; Clermont, Gilles

    2007-11-01

    The improved capacity to acquire quantitative data in a clinical setting has generally failed to improve outcomes in acutely ill patients, suggesting a need for advances in computer-supported data interpretation and decision making. In particular, the application of mathematical models of experimentally elucidated physiological mechanisms could augment the interpretation of quantitative, patient-specific information and help to better target therapy. Yet, such models are typically complex and nonlinear, a reality that often precludes the identification of unique parameters and states of the model that best represent available data. Hypothesizing that this non-uniqueness can convey useful information, we implemented a simplified simulation of a common differential diagnostic process (hypotension in an acute care setting), using a combination of a mathematical model of the cardiovascular system, a stochastic measurement model, and Bayesian inference techniques to quantify parameter and state uncertainty. The output of this procedure is a probability density function on the space of model parameters and initial conditions for a particular patient, based on prior population information together with patient-specific clinical observations. We show that multimodal posterior probability density functions arise naturally, even when unimodal and uninformative priors are used. The peaks of these densities correspond to clinically relevant differential diagnoses and can, in the simplified simulation setting, be constrained to a single diagnosis by assimilating additional observations from dynamical interventions (e.g., fluid challenge). We conclude that the ill-posedness of the inverse problem in quantitative physiology is not merely a technical obstacle, but rather reflects clinical reality and, when addressed adequately in the solution process, provides a novel link between mathematically described physiological knowledge and the clinical concept of differential diagnoses

  13. Variational structure of inverse problems in wave propagation and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1995-03-01

    Practical algorithms for solving realistic inverse problems may often be viewed as problems in nonlinear programming with the data serving as constraints. Such problems are most easily analyzed when it is possible to segment the solution space into regions that are feasible (satisfying all the known constraints) and infeasible (violating some of the constraints). Then, if the feasible set is convex or at least compact, the solution to the problem will normally lie on the boundary of the feasible set. A nonlinear program may seek the solution by systematically exploring the boundary while satisfying progressively more constraints. Examples of inverse problems in wave propagation (traveltime tomography) and vibration (modal analysis) will be presented to illustrate how the variational structure of these problems may be used to create nonlinear programs using implicit variational constraints.

  14. Deep Convolutional Neural Network for Inverse Problems in Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kyong Hwan; McCann, Michael T.; Froustey, Emmanuel; Unser, Michael

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel deep convolutional neural network (CNN)-based algorithm for solving ill-posed inverse problems. Regularized iterative algorithms have emerged as the standard approach to ill-posed inverse problems in the past few decades. These methods produce excellent results, but can be challenging to deploy in practice due to factors including the high computational cost of the forward and adjoint operators and the difficulty of hyper parameter selection. The starting point of our work is the observation that unrolled iterative methods have the form of a CNN (filtering followed by point-wise non-linearity) when the normal operator (H*H, the adjoint of H times H) of the forward model is a convolution. Based on this observation, we propose using direct inversion followed by a CNN to solve normal-convolutional inverse problems. The direct inversion encapsulates the physical model of the system, but leads to artifacts when the problem is ill-posed; the CNN combines multiresolution decomposition and residual learning in order to learn to remove these artifacts while preserving image structure. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed network in sparse-view reconstruction (down to 50 views) on parallel beam X-ray computed tomography in synthetic phantoms as well as in real experimental sinograms. The proposed network outperforms total variation-regularized iterative reconstruction for the more realistic phantoms and requires less than a second to reconstruct a 512 x 512 image on GPU.

  15. Cauchy problem for a class of nonlinear dispersive wave equations arising in elasto-plastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijian, Yang

    2006-01-01

    The paper studies the existence, both locally and globally in time, stability, decay estimates and blowup of solutions to the Cauchy problem for a class of nonlinear dispersive wave equations arising in elasto-plastic flow. Under the assumption that the nonlinear term of the equations is of polynomial growth order, say [alpha], it proves that when [alpha]>1, the Cauchy problem admits a unique local solution, which is stable and can be continued to a global solution under rather mild conditions; when [alpha][greater-or-equal, slanted]5 and the initial data is small enough, the Cauchy problem admits a unique global solution and its norm in L1,p(R) decays at the rate for 2problem blow up in finite time.

  16. Inverse problems of ultrasound tomography in models with attenuation.

    PubMed

    Goncharsky, Alexander V; Romanov, Sergey Y

    2014-04-21

    We develop efficient methods for solving inverse problems of ultrasound tomography in models with attenuation. We treat the inverse problem as a coefficient inverse problem for unknown coordinate-dependent functions that characterize both the speed cross section and the coefficients of the wave equation describing attenuation in the diagnosed region. We derive exact formulas for the gradient of the residual functional in models with attenuation, and develop efficient algorithms for minimizing the gradient of the residual by solving the conjugate problem. These algorithms are easy to parallelize when implemented on supercomputers, allowing the computation time to be reduced by a factor of several hundred compared to a PC. The numerical analysis of model problems shows that it is possible to reconstruct not only the speed cross section, but also the properties of the attenuating medium. We investigate the choice of the initial approximation for iterative algorithms used to solve inverse problems. The algorithms considered are primarily meant for the development of ultrasound tomographs for differential diagnosis of breast cancer.

  17. PREFACE: Inverse Problems in Applied Sciences—towards breakthrough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jin; Iso, Yuusuke; Nakamura, Gen; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2007-06-01

    These are the proceedings of the international conference `Inverse Problems in Applied Sciences—towards breakthrough' which was held at Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan on 3-7 July 2006 (http://coe.math.sci.hokudai.ac.jp/sympo/inverse/). There were 88 presentations and more than 100 participants, and we are proud to say that the conference was very successful. Nowadays, many new activities on inverse problems are flourishing at many centers of research around the world, and the conference has successfully gathered a world-wide variety of researchers. We believe that this volume contains not only main papers, but also conveys the general status of current research into inverse problems. This conference was the third biennial international conference on inverse problems, the core of which is the Pan-Pacific Asian area. The purpose of this series of conferences is to establish and develop constant international collaboration, especially among the Pan-Pacific Asian countries, and to lead the organization of activities concerning inverse problems centered in East Asia. The first conference was held at City University of Hong Kong in January 2002 and the second was held at Fudan University in June 2004. Following the preceding two successes, the third conference was organized in order to extend the scope of activities and build useful bridges to the next conference in Seoul in 2008. Therefore this third biennial conference was intended not only to establish collaboration and links between researchers in Asia and leading researchers worldwide in inverse problems but also to nurture interdisciplinary collaboration in theoretical fields such as mathematics, applied fields and evolving aspects of inverse problems. For these purposes, we organized tutorial lectures, serial lectures and a panel discussion as well as conference research presentations. This volume contains three lecture notes from the tutorial and serial lectures, and 22 papers. Especially at this

  18. Improved TV-CS Approaches for Inverse Scattering Problem

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Total Variation and Compressive Sensing (TV-CS) techniques represent a very attractive approach to inverse scattering problems. In fact, if the unknown is piecewise constant and so has a sparse gradient, TV-CS approaches allow us to achieve optimal reconstructions, reducing considerably the number of measurements and enforcing the sparsity on the gradient of the sought unknowns. In this paper, we introduce two different techniques based on TV-CS that exploit in a different manner the concept of gradient in order to improve the solution of the inverse scattering problems obtained by TV-CS approach. Numerical examples are addressed to show the effectiveness of the method. PMID:26495420

  19. Spectral collocation for multiparameter eigenvalue problems arising from separable boundary value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plestenjak, Bor; Gheorghiu, Călin I.; Hochstenbach, Michiel E.

    2015-10-01

    In numerous science and engineering applications a partial differential equation has to be solved on some fairly regular domain that allows the use of the method of separation of variables. In several orthogonal coordinate systems separation of variables applied to the Helmholtz, Laplace, or Schrödinger equation leads to a multiparameter eigenvalue problem (MEP); important cases include Mathieu's system, Lamé's system, and a system of spheroidal wave functions. Although multiparameter approaches are exploited occasionally to solve such equations numerically, MEPs remain less well known, and the variety of available numerical methods is not wide. The classical approach of discretizing the equations using standard finite differences leads to algebraic MEPs with large matrices, which are difficult to solve efficiently. The aim of this paper is to change this perspective. We show that by combining spectral collocation methods and new efficient numerical methods for algebraic MEPs it is possible to solve such problems both very efficiently and accurately. We improve on several previous results available in the literature, and also present a MATLAB toolbox for solving a wide range of problems.

  20. Solving probabilistic inverse problems rapidly with prior samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käufl, Paul; Valentine, Andrew P.; de Wit, Ralph W.; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-06-01

    Owing to the increasing availability of computational resources, in recent years the probabilistic solution of non-linear, geophysical inverse problems by means of sampling methods has become increasingly feasible. Nevertheless, we still face situations in which a Monte Carlo approach is not practical. This is particularly true in cases where the evaluation of the forward problem is computationally intensive or where inversions have to be carried out repeatedly or in a timely manner, as in natural hazards monitoring tasks such as earthquake early warning. Here, we present an alternative to Monte Carlo sampling, in which inferences are entirely based on a set of prior samples-that is, samples that have been obtained independent of a particular observed datum. This has the advantage that the computationally expensive sampling stage becomes separated from the inversion stage, and the set of prior samples-once obtained-can be reused for repeated evaluations of the inverse mapping without additional computational effort. This property is useful if the problem is such that repeated inversions of independent data have to be carried out. We formulate the inverse problem in a Bayesian framework and present a practical way to make posterior inferences based on a set of prior samples. We compare the prior sampling based approach to a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach that samples from the posterior probability distribution. We show results for both a toy example, and a realistic seismological source parameter estimation problem. We find that the posterior uncertainty estimates obtained based on prior sampling can be considered conservative estimates of the uncertainties obtained by directly sampling from the posterior distribution.

  1. A tutorial on inverse problems for anomalous diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Bangti; Rundell, William

    2015-03-01

    Over the last two decades, anomalous diffusion processes in which the mean squares variance grows slower or faster than that in a Gaussian process have found many applications. At a macroscopic level, these processes are adequately described by fractional differential equations, which involves fractional derivatives in time or/and space. The fractional derivatives describe either history mechanism or long range interactions of particle motions at a microscopic level. The new physics can change dramatically the behavior of the forward problems. For example, the solution operator of the time fractional diffusion diffusion equation has only limited smoothing property, whereas the solution for the space fractional diffusion equation may contain weak singularity. Naturally one expects that the new physics will impact related inverse problems in terms of uniqueness, stability, and degree of ill-posedness. The last aspect is especially important from a practical point of view, i.e., stably reconstructing the quantities of interest. In this paper, we employ a formal analytic and numerical way, especially the two-parameter Mittag-Leffler function and singular value decomposition, to examine the degree of ill-posedness of several ‘classical’ inverse problems for fractional differential equations involving a Djrbashian-Caputo fractional derivative in either time or space, which represent the fractional analogues of that for classical integral order differential equations. We discuss four inverse problems, i.e., backward fractional diffusion, sideways problem, inverse source problem and inverse potential problem for time fractional diffusion, and inverse Sturm-Liouville problem, Cauchy problem, backward fractional diffusion and sideways problem for space fractional diffusion. It is found that contrary to the wide belief, the influence of anomalous diffusion on the degree of ill-posedness is not definitive: it can either significantly improve or worsen the conditioning of

  2. A non-local free boundary problem arising in a theory of financial bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Berestycki, Henri; Monneau, Regis; Scheinkman, José A.

    2014-01-01

    We consider an evolution non-local free boundary problem that arises in the modelling of speculative bubbles. The solution of the model is the speculative component in the price of an asset. In the framework of viscosity solutions, we show the existence and uniqueness of the solution. We also show that the solution is convex in space, and establish several monotonicity properties of the solution and of the free boundary with respect to parameters of the problem. To study the free boundary, we use, in particular, the fact that the odd part of the solution solves a more standard obstacle problem. We show that the free boundary is and describe the asymptotics of the free boundary as c, the cost of transacting the asset, goes to zero. PMID:25288815

  3. Inverse scattering problems for perturbed bi-harmonic operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Valery; Tyni, Teemu

    2016-10-01

    Some inverse scattering problems for operator of order 4 which is the perturbation (in smaller terms) of the biharmonic operator in one and three dimensions are considered. The coefficients of this perturbation are assumed to be from some Sobolev spaces (they might be singular). The classical (as for the Schrödinger operator) scattering theory is developed for this operator of order 4. The classical inverse scattering problems are considered and their uniqueness is proved. The method of inverse scattering Born approximation and an analogue of Saito's formula are justified for this operator of order 4. Using this approximate method the reconstruction of the singularities of the unknown coefficients is proved in the scale of Sobolev spaces. The results have natural generalization for any dimensions.

  4. A time domain sampling method for inverse acoustic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yukun; Hömberg, Dietmar; Hu, Guanghui; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    This work concerns the inverse scattering problems of imaging unknown/inaccessible scatterers by transient acoustic near-field measurements. Based on the analysis of the migration method, we propose efficient and effective sampling schemes for imaging small and extended scatterers from knowledge of time-dependent scattered data due to incident impulsive point sources. Though the inverse scattering problems are known to be nonlinear and ill-posed, the proposed imaging algorithms are totally ;direct; involving only integral calculations on the measurement surface. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our methods. In particular, the proposed static imaging functionals enhance the performance of the total focusing method (TFM) and the dynamic imaging functionals show analogous behavior to the time reversal inversion but without solving time-dependent wave equations.

  5. A reduced computational and geometrical framework for inverse problems in hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Toni; Manzoni, Andrea; Quarteroni, Alfio; Rozza, Gianluigi

    2013-07-01

    The solution of inverse problems in cardiovascular mathematics is computationally expensive. In this paper, we apply a domain parametrization technique to reduce both the geometrical and computational complexities of the forward problem and replace the finite element solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations by a computationally less-expensive reduced-basis approximation. This greatly reduces the cost of simulating the forward problem. We then consider the solution of inverse problems both in the deterministic sense, by solving a least-squares problem, and in the statistical sense, by using a Bayesian framework for quantifying uncertainty. Two inverse problems arising in hemodynamics modeling are considered: (i) a simplified fluid-structure interaction model problem in a portion of a stenosed artery for quantifying the risk of atherosclerosis by identifying the material parameters of the arterial wall on the basis of pressure measurements; (ii) a simplified femoral bypass graft model for robust shape design under uncertain residual flow in the main arterial branch identified from pressure measurements.

  6. Toward precise solution of one-dimensional velocity inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.; Hagin, F.

    1980-01-01

    A family of one-dimensional inverse problems are considered with the goal of reconstructing velocity profiles to reasonably high accuracy. The travel-time variable change is used together with an iteration scheme to produce an effective algorithm for computation. Under modest assumptions the scheme is shown to be convergent.

  7. Solving the Inverse-Square Problem with Complex Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, N.

    2005-01-01

    The equation of motion for a mass that moves under the influence of a central, inverse-square force is formulated and solved as a problem in complex variables. To find the solution, the constancy of angular momentum is first established using complex variables. Next, the complex position coordinate and complex velocity of the particle are assumed…

  8. Solving the Inverse-Square Problem with Complex Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, N.

    2005-01-01

    The equation of motion for a mass that moves under the influence of a central, inverse-square force is formulated and solved as a problem in complex variables. To find the solution, the constancy of angular momentum is first established using complex variables. Next, the complex position coordinate and complex velocity of the particle are assumed…

  9. Inversion problem for singular integral operators: C*-approach

    PubMed Central

    Dynin, Alexander

    1978-01-01

    The inversion problem is solved for a wide class of singular integral operators, in particular for Wiener-Hopf operators in several variables, Mihlin-Calderon-Zygmund operators on bounded domains, and Folland-Stein operators on compact nondegenerate Cauchy-Riemann manifolds. PMID:16592574

  10. Boundary identification for 2-D parabolic problems arising in thermal testing of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Kojima, Fumio

    1988-01-01

    Problems on the identification of two-dimensional spatial domains arising in the detection and characterization of structural flaws in materials are considered. For a thermal diffusion system with external boundary input, observations of the temperature on the surface are used in an output least square approach. Parameter estimation techniques based on the method of mappings are discussed, and approximation schemes are developed based on a finite-element Galerkin approach. Theoretical convergence results for computational techniques are given, and the results are applied to the identification of two kinds of boundary shapes.

  11. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Emre Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  12. PREFACE: First International Congress of the International Association of Inverse Problems (IPIA): Applied Inverse Problems 2007: Theoretical and Computational Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    2008-07-01

    This volume represents the proceedings of the fourth Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) international conference and the first congress of the Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) which was held in Vancouver, Canada, June 25 29, 2007. The organizing committee was formed by Uri Ascher, University of British Columbia, Richard Froese, University of British Columbia, Gary Margrave, University of Calgary, and Gunther Uhlmann, University of Washington, chair. The conference was part of the activities of the Pacific Institute of Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) Collaborative Research Group on inverse problems (http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific/collaborative-research-groups/past-crgs). This event was also supported by grants from NSF and MITACS. Inverse Problems (IP) are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. The enormous increase in computing power and the development of powerful algorithms have made it possible to apply the techniques of IP to real-world problems of growing complexity. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences. The series of Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) Conferences aims to provide a primary international forum for academic and industrial researchers working on all aspects of inverse problems, such as mathematical modelling, functional analytic methods, computational approaches, numerical algorithms etc. The steering committee of the AIP conferences consists of Heinz Engl (Johannes Kepler Universität, Austria), Joyce McLaughlin (RPI, USA), William Rundell (Texas A&M, USA), Erkki Somersalo (Helsinki University of Technology

  13. Stochastic inverse problem in the radiation of noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P. L.; Maestrello, L.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation is concerned with a stochastic inverse radiation problem in a uniform medium. The problem is illustrated with the aid of a simple model consisting of an array of point sources. The entropy functional is chosen to be the structural functional in determining the source distribution. A general theory for the stochastic inverse problem is introduced. It is shown that the general procedure yields the methods of the Lagrangian multiplier, when the structural and residual functionals are specialized. Tihonov's regularization and a method related to generalized or pseudoinverses are also obtained. Examples considered for purposes of illustration are related to a continuous source with the least noise intensity, a continuous source with a potential, and an axisymmetric line source.

  14. A reduced basis Landweber method for nonlinear inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmatter, Dominik; Haasdonk, Bernard; Harrach, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    We consider parameter identification problems in parametrized partial differential equations (PDEs). These lead to nonlinear ill-posed inverse problems. One way of solving them is using iterative regularization methods, which typically require numerous amounts of forward solutions during the solution process. In this article we consider the nonlinear Landweber method and couple it with the reduced basis method as a model order reduction technique in order to reduce the overall computational time. In particular, we consider PDEs with a high-dimensional parameter space, which are known to pose difficulties in the context of reduced basis methods. We present a new method that is able to handle such high-dimensional parameter spaces by combining the nonlinear Landweber method with adaptive online reduced basis updates. It is then applied to the inverse problem of reconstructing the conductivity in the stationary heat equation.

  15. Improved regularized solution of the inverse problem in turbidimetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Mroczka, Janusz; Szczuczyński, Damian

    2010-08-20

    We present results of simulation research on the constrained regularized least-squares (RLS) solution of the ill-conditioned inverse problem in turbidimetric measurements. The problem is formulated in terms of the discretized Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. The inverse problem in turbidimetric measurements consists in determining particle size distribution (PSD) function of particulate system on the basis of turbidimetric measurements. The desired PSD should satisfy two constraints: nonnegativity of PSD values and normalization of PSD to unity when integrated over the whole range of particle size. Incorporating the constraints into the RLS method leads to the constrained regularized least-squares (CRLS) method, which is realized by means of an active set algorithm of quadratic programming. Results of simulation research prove that the CRLS method performs considerably better with reconstruction of PSD than the RLS method in terms of better fidelity and smaller uncertainty.

  16. SIAM conference on inverse problems: Geophysical applications. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This conference was the second in a series devoted to a particular area of inverse problems. The theme of this series is to discuss problems of major scientific importance in a specific area from a mathematical perspective. The theme of this symposium was geophysical applications. In putting together the program we tried to include a wide range of mathematical scientists and to interpret geophysics in as broad a sense as possible. Our speaker came from industry, government laboratories, and diverse departments in academia. We managed to attract a geographically diverse audience with participation from five continents. There were talks devoted to seismology, hydrology, determination of the earth`s interior on a global scale as well as oceanographic and atmospheric inverse problems.

  17. An inverse problem approach for elasticity imaging through vibroacoustics.

    PubMed

    Aguiló, Miguel A; Aquino, Wilkins; Brigham, John C; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2010-04-01

    A methodology for estimating the spatial distribution of elastic moduli using the steady-state dynamic response of solids immersed in fluids is presented. The technique relies on the ensuing acoustic field from a remotely excited solid to inversely estimate the spatial distribution of Young's modulus of biological structures (e.g., breast tissue). This work proposes the use of Gaussian radial basis functions (GRBF) to represent the spatial variation of elastic moduli. GRBF are shown to possess the advantage of representing smooth functions with quasi-compact support and can efficiently represent elastic moduli distributions such as those that occur in soft biological tissue in the presence of unhealthy tissue (e.g., tumors and calcifications). The direct problem consists of a coupled acoustic-structure interaction boundary-value problem solved in the frequency domain using the finite element method. The inverse problem is cast as an optimization problem in which the error functional is defined as a measure of discrepancy between an experimentally measured response and a finite element representation of the system. Nongradient based optimization algorithms are used to solve the resulting optimization problem. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated through a series of simulations and an experiment. For comparison purposes, the surface velocity response was also used for the inverse characterization as the measured response in place of the acoustic pressure.

  18. On the Forward and Inverse Computational Wave Propagation Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaziri Astaneh, Ali

    This dissertation provides efficient algorithms for forward and inverse modeling of wave propagation problems. The presented methods are verified with synthetic examples and validated with real-life experiments in near surface imaging and nondestructive testing applications. First, we study the dispersion analysis of guided waves in the layered waveguides and half-spaces which involves solution of eigenvalue problems. This mathematical model is often used in applications such as near surface imaging, pavement structures characterization and thickness gauging of pipelines. We apply the new discretization technique termed Complex- Length Finite Element Method (CFEM) which increases the efficiency of forward modeling for such piecewise homogenous media, thus reducing the computational cost of associated inverse problems that rely on multiple forward solves. Second, we consider the near surface imaging problem and propose an approximate analytical gradient that facilitates more efficient inversion using surface waves. We show that the improvements in both venues, i.e. forward modeling and inversion scheme, leads to an order-of-magnitude reduction in computational cost. Third, we focus on efficient simulation of immersed waveguides and propose the use of Perfectly Matched Discrete Layer (PMDL) for modeling the surrounding fluid. Immersed plates, fluid-filled pipes and immersed waveguides with arbitrary cross-section are considered and the guidelines for choosing the discretization parameters are provided. Numerical examples demonstrate the increased efficacy in obtaining the dispersion characteristics. Finally, we explore large-scale problems governed by the Helmholtz equation that can be practically solved only through parallel computation. These problems often involve oscillating solutions that pose issues in the performance and scalability of parallel solvers. We propose an improved domain decomposition technique as a preconditioner for iterative solvers, which

  19. Reflectance of acoustic horns and solution of the inverse problem

    PubMed Central

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M.; Neely, Stephen T.; Allen, Jont B.; Shera, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    A method is described for solving the inverse problem of determining the profile of an acoustic horn when time-domain reflectance (TDR) is known only at the entrance. The method involves recasting Webster’s horn equation in terms of forward and backward propagating wave variables. An essential feature of this method is a requirement that the backward propagating wave be continuous at the wave-front at all locations beyond the entrance. Derivation of the inverse solution raises questions about the meaning of causality in the context of wave propagation in non-uniform tubes. Exact reflectance expressions are presented for infinite exponential, conical and parabolic horns based on exact solutions of the horn equation. Diameter functions obtained with the inverse solution are a good match to all three horn profiles. PMID:22423684

  20. Use of subdomains for inverse problems in branching flow passages

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A.K.; Krishnan, S.; Yang, Tah The . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    For inverse problems in complex flow passages, a calculation procedure based on a multizone Navier-Stokes method was developed. A heuristic approach was employed to derive wall shape corrections from the wall pressure error. Only two subdomains sharing a row of control volumes were used. The grid work in the common region was identical for both subdomains. The flow solver, inverse calculation procedure, multizone Navier-Stokes method and subdomain inverse calculation procedure were validated independently against experimental data or numerical predictions. Then, the subdomain inverse calculation method was used to determine the wall shape of the main duct of a branching flow passage. A slightly adverse pressure gradient was prescribed downstream of the sidebranch. Inverse calculations resulted in a curved wall diffuser for which the wall pressure distribution matched the design (prescribed) wall pressure distribution. The present method was illustrated for laminar, incompressible flows in branching passages. However, the method presented is flexible and can be extended for turbulent flows in multiply connected domains.

  1. Inverse Problem of Ultrasound Beamforming with Sparsity Constraints and Regularization.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Ece; Vishnevsky, Valeriy; Goksel, Orcun

    2017-09-28

    Ultrasound (US) beamforming is the process of reconstructing an image from acquired echo traces on several transducer elements. Typical beamforming approaches, such as Delay-And-Sum, perform simple projection operations, while techniques using statistical information also exist, e.g. adaptive, phase-coherence, Delay-Multiply-And-Sum, and sparse coding approaches. Inspired by the feasibility and success of inverse problem formulations in several image reconstruction problems, such as computed tomography, we herein devise an inverse problem approach for US beamforming. We define a linear forward model for the synthesis of the beamformed image, and solve its inverse problem thanks to several intuitive and physicsbased constraints and regularization terms proposed. These reflect the prior knowledge about the spectra of carrier signal and spatial coherence of modulated signal. These constraints admit effective formulation through sparse representations. Our proposed method was evaluated for plane-wave imaging (PWI) that transmits unfocused waves, enabling high frame-rates with large field of view at the expense of much lower image quality with conventional beamforming techniques. Results are evaluated in numerical simulations, as well as tissue-mimicking phantoms and in-vivo data provided by Plane-wave Imaging Challenge in Medical UltraSound (PICMUS). The best results achieved by our proposed techniques are 0.39mm full-width at half-maximum for spatial resolution and 16.3 dB contrast-to-noise ratio, using a single plane-wave transmit.

  2. General bounds for electrode mislocation on the EEG inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Beltrachini, L; von Ellenrieder, N; Muravchik, C H

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the effect of electrode mislocation on the electroencephalography (EEG) inverse problem using the Cramér-Rao bound (CRB) for single dipolar source parameters. We adopt a realistic head shape model, and solve the forward problem using the Boundary Element Method; the use of the CRB allows us to obtain general results which do not depend on the algorithm used for solving the inverse problem. We consider two possible causes for the electrode mislocation, errors in the measurement of the electrode positions and an imperfect registration between the electrodes and the scalp surfaces. For 120 electrodes placed in the scalp according to the 10-20 standard, and errors on the electrode location with a standard deviation of 5mm, the lower bound on the standard deviation in the source depth estimation is approximately 1mm in the worst case. Therefore, we conclude that errors in the electrode location may be tolerated since their effect on the EEG inverse problem are negligible from a practical point of view. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Two hybrid regularization frameworks for solving the electrocardiography inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mingfeng; Xia, Ling; Shou, Guofa; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2008-09-21

    In this paper, two hybrid regularization frameworks, LSQR-Tik and Tik-LSQR, which integrate the properties of the direct regularization method (Tikhonov) and the iterative regularization method (LSQR), have been proposed and investigated for solving ECG inverse problems. The LSQR-Tik method is based on the Lanczos process, which yields a sequence of small bidiagonal systems to approximate the original ill-posed problem and then the Tikhonov regularization method is applied to stabilize the projected problem. The Tik-LSQR method is formulated as an iterative LSQR inverse, augmented with a Tikhonov-like prior information term. The performances of these two hybrid methods are evaluated using a realistic heart-torso model simulation protocol, in which the heart surface source method is employed to calculate the simulated epicardial potentials (EPs) from the action potentials (APs), and then the acquired EPs are used to calculate simulated body surface potentials (BSPs). The results show that the regularized solutions obtained by the LSQR-Tik method are approximate to those of the Tikhonov method, the computational cost of the LSQR-Tik method, however, is much less than that of the Tikhonov method. Moreover, the Tik-LSQR scheme can reconstruct the epcicardial potential distribution more accurately, specifically for the BSPs with large noisy cases. This investigation suggests that hybrid regularization methods may be more effective than separate regularization approaches for ECG inverse problems.

  4. A penalty method for PDE-constrained optimization in inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, T.; Herrmann, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    Many inverse and parameter estimation problems can be written as PDE-constrained optimization problems. The goal is to infer the parameters, typically coefficients of the PDE, from partial measurements of the solutions of the PDE for several right-hand sides. Such PDE-constrained problems can be solved by finding a stationary point of the Lagrangian, which entails simultaneously updating the parameters and the (adjoint) state variables. For large-scale problems, such an all-at-once approach is not feasible as it requires storing all the state variables. In this case one usually resorts to a reduced approach where the constraints are explicitly eliminated (at each iteration) by solving the PDEs. These two approaches, and variations thereof, are the main workhorses for solving PDE-constrained optimization problems arising from inverse problems. In this paper, we present an alternative method that aims to combine the advantages of both approaches. Our method is based on a quadratic penalty formulation of the constrained optimization problem. By eliminating the state variable, we develop an efficient algorithm that has roughly the same computational complexity as the conventional reduced approach while exploiting a larger search space. Numerical results show that this method indeed reduces some of the nonlinearity of the problem and is less sensitive to the initial iterate.

  5. Inverse problem of HIV cell dynamics using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. A.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2017-01-01

    In order to describe the cell dynamics of T-cells in a patient infected with HIV, we use a flavour of Perelson's model. This is a non-linear system of Ordinary Differential Equations that describes the evolution of healthy, latently infected, infected T-cell concentrations and the free viral cells. Different parameters in the equations give different dynamics. Considering the concentration of these types of cells is known for a particular patient, the inverse problem consists in estimating the parameters in the model. We solve this inverse problem using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) that minimizes the error between the solutions of the model and the data from the patient. These errors depend on the parameters of the GA, like mutation rate and population, although a detailed analysis of this dependence will be described elsewhere.

  6. Inverse problems in the modeling of vibrations of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Powers, R. K.; Rosen, I. G.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation and solution of inverse problems for the estimation of parameters which describe damping and other dynamic properties in distributed models for the vibration of flexible structures is considered. Motivated by a slewing beam experiment, the identification of a nonlinear velocity dependent term which models air drag damping in the Euler-Bernoulli equation is investigated. Galerkin techniques are used to generate finite dimensional approximations. Convergence estimates and numerical results are given. The modeling of, and related inverse problems for the dynamics of a high pressure hose line feeding a gas thruster actuator at the tip of a cantilevered beam are then considered. Approximation and convergence are discussed and numerical results involving experimental data are presented.

  7. Solving the inverse problem of noise-driven dynamic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zheng, Zhigang; Niu, Haijing; Mi, Yuanyuan; Wu, Si; Hu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, massive amounts of data are available for analysis in natural and social systems and the tasks to depict system structures from the data, i.e., the inverse problems, become one of the central issues in wide interdisciplinary fields. In this paper, we study the inverse problem of dynamic complex networks driven by white noise. A simple and universal inference formula of double correlation matrices and noise-decorrelation (DCMND) method is derived analytically, and numerical simulations confirm that the DCMND method can accurately depict both network structures and noise correlations by using available output data only. This inference performance has never been regarded possible by theoretical derivation, numerical computation, and experimental design.

  8. An inverse cavity problem for Maxwellʼs equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peijun

    Consider the scattering of a time-harmonic electromagnetic plane wave by an open cavity embedded in a perfect electrically conducting infinite ground plane, where the electromagnetic wave propagation is governed by the Maxwell equations. The upper half-space is filled with a lossless homogeneous medium above the flat ground surface; while the interior of the cavity is assumed to be filled with a lossy homogeneous medium accounting for the energy absorption. The inverse problem is to determine the cavity structure or the shape of the cavity from the tangential trace of the electric field measured on the aperture of the cavity. In this paper, results on a global uniqueness and a local stability are established for the inverse problem. A crucial step in the proof of the stability is to obtain the existence and characterization of the domain derivative of the electric field with respect to the shape of the cavity.

  9. Eddy-current NDE inverse problem with sparse grid algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liming; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Murphy, R. Kim; Bernacchi, William; Aldrin, John C.; Forsyth, David; Lindgren, Eric

    2016-02-01

    In model-based inverse problems, the unknown parameters (such as length, width, depth) need to be estimated. When the unknown parameters are few, the conventional mathematical methods are suitable. But the increasing number of unknown parameters will make the computation become heavy. To reduce the burden of computation, the sparse grid algorithm was used in our work. As a result, we obtain a powerful interpolation method that requires significantly fewer support nodes than conventional interpolation on a full grid.

  10. Combined approach to the inverse protein folding problem. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben A. Abagyan

    2000-06-01

    The main scientific contribution of the project ''Combined approach to the inverse protein folding problem'' submitted in 1996 and funded by the Department of Energy in 1997 is the formulation and development of the idea of the multilink recognition method for identification of functional and structural homologues of newly discovered genes. This idea became very popular after they first announced it and used it in prediction of the threading targets for the CASP2 competition (Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction).

  11. Inverse problems of NEO photometry: Imaging the NEO population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen1, Mikko; Durech, Josef

    2007-05-01

    Photometry is the main source of information on NEOs (and other asteroids) en masse. Surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST will produce colossal photometric databases that can readily be used for mapping the physical characteristics of the whole asteroid population. These datasets are efficiently enriched by any additional dense photometric or other observations. Due to their quickly changing geometries with respect to the Earth, NEOs are the subpopulation that can be mapped the fastest. I review the state of the art in the construction of physical asteroid models from sparse and/or dense photometric data (that can also be combined with other data modes). The models describe the shapes, spin states, scattering properties and surface structure of the targets, and are the solutions of inverse problems necessarily involving comprehensive mathematical analysis. I sum up what we can and cannot get from photometric data, and how all this is done in practice. I also discuss the new freely available software package for solving photometric inverse problems (soon to be released). The analysis of photometric datasets will very soon become an automated industry, resulting in tens of thousands of asteroid models, a large portion of them NEOs. The computational effort in this is considerable in both computer and human time, which means that a large portion of the targets is likely to be analyzed only once. This, again, means that we have to have a good understanding of the reliability of our models, and this is impossible without a thorough understanding of the mathematical nature of the inverse problem(s) involved. Very important concepts are the uniqueness and stability of the solution, the parameter spaces, the so-called inverse crimes in simulations and error prediction, and the domination of systematic errors over random ones.

  12. Inverse source problem in an anisotropic medium by boundary measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Badia, Abdellatif

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we consider an inverse source problem for an anisotropic elliptic equation, from boundary measurements. A uniqueness result is established and a local Lipshitz stability, for a linear combination of monopolar and dipolar sources, is discussed. Assuming the number of dipoles bounded by a given integer M, we propose an algebraic algorithm which allows us to estimate the number, the locations and the moments of dipoles. Using special functions, we propose a global Lipschitz stability estimate for dipolar sources.

  13. Inverse Spectral Problems for Tridiagonal N by N Complex Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, Gusein Sh.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, the concept of generalized spectral function is introduced for finite-order tridiagonal symmetric matrices (Jacobi matrices) with complex entries. The structure of the generalized spectral function is described in terms of spectral data consisting of the eigenvalues and normalizing numbers of the matrix. The inverse problems from generalized spectral function as well as from spectral data are investigated. In this way, a procedure for construction of complex tridiagonal matrices having real eigenvalues is obtained.

  14. Diffuse interface methods for inverse problems: case study for an elliptic Cauchy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Martin; Løseth Elvetun, Ole; Schlottbom, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Many inverse problems have to deal with complex, evolving and often not exactly known geometries, e.g. as domains of forward problems modeled by partial differential equations. This makes it desirable to use methods which are robust with respect to perturbed or not well resolved domains, and which allow for efficient discretizations not resolving any fine detail of those geometries. For forward problems in partial differential equations methods based on diffuse interface representations have gained strong attention in the last years, but so far they have not been considered systematically for inverse problems. In this work we introduce a diffuse domain method as a tool for the solution of variational inverse problems. As a particular example we study ECG inversion in further detail. ECG inversion is a linear inverse source problem with boundary measurements governed by an anisotropic diffusion equation, which naturally cries for solutions under changing geometries, namely the beating heart. We formulate a regularization strategy using Tikhonov regularization and, using standard source conditions, we prove convergence rates. A special property of our approach is that not only operator perturbations are introduced by the diffuse domain method, but more important we have to deal with topologies which depend on a parameter \\varepsilon in the diffuse domain method, i.e. we have to deal with \\varepsilon -dependent forward operators and \\varepsilon -dependent norms. In particular the appropriate function spaces for the unknown and the data depend on \\varepsilon . This prevents the application of some standard convergence techniques for inverse problems, in particular interpreting the perturbations as data errors in the original problem does not yield suitable results. We consequently develop a novel approach based on saddle-point problems. The numerical solution of the problem is discussed as well and results for several computational experiments are reported. In

  15. A New Homotopy Perturbation Scheme for Solving Singular Boundary Value Problems Arising in Various Physical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roul, Pradip; Warbhe, Ujwal

    2017-08-01

    The classical homotopy perturbation method proposed by J. H. He, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng. 178, 257 (1999) is useful for obtaining the approximate solutions for a wide class of nonlinear problems in terms of series with easily calculable components. However, in some cases, it has been found that this method results in slowly convergent series. To overcome the shortcoming, we present a new reliable algorithm called the domain decomposition homotopy perturbation method (DDHPM) to solve a class of singular two-point boundary value problems with Neumann and Robin-type boundary conditions arising in various physical models. Five numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of our method, including thermal explosion, oxygen-diffusion in a spherical cell and heat conduction through a solid with heat generation. A comparison is made between the proposed technique and other existing seminumerical or numerical techniques. Numerical results reveal that only two or three iterations lead to high accuracy of the solution and this newly improved technique introduces a powerful improvement for solving nonlinear singular boundary value problems (SBVPs).

  16. Introduction to the 30th volume of Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Alfred K.

    2014-01-01

    The field of inverse problems is a fast-developing domain of research originating from the practical demands of finding the cause when a result is observed. The woodpecker, searching for insects, is probing a tree using sound waves: the information searched for is whether there is an insect or not, hence a 0-1 decision. When the result has to contain more information, ad hoc solutions are not at hand and more sophisticated methods have to be developed. Right from its first appearance, the field of inverse problems has been characterized by an interdisciplinary nature: the interpretation of measured data, reinforced by mathematical models serving the analyzing questions of observability, stability and resolution, developing efficient, stable and accurate algorithms to gain as much information as possible from the input and to feedback to the questions of optimal measurement configuration. As is typical for a new area of research, facets of it are separated and studied independently. Hence, fields such as the theory of inverse scattering, tomography in general and regularization methods have developed. However, all aspects have to be reassembled to arrive at the best possible solution to the problem at hand. This development is reflected by the first and still leading journal in the field, Inverse Problems. Founded by pioneers Roy Pike from London and Pierre Sabatier from Montpellier, who enjoyably describes the journal's nascence in his book Rêves et Combats d'un Enseignant-Chercheur, Retour Inverse [1], the journal has developed successfully over the last few decades. Neither the Editors-in-Chief, formerly called Honorary Editors, nor the board or authors could have set the path to success alone. Their fruitful interplay, complemented by the efficient and highly competent publishing team at IOP Publishing, has been fundamental. As such it is my honor and pleasure to follow my renowned colleagues Pierre Sabatier, Mario Bertero, Frank Natterer, Alberto Grünbaum and

  17. Material derivatives of boundary integral operators in electromagnetism and application to inverse scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyshyn Yaman, Olha; Le Louër, Frédérique

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the material derivative analysis of the boundary integral operators arising from the scattering theory of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves and its application to inverse problems. We present new results using the Piola transform of the boundary parametrisation to transport the integral operators on a fixed reference boundary. The transported integral operators are infinitely differentiable with respect to the parametrisations and simplified expressions of the material derivatives are obtained. Using these results, we extend a nonlinear integral equations approach developed for solving acoustic inverse obstacle scattering problems to electromagnetism. The inverse problem is formulated as a pair of nonlinear and ill-posed integral equations for the unknown boundary representing the boundary condition and the measurements, for which the iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton method can be applied. The algorithm has the interesting feature that it avoids the numerous numerical solution of boundary value problems at each iteration step. Numerical experiments are presented in the special case of star-shaped obstacles.

  18. Inverse problems with Poisson data: statistical regularization theory, applications and algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohage, Thorsten; Werner, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Inverse problems with Poisson data arise in many photonic imaging modalities in medicine, engineering and astronomy. The design of regularization methods and estimators for such problems has been studied intensively over the last two decades. In this review we give an overview of statistical regularization theory for such problems, the most important applications, and the most widely used algorithms. The focus is on variational regularization methods in the form of penalized maximum likelihood estimators, which can be analyzed in a general setup. Complementing a number of recent convergence rate results we will establish consistency results. Moreover, we discuss estimators based on a wavelet-vaguelette decomposition of the (necessarily linear) forward operator. As most prominent applications we briefly introduce Positron emission tomography, inverse problems in fluorescence microscopy, and phase retrieval problems. The computation of a penalized maximum likelihood estimator involves the solution of a (typically convex) minimization problem. We also review several efficient algorithms which have been proposed for such problems over the last five years.

  19. The inverse problems of wing panel manufacture processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinikov, A. I.; Bormotin, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that inverse problems of steady-state creep bending of plates in both the geometrically linear and nonlinear formulations can be represented in a variational formulation. Steady-state values of the obtained functionals corresponding to the solutions of the problems of inelastic deformation and springback are determined by applying a finite element procedure to the functionals. Optimal laws of creep deformation are formulated using the criterion of minimizing damage in the functionals of the inverse problems. The formulated problems are reduced to the problems solved by the finite element method using MSC.Marc software. Currently, forming of light metals poses tremendous challenges due to their low ductility at room temperature and their unusual deformation characteristics at hot-cold work: strong asymmetry between tensile and compressive behavior, and a very pronounced anisotropy. We used the constitutive models of steady-state creep of initially transverse isotropy structural materials the kind of the stress state has influence. The paper gives basics of the developed computer-aided system of design, modeling, and electronic simulation targeting the processes of manufacture of wing integral panels. The modeling results can be used to calculate the die tooling, determine the panel processibility, and control panel rejection in the course of forming.

  20. Stochastic reduced order models for inverse problems under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Warner, James E; Aquino, Wilkins; Grigoriu, Mircea D

    2015-03-01

    This work presents a novel methodology for solving inverse problems under uncertainty using stochastic reduced order models (SROMs). Given statistical information about an observed state variable in a system, unknown parameters are estimated probabilistically through the solution of a model-constrained, stochastic optimization problem. The point of departure and crux of the proposed framework is the representation of a random quantity using a SROM - a low dimensional, discrete approximation to a continuous random element that permits e cient and non-intrusive stochastic computations. Characterizing the uncertainties with SROMs transforms the stochastic optimization problem into a deterministic one. The non-intrusive nature of SROMs facilitates e cient gradient computations for random vector unknowns and relies entirely on calls to existing deterministic solvers. Furthermore, the method is naturally extended to handle multiple sources of uncertainty in cases where state variable data, system parameters, and boundary conditions are all considered random. The new and widely-applicable SROM framework is formulated for a general stochastic optimization problem in terms of an abstract objective function and constraining model. For demonstration purposes, however, we study its performance in the specific case of inverse identification of random material parameters in elastodynamics. We demonstrate the ability to efficiently recover random shear moduli given material displacement statistics as input data. We also show that the approach remains effective for the case where the loading in the problem is random as well.

  1. The inverse problems of wing panel manufacture processes

    SciTech Connect

    Oleinikov, A. I.; Bormotin, K. S.

    2013-12-16

    It is shown that inverse problems of steady-state creep bending of plates in both the geometrically linear and nonlinear formulations can be represented in a variational formulation. Steady-state values of the obtained functionals corresponding to the solutions of the problems of inelastic deformation and springback are determined by applying a finite element procedure to the functionals. Optimal laws of creep deformation are formulated using the criterion of minimizing damage in the functionals of the inverse problems. The formulated problems are reduced to the problems solved by the finite element method using MSC.Marc software. Currently, forming of light metals poses tremendous challenges due to their low ductility at room temperature and their unusual deformation characteristics at hot-cold work: strong asymmetry between tensile and compressive behavior, and a very pronounced anisotropy. We used the constitutive models of steady-state creep of initially transverse isotropy structural materials the kind of the stress state has influence. The paper gives basics of the developed computer-aided system of design, modeling, and electronic simulation targeting the processes of manufacture of wing integral panels. The modeling results can be used to calculate the die tooling, determine the panel processibility, and control panel rejection in the course of forming.

  2. Stochastic reduced order models for inverse problems under uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Warner, James E.; Aquino, Wilkins; Grigoriu, Mircea D.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a novel methodology for solving inverse problems under uncertainty using stochastic reduced order models (SROMs). Given statistical information about an observed state variable in a system, unknown parameters are estimated probabilistically through the solution of a model-constrained, stochastic optimization problem. The point of departure and crux of the proposed framework is the representation of a random quantity using a SROM - a low dimensional, discrete approximation to a continuous random element that permits e cient and non-intrusive stochastic computations. Characterizing the uncertainties with SROMs transforms the stochastic optimization problem into a deterministic one. The non-intrusive nature of SROMs facilitates e cient gradient computations for random vector unknowns and relies entirely on calls to existing deterministic solvers. Furthermore, the method is naturally extended to handle multiple sources of uncertainty in cases where state variable data, system parameters, and boundary conditions are all considered random. The new and widely-applicable SROM framework is formulated for a general stochastic optimization problem in terms of an abstract objective function and constraining model. For demonstration purposes, however, we study its performance in the specific case of inverse identification of random material parameters in elastodynamics. We demonstrate the ability to efficiently recover random shear moduli given material displacement statistics as input data. We also show that the approach remains effective for the case where the loading in the problem is random as well. PMID:25558115

  3. Obtaining sparse distributions in 2D inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reci, A.; Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.

    2017-08-01

    The mathematics of inverse problems has relevance across numerous estimation problems in science and engineering. L1 regularization has attracted recent attention in reconstructing the system properties in the case of sparse inverse problems; i.e., when the true property sought is not adequately described by a continuous distribution, in particular in Compressed Sensing image reconstruction. In this work, we focus on the application of L1 regularization to a class of inverse problems; relaxation-relaxation, T1-T2, and diffusion-relaxation, D-T2, correlation experiments in NMR, which have found widespread applications in a number of areas including probing surface interactions in catalysis and characterizing fluid composition and pore structures in rocks. We introduce a robust algorithm for solving the L1 regularization problem and provide a guide to implementing it, including the choice of the amount of regularization used and the assignment of error estimates. We then show experimentally that L1 regularization has significant advantages over both the Non-Negative Least Squares (NNLS) algorithm and Tikhonov regularization. It is shown that the L1 regularization algorithm stably recovers a distribution at a signal to noise ratio < 20 and that it resolves relaxation time constants and diffusion coefficients differing by as little as 10%. The enhanced resolving capability is used to measure the inter and intra particle concentrations of a mixture of hexane and dodecane present within porous silica beads immersed within a bulk liquid phase; neither NNLS nor Tikhonov regularization are able to provide this resolution. This experimental study shows that the approach enables discrimination between different chemical species when direct spectroscopic discrimination is impossible, and hence measurement of chemical composition within porous media, such as catalysts or rocks, is possible while still being stable to high levels of noise.

  4. Inference in infinite-dimensional inverse problems - Discretization and duality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Philip B.

    1992-01-01

    Many techniques for solving inverse problems involve approximating the unknown model, a function, by a finite-dimensional 'discretization' or parametric representation. The uncertainty in the computed solution is sometimes taken to be the uncertainty within the parametrization; this can result in unwarranted confidence. The theory of conjugate duality can overcome the limitations of discretization within the 'strict bounds' formalism, a technique for constructing confidence intervals for functionals of the unknown model incorporating certain types of prior information. The usual computational approach to strict bounds approximates the 'primal' problem in a way that the resulting confidence intervals are at most long enough to have the nominal coverage probability. There is another approach based on 'dual' optimization problems that gives confidence intervals with at least the nominal coverage probability. The pair of intervals derived by the two approaches bracket a correct confidence interval. The theory is illustrated with gravimetric, seismic, geomagnetic, and helioseismic problems and a numerical example in seismology.

  5. Source localization in electromyography using the inverse potential problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Doel, Kees; Ascher, Uri M.; Pai, Dinesh K.

    2011-02-01

    We describe an efficient method for reconstructing the activity in human muscles from an array of voltage sensors on the skin surface. MRI is used to obtain morphometric data which are segmented into muscle tissue, fat, bone and skin, from which a finite element model for volume conduction is constructed. The inverse problem of finding the current sources in the muscles is solved using a careful regularization technique which adds a priori information, yielding physically reasonable solutions from among those that satisfy the basic potential problem. Several regularization functionals are considered and numerical experiments on a 2D test model are performed to determine which performs best. The resulting scheme leads to numerical difficulties when applied to large-scale 3D problems. We clarify the nature of these difficulties and provide a method to overcome them, which is shown to perform well in the large-scale problem setting.

  6. Inverse problem for in vivo NMR spatial localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenfeld, A.C.

    1985-11-01

    The basic physical problem of NMR spatial localization is considered. To study diseased sites, one must solve the problem of adequately localizing the NMR signal. We formulate this as an inverse problem. As the NMR Bloch equations determine the motion of nuclear spins in applied magnetic fields, a theoretical study is undertaken to answer the question of how to design magnetic field configurations to achieve these localized excited spin populations. Because of physical constraints in the production of the relevant radiofrequency fields, the problem factors into a temporal one and a spatial one. We formulate the temporal problem as a nonlinear transformation, called the Bloch Transform, from the rf input to the magnetization response. In trying to invert this transformation, both linear (for the Fourier Transform) and nonlinear (for the Bloch Transform) modes of radiofrequency excitation are constructed. The spatial problem is essentially a statics problem for the Maxwell equations of electromagnetism, as the wavelengths of the radiation considered are on the order of ten meters, and so propagation effects are negligible. In the general case, analytic solutions are unavailable, and so the methods of computer simulation are used to map the rf field spatial profiles. Numerical experiments are also performed to verify the theoretical analysis, and experimental confirmation of the theory is carried out on the 0.5 Tesla IBM/Oxford Imaging Spectrometer at the LBL NMR Medical Imaging Facility. While no explicit inverse is constructed to ''solve'' this problem, the combined theoretical/numerical analysis is validated experimentally, justifying the approximations made. 56 refs., 31 figs.

  7. Inverse problem of pulsed eddy current field of ferromagnetic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing-Le; Lei, Yin-Zhao

    2015-03-01

    To determine the wall thickness, conductivity and permeability of a ferromagnetic plate, an inverse problem is established with measured values and calculated values of time-domain induced voltage in pulsed eddy current testing on the plate. From time-domain analytical expressions of the partial derivatives of induced voltage with respect to parameters, it is deduced that the partial derivatives are approximately linearly dependent. Then the constraints of these parameters are obtained by solving a partial linear differential equation. It is indicated that only the product of conductivity and wall thickness, and the product of relative permeability and wall thickness can be determined accurately through the inverse problem with time-domain induced voltage. In the practical testing, supposing the conductivity of the ferromagnetic plate under test is a fixed value, and then the relative variation of wall thickness between two testing points can be calculated via the ratio of the corresponding inversion results of the product of conductivity and wall thickness. Finally, this method for wall thickness measurement is verified by the experiment results of a carbon steel plate. Project supported by the National Defense Basic Technology Research Program of China (Grant No. Z132013T001).

  8. Comparison of Optimal Design Methods in Inverse Problems

    PubMed Central

    Banks, H. T.; Holm, Kathleen; Kappel, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Typical optimal design methods for inverse or parameter estimation problems are designed to choose optimal sampling distributions through minimization of a specific cost function related to the resulting error in parameter estimates. It is hoped that the inverse problem will produce parameter estimates with increased accuracy using data collected according to the optimal sampling distribution. Here we formulate the classical optimal design problem in the context of general optimization problems over distributions of sampling times. We present a new Prohorov metric based theoretical framework that permits one to treat succinctly and rigorously any optimal design criteria based on the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM). A fundamental approximation theory is also included in this framework. A new optimal design, SE-optimal design (standard error optimal design), is then introduced in the context of this framework. We compare this new design criteria with the more traditional D-optimal and E-optimal designs. The optimal sampling distributions from each design are used to compute and compare standard errors; the standard errors for parameters are computed using asymptotic theory or bootstrapping and the optimal mesh. We use three examples to illustrate ideas: the Verhulst-Pearl logistic population model [13], the standard harmonic oscillator model [13] and a popular glucose regulation model [16, 19, 29]. PMID:21857762

  9. Inverse problem for multi-body interaction of nonlinear waves.

    PubMed

    Marruzzo, Alessia; Tyagi, Payal; Antenucci, Fabrizio; Pagnani, Andrea; Leuzzi, Luca

    2017-06-14

    The inverse problem is studied in multi-body systems with nonlinear dynamics representing, e.g., phase-locked wave systems, standard multimode and random lasers. Using a general model for four-body interacting complex-valued variables we test two methods based on pseudolikelihood, respectively with regularization and with decimation, to determine the coupling constants from sets of measured configurations. We test statistical inference predictions for increasing number of sampled configurations and for an externally tunable temperature-like parameter mimicing real data noise and helping minimization procedures. Analyzed models with phasors and rotors are generalizations of problems of real-valued spherical problems (e.g., density fluctuations), discrete spins (Ising and vectorial Potts) or finite number of states (standard Potts): inference methods presented here can, then, be straightforward applied to a large class of inverse problems. The high versatility of the exposed techniques also concerns the number of expected interactions: results are presented for different graph topologies, ranging from sparse to dense graphs.

  10. Comparison of Optimal Design Methods in Inverse Problems.

    PubMed

    Banks, H T; Holm, Kathleen; Kappel, Franz

    2011-07-01

    Typical optimal design methods for inverse or parameter estimation problems are designed to choose optimal sampling distributions through minimization of a specific cost function related to the resulting error in parameter estimates. It is hoped that the inverse problem will produce parameter estimates with increased accuracy using data collected according to the optimal sampling distribution. Here we formulate the classical optimal design problem in the context of general optimization problems over distributions of sampling times. We present a new Prohorov metric based theoretical framework that permits one to treat succinctly and rigorously any optimal design criteria based on the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM). A fundamental approximation theory is also included in this framework. A new optimal design, SE-optimal design (standard error optimal design), is then introduced in the context of this framework. We compare this new design criteria with the more traditional D-optimal and E-optimal designs. The optimal sampling distributions from each design are used to compute and compare standard errors; the standard errors for parameters are computed using asymptotic theory or bootstrapping and the optimal mesh. We use three examples to illustrate ideas: the Verhulst-Pearl logistic population model [13], the standard harmonic oscillator model [13] and a popular glucose regulation model [16, 19, 29].

  11. Inverse problems in heterogeneous and fractured media using peridynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Daniel Z.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Parks, Michael L.

    2015-12-10

    The following work presents an adjoint-based methodology for solving inverse problems in heterogeneous and fractured media using state-based peridynamics. We show that the inner product involving the peridynamic operators is self-adjoint. The proposed method is illustrated for several numerical examples with constant and spatially varying material parameters as well as in the context of fractures. We also present a framework for obtaining material parameters by integrating digital image correlation (DIC) with inverse analysis. This framework is demonstrated by evaluating the bulk and shear moduli for a sample of nuclear graphite using digital photographs taken during the experiment. The resulting measured values correspond well with other results reported in the literature. Lastly, we show that this framework can be used to determine the load state given observed measurements of a crack opening. Furthermore, this type of analysis has many applications in characterizing subsurface stress-state conditions given fracture patterns in cores of geologic material.

  12. The physical and mathematical aspects of inverse problems in radiation detection and applications.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Esam M A

    2012-07-01

    The inverse problem is the problem of converting detectable measurements into useful quantifiable indications. It is the problem of spectrum unfolding, image reconstruction, identifying a threat material, or devising a radiotherapy plan. The solution of an inverse problem requires a forward model that relates the quantities of interest to measurements. This paper explores the physical issues associated with formulating a radiation-transport forward model best suited for inversion, and the mathematical challenges associated with the solution of the corresponding inverse problem.

  13. Solving constrained inverse problems for waveform tomography with Salvus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, C.; Afanasiev, M.; van Driel, M.; Krischer, L.; May, D.; Rietmann, M.; Fichtner, A.

    2016-12-01

    Finding a good balance between flexibility and performance is often difficult within domain-specific software projects. To achieve this balance, we introduce Salvus: an open-source high-order finite element package built upon PETSc and Eigen, that focuses on large-scale full-waveform modeling and inversion. One of the key features of Salvus is its modular design, based on C++ mixins, that separates the physical equations from the numerical discretization and the mathematical optimization. In this presentation we focus on solving inverse problems with Salvus and discuss (i) dealing with inexact derivatives resulting, e.g., from lossy wavefield compression, (ii) imposing additional constraints on the model parameters, e.g., from effective medium theory, and (iii) integration with a workflow management tool. We present a feasible-point trust-region method for PDE-constrained inverse problems that can handle inexactly computed derivatives. The level of accuracy in the approximate derivatives is controlled by localized error estimates to ensure global convergence of the method. Additional constraints on the model parameters are typically cheap to compute without the need for further simulations. Hence, including them in the trust-region subproblem introduces only a small computational overhead, but ensures feasibility of the model in every iteration. We show examples with homogenization constraints derived from effective medium theory (i.e. all fine-scale updates must upscale to a physically meaningful long-wavelength model). Salvus has a built-in workflow management framework to automate the inversion with interfaces to user-defined misfit functionals and data structures. This significantly reduces the amount of manual user interaction and enhances reproducibility which we demonstrate for several applications from the laboratory to global scale.

  14. Inverse atmospheric radiative transfer problems - A nonlinear minimization search method of solution. [aerosol pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper studies the inversion of the radiative transfer equation describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atmospheric aerosols. The interaction can be considered as the propagation in the aerosol medium of two light beams: the direct beam in the line-of-sight attenuated by absorption and scattering, and the diffuse beam arising from scattering into the viewing direction, which propagates more or less in random fashion. The latter beam has single scattering and multiple scattering contributions. In the former case and for single scattering, the problem is reducible to first-kind Fredholm equations, while for multiple scattering it is necessary to invert partial integrodifferential equations. A nonlinear minimization search method, applicable to the solution of both types of problems has been developed, and is applied here to the problem of monitoring aerosol pollution, namely the complex refractive index and size distribution of aerosol particles.

  15. Inverse atmospheric radiative transfer problems - A nonlinear minimization search method of solution. [aerosol pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper studies the inversion of the radiative transfer equation describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atmospheric aerosols. The interaction can be considered as the propagation in the aerosol medium of two light beams: the direct beam in the line-of-sight attenuated by absorption and scattering, and the diffuse beam arising from scattering into the viewing direction, which propagates more or less in random fashion. The latter beam has single scattering and multiple scattering contributions. In the former case and for single scattering, the problem is reducible to first-kind Fredholm equations, while for multiple scattering it is necessary to invert partial integrodifferential equations. A nonlinear minimization search method, applicable to the solution of both types of problems has been developed, and is applied here to the problem of monitoring aerosol pollution, namely the complex refractive index and size distribution of aerosol particles.

  16. Incremental projection approach of regularization for inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Souopgui, Innocent; Ngodock, Hans E.; Vidard, Arthur Le Dimet, François-Xavier

    2016-10-15

    This paper presents an alternative approach to the regularized least squares solution of ill-posed inverse problems. Instead of solving a minimization problem with an objective function composed of a data term and a regularization term, the regularization information is used to define a projection onto a convex subspace of regularized candidate solutions. The objective function is modified to include the projection of each iterate in the place of the regularization. Numerical experiments based on the problem of motion estimation for geophysical fluid images, show the improvement of the proposed method compared with regularization methods. For the presented test case, the incremental projection method uses 7 times less computation time than the regularization method, to reach the same error target. Moreover, at convergence, the incremental projection is two order of magnitude more accurate than the regularization method.

  17. The inverse electromagnetic scattering problem in a piecewise homogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Jiaqing

    2010-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of scattering of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from an impenetrable obstacle in a piecewise homogeneous medium. The well-posedness of the direct problem is established, employing the integral equation method. In Liu and Zhang (2009 Appl. Anal. 88 1339-55) it was proved, under the condition that the wave numbers in the innermost and outermost homogeneous layers coincide and S0 is known in advance, that the obstacle with its physical property can be uniquely determined from knowledge of the electric far-field pattern for incident plane waves. In this paper, we will remove this restriction by establishing a new mixed reciprocity relation. Furthermore, inspired by Hähner's idea in Hähner (1993 Inverse Problems 9 667-78), we prove that the penetrable interface between layers can also be uniquely determined.

  18. Sparse stochastic processes and discretization of linear inverse problems.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Emrah; Kamilov, Ulugbek S; Nilchian, Masih; Unser, Michael

    2013-07-01

    We present a novel statistically-based discretization paradigm and derive a class of maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimators for solving ill-conditioned linear inverse problems. We are guided by the theory of sparse stochastic processes, which specifies continuous-domain signals as solutions of linear stochastic differential equations. Accordingly, we show that the class of admissible priors for the discretized version of the signal is confined to the family of infinitely divisible distributions. Our estimators not only cover the well-studied methods of Tikhonov and l1-type regularizations as particular cases, but also open the door to a broader class of sparsity-promoting regularization schemes that are typically nonconvex. We provide an algorithm that handles the corresponding nonconvex problems and illustrate the use of our formalism by applying it to deconvolution, magnetic resonance imaging, and X-ray tomographic reconstruction problems. Finally, we compare the performance of estimators associated with models of increasing sparsity.

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Inverse problems in astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbroek, B. L.; Vogel, C. R.

    2009-06-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used in ground-based astronomy to correct for the wavefront aberrations and loss of image quality caused by atmospheric turbulence. Provided some difficult technical problems can be overcome, AO will enable future astronomers to achieve nearly diffraction-limited performance with the extremely large telescopes that are currently under development, thereby greatly improving spatial resolution, spectral resolution and observing efficiency which will be achieved. The goal of this topical review is to present to the inverse problems community a representative sample of these problems. In this review, we first present a tutorial overview of the mathematical models and techniques used in current AO systems. We then examine in detail the following topics: laser guidestar adaptive optics, multi-conjugate and multi-object adaptive optics, high-contrast imaging and deformable mirror modeling and parameter identification.

  20. Inverse scattering for an AKNS problem with rational reflection coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steudel, H.; Kaup, D. J.

    2008-04-01

    We study the AKNS (Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur) inverse scattering problem for rational reflection coefficients on a semi-infinite interval. We demonstrate that the Marchenko integral equations for the AKNS version on such an interval can be solved in a direct and straightforward way by algebraic methods for any set of rational reflection coefficients, vanishing at infinity. The general AKNS scattering problem for this case, as well as the usual symmetry reductions, are discussed. The connection to an alternative procedure by Rourke and Morris (1992 Phys. Rev. A 46 3631) is pointed out. Our procedure is built around a constant matrix, M, which can be constructed from the poles and residues of the rational reflection coefficients. Under certain conditions, which we define as minimal symmetry and which then suitably constrains the distribution of eigenvalues, we show that it is always possible to represent the resulting potentials as truncated N-soliton potentials. This procedure is of interest for solving initial-boundary value problems of integrable hyperbolic systems by the inverse scattering transform (IST) applied to a semi-infinite or finite interval.

  1. Reconstructing Images in Astrophysics, an Inverse Problem Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theys, Céline; Aime, Claude

    2016-04-01

    After a short introduction, a first section provides a brief tutorial to the physics of image formation and its detection in the presence of noises. The rest of the chapter focuses on the resolution of the inverse problem . In the general form, the observed image is given by a Fredholm integral containing the object and the response of the instrument. Its inversion is formulated using a linear algebra. The discretized object and image of size N × N are stored in vectors x and y of length N 2. They are related one another by the linear relation y = H x, where H is a matrix of size N 2 × N 2 that contains the elements of the instrument response. This matrix presents particular properties for a shift invariant point spread function for which the Fredholm integral is reduced to a convolution relation. The presence of noise complicates the resolution of the problem. It is shown that minimum variance unbiased solutions fail to give good results because H is badly conditioned, leading to the need of a regularized solution. Relative strength of regularization versus fidelity to the data is discussed and briefly illustrated on an example using L-curves. The origins and construction of iterative algorithms are explained, and illustrations are given for the algorithms ISRA , for a Gaussian additive noise, and Richardson-Lucy , for a pure photodetected image (Poisson statistics). In this latter case, the way the algorithm modifies the spatial frequencies of the reconstructed image is illustrated for a diluted array of apertures in space. Throughout the chapter, the inverse problem is formulated in matrix form for the general case of the Fredholm integral, while numerical illustrations are limited to the deconvolution case, allowing the use of discrete Fourier transforms, because of computer limitations.

  2. Solving the inverse problem of magnetisation-stress resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, S. G. H.; Vo, C.; Cowell, D. M. J.; Freear, S.; Ives, C.; Varcoe, B. T. H.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetostriction in various metals has been known since 1842, recently the focus has shifted away from ferrous metals, towards materials with a straightforward or exaggerated stress magnetostriction relationship. However, there is an increasing interest in understanding ferrous metal relationships, especially steels, because of its widespread use in building structures, transportation infrastructure, and pipelines. The aim of this paper is to solve the inverse problem of determining stress from an observed magnetic field which implies a given magnetic structure and to demonstrate that theoretical calculations using a multi-physics modeling technique agree with this experimental observation.

  3. On the Inverse Scattering Problem in the Acoustic Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-03

    16 21 ( 1 − cos(3t)) + 5 28 ( 1 − cos(4t)) ) . (264) The scatterer is a c50 -function in R with support in the interval [− 1 , 1 ]. The performance of the...On the inverse scattering problem in the acoustic environment Ran Duan and Vladimir Rokhlin Technical Report YALEU/DCS/TR-1395 March 3, 2008 1 Report...Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per

  4. Negative Compressibility and Inverse Problem for Spinning Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Vasily Geyko and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2013-01-11

    A spinning ideal gas in a cylinder with a smooth surface is shown to have unusual properties. First, under compression parallel to the axis of rotation, the spinning gas exhibits negative compressibility because energy can be stored in the rotation. Second, the spinning breaks the symmetry under which partial pressures of a mixture of gases simply add proportional to the constituent number densities. Thus, remarkably, in a mixture of spinning gases, an inverse problem can be formulated such that the gas constituents can be determined through external measurements only.

  5. SUSY at the ILC and Solving the LHC Inverse Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Gainer, James S.; /SLAC

    2008-05-28

    Recently a large scale study of points in the MSSM parameter space which are problematic at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been performed. This work was carried out in part to determine whether the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) could be used to solve the LHC inverse problem. The results suggest that while the ILC will be a valuable tool, an energy upgrade may be crucial to its success, and that, in general, precision studies of the MSSM are more difficult at the ILC than has generally been believed.

  6. Inverse Retrospective Problem of Thermal Evolution of the Earth Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.

    2009-04-01

    I consider an inverse (time-reverse) problem of thermal evolution of a viscous inhomogeneous incompressible heat-conducting fluid describing dynamics of the Earth's mantle. Present observations of geophysical fields (temperature, velocity) are incorporated in a three-dimensional dynamic model to determine the initial conditions of the fields. I present and compare numerical techniques for assimilation of geophysical and geodetical data into the geological past: backward advection, variational (adjoint), and quasi-reversibility methods. The methods are applied to restore the evolution of the mantle structures such as rising plumes and descending lithospheric plates.

  7. Stability of charge inversion, Thomson problem, and application to electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Michael; Patriarca, Marco; Karttunen, Mikko

    2003-03-01

    We analyze charge inversion in colloidal systems at zero temperature using stability concepts, and connect this to the classical Thomson problem of arranging electrons on sphere. We show that for a finite microion charge, the globally stable, lowest-energy state of the complex formed by the colloid and the oppositely charged microions is always overcharged. This effect disappears in the continuous limit. Additionally, a layer of at least twice as many microions as required for charge neutrality is always locally stable. In an applied external electric field the stability of the microion cloud is reduced. Finally, this approach is applied to a system of two colloids at low but finite temperature.

  8. Evaluation of simplified evaporation duct refractivity models for inversion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeger, J. T.; Grimes, N. G.; Rickard, H. E.; Hackett, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    To assess a radar system's instantaneous performance on any given day, detailed knowledge of the meteorological conditions is required due to the dependency of atmospheric refractivity on thermodynamic properties such as temperature, water vapor, and pressure. Because of the significant challenges involved in obtaining these data, recent efforts have focused on development of methods to obtain the refractivity structure inversely using radar measurements and radar wave propagation models. Such inversion techniques generally use simplified refractivity models in order to reduce the parameter space of the solution. Here the accuracy of three simple refractivity models is examined for the case of an evaporation duct. The models utilize the basic log linear shape classically associated with evaporation ducts, but each model depends on various parameters that affect different aspects of the profile, such as its shape and duct height. The model parameters are optimized using radiosonde data, and their performance is compared to these atmospheric measurements. The optimized models and data are also used to predict propagation using a parabolic equation code with the refractivity prescribed by the models and measured data, and the resulting propagation patterns are compared. The results of this study suggest that the best log linear model formulation for an inversion problem would be a two-layer model that contains at least three parameters: duct height, duct curvature, and mixed layer slope. This functional form permits a reasonably accurate fit to atmospheric measurements as well as embodies key features of the profile required for correct propagation prediction with as few parameters as possible.

  9. Topological inversion for solution of geodesy-constrained geophysical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis

    2015-04-01

    Geodetic data, mostly GPS observations, permit to measure displacements of selected points around activated faults and volcanoes, and on the basis of geophysical models, to model the underlying physical processes. This requires inversion of redundant systems of highly non-linear equations with >3 unknowns; a situation analogous to the adjustment of geodetic networks. However, in geophysical problems inversion cannot be based on conventional least-squares techniques, and is based on numerical inversion techniques (a priori fixing of some variables, optimization in steps with values of two variables each time to be regarded fixed, random search in the vicinity of approximate solutions). Still these techniques lead to solutions trapped in local minima, to correlated estimates and to solutions with poor error control (usually sampling-based approaches). To overcome these problems, a numerical-topological, grid-search based technique in the RN space is proposed (N the number of unknown variables). This technique is in fact a generalization and refinement of techniques used in lighthouse positioning and in some cases of low-accuracy 2-D positioning using Wi-Fi etc. The basic concept is to assume discrete possible ranges of each variable, and from these ranges to define a grid G in the RN space, with some of the gridpoints to approximate the true solutions of the system. Each point of hyper-grid G is then tested whether it satisfies the observations, given their uncertainty level, and successful grid points define a sub-space of G containing the true solutions. The optimal (minimal) space containing one or more solutions is obtained using a trial-and-error approach, and a single optimization factor. From this essentially deterministic identification of the set of gridpoints satisfying the system of equations, at a following step, a stochastic optimal solution is computed corresponding to the center of gravity of this set of gridpoints. This solution corresponds to a

  10. 3D Magnetic inversion and remanence: solving the problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, V.; Morris, W.

    2003-04-01

    3D inversion of surface magnetic data is a common processing technique when used in mineral exploration. The major drawback of most 3D inversion algorithms is that they assume that the surface magnetic anomaly is produced by induced magnetization and that there are no remanent magnetization or demagnetization effects present. This has a significant impact when modeling magnetic data that has remanent magnetization. The magnetic anomaly produced by a dipping subsurface body will be identical for a consistent relationship between the dip of the body and the dip of the magnetic vector, regardless of the actual dip of the magnetic body. For example, in the case where a subsurface body is dipping, such as a dipping dike, the dip estimated by the inversion routine will be correct only if induced magnetization is present. This has serious implications for mineral exploration. A solution to the remanence problem is to model the surface magnetic anomaly using a constrained 2D approach rather than 3D. Using a priori information on dip and strike length of a source body, it is possible to approximate the remanence direction and intensity. The 2D solutions can then be rendered into a 3D imaging package to create a model in 3D. A case study was performed on a mafic-ultramafic layered igneous intrusion located in Big Trout Lake, northwestern Ontario, Canada. Large layered igneous intrusions are known to have significant remanence. Like many other layered igneous intrusions such as the Bushveld Complex in South Africa, the Big Trout Lake Complex is highly prospective for Platinum Group Elements (PGEs). Intruded during Archean time, the Big Trout Lake Complex has been subsequently folded and faulted to near vertical. As a consequence of limited surface exposures, knowledge of layering within the pluton and the extent of deformation of the pluton is very limited. Newly acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data shows a strongly mineralized horizon within the intrusion that

  11. Inverse Problems in Complex Models and Applications to Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The inference of the subsurface earth structure and properties requires the integration of different types of data, information and knowledge, by combined processes of analysis and synthesis. To support the process of integrating information, the regular concept of data inversion is evolving to expand its application to models with multiple inner components (properties, scales, structural parameters) that explain multiple data (geophysical survey data, well-logs, core data). The probabilistic inference methods provide the natural framework for the formulation of these problems, considering a posterior probability density function (PDF) that combines the information from a prior information PDF and the new sets of observations. To formulate the posterior PDF in the context of multiple datasets, the data likelihood functions are factorized assuming independence of uncertainties for data originating across different surveys. A realistic description of the earth medium requires modeling several properties and structural parameters, which relate to each other according to dependency and independency notions. Thus, conditional probabilities across model components also factorize. A common setting proceeds by structuring the model parameter space in hierarchical layers. A primary layer (e.g. lithology) conditions a secondary layer (e.g. physical medium properties), which conditions a third layer (e.g. geophysical data). In general, less structured relations within model components and data emerge from the analysis of other inverse problems. They can be described with flexibility via direct acyclic graphs, which are graphs that map dependency relations between the model components. Examples of inverse problems in complex models can be shown at various scales. At local scale, for example, the distribution of gas saturation is inferred from pre-stack seismic data and a calibrated rock-physics model. At regional scale, joint inversion of gravity and magnetic data is applied

  12. Review on solving the inverse problem in EEG source analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grech, Roberta; Cassar, Tracey; Muscat, Joseph; Camilleri, Kenneth P; Fabri, Simon G; Zervakis, Michalis; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Vanrumste, Bart

    2008-01-01

    In this primer, we give a review of the inverse problem for EEG source localization. This is intended for the researchers new in the field to get insight in the state-of-the-art techniques used to find approximate solutions of the brain sources giving rise to a scalp potential recording. Furthermore, a review of the performance results of the different techniques is provided to compare these different inverse solutions. The authors also include the results of a Monte-Carlo analysis which they performed to compare four non parametric algorithms and hence contribute to what is presently recorded in the literature. An extensive list of references to the work of other researchers is also provided. This paper starts off with a mathematical description of the inverse problem and proceeds to discuss the two main categories of methods which were developed to solve the EEG inverse problem, mainly the non parametric and parametric methods. The main difference between the two is to whether a fixed number of dipoles is assumed a priori or not. Various techniques falling within these categories are described including minimum norm estimates and their generalizations, LORETA, sLORETA, VARETA, S-MAP, ST-MAP, Backus-Gilbert, LAURA, Shrinking LORETA FOCUSS (SLF), SSLOFO and ALF for non parametric methods and beamforming techniques, BESA, subspace techniques such as MUSIC and methods derived from it, FINES, simulated annealing and computational intelligence algorithms for parametric methods. From a review of the performance of these techniques as documented in the literature, one could conclude that in most cases the LORETA solution gives satisfactory results. In situations involving clusters of dipoles, higher resolution algorithms such as MUSIC or FINES are however preferred. Imposing reliable biophysical and psychological constraints, as done by LAURA has given superior results. The Monte-Carlo analysis performed, comparing WMN, LORETA, sLORETA and SLF, for different noise levels

  13. The inverse transmission eigenvalue problem for a discontinuous refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gintides, Drossos; Pallikarakis, Nikolaos

    2017-05-01

    We consider the inverse spectral problem of determining a spherically symmetric and discontinuous refractive index n(r) from interior transmission eigenvalues. Using Liouville’s transform, we investigate the asymptotic properties of the solution of an auxiliary initial value problem for large wave numbers and the asymptotic behaviour of the characteristic determinants derived from the eigenfunction expansions. Next, we assume that we know all transmission eigenvalues with spherically symmetric eigenfunctions and prove under some conditions that the transformed discontinuity of the refractive index can be determined. Finally we prove that the knowledge of all transmission eigenvalues including multiplicities uniquely determines n(r), under the assumption that n(0) is known and either n(r)  >  1 or 0  <  n(r)  <  1 by using a moment type result and applying Müntz’s theorem.

  14. Galerkin approximation for inverse problems for nonautonomous nonlinear distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    An abstract framework and convergence theory is developed for Galerkin approximation for inverse problems involving the identification of nonautonomous nonlinear distributed parameter systems. A set of relatively easily verified conditions is provided which are sufficient to guarantee the existence of optimal solutions and their approximation by a sequence of solutions to a sequence of approximating finite dimensional identification problems. The approach is based on the theory of monotone operators in Banach spaces and is applicable to a reasonably broad class of nonlinear distributed systems. Operator theoretic and variational techniques are used to establish a fundamental convergence result. An example involving evolution systems with dynamics described by nonstationary quasilinear elliptic operators along with some applications are presented and discussed.

  15. Inverse Spin Glass and Related Maximum Entropy Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellana, Michele; Bialek, William

    2014-09-01

    If we have a system of binary variables and we measure the pairwise correlations among these variables, then the least structured or maximum entropy model for their joint distribution is an Ising model with pairwise interactions among the spins. Here we consider inhomogeneous systems in which we constrain, for example, not the full matrix of correlations, but only the distribution from which these correlations are drawn. In this sense, what we have constructed is an inverse spin glass: rather than choosing coupling constants at random from a distribution and calculating correlations, we choose the correlations from a distribution and infer the coupling constants. We argue that such models generate a block structure in the space of couplings, which provides an explicit solution of the inverse problem. This allows us to generate a phase diagram in the space of (measurable) moments of the distribution of correlations. We expect that these ideas will be most useful in building models for systems that are nonequilibrium statistical mechanics problems, such as networks of real neurons.

  16. Waterjet and laser etching: the nonlinear inverse problem

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao-Guillerna, A.; Axinte, D. A.; Cadot, G. B. J.

    2017-01-01

    In waterjet and laser milling, material is removed from a solid surface in a succession of layers to create a new shape, in a depth-controlled manner. The inverse problem consists of defining the control parameters, in particular, the two-dimensional beam path, to arrive at a prescribed freeform surface. Waterjet milling (WJM) and pulsed laser ablation (PLA) are studied in this paper, since a generic nonlinear material removal model is appropriate for both of these processes. The inverse problem is usually solved for this kind of process by simply controlling dwell time in proportion to the required depth of milling at a sequence of pixels on the surface. However, this approach is only valid when shallow surfaces are etched, since it does not take into account either the footprint of the beam or its overlapping on successive passes. A discrete adjoint algorithm is proposed in this paper to improve the solution. Nonlinear effects and non-straight passes are included in the optimization, while the calculation of the Jacobian matrix does not require large computation times. Several tests are performed to validate the proposed method and the results show that tracking error is reduced typically by a factor of two in comparison to the pixel-by-pixel approach and the classical raster path strategy with straight passes. The tracking error can be as low as 2–5% and 1–2% for WJM and PLA, respectively, depending on the complexity of the target surface. PMID:28791132

  17. Waterjet and laser etching: the nonlinear inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao-Guillerna, A.; Axinte, D. A.; Billingham, J.; Cadot, G. B. J.

    2017-07-01

    In waterjet and laser milling, material is removed from a solid surface in a succession of layers to create a new shape, in a depth-controlled manner. The inverse problem consists of defining the control parameters, in particular, the two-dimensional beam path, to arrive at a prescribed freeform surface. Waterjet milling (WJM) and pulsed laser ablation (PLA) are studied in this paper, since a generic nonlinear material removal model is appropriate for both of these processes. The inverse problem is usually solved for this kind of process by simply controlling dwell time in proportion to the required depth of milling at a sequence of pixels on the surface. However, this approach is only valid when shallow surfaces are etched, since it does not take into account either the footprint of the beam or its overlapping on successive passes. A discrete adjoint algorithm is proposed in this paper to improve the solution. Nonlinear effects and non-straight passes are included in the optimization, while the calculation of the Jacobian matrix does not require large computation times. Several tests are performed to validate the proposed method and the results show that tracking error is reduced typically by a factor of two in comparison to the pixel-by-pixel approach and the classical raster path strategy with straight passes. The tracking error can be as low as 2-5% and 1-2% for WJM and PLA, respectively, depending on the complexity of the target surface.

  18. Comparison of optimal design methods in inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, H. T.; Holm, K.; Kappel, F.

    2011-07-01

    Typical optimal design methods for inverse or parameter estimation problems are designed to choose optimal sampling distributions through minimization of a specific cost function related to the resulting error in parameter estimates. It is hoped that the inverse problem will produce parameter estimates with increased accuracy using data collected according to the optimal sampling distribution. Here we formulate the classical optimal design problem in the context of general optimization problems over distributions of sampling times. We present a new Prohorov metric-based theoretical framework that permits one to treat succinctly and rigorously any optimal design criteria based on the Fisher information matrix. A fundamental approximation theory is also included in this framework. A new optimal design, SE-optimal design (standard error optimal design), is then introduced in the context of this framework. We compare this new design criterion with the more traditional D-optimal and E-optimal designs. The optimal sampling distributions from each design are used to compute and compare standard errors; the standard errors for parameters are computed using asymptotic theory or bootstrapping and the optimal mesh. We use three examples to illustrate ideas: the Verhulst-Pearl logistic population model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009 Mathematical and Experimental Modeling of Physical and Biological Processes (Boca Raton, FL: Chapman and Hall/CRC)), the standard harmonic oscillator model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009) and a popular glucose regulation model (Bergman R N, Ider Y Z, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1979 Am. J. Physiol. 236 E667-77 De Gaetano A and Arino O 2000 J. Math. Biol. 40 136-68 Toffolo G, Bergman R N, Finegood D T, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1980 Diabetes 29 979-90).

  19. Model selection in cognitive science as an inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.; Navarro, Daniel J.

    2005-03-01

    How should we decide among competing explanations (models) of a cognitive phenomenon? This problem of model selection is at the heart of the scientific enterprise. Ideally, we would like to identify the model that actually generated the data at hand. However, this is an un-achievable goal as it is fundamentally ill-posed. Information in a finite data sample is seldom sufficient to point to a single model. Multiple models may provide equally good descriptions of the data, a problem that is exacerbated by the presence of random error in the data. In fact, model selection bears a striking similarity to perception, in that both require solving an inverse problem. Just as perceptual ambiguity can be addressed only by introducing external constraints on the interpretation of visual images, the ill-posedness of the model selection problem requires us to introduce external constraints on the choice of the most appropriate model. Model selection methods differ in how these external constraints are conceptualized and formalized. In this review we discuss the development of the various approaches, the differences between them, and why the methods perform as they do. An application example of selection methods in cognitive modeling is also discussed.

  20. Solving Vening Meinesz-Moritz inverse problem in isostasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, Lars E.

    2009-12-01

    Vening Meinesz' inverse problem in isostasy deals with solving for the Moho depth from known Bouguer gravity anomalies and ``normal'' Moho depth (T0, known, e.g. from seismic reflection data) using a flat Earth approximation. Moritz generalized the problem to the global case by assuming a spherical approximation of the Earth's surface, and this problem is also treated here. We show that T0 has an exact physical meaning. The problem can be formulated mathematically as that of solving a non-linear Fredholm integral equation of the first kind, and we present an iterative procedure for its solution. Moreover, we prove the uniqueness of the solution. Second, the integral equation is modified to a more suitable form, and an iterative solution is presented also for this. Also, a second-order approximate formula is derived, which determines the Moho depth to first/linear order by an earth gravitational model (EGM), and the remaining short-wavelength/non-linear part, of the order of 2 km, can be determined by iteration. A direct, second-order formula, in principle accurate to the order of 25 m, combines the first-order solution from an EGM with a second-order term, which may include terrestrial Bouguer gravity anomalies around the computation point.

  1. Inverse zombies, anesthesia awareness, and the hard problem of unconsciousness.

    PubMed

    Mashour, George A; LaRock, Eric

    2008-12-01

    Philosophical (p-) zombies are constructs that possess all of the behavioral features and responses of a sentient human being, yet are not conscious. P-zombies are intimately linked to the hard problem of consciousness and have been invoked as arguments against physicalist approaches. But what if we were to invert the characteristics of p-zombies? Such an inverse (i-) zombie would possess all of the behavioral features and responses of an insensate being, yet would nonetheless be conscious. While p-zombies are logically possible but naturally improbable, an approximation of i-zombies actually exists: individuals experiencing what is referred to as "anesthesia awareness." Patients under general anesthesia may be intubated (preventing speech), paralyzed (preventing movement), and narcotized (minimizing response to nociceptive stimuli). Thus, they appear--and typically are--unconscious. In 1-2 cases/1000, however, patients may be aware of intraoperative events, sometimes without any objective indices. Furthermore, a much higher percentage of patients (22% in a recent study) may have the subjective experience of dreaming during general anesthesia. P-zombies confront us with the hard problem of consciousness--how do we explain the presence of qualia? I-zombies present a more practical problem--how do we detect the presence of qualia? The current investigation compares p-zombies to i-zombies and explores the "hard problem" of unconsciousness with a focus on anesthesia awareness.

  2. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1482156 is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  3. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-15

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20–25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  4. Isotropic probability measures in infinite dimensional spaces: Inverse problems/prior information/stochastic inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George

    1987-01-01

    Let R be the real numbers, R(n) the linear space of all real n-tuples, and R(infinity) the linear space of all infinite real sequences x = (x sub 1, x sub 2,...). Let P sub n :R(infinity) approaches R(n) be the projection operator with P sub n (x) = (x sub 1,...,x sub n). Let p(infinity) be a probability measure on the smallest sigma-ring of subsets of R(infinity) which includes all of the cylinder sets P sub n(-1) (B sub n), where B sub n is an arbitrary Borel subset of R(n). Let p sub n be the marginal distribution of p(infinity) on R(n), so p sub n(B sub n) = p(infinity)(P sub n to the -1(B sub n)) for each B sub n. A measure on R(n) is isotropic if it is invariant under all orthogonal transformations of R(n). All members of the set of all isotropic probability distributions on R(n) are described. The result calls into question both stochastic inversion and Bayesian inference, as currently used in many geophysical inverse problems.

  5. Inverse problems in heterogeneous and fractured media using peridynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, Daniel Z.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Parks, Michael L.

    2015-12-10

    The following work presents an adjoint-based methodology for solving inverse problems in heterogeneous and fractured media using state-based peridynamics. We show that the inner product involving the peridynamic operators is self-adjoint. The proposed method is illustrated for several numerical examples with constant and spatially varying material parameters as well as in the context of fractures. We also present a framework for obtaining material parameters by integrating digital image correlation (DIC) with inverse analysis. This framework is demonstrated by evaluating the bulk and shear moduli for a sample of nuclear graphite using digital photographs taken during the experiment. The resulting measuredmore » values correspond well with other results reported in the literature. Lastly, we show that this framework can be used to determine the load state given observed measurements of a crack opening. Furthermore, this type of analysis has many applications in characterizing subsurface stress-state conditions given fracture patterns in cores of geologic material.« less

  6. Solution accelerators for large scale 3D electromagnetic inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory A.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2004-04-05

    We provide a framework for preconditioning nonlinear 3D electromagnetic inverse scattering problems using nonlinear conjugate gradient (NLCG) and limited memory (LM) quasi-Newton methods. Key to our approach is the use of an approximate adjoint method that allows for an economical approximation of the Hessian that is updated at each inversion iteration. Using this approximate Hessian as a preconditoner, we show that the preconditioned NLCG iteration converges significantly faster than the non-preconditioned iteration, as well as converging to a data misfit level below that observed for the non-preconditioned method. Similar conclusions are also observed for the LM iteration; preconditioned with the approximate Hessian, the LM iteration converges faster than the non-preconditioned version. At this time, however, we see little difference between the convergence performance of the preconditioned LM scheme and the preconditioned NLCG scheme. A possible reason for this outcome is the behavior of the line search within the LM iteration. It was anticipated that, near convergence, a step size of one would be approached, but what was observed, instead, were step lengths that were nowhere near one. We provide some insights into the reasons for this behavior and suggest further research that may improve the performance of the LM methods.

  7. An Inverse Problems Approach to MR-EPT Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Borsic, A; Perreard, I; Mahara, A; Halter, R J

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance-Electrical Properties Tomography (MR-EPT) is an imaging modality that maps the spatial distribution of the electrical conductivity and permittivity using standard MRI systems. The presence of a body within the scanner alters the RF field, and by mapping these alterations it is possible to recover the electrical properties. The field is time-harmonic, and can be described by the Helmholtz equation. Approximations to this equation have been previously used to estimate conductivity and permittivity in terms of first or second derivatives of RF field data. Using these same approximations, an inverse approach to solving the MR-EPT problem is presented here that leverages a forward model for describing the magnitude and phase of the field within the imaging domain, and a fitting approach for estimating the electrical properties distribution. The advantages of this approach are that 1) differentiation of the measured data is not required, thus reducing noise sensitivity, and 2) different regularization schemes can be adopted, depending on prior knowledge of the distribution of conductivity or permittivity, leading to improved image quality. To demonstrate the developed approach, both Quadratic (QR) and Total Variation (TV) regularization methods were implemented and evaluated through numerical simulation and experimentally acquired data. The proposed inverse approach to MR-EPT reconstruction correctly identifies contrasts and accurately reconstructs the geometry in both simulations and experiments. The TV regularized scheme reconstructs sharp spatial transitions, which are difficult to reconstruct with other, more traditional approaches.

  8. The geometry of discombinations and its applications to semi-inverse problems in anelasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Arash; Goriely, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The geometrical formulation of continuum mechanics provides us with a powerful approach to understand and solve problems in anelasticity where an elastic deformation is combined with a non-elastic component arising from defects, thermal stresses, growth effects or other effects leading to residual stresses. The central idea is to assume that the material manifold, prescribing the reference configuration for a body, has an intrinsic, non-Euclidean, geometrical structure. Residual stresses then naturally arise when this configuration is mapped into Euclidean space. Here, we consider the problem of discombinations (a new term that we introduce in this paper), that is, a combined distribution of fields of dislocations, disclinations and point defects. Given a discombination, we compute the geometrical characteristics of the material manifold (curvature, torsion, non-metricity), its Cartan's moving frames and structural equations. This identification provides a powerful algorithm to solve semi-inverse problems with non-elastic components. As an example, we calculate the residual stress field of a cylindrically symmetric distribution of discombinations in an infinite circular cylindrical bar made of an incompressible hyperelastic isotropic elastic solid. PMID:25197257

  9. The geometry of discombinations and its applications to semi-inverse problems in anelasticity.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Arash; Goriely, Alain

    2014-09-08

    The geometrical formulation of continuum mechanics provides us with a powerful approach to understand and solve problems in anelasticity where an elastic deformation is combined with a non-elastic component arising from defects, thermal stresses, growth effects or other effects leading to residual stresses. The central idea is to assume that the material manifold, prescribing the reference configuration for a body, has an intrinsic, non-Euclidean, geometrical structure. Residual stresses then naturally arise when this configuration is mapped into Euclidean space. Here, we consider the problem of discombinations (a new term that we introduce in this paper), that is, a combined distribution of fields of dislocations, disclinations and point defects. Given a discombination, we compute the geometrical characteristics of the material manifold (curvature, torsion, non-metricity), its Cartan's moving frames and structural equations. This identification provides a powerful algorithm to solve semi-inverse problems with non-elastic components. As an example, we calculate the residual stress field of a cylindrically symmetric distribution of discombinations in an infinite circular cylindrical bar made of an incompressible hyperelastic isotropic elastic solid.

  10. Solving the inverse problem of metamaterials with permittivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hon Ping; Hui, Ka Shing; Yu, Kin Wah

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a new strategy for the reconstruction of volume fraction distribution of metallic inclusion in a graded composite from the measured electric permittivity data. Some of the techniques by Milton[1] and McPhedran[2] on homogenous two phase composites, together with Bergman-Milton representation, electromagnetic representation of effective permittivity and optimization method are used, and the strategy consist of the following two parts: reconstructing the effective permittivity in spectral space with Bergman representation by minimizing the cost function, and obtaining the volume fraction distribution by a contact of Bergman representation and electromagnetic representation of effective permittivity. Demonstration of the strategy is carried out by typical monotonically decreasing graded profile. The study could be extended to arbitrary profiles. The results obtained are useful for solving various inverse problems for the reconstruction of the structures of composites.

  11. Detecting multi-spin interactions in the inverse Ising problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Joseph; Swendsen, Robert H.

    2017-10-01

    While the usual goal in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of Ising models is the efficient generation of spin configurations with Boltzmann probabilities, the inverse problem is to determine the coupling constants from a given set of spin configurations. Most recent work has been limited to local magnetic fields and pair-wise interactions. We have extended solutions to multi-spin interactions, using correlation function matching (CFM). A more serious limitation of previous work has been the uncertainty of whether a chosen set of interactions is capable of faithfully representing real data. We show how our confirmation testing method uses an additional MC simulation to detect significant interactions that might be missing in the assumed representation of the data.

  12. The inverse problem for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

    PubMed

    Malomed, Boris A; Stepanyants, Yury A

    2010-03-01

    Two different methods are proposed for the generation of wide classes of exact solutions to the stationary Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE). The first method, suggested by the work of Kondrat'ev and Miller [Izv. Vyssh. Uchebn. Zaved., Radiofiz IX, 910 (1966)], applies to one-dimensional (1D) GPE. It is based on the similarity between the GPE and the integrable Gardner equation, all solutions of the latter equation (both stationary and nonstationary ones) generating exact solutions to the GPE. The second method is based on the "inverse problem" for the GPE, i.e., construction of a potential function which provides a desirable solution to the equation. Systematic results are presented for one- and two-dimensional cases. Both methods are illustrated by a variety of localized solutions, including solitary vortices, for both attractive and repulsive nonlinearity in the GPE. The stability of the 1D solutions is tested by direct simulations of the time-dependent GPE.

  13. The LHC Inverse Problem, Supersymmetry and the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Gainer, J.S.; Hewett, J.L.; Lillie, B.; Rizzo, T.G.

    2007-11-12

    We address the question whether the ILC can resolve the LHC Inverse Problem within the framework of the MSSM. We examine 242 points in the MSSM parameter space which were generated at random and were found to give indistinguishable signatures at the LHC. After a realistic simulation including full Standard Model backgrounds and a fast detector simulation, we find that roughly only one third of these scenarios lead to visible signatures of some kind with a significance {ge} 5 at the ILC with {radical}s = 500 GeV. Furthermore, we examine these points in parameter space pairwise and find that only one third of the pairs are distinguishable at the ILC at 5{sigma}.

  14. Multiresolution subspace-based optimization method for inverse scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Giacomo; Zhong, Yu; Chen, Xudong; Massa, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    This paper investigates an approach to inverse scattering problems based on the integration of the subspace-based optimization method (SOM) within a multifocusing scheme in the framework of the contrast source formulation. The scattering equations are solved by a nested three-step procedure composed of (a) an outer multiresolution loop dealing with the identification of the regions of interest within the investigation domain through an iterative information-acquisition process, (b) a spectrum analysis step devoted to the reconstruction of the deterministic components of the contrast sources, and (c) an inner optimization loop aimed at retrieving the ambiguous components of the contrast sources through a conjugate gradient minimization of a suitable objective function. A set of representative reconstruction results is discussed to provide numerical evidence of the effectiveness of the proposed algorithmic approach as well as to assess the features and potentialities of the multifocusing integration in comparison with the state-of-the-art SOM implementation.

  15. A variational approach to an elastic inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. M.; Jais, M.; Knowles, I. W.

    2005-12-01

    We present a variational approach to the seismic inverse problem of determining the coefficients C and ρ of the hyperbolic system of partial differential equations \\fl \\sum_{j,k,l_{\\vphantom{1/2}}}^{\\;^{\\vphantom{1/2}}} \\frac{\\partial}{\\partial x_j} \\left(C_{i,j,k,l}(x) \\frac{\\partial}{\\partial x_l} u_k(x,t)\\right) = \\rho(x) \\frac{\\partial^2}{\\partial t^2} u_i, \\qquad 1 \\leq i \\leq n, from traction and displacement data measured on the surface. A crucial point of our approach will be a transformation of the above system to an elliptic system of partial differential equations \\fl -\\!\\sum_{k_{\\vphantom{1/2}}}^{{\\vphantom{1/2}}} \

  16. An inverse problem for a mathematical model of aquaponic agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobak, Carly; Kunze, Herb

    2017-01-01

    Aquaponic agriculture is a sustainable ecosystem that relies on a symbiotic relationship between fish and macrophytes. While the practice has been growing in popularity, relatively little mathematical models exist which aim to study the system processes. In this paper, we present a system of ODEs which aims to mathematically model the population and concetrations dynamics present in an aquaponic environment. Values of the parameters in the system are estimated from the literature so that simulated results can be presented to illustrate the nature of the solutions to the system. As well, a brief sensitivity analysis is performed in order to identify redundant parameters and highlight those which may need more reliable estimates. Specifically, an inverse problem with manufactured data for fish and plants is presented to demonstrate the ability of the collage theorem to recover parameter estimates.

  17. Geomagnetic inverse problem and data assimilation: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Julien; Fournier, Alexandre

    2013-04-01

    In this presentation I will present two studies recently undertaken by our group in an effort to bring the benefits of data assimilation to the study of Earth's magnetic field and the dynamics of its liquid iron core, where the geodynamo operates. In a first part I will focus on the geomagnetic inverse problem, which attempts to recover the fluid flow in the core from the temporal variation of the magnetic field (known as the secular variation). Geomagnetic data can be downward continued from the surface of the Earth down to the core-mantle boundary, but not further below, since the core is an electrical conductor. Historically, solutions to the geomagnetic inverse problem in such a sparsely observed system were thus found only for flow immediately below the core mantle boundary. We have recently shown that combining a numerical model of the geodynamo together with magnetic observations, through the use of Kalman filtering, now allows to present solutions for flow throughout the core. In a second part, I will present synthetic tests of sequential geomagnetic data assimilation aiming at evaluating the range at which the future of the geodynamo can be predicted, and our corresponding prospects to refine the current geomagnetic predictions. Fournier, Aubert, Thébault: Inference on core surface flow from observations and 3-D dynamo modelling, Geophys. J. Int. 186, 118-136, 2011, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.05037.x Aubert, Fournier: Inferring internal properties of Earth's core dynamics and their evolution from surface observations and a numerical geodynamo model, Nonlinear Proc. Geoph. 18, 657-674, 2011, doi:10.5194/npg-18-657-2011 Aubert: Flow throughout the Earth's core inverted from geomagnetic observations and numerical dynamo models, Geophys. J. Int., 2012, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggs051

  18. Nonlocal regularization of inverse problems: a unified variational framework

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhili; Jacob, Mathews

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a unifying energy minimization framework for nonlocal regularization of inverse problems. In contrast to the weighted sum of square differences between image pixels used by current schemes, the proposed functional is an unweighted sum of inter-patch distances. We use robust distance metrics that promote the averaging of similar patches, while discouraging the averaging of dissimilar patches. We show that the first iteration of a majorize-minimize algorithm to minimize the proposed cost function is similar to current non-local methods. The reformulation thus provides a theoretical justification for the heuristic approach of iterating non-local schemes, which re-estimate the weights from the current image estimate. Thanks to the reformulation, we now understand that the widely reported alias amplification associated with iterative non-local methods are caused by the convergence to local minimum of the nonconvex penalty. We introduce an efficient continuation strategy to overcome this problem. The similarity of the proposed criterion to widely used non-quadratic penalties (eg. total variation and `p semi-norms) opens the door to the adaptation of fast algorithms developed in the context of compressive sensing; we introduce several novel algorithms to solve the proposed non-local optimization problem. Thanks to the unifying framework, these fast algorithms are readily applicable for a large class of distance metrics. PMID:23014745

  19. Nonlocal regularization of inverse problems: a unified variational framework.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhili; Jacob, Mathews

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a unifying energy minimization framework for nonlocal regularization of inverse problems. In contrast to the weighted sum of square differences between image pixels used by current schemes, the proposed functional is an unweighted sum of inter-patch distances. We use robust distance metrics that promote the averaging of similar patches, while discouraging the averaging of dissimilar patches. We show that the first iteration of a majorize-minimize algorithm to minimize the proposed cost function is similar to current nonlocal methods. The reformulation thus provides a theoretical justification for the heuristic approach of iterating nonlocal schemes, which re-estimate the weights from the current image estimate. Thanks to the reformulation, we now understand that the widely reported alias amplification associated with iterative nonlocal methods are caused by the convergence to local minimum of the nonconvex penalty. We introduce an efficient continuation strategy to overcome this problem. The similarity of the proposed criterion to widely used nonquadratic penalties (e.g., total variation and lp semi-norms) opens the door to the adaptation of fast algorithms developed in the context of compressive sensing; we introduce several novel algorithms to solve the proposed nonlocal optimization problem. Thanks to the unifying framework, these fast algorithms are readily applicable for a large class of distance metrics.

  20. The ultrasound elastography inverse problem and the effective criteria.

    PubMed

    Aghajani, Atefeh; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Nikazad, Touraj

    2013-11-01

    The elastography (elasticity imaging) is one of the recent state-of-the-art methods for diagnosis of abnormalities in soft tissue. The idea is based on the computation of the tissue elasticity distribution. This leads to the inverse elasticity problem; in that, displacement field and boundary conditions are known, and elasticity distribution of the tissue is aimed for computation. We treat this problem by the Gauss-Newton method. This iterative method results in an ill-posed problem, and therefore, regularization schemes are required to deal with this issue. The impacts of the initial guess for tissue elasticity distribution, contrast ratio between elastic modulus of tumor and normal tissue, and noise level of the input data on the estimated solutions are investigated via two different regularization methods. The numerical results show that the accuracy and speed of convergence vary when different regularization methods are applied. Also, the semi-convergence behavior has been observed and discussed. At the end, we signify the necessity of a clever initial guess and intelligent stopping criteria for the iterations. The main purpose here is to highlight some technical factors that have an influence on elasticity image quality and diagnostic accuracy, and we have tried our best to make this article accessible for a broad audience.

  1. Solution of the inverse problem of magnetic induction tomography (MIT).

    PubMed

    Merwa, Robert; Hollaus, Karl; Brunner, Patricia; Scharfetter, Hermann

    2005-04-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) of biological tissue is used to reconstruct the changes in the complex conductivity distribution inside an object under investigation. The measurement principle is based on determining the perturbation DeltaB of a primary alternating magnetic field B0, which is coupled from an array of excitation coils to the object under investigation. The corresponding voltages DeltaV and V0 induced in a receiver coil carry the information about the passive electrical properties (i.e. conductivity, permittivity and permeability). The reconstruction of the conductivity distribution requires the solution of a 3D inverse eddy current problem. As in EIT the inverse problem is ill-posed and on this account some regularization scheme has to be applied. We developed an inverse solver based on the Gauss-Newton-one-step method for differential imaging, and we implemented and tested four different regularization schemes: the first and second approaches employ a classical smoothness criterion using the unit matrix and a differential matrix of first order as the regularization matrix. The third method is based on variance uniformization, and the fourth method is based on the truncated singular value decomposition. Reconstructions were carried out with synthetic measurement data generated with a spherical perturbation at different locations within a conducting cylinder. Data were generated on a different mesh and 1% random noise was added. The model contained 16 excitation coils and 32 receiver coils which could be combined pairwise to give 16 planar gradiometers. With 32 receiver coils all regularization methods yield fairly good 3D-images of the modelled changes of the conductivity distribution, and prove the feasibility of difference imaging with MIT. The reconstructed perturbations appear at the right location, and their size is in the expected range. With 16 planar gradiometers an additional spurious feature appears mirrored with respect to the median

  2. A regularizing iterative ensemble Kalman method for PDE-constrained inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Marco A.

    2016-02-01

    . The numerical investigation is carried out with synthetic experiments on two model inverse problems: (i) identification of conductivity on a Darcy flow model and (ii) electrical impedance tomography with the complete electrode model. We further demonstrate the potential application of the method in solving shape identification problems that arises from the aforementioned forward models by means of a level-set approach for the parameterization of unknown geometries.

  3. Methodes entropiques appliquees au probleme inverse en magnetoencephalographie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapalme, Ervig

    2005-07-01

    This thesis is devoted to biomagnetic source localization using magnetoencephalography. This problem is known to have an infinite number of solutions. So methods are required to take into account anatomical and functional information on the solution. The work presented in this thesis uses the maximum entropy on the mean method to constrain the solution. This method originates from statistical mechanics and information theory. This thesis is divided into two main parts containing three chapters each. The first part reviews the magnetoencephalographic inverse problem: the theory needed to understand its context and the hypotheses for simplifying the problem. In the last chapter of this first part, the maximum entropy on the mean method is presented: its origins are explained and also how it is applied to our problem. The second part is the original work of this thesis presenting three articles; one of them already published and two others submitted for publication. In the first article, a biomagnetic source model is developed and applied in a theoretical con text but still demonstrating the efficiency of the method. In the second article, we go one step further towards a realistic modelization of the cerebral activation. The main priors are estimated using the magnetoencephalographic data. This method proved to be very efficient in realistic simulations. In the third article, the previous method is extended to deal with time signals thus exploiting the excellent time resolution offered by magnetoencephalography. Compared with our previous work, the temporal method is applied to real magnetoencephalographic data coming from a somatotopy experience and results agree with previous physiological knowledge about this kind of cognitive process.

  4. An inverse problem approach to modelling coastal effluent plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, D. C. L.; Murthy, C. R.; Miners, K. C.

    Formulated as an inverse problem, the diffusion parameters associated with length-scale dependent eddy diffusivities can be viewed as the unknowns in the mass conservation equation for coastal zone transport problems. The values of the diffusion parameters can be optimized according to an error function incorporated with observed concentration data. Examples are given for the Fickian, shear diffusion and inertial subrange diffusion models. Based on a new set of dyeplume data collected in the coastal zone off Bronte, Lake Ontario, it is shown that the predictions of turbulence closure models can be evaluated for different flow conditions. The choice of computational schemes for this diagnostic approach is based on tests with analytic solutions and observed data. It is found that the optimized shear diffusion model produced a better agreement with observations for both high and low advective flows than, e.g., the unoptimized semi-empirical model, Ky=0.075 σy1.2, described by Murthy and Kenney.

  5. Digital image correlation involves an inverse problem: A regularization scheme based on subset size constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Qin; Yuan, Yuan; Fan, Xiangtao; Huang, Jianyong; Xiong, Chunyang; Yuan, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is essentially implicated in a class of inverse problem. Here, a regularization scheme is developed for the subset-based DIC technique to effectively inhibit potential ill-posedness that likely arises in actual deformation calculations and hence enhance numerical stability, accuracy and precision of correlation measurement. With the aid of a parameterized two-dimensional Butterworth window, a regularized subpixel registration strategy is established, in which the amount of speckle information introduced to correlation calculations may be weighted through equivalent subset size constraint. The optimal regularization parameter associated with each individual sampling point is determined in a self-adaptive way by numerically investigating the curve of 2-norm condition number of coefficient matrix versus the corresponding equivalent subset size, based on which the regularized solution can eventually be obtained. Numerical results deriving from both synthetic speckle images and actual experimental images demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the set of newly-proposed regularized DIC algorithms.

  6. Subspace-based analysis of the ERT inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Hadj Miled, Mohamed Khames; Miller, Eric L.

    2004-05-01

    In a previous work, we proposed a source-type formulation to the electrical resistance tomography (ERT) problem. Specifically, we showed that inhomogeneities in the medium can be viewed as secondary sources embedded in the homogeneous background medium and located at positions associated with variation in electrical conductivity. Assuming a piecewise constant conductivity distribution, the support of equivalent sources is equal to the boundary of the inhomogeneity. The estimation of the anomaly shape takes the form of an inverse source-type problem. In this paper, we explore the use of subspace methods to localize the secondary equivalent sources associated with discontinuities in the conductivity distribution. Our first alternative is the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm which is commonly used in the localization of multiple sources. The idea is to project a finite collection of plausible pole (or dipole) sources onto an estimated signal subspace and select those with largest correlations. In ERT, secondary sources are excited simultaneously but in different ways, i.e. with distinct amplitude patterns, depending on the locations and amplitudes of primary sources. If the number of receivers is "large enough", different source configurations can lead to a set of observation vectors that span the data subspace. However, since sources that are spatially close to each other have highly correlated signatures, seperation of such signals becomes very difficult in the presence of noise. To overcome this problem we consider iterative MUSIC algorithms like R-MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC. These recursive algorithms pose a computational burden as they require multiple large combinatorial searches. Results obtained with these algorithms using simulated data of different conductivity patterns are presented.

  7. Spectral and parameter estimation problems arising in the metrology of high performance mirror surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1986-04-01

    The accurate characterization of mirror surfaces requires the estimation of two-dimensional distribution functions and power spectra from trend-contaminated profile measurements. The rationale behind this, and our measurement and processing procedures, are described. The distinction between profile and area spectra is indicated, and since measurements often suggest inverse-power-law forms, a discussion of classical and fractal models of processes leading to these forms is included. 9 refs.

  8. Final Technical Report for "Applied Mathematics Research: Simulation Based Optimization and Application to Electromagnetic Inverse Problems"

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Eldad

    2014-03-17

    The focus of research was: Developing adaptive mesh for the solution of Maxwell's equations; Developing a parallel framework for time dependent inverse Maxwell's equations; Developing multilevel methods for optimization problems with inequal- ity constraints; A new inversion code for inverse Maxwell's equations in the 0th frequency (DC resistivity); A new inversion code for inverse Maxwell's equations in low frequency regime. Although the research concentrated on electromagnetic forward and in- verse problems the results of the research was applied to the problem of image registration.

  9. A New Analytical Procedure for Solving the Non-Linear Differential Equation Arising in the Stretching Sheet Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddheshwar, P. G.; Mahabaleswar, U. S.; Andersson, H. I.

    2013-08-01

    The paper discusses a new analytical procedure for solving the non-linear boundary layer equation arising in a linear stretching sheet problem involving a Newtonian/non-Newtonian liquid. On using a technique akin to perturbation the problem gives rise to a system of non-linear governing differential equations that are solved exactly. An analytical expression is obtained for the stream function and velocity as a function of the stretching parameters. The Clairaut equation is obtained on consideration of consistency and its solution is shown to be that of the stretching sheet boundary layer equation. The present study throws light on the analytical solution of a class of boundary layer equations arising in the stretching sheet problem

  10. Bayesian Genomic-Enabled Prediction as an Inverse Problem

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Jaime; Pérez-Elizalde, Sergio; Soberanis, Victor; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Gianola, Daniel; Crossa, José

    2014-01-01

    Genomic-enabled prediction in plant and animal breeding has become an active area of research. Many prediction models address the collinearity that arises when the number (p) of molecular markers (e.g. single-nucleotide polymorphisms) is larger than the sample size (n). Here we propose four Bayesian approaches to the problem based on commonly used data reduction methods. Specifically, we use a Gaussian linear model for an orthogonal transformation of both the observed data and the matrix of molecular markers. Because shrinkage of estimates is affected by the prior variance of transformed effects, we propose four structures of the prior variance as a way of potentially increasing the prediction accuracy of the models fitted. To evaluate our methods, maize and wheat data previously used with standard Bayesian regression models were employed for measuring prediction accuracy using the proposed models. Results indicate that, for the maize and wheat data sets, our Bayesian models yielded, on average, a prediction accuracy that is 3% greater than that of standard Bayesian regression models, with less computational effort. PMID:25155273

  11. Bayesian genomic-enabled prediction as an inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Jaime; Pérez-Elizalde, Sergio; Soberanis, Victor; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Gianola, Daniel; Crossa, José

    2014-08-25

    Genomic-enabled prediction in plant and animal breeding has become an active area of research. Many prediction models address the collinearity that arises when the number (p) of molecular markers (e.g. single-nucleotide polymorphisms) is larger than the sample size (n). Here we propose four Bayesian approaches to the problem based on commonly used data reduction methods. Specifically, we use a Gaussian linear model for an orthogonal transformation of both the observed data and the matrix of molecular markers. Because shrinkage of estimates is affected by the prior variance of transformed effects, we propose four structures of the prior variance as a way of potentially increasing the prediction accuracy of the models fitted. To evaluate our methods, maize and wheat data previously used with standard Bayesian regression models were employed for measuring prediction accuracy using the proposed models. Results indicate that, for the maize and wheat data sets, our Bayesian models yielded, on average, a prediction accuracy that is 3% greater than that of standard Bayesian regression models, with less computational effort.

  12. Inverse modeling for heat conduction problem in human abdominal phantom.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming; Chen, Wenxi

    2011-01-01

    Noninvasive methods for deep body temperature measurement are based on the principle of heat equilibrium between the thermal sensor and the target location theoretically. However, the measurement position is not able to be definitely determined. In this study, a 2-dimensional mathematical model was built based upon some assumptions for the physiological condition of the human abdomen phantom. We evaluated the feasibility in estimating the internal organs temperature distribution from the readings of the temperature sensors arranged on the skin surface. It is a typical inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP), and is usually mathematically ill-posed. In this study, by integrating some physical and physiological a-priori information, we invoked the quasi-linear (QL) method to reconstruct the internal temperature distribution. The solutions of this method were improved by increasing the accuracy of the sensors and adjusting their arrangement on the outer surface, and eventually reached the state of converging at the best state accurately. This study suggests that QL method is able to reconstruct the internal temperature distribution in this phantom and might be worthy of a further study in an anatomical based model.

  13. Parameter Identification Of Multilayer Thermal Insulation By Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenarokomov, Aleksey V.; Alifanov, Oleg M.; Gonzalez, Vivaldo M.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce an iterative regularization method in the research of radiative and thermal properties of materials with further applications in the design of Thermal Control Systems (TCS) of spacecrafts. In this paper the radiative and thermal properties (heat capacity, emissivity and thermal conductance) of a multilayered thermal-insulating blanket (MLI), which is a screen-vacuum thermal insulation as a part of the (TCS) for perspective spacecrafts, are estimated. Properties of the materials under study are determined in the result of temperature and heat flux measurement data processing based on the solution of the Inverse Heat Transfer Problem (IHTP) technique. Given are physical and mathematical models of heat transfer processes in a specimen of the multilayered thermal-insulating blanket located in the experimental facility. A mathematical formulation of the IHTP, based on sensitivity function approach, is presented too. The practical testing was performed for specimen of the real MLI. This paper consists of recent researches, which developed the approach suggested at [1].

  14. Solving Inverse Detection Problems Using Passive Radiation Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.; Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Vaquer, Pablo A.

    2012-08-15

    The ability to reconstruct an unknown radioactive object based on its passive gamma-ray and neutron signatures is very important in homeland security applications. Often in the analysis of unknown radioactive objects, for simplicity or speed or because there is no other information, they are modeled as spherically symmetric regardless of their actual geometry. In these presentation we discuss the accuracy and implications of this approximation for decay gamma rays and for neutron-induced gamma rays. We discuss an extension of spherical raytracing (for uncollided fluxes) that allows it to be used when the exterior shielding is flat or cylindrical. We revisit some early results in boundary perturbation theory, showing that the Roussopolos estimate is the correct one to use when the quantity of interest is the flux or leakage on the boundary. We apply boundary perturbation theory to problems in which spherically symmetric systems are perturbed in asymmetric nonspherical ways. We apply mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithms to object reconstructions. We present a benchmark test set that may be used to quantitatively evaluate inverse detection methods.

  15. Inverse problems of combined photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbau, Peter; Mindrinos, Leonidas; Scherzer, Otmar

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) are emerging non-invasive biological and medical imaging techniques. It is a recent trend in experimental science to design experiments that perform PAT and OCT imaging at once. In this paper we present a mathematical model describing the dual experiment. Since OCT is mathematically modelled by Maxwell's equations or some simplifications of it, whereas the light propagation in quantitative photoacoustics is modelled by (simplifications of) the radiative transfer equation, the first step in the derivation of a mathematical model of the dual experiment is to obtain a unified mathematical description, which in our case are Maxwell's equations. As a by-product we therefore derive a new mathematical model of photoacoustic tomography based on Maxwell's equations. It is well known by now, that without additional assumptions on the medium, it is not possible to uniquely reconstruct all optical parameters from either one of these modalities alone. We show that in the combined approach one has additional information, compared to a single modality, and the inverse problem of reconstruction of the optical parameters becomes feasible.

  16. Beamforming through regularized inverse problems in ultrasound medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Szasz, Teodora; Basarab, Adrian; Kouame, Denis

    2016-09-13

    Beamforming in ultrasound imaging has significant impact on the quality of the final image, controlling its resolution and contrast. Despite its low spatial resolution and contrast, delay-and-sum is still extensively used nowadays in clinical applications, due to its real-time capabilities. The most common alternatives are minimum variance method and its variants, which overcome the drawbacks of delay-and-sum, at the cost of higher computational complexity that limits its utilization in real-time applications. In this paper, we propose to perform beamforming in ultrasound imaging through a regularized inverse problem based on a linear model relating the reflected echoes to the signal to be recovered. Our approach presents two major advantages: i) its flexibility in the choice of statistical assumptions on the signal to be beamformed (Laplacian and Gaussian statistics are tested herein) and ii) its robustness to a reduced number of pulse emissions. The proposed framework is flexible and allows for choosing the right trade-off between noise suppression and sharpness of the resulted image. We illustrate the performance of our approach on both simulated and experimental data, with in vivo examples of carotid and thyroid. Compared to delay-and-sum, minimimum variance and two other recently published beamforming techniques, our method offers better spatial resolution, respectively contrast, when using Laplacian and Gaussian priors.

  17. Solvability of certain inverse problems for the nonstationary kinetic transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, N. P.

    2016-09-01

    Linear and nonlinear inverse problems for the nonstationary multispeed anisotropic kinetic transport equation are studied. Sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of weak solutions to these problems in various function spaces are found. The proofs of the corresponding theorems imply that solutions of the inverse problems under study can be obtained by applying the method of successive approximations.

  18. Explicit Solutions for a Class of Nonlinear PDE that Arise in Allocation Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-12

    approximations for allocation and occupancy problems one must solve a deterministic optimal control problem (or equiv- alently, a calculus of variations...to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 12 MAY 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3...significant underlying simplification. In the first example it is the fact that the value function for the control problem is expected to be quadratic

  19. Numerical methods for problems involving the Drazin inverse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C. D., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The objective was to try to develop a useful numerical algorithm for the Drazin inverse and to analyze the numerical aspects of the applications of the Drazin inverse relating to the study of homogeneous Markov chains and systems of linear differential equations with singular coefficient matrices. It is felt that all objectives were accomplished with a measurable degree of success.

  20. Definition and solution of a stochastic inverse problem for the Manning’s n parameter field in hydrodynamic models

    DOE PAGES

    Butler, Troy; Graham, L.; Estep, D.; ...

    2015-02-03

    The uncertainty in spatially heterogeneous Manning’s n fields is quantified using a novel formulation and numerical solution of stochastic inverse problems for physics-based models. The uncertainty is quantified in terms of a probability measure and the physics-based model considered here is the state-of-the-art ADCIRC model although the presented methodology applies to other hydrodynamic models. An accessible overview of the formulation and solution of the stochastic inverse problem in a mathematically rigorous framework based on measure theory is presented in this paper. Technical details that arise in practice by applying the framework to determine the Manning’s n parameter field in amore » shallow water equation model used for coastal hydrodynamics are presented and an efficient computational algorithm and open source software package are developed. A new notion of “condition” for the stochastic inverse problem is defined and analyzed as it relates to the computation of probabilities. Finally, this notion of condition is investigated to determine effective output quantities of interest of maximum water elevations to use for the inverse problem for the Manning’s n parameter and the effect on model predictions is analyzed.« less

  1. Definition and solution of a stochastic inverse problem for the Manning’s n parameter field in hydrodynamic models

    PubMed Central

    Butler, T.; Graham, L.; Estep, D.; Westerink, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    The uncertainty in spatially heterogeneous Manning’s n fields is quantified using a novel formulation and numerical solution of stochastic inverse problems for physics-based models. The uncertainty is quantified in terms of a probability measure and the physics-based model considered here is the state-of-the-art ADCIRC model although the presented methodology applies to other hydrodynamic models. An accessible overview of the formulation and solution of the stochastic inverse problem in a mathematically rigorous framework based on measure theory is presented. Technical details that arise in practice by applying the framework to determine the Manning’s n parameter field in a shallow water equation model used for coastal hydrodynamics are presented and an efficient computational algorithm and open source software package are developed. A new notion of “condition” for the stochastic inverse problem is defined and analyzed as it relates to the computation of probabilities. This notion of condition is investigated to determine effective output quantities of interest of maximum water elevations to use for the inverse problem for the Manning’s n parameter and the effect on model predictions is analyzed. PMID:25937695

  2. Definition and solution of a stochastic inverse problem for the Manning's n parameter field in hydrodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Butler, T; Graham, L; Estep, D; Dawson, C; Westerink, J J

    2015-04-01

    The uncertainty in spatially heterogeneous Manning's n fields is quantified using a novel formulation and numerical solution of stochastic inverse problems for physics-based models. The uncertainty is quantified in terms of a probability measure and the physics-based model considered here is the state-of-the-art ADCIRC model although the presented methodology applies to other hydrodynamic models. An accessible overview of the formulation and solution of the stochastic inverse problem in a mathematically rigorous framework based on measure theory is presented. Technical details that arise in practice by applying the framework to determine the Manning's n parameter field in a shallow water equation model used for coastal hydrodynamics are presented and an efficient computational algorithm and open source software package are developed. A new notion of "condition" for the stochastic inverse problem is defined and analyzed as it relates to the computation of probabilities. This notion of condition is investigated to determine effective output quantities of interest of maximum water elevations to use for the inverse problem for the Manning's n parameter and the effect on model predictions is analyzed.

  3. Definition and solution of a stochastic inverse problem for the Manning's n parameter field in hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T.; Graham, L.; Estep, D.; Dawson, C.; Westerink, J. J.

    2015-04-01

    The uncertainty in spatially heterogeneous Manning's n fields is quantified using a novel formulation and numerical solution of stochastic inverse problems for physics-based models. The uncertainty is quantified in terms of a probability measure and the physics-based model considered here is the state-of-the-art ADCIRC model although the presented methodology applies to other hydrodynamic models. An accessible overview of the formulation and solution of the stochastic inverse problem in a mathematically rigorous framework based on measure theory is presented. Technical details that arise in practice by applying the framework to determine the Manning's n parameter field in a shallow water equation model used for coastal hydrodynamics are presented and an efficient computational algorithm and open source software package are developed. A new notion of "condition" for the stochastic inverse problem is defined and analyzed as it relates to the computation of probabilities. This notion of condition is investigated to determine effective output quantities of interest of maximum water elevations to use for the inverse problem for the Manning's n parameter and the effect on model predictions is analyzed.

  4. Children's strategies to solving additive inverse problems: a preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Meixia; Auxter, Abbey E.

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies show that elementary school children generally "lack" formal understanding of inverse relations. This study goes beyond lack to explore what children might "have" in their existing conception. A total of 281 students, kindergarten to third grade, were recruited to respond to a questionnaire that involved both contextual and non-contextual tasks on inverse relations, requiring both computational and explanatory skills. Results showed that children demonstrated better performance in computation than explanation. However, many students' explanations indicated that they did not necessarily utilize inverse relations for computation. Rather, they appeared to possess partial understanding, as evidenced by their use of part-whole structure, which is a key to understanding inverse relations. A close inspection of children's solution strategies further revealed that the sophistication of children's conception of part-whole structure varied in representation use and unknown quantity recognition, which suggests rich opportunities to develop students' understanding of inverse relations in lower elementary classrooms.

  5. Children's strategies to solving additive inverse problems: a preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Meixia; Auxter, Abbey E.

    2017-03-01

    Prior studies show that elementary school children generally "lack" formal understanding of inverse relations. This study goes beyond lack to explore what children might "have" in their existing conception. A total of 281 students, kindergarten to third grade, were recruited to respond to a questionnaire that involved both contextual and non-contextual tasks on inverse relations, requiring both computational and explanatory skills. Results showed that children demonstrated better performance in computation than explanation. However, many students' explanations indicated that they did not necessarily utilize inverse relations for computation. Rather, they appeared to possess partial understanding, as evidenced by their use of part-whole structure, which is a key to understanding inverse relations. A close inspection of children's solution strategies further revealed that the sophistication of children's conception of part-whole structure varied in representation use and unknown quantity recognition, which suggests rich opportunities to develop students' understanding of inverse relations in lower elementary classrooms.

  6. New optimization problems arising in modelling of 2D-crystal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, Yury; Lurie, Sergey; Posypkin, Mikhail

    2016-10-01

    The paper considers the problem of finding the structure of a fragment of two-dimensional crystal lattice with the minimal energy. Atoms in a lattice reside on parallel lines (layers). The interatomic distances are the same within one layer but can differ for distinct layers. The energy of the piece of material is computed using so-called potential functions. We used Lennard-Jones, Morse and Tersoff potentials. The proposed formulation can serve as a scalable complex non-smooth optimization test. The paper evaluates various optimization techniques for the problem under consideration, compares their performances and draws the conclusion about the best choice of optimization methods for the problem under test. As a result we were able to locate minima meaningful from the physical point of view, e.g. reproducing graphene lattice.

  7. Inverse transient heat conduction problems and identification of thermal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchonouglo, K.; Banna, M.; Vallée, C.; Dupré, J.-C.

    2008-04-01

    This work deals with the estimation of polymers properties. An inverse analysis based on finite element method is applied to identify simultaneously the constants thermal conductivity and heat capacity per unit volume. The inverse method algorithm constructed is validated from simulated transient temperature recording taken at several locations on the surface of the solid. Transient temperature measures taped with infrared camera on polymers were used for identifying the thermal properties. The results show an excellent agreement between manufacturer and identified values.

  8. Numerical Solution of an Ill-Posed Problem Arising in Wind Tunnel Heat Transfer Data Reduction,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-04

    Solutions of Ill - Posed Problems , A. H. Winston and Sons, 1977 . 6. Widder, D. V., The Heat Equation, Academic Press. 7. Richtmyer, R. D. and...DEC Al J B BELL. A B WAROLAW UNCLASSI ESWC WC/TR2l3lSBI.ADF5 046NL U" ~ a5 11111.5 N NSWC TR 82-32 cNUMERICAL SOLUTION OF AN ILL - POSED PROBLEM ...is ill - posed . A Tikhonov regularization procedure5 is then used to compute stable approximate solutions to the integral equation. In the

  9. Dimensionality reduction and polynomial chaos acceleration of Bayesian inference in inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Marzouk, Youssef M. Najm, Habib N.

    2009-04-01

    We consider a Bayesian approach to nonlinear inverse problems in which the unknown quantity is a spatial or temporal field, endowed with a hierarchical Gaussian process prior. Computational challenges in this construction arise from the need for repeated evaluations of the forward model (e.g., in the context of Markov chain Monte Carlo) and are compounded by high dimensionality of the posterior. We address these challenges by introducing truncated Karhunen-Loeve expansions, based on the prior distribution, to efficiently parameterize the unknown field and to specify a stochastic forward problem whose solution captures that of the deterministic forward model over the support of the prior. We seek a solution of this problem using Galerkin projection on a polynomial chaos basis, and use the solution to construct a reduced-dimensionality surrogate posterior density that is inexpensive to evaluate. We demonstrate the formulation on a transient diffusion equation with prescribed source terms, inferring the spatially-varying diffusivity of the medium from limited and noisy data.

  10. A variational Bayesian approach for inverse problems with skew-t error distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Nilabja; Wu, Xiaoqing; Efendiev, Yalchin; Jin, Bangti; Mallick, Bani K.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we develop a novel robust Bayesian approach to inverse problems with data errors following a skew-t distribution. A hierarchical Bayesian model is developed in the inverse problem setup. The Bayesian approach contains a natural mechanism for regularization in the form of a prior distribution, and a LASSO type prior distribution is used to strongly induce sparseness. We propose a variational type algorithm by minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the true posterior distribution and a separable approximation. The proposed method is illustrated on several two-dimensional linear and nonlinear inverse problems, e.g. Cauchy problem and permeability estimation problem.

  11. The inverse scattering problem for a discrete Sturm-Liouville equation on the line

    SciTech Connect

    Khanmamedov, Agil Kh

    2011-07-31

    This paper investigates the inverse scattering problem for a discrete Sturm-Liouville equation on the entire line with coefficients that stabilize to zero in one direction. We derive a necessary and a sufficient condition on the scattering data so that the inverse problem is uniquely solvable. Bibliography: 23 titles.

  12. Uniqueness and Lipschitz stability of an inverse boundary value problem for time-harmonic elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Elena; de Hoop, Maarten V.; Francini, Elisa; Vessella, Sergio; Zhai, Jian

    2017-03-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining the Lamé parameters and the density of a three-dimensional elastic body from the local time-harmonic Dirichlet-to-Neumann map. We prove uniqueness and Lipschitz stability of this inverse problem when the Lamé parameters and the density are assumed to be piecewise constant on a given domain partition.

  13. On complex roots of an equation arising in the oblique derivative problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, A. B.; Sherstyukov, V. B.

    2017-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the eigenvalue problem for the Laplace operator in a disc under the condition that the oblique derivative vanishes on the disc boundary. In a famous article by V.A. Il’in and E.I. Moiseev (Differential equations, 1994) it was found, in particular, that the root of any equation of the form with the Bessel function Jn (μ) determines the eigenvalue λ = μ 2 of the problem. In our work we correct the information about the location of eigenvalues. It is specified explicit view of the corner, containing all the eigenvalues. It is shown that all the nonzero roots of the equation are simple and given a refined description of the set of their localization on the complex plane. To prove these facts we use the partial differential equations methods and also methods of entire functions theory.

  14. An optimal control problem arising from a dengue disease transmission model.

    PubMed

    Aldila, Dipo; Götz, Thomas; Soewono, Edy

    2013-03-01

    An optimal control problem for a host-vector Dengue transmission model is discussed here. In the model, treatments with mosquito repellent are given to adults and children and those who undergo treatment are classified in treated compartments. With this classification, the model consists of 11 dynamic equations. The basic reproductive ratio that represents the epidemic indicator is obtained from the largest eigenvalue of the next generation matrix. The optimal control problem is designed with four control parameters, namely the treatment rates for children and adult compartments, and the drop-out rates from both compartments. The cost functional accounts for the total number of the infected persons, the cost of the treatment, and the cost related to reducing the drop-out rates. Numerical results for the optimal controls and the related dynamics are shown for the case of epidemic prevention and outbreak reduction strategies.

  15. Reinforcement learning solution for HJB equation arising in constrained optimal control problem.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Wu, Huai-Ning; Huang, Tingwen; Liu, Derong

    2015-11-01

    The constrained optimal control problem depends on the solution of the complicated Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation (HJBE). In this paper, a data-based off-policy reinforcement learning (RL) method is proposed, which learns the solution of the HJBE and the optimal control policy from real system data. One important feature of the off-policy RL is that its policy evaluation can be realized with data generated by other behavior policies, not necessarily the target policy, which solves the insufficient exploration problem. The convergence of the off-policy RL is proved by demonstrating its equivalence to the successive approximation approach. Its implementation procedure is based on the actor-critic neural networks structure, where the function approximation is conducted with linearly independent basis functions. Subsequently, the convergence of the implementation procedure with function approximation is also proved. Finally, its effectiveness is verified through computer simulations.

  16. Usefulness of precordial T-wave inversion to distinguish arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy from idiopathic ventricular tachycardia arising from the right ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed

    Morin, Daniel P; Mauer, Andreas C; Gear, Kathleen; Zareba, Wojciech; Markowitz, Steven M; Marcus, Frank I; Lerman, Bruce B

    2010-06-15

    The 2 predominant causes of ventricular tachycardia (VT) arising from the right ventricle are arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and idiopathic VT arising from the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT). These arrhythmias can be adrenergically mediated and may be difficult to distinguish clinically. A minor criterion for the diagnosis of ARVC is T-wave inversion (TWI) in the right precordial leads during sinus rhythm. However, there have been reports of precordial TWI identified in patients with RVOT tachycardia. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patterns of precordial TWI could differentiate between the 2 groups. A multicenter registry of 229 patients with VT of right ventricular origin was evaluated. After appropriate exclusions (n = 29), 79 patients (58% men, mean age 40 +/- 14 years) had ARVC, and 121 patients (41% men, mean age 48 +/- 14 years) had RVOT tachycardia. During sinus rhythm, 37 patients (47%) with ARVC and 5 patients (4%) with RVOT tachycardia had TWI in leads V(1) to V(3). For the diagnosis of ARVC, TWI in leads V(1) to V(3) had sensitivity of 47% and specificity of 96%. In conclusion, in patients with VT of right ventricular origin, the presence of TWI in electrocardiographic leads V(1) to V(3) supports the diagnosis of ARVC.

  17. Usefulness of Precordial T-Wave Inversion to Distinguish Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy from Idiopathic Ventricular Tachycardia Arising from the Right Ventricular Outflow Tract

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Daniel P.; Mauer, Andreas C.; Gear, Kathleen; Zareba, Wojciech; Markowitz, Steven M.; Marcus, Frank I.; Lerman, Bruce B.

    2010-01-01

    The 2 predominant etiologies of right ventricular tachycardia (VT) are arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and idiopathic VT arising from the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT). Both of these arrhythmias can be adrenergically mediated and may be difficult to distinguish clinically. A minor criterion for the diagnosis of ARVC is T wave inversion (TWI) in the right precordial leads during sinus rhythm. However, there have been reports of precordial TWI identified in patients with RVOT tachycardia. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patterns of precordial TWI could differentiate between the two groups. We evaluated a multicenter registry of 229 patients with VT of right ventricular origin. After appropriate exclusions (n=29), 79 patients (58% M, 40±14y) had ARVC, and 121 patients (41% M, 48±14y) had RVOT tachycardia. During sinus rhythm, 37/79 (47%) patients with ARVC and 5/121 (4%) patients with RVOT tachycardia had T-wave inversion in leads V1-V3. For the diagnosis of ARVC, TWI in leads V1-V3 had a sensitivity of 47% and a specificity of 96%. In conclusion, in patients with VT of RV origin, the presence of TWI in electrocardiogram leads V1-V3 supports the diagnosis of ARVC. PMID:20538137

  18. The inverse scattering problem at fixed angular momentum for nonlocal separable interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadan, K.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of inverse scattering at fixed angular momentum is considered. The problem is particularized to the case of nonlocal separable interactions. A brief survey of the inverse problem for nonlocal separable interactions is presented. This problem can be solved exactly by integration. It amounts to solving singular integral equations of the Hilbert-Mushkhelishvili type, which have been studied extensively in the past and appear in many areas of physics, including theory of elasticity and dispersions relations in high energy physics.

  19. Model error estimation and correction by solving a inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Haile

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the weather forecasts and climate predictions are increasingly relied on numerical models. Yet, errors inevitably exist in model due to the imperfect numeric and parameterizations. From the practical point of view, model correction is an efficient strategy. Despite of the different complexity of forecast error correction algorithms, the general idea is to estimate the forecast errors by considering the NWP as a direct problem. Chou (1974) suggested an alternative view by considering the NWP as an inverse problem. The model error tendency term (ME) due to the model deficiency is assumed as an unknown term in NWP model, which can be discretized into short intervals (for example 6 hour) and considered as a constant or linear form in each interval. Given the past re-analyses and NWP model, the discretized MEs in the past intervals can be solved iteratively as a constant or linear-increased tendency term in each interval. These MEs can be further used as the online corrections. In this study, an iterative method for obtaining the MEs in past intervals was presented, and its convergence had been confirmed with sets of experiments in the global forecast system of the Global and Regional Assimilation and Prediction System (GRAPES-GFS) for July-August (JA) 2009 and January-February (JF) 2010. Then these MEs were used to get online model corretions based of systematic errors of GRAPES-GFS for July 2009 and January 2010. The data sets associated with initial condition and sea surface temperature (SST) used in this study are both based on NCEP final (FNL) data. According to the iterative numerical experiments, the following key conclusions can be drawn:(1) Batches of iteration test results indicated that the hour 6 forecast errors were reduced to 10% of their original value after 20 steps of iteration.(2) By offlinely comparing the error corrections estimated by MEs to the mean forecast errors, the patterns of estimated errors were considered to agree well with those

  20. Application of spectral Lanczos decomposition method to large scale problems arising geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Tamarchenko, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents an application of Spectral Lanczos Decomposition Method (SLDM) to numerical modeling of electromagnetic diffusion and elastic waves propagation in inhomogeneous media. SLDM approximates an action of a matrix function as a linear combination of basis vectors in Krylov subspace. I applied the method to model electromagnetic fields in three-dimensions and elastic waves in two dimensions. The finite-difference approximation of the spatial part of differential operator reduces the initial boundary-value problem to a system of ordinary differential equations with respect to time. The solution to this system requires calculating exponential and sine/cosine functions of the stiffness matrices. Large scale numerical examples are in a good agreement with the theoretical error bounds and stability estimates given by Druskin, Knizhnerman, 1987.

  1. Approximate Series Solution of Nonlinear Singular Boundary Value Problems Arising in Physiology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an efficient recursive scheme based on Adomian decomposition method (ADM) for solving nonlinear singular boundary value problems. This approach is based on a modification of the ADM; here we use all the boundary conditions to derive an integral equation before establishing the recursive scheme for the solution components. In fact, we develop the recursive scheme without any undetermined coefficients while computing the solution components. Unlike the classical ADM, the proposed method avoids solving a sequence of nonlinear algebraic or transcendental equations for the undetermined coefficients. The approximate solution is obtained in the form of series with easily calculable components. The uniqueness of the solution is discussed. The convergence and error analysis of the proposed method are also established. The accuracy and reliability of the proposed method are examined by four numerical examples. PMID:24707221

  2. An inverse problem strategy based on forward model evaluations: Gradient-based optimization without adjoint solves

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilo Valentin, Miguel Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a new nonlinear programming formulation for the solution of inverse problems. First, a general inverse problem formulation based on the compliance error functional is presented. The proposed error functional enables the computation of the Lagrange multipliers, and thus the first order derivative information, at the expense of just one model evaluation. Therefore, the calculation of the Lagrange multipliers does not require the solution of the computationally intensive adjoint problem. This leads to significant speedups for large-scale, gradient-based inverse problems.

  3. Children's Strategies to Solving Additive Inverse Problems: A Preliminary Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Meixia; Auxter, Abbey E

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies show that elementary school children generally "lack" formal understanding of inverse relations. This study goes beyond lack to explore what children might "have" in their existing conception. A total of 281 students, kindergarten to third grade, were recruited to respond to a questionnaire that involved both…

  4. [Current problems arising from not having biosafety level 4 laboratories in Japan--qualitative study of infectious disease experts].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuko; Horiguchi, Itsuko; Marui, Eiji

    2009-09-01

    No public consensus exists yet on handling Biosafety Level 4 agents and no laboratory is operational at BSL4 in Japan. A discussion that includes neighboring residents and experts should be initiated to communicate risks. In this article, we present the current situation and prioritize problems we presently face. A three-stage Delphi survey was conducted. The subjects were twenty-two persons with extensive experience and knowledge of infectious diseases. Seven projections and issues were made with regard to the problems arising from the lack of an operational BSL4 laboratory. These were tabulated by the KJ method. The top seven projections were scored, such that the top received 7 points and the last received 1 point. A total of 51 projections were obtained for the first part of the survey, 39 for the second, and 29 for the last. The projection with the highest score was that it is impossible to cope with newly emerging infectious diseases. The second was that complete diagnoses are impossible without a BSL4 laboratory. All projections and issues were divided into the following four main groups: issues for researchers and laboratory staff, clinical practice and research on BSL4 agents, domestic and global security, and Japan's international position. We clarified possible problem arising from not having BSL4 laboratories in Japan. The identification of projections by the Delphi survey in this study should be considered as one of many attempts to develop effective risk communication strategies.

  5. Graph coarsening methods for Karush-Kuhn-Tucker matrices arising in orthogonal collocation of optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Begum

    A state-defect constraint pairing graph coarsening method is described for improving computational efficiency during the numerical factorization of large sparse Karush-Kuhn-Tucker matrices that arise from the discretization of optimal control problems via a Legendre-Gauss-Radau orthogonal collocation method. The method takes advantage of the particular sparse structure of the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker matrix that arises from the orthogonal collocation method. The state-defect constraint pairing graph coarsening method pairs each component of the state with its corresponding defect constraint and forces paired rows to be adjacent in the reordered Karush-Kuhn-Tucker matrix. Aggregate state-defect constraint pairing results are presented using a wide variety of benchmark optimal control problems where it is found that the proposed state-defect constraint pairing graph coarsening method significantly reduces both the number of delayed pivots and the number of floating point operations and increases the computational efficiency by performing more floating point operations per unit time. It is then shown that the state-defect constraint pairing graph coarsening method is less effective on Karush-Kuhn-Tucker matrices arising from Legendre-Gauss-Radau collocation when the optimal control problem contains state and control equality path constraints because such matrices may have delayed pivots that correspond to both defect and path constraints. An unweighted alternate graph coarsening method that employs maximal matching and a weighted alternate graph coarsening method that employs Hungarian algorithm on a weighting matrix are then used to attempt to further reduce the number of delayed pivots. It is found, however, that these alternate graph coarsening methods provide no further advantage over the state-defect constraint pairing graph coarsening method.

  6. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  7. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  8. Problems Arising from Current Trends in Propulsion System Design and Guidance Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, George H., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Mission requirements in various NASA programs dictate the necessity for high reliability, continual and chronic increases in payload capability, and precise injection into the prescribed orbit. In some vehicles, concepts employed to meet these criteria in the areas of guidance and propulsion have been found to be somewhat in conflict. For the express purpose of increasing reliability, the primary emphasis in engine and feed design has been placed on simplification including the removal of control systems. In the guidance area considerable attention has been given to the development of methods of implementation which allow complete reshaping of the pitch program if the stage should perform at some level other than predicted. In such a guidance scheme the assumption is made that observed differences in performance levels are constant throughout flight. In the absence of propulsion control systems, however, some oscillations about a mean value representative of the shift can be expected. Analyses showed that this occurrence would severely limit the effectiveness of the Iterative Guidance Mode. The purpose of this paper is to deal with the definition, causes and cures of this problem.

  9. [Anaesthetic problems arising during the surgical correction of scoliosis (harrington chnique].

    PubMed

    Hack, G; Schraudebach, T; Rommelsheim, K; Freiberger, K U; Picht, U

    1976-04-01

    Anaesthesia for the surgical correction of scoliosis with the Harrington technique carries serious risks on account of the impaired cardiac and pulmonary function, the length of the operation, the area involved and the post-operative problems. Based on the experience gained in 32 young persons who had this operation the anaesthetic procedure for these cases is described: it comprises detailted pre- operative examination of cardiac and pulmonary function, continuous monitoring during the operation, a careful technique that takes into account the massive blood loss and stress associated with the operation, a careful technique that takes into account the massive blood loss and stress associated with the operation and close surveillance during the post-operative stage. Controlled hypotension (60 mm Hg) succeeded in reducing the blood loss during operation to 2,500 ml, compared with 4,500 ml without hypotension. If the pre-0perative examinations have established adequate cardiac function, if surgeon and anaesthetist work in close collaboration and if the heart action, pulse, arterial and venous pressure (catheter) and body temperature are continuously monitored, then controlled hypotension offers a means to reduce the, generally massive, blood loss during the surgical correction of scoliosis.

  10. Solving Non-parametric Inverse Problem in Continuous Markov Random Field Using Loopy Belief Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Muneki; Kataoka, Shun

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we address the inverse problem, or the statistical machine learning problem, in Markov random fields with a non-parametric pair-wise energy function with continuous variables. The inverse problem is formulated by maximum likelihood estimation. The exact treatment of maximum likelihood estimation is intractable because of two problems: (1) it includes the evaluation of the partition function and (2) it is formulated in the form of functional optimization. We avoid Problem (1) by using Bethe approximation. Bethe approximation is an approximation technique equivalent to the loopy belief propagation. Problem (2) can be solved by using orthonormal function expansion. Orthonormal function expansion can reduce a functional optimization problem to a function optimization problem. Our method can provide an analytic form of the solution of the inverse problem within the framework of Bethe approximation as a result of variational optimization.

  11. Global solution to a hyperbolic problem arising in the modeling of blood flow in circulatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Weihua; Clark, M. E.; Zhao, Meide; Curcio, Anthony

    2007-07-01

    This paper considers a system of first-order, hyperbolic, partial differential equations in the domain of a one-dimensional network. The system models the blood flow in human circulatory systems as an initial-boundary-value problem with boundary conditions of either algebraic or differential type. The differential equations are nonhomogeneous with frictional damping terms and the state variables are coupled at internal junctions. The existence and uniqueness of the local classical solution have been established in our earlier work [W. Ruan, M.E. Clark, M. Zhao, A. Curcio, A hyperbolic system of equations of blood flow in an arterial network, J. Appl. Math. 64 (2) (2003) 637-667; W. Ruan, M.E. Clark, M. Zhao, A. Curcio, Blood flow in a network, Nonlinear Anal. Real World Appl. 5 (2004) 463-485; W. Ruan, M.E. Clark, M. Zhao, A. Curcio, A quasilinear hyperbolic system that models blood flow in a network, in: Charles V. Benton (Ed.), Focus on Mathematical Physics Research, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., New York, 2004, pp. 203-230]. This paper continues the analysis and gives sufficient conditions for the global existence of the classical solution. We prove that the solution exists globally if the boundary data satisfy the dissipative condition (2.3) or (3.2), and the norms of the initial and forcing functions in a certain Sobolev space are sufficiently small. This is only the first step toward establishing the global existence of the solution to physiologically realistic models, because, in general, the chosen dissipative conditions (2.3) and (3.2) do not appear to hold for the originally proposed boundary conditions (1.3)-(1.12).

  12. Solution of an inverse scattering problem for the acoustic wave equation in three-dimensional media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional inverse scattering problem for the acoustic wave equation is studied. The task is to determine the density and acoustic impedance of a medium. A necessary and sufficient condition for the unique solvability of this problem is established in the form of an energy conservation law. The interpretation of the solution to the inverse problem and the construction of medium images are discussed.

  13. A boundary integral method for an inverse problem in thermal imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    An inverse problem in thermal imaging involving the recovery of a void in a material from its surface temperature response to external heating is examined. Uniqueness and continuous dependence results for the inverse problem are demonstrated, and a numerical method for its solution is developed. This method is based on an optimization approach, coupled with a boundary integral equation formulation of the forward heat conduction problem. Some convergence results for the method are proved, and several examples are presented using computationally generated data.

  14. Inverse problems in the design, modeling and testing of engineering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alifanov, Oleg M.

    1991-01-01

    Formulations, classification, areas of application, and approaches to solving different inverse problems are considered for the design of structures, modeling, and experimental data processing. Problems in the practical implementation of theoretical-experimental methods based on solving inverse problems are analyzed in order to identify mathematical models of physical processes, aid in input data preparation for design parameter optimization, help in design parameter optimization itself, and to model experiments, large-scale tests, and real tests of engineering systems.

  15. A PDE-Constrained Optimization Approach to Uncertainty in Inverse Problems with Applications to Inverse Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-12

    denotes the state, c the speed of sound, a viscous dissipation, and S the source term. If all variables are time- harmonic with a fixed angular...for the 2008 Gordon Bell Prize. • PI Ghattas gave the keynote talk at the 10th LCI International Conference on High- Performance Clustered Computing...diagonal of the inverse, adaptivity, and integration of all of these components within a particle filter methodology. In addition, our

  16. The Inverse Source Problem for Maxwell’s Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT...currents from surface electroencephalographic measurements. The application is to prosthesis control . 15. SUBJECT TERMS INVERSE, MAXWELL...measurements could be used to diagnose abnormalities in the brain and also to allow the control of prosthetic limbs. From the point of view of mathematical

  17. The incomplete inverse and its applications to the linear least squares problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morduch, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    A modified matrix product is explained, and it is shown that this product defiles a group whose inverse is called the incomplete inverse. It was proven that the incomplete inverse of an augmented normal matrix includes all the quantities associated with the least squares solution. An answer is provided to the problem that occurs when the data residuals are too large and when insufficient data to justify augmenting the model are available.

  18. Adapting a truly nonlinear filter to the ocean acoustic inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganse, Andrew A.; Odom, Robert I.

    2005-04-01

    Nonlinear inverse problems including the ocean acoustic problem have been solved by Monte Carlo, locally-linear, and filter based techniques such as the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). While these techniques do provide statistical information about the solution (e.g., mean and variance), each suffers from inherent limitations in their approach to nonlinear problems. Monte Carlo techniques are expensive to compute and do not contribute to intuitive interpretation of a problem, and locally-linear techniques (including the EKF) are limited by the multimodal objective landscape of nonlinear problems. A truly nonlinear filter, based on recent work in nonlinear tracking, estimates state information for a nonlinear problem in continual measurement updates and is adapted to solving nonlinear inverse problems. Additional terms derived from the system's state PDF are added to the mean and covariance of the solution to address the nonlinearities of the problem, and overall the technique offers improved performance in nonlinear inversion. [Work supported by ONR.

  19. Solving inverse problems with piecewise linear estimators: from Gaussian mixture models to structured sparsity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoshen; Sapiro, Guillermo; Mallat, Stéphane

    2012-05-01

    A general framework for solving image inverse problems with piecewise linear estimations is introduced in this paper. The approach is based on Gaussian mixture models, which are estimated via a maximum a posteriori expectation-maximization algorithm. A dual mathematical interpretation of the proposed framework with a structured sparse estimation is described, which shows that the resulting piecewise linear estimate stabilizes the estimation when compared with traditional sparse inverse problem techniques. We demonstrate that, in a number of image inverse problems, including interpolation, zooming, and deblurring of narrow kernels, the same simple and computationally efficient algorithm yields results in the same ballpark as that of the state of the art.

  20. Collage-based approaches for elliptic partial differential equations inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodzis, Michael; Kunze, Herb

    2017-01-01

    The collage method for inverse problems has become well-established in the literature in recent years. Initial work developed a collage theorem, based upon Banach's fixed point theorem, for treating inverse problems for ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Amongst the subsequent work was a generalized collage theorem, based upon the Lax-Milgram representation theorem, useful for treating inverse problems for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). Each of these two different approaches can be applied to elliptic PDEs in one space dimension. In this paper, we explore and compare how the two different approaches perform for the estimation of the diffusivity for a steady-state heat equation.

  1. A unified approach to the helioseismic forward and inverse problems of differential rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Lavely, Eugene M.

    1991-01-01

    A general, degenerate perturbation theoretic treatment of the helioseismic forward and inverse problem for solar differential rotation is presented. For the forward problem, differential rotation is represented as the axisymmetric component of a general toroidal flow field using velocity spherical harmonics. This approach allows each degree of differential rotation to be estimated independently from all other degrees. In the inverse problem, the splitting caused by differential rotation is expressed as an expansion in a set of orthonormal polynomials that are intimately related to the solution of the forward problem. The combined use of vector spherical harmonics as basis functions for differential ratio and the Clebsch-Gordon coefficients to represent splitting provides a unified approach to the forward and inverse problems of differential rotation which greatly simplify inversion.

  2. Combination of the LSQR method and a genetic algorithm for solving the electrocardiography inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mingfeng; Xia, Ling; Shou, Guofa; Tang, Min

    2007-03-07

    Computing epicardial potentials from body surface potentials constitutes one form of ill-posed inverse problem of electrocardiography (ECG). To solve this ECG inverse problem, the Tikhonov regularization and truncated singular-value decomposition (TSVD) methods have been commonly used to overcome the ill-posed property by imposing constraints on the magnitudes or derivatives of the computed epicardial potentials. Such direct regularization methods, however, are impractical when the transfer matrix is large. The least-squares QR (LSQR) method, one of the iterative regularization methods based on Lanczos bidiagonalization and QR factorization, has been shown to be numerically more reliable in various circumstances than the other methods considered. This LSQR method, however, to our knowledge, has not been introduced and investigated for the ECG inverse problem. In this paper, the regularization properties of the Krylov subspace iterative method of LSQR for solving the ECG inverse problem were investigated. Due to the 'semi-convergence' property of the LSQR method, the L-curve method was used to determine the stopping iteration number. The performance of the LSQR method for solving the ECG inverse problem was also evaluated based on a realistic heart-torso model simulation protocol. The results show that the inverse solutions recovered by the LSQR method were more accurate than those recovered by the Tikhonov and TSVD methods. In addition, by combing the LSQR with genetic algorithms (GA), the performance can be improved further. It suggests that their combination may provide a good scheme for solving the ECG inverse problem.

  3. Identification of weakly coupled multiphysics problems. Application to the inverse problem of electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrado, Cesare; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric; Moireau, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    This work addresses the inverse problem of electrocardiography from a new perspective, by combining electrical and mechanical measurements. Our strategy relies on the definition of a model of the electromechanical contraction which is registered on ECG data but also on measured mechanical displacements of the heart tissue typically extracted from medical images. In this respect, we establish in this work the convergence of a sequential estimator which combines for such coupled problems various state of the art sequential data assimilation methods in a unified consistent and efficient framework. Indeed, we aggregate a Luenberger observer for the mechanical state and a Reduced-Order Unscented Kalman Filter applied on the parameters to be identified and a POD projection of the electrical state. Then using synthetic data we show the benefits of our approach for the estimation of the electrical state of the ventricles along the heart beat compared with more classical strategies which only consider an electrophysiological model with ECG measurements. Our numerical results actually show that the mechanical measurements improve the identifiability of the electrical problem allowing to reconstruct the electrical state of the coupled system more precisely. Therefore, this work is intended to be a first proof of concept, with theoretical justifications and numerical investigations, of the advantage of using available multi-modal observations for the estimation and identification of an electromechanical model of the heart.

  4. Inverse problem approaches for stationary Fourier transform spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Frédéric; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Ferrec, Yann; Mugnier, Laurent; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Benoit, Céline; Guérineau, Nicolas; Taboury, Jean

    2011-07-01

    A design of a miniaturized stationary Fourier transform IR spectrometer has been developed that produces a two-dimensional interferogram. The latter is disturbed by effects like parasitic interferences or disparities in the cutoff wavelength of the pixels. Thus, a simple Fourier transform cannot be used to estimate the spectrum of the scene. However, as these defects are deterministic, they can be measured and taken into account by inversion methods. A regularization term can also be added. The first experimental results prove the efficiency of this processing methodology.

  5. PREFACE: The Second International Conference on Inverse Problems: Recent Theoretical Developments and Numerical Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jin; Hon, Yiu-Chung; Seo, Jin Keun; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Inverse Problems: Recent Theoretical Developments and Numerical Approaches was held at Fudan University, Shanghai from 16-21 June 2004. The first conference in this series was held at the City University of Hong Kong in January 2002 and it was agreed to hold the conference once every two years in a Pan-Pacific Asian country. The next conference is scheduled to be held at Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan in July 2006. The purpose of this series of biennial conferences is to establish and develop constant international collaboration, especially among the Pan-Pacific Asian countries. In recent decades, interest in inverse problems has been flourishing all over the globe because of both the theoretical interest and practical requirements. In particular, in Asian countries, one is witnessing remarkable new trends of research in inverse problems as well as the participation of many young talents. Considering these trends, the second conference was organized with the chairperson Professor Li Tat-tsien (Fudan University), in order to provide forums for developing research cooperation and to promote activities in the field of inverse problems. Because solutions to inverse problems are needed in various applied fields, we entertained a total of 92 participants at the second conference and arranged various talks which ranged from mathematical analyses to solutions of concrete inverse problems in the real world. This volume contains 18 selected papers, all of which have undergone peer review. The 18 papers are classified as follows: Surveys: four papers give reviews of specific inverse problems. Theoretical aspects: six papers investigate the uniqueness, stability, and reconstruction schemes. Numerical methods: four papers devise new numerical methods and their applications to inverse problems. Solutions to applied inverse problems: four papers discuss concrete inverse problems such as scattering problems and inverse problems in

  6. An adaptive large neighborhood search heuristic for Two-Echelon Vehicle Routing Problems arising in city logistics

    PubMed Central

    Hemmelmayr, Vera C.; Cordeau, Jean-François; Crainic, Teodor Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive large neighborhood search heuristic for the Two-Echelon Vehicle Routing Problem (2E-VRP) and the Location Routing Problem (LRP). The 2E-VRP arises in two-level transportation systems such as those encountered in the context of city logistics. In such systems, freight arrives at a major terminal and is shipped through intermediate satellite facilities to the final customers. The LRP can be seen as a special case of the 2E-VRP in which vehicle routing is performed only at the second level. We have developed new neighborhood search operators by exploiting the structure of the two problem classes considered and have also adapted existing operators from the literature. The operators are used in a hierarchical scheme reflecting the multi-level nature of the problem. Computational experiments conducted on several sets of instances from the literature show that our algorithm outperforms existing solution methods for the 2E-VRP and achieves excellent results on the LRP. PMID:23483764

  7. An adaptive large neighborhood search heuristic for Two-Echelon Vehicle Routing Problems arising in city logistics.

    PubMed

    Hemmelmayr, Vera C; Cordeau, Jean-François; Crainic, Teodor Gabriel

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive large neighborhood search heuristic for the Two-Echelon Vehicle Routing Problem (2E-VRP) and the Location Routing Problem (LRP). The 2E-VRP arises in two-level transportation systems such as those encountered in the context of city logistics. In such systems, freight arrives at a major terminal and is shipped through intermediate satellite facilities to the final customers. The LRP can be seen as a special case of the 2E-VRP in which vehicle routing is performed only at the second level. We have developed new neighborhood search operators by exploiting the structure of the two problem classes considered and have also adapted existing operators from the literature. The operators are used in a hierarchical scheme reflecting the multi-level nature of the problem. Computational experiments conducted on several sets of instances from the literature show that our algorithm outperforms existing solution methods for the 2E-VRP and achieves excellent results on the LRP.

  8. The inverse problem of constructing a gravimetric geoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlotnicki, V.; Parsons, B.; Wunsch, C.

    1982-01-01

    Computation of a single geoidal height from gravity acceleration data formally requires that the latter be known everywhere on the earth. A computational procedure based on linear inverse theory for estimating geoidal heights from incomplete sets of data is presented. The same scheme can be used to estimate gravity accelerations from altimetry-derived geoids. The systematic error owing to lack of data and the choice of a particular inverse operator is described by using resolution functions and their spherical harmonic expansions. An rms value of this error is also estimated by assuming a spectrum for the unknown geoid. The influence of the size of the data region, the spacing between data, the filtering applied to the data, and the model weighting function chosen are all quantified in a spherical geometry. The examples presented show that when low degree spherical harmonic coefficients are available - from satellite orbit analysis - a band-passed version of the geoid can be constructed from local gravity data, even with a relatively restricted data set.

  9. Comparing hard and soft prior bounds in geophysical inverse problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1987-01-01

    In linear inversion of a finite-dimensional data vector y to estimate a finite-dimensional prediction vector z, prior information about X sub E is essential if y is to supply useful limits for z. The one exception occurs when all the prediction functionals are linear combinations of the data functionals. Two forms of prior information are compared: a soft bound on X sub E is a probability distribution p sub x on X which describeds the observer's opinion about where X sub E is likely to be in X; a hard bound on X sub E is an inequality Q sub x(X sub E, X sub E) is equal to or less than 1, where Q sub x is a positive definite quadratic form on X. A hard bound Q sub x can be softened to many different probability distributions p sub x, but all these p sub x's carry much new information about X sub E which is absent from Q sub x, and some information which contradicts Q sub x. Both stochastic inversion (SI) and Bayesian inference (BI) estimate z from y and a soft prior bound p sub x. If that probability distribution was obtained by softening a hard prior bound Q sub x, rather than by objective statistical inference independent of y, then p sub x contains so much unsupported new information absent from Q sub x that conclusions about z obtained with SI or BI would seen to be suspect.

  10. Average synaptic activity and neural networks topology: a global inverse problem

    PubMed Central

    Burioni, Raffaella; Casartelli, Mario; di Volo, Matteo; Livi, Roberto; Vezzani, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of neural networks is often characterized by collective behavior and quasi-synchronous events, where a large fraction of neurons fire in short time intervals, separated by uncorrelated firing activity. These global temporal signals are crucial for brain functioning. They strongly depend on the topology of the network and on the fluctuations of the connectivity. We propose a heterogeneous mean–field approach to neural dynamics on random networks, that explicitly preserves the disorder in the topology at growing network sizes, and leads to a set of self-consistent equations. Within this approach, we provide an effective description of microscopic and large scale temporal signals in a leaky integrate-and-fire model with short term plasticity, where quasi-synchronous events arise. Our equations provide a clear analytical picture of the dynamics, evidencing the contributions of both periodic (locked) and aperiodic (unlocked) neurons to the measurable average signal. In particular, we formulate and solve a global inverse problem of reconstructing the in-degree distribution from the knowledge of the average activity field. Our method is very general and applies to a large class of dynamical models on dense random networks. PMID:24613973

  11. Two reconstruction procedures for a 3D phaseless inverse scattering problem for the generalized Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klibanov, Michael V.; Romanov, Vladimir G.

    2016-01-01

    The 3D inverse scattering problem of the reconstruction of the unknown dielectric permittivity in the generalized Helmholtz equation is considered. Applications are in imaging of nanostructures and biological cells. The main difference with the conventional inverse scattering problems is that only the modulus of the scattering wave field is measured. The phase is not measured. The initializing wave field is the incident plane wave. On the other hand, in the previous recent works of the authors about the ‘phaseless topic’ the case of the point source was considered (Klibanov and Romanov 2015 J. Inverse Ill-Posed Problem 23 415-28 J. Inverse Ill-Posed Problem 23 187-93). Two reconstruction procedures are developed.

  12. Uniqueness and stability for the inverse medium problem with internal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triki, Faouzi

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we study the inverse medium problem with internal data. We show that knowledge of one real internal data uniquely determines the medium. A local Lipschitz stability of the reconstruction is also derived.

  13. The numerical solution of the boundary inverse problem for a parabolic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, V. V.; Vasilyeva, M. V.; Kardashevsky, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    Boundary inverse problems occupy an important place among the inverse problems of mathematical physics. They are connected with the problems of diagnosis, when additional measurements on one of the borders or inside the computational domain are necessary to restore the boundary regime in the other border, inaccessible to direct measurements. The boundary inverse problems belong to a class of conditionally correct problems, and therefore, their numerical solution requires the development of special computational algorithms. The paper deals with the solution of the boundary inverse problem for one-dimensional second-order parabolic equations, consisting in the restoration of boundary regime according to measurements inside the computational domain. For the numerical solution of the inverse problem it is proposed to use an analogue of a computational algorithm, proposed and developed to meet the challenges of identification of the right side of the parabolic equations in the works P.N.Vabishchevich and his students based on a special decomposition of solving the problem at each temporal layer. We present and discuss the results of a computational experiment conducted on model problems with quasi-solutions, including with random errors in the input data.

  14. The Use of Reciprocity in Atmospheric Source Inversion Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Nitao, J J

    2004-10-13

    The goal of the Event Reconstruction Project is to find the location and strength of atmospheric release points, both stationary and moving. Source inversion relies on observational data as input. The methodology is sufficiently general to allow various forms of data. In this report, the authors will focus primarily on concentration measurements obtained at point monitoring locations at various times. The algorithms being investigated in the Project are the MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo), SMC (Sequential Monte Carlo) Methods, classical inversion methods, and hybrids of these. They refer the reader to the report by Johannesson et al. (2004) for explanations of these methods. These methods require computing the concentrations at all monitoring locations for a given ''proposed'' source characteristic (locations and strength history). It is anticipated that the largest portion of the CPU time will take place performing this computation. MCMC and SMC will require this computation to be done at least tens of thousands of times. Therefore, an efficient means of computing forward model predictions is important to making the inversion practical. In this report they show how Green's functions and reciprocal Green's functions can significantly accelerate forward model computations. First, instead of computing a plume for each possible source strength history, they can compute plumes from unit impulse sources only. By using linear superposition, they can obtain the response for any strength history. This response is given by the forward Green's function. Second, they may use the law of reciprocity. Suppose that they require the concentration at a single monitoring point x{sub m} due to a potential (unit impulse) source that is located at x{sub s}. instead of computing a plume with source location x{sub s}, they compute a ''reciprocal plume'' whose (unit impulse) source is at the monitoring locations x{sub m}. The reciprocal plume is computed using a reversed-direction wind

  15. Review of the inverse scattering problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatier, P. C.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of solution of the inverse scattering problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics are presented. Scattering experiments of a beam of particles at a nonrelativisitic energy by a target made up of particles are analyzed. The Schroedinger equation is used to develop the quantum mechanical description of the system and one of several functions depending on the relative distance of the particles. The inverse problem is the construction of the potentials from experimental measurements.

  16. Sedimentary Facies Analysis Using AVIRIS Data: A Geophysical Inverse Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardmann, Joe W.; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    AVIRIS data can be used to quantitatively analyze and map sedimentary lithofacies. The observed radiance spectra can be reduced to 'apparent reflectance' spectra by topographic and reflectance characterization of several field sites within the image. These apparent reflectance spectra correspond to the true reflectance at each pixel, multiplied by an unknown illumination factor (ranging in value from zero to one). The spatial abundance patterns of spectrally defined lithofacies and the unknown illumination factors can be simultaneously derived using constrained linear spectral unmixing methods. Estimates of the minimum uncertainty in the final results (due to noise, instrument resolutions, degree of illumination and mixing systematics) can be made by forward and inverse modeling. Specific facies studies in the Rattlesnake Hills region of Wyoming illustrate the successful application of these methods.

  17. Proximal point methods for the inverse problem of identifying parameters in beam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamba, B.; Khan, A. A.; Paulhamus, M.; Sama, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper studies the nonlinear inverse problem of identifying certain material parameters in the fourth-order boundary value problem representing the beam model. The inverse problem is solved by posing a convex optimization problem whose solution is an approximation of the sought parameters. The optimization problem is solved by the gradient based approaches, and in this setting, the most challenging aspect is the computation of the gradient of the objective functional. We present a detailed treatment of the adjoint stiffness matrix based approach for the gradient computation. We employ recently proposed self-adaptive inexact proximal point methods by Hager and Zhang [6] to solve the inverse problem. It is known that the regularization features of the proximal point methods are quite different from that of the Tikhonov regularization. We present a comparative analysis of the numerical efficiency of the used proximal point methods without using the Tikhonov regularization.

  18. Nature inspired computational technique for the numerical solution of nonlinear singular boundary value problems arising in physiology.

    PubMed

    Malik, Suheel Abdullah; Qureshi, Ijaz Mansoor; Amir, Muhammad; Haq, Ihsanul

    2014-01-01

    We present a hybrid heuristic computing method for the numerical solution of nonlinear singular boundary value problems arising in physiology. The approximate solution is deduced as a linear combination of some log sigmoid basis functions. A fitness function representing the sum of the mean square error of the given nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) and its boundary conditions is formulated. The optimization of the unknown adjustable parameters contained in the fitness function is performed by the hybrid heuristic computation algorithm based on genetic algorithm (GA), interior point algorithm (IPA), and active set algorithm (ASA). The efficiency and the viability of the proposed method are confirmed by solving three examples from physiology. The obtained approximate solutions are found in excellent agreement with the exact solutions as well as some conventional numerical solutions.

  19. Nature Inspired Computational Technique for the Numerical Solution of Nonlinear Singular Boundary Value Problems Arising in Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Suheel Abdullah; Qureshi, Ijaz Mansoor; Haq, Ihsanul

    2014-01-01

    We present a hybrid heuristic computing method for the numerical solution of nonlinear singular boundary value problems arising in physiology. The approximate solution is deduced as a linear combination of some log sigmoid basis functions. A fitness function representing the sum of the mean square error of the given nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) and its boundary conditions is formulated. The optimization of the unknown adjustable parameters contained in the fitness function is performed by the hybrid heuristic computation algorithm based on genetic algorithm (GA), interior point algorithm (IPA), and active set algorithm (ASA). The efficiency and the viability of the proposed method are confirmed by solving three examples from physiology. The obtained approximate solutions are found in excellent agreement with the exact solutions as well as some conventional numerical solutions. PMID:24672381

  20. FOREWORD: 5th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourc'h, Eric; Rodet, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific research presented during the 5th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2015 (http://complement.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2015.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, on May 29, 2015. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of ValueTools Conference, in May 2011, and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012, May 2013 and May 2014. The New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP) workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed, inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, Kernel methods, learning methods

  1. FOREWORD: 4th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 4th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2014 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2014.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, on May 23, 2014. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/), and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012 and May 2013, (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2012.html), (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2013.html). The New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP) Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed, inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the

  2. Integral equations of the first kind, inverse problems and regularization: a crash course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2007-06-01

    This paper is an expository survey of the basic theory of regularization for Fredholm integral equations of the first kind and related background material on inverse problems. We begin with an historical introduction to the field of integral equations of the first kind, with special emphasis on model inverse problems that lead to such equations. The basic theory of linear Fredholm equations of the first kind, paying particular attention to E. Schmidt's singular function analysis, Picard's existence criterion, and the Moore-Penrose theory of generalized inverses is outlined. The fundamentals of the theory of Tikhonov regularization are then treated and a collection of exercises and a bibliography are provided.

  3. Computational experiment on the numerical solution of some inverse problems of mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, V. I.; Kardashevsky, A. M.; Sivtsev, PV

    2016-11-01

    In this article the computational experiment on the numerical solution of the most popular linear inverse problems for equations of mathematical physics are presented. The discretization of retrospective inverse problem for parabolic equation is performed using difference scheme with non-positive weight multiplier. Similar difference scheme is also used for the numerical solution of Cauchy problem for two-dimensional Laplace equation. The results of computational experiment, performed on model problems with exact solution, including ones with randomly perturbed input data are presented and discussed.

  4. A fixed energy fixed angle inverse scattering in interior transmission problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lung-Hui

    2017-06-01

    We study the inverse acoustic scattering problem in mathematical physics. The problem is to recover the index of refraction in an inhomogeneous medium by measuring the scattered wave fields in the far field. We transform the problem to the interior transmission problem in the study of the Helmholtz equation. We find an inverse uniqueness on the scatterer with a knowledge of a fixed interior transmission eigenvalue. By examining the solution in a series of spherical harmonics in the far field, we can determine uniquely the perturbation source for the radially symmetric perturbations.

  5. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part I: Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.; Park, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    In a set of two papers we study the inverse problem of refraction travel times. The purpose of this work is to use the study as a basis for development of more sophisticated methods for finding more reliable solutions to the inverse problem of refraction travel times, which is known to be nonunique. The first paper, "Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization," emphasizes the existence of different forms of nonuniqueness in the realm of inverse geophysical problems. Each type of nonuniqueness requires a different type and amount of a priori information to acquire a reliable solution. Based on such coupling, a nonuniqueness classification is designed. Therefore, since most inverse geophysical problems are nonunique, each inverse problem must be studied to define what type of nonuniqueness it belongs to and thus determine what type of a priori information is necessary to find a realistic solution. The second paper, "Quantifying Refraction Nonuniqueness Using a Three-layer Model," serves as an example of such an approach. However, its main purpose is to provide a better understanding of the inverse refraction problem by studying the type of nonuniqueness it possesses. An approach for obtaining a realistic solution to the inverse refraction problem is planned to be offered in a third paper that is in preparation. The main goal of this paper is to redefine the existing generalized notion of nonuniqueness and a priori information by offering a classified, discriminate structure. Nonuniqueness is often encountered when trying to solve inverse problems. However, possible nonuniqueness diversity is typically neglected and nonuniqueness is regarded as a whole, as an unpleasant "black box" and is approached in the same manner by applying smoothing constraints, damping constraints with respect to the solution increment and, rarely, damping constraints with respect to some sparse reference information about the true parameters. In practice, when solving geophysical

  6. Adaptive eigenspace method for inverse scattering problems in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grote, Marcus J.; Kray, Marie; Nahum, Uri

    2017-02-01

    A nonlinear optimization method is proposed for the solution of inverse scattering problems in the frequency domain, when the scattered field is governed by the Helmholtz equation. The time-harmonic inverse medium problem is formulated as a PDE-constrained optimization problem and solved by an inexact truncated Newton-type iteration. Instead of a grid-based discrete representation, the unknown wave speed is projected to a particular finite-dimensional basis of eigenfunctions, which is iteratively adapted during the optimization. Truncating the adaptive eigenspace (AE) basis at a (small and slowly increasing) finite number of eigenfunctions effectively introduces regularization into the inversion and thus avoids the need for standard Tikhonov-type regularization. Both analytical and numerical evidence underpins the accuracy of the AE representation. Numerical experiments demonstrate the efficiency and robustness to missing or noisy data of the resulting adaptive eigenspace inversion method.

  7. Numerical computations on one-dimensional inverse scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. H.; Hariharan, S. I.

    1983-01-01

    An approximate method to determine the index of refraction of a dielectric obstacle is presented. For simplicity one dimensional models of electromagnetic scattering are treated. The governing equations yield a second order boundary value problem, in which the index of refraction appears as a functional parameter. The availability of reflection coefficients yield two additional boundary conditions. The index of refraction by a k-th order spline which can be written as a linear combination of B-splines is approximated. For N distinct reflection coefficients, the resulting N boundary value problems yield a system of N nonlinear equations in N unknowns which are the coefficients of the B-splines.

  8. A MEASURE-THEORETIC COMPUTATIONAL METHOD FOR INVERSE SENSITIVITY PROBLEMS I: METHOD AND ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Breidt, J.; Butler, T.; Estep, D.

    2012-01-01

    We consider the inverse sensitivity analysis problem of quantifying the uncertainty of inputs to a deterministic map given specified uncertainty in a linear functional of the output of the map. This is a version of the model calibration or parameter estimation problem for a deterministic map. We assume that the uncertainty in the quantity of interest is represented by a random variable with a given distribution, and we use the law of total probability to express the inverse problem for the corresponding probability measure on the input space. Assuming that the map from the input space to the quantity of interest is smooth, we solve the generally ill-posed inverse problem by using the implicit function theorem to derive a method for approximating the set-valued inverse that provides an approximate quotient space representation of the input space. We then derive an efficient computational approach to compute a measure theoretic approximation of the probability measure on the input space imparted by the approximate set-valued inverse that solves the inverse problem. PMID:23637467

  9. A simple method for determining the spatial resolution of a general inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Meijian

    2012-09-01

    The resolution matrix of an inverse problem defines a linear relationship in which each solution parameter is derived from the weighted averages of nearby true-model parameters, and the resolution matrix elements are the weights. Resolution matrices are not only widely used to measure the solution obtainability or the inversion perfectness from the data based on the degree to which the matrix approximates the identity matrix, but also to extract spatial-resolution or resolution-length information. Resolution matrices presented in previous spatial-resolution analysis studies can be divided into three classes: direct resolution matrix, regularized/stabilized resolution matrix and hybrid resolution matrix. The direct resolution matrix can yield resolution-length information only for ill-posed inverse problems. The regularized resolution matrix cannot give any spatial-resolution information. The hybrid resolution matrix can provide resolution-length information; however, this depends on the regularization contribution to the inversion. The computation of the matrices needs matrix operation, however, this is often a difficult problem for very large inverse problems. Here, a new class of resolution matrices, generated using a Gaussian approximation (called the statistical resolution matrices), is proposed whereby the direct determination of the matrix is accomplished via a simple one-parameter non-linear inversion performed based on limited pairs of random synthetic models and their inverse solutions. Tests showed that a statistical resolution matrix could not only measure the resolution obtainable from the data, but also provided reasonable spatial/temporal resolution or resolution-length information. The estimates were restricted to forward/inversion processes and were independent of the degree of inverse skill used in the solution inversion; therefore, the original inversion codes did not need to be modified. The absence of a requirement for matrix operations during

  10. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a meshmore » adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.« less

  11. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.

  12. Effect of head shape variations among individuals on the EEG/MEG forward and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Muravchik, Carlos H; Wagner, Michael; Nehorai, Arye

    2009-03-01

    We study the effect of the head shape variations on the EEG/magnetoencephalography (MEG) forward and inverse problems. We build a random head model such that each sample represents the head shape of a different individual and solve the forward problem assuming this random head model, using a polynomial chaos expansion. The random solution of the forward problem is then used to quantify the effect of the geometry when the inverse problem is solved with a standard head model. The results derived with this approach are valid for a continuous family of head models, rather than just for a set of cases. The random model consists of three random surfaces that define layers of different electric conductivity, and we built an example based on a set of 30 deterministic models from adults. Our results show that for a dipolar source model, the effect of the head shape variations on the EEG/MEG inverse problem due to the random head model is slightly larger than the effect of the electronic noise present in the sensors. The variations in the EEG inverse problem solutions are due to the variations in the shape of the volume conductor, while the variations in the MEG inverse problem solutions, larger than the EEG ones, are caused mainly by the variations of the absolute position of the sources in a coordinate system based on anatomical landmarks, in which the magnetometers have a fixed position.

  13. Analysis and algorithms for a regularized Cauchy problem arising from a non-linear elliptic PDE for seismic velocity estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, M.K.; Fomel, S.B.; Sethian, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work we derive and study a nonlinear elliptic PDE coming from the problem of estimation of sound speed inside the Earth. The physical setting of the PDE allows us to pose only a Cauchy problem, and hence is ill-posed. However we are still able to solve it numerically on a long enough time interval to be of practical use. We used two approaches. The first approach is a finite difference time-marching numerical scheme inspired by the Lax-Friedrichs method. The key features of this scheme is the Lax-Friedrichs averaging and the wide stencil in space. The second approach is a spectral Chebyshev method with truncated series. We show that our schemes work because of (1) the special input corresponding to a positive finite seismic velocity, (2) special initial conditions corresponding to the image rays, (3) the fact that our finite-difference scheme contains small error terms which damp the high harmonics; truncation of the Chebyshev series, and (4) the need to compute the solution only for a short interval of time. We test our numerical scheme on a collection of analytic examples and demonstrate a dramatic improvement in accuracy in the estimation of the sound speed inside the Earth in comparison with the conventional Dix inversion. Our test on the Marmousi example confirms the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  14. Extremal norms of the potentials recovered from inverse Dirichlet problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jiangang; Chen, Shaozhu

    2016-03-01

    Consider the Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem -y\\prime\\prime (x)+q(x)y(x)=λ y(x),x\\in [0,1],y(0)=y(1)=0, where q\\in {L}1[0,1], and its spectrum is denoted by σ (q). For a real number λ, define {{Ω }}(λ )=\\{q\\in {L}1[0,1] :λ \\in σ (q)\\} and E(λ )={inf}\\{\\parallel q\\parallel :q\\in {{Ω }}(λ )\\}. We will set up a formula for E(λ ) explicitly in terms of λ and specify where the infimum can be attained. As an application, we will give the extremal values of the nth eigenvalue of the Dirichlet problem for potentials on a sphere {L}1[0,1], n≥slant 1. The proofs are based on a new Lyapunov-type inequality for Sturm-Liouville equations with potentials.

  15. Inverse heat conduction problem in a phase change memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Jean-Luc; De, Indrayush; Sousa, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    An invers heat conduction problem is solved considering the thermal investigation of a phase change memory device using the scanning thermal microscopy. The heat transfer model rests on system identification for the probe thermal impedance and on a finite element method for the device thermal impedance. Unknown parameters in the model are then identified using a nonlinear least square algorithm that minimizes the quadratic gap between the measured probe temperature and the simulated one.

  16. ARISE antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Arthur B.; Noca, Muriel; Ulvestad, James

    2000-03-01

    Supermassive black holes are among the most spectacular objects in the Universe, and are laboratories for physics in extreme conditions. Understanding the physics of massive black holes and related phenomena is a primary goal of the ARISE mission. The scientific goals of the mission are described in detail on the ARISE web site http://arise.ipl.nasa.gov and in the ARISE Science Goals document. The following paper, as the title suggests, is not intended to be a comprehensive description of ARISE, but deals only with one aspect of the ARISE mission-the inflatable antenna which is the key element of the ARISE spacecraft. This spacecraft,due to the extensive reliance on inflatables, may be considered as the first generation Gossamer spacecraft

  17. Application of invariant integrals to elastostatic inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Robert; Shifrin, Efim; Shushpannikov, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    A problem of parameters identification for embedded defects in a linear elastic body using results of static tests is considered. A method, based on the use of invariant integrals is developed for solving this problem. A problem for the spherical inclusion parameters identification is considered as an example of the proposed approach application. It is shown that a radius, elastic moduli and coordinates of a spherical inclusion center are determined from one uniaxial tension (compression) test. The explicit formulae, expressing the spherical inclusion parameters by means of the values of corresponding invariant integrals are obtained. The values of the integrals can be calculated from the experimental data if both applied loads and displacements are measured on the surface of the body in the static test. A numerical analysis of the obtained explicit formulae is fulfilled. It is shown that the formulae give a good approximation of the spherical inclusion parameters even in the case when the inclusion is located close enough to the surface of the body. To cite this article: R. Goldstein et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  18. Maximum entropy regularization of the geomagnetic core field inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andrew; Constable, Catherine; Gillet, Nicolas

    2007-12-01

    The maximum entropy technique is an accepted method of image reconstruction when the image is made up of pixels of unknown positive intensity (e.g. a grey-scale image). The problem of reconstructing the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary from surface data is a problem where the target image, the value of the radial field Br, can be of either sign. We adopt a known extension of the usual maximum entropy method that can be applied to images consisting of pixels of unconstrained sign. We find that we are able to construct images which have high dynamic ranges, but which still have very simple structure. In the spherical harmonic domain they have smoothly decreasing power spectra. It is also noteworthy that these models have far less complex null flux curve topology (lines on which the radial field vanishes) than do models which are quadratically regularized. Problems such as the one addressed are ubiquitous in geophysics, and it is suggested that the applications of the method could be much more widespread than is currently the case.

  19. A systematic linear space approach to solving partially described inverse eigenvalue problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Sau-Lon James; Li, Haujun

    2008-06-01

    Most applications of the inverse eigenvalue problem (IEP), which concerns the reconstruction of a matrix from prescribed spectral data, are associated with special classes of structured matrices. Solving the IEP requires one to satisfy both the spectral constraint and the structural constraint. If the spectral constraint consists of only one or few prescribed eigenpairs, this kind of inverse problem has been referred to as the partially described inverse eigenvalue problem (PDIEP). This paper develops an efficient, general and systematic approach to solve the PDIEP. Basically, the approach, applicable to various structured matrices, converts the PDIEP into an ordinary inverse problem that is formulated as a set of simultaneous linear equations. While solving simultaneous linear equations for model parameters, the singular value decomposition method is applied. Because of the conversion to an ordinary inverse problem, other constraints associated with the model parameters can be easily incorporated into the solution procedure. The detailed derivation and numerical examples to implement the newly developed approach to symmetric Toeplitz and quadratic pencil (including mass, damping and stiffness matrices of a linear dynamic system) PDIEPs are presented. Excellent numerical results for both kinds of problem are achieved under the situations that have either unique or infinitely many solutions.

  20. Inverse source problem for the hyperbolic equation with a time-dependent principal part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Daijun; Liu, Yikan; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the inverse problem on determining the spatial component of the source term in the hyperbolic equation with a time-dependent principal part. Based on a Carleman estimate for general hyperbolic operators, we prove a local stability result of Hölder type in both cases of partial boundary and interior observation data. Numerically, we adopt the classical Tikhonov regularization to reformulate the inverse problem into a related optimization problem, for which we develop an iterative thresholding algorithm by using the corresponding adjoint system. Numerical examples up to three spatial dimensions are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Statistical method for resolving the photon-photoelectron-counting inversion problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jinlong; Li Tiejun; Peng, Xiang; Guo Hong

    2011-02-01

    A statistical inversion method is proposed for the photon-photoelectron-counting statistics in quantum key distribution experiment. With the statistical viewpoint, this problem is equivalent to the parameter estimation for an infinite binomial mixture model. The coarse-graining idea and Bayesian methods are applied to deal with this ill-posed problem, which is a good simple example to show the successful application of the statistical methods to the inverse problem. Numerical results show the applicability of the proposed strategy. The coarse-graining idea for the infinite mixture models should be general to be used in the future.

  2. Iterative algorithms for a non-linear inverse problem in atmospheric lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denevi, Giulia; Garbarino, Sara; Sorrentino, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    We consider the inverse problem of retrieving aerosol extinction coefficients from Raman lidar measurements. In this problem the unknown and the data are related through the exponential of a linear operator, the unknown is non-negative and the data follow the Poisson distribution. Standard methods work on the log-transformed data and solve the resulting linear inverse problem, but neglect to take into account the noise statistics. In this study we show that proper modelling of the noise distribution can improve substantially the quality of the reconstructed extinction profiles. To achieve this goal, we consider the non-linear inverse problem with non-negativity constraint, and propose two iterative algorithms derived using the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. We validate the algorithms with synthetic and experimental data. As expected, the proposed algorithms out-perform standard methods in terms of sensitivity to noise and reliability of the estimated profile.

  3. State estimation and inverse problems in electrical impedance tomography: observability, convergence and regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbarbaro, D.; Vauhkonen, M.; Johansen, T. A.

    2015-04-01

    Solving electrical impedance tomography (EIT) inverse problems in real-time is a challenging task due to their dimension, the nonlinearities involved and the fact that they are ill-posed. Thus, efficient algorithms are required to address the application of tomographic technologies in process industry. In practical applications the EIT inverse problem is often linearized for fast and robust reconstruction. The aim of this paper is to analyse the solution of linearized EIT inverse problem from the perspective of a state estimation problem, providing links between regularization, observability and convergence of the algorithms. In addition, also a new way to define the fictitious outputs is proposed, leading to observers with fewer parameters than with the approach widely used in literature. Simulation of EIT examples illustrate the main ideas and algorithmic improvements of the proposed approaches.

  4. Unrealistic parameter estimates in inverse modelling: A problem or a benefit for model calibration?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poeter, E.P.; Hill, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    Estimation of unrealistic parameter values by inverse modelling is useful for constructed model discrimination. This utility is demonstrated using the three-dimensional, groundwater flow inverse model MODFLOWP to estimate parameters in a simple synthetic model where the true conditions and character of the errors are completely known. When a poorly constructed model is used, unreasonable parameter values are obtained even when using error free observations and true initial parameter values. This apparent problem is actually a benefit because it differentiates accurately and inaccurately constructed models. The problems seem obvious for a synthetic problem in which the truth is known, but are obscure when working with field data. Situations in which unrealistic parameter estimates indicate constructed model problems are illustrated in applications of inverse modelling to three field sites and to complex synthetic test cases in which it is shown that prediction accuracy also suffers when constructed models are inaccurate.

  5. A boundary inverse problem for the process of heat and moisture transfer in multilayered region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysbaiuly, Bolatbek; Karashbayeva, Zhanat O.; Ryskeldi, Meiirzhan

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with the boundary inverse problem for a system of transfer equations for heat and moisture. A system of equations describe the joint movement of moisture and heat in the multilayer region. Boundary conditions of practical importance have defined. The resulting initial boundary problem is written in dimensionless form. After that the formulation of the inverse boundary value problem in dimensionless variables is given. The result gives a quasi-linear inverse boundary problem. In the present work we have derived the conjugate system of differential equations with partial derivatives. The boundary and initial conditions of the conjugate problem are defined. A connection between the line and the conjugate problem is established. We have constructed a functional for solving the inverse boundary problem. The unknown quantities are determined from the minimum of this functional. The minimizing functional is written in the dimensionless form. An iterative method is developed to calculate the unknown boundary heat and moisture values. Iteration formulas are written in an explicit form and contain the decisions of direct and the conjugate problem. The iteration is carried out so, that the functional decreases monotonically in the calculation process. The convergence of iterative processes is controlled by a small control functions. The numerical calculations are conducted by proving the suitability of the developed method. The criterion for stopping the computing process is sufficient smallness of the dimensionless values of the functional.

  6. Geophysical approaches to inverse problems: A methodological comparison. Part 1: A Posteriori approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidman, T. I.; Munteanu, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The relationships of a variety of general computational methods (and variances) for treating illposed problems such as geophysical inverse problems are considered. Differences in approach and interpretation based on varying assumptions as to, e.g., the nature of measurement uncertainties are discussed along with the factors to be considered in selecting an approach. The reliability of the results of such computation is addressed.

  7. The inverse problem in electrocardiography: solutions in terms of epicardial potentials.

    PubMed

    Rudy, Y; Messinger-Rapport, B J

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the inverse problem in electrocardiography is to recover noninvasively regional information about intracardiac electrical events from electrical measurements on the body surface. The choice of epicardial potentials as the solution to the inverse problem is motivated by the availability of a unique epicardial potential solution for each body surface potential distribution, by the ability to verify experimentally the inverse-recovered epicardial potentials, by the proven relationship between epicardial potentials and the details of intracardiac regional events, and by the possibility of using the inverse solution as a supplement or possible replacement to clinical epicardial potential mapping prior to surgical intervention. Although, in principle, the epicardial potential distribution can be recovered from the body surface potential distribution, the inverse problem in terms of potentials is ill-posed, and naive attempts to reconstruct the epicardial potentials result in incorrect solutions which are highly oscillatory. Large deviations from the actual solution may result from inaccuracy of the data measurement, incomplete knowledge of the potential data over the entire torso, and inaccurate description of the inhomogeneous torso volume conductor. This review begins with a mathematical and qualitative description of the inverse problem in terms of epicardial potentials. The ill-posed nature of the problem is demonstrated using a theoretical boundary value problem. Effects of inaccuracies in the body surface potential data (stability estimates) are introduced, and a sensitivity analysis of geometrical and inhomogeneity parameters is presented using an analytical eccentric spheres model. Various computational methods for relating epicardial to body surface potentials, i.e., the computation of the forward transfer matrix, are described and compared. The need for regularization of the inverse recovery of epicardial potentials, resulting from the need to

  8. Fast and accurate analytical model to solve inverse problem in SHM using Lamb wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Lamb wave propagation is at the center of attention of researchers for structural health monitoring of thin walled structures. This is due to the fact that Lamb wave modes are natural modes of wave propagation in these structures with long travel distances and without much attenuation. This brings the prospect of monitoring large structure with few sensors/actuators. However the problem of damage detection and identification is an "inverse problem" where we do not have the luxury to know the exact mathematical model of the system. On top of that the problem is more challenging due to the confounding factors of statistical variation of the material and geometric properties. Typically this problem may also be ill posed. Due to all these complexities the direct solution of the problem of damage detection and identification in SHM is impossible. Therefore an indirect method using the solution of the "forward problem" is popular for solving the "inverse problem". This requires a fast forward problem solver. Due to the complexities involved with the forward problem of scattering of Lamb waves from damages researchers rely primarily on numerical techniques such as FEM, BEM, etc. But these methods are slow and practically impossible to be used in structural health monitoring. We have developed a fast and accurate analytical forward problem solver for this purpose. This solver, CMEP (complex modes expansion and vector projection), can simulate scattering of Lamb waves from all types of damages in thin walled structures fast and accurately to assist the inverse problem solver.

  9. From Bayes to Tarantola: New insights to understand uncertainty in inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martínez, J. L.; Fernández-Muñiz, Z.; Pallero, J. L. G.; Pedruelo-González, L. M.

    2013-11-01

    Anyone working on inverse problems is aware of their ill-posed character. In the case of inverse problems, this concept (ill-posed) proposed by J. Hadamard in 1902, admits revision since it is somehow related to their ill-conditioning and the use of local optimization methods to find their solution. A more general and interesting approach regarding risk analysis and epistemological decision making would consist in analyzing the existence of families of equivalent model parameters that are compatible with the prior information and predict the observed data within the same error bounds. Otherwise said, the ill-posed character of discrete inverse problems (ill-conditioning) originates that their solution is uncertain. Traditionally nonlinear inverse problems in discrete form have been solved via local optimization methods with regularization, but linear analysis techniques failed to account for the uncertainty in the solution that it is adopted. As a result of this fact uncertainty analysis in nonlinear inverse problems has been approached in a probabilistic framework (Bayesian approach), but these methods are hindered by the curse of dimensionality and by the high computational cost needed to solve the corresponding forward problems. Global optimization techniques are very attractive, but most of the times are heuristic and have the same limitations than Monte Carlo methods. New research is needed to provide uncertainty estimates, especially in the case of high dimensional nonlinear inverse problems with very costly forward problems. After the discredit of deterministic methods and some initial years of Bayesian fever, now the pendulum seems to return back, because practitioners are aware that the uncertainty analysis in high dimensional nonlinear inverse problems cannot (and should not be) solved via random sampling methodologies. The main reason is that the uncertainty “space” of nonlinear inverse problems has a mathematical structure that is embedded in the

  10. Statistical mechanics of the inverse Ising problem and the optimal objective function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    The inverse Ising problem seeks to reconstruct the parameters of an Ising Hamiltonian on the basis of spin configurations sampled from the Boltzmann measure. Over the last decade, many applications of the inverse Ising problem have arisen, driven by the advent of large-scale data across different scientific disciplines. Recently, strategies to solve the inverse Ising problem based on convex optimisation have proven to be very successful. These approaches maximise particular objective functions with respect to the model parameters. Examples are the pseudolikelihood method and interaction screening. In this paper, we establish a link between approaches to the inverse Ising problem based on convex optimisation and the statistical physics of disordered systems. We characterise the performance of an arbitrary objective function and calculate the objective function which optimally reconstructs the model parameters. We evaluate the optimal objective function within a replica-symmetric ansatz and compare the results of the optimal objective function with other reconstruction methods. Apart from giving a theoretical underpinning to solving the inverse Ising problem by convex optimisation, the optimal objective function outperforms state-of-the-art methods, albeit by a small margin.

  11. Model Reduction Using Principal Component Analysis and Markov Chain Monte Carlo for Hydrogeological Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Rathore, S.; Chen, J.; Hoversten, G. M.; Luo, J.

    2016-12-01

    Inverse problems in hydrogeological applications often require estimation of a large number of unknown parameters ranging from hundreds to millions. Such problems are computationally prohibitive. To efficiently deal with such high-dimensional problems, model reduction techniques are usually introduced to improve computational performance of traditional inversion method. In this study, we explored the feasibility and effectiveness of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) for model reduction using error-involved synthetic data. A 1-D groundwater pumping test is implemented on randomly generated hydraulic conductivity field, then computed head distribution adding random errors is treated as available data for inversing the original hydraulic conductivity field. We run full-dimensional inverse method a few times to generate training set for constructing experienced covariance matrix. Principal Component Analysis is implemented on the experienced covariance matrix to reduce dimensionality of the inverse problem. MCMC is implemented to draw samples from the reduced variable space for providing best estimate and quantifying uncertainty. The synthetic data study demonstrates that PCA-MCMC method can successfully provide reasonable estimate of hydraulic conductivity using biased data and effectively reduce computational time and storage usage. It is also noticed that a tradeoff exists between model simplicity and uncertainty quantification - a highly-reduced model causes narrower confidential intervals, sometimes implying insufficient uncertainty quantification. Thus the extent of model reduction should be wisely manipulated in light of specific problem requirements.

  12. The time-dependent inverse source problem for the acoustic and electromagnetic equations in the one- and three-dimensional cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Harry E.

    1984-06-01

    The object of the time-dependent inverse source problem of electromagnetic theory and acoustics is to find time-dependent sources and currents, which are turned on at a given time and then off to give rise to prescribed radiation fields. In an early paper for the three-dimensional electromagnetic case, the present writer showed that the sources and currents are not unique and gave conditions which make them so. The ideas of that paper are reformulated for the three-dimensional electromagnetic case and extended to the acoustical three-dimensional case and the one-dimensional electromagnetic and acoustic cases. The one-dimensional cases show very explicitly the nature of the ambiguity of the choice of sources and currents. This ambiguity is closely related to one which occurs in inverse scattering theory. The ambiguity in inverse scattering theory arises when one wishes to obtain the off-shell elements of the T matrix from some of the on-shell elements (i.e., from the corresponding elements of the scattering operator). In inverse scattering theory prescribing of the representation in which the potential is to be diagonal removes the ambiguity. For the inverse source problem a partial prescription of the time dependence of the sources and currents removes the ambiguity. The inverse source problem is then solved explicitly for this prescribed time dependence. The direct source problems for the one- and three-dimensional acoustic and electromagnetic cases are also given to provide a contrast with the inverse source problem and for use in later papers. Moreover, the present author's earlier work on the eigenfunctions of the curl operator is reviewed and used to simplify drastically the three-dimensional direct and inverse source problems for electromagnetic theory by splitting off the radiation field and its currents from the longitudinal field and its sources and currents. Finally, for a prescribed time dependence, the inverse source problem is solved explicitly in

  13. The neural network approximation method for solving multidimensional nonlinear inverse problems of geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimelevich, M. I.; Obornev, E. A.; Obornev, I. E.; Rodionov, E. A.

    2017-07-01

    The iterative approximation neural network method for solving conditionally well-posed nonlinear inverse problems of geophysics is presented. The method is based on the neural network approximation of the inverse operator. The inverse problem is solved in the class of grid (block) models of the medium on a regularized parameterization grid. The construction principle of this grid relies on using the calculated values of the continuity modulus of the inverse operator and its modifications determining the degree of ambiguity of the solutions. The method provides approximate solutions of inverse problems with the maximal degree of detail given the specified degree of ambiguity with the total number of the sought parameters n × 103 of the medium. The a priori and a posteriori estimates of the degree of ambiguity of the approximated solutions are calculated. The work of the method is illustrated by the example of the three-dimensional (3D) inversion of the synthesized 2D areal geoelectrical (audio magnetotelluric sounding, AMTS) data corresponding to the schematic model of a kimberlite pipe.

  14. Analytical and numerical analysis of inverse optimization problems: conditions of uniqueness and computational methods

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the key problems of motor control is the redundancy problem, in particular how the central nervous system (CNS) chooses an action out of infinitely many possible. A promising way to address this question is to assume that the choice is made based on optimization of a certain cost function. A number of cost functions have been proposed in the literature to explain performance in different motor tasks: from force sharing in grasping to path planning in walking. However, the problem of uniqueness of the cost function(s) was not addressed until recently. In this article, we analyze two methods of finding additive cost functions in inverse optimization problems with linear constraints, so-called linear-additive inverse optimization problems. These methods are based on the Uniqueness Theorem for inverse optimization problems that we proved recently (Terekhov et al., J Math Biol 61(3):423–453, 2010). Using synthetic data, we show that both methods allow for determining the cost function. We analyze the influence of noise on the both methods. Finally, we show how a violation of the conditions of the Uniqueness Theorem may lead to incorrect solutions of the inverse optimization problem. PMID:21311907

  15. Analytical and numerical analysis of inverse optimization problems: conditions of uniqueness and computational methods.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Alexander V; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2011-02-01

    One of the key problems of motor control is the redundancy problem, in particular how the central nervous system (CNS) chooses an action out of infinitely many possible. A promising way to address this question is to assume that the choice is made based on optimization of a certain cost function. A number of cost functions have been proposed in the literature to explain performance in different motor tasks: from force sharing in grasping to path planning in walking. However, the problem of uniqueness of the cost function(s) was not addressed until recently. In this article, we analyze two methods of finding additive cost functions in inverse optimization problems with linear constraints, so-called linear-additive inverse optimization problems. These methods are based on the Uniqueness Theorem for inverse optimization problems that we proved recently (Terekhov et al., J Math Biol 61(3):423-453, 2010). Using synthetic data, we show that both methods allow for determining the cost function. We analyze the influence of noise on the both methods. Finally, we show how a violation of the conditions of the Uniqueness Theorem may lead to incorrect solutions of the inverse optimization problem.

  16. Inverse problem for multivariate time series using dynamical latent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamparo, M.; Stramaglia, S.; Banavar, J. R.; Maritan, A.

    2012-06-01

    Factor analysis is a well known statistical method to describe the variability among observed variables in terms of a smaller number of unobserved latent variables called factors. While dealing with multivariate time series, the temporal correlation structure of data may be modeled by including correlations in latent factors, but a crucial choice is the covariance function to be implemented. We show that analyzing multivariate time series in terms of latent Gaussian processes, which are mutually independent but with each of them being characterized by exponentially decaying temporal correlations, leads to an efficient implementation of the expectation-maximization algorithm for the maximum likelihood estimation of parameters, due to the properties of block-tridiagonal matrices. The proposed approach solves an ambiguity known as the identifiability problem, which renders the solution of factor analysis determined only up to an orthogonal transformation. Samples with just two temporal points are sufficient for the parameter estimation: hence the proposed approach may be applied even in the absence of prior information about the correlation structure of latent variables by fitting the model to pairs of points with varying time delay. Our modeling allows one to make predictions of the future values of time series and we illustrate our method by applying it to an analysis of published gene expression data from cell culture HeLa.

  17. Reification of galaxies: cognitive astrophysics and the multiwavelength inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madore, Barry F.

    2012-08-01

    Lessons learned in the history and philosophy of science have generally had little immediate impact on how we as individual astronomers conduct our research. And yet we do share many common views on how we undertake basic research, and how we translate observations and theory into communicable knowledge. In this introductory talk I will illustrate how we as extragalactic astronomers have already violated some of the basic tenets of what constitutes ``science'' as seen from a philosophical point of view, and I will predict what the future of astronomy as a science may soon look like. Simple examples of how we are already ``cognitively closed'' to many immediate and tangible aspects of the Universe will be given and some solutions to this dilemma will be proposed. We may be at a point in time where more data is not necessarily the best solution to our problems. Discovering that familiar concepts and even certain objects may not exist in the traditional sense of the word could provide a motivation for broadening our way of conceptualizing the extragalactic Universe, more as a continuum of processes and phase transitions rather than an assembly of discrete objects. Once again the Universe may be ``forcing us to think''.

  18. Inverse problem in archeological magnetic surveys using complex wavelet transform.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, G.; Moreau, F.; Mathe, P. E.; Hermitte, D.

    2003-04-01

    The wavelet transform applied to potential fields (electric, magnetic, or gravimetric, ...) has been now used from several years in geophysical applications, in particular to define the depth of potentiel sources verifying Poisson equation and responsible for potential anomalies measured at the ground surface. The complex continuous wavelet transform (CCWT) has been described, but the phase has not yet been exploited. (For these kinds of problem we construct a complex analyzing wavelet by Hilbert transforms of the Poisson or derivative of the Poisson wavelet which is real by definition). We show, here, that the phase of the CCWT provides useful information on the geometric and total magnetic inclination of the potential sources, as the modulus allows to characterize their depth and heterogenety degree. Regarding the properties of the phase compared to the modulus, it is more stable in presence of noise and we can defined it, independantly of the low level of energy of the signal. In this sense, information carried by the phase is more efficient to detect small objects or to separate close sources. We have applied a multi-scale analysis on magnetic measurements providing from a cesium magnetometer on the Fox-Amphoux site (France), to detect and localize buried structures like antik ovens. Conjointly, a rock magnetic study including susceptibility and magnetisations (induced or remanent) measurements give a better constrain on the magnetic parameters we want to extract.

  19. Uniqueness of a 3-D coefficient inverse scattering problem without the phase information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klibanov, Michael V.; Romanov, Vladimir G.

    2017-09-01

    We use a new method to prove the uniqueness theorem for a coefficient inverse scattering problem without the phase information for the 3-D Helmholtz equation. We consider the case when only the modulus of the scattered wave field is measured and the phase is not measured. The spatially distributed refractive index is the subject of interest in this problem. Applications of this problem are in imaging of nanostructures and biological cells.

  20. [Inverse problem identification of parameters in heat transfer processes of human body].

    PubMed

    Yu, K; Ji, Z; Xie, T; Li, X

    1999-06-01

    In order that the distortion of the relative skin temperatures which is accompanied with the physiological destruction of an organ in the abdominal cavity and its physical-physiological mechanism may be investigated, we adopt in this paper the mathematical model for heat transfer problems in human layered tissues and a perfect parametric identification approach-inverse problem method. By utilizing the extremum method and integrating with the experimental data of an artificial thermo-focus, this difficult biophysical problem is solved.

  1. On a class of inverse problems for a parabolic equation with involution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarsenbi, Abdisalam A.

    2017-09-01

    A class of inverse problems for a heat equation with involution perturbation is considered using four different bound-ary conditions, namely, Dirichlet, Neumann, periodic and anti-periodic boundary conditions. Proved theorems on existence and uniqueness of solutions to these problems are presented. Solutions are obtained in the form of series expansion using a set of appropriate orthogonal basis for each problem. Convergence of the obtained solutions is also discussed.

  2. Physics-based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-07

    solution to the model parameters. As such, part of this effort examines the forward problem to improve understanding of the physical mechanisms that...environmental factors including refractivity. Study of the forward problem in this context improves our understanding of the physical mechanisms impacting EM...please find the Final Technical Report with SF 298 for Dr. Erin E. Hackett’s ONR grant entitled Physics -based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine

  3. Advanced model of eddy-current NDE inverse problem with sparse grid algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liming; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Murphy, R. Kim; Bernacchi, William

    2017-02-01

    In model-based inverse problem, some unknown parameters need to be estimated. These parameters are used not only to characterize the physical properties of cracks, but also to describe the position of the probes (such as lift off and angles) in the calibration. After considering the effect of the position of the probes in the inverse problem, the accuracy of the inverse result will be improved. With increasing the number of the parameters in the inverse problems, the burden of calculations will increase exponentially in the traditional full grid method. The sparse grid algorithm, which was introduced by Sergey A. Smolyak, was used in our work. With this algorithm, we obtain a powerful interpolation method that requires significantly fewer support nodes than conventional interpolation on a full grid. In this work, we combined sparse grid toolbox TASMANIAN, which is produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and professional eddy-current NDE software, VIC-3D R◯, to solve a specific inverse problem. An advanced model based on our previous one is used to estimate length and depth of the crack, lift off and two angles of the position of probes. Considering the calibration process, pseudorandom noise is considered in the model and statistical behavior is discussed.

  4. Effects of geometric head model perturbations on the EEG forward and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Muravchik, Carlos H; Nehorai, Arye

    2006-03-01

    We study the effect of geometric head model perturbations on the electroencephalography (EEG) forward and inverse problems. Small magnitude perturbations of the shape of the head could represent uncertainties in the head model due to errors on images or techniques used to construct the model. They could also represent small scale details of the shape of the surfaces not described in a deterministic model, such as the sulci and fissures of the cortical layer. We perform a first-order perturbation analysis, using a meshless method for computing the sensitivity of the solution of the forward problem to the geometry of the head model. The effect on the forward problem solution is treated as noise in the EEG measurements and the Cramér-Rao bound is computed to quantify the effect on the inverse problem performance. Our results show that, for a dipolar source, the effect of the perturbations on the inverse problem performance is under the level of the uncertainties due to the spontaneous brain activity. Thus, the results suggest that an extremely detailed model of the head may be unnecessary when solving the EEG inverse problem.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of solutions of the harmonic inversion problem: are all data points created equal?

    PubMed

    Celik, Hasan; Shaka, A J; Mandelshtam, V A

    2010-09-01

    We consider the harmonic inversion problem, and the associated spectral estimation problem, both of which are key numerical problems in NMR data analysis. Under certain conditions (in particular, in exact arithmetic) these problems have unique solutions. Therefore, these solutions must not depend on the inversion algorithm, as long as it is exact in principle. In this paper, we are not concerned with the algorithmic aspects of harmonic inversion, but rather with the sensitivity of the solutions of the problem to perturbations of the time-domain data. A sensitivity analysis was performed and the counterintuitive results call into question the common assumption made in "super-resolution" methods using non-uniform data sampling, namely, that the data should be sampled more often where the time signal has the largest signal-to-noise ratio. The numerical analysis herein demonstrates that the spectral parameters (such as the peak positions and amplitudes) resulting from the solution of the harmonic inversion problem are least susceptible to the perturbations in the values of data points at the edges of the time interval and most susceptible to the perturbations in the values at intermediate times.

  6. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part II: Quantifying refraction nonuniqueness using a three-layer model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second of a set of two papers in which we study the inverse refraction problem. The first paper, "Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization," studies and classifies the types of nonuniqueness that exist when solving inverse problems depending on the participation of a priori information required to obtain reliable solutions of inverse geophysical problems. In view of the classification developed, in this paper we study the type of nonuniqueness associated with the inverse refraction problem. An approach for obtaining a realistic solution to the inverse refraction problem is offered in a third paper that is in preparation. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined by using a simple three-layer model. Like many other inverse geophysical problems, the inverse refraction problem does not have a unique solution. Conventionally, nonuniqueness is considered to be a result of insufficient data and/or error in the data, for any fixed number of model parameters. This study illustrates that even for overdetermined and error free data, nonlinear inverse refraction problems exhibit exact-data nonuniqueness, which further complicates the problem of nonuniqueness. By evaluating the nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem, this paper targets the improvement of refraction inversion algorithms, and as a result, the achievement of more realistic solutions. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined initially by using a simple three-layer model. The observations and conclusions of the three-layer model nonuniqueness study are used to evaluate the nonuniqueness of more complicated n-layer models and multi-parameter cell models such as in refraction tomography. For any fixed number of model parameters, the inverse refraction problem exhibits continuous ranges of exact-data nonuniqueness. Such an unfavorable type of nonuniqueness can be uniquely solved only by providing abundant a priori information

  7. Decomposing Large Inverse Problems with an Augmented Lagrangian Approach: Application to Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Travel Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, D. T.; Rodi, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Constructing 3D Earth models through the joint inversion of large geophysical data sets presents numerous theoretical and practical challenges, especially when diverse types of data and model parameters are involved. Among the challenges are the computational complexity associated with large data and model vectors and the need to unify differing model parameterizations, forward modeling methods and regularization schemes within a common inversion framework. The challenges can be addressed in part by decomposing the inverse problem into smaller, simpler inverse problems that can be solved separately, providing one knows how to merge the separate inversion results into an optimal solution of the full problem. We have formulated an approach to the decomposition of large inverse problems based on the augmented Lagrangian technique from optimization theory. As commonly done, we define a solution to the full inverse problem as the Earth model minimizing an objective function motivated, for example, by a Bayesian inference formulation. Our decomposition approach recasts the minimization problem equivalently as the minimization of component objective functions, corresponding to specified data subsets, subject to the constraints that the minimizing models be equal. A standard optimization algorithm solves the resulting constrained minimization problems by alternating between the separate solution of the component problems and the updating of Lagrange multipliers that serve to steer the individual solution models toward a common model solving the full problem. We are applying our inversion method to the reconstruction of the·crust and upper-mantle seismic velocity structure across Eurasia.· Data for the inversion comprise a large set of P and S body-wave travel times·and fundamental and first-higher mode Rayleigh-wave group velocities.

  8. Joint analysis of refractions with surface waves: An inverse solution to the refraction-traveltime problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a possible solution to the inverse refraction-traveltime problem (IRTP) that reduces the range of possible solutions (nonuniqueness). This approach uses a reference model, derived from surface-wave shear-wave velocity estimates, as a constraint. The application of the joint analysis of refractions with surface waves (JARS) method provided a more realistic solution than the conventional refraction/tomography methods, which did not benefit from a reference model derived from real data. This confirmed our conclusion that the proposed method is an advancement in the IRTP analysis. The unique basic principles of the JARS method might be applicable to other inverse geophysical problems. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  9. The Bayesian formulation and well-posedness of fractional elliptic inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Trillos, Nicolás; Sanz-Alonso, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    We study the inverse problem of recovering the order and the diffusion coefficient of an elliptic fractional partial differential equation from a finite number of noisy observations of the solution. We work in a Bayesian framework and show conditions under which the posterior distribution is given by a change of measure from the prior. Moreover, we show well-posedness of the inverse problem, in the sense that small perturbations of the observed solution lead to small Hellinger perturbations of the associated posterior measures. We thus provide a mathematical foundation to the Bayesian learning of the order—and other inputs—of fractional models.

  10. Solution of inverse heat conduction problem using the Tikhonov regularization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, Piotr

    2017-02-01

    It is hard to solve ill-posed problems, as calculated temperatures are very sensitive to errors made while calculating "measured" temperatures or performing real-time measurements. The errors can create temperature oscillation, which can be the cause of an unstable solution. In order to overcome such difficulties, a variety of techniques have been proposed in literature, including regularization, future time steps and smoothing digital filters. In this paper, the Tikhonov regularization is applied to stabilize the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem. The impact on the inverse solution stability and accuracy is demonstrated.

  11. Preliminary Study of the Feasibility of Inverse Problem Algorithms Used for Arc Magnetic Measurement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Li, Xingwen; Song, Haoyong; Rong, Mingzhe

    2010-04-01

    Non-contact magnetic measurement method is an effective way to study the air arc behavior experimentally One of the crucial techniques is to solve an inverse problem for the electromagnetic field. This study is devoted to investigating different algorithms for this kind of inverse problem preliminarily, including the preconditioned conjugate gradient method, penalty function method and genetic algorithm. The feasibility of each algorithm is analyzed. It is shown that the preconditioned conjugate gradient method is valid only for few arc segments, the estimation accuracy of the penalty function method is dependent on the initial conditions, and the convergence of genetic algorithm should be studied further for more segments in an arc current.

  12. Uniqueness of inverse problems of isotropic incompressible three-dimensional elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albocher, Uri; Barbone, Paul E.; Oberai, Assad A.; Harari, Isaac

    2014-12-01

    The uniqueness of an inverse problem of isotropic incompressible three dimensional elasticity aimed at reconstructing material modulus distributions is considered. We show that given a single strain field and no boundary conditions, arbitrary functions may have to be prescribed to make the solution unique. On the other hand, having two linearly independent strain fields leads to a favorable solution space where a maximum of five arbitrary constants must be prescribed to guarantee a unique solution. We solve inverse problems with two strain fields given using the adjoint weighted equation method and impose five discrete constraints. The method exhibits good numerical performance with optimal rates of convergence.

  13. Computational modeling of monoenergetic neutral particle inverse transport problems in slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Rodrigo R.; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2012-09-01

    Presented here is an analytical numerical method applied to three different types of monoenergetic neutral particle inverse transport problems in the discrete ordinates (SN) formulation: (a) boundary condition estimation; (b) interior source estimation; and (c) effective slab length estimation. These three types of inverse problems governed by the linear integrodifferential transport equation in SN formulation are related respectively to medical physics (a); nuclear waste storage (b); and non-destructive testing in industry (c). Numerical results and a brief discussion are given to conclude this paper.

  14. Solving an inverse eigenvalue problem with triple constraints on eigenvalues, singular values, and diagonal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheng-Jhih; Chu, Moody T.

    2017-08-01

    An inverse eigenvalue problem usually entails two constraints, one conditioned upon the spectrum and the other on the structure. This paper investigates the problem where triple constraints of eigenvalues, singular values, and diagonal entries are imposed simultaneously. An approach combining an eclectic mix of skills from differential geometry, optimization theory, and analytic gradient flow is employed to prove the solvability of such a problem. The result generalizes the classical Mirsky, Sing-Thompson, and Weyl-Horn theorems concerning the respective majorization relationships between any two of the arrays of main diagonal entries, eigenvalues, and singular values. The existence theory fills a gap in the classical matrix theory. The problem might find applications in wireless communication and quantum information science. The technique employed can be implemented as a first-step numerical method for constructing the matrix. With slight modification, the approach might be used to explore similar types of inverse problems where the prescribed entries are at general locations.

  15. A generalization of szebehely's inverse problem of dynamics in dimension three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlet, W.; Mestdag, T.; Prince, G.

    2017-06-01

    Extending a previous paper, we present a generalization in dimension 3 of the traditional Szebehely-type inverse problem. In that traditional setting, the data are curves determined as the intersection of two families of surfaces, and the problem is to find a potential V such that the Lagrangian L = T - V, where T is the standard Euclidean kinetic energy function, generates integral curves which include the given family of curves. Our more general way of posing the problem makes use of ideas of the inverse problem of the calculus of variations and essentially consists of allowing more general kinetic energy functions, with a metric which is still constant, but need not be the standard Euclidean one. In developing our generalization, we review and clarify different aspects of the existing literature on the problem and illustrate the relevance of the newly introduced additional freedom with many examples.

  16. Application of robust Generalised Cross-Validation to the inverse problem of electrocardiology.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Josef P; Johnston, Peter R

    2016-02-01

    Robust Generalised Cross-Validation was proposed recently as a method for determining near optimal regularisation parameters in inverse problems. It was introduced to overcome a problem with the regular Generalised Cross-Validation method in which the function that is minimised to obtain the regularisation parameter often has a broad, flat minimum, resulting in a poor estimate for the parameter. The robust method defines a new function to be minimised which has a narrower minimum, but at the expense of introducing a new parameter called the robustness parameter. In this study, the Robust Generalised Cross-Validation method is applied to the inverse problem of electrocardiology. It is demonstrated that, for realistic situations, the robustness parameter can be set to zero. With this choice of robustness parameter, it is shown that the robust method is able to obtain estimates of the regularisation parameter in the inverse problem of electrocardiology that are comparable to, or better than, many of the standard methods that are applied to this inverse problem.

  17. FOREWORD: Tackling inverse problems in a Banach space environment: from theory to applications Tackling inverse problems in a Banach space environment: from theory to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Thomas; Hofmann, Bernd; Kaltenbacher, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Inverse problems can usually be modelled as operator equations in infinite-dimensional spaces with a forward operator acting between Hilbert or Banach spaces—a formulation which quite often also serves as the basis for defining and analyzing solution methods. The additional amount of structure and geometric interpretability provided by the concept of an inner product has rendered these methods amenable to a convergence analysis, a fact which has led to a rigorous and comprehensive study of regularization methods in Hilbert spaces over the last three decades. However, for numerous problems such as x-ray diffractometry, certain inverse scattering problems and a number of parameter identification problems in PDEs, the reasons for using a Hilbert space setting seem to be based on conventions rather than an appropriate and realistic model choice, so often a Banach space setting would be closer to reality. Furthermore, non-Hilbertian regularization and data fidelity terms incorporating a priori information on solution and noise, such as general Lp-norms, TV-type norms, or the Kullback-Leibler divergence, have recently become very popular. These facts have motivated intensive investigations on regularization methods in Banach spaces, a topic which has emerged as a highly active research field within the area of inverse problems. Meanwhile some of the most well-known regularization approaches, such as Tikhonov-type methods requiring the solution of extremal problems, and iterative ones like the Landweber method, the Gauss-Newton method, as well as the approximate inverse method, have been investigated for linear and nonlinear operator equations in Banach spaces. Convergence with rates has been proven and conditions on the solution smoothness and on the structure of nonlinearity have been formulated. Still, beyond the existing results a large number of challenging open questions have arisen, due to the more involved handling of general Banach spaces and the larger variety

  18. Solution of the nonlinear inverse scattering problem by T -matrix completion. II. Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Howard W.; Markel, Vadim A.

    2016-10-01

    This is Part II of the paper series on data-compatible T -matrix completion (DCTMC), which is a method for solving nonlinear inverse problems. Part I of the series [H. W. Levinson and V. A. Markel, Phys. Rev. E 94, 043317 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.94.043317] contains theory and here we present simulations for inverse scattering of scalar waves. The underlying mathematical model is the scalar wave equation and the object function that is reconstructed is the medium susceptibility. The simulations are relevant to ultrasound tomographic imaging and seismic tomography. It is shown that DCTMC is a viable method for solving strongly nonlinear inverse problems with large data sets. It provides not only the overall shape of the object, but the quantitative contrast, which can correspond, for instance, to the variable speed of sound in the imaged medium.

  19. Solution of the nonlinear inverse scattering problem by T-matrix completion. II. Simulations.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Howard W; Markel, Vadim A

    2016-10-01

    This is Part II of the paper series on data-compatible T-matrix completion (DCTMC), which is a method for solving nonlinear inverse problems. Part I of the series [H. W. Levinson and V. A. Markel, Phys. Rev. E 94, 043317 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevE.94.043317] contains theory and here we present simulations for inverse scattering of scalar waves. The underlying mathematical model is the scalar wave equation and the object function that is reconstructed is the medium susceptibility. The simulations are relevant to ultrasound tomographic imaging and seismic tomography. It is shown that DCTMC is a viable method for solving strongly nonlinear inverse problems with large data sets. It provides not only the overall shape of the object, but the quantitative contrast, which can correspond, for instance, to the variable speed of sound in the imaged medium.

  20. Solving stochastic inverse elasticity problems via gradient-enhanced kernel PCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thimmisetty, C.; Zhao, W.; Chen, X.; Tong, C. H.; White, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    We study a class of inverse problems in which one wishes to determine the elastic properties of a subsurface formation based on deformation observations. This problem is challenging due to sparse observations, noisy measurements, and the highly heterogeneous nature of unknown underground structures. As a result, traditional deterministic inversion methods often fail to recover the unknown elastic properties with a complete description of their joint probabilistic distributions. Here, we consider a stochastic inversion problem where useful prior information about the geometry of the subsurface is given by a set of "snapshots" representing potential subsurface configurations generated by a machine-learning algorithm. Kernel principal component analysis is thus used to capture properties of the nonlinearly correlated observational data based on a smaller set of non-Gaussian "feature" random parameters. We then standardize these non-Gaussian feature parameters in terms of Gaussian random variables using Rosenblatt transformation and polynomial chaos expansion. In order to accelerate convergence of the stochastic inversion algorithm, one needs to obtain the gradient of a cost functional measuring the discrepancies between model solutions and deformation observations. Specially, the gradient information is incorporated into a Bayesian inference framework to determine the solution of the inverse problem via a variant of the MCMC algorithm. To compute the gradient information, a continuous self-adjoint model is derived and it is coupled with another two discretized adjoint models that are constructed by automatic differentiation toolkit TAPDENADE. We present numerical experiments involving a channelized formation to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the proposed inversion approach. This work was performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. A domain derivative-based method for solving elastodynamic inverse obstacle scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Louër, Frédérique

    2015-11-01

    The present work is concerned with the shape reconstruction problem of isotropic elastic inclusions from far-field data obtained by the scattering of a finite number of time-harmonic incident plane waves. This paper aims at completing the theoretical framework which is necessary for the application of geometric optimization tools to the inverse transmission problem in elastodynamics. The forward problem is reduced to systems of boundary integral equations following the direct and indirect methods initially developed for solving acoustic transmission problems. We establish the Fréchet differentiability of the boundary to far-field operator and give a characterization of the first Fréchet derivative and its adjoint operator. Using these results we propose an inverse scattering algorithm based on the iteratively regularized Gauß-Newton method and show numerical experiments in the special case of star-shaped obstacles.

  2. Effective one-dimensional approach to the source reconstruction problem of three-dimensional inverse optoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stritzel, J.; Melchert, O.; Wollweber, M.; Roth, B.

    2017-09-01

    The direct problem of optoacoustic signal generation in biological media consists of solving an inhomogeneous three-dimensional (3D) wave equation for an initial acoustic stress profile. In contrast, the more defiant inverse problem requires the reconstruction of the initial stress profile from a proper set of observed signals. In this article, we consider an effectively 1D approach, based on the assumption of a Gaussian transverse irradiation source profile and plane acoustic waves, in which the effects of acoustic diffraction are described in terms of a linear integral equation. The respective inverse problem along the beam axis can be cast into a Volterra integral equation of the second kind for which we explore here efficient numerical schemes in order to reconstruct initial stress profiles from observed signals, constituting a methodical progress of computational aspects of optoacoustics. In this regard, we explore the validity as well as the limits of the inversion scheme via numerical experiments, with parameters geared toward actual optoacoustic problem instances. The considered inversion input consists of synthetic data, obtained in terms of the effectively 1D approach, and, more generally, a solution of the 3D optoacoustic wave equation. Finally, we also analyze the effect of noise and different detector-to-sample distances on the optoacoustic signal and the reconstructed pressure profiles.

  3. New global stability estimates for the Gel'fand-Calderon inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, R. G.

    2011-01-01

    We prove new global stability estimates for the Gel'fand-Calderon inverse problem in 3D. For sufficiently regular potentials, this result of the present work is a principal improvement of the result of Alessandrini (1988 Appl. Anal. 27 153-172).

  4. Numerical solution of 2D-vector tomography problem using the method of approximate inverse

    SciTech Connect

    Svetov, Ivan; Maltseva, Svetlana; Polyakova, Anna

    2016-08-10

    We propose a numerical solution of reconstruction problem of a two-dimensional vector field in a unit disk from the known values of the longitudinal and transverse ray transforms. The algorithm is based on the method of approximate inverse. Numerical simulations confirm that the proposed method yields good results of reconstruction of vector fields.

  5. Integro-differential method of solving the inverse coefficient heat conduction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. L.; Zasyad'Ko, A. A.; Frolov, G. A.

    2010-03-01

    On the basis of differential transformations, a stable integro-differential method of solving the inverse heat conduction problem is suggested. The method has been tested on the example of determining the thermal diffusivity on quasi-stationary fusion and heating of a quartz glazed ceramics specimen.

  6. Global stability for an inverse problem in soil–structure interaction

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, G.; Morassi, A.; Rosset, E.; Vessella, S.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining the Winkler subgrade reaction coefficient of a slab foundation modelled as a thin elastic plate clamped at the boundary. The plate is loaded by a concentrated force and its transversal deflection is measured at the interior points. We prove a global Hölder stability estimate under (mild) regularity assumptions on the unknown coefficient. PMID:26345082

  7. Solution of a multiple-scattering inverse problem: electron diffraction from surfaces.

    PubMed

    Saldin, D K; Seubert, A; Heinz, K

    2002-03-18

    We present a solution to the multiple-scattering inverse problem for low-energy electron diffraction that enables the determination of the three-dimensional atomic structure of an entire surface unit cell directly from measured data. The solution requires a knowledge of the structure of the underlying bulk crystal and is implemented by a maximum entropy algorithm.

  8. Numerical solution of 2D-vector tomography problem using the method of approximate inverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetov, Ivan; Maltseva, Svetlana; Polyakova, Anna

    2016-08-01

    We propose a numerical solution of reconstruction problem of a two-dimensional vector field in a unit disk from the known values of the longitudinal and transverse ray transforms. The algorithm is based on the method of approximate inverse. Numerical simulations confirm that the proposed method yields good results of reconstruction of vector fields.

  9. ON THE GEOSTATISTICAL APPROACH TO THE INVERSE PROBLEM. (R825689C037)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The geostatistical approach to the inverse problem is discussed with emphasis on the importance of structural analysis. Although the geostatistical approach is occasionally misconstrued as mere cokriging, in fact it consists of two steps: estimation of statist...

  10. Inverse problem for the Verhulst equation of limited population growth with discrete experiment data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimov, Anvar; Kasenov, Syrym; Nurseitov, Daniyar; Serovajsky, Simon

    2016-08-01

    Verhulst limited growth model with unknown parameters of growth is considered. These parameters are defined by discrete experiment data. This inverse problem is solved with using gradient method with interpolation of data and without it. Approximation of the delta-function is used for the latter case. As an example the bacteria population E.coli is considered.

  11. Restart Operator Meta-heuristics for a Problem-Oriented Evolutionary Strategies Algorithm in Inverse Mathematical MISO Modelling Problem Solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikov, I. S.; Semenkin, E. S.

    2017-02-01

    This study is focused on solving an inverse mathematical modelling problem for dynamical systems based on observation data and control inputs. The mathematical model is being searched in the form of a linear differential equation, which determines the system with multiple inputs and a single output, and a vector of the initial point coordinates. The described problem is complex and multimodal and for this reason the proposed evolutionary-based optimization technique, which is oriented on a dynamical system identification problem, was applied. To improve its performance an algorithm restart operator was implemented.

  12. On an inverse problem of mathematical modeling of the extraction process of polydisperse porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orazov, Isabek; Sadybekov, Makhmud A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider one family of problems simulating the determination of target components and density of sources from given values of the initial and final states. The mathematical statement of these problems leads to the inverse problem for the diffusion equation, where it is required to find not only a solution of the problem, but also its right-hand side that depends only on a spatial variable. One of specific features of the considered problems is that the system of eigenfunctions of the multiple differentiation operator subject to boundary conditions of the initial problem does not have the basis property. The other specific feature of the considered problems is that an unknown function is simultaneously present both in the right-hand side of the equation and in conditions of the initial and final redefinition. We prove the unique existence of a generalized solution to the mentioned problem.

  13. Numerical study of the inverse problem for the diffusion-reaction equation using optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soboleva, O. V.; Brizitskii, R. V.

    2016-04-01

    The model of transfer of substance with mixed boundary condition is considered. The inverse extremum problem of identification of the main coefficient in a nonstationary diffusion-reaction equation is formulated. The numerical algorithm based on the Newton-method of nonlinear optimization and finite difference discretization for solving this extremum problem is developed and realized on computer. The results of numerical experiments are discussed.

  14. On the unique solvability of an inverse problem for a semilinear equation with final overdetermination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazaklioglu, Ali Ugur; Erdogan, Abdullah Said; Ashyralyev, Allaberen

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with existence and uniqueness of the solution of an inverse problem for a semilinear equation subject to a final overdetermination in a Banach space. Moreover, the first order of accuracy Rothe difference scheme is presented for the numerical solution of this problem. The existence and uniqueness result for this difference scheme is given. This difference scheme is applied on a particular example and some numerical results are given.

  15. Definition and solution of a stochastic inverse problem for the Manning’s n parameter field in hydrodynamic models

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Troy; Graham, L.; Estep, D.; Dawson, C.; Westerink, J. J.

    2015-02-03

    The uncertainty in spatially heterogeneous Manning’s n fields is quantified using a novel formulation and numerical solution of stochastic inverse problems for physics-based models. The uncertainty is quantified in terms of a probability measure and the physics-based model considered here is the state-of-the-art ADCIRC model although the presented methodology applies to other hydrodynamic models. An accessible overview of the formulation and solution of the stochastic inverse problem in a mathematically rigorous framework based on measure theory is presented in this paper. Technical details that arise in practice by applying the framework to determine the Manning’s n parameter field in a shallow water equation model used for coastal hydrodynamics are presented and an efficient computational algorithm and open source software package are developed. A new notion of “condition” for the stochastic inverse problem is defined and analyzed as it relates to the computation of probabilities. Finally, this notion of condition is investigated to determine effective output quantities of interest of maximum water elevations to use for the inverse problem for the Manning’s n parameter and the effect on model predictions is analyzed.

  16. Revealing the consequences and errors of substance arising from the inverse confusion between the crystal (ligand) field quantities and the zero-field splitting ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, Czesław; Karbowiak, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Survey of recent literature has revealed a doubly-worrying tendency concerning the treatment of the two distinct types of Hamiltonians, namely, the physical crystal field (CF), or equivalently ligand field (LF), Hamiltonians and the zero-field splitting (ZFS) Hamiltonians, which appear in the effective spin Hamiltonians (SH). The nature and properties of the CF (LF) Hamiltonians have been mixed up in various ways with those of the ZFS Hamiltonians. Such cases have been identified in a rapidly growing number of studies of the transition-ion based systems using electron magnetic resonance (EMR), optical spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements. These findings have far ranging implications since these Hamiltonians are cornerstones for interpretation of magnetic and spectroscopic properties of the single transition ions in various crystals or molecules as well as the exchange coupled systems (ECS) of transition ions, e.g. single molecule magnets (SMM) or single ion magnets (SIM). The seriousness of the consequences of such conceptual problems and related terminological confusions has reached a level that goes far beyond simple semantic issues or misleading keyword classifications of papers in journals and scientific databases. The prevailing confusion, denoted as the CF=ZFS confusion, pertains to the cases of labeling the true ZFS quantities as purportedly the CF (LF) quantities. Here we consider the inverse confusion between the CF (LF) quantities and the SH (ZFS) ones, denoted the ZFS=CF confusion, which consists in referring to the parameters (or Hamiltonians), which are the true CF (LF) quantities, as purportedly the ZFS (or SH) quantities. Specific cases of the ZFS=CF confusion identified in recent textbooks, reviews and papers, especially SMM- and SIM-related ones, are surveyed and the pertinent misconceptions are clarified. The serious consequences of the terminological confusions include misinterpretation of data from a wide range of experimental techniques and

  17. Analysis of forward and inverse problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rabitz, H.

    1993-12-01

    The overall scope of this research concerns the development and application of forward and inverse analysis tools for problems in chemical dynamics and chemical kinetics. The chemical dynamics work is specifically associated with relating features in potential surfaces and resultant dynamical behavior. The analogous inverse research aims to provide stable algorithms for extracting potential surfaces from laboratory data. In the case of chemical kinetics, the focus is on the development of systematic means to reduce the complexity of chemical kinetic models. Recent progress in these directions is summarized below.

  18. Scattering and inverse scattering for a left-definite Sturm-Liouville problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennewitz, C.; Brown, B. M.; Weikard, R.

    This work develops a scattering and an inverse scattering theory for the Sturm-Liouville equation -u″+qu=λwu where w may change sign but q⩾0. Thus the left-hand side of the equation gives rise to a positive quadratic form and one is led to a left-definite spectral problem. The crucial ingredient of the approach is a generalized transform built on the Jost solutions of the problem and hence termed the Jost transform and the associated Paley-Wiener theorem linking growth properties of transforms with support properties of functions. One motivation for this investigation comes from the Camassa-Holm equation for which the solution of the Cauchy problem can be achieved by the inverse scattering transform for -u″+1/4u=λwu.

  19. A neural network approach for the solution of electric and magnetic inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Coccorese, E.; Morabito, F.C. . Istituto di Ingegneria Elettronica); Martone, R. . Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica)

    1994-09-01

    Multilayer neural networks, trained via the back-propagation rule, are proved to provide an efficient means for solving electric and/or magnetic inverse problems. The underlying model of the system is learned by the network by means of a dataset defining the relationship between input and output parameters. The merits of the method are illustrated at the light of three example cases. The first two samples deal with inverse electrostatic problems which are relevant for nondestructive testing applications. In a first problem, a boss on an earthed plane is identified on the basis of the map of potential produced by a point charge. In the second problem, the geometric parameters of an ellipsoid carrying an electric charge are identified. In both cases, database of simulated measurements has been generated thanks to the available analytical solutions. As a sample magnetic inverse problem, the identification of a circular plasma in a tokamak device from external flux measurements is carried out. The results achieved show that the method here proposed is promising for technically meaningful applications.

  20. On computational experiments in some inverse problems of heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilchenko, G. G.; Bilchenko, N. G.

    2016-11-01

    The results of mathematical modeling of effective heat and mass transfer on hypersonic aircraft permeable surfaces are considered. The physic-chemical processes (the dissociation and the ionization) in laminar boundary layer of compressible gas are appreciated. Some algorithms of control restoration are suggested for the interpolation and approximation statements of heat and mass transfer inverse problems. The differences between the methods applied for the problem solutions search for these statements are discussed. Both the algorithms are realized as programs. Many computational experiments were accomplished with the use of these programs. The parameters of boundary layer obtained by means of the A.A.Dorodnicyn's generalized integral relations method from solving the direct problems have been used to obtain the inverse problems solutions. Two types of blowing laws restoration for the inverse problem in interpolation statement are presented as the examples. The influence of the temperature factor on the blowing restoration is investigated. The different character of sensitivity of controllable parameters (the local heat flow and local tangent friction) respectively to step (discrete) changing of control (the blowing) and the switching point position is studied.

  1. Inversion of the conical Radon transform with vertices on a surface of revolution arising in an application of a Compton camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sunghwan

    2017-06-01

    A Compton camera has been introduced for use in single photon emission computed tomography to improve the low efficiency of a conventional gamma camera. In general, a Compton camera brings about the conical Radon transform. Here we consider a conical Radon transform with the vertices on a rotation symmetric set with respect to a coordinate axis. We show that this conical Radon transform can be decomposed into two transforms: the spherical sectional transform and the weighted fan beam transform. After finding inversion formulas for these two transforms, we provide an inversion formula for the conical Radon transform.

  2. The Uniqueness of Single Data Function, Multiple Model Functions, Inverse Problems Including the Rayleigh Wave Dispersion Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, William

    2017-04-01

    We prove that the problem of inverting Rayleigh wave phase velocity functions c( k ), where k is wavenumber, for density ρ ( z ), rigidity μ ( z ) and Lamé parameter λ ( z ), where z is depth, is fully non-unique, at least in the highly-idealized case where the base Earth model is an isotropic half space. The model functions completely trade off. This is one special case of a common inversion scenario in which one seeks to determine several model functions from a single data function. We explore the circumstances under which this broad class of problems is unique, starting with very simple scenarios, building up to the somewhat more complicated (and common) case where data and model functions are related by convolutions, and then finally, to scale-independent problems (which include the Rayleigh wave problem). The idealized cases that we examine analytically provide insight into the kinds of nonuniqueness that are inherent in the much more complicated problems encountered in modern geophysical imaging (though they do not necessarily provide methods for solving those problems). We also define what is meant by a Backus and Gilbert resolution kernel in this kind of inversion and show under what circumstances a unique localized average of a single model function can be constructed.

  3. The Uniqueness of Single Data Function, Multiple Model Functions, Inverse Problems Including the Rayleigh Wave Dispersion Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, William

    2017-02-01

    We prove that the problem of inverting Rayleigh wave phase velocity functions c( k ) , where k is wavenumber, for density ρ ( z ) , rigidity μ ( z ) and Lamé parameter λ ( z ) , where z is depth, is fully non-unique, at least in the highly-idealized case where the base Earth model is an isotropic half space. The model functions completely trade off. This is one special case of a common inversion scenario in which one seeks to determine several model functions from a single data function. We explore the circumstances under which this broad class of problems is unique, starting with very simple scenarios, building up to the somewhat more complicated (and common) case where data and model functions are related by convolutions, and then finally, to scale-independent problems (which include the Rayleigh wave problem). The idealized cases that we examine analytically provide insight into the kinds of nonuniqueness that are inherent in the much more complicated problems encountered in modern geophysical imaging (though they do not necessarily provide methods for solving those problems). We also define what is meant by a Backus and Gilbert resolution kernel in this kind of inversion and show under what circumstances a unique localized average of a single model function can be constructed.

  4. Inverse reference in subtraction performance: an analysis from arithmetic word problems.

    PubMed

    Orrantia, Josetxu; Rodríguez, Laura; Múñez, David; Vicente, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Studies of elementary calculation have shown that adults solve basic subtraction problems faster with problems presented in addition format (e.g., 6 ± = 13) than in standard subtraction format (e.g., 13 - 6 = ). Therefore, it is considered that adults solve subtraction problems by reference to the inverse operation (e.g., for 13 - 6 = 7, "I know that 13 is 6 + 7") because presenting the subtraction problem in addition format does not require the mental rearrangement of the problem elements into the addition format. In two experiments, we examine whether adults' use of addition to solve subtractions is modulated by the arrangement of minuend and subtrahend, regardless of format. To this end, we used arithmetic word problems since single-digit problems in subtraction format would not allow the subtrahend to appear before the minuend. In Experiment 1, subtractions were presented by arranging minuend and subtrahend according to previous research. In Experiment 2, operands were reversed. The overall results showed that participants benefited from word problems where the subtrahend appears before the minuend, including subtractions in standard subtraction format. These findings add to a growing body of literature that emphasizes the role of inverse reference in adults' performance on subtractions.

  5. Analysis of forward and inverse problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rabitz, H.

    1991-01-01

    This research is concerned with the development and application of advanced analysis tools for studying dynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopic phenomena from a forward and inverse perspective. In particular, the forward problem is concerned with understanding how detailed interatomic potential information maps onto a hierarchy of chemical dynamic and kinetic observables. The inverse aspects of the research are concerned with exactly the reverse of this process, whereby we desire to understand how particular measurements project back to yield information regarding the potential surface. Thus, in the latter domain, our research is concerned with the development of theoretically based tools ultimately aimed at applications to the inversion of quality laboratory data for the extraction of microscopic potential information.

  6. Inverse problems and optimal experiment design in unsteady heat transfer processes identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artyukhin, Eugene A.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental-computational methods for estimating characteristics of unsteady heat transfer processes are analyzed. The methods are based on the principles of distributed parameter system identification. The theoretical basis of such methods is the numerical solution of nonlinear ill-posed inverse heat transfer problems and optimal experiment design problems. Numerical techniques for solving problems are briefly reviewed. The results of the practical application of identification methods are demonstrated when estimating effective thermophysical characteristics of composite materials and thermal contact resistance in two-layer systems.

  7. Solving Large-Scale Inverse Magnetostatic Problems using the Adjoint Method

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Wautischer, Gregor; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Hinze, Michael; Suess, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the reconstruction of the magnetization state within magnetic components is presented. The occurring inverse magnetostatic problem is solved by means of an adjoint approach, based on the Fredkin-Koehler method for the solution of the forward problem. Due to the use of hybrid FEM-BEM coupling combined with matrix compression techniques the resulting algorithm is well suited for large-scale problems. Furthermore the reconstruction of the magnetization state within a permanent magnet as well as an optimal design application are demonstrated. PMID:28098851

  8. Solving Large-Scale Inverse Magnetostatic Problems using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Wautischer, Gregor; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Hinze, Michael; Suess, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the reconstruction of the magnetization state within magnetic components is presented. The occurring inverse magnetostatic problem is solved by means of an adjoint approach, based on the Fredkin-Koehler method for the solution of the forward problem. Due to the use of hybrid FEM-BEM coupling combined with matrix compression techniques the resulting algorithm is well suited for large-scale problems. Furthermore the reconstruction of the magnetization state within a permanent magnet as well as an optimal design application are demonstrated.

  9. On the new approach to solving the inverse problem of gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsanukaev, Z. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the studies within the new approach to solving the inverse problem of gravimetry are considered. This approach consists in direct (analytical) continuation of the anomalous gravitational field specified on the Earth's surface into the lower half-space with the use of the method of discrete approximations. The solution of the problem of analytical continuation is demonstrated by the model example. In the solution of the problem of analytical continuation, the developed algorithms and computer programs were implemented in two program packages which are used both in the model computations and in practice.

  10. Escript: Open Source Environment For Solving Large-Scale Geophysical Joint Inversion Problems in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Lutz; Altinay, Cihan; Fenwick, Joel; Smith, Troy

    2014-05-01

    The program package escript has been designed for solving mathematical modeling problems using python, see Gross et al. (2013). Its development and maintenance has been funded by the Australian Commonwealth to provide open source software infrastructure for the Australian Earth Science community (recent funding by the Australian Geophysical Observing System EIF (AGOS) and the AuScope Collaborative Research Infrastructure Scheme (CRIS)). The key concepts of escript are based on the terminology of spatial functions and partial differential equations (PDEs) - an approach providing abstraction from the underlying spatial discretization method (i.e. the finite element method (FEM)). This feature presents a programming environment to the user which is easy to use even for complex models. Due to the fact that implementations are independent from data structures simulations are easily portable across desktop computers and scalable compute clusters without modifications to the program code. escript has been successfully applied in a variety of applications including modeling mantel convection, melting processes, volcanic flow, earthquakes, faulting, multi-phase flow, block caving and mineralization (see Poulet et al. 2013). The recent escript release (see Gross et al. (2013)) provides an open framework for solving joint inversion problems for geophysical data sets (potential field, seismic and electro-magnetic). The strategy bases on the idea to formulate the inversion problem as an optimization problem with PDE constraints where the cost function is defined by the data defect and the regularization term for the rock properties, see Gross & Kemp (2013). This approach of first-optimize-then-discretize avoids the assemblage of the - in general- dense sensitivity matrix as used in conventional approaches where discrete programming techniques are applied to the discretized problem (first-discretize-then-optimize). In this paper we will discuss the mathematical framework for

  11. Investigation of one inverse problem in case of modeling water areas with "liquid" boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheloput, Tatiana; Agoshkov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    In hydrodynamics often appears the problem of modeling water areas (oceans, seas, rivers, etc.) with "liquid" boundaries. "Liquid" boundary means set of those parts of boundary where impermeability condition is broken (for example, straits, bays borders, estuaries, interfaces of oceans). Frequently such effects are ignored: for "liquid" boundaries the same conditions are used as for "solid" ones, "material boundary" approximation is applied [1]. Sometimes it is possible to interpolate the results received from models of bigger areas. Moreover, approximate estimates for boundary conditions are often used. However, those approximations are not always valid. Sometimes errors in boundary condition determination could lead to a significant decrease in the accuracy of the simulation results. In this work one way of considering the problem mentioned above is described. According to this way one inverse problem on reconstruction of boundary function in convection-reaction-diffusion equations which describe transfer of heat and salinity is solved. The work is based on theory of adjoint equations [2] and optimal control, as well as on common methodology of investigation inverse problems [3]. The work contains theoretical investigation and the results of computer simulation applied for the Baltic Sea. Moreover, conditions and restrictions that should be satisfied for solvability of the problem are entered and justified in the work. Submitted work could be applied for the solution of more complicated inverse problems and data assimilation problems in the areas with "liquid" boundaries; also it is a step for developing algorithms on computing level, speed, temperature and salinity that could be applied for real objects. References 1. A. E. Gill. Atmosphere-ocean dynamics. // London: Academic Press, 1982. 2. G. I. Marchuk. Adjoint equations. // Moscow: INM RAS, 2000, 175 p. (in Russian). 3. V.I. Agoshkov. The methods of optimal control and adjoint equations in problems of

  12. Beamforming regularization matrix and inverse problems applied to sound field measurement and extrapolation using microphone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, P.-A.; Camier, C.; Pasco, Y.; Berry, A.; Chambatte, E.; Lapointe, R.; Delalay, M.-A.

    2011-11-01

    For sound field reproduction using multichannel spatial sound systems such as Wave Field Synthesis and Ambisonics, sound field extrapolation is a useful tool for the measurement, description and characterization of a sound environment to be reproduced in a listening area. In this paper, the inverse problem theory is adapted to sound field extrapolation around a microphone array for further spatial sound and sound environment reproduction. A general review of inverse problem theory and analysis tools is given and used for the comparative evaluation of various microphone array configurations. Classical direct regularization methods such as truncated singular value decomposition and Tikhonov regularization are recalled. On the basis of the reviewed background, a new regularization method adapted to the problem at hand is introduced. This method involves the use of an a priori beamforming measurement to define a data-dependent discrete smoothing norm for the regularization of the inverse problem. This method which represents the main contribution of this paper shows promising results and opens new research avenues.

  13. A hierarchical Bayesian-MAP approach to inverse problems in imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Raghu G.

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel approach to inverse problems in imaging based on a hierarchical Bayesian-MAP (HB-MAP) formulation. In this paper we specifically focus on the difficult and basic inverse problem of multi-sensor (tomographic) imaging wherein the source object of interest is viewed from multiple directions by independent sensors. Given the measurements recorded by these sensors, the problem is to reconstruct the image (of the object) with a high degree of fidelity. We employ a probabilistic graphical modeling extension of the compound Gaussian distribution as a global image prior into a hierarchical Bayesian inference procedure. Since the prior employed by our HB-MAP algorithm is general enough to subsume a wide class of priors including those typically employed in compressive sensing (CS) algorithms, HB-MAP algorithm offers a vehicle to extend the capabilities of current CS algorithms to include truly global priors. After rigorously deriving the regression algorithm for solving our inverse problem from first principles, we demonstrate the performance of the HB-MAP algorithm on Monte Carlo trials and on real empirical data (natural scenes). In all cases we find that our algorithm outperforms previous approaches in the literature including filtered back-projection and a variety of state-of-the-art CS algorithms. We conclude with directions of future research emanating from this work.

  14. Solving the inverse problem of electrocardiography using a Duncan and Horn formulation of the Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Keith L; Sorensen, Danny C; Khoury, Dirar S

    2004-03-01

    Numeric regularization methods most often used to solve the ill-posed inverse problem of electrocardiography are spatial and ignore the temporal nature of the problem. In this paper, a Kalman filter reformulation incorporated temporal information to regularize the inverse problem, and was applied to reconstruct left ventricular endocardial electrograms based on cavitary electrograms measured by a noncontact, multielectrode probe. These results were validated against in situ electrograms measured with an integrated, multielectrode basket-catheter. A three-dimensional, probe-endocardium model was determined from multiplane fluoroscopic images. The boundary element method was applied to solve the boundary value problem and determine a linear relationship between endocardial and probe potentials. The Duncan and Horn formulation of the Kalman filter was employed and was compared to the commonly used zero- and first-order Tikhonov spatial regularization as well as the Twomey temporal regularization method. Endocardial electrograms were reconstructed during both sinus and paced rhythms. The Paige and Saunders solution of the Duncan and Horn formulation reconstructed endocardial electrograms at an amplitude relative error of 13% (potential amplitude) which was superior to solutions obtained with zero-order Tikhonov (relative error, 31%), first-order Tikhonov (relative error, 19%), and Twomey regularization (relative error, 44%). Likewise, activation time error in the inverse solution using the Duncan and Horn formulation (2.9 ms) was smaller than that of zero-order Tikhonov (4.8 ms), first-order Tikhonov (5.4 ms), and Twomey regularization (5.8 ms). Therefore, temporal regularization based on the Duncan and Horn formulation of the Kalman filter improves the solution of the inverse problem of electrocardiography.

  15. The \\bar\\partial-equation in the multidimensional inverse scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, R. G.; Khenkin, G. M.

    1987-06-01

    CONTENTSChapter I. A survey of the results § 1.1. The method of Faddeev in the inverse scattering problem for the Schrödinger equation -\\Delta\\psi+v\\cdot\\psi=k^2\\psi § 1.2. The results of Newton, Ablowitz, and Nachman § 1.3. Necessary and sufficient properties of the scattering data. Generalized dispersion relations § 1.4. Methods of solution of the inverse problem with non-overdetermined data. The results of Moses and Prosser and their generalizations § 1.5. The inverse problem on a fixed energy level for the two-dimensional Schrödinger operator and non-linear equations. The methods of S. P. Novikov and Manakov and their further development § 1.6. The inverse problem on a fixed energy level for the three-dimensional Schrödinger operator. The results of Beals and Coifman. New resultsChapter II. Necessary properties of the scattering data § 2.1. The Green-Faddeev function G(x, k) and its properties. Analysis of the integral equation \\mu=1+G*\\mu\\cdot v § 2.2. Generalized scattering data h(k,l). The non-linear \\bar\\partial-equation \\bar\\partial h=\\{h,h\\}. Corollaries § 2.3. Properties of zeros of the Fredholm determinant \\Delta(k) for the equation \\mu=1+G*\\mu\\cdot v § 2.4. Solution of the inverse problem on the basis of generalized dispersion relationsChapter III. Characterization of scattering data. Preliminary results § 3.1. Liouville's theorem for solutions of the non-linear \\bar\\partial-equation § 3.2. Formulae for solutions of the \\bar\\partial-equation in a concave domain of \\mathbf{C}^n § 3.3. Estimates for the form \\{h, h\\} § 3.4. Estimates for solutions of the \\bar\\partial-equation § 3.5. Proof of Liouville's theorem for the non-linear \\bar\\partial-equation Chapter IV. Characterization of scattering data. Final results § 4.1. Theorems concerning the characterization of scattering data in "physical" and "non-physical" domains § 4.2. A separate analyticity theorem for the non-linear \\bar\\partial-equation § 4

  16. Variational approach to direct and inverse problems of atmospheric pollution studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena; Penenko, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    We present the development of a variational approach for solving interrelated problems of atmospheric hydrodynamics and chemistry concerning air pollution transport and transformations. The proposed approach allows us to carry out complex studies of different-scale physical and chemical processes using the methods of direct and inverse modeling [1-3]. We formulate the problems of risk/vulnerability and uncertainty assessment, sensitivity studies, variational data assimilation procedures [4], etc. A computational technology of constructing consistent mathematical models and methods of their numerical implementation is based on the variational principle in the weak constraint formulation specifically designed to account for uncertainties in models and observations. Algorithms for direct and inverse modeling are designed with the use of global and local adjoint problems. Implementing the idea of adjoint integrating factors provides unconditionally monotone and stable discrete-analytic approximations for convection-diffusion-reaction problems [5,6]. The general framework is applied to the direct and inverse problems for the models of transport and transformation of pollutants in Siberian and Arctic regions. The work has been partially supported by the RFBR grant 14-01-00125 and RAS Presidium Program I.33P. References: 1. V. Penenko, A.Baklanov, E. Tsvetova and A. Mahura . Direct and inverse problems in a variational concept of environmental modeling //Pure and Applied Geoph.(2012) v.169: 447-465. 2. V. V. Penenko, E. A. Tsvetova, and A. V. Penenko Development of variational approach for direct and inverse problems of atmospheric hydrodynamics and chemistry, Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2015, Vol. 51, No. 3, p. 311-319, DOI: 10.1134/S0001433815030093. 3. V.V. Penenko, E.A. Tsvetova, A.V. Penenko. Methods based on the joint use of models and observational data in the framework of variational approach to forecasting weather and atmospheric composition

  17. A multiple-scale Pascal polynomial for 2D Stokes and inverse Cauchy-Stokes problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chein-Shan; Young, D. L.

    2016-05-01

    The polynomial expansion method is a useful tool for solving both the direct and inverse Stokes problems, which together with the pointwise collocation technique is easy to derive the algebraic equations for satisfying the Stokes differential equations and the specified boundary conditions. In this paper we propose two novel numerical algorithms, based on a third-first order system and a third-third order system, to solve the direct and the inverse Cauchy problems in Stokes flows by developing a multiple-scale Pascal polynomial method, of which the scales are determined a priori by the collocation points. To assess the performance through numerical experiments, we find that the multiple-scale Pascal polynomial expansion method (MSPEM) is accurate and stable against large noise.

  18. Inverse problem for multiple scattering of fast charged particles in a mesoscopic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ramm, A.G. C-3 Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexcio 87545 ); Berman, G.P. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Research Educational Center for Nonlinear Processes, The Krasnoyarsk Technical University, 660036 Krasnoyarsk Theoretical Department, The Krasnoyarsk State University, 660036 Krasnoyarsk )

    1995-01-15

    We consider an inverse problem of multiple scattering for fast charged particles propagating in an inhomogeneous medium. The scattering processes are described by the diffusion-type equation in the small-angle approximation. It is shown that by using the scattering data given on some small interval, it is possible to recover the spatial dependence of the density of the medium. This inverse problem is ill posed in the sense that small noise in the data may lead to large perturbations in [epsilon]([ital z]) if no [ital a] priori assumptions are made about [epsilon]([ital z]). This is clear from our presentation, since an analytic continuation of [epsilon]([ital z]) is involved. One hopes that the proposed method can be applied to thin foils and to mesoscopic systems.

  19. Inverse acoustic scattering problem in half-space with anisotropic random impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helin, Tapio; Lassas, Matti; Päivärinta, Lassi

    2017-02-01

    We study an inverse acoustic scattering problem in half-space with a probabilistic impedance boundary value condition. The Robin coefficient (surface impedance) is assumed to be a Gaussian random function with a pseudodifferential operator describing the covariance. We measure the amplitude of the backscattered field averaged over the frequency band and assume that the data is generated by a single realization of λ. Our main result is to show that under certain conditions the principal symbol of the covariance operator of λ is uniquely determined. Most importantly, no approximations are needed and we can solve the full non-linear inverse problem. We concentrate on anisotropic models for the principal symbol, which leads to the analysis of a novel anisotropic spherical Radon transform and its invertibility.

  20. Inverse problem for shape control of flexible space reflectors using distributed solar pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borggräfe, A.; Heiligers, J.; Ceriotti, M.; McInnes, C. R.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates controlled elastic deflection of thin circular space reflectors using an inverse problem approach to non-linear thin membrane theory. When changing the surface reflectivity across the membrane, the distributed loads due to ambient solar radiation pressure can be manipulated optically, thus controlling the surface shape without using mechanical or piezo-electric systems. The surface reflectivity can in principle be modulated using uniformly distributed thin-film electro-chromic coatings. We present an analytic solution to the inverse problem of finding the necessary reflectivity distribution that creates a specific membrane deflection, for example that of a parabolic reflector. Importantly, the reflectivity distribution across the surface is found to be independent of membrane size, thickness and solar distance, enabling engineering of the reflectivity distribution directly during the manufacture of the membrane.

  1. Variable-Precision Arithmetic for Solving Inverse Problems of Electrical Impedance Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.; Yamada, S.; Iwahara, M.; Yang, H.

    2005-04-09

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a nondestructive imaging technique, which reconstructs the electrical characteristic tomographys by electrical measurement on the periphery of objects. EIT approximates the spatial distribution of impedance (or conductivity) within the detected objects via employing data of injected electrical currents and boundary electrical potentials. This technique would be used for detecting flaws inside metal materials or providing medical images. In theory EIT belongs to inverse problems of low frequency current field and its reconstruction calculation suffers from ill-posed nonlinear nature. This paper presents variable-precision arithmetic is effective to improve the precision of conventional finite-difference in Newton's method. Comparing with exact symbolic arithmetic and floating-point arithmetic, variable-precision arithmetic achieves a good tradeoff between accuracy and complexity of computing. The simulation results have illustrated that variable-precision arithmetic is valid for solving inverse problems of EIT.

  2. Adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer approach to inverse Ising problems with quenched random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiping; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2013-06-01

    The adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer equation is derived for inverse Ising problems in the presence of quenched random fields. We test the proposed scheme on Sherrington-Kirkpatrick, Hopfield, and random orthogonal models and find that the adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer approach allows accurate inference of quenched random fields whose distribution can be either Gaussian or bimodal. In particular, another competitive method for inferring external fields, namely, the naive mean field method with diagonal weights, is compared and discussed.

  3. Assessing and accounting for the effects of model error in Bayesian solutions to hydrogeophysical inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, C.; Irving, J.; Roubinet, D.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical methods have gained much interest in hydrology over the past two decades because of their ability to provide estimates of the spatial distribution of subsurface properties at a scale that is often relevant to key hydrological processes. Because of an increased desire to quantify uncertainty in hydrological predictions, many hydrogeophysical inverse problems have recently been posed within a Bayesian framework, such that estimates of hydrological properties and their corresponding uncertainties can be obtained. With the Bayesian approach, it is often necessary to make significant approximations to the associated hydrological and geophysical forward models such that stochastic sampling from the posterior distribution, for example using Markov-chain-Monte-Carlo (MCMC) methods, is computationally feasible. These approximations lead to model structural errors, which, so far, have not been properly treated in hydrogeophysical inverse problems. Here, we study the inverse problem of estimating unsaturated hydraulic properties, namely the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) parameters, in a layered subsurface from time-lapse, zero-offset-profile (ZOP) ground penetrating radar (GPR) data, collected over the course of an infiltration experiment. In particular, we investigate the effects of assumptions made for computational tractability of the stochastic inversion on model prediction errors as a function of depth and time. These assumptions are that (i) infiltration is purely vertical and can be modeled by the 1D Richards equation, and (ii) the petrophysical relationship between water content and relative dielectric permittivity is known. Results indicate that model errors for this problem are far from Gaussian and independently identically distributed, which has been the common assumption in previous efforts in this domain. In order to develop a more appropriate likelihood formulation, we use (i) a stochastic description of the model error that is obtained through

  4. Differential topology of the inverse kinematic problem for redundant robot manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Tchon, K. )

    1991-10-01

    In this paper a program of singularity theory is proclaimed to be of systematic use in robotics. Complete lists of normal forms are proposed and are regarded as candidate models of kinematics of robot manipulators. Arguments for the applicability of candidate normal forms to manipulator kinematics are provided. Singularities and bifurcation diagrams of the normal forms are examined and consequences derived for the inverse kinematic problem in redundant kinematics with singularities.

  5. Inverse Source Problem in Non-homogeneous and Metamaterial Background Media: Antenna Synthesis and Performance Bounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-28

    each one), as governed by a for- mally tractable source-energy cost function that is physically motivated by ohmic loss control . The derived theory ...The main accomplishments of this work are: • The development of a new theory of the full vector electromagnetic inverse source problem in non...plus reactive power tun- ing). • The demonstration, via many computer simulations, of the effective- ness of this theory as a tool for antenna

  6. Iterative methods for solving coefficient inverse problems of wave tomography in models with attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharsky, Alexander V.; Romanov, Sergey Y.

    2017-02-01

    We develop efficient iterative methods for solving inverse problems of wave tomography in models incorporating both diffraction effects and attenuation. In the inverse problem the aim is to reconstruct the velocity structure and the function that characterizes the distribution of attenuation properties in the object studied. We prove mathematically and rigorously the differentiability of the residual functional in normed spaces, and derive the corresponding formula for the Fréchet derivative. The computation of the Fréchet derivative includes solving both the direct problem with the Neumann boundary condition and the reversed-time conjugate problem. We develop efficient methods for numerical computations where the approximate solution is found using the detector measurements of the wave field and its normal derivative. The wave field derivative values at detector locations are found by solving the exterior boundary value problem with the Dirichlet boundary conditions. We illustrate the efficiency of this approach by applying it to model problems. The algorithms developed are highly parallelizable and designed to be run on supercomputers. Among the most promising medical applications of our results is the development of ultrasonic tomographs for differential diagnosis of breast cancer.

  7. Using the Schwinger variational functional for the solution of inverse transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    A new iterative inverse method for gama-ray transport problems is presented. The method, based on a novel application of the Schwinger variational functional, is developed as a perturbation problem in which the current model (in the iterative process) is considered the initial, unperturbed system, and the actual model is considered the perturbed system. The new method requires the solution of a set of uncoupled one-group forward and adjoint transport equations in each iteration. Four inverse problems are considered: determination of (1) interface locations in a multilayer sourcehhield system; (2) the isotopic composition of an unknown source (including inert elements); (3) interface locations and the source composition simultaneously; and (4) the composition of an unknown layer in the shield. Only the first two problems were actually solved in numerical one-dimensional (spherical) test cases. The method worked well for the unknown interface location problem and extremely well for the unknown source composition problem. Convergence of the method was heavily dependent on the initial guess.

  8. Well-posedness and qualitative behaviour of a semi-linear parabolic Cauchy problem arising from a generic model for fractional-order autocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J C; Needham, D J

    2015-03-08

    In this paper, we examine a semi-linear parabolic Cauchy problem with non-Lipschitz nonlinearity which arises as a generic form in a significant number of applications. Specifically, we obtain a well-posedness result and examine the qualitative structure of the solution in detail. The standard classical approach to establishing well-posedness is precluded owing to the lack of Lipschitz continuity for the nonlinearity. Here, existence and uniqueness of solutions is established via the recently developed generic approach to this class of problem (Meyer & Needham 2015 The Cauchy problem for non-Lipschitz semi-linear parabolic partial differential equations. London Mathematical Society Lecture Note Series, vol. 419) which examines the difference of the maximal and minimal solutions to the problem. From this uniqueness result, the approach of Meyer & Needham allows for development of a comparison result which is then used to exhibit global continuous dependence of solutions to the problem on a suitable initial dataset. The comparison and continuous dependence results obtained here are novel to this class of problem. This class of problem arises specifically in the study of a one-step autocatalytic reaction, which is schematically given by A→B at rate a(p)b(q) (where a and b are the concentrations of A and B, respectively, with 0problem has been lacking up to the present.

  9. Uniqueness of the interior plane strain time-harmonic viscoelastic inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixiao; Barbone, Paul E.; Harari, Isaac; Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-07-01

    Elasticity imaging has emerged as a promising medical imaging technique with applications in the detection, diagnosis and treatment monitoring of several types of disease. In elasticity imaging measured displacement fields are used to generate images of elastic parameters of tissue by solving an inverse problem. When the tissue excitation, and the resulting tissue motion is time-harmonic, elasticity imaging can be extended to image the viscoelastic properties of the tissue. This leads to an inverse problem for the complex-valued shear modulus at a given frequency. In this manuscript we have considered the uniqueness of this inverse problem for an incompressible, isotropic linear viscoelastic solid in a state of plane strain. For a single measured displacement field we conclude that the solution is infinite dimensional, and the data required to render it unique is determined by the measured strain field. In contrast, for two independent displacement fields such that the principal directions of the resulting strain fields are different, the space of possible solutions is eight dimensional, and given additional data, like the value of the shear modulus at four locations, or over a calibration region, we may determine the shear modulus everywhere. We have also considered simple analytical examples that verify these results and offer additional insights. The results derived in this paper may be used as guidelines by the practitioners of elasticity imaging in designing more robust and accurate imaging protocols.

  10. Reduced conductivity dependence method for increase of dipole localization accuracy in the EEG inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Yitembe, Bertrand Russel; Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Van Keer, Roger; Dupre, Luc

    2011-05-01

    The EEG is a neurological diagnostic tool with high temporal resolution. However, when solving the EEG inverse problem, its localization accuracy is limited because of noise in measurements and available uncertainties of the conductivity value in the forward model evaluations. This paper proposes the reduced conductivity dependence (RCD) method for decreasing the localization error in EEG source analysis by limiting the propagation of the uncertain conductivity values to the solutions of the inverse problem. We redefine the traditional EEG cost function, and in contrast to previous approaches, we introduce a selection procedure of the EEG potentials. The selected potentials are, as low as possible, affected by the uncertainties of the conductivity when solving the inverse problem. We validate the methodology on the widely used three-shell spherical head model with a single electrical dipole and multiple dipoles as source model. The proposed RCD method enhances the source localization accuracy with a factor ranging between 2 and 4, dependent on the dipole location and the noise in measurements. © 2011 IEEE

  11. The inverse problem of acoustic wave scattering by an air-saturated poroelastic cylinder.

    PubMed

    Ogam, Erick; Fellah, Z E A; Baki, Paul

    2013-03-01

    The efficient use of plastic foams in a diverse range of structural applications like in noise reduction, cushioning, and sleeping mattresses requires detailed characterization of their permeability and deformation (load-bearing) behavior. The elastic moduli and airflow resistance properties of foams are often measured using two separate techniques, one employing mechanical vibration methods and the other, flow rates of fluids based on fluid mechanics technology, respectively. A multi-parameter inverse acoustic scattering problem to recover airflow resistivity (AR) and mechanical properties of an air-saturated foam cylinder is solved. A wave-fluid saturated poroelastic structure interaction model based on the modified Biot theory and plane-wave decomposition using orthogonal cylindrical functions is employed to solve the inverse problem. The solutions to the inverse problem are obtained by constructing the objective functional given by the total square of the difference between predictions from the model and scattered acoustic field data acquired in an anechoic chamber. The value of the recovered AR is in good agreement with that of a slab sample cut from the cylinder and characterized using a method employing low frequency transmitted and reflected acoustic waves in a long waveguide developed by Fellah et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78(11), 114902 (2007)].

  12. Sparse Solution of High-Dimensional Model Calibration Inverse Problems under Uncertainty in Prior Structural Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad khaninezhad, M.; Jafarpour, B.

    2012-12-01

    Data limitation and heterogeneity of the geologic formations introduce significant uncertainty in predicting the related flow and transport processes in these environments. Fluid flow and displacement behavior in subsurface systems is mainly controlled by the structural connectivity models that create preferential flow pathways (or barriers). The connectivity of extreme geologic features strongly constrains the evolution of the related flow and transport processes in subsurface formations. Therefore, characterization of the geologic continuity and facies connectivity is critical for reliable prediction of the flow and transport behavior. The goal of this study is to develop a robust and geologically consistent framework for solving large-scale nonlinear subsurface characterization inverse problems under uncertainty about geologic continuity and structural connectivity. We formulate a novel inverse modeling approach by adopting a sparse reconstruction perspective, which involves two major components: 1) sparse description of hydraulic property distribution under significant uncertainty in structural connectivity and 2) formulation of an effective sparsity-promoting inversion method that is robust against prior model uncertainty. To account for the significant variability in the structural connectivity, we use, as prior, multiple distinct connectivity models. For sparse/compact representation of high-dimensional hydraulic property maps, we investigate two methods. In one approach, we apply the principle component analysis (PCA) to each prior connectivity model individually and combine the resulting leading components from each model to form a diverse geologic dictionary. Alternatively, we combine many realizations of the hydraulic properties from different prior connectivity models and use them to generate a diverse training dataset. We use the training dataset with a sparsifying transform, such as K-SVD, to construct a sparse geologic dictionary that is robust to

  13. Computing specific intensity distributions for laser material processing by solving an inverse heat conduction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völl, Annika; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Laser beam intensity distribution profiles for material processing techniques are most of the time restricted to be either of Gaussian or tophat shape. This often leads to different kind of problems especially at the edges of the laser-heated tracks, examples are energy losses or unnecessary overlaps. Thus, machining quality and process efficiency could be much improved by using application specific intensity profiles to generate optimal temperature distributions in the processed material. In this work, we present a numerical method to derive a specific intensity profile for a given temperature distribution. As this problem belongs to the set of inverse heat conduction problems, which are ill-posed, special regularization algorithms are needed. The only method to solve this inverse problem in reasonable time is the conjugate gradient method which we extend to the given problem of laser material processing applications. This method is an iterative approach where in each step the actual temperature distribution is calculated by using the finite element method. In general, the proposed method is applicable for materials with constant or temperature dependent coefficients, for static and dynamic distributions as well as for plane or complex geometries. However, restricting ourselves to plane geometries, intensity distributions that create tophat- or stepped temperature distributions on the plane surface of the processed material are derived and will be presented. In future work, we intend to verify these results using freeform optics as well as singly addressable V(E)CSEL arrays.

  14. On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, M. B.; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Commer, Michael; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Englert, Andreas L.; Steefel, Carl I.; Hubbard, Susan

    2012-06-11

    We consider a field-scale tracer experiment conducted in 2007 in a shallow uranium-contaminated aquifer at Rifle, Colorado. In developing a reliable approach for inferring hydrological properties at the site through inverse modeling of the tracer data, decisions made on how to parameterize heterogeneity (i.e., how to represent a heterogeneous distribution using a limited number of parameters that are amenable to estimation) are of paramount importance. We present an approach for hydrological inversion of the tracer data and explore, using a 2D synthetic example at first, how parameterization affects the solution, and how additional characterization data could be incorporated to reduce uncertainty. Specifically, we examine sensitivity of the results to the configuration of pilot points used in a geostatistical parameterization, and to the sampling frequency and measurement error of the concentration data. A reliable solution of the inverse problem is found when the pilot point configuration is carefully implemented. In addition, we examine the use of a zonation parameterization, in which the geometry of the geological facies is known (e.g., from geophysical data or core data), to reduce the non-uniqueness of the solution and the number of unknown parameters to be estimated. When zonation information is only available for a limited region, special treatment in the remainder of the model is necessary, such as using a geostatistical parameterization. Finally, inversion of the actual field data is performed using 2D and 3D models, and results are compared with slug test data.

  15. Quantitative optical coherence elastography as an inverse elasticity problem (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Li; Wijesinghe, Philip; Dantuono, James T.; Sampson, David D.; Munro, Peter R. T.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative elasticity imaging, which retrieves elastic modulus maps from tissue, is preferred to qualitative strain imaging for acquiring system- and operator-independent images and longitudinal and multi-site diagnoses. Quantitative elasticity imaging has already been demonstrated in optical elastography by relating surface-acoustic and shear wave speed to Young's modulus via a simple algebraic relationship. Such approaches assume largely homogeneous samples and neglect the effect of boundary conditions. We present a general approach to quantitative elasticity imaging based upon the solution of the inverse elasticity problem using an iterative technique and apply it to compression optical coherence elastography. The inverse problem is one of finding the distribution of Young's modulus within a sample, that in response to an applied load, and a given displacement and traction boundary conditions, can produce a displacement field matching one measured in experiment. Key to our solution of the inverse elasticity problem is the use of the adjoint equations that allow the very efficient evaluation of the gradient of the objective function to be minimized with respect to the unknown values of Young's modulus within the sample. Although we present the approach for the case of linear elastic, isotropic, incompressible solids, this method can be employed for arbitrarily complex mechanical models. We present the details of the method and quantitative elastograms of phantoms and tissues. We demonstrate that by using the inverse approach, we can decouple the artefacts produced by mechanical tissue heterogeneity from the true distribution of Young's modulus, which are often evident in techniques that employ first-order algebraic relationships.

  16. A method of fast, sequential experimental design for linearized geophysical inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Darrell A.; Morgan, Frank Dale

    2009-07-01

    An algorithm for linear(ized) experimental design is developed for a determinant-based design objective function. This objective function is common in design theory and is used to design experiments that minimize the model entropy, a measure of posterior model uncertainty. Of primary significance in design problems is computational expediency. Several earlier papers have focused attention on posing design objective functions and opted to use global search methods for finding the critical points of these functions, but these algorithms are too slow to be practical. The proposed technique is distinguished primarily for its computational efficiency, which derives partly from a greedy optimization approach, termed sequential design. Computational efficiency is further enhanced through formulae for updating determinants and matrix inverses without need for direct calculation. The design approach is orders of magnitude faster than a genetic algorithm applied to the same design problem. However, greedy optimization often trades global optimality for increased computational speed; the ramifications of this tradeoff are discussed. The design methodology is demonstrated on a simple, single-borehole DC electrical resistivity problem. Designed surveys are compared with random and standard surveys, both with and without prior information. All surveys were compared with respect to a `relative quality' measure, the post-inversion model per cent rms error. The issue of design for inherently ill-posed inverse problems is considered and an approach for circumventing such problems is proposed. The design algorithm is also applied in an adaptive manner, with excellent results suggesting that smart, compact experiments can be designed in real time.

  17. A reconstruction algorithm based on topological gradient for an inverse problem related to a semilinear elliptic boundary value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Elena; Manzoni, Andrea; Ratti, Luca

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we develop a reconstruction algorithm for the solution of an inverse boundary value problem dealing with a semilinear elliptic partial differential equation of interest in cardiac electrophysiology. The goal is the detection of small inhomogeneities located inside a domain Ω , where the coefficients of the equation are altered, starting from observations of the solution of the equation on the boundary \\partial Ω . Exploiting theoretical results recently achieved in [13], we implement a reconstruction procedure based on the computation of the topological gradient of a suitable cost functional. Numerical results obtained for several test cases finally assess the feasibility and the accuracy of the proposed technique.

  18. Method of Minimax Optimization in the Coefficient Inverse Heat-Conduction Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diligenskaya, A. N.; Rapoport, É. Ya.

    2016-07-01

    Consideration has been given to the inverse problem on identification of a temperature-dependent thermal-conductivity coefficient. The problem was formulated in an extremum statement as a problem of search for a quantity considered as the optimum control of an object with distributed parameters, which is described by a nonlinear homogeneous spatially one-dimensional Fourier partial equation with boundary conditions of the second kind. As the optimality criterion, the authors used the error (minimized on the time interval of observation) of uniform approximation of the temperature computed on the object's model at an assigned point of the segment of variation in the spatial variable to its directly measured value. Pre-parametrization of the sought control action, which a priori records its description accurate to assigning parameters of representation in the class of polynomial temperature functions, ensured the reduction of the problem under study to a problem of parametric optimization. To solve the formulated problem, the authors used an analytical minimax-optimization method taking account of the alternance properties of the sought optimum solutions based on which the algorithm of computation of the optimum values of the sought parameters is reduced to a system (closed for these unknowns) of equations fixing minimax deviations of the calculated values of temperature from those observed on the time interval of identification. The obtained results confirm the efficiency of the proposed method for solution of a certain range of applied problems. The authors have studied the influence of the coordinate of a point of temperature measurement on the exactness of solution of the inverse problem.

  19. Model-based elastography: a survey of approaches to the inverse elasticity problem

    PubMed Central

    Doyley, M M

    2012-01-01

    Elastography is emerging as an imaging modality that can distinguish normal versus diseased tissues via their biomechanical properties. This article reviews current approaches to elastography in three areas — quasi-static, harmonic, and transient — and describes inversion schemes for each elastographic imaging approach. Approaches include: first-order approximation methods; direct and iterative inversion schemes for linear elastic; isotropic materials; and advanced reconstruction methods for recovering parameters that characterize complex mechanical behavior. The paper’s objective is to document efforts to develop elastography within the framework of solving an inverse problem, so that elastography may provide reliable estimates of shear modulus and other mechanical parameters. We discuss issues that must be addressed if model-based elastography is to become the prevailing approach to quasi-static, harmonic, and transient elastography: (1) developing practical techniques to transform the ill-posed problem with a well-posed one; (2) devising better forward models to capture the transient behavior of soft tissue; and (3) developing better test procedures to evaluate the performance of modulus elastograms. PMID:22222839

  20. Comparison of potential- and activation-based formulations for the inverse problem of electrocardiology.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Leo K; Bodley, John M; Pullan, Andrew J

    2003-01-01

    Two predominant source formulations for the inverse problem of electrocardiology currently exist. They involve the reconstruction of epicardial potentials or myocardial activation times from noninvasively recorded torso surface potentials. Each of these formulations have their advantages, however, they have not been systematically compared against each other. We present results from a simulation study which compared a number of epicardial potential (Tikhonov, Truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD), Greensite-Tikhonov and Greensite-TSVD), and a myocardial activation time formulation for the inverse problem of electrocardiology. A number of different methods were also used to determine the appropriate level of regularization (optimal, L-curve, zero-crossing, and composite residual and smoothing operator) to apply to each formulation. The simulation study was conducted using an anatomically based boundary element porcine model with a variety of cardiac sources. Varying levels of geometric error were introduced to the system and solutions were computed using each of the inverse algorithms. Results show that under pure Gaussian noise potential-based methods performed best at low noise levels while the activation-based method was less effected by higher noise levels. In the presence of correlated geometric error, the activation-based method out performed the potential methods, with the Greensite-Tikhonov method being the most favored potential-based method when using the L-curve or zero-crossing method to determine the regularization parameter.

  1. Model-based elastography: a survey of approaches to the inverse elasticity problem.

    PubMed

    Doyley, M M

    2012-02-07

    Elastography is emerging as an imaging modality that can distinguish normal versus diseased tissues via their biomechanical properties. This paper reviews current approaches to elastography in three areas--quasi-static, harmonic and transient--and describes inversion schemes for each elastographic imaging approach. Approaches include first-order approximation methods; direct and iterative inversion schemes for linear elastic; isotropic materials and advanced reconstruction methods for recovering parameters that characterize complex mechanical behavior. The paper's objective is to document efforts to develop elastography within the framework of solving an inverse problem, so that elastography may provide reliable estimates of shear modulus and other mechanical parameters. We discuss issues that must be addressed if model-based elastography is to become the prevailing approach to quasi-static, harmonic and transient elastography: (1) developing practical techniques to transform the ill-posed problem with a well-posed one; (2) devising better forward models to capture the complex mechanical behavior of soft tissues and (3) developing better test procedures to evaluate the performance of modulus elastograms.

  2. On the Optimization of the Inverse Problem for Bouguer Gravity Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, A.; Velasco, A. A.; Gutierrez, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Inverse modeling of gravity data presents a very ill-posed mathematical problem, given that solutions are non-unique and small changes in parameters (position and density contrast of an anomalous body) can highly impact the resulting Earth's model. Although implementing 2- and 3-Dimensional gravitational inverse problems can determine the structural composition of the Earth, traditional inverse modeling approaches can be very unstable. A model of the shallow substructure is based on the density contrasts of anomalous bodies -with different densities with respect to a uniform region- or the boundaries between layers in a layered environment. We implement an interior-point method constrained optimization technique to improve the 2-D model of the Earth's structure through the use of known density constraints for transitional areas obtained from previous geological observations (e.g. core samples, seismic surveys, etc.). The proposed technique is applied to both synthetic data and gravitational data previously obtained from the Rio Grande Rift and the Cooper Flat Mine region located in Sierra County, New Mexico. We find improvements on the models obtained from this optimization scheme given that getting rid of geologically unacceptable models that would otherwise meet the required geophysical properties reduces the solution space.

  3. Model-based elastography: a survey of approaches to the inverse elasticity problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyley, M. M.

    2012-02-01

    Elastography is emerging as an imaging modality that can distinguish normal versus diseased tissues via their biomechanical properties. This paper reviews current approaches to elastography in three areas—quasi-static, harmonic and transient—and describes inversion schemes for each elastographic imaging approach. Approaches include first-order approximation methods; direct and iterative inversion schemes for linear elastic; isotropic materials and advanced reconstruction methods for recovering parameters that characterize complex mechanical behavior. The paper's objective is to document efforts to develop elastography within the framework of solving an inverse problem, so that elastography may provide reliable estimates of shear modulus and other mechanical parameters. We discuss issues that must be addressed if model-based elastography is to become the prevailing approach to quasi-static, harmonic and transient elastography: (1) developing practical techniques to transform the ill-posed problem with a well-posed one; (2) devising better forward models to capture the complex mechanical behavior of soft tissues and (3) developing better test procedures to evaluate the performance of modulus elastograms.

  4. All-at-once versus reduced iterative methods for time dependent inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbacher, B.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we investigate all-at-once versus reduced regularization of dynamic inverse problems on finite time intervals (0, T). In doing so, we concentrate on iterative methods and nonlinear problems, since they have already been shown to exhibit considerable differences in their reduced and all-at-once versions, whereas Tikhonov regularization is basically the same in both settings. More precisely, we consider Landweber iteration, the iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton method, and the Landweber-Kaczmarz method, the latter relying on cyclic iteration over a subdivision of the problem into subsequent subintervals of (0, T). Part of the paper is devoted to providing an appropriate function space setting as well as establishing the required differentiability results needed for well-definedness and convergence of the methods under consideration. Based on this, we formulate and compare the above mentioned iterative methods in their all-at-once and their reduced version. Finally, we provide some convergence results in the framework of Hilbert space regularization theory and illustrate the convergence conditions by an example of an inverse source problem for a nonlinear diffusion equation.

  5. [A method for solution of the multi-objective inverse problems under uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Pisarev, A S; Samsonova, M G

    2013-01-01

    We describe a method to solve multi-objective inverse problems under uncertainty. The method was tested on non-linear models of dynamic series and population dynamics, as well as on the spatiotemporal model of gene expression in terms of non-linear differential equations. We consider how to identify model parameters when experimental data contain additive noise and measurements are performed in discrete time points. We formulate the multi-objective problem of optimization under uncertainty. In addition to a criterion of least squares difference we applied a criterion which is based on the integral of trajectories of the system spatiotemporal dynamics, as well as a heuristic criterion CHAOS based on the decision tree method. The optimization problem is formulated using a fuzzy statement and is constrained by penalty functions based on the normalized membership functions of a fuzzy set of model solutions. This allows us to reconstruct the expression pattern of hairy gene in Drosophila even-skipped mutants that is in good agreement with experimental data. The reproducibility of obtained results is confirmed by solution of inverse problems using different global optimization methods with heuristic strategies.

  6. A numerical method for the inverse problem of cell traction in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, G.; Preziosi, L.; Ambrosi, D.

    2012-09-01

    Force traction microscopy is an inversion method that allows us to obtain the stress field applied by a living cell on the environment on the basis of a pointwise knowledge of the displacement produced by the cell itself. This classical biophysical problem, usually addressed in terms of Green’s functions, can be alternatively tackled in a variational framework. In such a case, a variation of the error functional under suitable regularization is operated in view of its minimization. This setting naturally suggests the introduction of a new equation, based on the adjoint operator of the elasticity problem. In this paper, we illustrate a numerical strategy of the inversion method that discretizes the partial differential equations associated with the optimal control problem by finite elements. A detailed discussion of the numerical approximation of a test problem (with known solution) that contains most of the mathematical difficulties of the real one allows a precise evaluation of the degree of confidence that one can achieve in the numerical results.

  7. Numerical solution of an inverse obstacle scattering problem with near-field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peijun; Wang, Yuliang

    2015-06-01

    Consider the scattering of an arbitrary time-harmonic incident wave by a sound soft obstacle. In this paper, a novel method is presented for solving the inverse obstacle scattering problem of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation, which is to reconstruct the obstacle surface by using the near-field data. The obstacle is assumed to be a small and smooth perturbation of a disc. The method uses the transformed field expansion to reduce the boundary value problem into a successive sequence of one-dimensional problems which are solved in closed forms. By dropping the higher order terms in the power series expansion and truncating the infinite linear system for the first order term, the inverse problem is linearized and an approximate but explicit formula is obtained between the Fourier coefficients of the solution and data. A nonlinear correction algorithm is introduced to improve the accuracy of the reconstructions for large deformations. Numerical examples show that the method is simple, efficient, and stable to reconstruct the obstacle with subwavelength resolution.

  8. A new reconstruction method for the inverse source problem from partial boundary measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelas, Alfredo; Laurain, Antoine; Novotny, Antonio A.

    2015-07-01

    The inverse source problem consists of reconstructing a mass distribution in a geometrical domain from boundary measurements of the associated potential and its normal derivative. In this paper the inverse source problem is reformulated as a topology optimization problem, where the support of the mass distribution is the unknown variable. The Kohn-Vogelius functional is minimized. It measures the misfit between the solutions of two auxiliary problems containing information about the boundary measurements. The Newtonian potential is used to complement the unavailable information on the hidden boundary. The resulting topology optimization algorithm is based on an analytic formula for the variation of the Kohn-Vogelius functional with respect to a class of mass distributions consisting of a finite number of ball-shaped trial anomalies. The proposed reconstruction algorithm is non-iterative and very robust with respect to noisy data. Finally, in order to show the effectiveness of the devised reconstruction algorithm, some numerical experiments in two and three spatial dimensions are presented.

  9. Inverse problem theory in the optical depth profilometry of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    The problem of nondestructive measurement of composition with depth on the scale of ˜0.1-500 μm, in polymers and related materials, has many applications in traditional and recent areas of thin film processing. This article reviews the optical depth profilometry techniques operating on this scale based on optical absorption, photoluminescence, elastic, and inelastic scattering. These methods include photoacoustic and photothermal imaging (including pulsed laser opto-acoustic profiling), attenuated total reflectance infrared, integrated optical spectroscopy methods (based on excitation of planar waveguide structures), confocal scanning microscopy, and the recent technique of light profile microscopy. The profiling of planar structures is emphasized. A common element of all of these methods is that depth mapping requires the solution of a linear inverse problem, where a map of the sample properties is mathematically reconstructed from a set of experimental measurements. This problem is to some extent ill conditioned in some or all regimes of measurement, with the result that depth maps may show sensitivity to data errors. A method is presented for assessing performance of the above experimental depth profilometry techniques in terms of ill conditioning as indicated by: spatial resolution, sensitivity to data errors, and apparent multiplicity of solutions. This method is applied a priori given a knowledge of the linear response theory and measurement parameters Application is made to individual profiling techniques, the performance of each in applications is reviewed, and an inter-comparison is made based on the conditioning of the inverse problem.

  10. Manipulation with heterogeneity within a species population formulated as an inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, D.; Brutovsky, B.; Kočišová, J.; Šprinc, S.

    2010-11-01

    Dependence of the evolutionary dynamics on the population’s heterogeneity has been reliably recognized and studied within the frame of evolutionary optimization theory. As the causal relation between the heterogeneity and dynamics of environment has been revealed, the possibility to influence convergence rate of evolutionary processes by purposeful manipulation with environment emerges. For the above purposes we formulate the task as the inverse problem meaning that desired population heterogeneity, quantified by Tsallis information entropy, represents the model’s input and dynamics of environment leading to desired population heterogeneity is looked for. Here the presented abstract model of evolutionary motion within the inverse model of replicating species is case-independent and it is relevant for the broad range of phenomena observed at cellular, ecological, economic and social scales. We envision relevance of the model for anticancer therapy, in which the effort is to circumvent heterogeneity as it typically correlates with the therapy efficiency.

  11. Direct and inverse problems in radiation of sound from discrete random sources on two coaxial rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical model consisting of two ring sources of sound is developed to study the direct radiation in terms of correlation, coherence, and phase and also to aid in solving the inverse-radiation problem of determining the noise source in terms of farfield measurements. The rings consist of discrete sources which are either monopoles or quadrupoles with Gaussian autocorrelations. Only adjacent sources, both within and between the rings, are correlated. Results show that from the farfield information one can determine when the sources are compact or noncompact with respect to the acoustic wavelength and distinguish between the types of sources. In addition, from the inverse-radiation approach one can recover the center of mass, the location and separation distance of the ring, and the respective diameters.

  12. Direct and inverse problems in radiation of sound from discrete random sources on two coaxial rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical model consisting of two ring sources of sound is developed to study the direct radiation in terms of correlation, coherence, and phase and also to aid in solving the inverse-radiation problem of determining the noise source in terms of farfield measurements. The rings consist of discrete sources which are either monopoles or quadrupoles with Gaussian autocorrelations. Only adjacent sources, both within and between the rings, are correlated. Results show that from the farfield information one can determine when the sources are compact or noncompact with respect to the acoustic wavelength and distinguish between the types of sources. In addition, from the inverse-radiation approach one can recover the center of mass, the location and separation distance of the ring, and the respective diameters.

  13. Solving the Linear Balance Equation on the Globe as a Generalized Inverse Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Huei-Iin; Robertson, Franklin R.

    1999-01-01

    A generalized (pseudo) inverse technique was developed to facilitate a better understanding of the numerical effects of tropical singularities inherent in the spectral linear balance equation (LBE). Depending upon the truncation, various levels of determinancy are manifest. The traditional fully-determined (FD) systems give rise to a strong response, while the under-determined (UD) systems yield a weak response to the tropical singularities. The over-determined (OD) systems result in a modest response and a large residual in the tropics. The FD and OD systems can be alternatively solved by the iterative method. Differences in the solutions of an UD system exist between the inverse technique and the iterative method owing to the non- uniqueness of the problem. A realistic balanced wind was obtained by solving the principal components of the spectral LBE in terms of vorticity in an intermediate resolution. Improved solutions were achieved by including the singular-component solutions which best fit the observed wind data.

  14. Solving the Linear Balance Equation on the Globe as a Generalized Inverse Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Huei-Iin; Robertson, Franklin R.

    1999-01-01

    A generalized (pseudo) inverse technique was developed to facilitate a better understanding of the numerical effects of tropical singularities inherent in the spectral linear balance equation (LBE). Depending upon the truncation, various levels of determinancy are manifest. The traditional fully-determined (FD) systems give rise to a strong response, while the under-determined (UD) systems yield a weak response to the tropical singularities. The over-determined (OD) systems result in a modest response and a large residual in the tropics. The FD and OD systems can be alternatively solved by the iterative method. Differences in the solutions of an UD system exist between the inverse technique and the iterative method owing to the non- uniqueness of the problem. A realistic balanced wind was obtained by solving the principal components of the spectral LBE in terms of vorticity in an intermediate resolution. Improved solutions were achieved by including the singular-component solutions which best fit the observed wind data.

  15. Open forward and inverse problems in theoretical modeling of bone tissue adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zadpoor, Amir Abbas

    2013-11-01

    Theoretical modeling of bone tissue adaptation started several decades ago. Many important problems have been addressed in this area of research during the last decades. However, many important questions remain unanswered. In this paper, an overview of open problems in theoretical modeling of bone tissue adaptation is presented. First, the principal elements of bone tissue adaptation models are defined and briefly reviewed. Based on these principal elements, four categories of open problems are identified. Two of these categories primarily include forward problems, while two others include inverse problems. In every one of the identified categories, important open problems are highlighted and their importance is discussed. It is shown that most of previous studies on the theoretical modeling of bone tissue adaptation have been focused on the problems of the first category and not much is done in three other categories. The paper tries to highlight these potentially important problems that have been so far largely overlooked and to inspire new avenues of research. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Simulation research on improved regularized solution of the inverse problem in spectral extinction measurements.

    PubMed

    Mroczka, Janusz; Szczuczyński, Damian

    2012-04-10

    We present further results of the simulation research on the constrained regularized least squares (CRLS) solution of the ill-conditioned inverse problem in spectral extinction (turbidimetric) measurements, which we originally presented in this journal [Appl. Opt. 49, 4591 (2010)]. The inverse problem consists of determining the particle size distribution (PSD) function of a particulate system on the basis of a measured extinction coefficient as a function of wavelength. In our previous paper, it was shown that under assumed conditions the problem can be formulated in terms of the discretized Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. The CRLS method incorporates two constraints, which the PSD sought will satisfy: nonnegativity of the PSD values and normalization of the PSD to unity when integrated over the whole range of particle size, into the regularized least squares (RLS) method. This leads to the quadratic programming problem, which is solved by means of the active set algorithm within the research. The simulation research that is the subject of the present paper is a continuation and extension of the research described in our previous paper. In the present research, the performance of the CRLS method variants is compared not only to the corresponding RLS method variants but also to other regularization techniques: the truncated generalized singular value decomposition and the filtered generalized singular value decomposition, as well as nonlinear iterative algorithms: The Twomey algorithm and the Twomey-Markowski algorithm. Moreover, two methods of selecting the optimum value of the regularization parameter are considered: The L-curve method and the generalized cross validation method. The results of our simulation research provide even stronger proof that the CRLS method performs considerably better with reconstruction of PSD than other inversing methods, in terms of better fidelity and smaller uncertainty.

  17. Electrostatic point charge fitting as an inverse problem: Revealing the underlying ill-conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Maxim V.; Talipov, Marat R.; Timerghazin, Qadir K.

    2015-10-07

    Atom-centered point charge (PC) model of the molecular electrostatics—a major workhorse of the atomistic biomolecular simulations—is usually parameterized by least-squares (LS) fitting of the point charge values to a reference electrostatic potential, a procedure that suffers from numerical instabilities due to the ill-conditioned nature of the LS problem. To reveal the origins of this ill-conditioning, we start with a general treatment of the point charge fitting problem as an inverse problem and construct an analytical model with the point charges spherically arranged according to Lebedev quadrature which is naturally suited for the inverse electrostatic problem. This analytical model is contrasted to the atom-centered point-charge model that can be viewed as an irregular quadrature poorly suited for the problem. This analysis shows that the numerical problems of the point charge fitting are due to the decay of the curvatures corresponding to the eigenvectors of LS sum Hessian matrix. In part, this ill-conditioning is intrinsic to the problem and is related to decreasing electrostatic contribution of the higher multipole moments, that are, in the case of Lebedev grid model, directly associated with the Hessian eigenvectors. For the atom-centered model, this association breaks down beyond the first few eigenvectors related to the high-curvature monopole and dipole terms; this leads to even wider spread-out of the Hessian curvature values. Using these insights, it is possible to alleviate the ill-conditioning of the LS point-charge fitting without introducing external restraints and/or constraints. Also, as the analytical Lebedev grid PC model proposed here can reproduce multipole moments up to a given rank, it may provide a promising alternative to including explicit multipole terms in a force field.

  18. Solutions to the Inverse LQR Problem with Application to Biological Systems Analysis.

    PubMed

    Priess, M Cody; Conway, Richard; Choi, Jongeun; Popovich, John M; Radcliffe, Clark

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a set of techniques for finding a cost function to the time-invariant Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) problem in both continuous- and discrete-time cases. Our methodology is based on the solution to the inverse LQR problem, which can be stated as: does a given controller K describe the solution to a time-invariant LQR problem, and if so, what weights Q and R produce K as the optimal solution? Our motivation for investigating this problem is the analysis of motion goals in biological systems. We first describe an efficient Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI) method for determining a solution to the general case of this inverse LQR problem when both the weighting matrices Q and R are unknown. Our first LMI-based formulation provides a unique solution when it is feasible. Additionally, we propose a gradient-based, least-squares minimization method that can be applied to approximate a solution in cases when the LMIs are infeasible. This new method is very useful in practice since the estimated gain matrix K from the noisy experimental data could be perturbed by the estimation error, which may result in the infeasibility of the LMIs. We also provide an LMI minimization problem to find a good initial point for the minimization using the proposed gradient descent algorithm. We then provide a set of examples to illustrate how to apply our approaches to several different types of problems. An important result is the application of the technique to human subject posture control when seated on a moving robot. Results show that we can recover a cost function which may provide a useful insight on the human motor control goal.

  19. Solutions to the Inverse LQR Problem with Application to Biological Systems Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Priess, M Cody; Conway, Richard; Choi, Jongeun; Popovich, John M; Radcliffe, Clark

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a set of techniques for finding a cost function to the time-invariant Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) problem in both continuous- and discrete-time cases. Our methodology is based on the solution to the inverse LQR problem, which can be stated as: does a given controller K describe the solution to a time-invariant LQR problem, and if so, what weights Q and R produce K as the optimal solution? Our motivation for investigating this problem is the analysis of motion goals in biological systems. We first describe an efficient Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI) method for determining a solution to the general case of this inverse LQR problem when both the weighting matrices Q and R are unknown. Our first LMI-based formulation provides a unique solution when it is feasible. Additionally, we propose a gradient-based, least-squares minimization method that can be applied to approximate a solution in cases when the LMIs are infeasible. This new method is very useful in practice since the estimated gain matrix K from the noisy experimental data could be perturbed by the estimation error, which may result in the infeasibility of the LMIs. We also provide an LMI minimization problem to find a good initial point for the minimization using the proposed gradient descent algorithm. We then provide a set of examples to illustrate how to apply our approaches to several different types of problems. An important result is the application of the technique to human subject posture control when seated on a moving robot. Results show that we can recover a cost function which may provide a useful insight on the human motor control goal. PMID:26640359

  20. Uncertainty Quantification for Adjoint-Based Inverse Problems with Sparse Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, Nora; Heimbach, Patrick; Nisancioglu, Kerim

    2017-04-01

    The adjoint method of data assimilation (DA) is used in many fields of Geosciences. It fits a dynamical model to observations in a least-squares optimization problem, leading to a solution that follows the model equations exactly. While the physical consistency of the obtained solution makes the adjoint method an attractive DA technique for many applications, one of its major drawbacks is that an accompanying uncertainty quantification is computationally challenging. In theory, the Hessian of the model-data misfit function can provide such an error estimate on the solution of the inverse problem because - under certain assumptions - it can be associated with the inverse of the error covariance matrix. In practice, however, studies that use adjoint-based DA into ocean GCMs usually don't deal with a quantification of uncertainties, mostly because an analysis of the Hessian is often intractable due to its high dimensionality. This work is motivated by the fact that an increasing number of studies apply the adjoint-based DA machinery to paleoceanographic problems - without considering accompanying uncertainties. In such applications, the number of observations can be of the order 102, while the dimension of the control space is still as high as of the order 106 to 108. An uncertainty quantification in such heavily underdetermined inverse problems seems even more crucial, an objective that we pursue here. We take advantage of the fact that in such situations the Hessian is of very low rank (while still of high dimension). This enables us to explore in great detail to what extent paleo proxy data from ocean sediment cores informs the solution of the inverse problem. We use the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm) and sample a sparse set of observations from a control simulation, corresponding to available data from ocean sediment cores. We then quantify how well the synthetic data constrains different quantities of interest, such as heat content of specific ocean

  1. FOREWORD: 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, (NCMIP 2012). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 15 May 2012, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The first edition of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finance. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, kernel methods, learning methods, convex optimization, free discontinuity problems, metamodels, proper orthogonal decomposition

  2. FOREWORD: 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2013-10-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2013 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2013.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 22 May 2013, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/), and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2012.html). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational

  3. In silico model-based inference: an emerging approach for inverse problems in engineering better medicines

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.; Birtwistle, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the network of biochemical interactions that underpin disease pathophysiology is a key hurdle in drug discovery. While many components involved in these biological processes are identified, how components organize differently in health and disease remains unclear. In chemical engineering, mechanistic modeling provides a quantitative framework to capture our understanding of a reactive system and test this knowledge against data. Here, we describe an emerging approach to test this knowledge against data that leverages concepts from probability, Bayesian statistics, and chemical kinetics by focusing on two related inverse problems. The first problem is to identify the causal structure of the reaction network, given uncertainty as to how the reactive components interact. The second problem is to identify the values of the model parameters, when a network is known a priori. PMID:26309811

  4. Inverse-problem approach for particle digital holography: accurate location based on local optimization.

    PubMed

    Soulez, Ferréol; Denis, Loïc; Fournier, Corinne; Thiébaut, Eric; Goepfert, Charles

    2007-04-01

    We propose a microparticle localization scheme in digital holography. Most conventional digital holography methods are based on Fresnel transform and present several problems such as twin-image noise, border effects, and other effects. To avoid these difficulties, we propose an inverse-problem approach, which yields the optimal particle set that best models the observed hologram image. We resolve this global optimization problem by conventional particle detection followed by a local refinement for each particle. Results for both simulated and real digital holograms show strong improvement in the localization of the particles, particularly along the depth dimension. In our simulations, the position precision is > or =1 microm rms. Our results also show that the localization precision does not deteriorate for particles near the edge of the field of view.

  5. Approximate Bayesian computation for machine learning, inverse problems and big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2017-06-01

    This paper summarizes my tutorial talk in MaxEnt 2016 workshop. Starting from the basics of the Bayesian approach and simple example of low dimensional parameter estimation where almost all the computations can be done easily, we go very fast to high dimensional case. In those real world cases, even for the sample case of linear model with Gaussian prior, where the posterior law is also Gaussian, the cost of the computation of the posterior covariance becomes important and needs approximate and fast algorithms. Different approximation methods for model comparison and model selection in machine learning problems are presented in summary. Among the existing methods, we mention Laplace approximation, Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) and Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) Methods. Finally, through two examples of inverse problems in imaging systems: X ray and Diffraction wave Computed Tomography (CT), we show how to handle the real great dimensional problems.

  6. Numerical solution of an inverse medium scattering problem for Maxwell’s Equations at fixed frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Li, Peijun

    2009-07-01

    Consider a time-harmonic electromagnetic plane wave incident on a medium enclosed by a bounded domain in R3. In this paper, well-posedness of the variational problem for the direct scattering is examined. An energy estimate for the scattered field is obtained on which the Born approximation is based. A regularized recursive linearization method for the inverse medium scattering, which reconstructs the scatterer of an inhomogeneous medium from the boundary measurements of the scattered field, is developed. The algorithm requires only single-frequency data. Using an initial guess from the Born approximation, each update is obtained via continuation on the spatial frequency of a two-parameter family of plane waves by solving one direct problem and one adjoint problem of the Maxwell equation.

  7. Inverse problems for the Schroedinger equations with time-dependent electromagnetic potentials and the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Eskin, G.

    2008-02-15

    We consider the inverse boundary value problem for the Schroedinger operator with time-dependent electromagnetic potentials in domains with obstacles. We extend the resuls of the author's works [Inverse Probl. 19, 49 (2003); 19, 985 (2003); 20, 1497 (2004)] to the case of time-dependent potentials. We relate our results to the Aharonov-Bohm effect caused by magnetic and electric fluxes.

  8. An Augmented Lagrangian Method for a Class of Inverse Quadratic Programming Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jianzhong; Zhang Liwei

    2010-02-15

    We consider an inverse quadratic programming (QP) problem in which the parameters in the objective function of a given QP problem are adjusted as little as possible so that a known feasible solution becomes the optimal one. We formulate this problem as a minimization problem with a positive semidefinite cone constraint and its dual is a linearly constrained semismoothly differentiable (SC{sup 1}) convex programming problem with fewer variables than the original one. We demonstrate the global convergence of the augmented Lagrangian method for the dual problem and prove that the convergence rate of primal iterates, generated by the augmented Lagrange method, is proportional to 1/r, and the rate of multiplier iterates is proportional to 1/{radical}r, where r is the penalty parameter in the augmented Lagrangian. As the objective function of the dual problem is a SC{sup 1} function involving the projection operator onto the cone of symmetrically semi-definite matrices, the analysis requires extensive tools such as the singular value decomposition of matrices, an implicit function theorem for semismooth functions, and properties of the projection operator in the symmetric-matrix space. Furthermore, the semismooth Newton method with Armijo line search is applied to solve the subproblems in the augmented Lagrange approach, which is proven to have global convergence and local quadratic rate. Finally numerical results, implemented by the augmented Lagrangian method, are reported.

  9. Joint Model and Parameter Dimension Reduction for Bayesian Inversion Applied to an Ice Sheet Flow Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghattas, O.; Petra, N.; Cui, T.; Marzouk, Y.; Benjamin, P.; Willcox, K.

    2016-12-01

    Model-based projections of the dynamics of the polar ice sheets play a central role in anticipating future sea level rise. However, a number of mathematical and computational challenges place significant barriers on improving predictability of these models. One such challenge is caused by the unknown model parameters (e.g., in the basal boundary conditions) that must be inferred from heterogeneous observational data, leading to an ill-posed inverse problem and the need to quantify uncertainties in its solution. In this talk we discuss the problem of estimating the uncertainty in the solution of (large-scale) ice sheet inverse problems within the framework of Bayesian inference. Computing the general solution of the inverse problem--i.e., the posterior probability density--is intractable with current methods on today's computers, due to the expense of solving the forward model (3D full Stokes flow with nonlinear rheology) and the high dimensionality of the uncertain parameters (which are discretizations of the basal sliding coefficient field). To overcome these twin computational challenges, it is essential to exploit problem structure (e.g., sensitivity of the data to parameters, the smoothing property of the forward model, and correlations in the prior). To this end, we present a data-informed approach that identifies low-dimensional structure in both parameter space and the forward model state space. This approach exploits the fact that the observations inform only a low-dimensional parameter space and allows us to construct a parameter-reduced posterior. Sampling this parameter-reduced posterior still requires multiple evaluations of the forward problem, therefore we also aim to identify a low dimensional state space to reduce the computational cost. To this end, we apply a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) approach to approximate the state using a low-dimensional manifold constructed using ``snapshots'' from the parameter reduced posterior, and the discrete

  10. An inverse problem solution to the flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Jetzabeth Ramirez S.; Fernando Samaniego V.; Fernando Rodriguez; Jesus Rivera R.

    1994-01-20

    This paper presents a solution for the inverse problem to the flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs. The models considered include linear flow in vertical fractures, radial flow in horizontal fractures, and cubic block matrix-fracture geometry. The Rosenbrock method for nonlinear regression used in this study, allowed the estimation of up to six parameters for the cubic block matrix fracture geometry. The nonlinear regression for the three cases was carefully tested against syntetical tracer concentration responses affected by random noise, with the objective of simulating as close as possible step injection field data. Results were obtained within 95 percent confidence limits. The sensitivity of the inverse problem solution on the main parameters that describe this flow problem was investigated. The main features of the nonlinear regression program used in this study are also discussed. The procedure of this study can be applied to interpret tracer tests in naturally fractured reservoirs, allowing the estimation of fracture and matrix parameters of practical interest (longitudinal fracture dispersivity alpha, matrix porosity phi2, fracture half-width w, matrix block size d, matrix diffusion coefficient D2 and the adsorption constant kd). The methodology of this work offers a practical alternative for tracer flow tests interpretation to other techniques.

  11. Implementation of probabilistic approach in solving inverse problems as a grid-backed web service.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodkov, K. I.; Aleshin, I. M.; Koryagin, V. N.; Shogin, A. N.; Sukhoroslov, O. V.

    2012-04-01

    In this work probabilistic approach to inverse problem was adopted. It leads to definition and sampling of a posteriori probability density function (APDF), which combines a priori system information with information, derived from observation data. Use of APDF implies significant computational resourses consumption, even for moderate model parameter count. However the computation of APDF value at different points is carried out completely independently, therefore this problem is considered ideal for loosely coupled distributed computing system. Globus Toolkit middleware was used, including the GridFTP for data transfer and GRAM for execution control, as well as TORQUE resource manager for each computing node. To reduce the hardware cost all grid services, except for GridFTP, run as virtual guests on execution nodes. Due to very insignificant resources utilization the guests make no footprint on node's computation power. To hide complex middleware interface from scientific users, user friendly web interface was created, which provides restricted but sufficient tool set. Determination of seismic anisotropy by wave form inversion was implemented as model problem. The interface allows user to edit model parameters, estimate execution time for specified parameter set, run calculation and perform result visualization. Details of start-up, management and results acquisition are hidden from user. This work was supported by Russian Foundation of Basic Research, grants 10-07-00491-a, 11-05-00988-a and 11-07-12045-ofi-m-2011

  12. A Hybrid Optimization Method for Solving Bayesian Inverse Problems under Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Zengfei; Zhang, Liming; Yao, Jun; Yan, Xia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the application of a new method, the Finite Difference and Stochastic Gradient (Hybrid method), for history matching in reservoir models. History matching is one of the processes of solving an inverse problem by calibrating reservoir models to dynamic behaviour of the reservoir in which an objective function is formulated based on a Bayesian approach for optimization. The goal of history matching is to identify the minimum value of an objective function that expresses the misfit between the predicted and measured data of a reservoir. To address the optimization problem, we present a novel application using a combination of the stochastic gradient and finite difference methods for solving inverse problems. The optimization is constrained by a linear equation that contains the reservoir parameters. We reformulate the reservoir model’s parameters and dynamic data by operating the objective function, the approximate gradient of which can guarantee convergence. At each iteration step, we obtain the relatively ‘important’ elements of the gradient, which are subsequently substituted by the values from the Finite Difference method through comparing the magnitude of the components of the stochastic gradient, which forms a new gradient, and we subsequently iterate with the new gradient. Through the application of the Hybrid method, we efficiently and accurately optimize the objective function. We present a number numerical simulations in this paper that show that the method is accurate and computationally efficient. PMID:26252392

  13. SimPEG: An open-source framework for geophysical simulations and inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockett, R.; Kang, S.; Heagy, L.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical surveys are powerful tools for obtaining information about the subsurface. Inverse modelling provides a mathematical framework for constructing a model of physical property distributions that are consistent with the data collected by these surveys. The geosciences are increasingly moving towards the integration of geological, geophysical, and hydrological information to better characterize the subsurface. This integration must span disciplines and is not only challenging scientifically, but the inconsistencies between conventions often makes implementations complicated, non-reproducible, or inefficient. We have developed an open source software package for Simulation and Parameter Estimation in Geophysics (SimPEG), which provides a generalized framework for solving geophysical forward and inverse problems. SimPEG is written entirely in Python with minimal dependencies in the hopes that it can be used both as a research tool and for education. SimPEG includes finite volume discretizations on structured and unstructured meshes, interfaces to standard numerical solver packages, convex optimization algorithms, model parameterizations, and tailored visualization routines. The framework is modular and object-oriented, which promotes real time experimentation and combination of geophysical problems and inversion methodologies. In this presentation, we will highlight a few geophysical examples, including direct-current resistivity and electromagnetics, and discuss some of the challenges and successes we encountered in developing a flexible and extensible framework. Throughout development of SimPEG we have focused on simplicity, usability, documentation, and extensive testing. By embracing a fully open source development paradigm, we hope to encourage reproducible research, cooperation, and communication to help tackle some of the inherently multidisciplinary problems that face integrated geophysical methods.

  14. A Subspace Pursuit–based Iterative Greedy Hierarchical Solution to the Neuromagnetic Inverse Problem

    PubMed Central

    Babadi, Behtash; Obregon-Henao, Gabriel; Lamus, Camilo; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Brown, Emery N.; Purdon, Patrick L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is an important non-invasive method for studying activity within the human brain. Source localization methods can be used to estimate spatiotemporal activity from MEG measurements with high temporal resolution, but the spatial resolution of these estimates is poor due to the ill-posed nature of the MEG inverse problem. Recent developments in source localization methodology have emphasized temporal as well as spatial constraints to improve source localization accuracy, but these methods can be computationally intense. Solutions emphasizing spatial sparsity hold tremendous promise, since the underlying neurophysiological processes generating MEG signals are often sparse in nature, whether in the form of focal sources, or distributed sources representing large-scale functional networks. Recent developments in the theory of compressed sensing (CS) provide a rigorous framework to estimate signals with sparse structure. In particular, a class of CS algorithms referred to as greedy pursuit algorithms can provide both high recovery accuracy and low computational complexity. Greedy pursuit algorithms are difficult to apply directly to the MEG inverse problem because of the high-dimensional structure of the MEG source space and the high spatial correlation in MEG measurements. In this paper, we develop a novel greedy pursuit algorithm for sparse MEG source localization that overcomes these fundamental problems. This algorithm, which we refer to as the Subspace Pursuit-based Iterative Greedy Hierarchical (SPIGH) inverse solution, exhibits very low computational complexity while achieving very high localization accuracy. We evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm using comprehensive simulations, as well as the analysis of human MEG data during spontaneous brain activity and somatosensory stimuli. These studies reveal substantial performance gains provided by the SPIGH algorithm in terms of computational complexity, localization accuracy

  15. Approximate Global Convergence and Quasi-Reversibility for a Coefficient Inverse Problem with Backscattering Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    L1u. Assume that geodesic lines, generated by the eikonal equation corresponding to the function c (x) are regular, i.e. any two points in R3 can be...backscattering data for a Coefficient Inverse Problem (CIP) for a hyperbolic PDE are generated by a single location of the point source. We develop a new...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 we model the most suitable arrangement for this case, which is to use a single position of the point source and

  16. Inverse problem for extragalactic transport of ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, V.S.; Rogovaya, S.I.; Zirakashvili, V.N. E-mail: rogovaya@izmiran.ru

    2015-03-01

    The energy spectra and composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are changing in a course of propagation in the expanding Universe filled with background radiation. We developed a numerical code for solution of inverse problem for cosmic-ray transport equations that allows the determination of average source spectra of different nuclei from the cosmic ray spectra observed at the Earth. Employing this approach, the injection spectra of protons and Iron nuclei in extragalactic sources are found assuming that only these species are accelerated at the source. The data from the Auger experiment and the combined data from the Telescope Array + HiRes experiments are used to illustrate the method.

  17. On the inverse nodal problems for discontinuous Sturm-Liouville operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu Ping; Yurko, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss the inverse nodal problems for discontinuous Sturm-Liouville operators with Robin boundary conditions. We show that the potential q up to its mean value on the interval [ 0 , 1 ] and coefficients h, H, b/a can be uniquely determined by the twin-dense nodal subset on the subinterval [a0 ,b0 ], a0 <1/2

  18. Automatic Processing of Digital Ionograms and Full Wave Solutions for the Profile Inversion Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Korteweg - deVries Equation ," J. Math. Phys., 18, 2445 (1977). Kay, I., "The Inverse Scattering Problem," Report No. EM-74 of the Institute of Mathematical...3.2 Comparison of the IWKB Method with the Full-Wave Method for Profiles for Which the Full-Wave Equation can be Solved for Exactly 45 3.2.1 General...Section 2 describes the automatic scaling of Digisonde ionograms, and Section 3 investigates the possibility of solving the Schroedinger wave equation for

  19. Inverse-problem approach to designing photonic crystals for cavity QED experiments.

    PubMed

    Geremia, J M; Williams, Jon; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2002-12-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) materials are attractive for cavity QED experiments because they provide extremely small mode volumes and are monolithic, integratable structures. As such, PBG cavities are a promising alternative to Fabry-Perot resonators. However, the cavity requirements imposed by QED experiments, such as the need for high Q (low cavity damping) and small mode volumes, present significant design challenges for photonic band gap materials. Here, we pose the PBG design problem as a mathematical inversion and provide an analytical solution for a two-dimensional (2D) crystal. We then address a planar (2D crystal with finite thickness) structure using numerical techniques.

  20. Limitations of polynomial chaos expansions in the Bayesian solution of inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Fei; Morzfeld, Matthias; Tu, Xuemin; Chorin, Alexandre J.

    2015-02-01

    Polynomial chaos expansions are used to reduce the computational cost in the Bayesian solutions of inverse problems by creating a surrogate posterior that can be evaluated inexpensively. We show, by analysis and example, that when the data contain significant information beyond what is assumed in the prior, the surrogate posterior can be very different from the posterior, and the resulting estimates become inaccurate. One can improve the accuracy by adaptively increasing the order of the polynomial chaos, but the cost may increase too fast for this to be cost effective compared to Monte Carlo sampling without a surrogate posterior.

  1. Solution of the inverse Langevin problem for open dissipative systems with anisotropic interparticle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lisin, E. A.; Lisina, I. I.; Vaulina, O. S.; Petrov, O. F.

    2015-03-15

    Solution of the inverse Langevin problem is presented for open dissipative systems with anisotropic interparticle interaction. Possibility of applying this solution for experimental determining the anisotropic interaction forces between dust particles in complex plasmas with ion flow is considered. For this purpose, we have tested the method on the results of numerical simulation of chain structures of particles with quasidipole-dipole interaction, similar to the one occurring due to effects of ion focusing in gas discharges. Influence of charge spatial inhomogeneity and fluctuations on the results of recovery is also discussed.

  2. An efficient numerical method for solving inverse conduction problem in a hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. C.

    1984-06-01

    A simple numerical scheme for solving the inverse conduction problem in a hollow cylinder is presented using transient temperature data for estimating the unknown surface conditions. A general digital program is discussed that can treat a variety of boundary conditions using a single set of equations. As an example, the method is applied to estimate the wall heat flux, surface temperature, convective heat transfer coefficient, and combustion gas temperature for a typical divergent rocket nozzle made of mild steel, and the results are compared with experimentally measured outer surface temperature data.

  3. Solution of the inverse Langevin problem for open dissipative systems with anisotropic interparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisin, E. A.; Lisina, I. I.; Vaulina, O. S.; Petrov, O. F.

    2015-03-01

    Solution of the inverse Langevin problem is presented for open dissipative systems with anisotropic interparticle interaction. Possibility of applying this solution for experimental determining the anisotropic interaction forces between dust particles in complex plasmas with ion flow is considered. For this purpose, we have tested the method on the results of numerical simulation of chain structures of particles with quasidipole-dipole interaction, similar to the one occurring due to effects of ion focusing in gas discharges. Influence of charge spatial inhomogeneity and fluctuations on the results of recovery is also discussed.

  4. Electromagnetic forward and inverse problems of non-rotating magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Guoqiang; Tao, Chunjing; Wang, Hao; He, Wenjing

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of electromagnetic forward and inverse problems is very important in the process of image reconstruction for magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI). A new analysis method was introduced in this paper. It breaks through some illogical supposes that the existing methods applied and can improve the spatial resolution of the image availably. Besides it can avoid rotating the static magnetic field which is very difficult to come true in application, therefore the development of MAT-MI technique can be promoted greatly. To test the validity of the new method, two test models were analyzed, and the availability of the method was demonstrated.

  5. An optimization approach to multi-dimensional time domain acoustic inverse problems.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, M; He, S

    2000-10-01

    An optimization approach to a multi-dimensional acoustic inverse problem in the time domain is considered. The density and/or the sound speed are reconstructed by minimizing an objective functional. By introducing dual functions and using the Gauss divergence theorem, the gradient of the objective functional is found as an explicit expression. The parameters are then reconstructed by an iterative algorithm (the conjugate gradient method). The reconstruction algorithm is tested with noisy data, and these tests indicate that the algorithm is stable and robust. The computation time for the reconstruction is greatly improved when the analytic gradient is used.

  6. Stability estimate for the hyperbolic inverse boundary value problem by local Dirichlet-to-Neumann map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellassoued, M.; Jellali, D.; Yamamoto, M.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we consider the stability of the inverse problem of determining a function q(x) in a wave equation in a bounded smooth domain in from boundary observations. This information is enclosed in the hyperbolic (dynamic) Dirichlet-to-Neumann map associated to the solutions to the wave equation. We prove in the case of n[greater-or-equal, slanted]2 that q(x) is uniquely determined by the range restricted to a subboundary of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map whose stability is a type of double logarithm.

  7. A necessary condition for applying MUSIC algorithm in limited-view inverse scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taehoon; Park, Won-Kwang

    2015-09-01

    Throughout various results of numerical simulations, it is well-known that MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm can be applied in the limited-view inverse scattering problems. However, the application is somehow heuristic. In this contribution, we identify a necessary condition of MUSIC for imaging of collection of small, perfectly conducting cracks. This is based on the fact that MUSIC imaging functional can be represented as an infinite series of Bessel function of integer order of the first kind. Numerical experiments from noisy synthetic data supports our investigation.

  8. Research on inverse, hybrid and optimization problems in engineering sciences with emphasis on turbomachine aerodynamics: Review of Chinese advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Gao-Lian

    1991-01-01

    Advances in inverse design and optimization theory in engineering fields in China are presented. Two original approaches, the image-space approach and the variational approach, are discussed in terms of turbomachine aerodynamic inverse design. Other areas of research in turbomachine aerodynamic inverse design include the improved mean-streamline (stream surface) method and optimization theory based on optimal control. Among the additional engineering fields discussed are the following: the inverse problem of heat conduction, free-surface flow, variational cogeneration of optimal grid and flow field, and optimal meshing theory of gears.

  9. Domain decomposition method for the Baltic Sea based on theory of adjoint equation and inverse problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezina, Natalya; Agoshkov, Valery

    2017-04-01

    Domain decomposition method (DDM) allows one to present a domain with complex geometry as a set of essentially simpler subdomains. This method is particularly applied for the hydrodynamics of oceans and seas. In each subdomain the system of thermo-hydrodynamic equations in the Boussinesq and hydrostatic approximations is solved. The problem of obtaining solution in the whole domain is that it is necessary to combine solutions in subdomains. For this purposes iterative algorithm is created and numerical experiments are conducted to investigate an effectiveness of developed algorithm using DDM. For symmetric operators in DDM, Poincare-Steklov's operators [1] are used, but for the problems of the hydrodynamics, it is not suitable. In this case for the problem, adjoint equation method [2] and inverse problem theory are used. In addition, it is possible to create algorithms for the parallel calculations using DDM on multiprocessor computer system. DDM for the model of the Baltic Sea dynamics is numerically studied. The results of numerical experiments using DDM are compared with the solution of the system of hydrodynamic equations in the whole domain. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project 14-11-00609, the formulation of the iterative process and numerical experiments). [1] V.I. Agoshkov, Domain Decompositions Methods in the Mathematical Physics Problem // Numerical processes and systems, No 8, Moscow, 1991 (in Russian). [2] V.I. Agoshkov, Optimal Control Approaches and Adjoint Equations in the Mathematical Physics Problem, Institute of Numerical Mathematics, RAS, Moscow, 2003 (in Russian).

  10. Existence, uniqueness and regularity of a time-periodic probability density distribution arising in a sedimentation-diffusion problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitsche, Ludwig C.; Nitsche, Johannes M.; Brenner, Howard

    1988-01-01

    The sedimentation and diffusion of a nonneutrally buoyant Brownian particle in vertical fluid-filled cylinder of finite length which is instantaneously inverted at regular intervals are investigated analytically. A one-dimensional convective-diffusive equation is derived to describe the temporal and spatial evolution of the probability density; a periodicity condition is formulated; the applicability of Fredholm theory is established; and the parameter-space regions are determined within which the existence and uniqueness of solutions are guaranteed. Numerical results for sample problems are presented graphically and briefly characterized.

  11. jInv: A Modular and Scalable Framework for Electromagnetic Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belliveau, P. T.; Haber, E.

    2016-12-01

    Inversion is a key tool in the interpretation of geophysical electromagnetic (EM) data. Three-dimensional (3D) EM inversion is very computationally expensive and practical software for inverting large 3D EM surveys must be able to take advantage of high performance computing (HPC) resources. It has traditionally been difficult to achieve those goals in a high level dynamic programming environment that allows rapid development and testing of new algorithms, which is important in a research setting. With those goals in mind, we have developed jInv, a framework for PDE constrained parameter estimation problems. jInv provides optimization and regularization routines, a framework for user defined forward problems, and interfaces to several direct and iterative solvers for sparse linear systems. The forward modeling framework provides finite volume discretizations of differential operators on rectangular tensor product meshes and tetrahedral unstructured meshes that can be used to easily construct forward modeling and sensitivity routines for forward problems described by partial differential equations. jInv is written in the emerging programming language Julia. Julia is a dynamic language targeted at the computational science community with a focus on high performance and native support for parallel programming. We have developed frequency and time-domain EM forward modeling and sensitivity routines for jInv. We will illustrate its capabilities and performance with two synthetic time-domain EM inversion examples. First, in airborne surveys, which use many sources, we achieve distributed memory parallelism by decoupling the forward and inverse meshes and performing forward modeling for each source on small, locally refined meshes. Secondly, we invert grounded source time-domain data from a gradient array style induced polarization survey using a novel time-stepping technique that allows us to compute data from different time-steps in parallel. These examples both show

  12. Ultrasonic focusing through inhomogeneous media by application of the inverse scattering problem

    PubMed Central

    Haddadin, Osama S.; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach is introduced for self-focusing phased arrays through inhomogeneous media for therapeutic and imaging applications. This algorithm utilizes solutions to the inverse scattering problem to estimate the impulse response (Green’s function) of the desired focal point(s) at the elements of the array. This approach is a two-stage procedure, where in the first stage the Green’s functions is estimated from measurements of the scattered field taken outside the region of interest. In the second stage, these estimates are used in the pseudoinverse method to compute excitation weights satisfying predefined set of constraints on the structure of the field at the focus points. These scalar, complex valued excitation weights are used to modulate the incident field for retransmission. The pseudoinverse pattern synthesis method requires knowing the Green’s function between the focus points and the array, which is difficult to attain for an unknown inhomogeneous medium. However, the solution to the inverse scattering problem, the scattering function, can be used directly to compute the required inhomogeneous Green’s function. This inverse scattering based self-focusing is noninvasive and does not require a strong point scatterer at or near the desired focus point. It simply requires measurements of the scattered field outside the region of interest. It can be used for high resolution imaging and enhanced therapeutic effects through inhomogeneous media without making any assumptions on the shape, size, or location of the inhomogeneity. This technique is outlined and numerical simulations are shown which validate this technique for single and multiple focusing using a circular array. PMID:9670525

  13. Generalized Uncertainty Quantification for Linear Inverse Problems in X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Michael James

    2014-04-25

    In industrial and engineering applications, X-ray radiography has attained wide use as a data collection protocol for the assessment of material properties in cases where direct observation is not possible. The direct measurement of nuclear materials, particularly when they are under explosive or implosive loading, is not feasible, and radiography can serve as a useful tool for obtaining indirect measurements. In such experiments, high energy X-rays are pulsed through a scene containing material of interest, and a detector records a radiograph by measuring the radiation that is not attenuated in the scene. One approach to the analysis of these radiographs is to model the imaging system as an operator that acts upon the object being imaged to produce a radiograph. In this model, the goal is to solve an inverse problem to reconstruct the values of interest in the object, which are typically material properties such as density or areal density. The primary objective in this work is to provide quantitative solutions with uncertainty estimates for three separate applications in X-ray radiography: deconvolution, Abel inversion, and radiation spot shape reconstruction. For each problem, we introduce a new hierarchical Bayesian model for determining a posterior distribution on the unknowns and develop efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for sampling from the posterior. A Poisson likelihood, based on a noise model for photon counts at the detector, is combined with a prior tailored to each application: an edge-localizing prior for deconvolution; a smoothing prior with non-negativity constraints for spot reconstruction; and a full covariance sampling prior based on a Wishart hyperprior for Abel inversion. After developing our methods in a general setting, we demonstrate each model on both synthetically generated datasets, including those from a well known radiation transport code, and real high energy radiographs taken at two U. S. Department of Energy

  14. A hybrid differential evolution/Levenberg-Marquardt method for solving inverse transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bledsoe, Keith C; Favorite, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the Differential Evolution (DE) optimization method was applied to solve inverse transport problems in finite cylindrical geometries and was shown to be far superior to the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method at finding a global optimum for problems with several unknowns. However, while extremely adept at finding a global optimum solution, the DE method often requires a large number (hundreds or thousands) of transport calculations, making it much slower than the Levenberg-Marquardt method. In this paper, a hybridization of the Differential Evolution and Levenberg-Marquardt approaches is presented. This hybrid method takes advantage of the robust search capability of the Differential Evolution method and the speed of the Levenberg-Marquardt technique.

  15. Introducing spatio-temporal reasoning into the inverse problem in electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Siregar, P; Sinteff, J P

    1996-05-01

    Studying the Brain's Electrical and Magnetic Signals (BEMS) requires the contribution of many area of research that include anatomy, neurophysiology and electromagnetic theory. NEUROLAB is a framework dedicated to the study of brain disorders. Upon completion, it should provide users with an intelligent computational environment that incorporates qualitative and quantitative models of the brain and head, and a model for representing and reasoning about time and space. Spatio-temporal knowledge of a given problem is represented as a constraint network where to each node of the network are attached temporal and spatial variables that must satisfy the constraints defined by the arch labels connecting the nodes. In this paper, we show how temporal reasoning can be combined with spatial descriptions to produce different scenarios of possible seizure spread. These scenarios can provide a priori information for the inverse problem the role of which is to localise the sources of the observed BEMS.

  16. Deforming finite elements for the numerical solution of the nonlinear inverse heat conduction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. C.; Jayachandran, T.

    1987-06-01

    A numerical solution of the nonlinear inverse heat conduction problem is obtained using an in-line method in conjunction with the measured thermocouple temperature history. The deforming finite elements technique is used to treat initial time delay in temperature response due to thermocouple location. In the absence of elements deformation, the method reduces to the conventional Galerkin formulation. A three-time level implicit scheme, which is unconditionally stable and convergent, is employed for the numerical solution. The temperature-dependent thermophysical properties in the matrices are evaluated at the intermediate level. The complication of solving a set of nonlinear algebraic equations at each step is avoided. Illustration of the technique is made on the one-dimensional problem with a thermal radiation boundary condition. The results demonstrate that the method is remarkable in its ability to predict surface condition without debilitation.

  17. Mature red blood cells: from optical model to inverse light-scattering problem

    PubMed Central

    Gilev, Konstantin V.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshova, Ekaterina S.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for characterization of mature red blood cells (RBCs) morphology, based on measurement of light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual RBCs with the scanning flow cytometer and on solution of the inverse light-scattering (ILS) problem for each LSP. We considered a RBC shape model, corresponding to the minimal bending energy of the membrane with isotropic elasticity, and constructed an analytical approximation, which allows rapid simulation of the shape, given the diameter and minimal and maximal thicknesses. The ILS problem was solved by the nearest-neighbor interpolation using a preliminary calculated database of 250,000 theoretical LSPs. For each RBC in blood sample we determined three abovementioned shape characteristics and refractive index, which also allows us to calculate volume, surface area, sphericity index, spontaneous curvature, hemoglobin concentration and content. PMID:27446656

  18. A uniqueness result for the inverse electromagnetic scattering problem in a two-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Bo

    2010-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the inverse problem of scattering of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves by an impenetrable obstacle buried in the lower half-space of a two-layered background medium. We prove that the buried obstacle and its physical property can be uniquely determined from a knowledge of the tangential component of the electric field on some two-dimensional device in the upper half-space corresponding to all incident electric dipoles located on another two-dimensional device in the upper half-space with two different polarizations. The key ingredient of our proof is a novel reciprocity relation established in this paper for the solution of the scattering problem of the electric dipole located at two different source points.

  19. Solution of the Inverse Problem of the Transfer of Ultrarelativistic Nuclei in the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirakashvili, V. N.; Ptuskin, V. S.; Rogovaya, S. I.

    2017-04-01

    We consider propagation of nuclei with energies over 1018 eV in the expanding Universe filled with background electromagnetic radiation. The spectrum of sources of extragalactic cosmic rays for protons and nuclei up to iron is determined on the basis of the particle spectrum observed near Earth as a solution of the inverse problem of transfer of ultrarelativistic nuclei. The method of regularization of the solution of this mathematically ill-posed problem is used basing on the data of the Pierre Auger Observatory on the energy spectrum of cosmic rays, the average logarithm of the mass number, and its variance. The found energy spectra of the sources prove to be very hard and strongly dependent on the assumption about the composition of the accelerated nuclei.

  20. Variational Bayesian approximation with scale mixture prior for inverse problems: A numerical comparison between three algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharsalli, Leila; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Fraysse, Aurélia; Rodet, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Our aim is to solve a linear inverse problem using various methods based on the Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA). We choose to take sparsity into account via a scale mixture prior, more precisely a student-t model. The joint posterior of the unknown and hidden variable of the mixtures is approximated via the VBA. To do this approximation, classically the alternate algorithm is used. But this method is not the most efficient. Recently other optimization algorithms have been proposed; indeed classical iterative algorithms of optimization such as the steepest descent method and the conjugate gradient have been studied in the space of the probability densities involved in the Bayesian methodology to treat this problem. The main object of this work is to present these three algorithms and a numerical comparison of their performances.

  1. SEMI-DEFINITE PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES FOR STRUCTURED QUADRATIC INVERSE EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS

    PubMed Central

    LIN, MATTHEW M.; DONG, BO; CHU, MOODY T.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade or so, semi-definite programming (SDP) has emerged as a powerful tool capable of handling a remarkably wide range of problems. This article describes an innovative application of SDP techniques to quadratic inverse eigenvalue problems (QIEPs). The notion of QIEPs is of fundamental importance because its ultimate goal of constructing or updating a vibration system from some observed or desirable dynamical behaviors while respecting some inherent feasibility constraints well suits many engineering applications. Thus far, however, QIEPs have remained challenging both theoretically and computationally due to the great variations of structural constraints that must be addressed. Of notable interest and significance are the uniformity and the simplicity in the SDP formulation that solves effectively many otherwise very difficult QIEPs. PMID:25392603

  2. Numerical identification of boundary conditions on nonlinearly radiating inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murio, Diego A.

    1991-01-01

    An explicit and unconditionally stable finite difference method for the solution of the transient inverse heat conduction problem in a semi-infinite or finite slab mediums subject to nonlinear radiation boundary conditions is presented. After measuring two interior temperature histories, the mollification method is used to determine the surface transient heat source if the energy radiation law is known. Alternatively, if the active surface is heated by a source at a rate proportional to a given function, the nonlinear surface radiation law is then recovered as a function of the interface temperature when the problem is feasible. Two typical examples corresponding to Newton cooling law and Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law respectively are illustrated. In all cases, the method predicts the surface conditions with an accuracy suitable for many practical purposes.

  3. Inverse problem analysis for identification of reaction kinetics constants in microreactors for biodiesel synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, P. C.; Naveira-Cotta, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    The theoretical analysis for the design of microreactors in biodiesel production is a complicated task due to the complex liquid-liquid flow and mass transfer processes, and the transesterification reaction that takes place within these microsystems. Thus, computational simulation is an important tool that aids in understanding the physical-chemical phenomenon and, consequently, in determining the suitable conditions that maximize the conversion of triglycerides during the biodiesel synthesis. A diffusive-convective-reactive coupled nonlinear mathematical model, that governs the mass transfer process during the transesterification reaction in parallel plates microreactors, under isothermal conditions, is here described. A hybrid numerical-analytical solution via the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT) for this partial differential system is developed and the eigenfunction expansions convergence rates are extensively analyzed and illustrated. The heuristic method of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is applied in the inverse analysis of the proposed direct problem, to estimate the reaction kinetics constants, which is a critical step in the design of such microsystems. The results present a good agreement with the limited experimental data in the literature, but indicate that the GITT methodology combined with the PSO approach provide a reliable computational algorithm for direct-inverse analysis in such reactive mass transfer problems.

  4. A GRASP-based Heuristic for the Sorting by Length-Weighted Inversions Problem.

    PubMed

    da Silva Arruda, Thiago; Dias, Ulisses; Dias, Zanoni

    2015-08-28

    Genome Rearrangements are large-scale mutational events that affect genomes during the evolutionary process. Therefore, these mutations differ from punctual mutations. They can move genes from one place to the other, change the orientation of some genes, or even change the number of chromosomes. In this work, we deal with inversion events which occur when a segment of DNA sequence in the genome is reversed. In our model, each inversion costs the number of elements in the reversed segment. We present a new algorithm for this problem based on the metaheuristic called Greedy Randomized Adaptive Search Procedure (GRASP) that has been routinely used to find solutions for combinatorial optimization problems. In essence, we implemented an iterative process in which each iteration receives a feasible solution whose neighborhood is investigated. Our analysis shows that we outperform any other approach by significant margin. We also use our algorithm to build phylogenetic trees for a subset of species in the Yersinia genus and we compared our trees to other results in the literature.

  5. Emulation of higher-order tensors in manifold Monte Carlo methods for Bayesian Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Shiwei; Bui-Thanh, Tan; Christie, Mike; Girolami, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The Bayesian approach to Inverse Problems relies predominantly on Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods for posterior inference. The typical nonlinear concentration of posterior measure observed in many such Inverse Problems presents severe challenges to existing simulation based inference methods. Motivated by these challenges the exploitation of local geometric information in the form of covariant gradients, metric tensors, Levi-Civita connections, and local geodesic flows have been introduced to more effectively locally explore the configuration space of the posterior measure. However, obtaining such geometric quantities usually requires extensive computational effort and despite their effectiveness affects the applicability of these geometrically-based Monte Carlo methods. In this paper we explore one way to address this issue by the construction of an emulator of the model from which all geometric objects can be obtained in a much more computationally feasible manner. The main concept is to approximate the geometric quantities using a Gaussian Process emulator which is conditioned on a carefully chosen design set of configuration points, which also determines the quality of the emulator. To this end we propose the use of statistical experiment design methods to refine a potentially arbitrarily initialized design online without destroying the convergence of the resulting Markov chain to the desired invariant measure. The practical examples considered in this paper provide a demonstration of the significant improvement possible in terms of computational loading suggesting this is a promising avenue of further development.

  6. A hybrid algorithm for solving the EEG inverse problem from spatio-temporal EEG data.

    PubMed

    Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Hallez, Hans; Van Hese, Peter; D'Asseler, Yves; Dupré, Luc; Van de Walle, Rik

    2008-08-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder caused by intense electrical activity in the brain. The electrical activity, which can be modelled through the superposition of several electrical dipoles, can be determined in a non-invasive way by analysing the electro-encephalogram. This source localization requires the solution of an inverse problem. Locally convergent optimization algorithms may be trapped in local solutions and when using global optimization techniques, the computational effort can become expensive. Fast recovery of the electrical sources becomes difficult that way. Therefore, there is a need to solve the inverse problem in an accurate and fast way. This paper performs the localization of multiple dipoles using a global-local hybrid algorithm. Global convergence is guaranteed by using space mapping techniques and independent component analysis in a computationally efficient way. The accuracy is locally obtained by using the Recursively Applied and Projected-MUltiple Signal Classification (RAP-MUSIC) algorithm. When using this hybrid algorithm, a four times faster solution is obtained.

  7. A linear model approach for ultrasonic inverse problems with attenuation and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Carcreff, Ewen; Bourguignon, Sébastien; Idier, Jérôme; Simon, Laurent

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic inverse problems such as spike train deconvolution, synthetic aperture focusing, or tomography attempt to reconstruct spatial properties of an object (discontinuities, delaminations, flaws, etc.) from noisy and incomplete measurements. They require an accurate description of the data acquisition process. Dealing with frequency-dependent attenuation and dispersion is therefore crucial because both phenomena modify the wave shape as the travel distance increases. In an inversion context, this paper proposes to exploit a linear model of ultrasonic data taking into account attenuation and dispersion. The propagation distance is discretized to build a finite set of radiation impulse responses. Attenuation is modeled with a frequency power law and then dispersion is computed to yield physically consistent responses. Using experimental data acquired from attenuative materials, this model outperforms the standard attenuation-free model and other models of the literature. Because of model linearity, robust estimation methods can be implemented. When matched filtering is employed for single echo detection, the model that we propose yields precise estimation of the attenuation coefficient and of the sound velocity. A thickness estimation problem is also addressed through spike deconvolution, for which the proposed model also achieves accurate results.

  8. The Prediction Properties of Inverse and Reverse Regression for the Simple Linear Calibration Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Peter A.; Geoffrey, Vining G.; Wilson, Sara R.; Szarka, John L., III; Johnson, Nels G.

    2010-01-01

    The calibration of measurement systems is a fundamental but under-studied problem within industrial statistics. The origins of this problem go back to basic chemical analysis based on NIST standards. In today's world these issues extend to mechanical, electrical, and materials engineering. Often, these new scenarios do not provide "gold standards" such as the standard weights provided by NIST. This paper considers the classic "forward regression followed by inverse regression" approach. In this approach the initial experiment treats the "standards" as the regressor and the observed values as the response to calibrate the instrument. The analyst then must invert the resulting regression model in order to use the instrument to make actual measurements in practice. This paper compares this classical approach to "reverse regression," which treats the standards as the response and the observed measurements as the regressor in the calibration experiment. Such an approach is intuitively appealing because it avoids the need for the inverse regression. However, it also violates some of the basic regression assumptions.

  9. Identification of the mechanical moduli of flexible thermoplastic thin films using reflected ultrasonic waves: Inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Lazri, Hacene; Ogam, Erick; Amar, Boudour; Fellah, Z E A; Oduor, Andrew O; Baki, Paul

    2017-11-01

    A method for the identification of the mechanical moduli and density of flexible, supple thermoplastic thin films placed on elastic substrates using ultrasonic waves has been developed. The composite medium immersed in a fluid host medium (water) was excited using a 50MHz transducer operating at normal incidence in reflection mode. Inverse problems involving experimental data pertaining to elastic wave propagation in the thin films on their substrates and theoretical fluid-solid interaction models for stratified media using elasticity theory were solved. Two configurations having different interface boundary conditions (BC) were modeled, transverse slip for the sliding contact interface in the case where the thin films were placed on the substrate without bonding; a bonded interface condition. The inverse problem for the recovery of the mechanical parameters were solved for the thin films under the bonded and slip BCs. Substrates made of different elastic materials having different geometries were also evaluated and their advantages discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Warhead verification as inverse problem: Applications of neutron spectrum unfolding from organic-scintillator measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Becchetti, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    Verification of future warhead-dismantlement treaties will require detection of certain warhead attributes without the disclosure of sensitive design information, and this presents an unusual measurement challenge. Neutron spectroscopy—commonly eschewed as an ill-posed inverse problem—may hold special advantages for warhead verification by virtue of its insensitivity to certain neutron-source parameters like plutonium isotopics. In this article, we investigate the usefulness of unfolded neutron spectra obtained from organic-scintillator data for verifying a particular treaty-relevant warhead attribute: the presence of high-explosive and neutron-reflecting materials. Toward this end, several improvements on current unfolding capabilities are demonstrated: deuterated detectors are shown to have superior response-matrix condition to that of standard hydrogen-base scintintillators; a novel data-discretization scheme is proposed which removes important detector nonlinearities; and a technique is described for re-parameterizing the unfolding problem in order to constrain the parameter space of solutions sought, sidestepping the inverse problem altogether. These improvements are demonstrated with trial measurements and verified using accelerator-based time-of-flight calculation of reference spectra. Then, a demonstration is presented in which the elemental compositions of low-Z neutron-attenuating materials are estimated to within 10%. These techniques could have direct application in verifying the presence of high-explosive materials in a neutron-emitting test item, as well as other for treaty verification challenges.

  11. Solving inverse problem for Markov chain model of customer lifetime value using flower pollination algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ma'shumah, Fathimah; Permana, Dony; Sidarto, Kuntjoro Adji

    2015-12-01

    Customer Lifetime Value is an important and useful concept in marketing. One of its benefits is to help a company for budgeting marketing expenditure for customer acquisition and customer retention. Many mathematical models have been introduced to calculate CLV considering the customer retention/migration classification scheme. A fairly new class of these models which will be described in this paper uses Markov Chain Models (MCM). This class of models has the major advantage for its flexibility to be modified to several different cases/classification schemes. In this model, the probabilities of customer retention and acquisition play an important role. From Pfeifer and Carraway, 2000, the final formula of CLV obtained from MCM usually contains nonlinear form of the transition probability matrix. This nonlinearity makes the inverse problem of CLV difficult to solve. This paper aims to solve this inverse problem, yielding the approximate transition probabilities for the customers, by applying metaheuristic optimization algorithm developed by Yang, 2013, Flower Pollination Algorithm. The major interpretation of obtaining the transition probabilities are to set goals for marketing teams in keeping the relative frequencies of customer acquisition and customer retention.

  12. Inverse transport problem solvers based on regularized and compressive sensing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.; Cao, L.; Wu, H.; Zhang, H.

    2012-07-01

    According to the direct exposure measurements from flash radiographic image, regularized-based method and compressive sensing (CS)-based method for inverse transport equation are presented. The linear absorption coefficients and interface locations of objects are reconstructed directly at the same time. With a large number of measurements, least-square method is utilized to complete the reconstruction. Owing to the ill-posedness of the inverse problems, regularized algorithm is employed. Tikhonov method is applied with an appropriate posterior regularization parameter to get a meaningful solution. However, it's always very costly to obtain enough measurements. With limited measurements, CS sparse reconstruction technique Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) is applied to obtain the sparse coefficients by solving an optimization problem. This paper constructs and takes the forward projection matrix rather than Gauss matrix as measurement matrix. In the CS-based algorithm, Fourier expansion and wavelet expansion are adopted to convert an underdetermined system to a well-posed system. Simulations and numerical results of regularized method with appropriate regularization parameter and that of CS-based agree well with the reference value, furthermore, both methods avoid amplifying the noise. (authors)

  13. A Bayesian approach to Fourier Synthesis inverse problem with application in SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sha; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we propose a Bayesian approach to the ill-posed inverse problem of Fourier synthesis (FS) which consists in reconstructing a function from partial knowledge of its Fourier Transform (FT) with application in SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imaging. The function to be estimated represents an image of the observed scene. Considering this observed scene is mainly composed of point sources, we propose to use a Generalized Gaussian (GG) prior model, and then the Maximum A posterior (MAP) estimator as the desired solution. In particular, we are interested in bi-static case of spotlight-mode SAR data. In a first step, we consider real valued reflectivities but we account for the complex value of the measured data. The relation between the Fourier transform of the measured data and the unknown scene reflectivity is modeled by a 2D spatial FT. The inverse problem becomes then a FS and depending on the geometry of the data acquisition, only the set of locations in the Fourier space are different. We give a detailed modeling of the data acquisition process that we simulated, then apply the proposed method on those synthetic data to measure its performances compared to some other classical methods. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the method on experimental SAR data obtained in a collaborative work by ONERA.

  14. Sparse deconvolution for the large-scale ill-posed inverse problem of impact force reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Baijie; Zhang, Xingwu; Gao, Jiawei; Liu, Ruonan; Chen, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    Most previous regularization methods for solving the inverse problem of force reconstruction are to minimize the l2-norm of the desired force. However, these traditional regularization methods such as Tikhonov regularization and truncated singular value decomposition, commonly fail to solve the large-scale ill-posed inverse problem in moderate computational cost. In this paper, taking into account the sparse characteristic of impact force, the idea of sparse deconvolution is first introduced to the field of impact force reconstruction and a general sparse deconvolution model of impact force is constructed. Second, a novel impact force reconstruction method based on the primal-dual interior point method (PDIPM) is proposed to solve such a large-scale sparse deconvolution model, where minimizing the l2-norm is replaced by minimizing the l1-norm. Meanwhile, the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm is used to compute the search direction of PDIPM with high computational efficiency. Finally, two experiments including the small-scale or medium-scale single impact force reconstruction and the relatively large-scale consecutive impact force reconstruction are conducted on a composite wind turbine blade and a shell structure to illustrate the advantage of PDIPM. Compared with Tikhonov regularization, PDIPM is more efficient, accurate and robust whether in the single impact force reconstruction or in the consecutive impact force reconstruction.

  15. A limited memory BFGS method for a nonlinear inverse problem in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, G.; Loli Piccolomini, E.; Nagy, J. G.

    2017-09-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an imaging technique that allows the reconstruction of a pseudo three-dimensional image of the breast from a finite number of low-dose two-dimensional projections obtained by different x-ray tube angles. An issue that is often ignored in DBT is the fact that an x-ray beam is polyenergetic, i.e. it is composed of photons with different levels of energy. The polyenergetic model requires solving a large-scale, nonlinear inverse problem, which is more expensive than the typically used simplified, linear monoenergetic model. However, the polyenergetic model is much less susceptible to beam hardening artifacts, which show up as dark streaks and cupping (i.e. background nonuniformities) in the reconstructed image. In addition, it has been shown that the polyenergetic model can be exploited to obtain additional quantitative information about the material of the object being imaged. In this paper we consider the multimaterial polyenergetic DBT model, and solve the nonlinear inverse problem with a limited memory BFGS quasi-Newton method. Regularization is enforced at each iteration using a diagonally modified approximation of the Hessian matrix, and by truncating the iterations.

  16. Space-time adaptive solution of inverse problems with the discrete adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexe, Mihai; Sandu, Adrian

    2014-08-01

    This paper develops a framework for the construction and analysis of discrete adjoint sensitivities in the context of time dependent, adaptive grid, adaptive step models. Discrete adjoints are attractive in practice since they can be generated with low effort using automatic differentiation. However, this approach brings several important challenges. The space-time adjoint of the forward numerical scheme may be inconsistent with the continuous adjoint equations. A reduction in accuracy of the discrete adjoint sensitivities may appear due to the inter-grid transfer operators. Moreover, the optimization algorithm may need to accommodate state and gradient vectors whose dimensions change between iterations. This work shows that several of these potential issues can be avoided through a multi-level optimization strategy using discontinuous Galerkin (DG) hp-adaptive discretizations paired with Runge-Kutta (RK) time integration. We extend the concept of dual (adjoint) consistency to space-time RK-DG discretizations, which are then shown to be well suited for the adaptive solution of time-dependent inverse problems. Furthermore, we prove that DG mesh transfer operators on general meshes are also dual consistent. This allows the simultaneous derivation of the discrete adjoint for both the numerical solver and the mesh transfer logic with an automatic code generation mechanism such as algorithmic differentiation (AD), potentially speeding up development of large-scale simulation codes. The theoretical analysis is supported by numerical results reported for a two-dimensional non-stationary inverse problem.

  17. Warhead verification as inverse problem: Applications of neutron spectrum unfolding from organic-scintillator measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Febbraro, Michael; Becchetti, F. D.

    2016-08-14

    Verification of future warhead-dismantlement treaties will require detection of certain warhead attributes without the disclosure of sensitive design information, and this presents an unusual measurement challenge. Neutron spectroscopy—commonly eschewed as an ill-posed inverse problem—may hold special advantages for warhead verification by virtue of its insensitivity to certain neutron-source parameters like plutonium isotopics. In this article, we investigate the usefulness of unfolded neutron spectra obtained from organic-scintillator data for verifying a particular treaty-relevant warhead attribute: the presence of high-explosive and neutron-reflecting materials. Toward this end, several improvements on current unfolding capabilities are demonstrated: deuterated detectors are shown to have superior response-matrix condition to that of standard hydrogen-base scintintillators; a novel data-discretization scheme is proposed which removes important detector nonlinearities; and a technique is described for re-parameterizing the unfolding problem in order to constrain the parameter space of solutions sought, sidestepping the inverse problem altogether. These improvements are demonstrated with trial measurements and verified using accelerator-based time-of-flight calculation of reference spectra. Then, a demonstration is presented in which the elemental compositions of low-Z neutron-attenuating materials are estimated to within 10%. These techniques could have direct application in verifying the presence of high-explosive materials in a neutron-emitting test item, as well as other for treaty verification challenges.

  18. Multimodal, high-dimensional, model-based, Bayesian inverse problems with applications in biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, I. M.; Koutsourelakis, P. S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the numerical solution of model-based, Bayesian inverse problems. We are particularly interested in cases where the cost of each likelihood evaluation (forward-model call) is expensive and the number of unknown (latent) variables is high. This is the setting in many problems in computational physics where forward models with nonlinear PDEs are used and the parameters to be calibrated involve spatio-temporarily varying coefficients, which upon discretization give rise to a high-dimensional vector of unknowns. One of the consequences of the well-documented ill-posedness of inverse problems is the possibility of multiple solutions. While such information is contained in the posterior density in Bayesian formulations, the discovery of a single mode, let alone multiple, poses a formidable computational task. The goal of the present paper is two-fold. On one hand, we propose approximate, adaptive inference strategies using mixture densities to capture multi-modal posteriors. On the other, we extend our work in [1] with regard to effective dimensionality reduction techniques that reveal low-dimensional subspaces where the posterior variance is mostly concentrated. We validate the proposed model by employing Importance Sampling which confirms that the bias introduced is small and can be efficiently corrected if the analyst wishes to do so. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed strategy in nonlinear elastography where the identification of the mechanical properties of biological materials can inform non-invasive, medical diagnosis. The discovery of multiple modes (solutions) in such problems is critical in achieving the diagnostic objectives.

  19. Generalized approach to inverse problems in tomography: Image reconstruction for spatially variant systems using natural pixels

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.R.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1992-10-01

    A major limitation in tomographic inverse problems is inadequate computation speed, which frequently impedes the application of engineering ideas and principles in medical science more than in the physical and engineering sciences. Medical problems are computationally taxing because a minimum description of the system often involves 5 dimensions (3 space, 1 energy, 1 time), with the range of each space coordinate requiring up to 512 samples. The computational tasks for this problem can be simply expressed by posing the problem as one in which the tomograph system response function is spatially invariant, and the noise is additive and Gaussian. Under these assumptions, a number of reconstruction methods have been implemented with generally satisfactory results for general medical imaging purposes. However, if the system response function of the tomograph is assumed more realistically to be spatially variant and the noise to be Poisson, the computational problem becomes much more difficult. Some of the algorithms being studied to compensate for position dependent resolution and statistical fluctuations in the data acquisition process, when expressed in canonical form, are not practical for clinical applications because the number of computations necessary exceeds the capabilities of high performance computer systems currently available. Reconstruction methods based on natural pixels, specifically orthonormal natural pixels, preserve symmetries in the data acquisition process. Fast implementations of orthonormal natural pixel algorithms can achieve orders of magnitude speedup relative to general implementations. Thus, specialized thought in algorithm development can lead to more significant increases in performance than can be achieved through hardware improvements alone.

  20. Nature-inspired computing approach for solving non-linear singular Emden-Fowler problem arising in electromagnetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Junaid Ali; Zahoor Raja, Muhammad Asif; Rashidi, Mohammad Mehdi; Syam, Muhammad Ibrahim; Majid Wazwaz, Abdul

    2015-10-01

    In this research, the well-known non-linear Lane-Emden-Fowler (LEF) equations are approximated by developing a nature-inspired stochastic computational intelligence algorithm. A trial solution of the model is formulated as an artificial feed-forward neural network model containing unknown adjustable parameters. From the LEF equation and its initial conditions, an energy function is constructed that is used in the algorithm for the optimisation of the networks in an unsupervised way. The proposed scheme is tested successfully by applying it on various test cases of initial value problems of LEF equations. The reliability and effectiveness of the scheme are validated through comprehensive statistical analysis. The obtained numerical results are in a good agreement with their corresponding exact solutions, which confirms the enhancement made by the proposed approach.