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Sample records for inverse square distribution

  1. Slip distribution of the 2010 Mentawai earthquake from GPS observation using least squares inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaluddin, Moehammad; Yuwono, Bambang Darmo; Puspita, Yolanda Adya

    2016-05-01

    Continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) observations showed significant crustal displacements as a result of the 2010 Mentawai earthquake. The Least Square Inversion method of Mentawai earthquake slip distribution from SuGAR observations yielded in an optimum value of slip distribution by giving a weight of smoothing constraint and a weight of slip value constraint = 0 at the edge of the earthquake rupture area. A maximum coseismic slip of the inversion calculation was 1.997 m and concentrated around stations PRKB (Pagai Island). In addition, the values of dip-slip direction tend to be more dominant. The seismic moment calculated from the slip distribution was 6.89 × 10E+20 Nm, which is equivalent to a magnitude of 7.8.

  2. On the Magic Square and Inverse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elzaidi, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    In this note, we give a method for finding the inverse of a three by three magic square matrix without using the usual methods for finding the inverse of a matrix. Also we give a method for finding the inverse of a three by three magic square matrix whose entries are also matrices. By using these ideas, we can construct large matrices whose…

  3. GammaCHI: A package for the inversion and computation of the gamma and chi-square cumulative distribution functions (central and noncentral)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Amparo; Segura, Javier; Temme, Nico M.

    2015-06-01

    A Fortran 90 module GammaCHI for computing and inverting the gamma and chi-square cumulative distribution functions (central and noncentral) is presented. The main novelty of this package is the reliable and accurate inversion routines for the noncentral cumulative distribution functions. Additionally, the package also provides routines for computing the gamma function, the error function and other functions related to the gamma function. The module includes the routines cdfgamC, invcdfgamC, cdfgamNC, invcdfgamNC, errorfunction, inverfc, gamma, loggam, gamstar and quotgamm for the computation of the central gamma distribution function (and its complementary function), the inversion of the central gamma distribution function, the computation of the noncentral gamma distribution function (and its complementary function), the inversion of the noncentral gamma distribution function, the computation of the error function and its complementary function, the inversion of the complementary error function, the computation of: the gamma function, the logarithm of the gamma function, the regulated gamma function and the ratio of two gamma functions, respectively.

  4. Inverse-Square Orbits: A Geometric Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainwater, James C.; Weinstock, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Presents a derivation of Kepler's first law of planetary motion from Newtonian principles. Analogus derivations of the hyperbolic and parabolic orbits of nonreturning comets and the hyperbolic orbit for a particle in a repulsive inverse-square field are also presented. (HM)

  5. Optical inverse-square displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Robert D.; Kychakoff, George

    1989-01-01

    This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R+.DELTA.R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as ##EQU1##

  6. Optical inverse-square displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Howe, R.D.; Kychakoff, G.

    1989-09-12

    This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R + [Delta]R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as given in an equation. 10 figs.

  7. Testing Newton's Gravitational Inverse-Square Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Newton's inverse-square law of gravitation is the oldest standing mathematical description of a fundamental interaction. Experimental tests of gravity's distance-dependence define a frontier between our understanding of gravity and many proposed forms of new physics. These experiments constrain the size of possible extra dimensions, bound attempted resolution of the cosmological-constant problem, search for self-interacting chameleons, make direct measurements at the dark-energy length-scale, and more. As gravity is ~1040 times weaker than electromagnetism, gravity remains hidden by experimental backgrounds at distances smaller than the diameter of a fine human hair. This talk will survey the past, present, and near-future of the experimental field, with substantial emphasis on precision sub-millimeter laboratory experiments.

  8. Least-squares wave-equation migration/inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehl, Henning

    -world dataset. The efficient implementation of the algorithm is a challenge and had to be confined to two spatial dimensions (i.e., 2-D earth). Fortunately, distributed computing accelerates the computational turnaround of least-squares migration/inversion greatly. Therefore, given the rapidly evolving computer technology, it is conceivable that 3-D least-squares migration/inversion will become amenable to a practical implementation in the near future.

  9. Do pulsar radio fluxes violate the inverse-square law?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shantanu

    2016-04-01

    Singleton et al. (arXiv:0912.0350, 2009) have argued that the flux of pulsars measured at 1400 MHz shows an apparent violation of the inverse-square law with distance (r), and instead the flux scales as 1/r. They deduced this from the fact that the convergence error obtained in reconstructing the luminosity function of pulsars using an iterative maximum likelihood procedure is about 105 times larger for a distance exponent of two (corresponding to the inverse-square law) compared to an exponent of one. When we applied the same technique to this pulsar dataset with two different values for the trial luminosity function in the zeroth iteration, we find that neither of them can reproduce a value of 105 for the ratio of the convergence error between these distance exponents. We then reconstruct the differential pulsar luminosity function using Lynden-Bell's C- method after positing both inverse-linear and inverse-square scalings with distance. We show that this method cannot help in discerning between the two exponents. Finally, when we tried to estimate the power-law exponent with a Bayesian regression procedure, we do not get a best-fit value of one for the distance exponent. The model residuals obtained from our fitting procedure are larger for the inverse-linear law compared to the inverse-square law. Moreover, the observed pulsar flux cannot be parameterized only by power-law functions of distance, period, and period derivative. Therefore, we conclude from our analysis using multiple methods that there is no evidence that the pulsar radio flux at 1400 MHz violates the inverse-square law or that the flux scales inversely with distance.

  10. Solving the Inverse-Square Problem with Complex Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, N.

    2005-01-01

    The equation of motion for a mass that moves under the influence of a central, inverse-square force is formulated and solved as a problem in complex variables. To find the solution, the constancy of angular momentum is first established using complex variables. Next, the complex position coordinate and complex velocity of the particle are assumed…

  11. From Moon-Fall to Motions under Inverse Square Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foong, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    The motion of two bodies, along a straight line, under the inverse square law of gravity is considered in detail, progressing from simpler cases to more complex ones: (1) one body fixed and one free; (2) both bodies free and identical mass; (3) both bodies free and different masses; and (4) the inclusion of electrostatic forces for both bodies'…

  12. The Inverse-Square Law with Data Loggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The inverse-square law for the intensity of light received at a distance from a light source has been verified using various experimental techniques. Typical measurements involve a manual variation of the distance between a light source and a light sensor, usually by sliding the sensor or source along a bench, measuring the source-sensor distance…

  13. A Data Analysis for the Inverse Square Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downie, Russell

    2007-01-01

    When first encountered, inverse square laws can damage the confidence of beginning physics students whose maths skills are uncertain. Engaging in practical exercises that help them work with the idea can be a great help. We have used the following apparatus for a number of years and our students understand and enjoy the exercise.

  14. The Confirmation of the Inverse Square Law Using Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papacosta, Pangratios; Linscheid, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the inverse square law, how for example the intensity of light or sound varies with distance, presents conceptual and mathematical challenges. Students know intuitively that intensity decreases with distance. A light source appears dimmer and sound gets fainter as the distance from the source increases. The difficulty is in…

  15. Robust inverse kinematics using damped least squares with dynamic weighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinstock, D. E.; Faddis, T. N.; Greenway, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a general method for calculating the inverse kinematics with singularity and joint limit robustness for both redundant and non-redundant serial-link manipulators. Damped least squares inverse of the Jacobian is used with dynamic weighting matrices in approximating the solution. This reduces specific joint differential vectors. The algorithm gives an exact solution away from the singularities and joint limits, and an approximate solution at or near the singularities and/or joint limits. The procedure is here implemented for a six d.o.f. teleoperator and a well behaved slave manipulator resulted under teleoperational control.

  16. Test of the Gravitational Inverse Square Law at Millimeter Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shan-Qing; Zhan, Bi-Fu; Wang, Qing-Lan; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Tan, Wen-Hai; Luo, Jun

    2012-02-01

    We report a new test of the gravitational inverse square law at millimeter ranges by using a dual-modulation torsion pendulum. An I-shaped symmetric pendulum and I-shaped symmetric attractors were adopted to realize a null experimental design. The non-Newtonian force between two macroscopic tungsten plates is measured at separations ranging down to 0.4 mm, and the validity of the null experimental design was checked by non-null Newtonian gravity measurements. We find no deviations from the Newtonian inverse square law with 95% confidence level, and this work establishes the most stringent constraints on non-Newtonian interaction in the ranges from 0.7 to 5.0 mm, and a factor of 8 improvement is achieved at the length scale of several millimeters.

  17. Diffractive theorems for the wave equation with inverse square potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Randy Zhigang

    This dissertation investigates the phenomenon of diffraction resulting from the addition of an inverse square potential term to the wave operator. In particular, it explicitly establishes the existence of diffraction for the solution to the wave operator with an inverse square potential in 2-dimensional euclidean space and proves a propagation of smoothness result in two more general settings. Chapter 2 establishes diffraction in the fundamental solutions to the wave operator plus inverse square potential with a Dirac Delta initial condition in 2-dimensional euclidean space. Following methods as described by Cheeger and Taylor, we separate variables, apply spectral transforms to each variable, and employ contour deformation techniques to establish an explicit form for diffractive front in the fundamental solution. Chapter 3 proves a propagation of smoothness result for a related wave operator with potential, where instead of a constant, we put a smooth bounded function in the numerator of the potential. Microlocal energy estimates are used following the basic propagation methods of Duistermaat and Hormander, and employing the heavy refinements due to Melrose, Vasy, and Wunsch to handle propagation through the radial point at the origin. The potential term is estimated using Hardy's Inequality. Chapter 4 extends the propagation of smoothness result to conic manifolds with an inverse square potential concentrated at their boundary. We state a product decomposition theorem for the conic metric due to Melrose and Wunsch, then use the resulting coordinates to deploy our argument from Chapter 3. New terms with dependence on distance to the boundary arise, and we show how to bound them.

  18. Short-range inverse-square law experiment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.; Moody, M. V.

    2002-01-01

    Newton's inverse-square law is a cornerstone of General Relativity. Its validity has been demonstrated to better than one part in thousand in ranges greater than 1 cm. The range below 1 mm has been left largely unexplored, due to the difficulties associated with designing sensitive short-range experiments. However, the theoretical rationale for testing Newton's law at ranges below 1 mm has become very strong recently.

  19. Short-range inverse-square law experiment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D.; Paik, H. J.; Moody, M. V.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of ISLES (Inverse-Square Law Experiment in Space) is to perform a null test ofNewton's law on the ISS with a resolution of one part in lo5 at ranges from 100 pm to 1 mm. ISLES will be sensitive enough to detect axions with the strongest allowed coupling and to test the string-theory prediction with R z 5 pm.

  20. The Confirmation of the Inverse Square Law Using Diffraction Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papacosta, Pangratios; Linscheid, Nathan

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the inverse square law, how for example the intensity of light or sound varies with distance, presents conceptual and mathematical challenges. Students know intuitively that intensity decreases with distance. A light source appears dimmer and sound gets fainter as the distance from the source increases. The difficulty is in understanding why the intensity decreases as 1/r2 rather than as 1/r or 1/r3, or even as 1/ √r, where r is the distance from the source. This paper describes a simple experiment that verifies the inverse square law using a laser pointer, a pair of diffraction gratings, and a ruler. The method examines how the rectangular area outlined by bright spots produced by a laser beam going through a pair of diffraction gratings varies with the distance to the screen. These bright spots are the result of diffraction and interference caused by the diffraction grating assembly. The relationship between the area marked by these bright spots and the diffraction gratings-screen distance is an indirect confirmation of the inverse square law.

  1. Regularized total least squares approach for nonconvolutional linear inverse problems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Wang, Y; Galatsanos, N P; Zhang, J

    1999-01-01

    In this correspondence, a solution is developed for the regularized total least squares (RTLS) estimate in linear inverse problems where the linear operator is nonconvolutional. Our approach is based on a Rayleigh quotient (RQ) formulation of the TLS problem, and we accomplish regularization by modifying the RQ function to enforce a smooth solution. A conjugate gradient algorithm is used to minimize the modified RQ function. As an example, the proposed approach has been applied to the perturbation equation encountered in optical tomography. Simulation results show that this method provides more stable and accurate solutions than the regularized least squares and a previously reported total least squares approach, also based on the RQ formulation. PMID:18267442

  2. Adaptive regularization of earthquake slip distribution inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chisheng; Ding, Xiaoli; Li, Qingquan; Shan, Xinjian; Zhu, Jiasong; Guo, Bo; Liu, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Regularization is a routine approach used in earthquake slip distribution inversion to avoid numerically abnormal solutions. To date, most slip inversion studies have imposed uniform regularization on all the fault patches. However, adaptive regularization, where each retrieved parameter is regularized differently, has exhibited better performances in other research fields such as image restoration. In this paper, we implement an investigation into adaptive regularization for earthquake slip distribution inversion. It is found that adaptive regularization can achieve a significantly smaller mean square error (MSE) than uniform regularization, if it is set properly. We propose an adaptive regularization method based on weighted total least squares (WTLS). This approach assumes that errors exist in both the regularization matrix and observation, and an iterative algorithm is used to solve the solution. A weight coefficient is used to balance the regularization matrix residual and the observation residual. An experiment using four slip patterns was carried out to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed regularization method can derive a smaller MSE than uniform regularization and resolution-based adaptive regularization, and the improvement in MSE is more significant for slip patterns with low-resolution slip patches. In this paper, we apply the proposed regularization method to study the slip distribution of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake. The retrieved slip distribution is less smooth and more detailed than the one retrieved with the uniform regularization method, and is closer to the existing slip model from joint inversion of the geodetic and seismic data.

  3. Entanglement in a spin system with inverse square statistical interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, D.; Sindona, A.; Falcone, G.; Plastina, F.; Amico, L.

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the entanglement content of the ground state of a system characterized by effective elementary degrees of freedom with fractional statistics. To this end, we explicitly construct the ground state for a chain of N spins with inverse square interaction (the Haldane-Shastry model) in the presence of an external uniform magnetic field. For such a system at zero temperature, we evaluate the entanglement in the ground state both at finite size and in the thermodynamic limit. We relate the behavior of the quantum correlations with the spinon condensation phenomenon occurring at the saturation field.

  4. Inversion Theorem Based Kernel Density Estimation for the Ordinary Least Squares Estimator of a Regression Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongliang; Hutson, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional confidence interval associated with the ordinary least squares estimator of linear regression coefficient is sensitive to non-normality of the underlying distribution. In this article, we develop a novel kernel density estimator for the ordinary least squares estimator via utilizing well-defined inversion based kernel smoothing techniques in order to estimate the conditional probability density distribution of the dependent random variable. Simulation results show that given a small sample size, our method significantly increases the power as compared with Wald-type CIs. The proposed approach is illustrated via an application to a classic small data set originally from Graybill (1961). PMID:26924882

  5. Classical and quantum dynamics in an inverse square potential

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaumín-España, Elisa; Núñez-Yépez, H. N.; Salas-Brito, A. L.

    2014-10-15

    The classical motion of a particle in a 3D inverse square potential with negative energy, E, is shown to be geodesic, i.e., equivalent to the particle's free motion on a non-compact phase space manifold irrespective of the sign of the coupling constant. We thus establish that all its classical orbits with E < 0 are unbounded. To analyse the corresponding quantum problem, the Schrödinger equation is solved in momentum space. No discrete energy levels exist in the unrenormalized case and the system shows a complete “fall-to-the-center” with an energy spectrum unbounded by below. Such behavior corresponds to the non-existence of bound classical orbits. The symmetry of the problem is SO(3) × SO(2, 1) corroborating previously obtained results.

  6. Nonrelativistic inverse square potential, scale anomaly, and complex extension

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, Sergej Schmidt, Richard

    2010-02-15

    The old problem of a singular, inverse square potential in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is treated employing a field-theoretic, functional renormalization method. An emergent contact coupling flows to a fixed point or develops a limit cycle depending on the discriminant of its quadratic beta function. We analyze the fixed points in both conformal and nonconformal phases and perform a natural extension of the renormalization group analysis to complex values of the contact coupling. Physical interpretation and motivation for this extension is the presence of an inelastic scattering channel in two-body collisions. We present a geometric description of the complex generalization by considering renormalization group flows on the Riemann sphere. Finally, using bosonization, we find an analytical solution of the extended renormalization group flow equations, constituting the main result of our work.

  7. Gravitational Microlensing in Modified Gravity Theories - Inverse-Square Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H.

    2011-02-01

    Microlensing studies are usually based on the lens equation that is valid only to the first order in the gravitational constant G and lens mass M. We consider corrections to the conventional lens equation in terms of differentiable functions, so that they can express not only the second-order effects of GM in general relativity but also modified gravity theories. As a generalization of Ebina et al. (Prog. Theor. Phys. 104 (2000), 1317), we show that, provided that the spacetime is static, spherically symmetric and asymptotically flat, the total amplification by microlensing remains unchanged at the linear order of the correction to the deflection angle, if and only if the correction takes a particular form as the inverse square of the impact parameter, whereas the magnification factor for each image is corrected. It is concluded that the light curve shape by microlensing is inevitably changed and will thus allow us to probe modified gravity, unless a modificati on to the deflection angle takes the particular form. No systematic deviation in microlensing observations has been reported. For instance, therefore, the Yukawa-type correction is constrained as the characteristic length > 10^{14} m.

  8. Attractive inverse square potential, U(1) gauge, and winding transitions.

    PubMed

    Nisoli, Cristiano; Bishop, A R

    2014-02-21

    The inverse square potential arises in a variety of different quantum phenomena, yet notoriously it must be handled with care: it suffers from pathologies rooted in the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics. We show that its recently studied conformality breaking corresponds to an infinitely smooth winding-unwinding topological transition for the classical statistical mechanics of a one-dimensional system: this describes the tangling or untangling of floppy polymers under a biasing torque. When the ratio between torque and temperature exceeds a critical value the polymer undergoes tangled oscillations, with an extensive winding number. At lower torque or higher temperature the winding number per unit length is zero. Approaching criticality, the correlation length of the order parameter-the extensive winding number-follows a Kosterlitz-Thouless-type law. The model is described by the Wilson line of a (0+1) U(1) gauge theory, and applies to the tangling or untangling of floppy polymers and to the winding or diffusing kinetics in diffusion-convection reactions. PMID:24579570

  9. Attractive Inverse Square Potential, U(1) Gauge, and Winding Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisoli, Cristiano; Bishop, A. R.

    2014-02-01

    The inverse square potential arises in a variety of different quantum phenomena, yet notoriously it must be handled with care: it suffers from pathologies rooted in the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics. We show that its recently studied conformality breaking corresponds to an infinitely smooth winding-unwinding topological transition for the classical statistical mechanics of a one-dimensional system: this describes the tangling or untangling of floppy polymers under a biasing torque. When the ratio between torque and temperature exceeds a critical value the polymer undergoes tangled oscillations, with an extensive winding number. At lower torque or higher temperature the winding number per unit length is zero. Approaching criticality, the correlation length of the order parameter—the extensive winding number—follows a Kosterlitz-Thouless-type law. The model is described by the Wilson line of a (0+1) U(1) gauge theory, and applies to the tangling or untangling of floppy polymers and to the winding or diffusing kinetics in diffusion-convection reactions.

  10. Superconducting gravity gradiometer and a test of inverse square law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, M. V.; Paik, Ho Jung

    1989-01-01

    The equivalence principle prohibits the distinction of gravity from acceleration by a local measurement. However, by making a differential measurement of acceleration over a baseline, platform accelerations can be cancelled and gravity gradients detected. In an in-line superconducting gravity gradiometer, this differencing is accomplished with two spring-mass accelerometers in which the proof masses are confined to motion in a single degree of freedom and are coupled together by superconducting circuits. Platform motions appear as common mode accelerations and are cancelled by adjusting the ratio of two persistent currents in the sensing circuit. The sensing circuit is connected to a commercial SQUID amplifier to sense changes in the persistent currents generated by differential accelerations, i.e., gravity gradients. A three-axis gravity gradiometer is formed by mounting six accelerometers on the faces of a precision cube, with the accelerometers on opposite faces of the cube forming one of three in-line gradiometers. A dedicated satellite mission for mapping the earth's gravity field is an important one. Additional scientific goals are a test of the inverse square law to a part in 10(exp 10) at 100 km, and a test of the Lense-Thirring effect by detecting the relativistic gravity magnetic terms in the gravity gradient tensor for the earth.

  11. Most-Perfect Pandiagonal Magic Squares and Their Moore-Penrose Inverse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, Dietrich; Trenkler, Gotz

    2004-01-01

    In this note 4 x 4 most-perfect pandiagonal magic squares are considered in which rows, columns and the two main, along with the broken, diagonals add up to the same sum. It is shown that the Moore-Penrose inverse of these squares has the same magic property.

  12. The incomplete inverse and its applications to the linear least squares problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morduch, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    A modified matrix product is explained, and it is shown that this product defiles a group whose inverse is called the incomplete inverse. It was proven that the incomplete inverse of an augmented normal matrix includes all the quantities associated with the least squares solution. An answer is provided to the problem that occurs when the data residuals are too large and when insufficient data to justify augmenting the model are available.

  13. Application of the least-squares inversion method: Fourier series versus waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Dong-Joo; Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo

    2015-11-01

    We describe an implicit link between waveform inversion and Fourier series based on inversion methods such as gradient, Gauss-Newton, and full Newton methods. Fourier series have been widely used as a basic concept in studies on seismic data interpretation, and their coefficients are obtained in the classical Fourier analysis. We show that Fourier coefficients can also be obtained by inversion algorithms, and compare the method to seismic waveform inversion algorithms. In that case, Fourier coefficients correspond to model parameters (velocities, density or elastic constants), whereas cosine and sine functions correspond to components of the Jacobian matrix, that is, partial derivative wavefields in seismic inversion. In the classical Fourier analysis, optimal coefficients are determined by the sensitivity of a given function to sine and cosine functions. In the inversion method for Fourier series, Fourier coefficients are obtained by measuring the sensitivity of residuals between given functions and test functions (defined as the sum of weighted cosine and sine functions) to cosine and sine functions. The orthogonal property of cosine and sine functions makes the full or approximate Hessian matrix become a diagonal matrix in the inversion for Fourier series. In seismic waveform inversion, the Hessian matrix may or may not be a diagonal matrix, because partial derivative wavefields correlate with each other to some extent, making them semi-orthogonal. At the high-frequency limits, however, the Hessian matrix can be approximated by either a diagonal matrix or a diagonally-dominant matrix. Since we usually deal with relatively low frequencies in seismic waveform inversion, it is not diagonally dominant and thus it is prohibitively expensive to compute the full or approximate Hessian matrix. By interpreting Fourier series with the inversion algorithms, we note that the Fourier series can be computed at an iteration step using any inversion algorithms such as the

  14. Tests of the gravitational inverse-square law below the dark-energy length scale.

    PubMed

    Kapner, D J; Cook, T S; Adelberger, E G; Gundlach, J H; Heckel, B R; Hoyle, C D; Swanson, H E

    2007-01-12

    We conducted three torsion-balance experiments to test the gravitational inverse-square law at separations between 9.53 mm and 55 microm, probing distances less than the dark-energy length scale lambda(d)=[4 -root](variant Planck's over 2pic/rho(d) approximately 85 microm. We find with 95% confidence that the inverse-square law holds (|alpha|

  15. High Accuracy Optical Inverse Square Law Experiment Using Inexpensive Light to Frequency Converters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanser, Keith H.; Mahrley, Steve; Tanner, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report on the use of two different light to frequency converters, four different light sources, three of which are novel and inexpensive, and a hand held digital multimeter with a frequency counter, suitable for making accurate and rapid determination of the optical inverse square law exponent of -2 to better than [plus or…

  16. Existence of solutions for a nonlinear PDE with an inverse square potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianqing

    Via Linking theorem and delicate energy estimates, the existence of nontrivial solutions for a nonlinear PDE with an inverse square potential and critical sobolev exponent is proved. This result gives a partial (positive) answer to an open problem proposed in Ferrero and Gazzola (J. Differential Equations 177 (2001) 494).

  17. Sensitivity Considerations for a Short-range Test of the Gravitational Inverse-square Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Cardenas, Crystal; Harter, A. Conrad; Hoyle, C. D.; Leopardi, Holly

    2014-03-01

    The gravitational Inverse-Square Law (ISL) has been verified from infinity down to the 0.1 mm regime. Several theoretical scenarios predict possible violations of the ISL at short distances. At HSU we are developing an experiment that will test gravitational interactions below 50 microns. The experiment will be approximately null by using a stepped torsion pendulum and a large attractor plate. Hence, in the approximation that the attractor mass is an infinite sheet of matter, the Newtonian gravitational force is independent of separation distance between the pendulum and attractor. The experiment will measure the torque applied to the pendulum as the attractor mass is oscillated nearby. The size and distance dependence of the torque variation will provide a means to determine any deviations from the ISL at untested scales. The mass distribution of the pendulum and attractor determine the sensitivity of the experiment. This talk will focus on the investigation of the ISL and the experimental sensitivity. Gauss' Law of Gravitation, the infinite plane approximation, Yukawa potential, and Newtonian vs. Yukawa torque will be discussed. Supported by NSF grants 1065697 and 1306783.

  18. Analysis of Temperature Distributions in Nighttime Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telyak, Oksana; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Svetashev, Alexander; Turishev, Leonid; Barodka, Siarhei

    2015-04-01

    Adequate prediction of temperature inversion in the atmospheric boundary layer is one of prerequisites for successful forecasting of meteorological parameters and severe weather events. Examples include surface air temperature and precipitation forecasting as well as prediction of fog, frosts and smog with hazardous levels of atmospheric pollution. At the same time, reliable forecasting of temperature inversions remains an unsolved problem. For prediction of nighttime inversions over some specific territory, it is important to study characteristic features of local circulation cells formation and to properly take local factors into account to develop custom modeling techniques for operational use. The present study aims to investigate and analyze vertical temperature distributions in tropospheric inversions (isotherms) over the territory of Belarus. We study several specific cases of formation, evolution and decay of deep nighttime temperature inversions in Belarus by means of mesoscale numerical simulations with WRF model, considering basic mechanisms of isothermal and inverse temperature layers formation in the troposphere and impact of these layers on local circulation cells. Our primary goal is to assess the feasibility of advance prediction of inversions formation with WRF. Modeling results reveal that all cases under consideration have characteristic features of radiative inversions (e.g., their formation times, development phases, inversion intensities, etc). Regions of "blocking" layers formation are extensive and often spread over the entire territory of Belarus. Inversions decay starts from the lowermost (near surface) layer (altitudes of 5 to 50 m). In all cases, one can observe formation of temperature gradients that substantially differ from the basic inversion gradient, i.e. the layer splits into smaller layers, each having a different temperature stratification (isothermal, adiabatic, etc). As opposed to various empirical techniques as well as

  19. A test of the gravitational inverse-square law at short distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Ted S.

    Proposed theories that unify gravity and quantum mechanics often require Newton's gravitational inverse-square law to fail below some length scale. Additionally, some theorists have proposed the discovery of Dark Energy may imply altered gravitational dynamics at short length scales. These facts motivated our previous and continued efforts to test gravity at the smallest achievable distances. This dissertation describes an improved test of gravity using a torsion pendulum and attractor designed with 120-fold azimuthal symmetry. We tested the inverse-square law at separations down to 60 microns and have excluded gravity-strength Yukawa interactions with length scale > 42 microns at the 95% confidence level. However, our data preferred the inclusion of a Yukawa potential at longer length scales, in a region of parameter space previously excluded by experiment, indicating some yet unresolved systematic issues. This dissertation provides a complete description of the experiment and gives guidance for improved future measurement.

  20. A novel study on Kepler’s law and inverse square law of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bingzhan; Zhen, Shengchao; Zhao, Han; Huang, Kang; Deng, Bin; Chen, Ye-Hwa

    2015-05-01

    The Udwadia-Kalaba equation is a simple, aesthetic, and thought-provoking description of the world at a very fundamental level. It is about the way systems move. In this paper, we creatively apply the Udwadia-Kalaba approach to study heavenly bodies’ movements (especially on Kepler’s law and the inverse square law of gravitation). In an alternative way, we show that a heavenly body’s motion orbit can be an ellipse, a circle, a hyperbola, or a parabola and show the conservation of angular momentum. Furthermore, by applying the Udwadia-Kalaba approach, we use the constraint of motion orbit (ellipse, circle, hyperbola, or parabola) and the conservation of angular momentum constraint (or energy conservation constraint) and easily verify that any heavenly body’s motion complies with the inverse square law of gravitation. That is, we study Kepler’s law and Newton’s inverse square law in an analytical way, which makes the dynamicist more clear about the way heavenly bodies move and also makes the celestial mechanician more clear about the analytical mechanics (the Udwadia-Kalaba approach). Furthermore, for the students of dynamics and celestial physics, a different unique perspective is provided for them to study. At the end, we present the detailed process of applying the Udwadia-Kalaba approach to two imaginary cases to show its simplicity and efficiency.

  1. Resolution of five-component mixture using mean centering ratio and inverse least squares chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A comparative study of the use of mean centering of ratio spectra and inverse least squares for the resolution of paracetamol, methylparaben, propylparaben, chlorpheniramine maleate and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride has been achieved showing that the two chemometric methods provide a good example of the high resolving power of these techniques. Method (I) is the mean centering of ratio spectra which depends on using the mean centered ratio spectra in four successive steps that eliminates the derivative steps and therefore the signal to noise ratio is improved. The absorption spectra of prepared solutions were measured in the range of 220–280 nm. Method (II) is based on the inverse least squares that depend on updating developed multivariate calibration model. The absorption spectra of the prepared mixtures in the range 230–270 nm were recorded. Results The linear concentration ranges were 0–25.6, 0–15.0, 0–15.0, 0–45.0 and 0–100.0 μg mL-1 for paracetamol, methylparaben, propylparaben, chlorpheniramine maleate and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, respectively. The mean recoveries for simultaneous determination were between 99.9-101.3% for the two methods. The two developed methods have been successfully used for prediction of five-component mixture in Decamol Flu syrup with good selectivity, high sensitivity and extremely low detection limit. Conclusion No published method has been reported for simultaneous determination of the five components of this mixture so that the results of the mean centering of ratio spectra method were compared with those of the proposed inverse least squares method. Statistical comparison was performed using t-test and F-ratio at P = 0.05. There was no significant difference between the results. PMID:24028626

  2. Least squares inversion of self-potential (SP) data and application to the shallow flow of ground water in sinkholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardani, A.; Revil, A.; Akoa, F.; Schmutz, M.; Florsch, N.; Dupont, J. P.

    2006-10-01

    We propose a least squares inversion algorithm to determine the spatially variable depth of the water table in shallow unconfined aquifers using self-potential signals measured on the ground surface. Traditionally, the water table is determined only at few locations using piezometers. Our approach relates its shape with the distribution of the self-potential signals according to a Fredholm equation of the first kind. The latter is discretized to obtain a linear matrix formulation of the forward problem. This new formulation is very general and can account for the resistivity distribution of the vadose zone. It is used to setup the inverse problem using the approach of Tarantola (1987) for a test site located in Normandy (France) where 225 self-potential measurements were performed over an area of 15,400 m2. Ground water flows through the loess overlying a low permeability clay-with-flint weathered chalk, at a depth between 1 to 7 meters, into sinkholes in chalk bedrock. The method determines the water table with a precision of 0.4 m.

  3. [A hyperspectral subpixel target detection method based on inverse least squares method].

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Bo; Nie, Xin; Zhang, Guang-Jun

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, an inverse least square (ILS) method combined with the Mahalanobis distance outlier detection method is discussed to detect the subpixel target from the hyperspectral image. Firstly, the inverse model for the target spectrum and all the pixel spectra was established, in which the accurate target spectrum was obtained previously, and then the SNV algorithm was employed to preprocess each original pixel spectra separately. After the pretreatment, the regressive coefficient of ILS was calculated with partial least square (PLS) algorithm. Each point in the vector of regressive coefficient corresponds to a pixel in the image. The Mahalanobis distance was calculated with each point in the regressive coefficient vector. Because Mahalanobis distance stands for the extent to which samples deviate from the total population, the point with Mahalanobis distance larger than the 3sigma was regarded as the subpixel target. In this algorithm, no other prior information such as representative background spectrum or modeling of background is required, and only the target spectrum is needed. In addition, the result of the detection is insensitive to the complexity of background. This method was applied to AVIRIS remote sensing data. For this simulation experiment, AVIRIS remote sensing data was free downloaded from the NASA official websit, the spectrum of a ground object in the AVIRIS hyperspectral image was picked up as the target spectrum, and the subpixel target was simulated though a linear mixed method. The comparison of the subpixel detection result of the method mentioned above with that of orthogonal subspace projection method (OSP) was performed. The result shows that the performance of the ILS method is better than the traditional OSP method. The ROC (receive operating characteristic curve) and SNR were calculated, which indicates that the ILS method possesses higher detection accuracy and less computing time than the OSP algorithm. PMID:19385196

  4. Sensitivity analysis of distributed volcanic source inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavo', Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2016-04-01

    A recently proposed algorithm (Camacho et al., 2011) claims to rapidly estimate magmatic sources from surface geodetic data without any a priori assumption about source geometry. The algorithm takes the advantages of fast calculation from the analytical models and adds the capability to model free-shape distributed sources. Assuming homogenous elastic conditions, the approach can determine general geometrical configurations of pressured and/or density source and/or sliding structures corresponding to prescribed values of anomalous density, pressure and slip. These source bodies are described as aggregation of elemental point sources for pressure, density and slip, and they fit the whole data (keeping some 3D regularity conditions). Although some examples and applications have been already presented to demonstrate the ability of the algorithm in reconstructing a magma pressure source (e.g. Camacho et al., 2011,Cannavò et al., 2015), a systematic analysis of sensitivity and reliability of the algorithm is still lacking. In this explorative work we present results from a large statistical test designed to evaluate the advantages and limitations of the methodology by assessing its sensitivity to the free and constrained parameters involved in inversions. In particular, besides the source parameters, we focused on the ground deformation network topology, and noise in measurements. The proposed analysis can be used for a better interpretation of the algorithm results in real-case applications. Camacho, A. G., González, P. J., Fernández, J. & Berrino, G. (2011) Simultaneous inversion of surface deformation and gravity changes by means of extended bodies with a free geometry: Application to deforming calderas. J. Geophys. Res. 116. Cannavò F., Camacho A.G., González P.J., Mattia M., Puglisi G., Fernández J. (2015) Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises, Scientific Reports, 5 (10970) doi:10.1038/srep

  5. Rapid Inversion of Angular Deflection Data for Certain Axisymmetric Refractive Index Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R.; Greenberg, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Certain functions useful for representing axisymmetric refractive-index distributions are shown to have exact solutions for Abel transformation of the resulting angular deflection data. An advantage of this procedure over direct numerical Abel inversion is that least-squares curve fitting is a smoothing process that reduces the noise sensitivity of the computation

  6. Modified inverse square sensitometry for the determination of the characteristic curve of radiographic screen/film systems.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, A; Hiraki, Y; Ohkawa, Y; Yamada, T; Hashimoto, K; Aono, K

    1986-02-01

    To determine the characteristic curve of the radiographic screen/film systems in a short focal spot-film distance, the inverse square sensitometric method was modified by changing the radiation intensity with two kinds of filters. The characteristic curves obtained in the two exposure series with these two kinds of filters were overlapped to obtain a complete one. The characteristic curve thus obtained was almost the same as the one obtained by the original inverse square sensitometric method. The accuracy of the characteristic curves obtained by the modified method was well-reflected in the clinical radiographs. PMID:3962729

  7. Investigating the Inverse Square Law with the Timepix Hybrid Silicon Pixel Detector: A CERN [at] School Demonstration Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyntie, T.; Parker, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Timepix hybrid silicon pixel detector has been used to investigate the inverse square law of radiation from a point source as a demonstration of the CERN [at] school detector kit capabilities. The experiment described uses a Timepix detector to detect the gamma rays emitted by an [superscript 241]Am radioactive source at a number of different…

  8. 3D modeling inversion calculation of magnetic data using iterative reweighted least squares at the Lau basin, Southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Kim, C.; Kim, H. R.; Park, C.; Park, H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    We performed the marine magnetic and the bathymetry survey in the Lau basin for finding the submarine hydrothermal deposits in October 2009. We acquired magnetic and bathymetry datasets by using Overhouser Proton Magnetometer SeaSPY(Marine Magnetics Co.) and Multi-Beam Echo Sounder EM120(Kongsberg Co.). We conducted the data processing to obtain detailed seabed topography, magnetic anomaly and reduction to the pole(RTP). The Lau basin is one of the youngest back-arc basins in the Southwest Pacific. This region was a lot of hydrothermal activities and hydrothermal deposits. In particular, Tofua Arc(TA) in the Lau basin consists of various and complex stratovolcanos(from Massoth et al., 2007).), We calculated the magnetic susceptibility distribution of the TA19-1 seamount(longitude:176°23.5'W, latitude: 22°42.5'W)area using the RTP data by 3-D magnetic inversion from Jung's previous study(2013). Based on 2D 'compact gravity inversion' by Last & Kubik(1983), we expend it to the 3D algorithm using iterative reweighted least squares method with some weight matrices. The used weight matrices are two types: 1) the minimum gradient support(MGS) that controls the spatial distribution of the solution from Porniaguine and Zhdanov(1999); 2) the depth weight that are used according to the shape of subsurface structures. From the modeling, we derived the appropriate scale factor for the use of depth weight and setting magnetic susceptibility. Furthermore, we have to enter a very small error value to control the computation of the singular point of the inversion model that was able to be easily calculated for modeling. In addition, we applied separately weighted value for the correct shape and depth of the magnetic source. We selected the best results model by change to converge of RMS. Compared between the final modeled result and RTP values in this study, they are generally similar to the each other. But the input values and the modeled values have slightly little difference

  9. Cold Fermi gas with inverse square interaction in a harmonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Manas; Abanov, Alexander G.

    2011-05-01

    We study equilibrium density and spin density profiles for a model of cold one-dimensional spin 1/2 fermions interacting via inverse square interaction and exchange in an external harmonic trap. This model is the well-known spin-Calogero model (sCM) and its fully nonlinear collective field theory description is known. We extend the field theory description to the presence of an external harmonic trap and obtain analytic results for statics and dynamics of the system. For instance, we find how the equilibrium density profile changes upon tuning the interaction strength. The results we obtain for equilibrium configurations are very similar to the ones obtained recently by Ma and Yang (2010) [1] for a model of fermions with short ranged interactions. Our main approximation is the neglect of the terms of higher order in spatial derivatives in equations of motion - gradientless approximation (Kulkarni et al., 2009) [2]. Within this approximation the hydrodynamic equations of motion can be written as a set of decoupled forced Riemann-Hopf equations for the dressed Fermi momenta of the model. This enables us to write analytical solutions for the dynamics of spin and charge. We describe the time evolution of the charge density when an initial non-equilibrium profile is created by cooling the gas with an additional potential in place and then suddenly removing the potential. We present our results as a simple "single-particle" evolution in the phase space reminiscing a similar description of the dynamics of noninteracting one-dimensional fermions.

  10. A nonlinear least-squares inverse analysis of strike-slip faulting with application to the San Andreas fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Charles A.; Richardson, Randall M.

    1988-01-01

    A nonlinear weighted least-squares analysis was performed for a synthetic elastic layer over a viscoelastic half-space model of strike-slip faulting. Also, an inversion of strain rate data was attempted for the locked portions of the San Andreas fault in California. Based on an eigenvector analysis of synthetic data, it is found that the only parameter which can be resolved is the average shear modulus of the elastic layer and viscoelastic half-space. The other parameters were obtained by performing a suite of inversions for the fault. The inversions on data from the northern San Andreas resulted in predicted parameter ranges similar to those produced by inversions on data from the whole fault.

  11. New Test of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law at the Submillimeter Range with Dual Modulation and Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wen-Hai; Yang, Shan-Qing; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Li, Jia; Du, An-Bin; Zhan, Bi-Fu; Wang, Qing-Lan; Luo, Peng-Shun; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun

    2016-04-01

    By using a torsion pendulum and a rotating eightfold symmetric attractor with dual modulation of both the interested signal and the gravitational calibration signal, a new test of the gravitational inverse-square law at separations down to 295 μ m is presented. A dual-compensation design by adding masses on both the pendulum and the attractor was adopted to realize a null experiment. The experimental result shows that, at a 95% confidence level, the gravitational inverse-square law holds (|α |≤1 ) down to a length scale λ =59 μ m . This work establishes the strongest bound on the magnitude α of Yukawa-type deviations from Newtonian gravity in the range of 70 - 300 μ m , and improves the previous bounds by up to a factor of 2 at the length scale λ ≈160 μ m .

  12. New Test of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law at the Submillimeter Range with Dual Modulation and Compensation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-Hai; Yang, Shan-Qing; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Li, Jia; Du, An-Bin; Zhan, Bi-Fu; Wang, Qing-Lan; Luo, Peng-Shun; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun

    2016-04-01

    By using a torsion pendulum and a rotating eightfold symmetric attractor with dual modulation of both the interested signal and the gravitational calibration signal, a new test of the gravitational inverse-square law at separations down to 295  μm is presented. A dual-compensation design by adding masses on both the pendulum and the attractor was adopted to realize a null experiment. The experimental result shows that, at a 95% confidence level, the gravitational inverse-square law holds (|α|≤1) down to a length scale λ=59  μm. This work establishes the strongest bound on the magnitude α of Yukawa-type deviations from Newtonian gravity in the range of 70-300  μm, and improves the previous bounds by up to a factor of 2 at the length scale λ≈160  μm. PMID:27081964

  13. Fair and Square Computation of Inverse "Z"-Transforms of Rational Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, M. V.; Basilio, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    All methods presented in textbooks for computing inverse "Z"-transforms of rational functions have some limitation: 1) the direct division method does not, in general, provide enough information to derive an analytical expression for the time-domain sequence "x"("k") whose "Z"-transform is "X"("z"); 2) computation using the inversion integral…

  14. Inverse Analysis of Distributed Load Using Strain Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Toshiya; Igawa, Hirotaka

    The operational stress data is quite useful in managing the structural integrity and airworthiness of an aircraft. Since the aerodynamic load (pressure) distributes continuously on the structure surface, identifying the load from finite number of measured strain data is not easy. Although this is an inverse problem, usually used is an empirical correlation between load and strain obtained through expensive ground tests. Some analytical studies have been conducted but simple mathematical expressions were assumed to approximate the pressure distribution. In the present study a more flexible approximation of continuous load distribution is proposed. The pressure distribution is identified based on finite number of strain data with using the conventional finite element method and pseudo-inverse matrix. Also an extension is made by coupling an aerodynamical restriction with the elastic equation. Numerical examples show that this extension improves the precision of the inverse analysis with very small number of strain data.

  15. Inverse distributed hydrological modelling of alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, H.; Krause, J.; Mayr, S.

    2005-12-01

    Even in physically based distributed hydrological models, various remaining parameters must be estimated for each sub-catchment. This can involve tremendous effort, especially when the number of sub-catchments is large and the applied hydrological model is computationally expensive. Automatic parameter estimation tools can significantly facilitate the calibration process. Hence, we combined the nonlinear parameter estimation tool PEST with the distributed hydrological model WaSiM. PEST is based on the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg method, a gradient-based nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm. WaSiM is a fully distributed hydrological model using physically based algorithms for most of the process descriptions. WaSiM was applied to the alpine/prealpine Ammer River catchment (southern Germany, 710 km2) in a 100×100 m2 horizontal resolution. The catchment is heterogeneous in terms of geology, pedology and land use and shows a complex orography (the difference of elevation is around 1600 m). Using the developed PEST-WaSiM interface, the hydrological model was calibrated by comparing simulated and observed runoff at eight gauges for the hydrologic year 1997 and validated for the hydrologic year 1993. For each sub-catchment four parameters had to be calibrated: the recession constants of direct runoff and interflow, the drainage density, and the hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost aquifer. Additionally, five snowmelt specific parameters were adjusted for the entire catchment. Altogether, 37 parameters had to be calibrated. Additional a priori information (e.g. from flood hydrograph analysis) narrowed the parameter space of the solutions and improved the non-uniqueness of the fitted values. A reasonable quality of fit was achieved. Discrepancies between modelled and observed runoff were also due to the small number of meteorological stations and corresponding interpolation artefacts in the orographically complex terrain. A detailed covariance analysis was performed

  16. Inverse distributed hydrological modelling of Alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, H.; Krause, J.; Mayr, S.

    2006-06-01

    Even in physically based distributed hydrological models, various remaining parameters must be estimated for each sub-catchment. This can involve tremendous effort, especially when the number of sub-catchments is large and the applied hydrological model is computationally expensive. Automatic parameter estimation tools can significantly facilitate the calibration process. Hence, we combined the nonlinear parameter estimation tool PEST with the distributed hydrological model WaSiM. PEST is based on the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg method, a gradient-based nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm. WaSiM is a fully distributed hydrological model using physically based algorithms for most of the process descriptions. WaSiM was applied to the alpine/prealpine Ammer River catchment (southern Germany, 710 km2 in a 100×100 m2 horizontal resolution. The catchment is heterogeneous in terms of geology, pedology and land use and shows a complex orography (the difference of elevation is around 1600 m). Using the developed PEST-WaSiM interface, the hydrological model was calibrated by comparing simulated and observed runoff at eight gauges for the hydrologic year 1997 and validated for the hydrologic year 1993. For each sub-catchment four parameters had to be calibrated: the recession constants of direct runoff and interflow, the drainage density, and the hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost aquifer. Additionally, five snowmelt specific parameters were adjusted for the entire catchment. Altogether, 37 parameters had to be calibrated. Additional a priori information (e.g. from flood hydrograph analysis) narrowed the parameter space of the solutions and improved the non-uniqueness of the fitted values. A reasonable quality of fit was achieved. Discrepancies between modelled and observed runoff were also due to the small number of meteorological stations and corresponding interpolation artefacts in the orographically complex terrain. Application of a 2-dimensional numerical

  17. Inverse hardness distribution and its influence on mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liscic, B.; Grubisic, V.; Totton, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    Studying the pattern of hardness distribution on round bars cross-section after quenching, Shimizu and Tamura have introduced the expression of {open_quotes}inverse hardening{close_quotes}. Opposite to normal hardness distribution it shows lower hardness at the surface and higher hardness in the core. This phenomenon takes place dependent on: hardenability of the steel, cross-section size of the workpiece and on quenching condition. It is related to the delayed quenching with discontinuous change of cooling rate, and to the incubation period consumed before changing the cooling rate. Their experiments using cylindrical specimens of 50 mm Dia, made of the same heat of AISI-4140 steel have shown that polymer solutions (PAG) of high concentration may reproducibly cause delayed quenching and yield inverse hardness distribution. This Controllable Delayed Quenching (CDQ) technology, influencing intentionally the dynamics of heat extraction, has a great potential lo increase the depth of hardening, compared to conventional quenching practice. After tempering a workpiece having inverse hardness distribution to suitable tempering temperature, uniform microstructure of tempered martensite, giving the best impact toughness, can be obtained through the whole cross-section. Bending fatigue tests with adequate specimens have shown a significant increase of the fatigue life for tempered specimens with inverse hardness distribution after quenching, in comparison with specimens having normal hardness distribution.

  18. On the inversion of the von Kármán street in the wake of a confined square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarri, Simone; Giannetti, Flavio

    This paper considers the incompressible two-dimensional laminar flow around a square cylinder symmetrically positioned in a channel. In this type of flow, even if vortices of opposite sign are alternately shed from the body into the wake as in the unconfined case, an inversion of their position with respect to the flow symmetry line takes place further downstream. A numerical analysis is carried out to investigate the physical origin of this phenomenon and to characterize the position in the wake at which the vortices cross the symmetry line. It is shown that, for low to moderate blockage ratios, the fundamental cause of the inversion of the vortices is the amount of vorticity present in the incoming flow, and a dynamic interpretation in terms of vorticity interference in the wake is given. Further insight is gained through a linear stability analysis of the vortex shedding instability.

  19. Least squares inversion of Stokes profiles in the presence of velocity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skumanich, A.; Rees, D. E.; Lites, B. W.

    1985-05-01

    The Auer, Heasley and House Stokes inversion procedure in use at High Altitude Observatory is based on the analytic solution of the equation of transfer for polarized light where the representation of the thermodynamic and magnetic structure of the atmosphere is assumed to have a high degree of invariance, namely, a Milne-Eddington (ME) structure with a constant magnetic field. In the presence of invariance breaking gradients the resultant Stokes profiles are represented only approximately, if at all, by analytic forms. The accuracy of the inversion parameters and their significance as measures of actual structure are explored for the ME and the Landman-Finn sunspot models under the effects of velocity gradients. The resulting field parameters are good to a few percent and prove to be insensitive to the errors committed by the use of a ME-representation, but the resulting ME parameters yield a less precise measure of thermal structure.

  20. Least squares inversion of Stokes profiles in the presence of velocity gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skumanich, A.; Rees, D. E.; Lites, B. W.

    1985-01-01

    The Auer, Heasley and House Stokes inversion procedure in use at High Altitude Observatory is based on the analytic solution of the equation of transfer for polarized light where the representation of the thermodynamic and magnetic structure of the atmosphere is assumed to have a high degree of invariance, namely, a Milne-Eddington (ME) structure with a constant magnetic field. In the presence of invariance breaking gradients the resultant Stokes profiles are represented only approximately, if at all, by analytic forms. The accuracy of the inversion parameters and their significance as measures of actual structure are explored for the ME and the Landman-Finn sunspot models under the effects of velocity gradients. The resulting field parameters are good to a few percent and prove to be insensitive to the errors committed by the use of a ME-representation, but the resulting ME parameters yield a less precise measure of thermal structure.

  1. Investigating the inverse square law with the Timepix hybrid silicon pixel detector: a CERN@school demonstration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyntie, T.; Parker, B.

    2013-05-01

    The Timepix hybrid silicon pixel detector has been used to investigate the inverse square law of radiation from a point source as a demonstration of the CERN@school detector kit capabilities. The experiment described uses a Timepix detector to detect the gamma rays emitted by an 241Am radioactive source at a number of different distances. Datasets for each distance were collected, processed and analysed using the Pixelman software suite and CERN’s ROOT analysis software. The inverse square law approximation describes the data well, and so by following the experiment students can make the connection between the relevant elements of the physics curriculum and cutting-edge physics research. Additionally, an analytic model of the detector geometry is used to provide a comparable description of the data without the need for approximations. Such an exercise is typical of the kind of extension activity that can pave the way to students and teachers going beyond the physics curriculum and performing their own research with CERN@school.

  2. Dark matter versus modifications of the gravitational inverse-square law: results from planetary motion in the Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, M.; Jetzer, Ph.

    2006-09-01

    Dark matter or modifications of the Newtonian inverse-square law in the Solar system are studied with accurate planetary astrometric data. From extraperihelion precession and possible changes in the third Kepler's law, we get an upper limit on the local dark matter density, ρDM <~ 3 × 10-16kgm-3 at the 2σ confidence level. Variations in the 1/r2 behaviour are considered in the form of either a possible Yukawa-like interaction or a modification of gravity of Milgrom's modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) type. Up to scales of 1011m, scale-dependent deviations in the gravitational acceleration are really small. We examined the MOND interpolating function μ in the regime of strong gravity. Gradually varying μ suggested by fits of rotation curves are excluded, whereas the standard form μ(x) = x/(1 + x2)1/2 is still compatible with data. In combination with constraints from galactic rotation curves and theoretical considerations on the external field effect, the absence of any significant deviation from inverse square attraction in the Solar system makes the range of acceptable interpolating functions significantly narrow. Future radio ranging observations of outer planets with an accuracy of few tenths of a metre could either give positive evidence of dark matter or disprove modifications of gravity.

  3. The Dynamics of Tachyon Field with AN Inverse Square Potential in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei; Zhu, Jian-Yang; Xiao, Kui

    2013-05-01

    The dynamical behavior of tachyon field with an inverse potential is investigated in loop quantum cosmology. It reveals that the late-time behavior of tachyon field with this potential leads to a power-law expansion. In addition, an additional barotropic perfect fluid with the adiabatic index 0 < γ < 2 is added and the dynamical system is shown to be an autonomous one. The stability of this autonomous system is discussed using phase plane analysis. There exist up to five fixed points with only two of them possibly stable. The two stable node (attractor) solutions are specified and their cosmological indications are discussed. For the tachyon dominated solution, the further discussion is stretched to the possibility of considering tachyon field as a combination of two parts which respectively behave like dark matter and dark energy.

  4. Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis Discovered a Dietary Pattern Inversely Associated with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yen-Li; Pan, Wen-Harn; Hsu, Wan-Lun; Chien, Yin-Chu; Chen, Jen-Yang; Hsu, Mow-Ming; Lou, Pei-Jen; Chen, I-How; Hildesheim, Allan; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on the association between dietary component, dietary pattern and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is scarce. A major challenge is the high degree of correlation among dietary constituents. We aimed to identify dietary pattern associated with NPC and to illustrate the dose-response relationship between the identified dietary pattern scores and the risk of NPC. Taking advantage of a matched NPC case–control study, data from a total of 319 incident cases and 319 matched controls were analyzed. Dietary pattern was derived employing partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) performed on energy-adjusted food frequencies derived from a 66-item food-frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated with multiple conditional logistic regression models, linking pattern scores and NPC risk. A high score of the PLS-DA derived pattern was characterized by high intakes of fruits, milk, fresh fish, vegetables, tea, and eggs ordered by loading values. We observed that one unit increase in the scores was associated with a significantly lower risk of NPC (ORadj = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.60–0.88) after controlling for potential confounders. Similar results were observed among Epstein-Barr virus seropositive subjects. An NPC protective diet is indicated with more phytonutrient-rich plant foods (fruits, vegetables), milk, other protein-rich foods (in particular fresh fish and eggs), and tea. This information may be used to design potential dietary regimen for NPC prevention. PMID:27249558

  5. Effects of dipole-dipole interaction between cigar-shaped BECs of cold alkali atoms: towards inverse-squared interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Luo, Zhuxi; Wang, Ziqiang

    2014-07-01

    We show that the dipole-dipole coupling between Wannier modes in cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) is significantly enhanced while the short-range coupling is strongly suppressed. As a result, the dipole-dipole interaction can become the dominant interaction between ultracold alkali Bose atoms. In the long length limit of a cigar-shaped BEC, the resulting effective one-dimensional models possess an effective inverse squared interacting potential, the Calogero-Sutherland potential, which plays a fundamental role in many fields of contemporary physics; but its direct experimental realization has been a challenge for a long time. We propose to realize the Calogero-Sutherland model in ultracold alkali Bose atoms and study the effects of the dipole-dipole interaction.

  6. A spatiotemporal dynamic distributed solution to the MEG inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Lamus, Camilo; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Temereanca, Simona; Brown, Emery N; Purdon, Patrick L

    2012-11-01

    MEG/EEG are non-invasive imaging techniques that record brain activity with high temporal resolution. However, estimation of brain source currents from surface recordings requires solving an ill-conditioned inverse problem. Converging lines of evidence in neuroscience, from neuronal network models to resting-state imaging and neurophysiology, suggest that cortical activation is a distributed spatiotemporal dynamic process, supported by both local and long-distance neuroanatomic connections. Because spatiotemporal dynamics of this kind are central to brain physiology, inverse solutions could be improved by incorporating models of these dynamics. In this article, we present a model for cortical activity based on nearest-neighbor autoregression that incorporates local spatiotemporal interactions between distributed sources in a manner consistent with neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. We develop a dynamic maximum a posteriori expectation-maximization (dMAP-EM) source localization algorithm for estimation of cortical sources and model parameters based on the Kalman Filter, the Fixed Interval Smoother, and the EM algorithms. We apply the dMAP-EM algorithm to simulated experiments as well as to human experimental data. Furthermore, we derive expressions to relate our dynamic estimation formulas to those of standard static models, and show how dynamic methods optimally assimilate past and future data. Our results establish the feasibility of spatiotemporal dynamic estimation in large-scale distributed source spaces with several thousand source locations and hundreds of sensors, with resulting inverse solutions that provide substantial performance improvements over static methods. PMID:22155043

  7. A spatiotemporal dynamic distributed solution to the MEG inverse problem

    PubMed Central

    Lamus, Camilo; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Temereanca, Simona; Brown, Emery N.; Purdon, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    MEG/EEG are non-invasive imaging techniques that record brain activity with high temporal resolution. However, estimation of brain source currents from surface recordings requires solving an ill-conditioned inverse problem. Converging lines of evidence in neuroscience, from neuronal network models to resting-state imaging and neurophysiology, suggest that cortical activation is a distributed spatiotemporal dynamic process, supported by both local and long-distance neuroanatomic connections. Because spatiotemporal dynamics of this kind are central to brain physiology, inverse solutions could be improved by incorporating models of these dynamics. In this article, we present a model for cortical activity based on nearest-neighbor autoregression that incorporates local spatiotemporal interactions between distributed sources in a manner consistent with neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. We develop a dynamic Maximum a Posteriori Expectation-Maximization (dMAP-EM) source localization algorithm for estimation of cortical sources and model parameters based on the Kalman Filter, the Fixed Interval Smoother, and the EM algorithms. We apply the dMAP-EM algorithm to simulated experiments as well as to human experimental data. Furthermore, we derive expressions to relate our dynamic estimation formulas to those of standard static models, and show how dynamic methods optimally assimilate past and future data. Our results establish the feasibility of spatiotemporal dynamic estimation in large-scale distributed source spaces with several thousand source locations and hundreds of sensors, with resulting inverse solutions that provide substantial performance improvements over static methods. PMID:22155043

  8. On the simulated sampling distribution of RMAD2 for inverse Gaussian samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarof, Fauziah; Midi, Habshah; Abdullah, Aimi Athirah

    2015-02-01

    The coefficient of determination based on ordinary least squares regression, ROLS2 has been used in the construction of a goodness-of-fit test statistic based on regression for symmetrically and non-symmetrically distributed data with minimal or no outliers. Similarly, a form of a robust coefficient of determination based on the mean absolute deviation, RMAD2, is a plausible consideration in the construction of a goodness-of-fit test based on regression, especially if the underlying data distribution is non-symmetric. This paper presents observed properties of simulated sampling distribution of RMAD2 for 5000 samples of size 100 from the inverse Gaussian distribution with varying parameters ((μ, λ) = (1, 0.01), (1, 0.1), (1, 0.5), (1, 0.8), (1,1), (1, 3), (1, 5), (1, 7), (1, 10), (1, 15) and (1, 30)). Results indicated that for values of ψ = λ/μ less than 1, fifty percent of the mass of the sampling distribution is highly right-skewed whereas for ψ larger than or equal to 1, although still skewedly distributed, the same mass is almost symmetric. It is also observed that the domain of RMAD2 for inverse Gaussian variates is affected by the values of ψ.

  9. Inversion of generalized relaxation time distributions with optimized damping parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsch, Nicolas; Revil, André; Camerlynck, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Retrieving the Relaxation Time Distribution (RDT), the Grains Size Distribution (GSD) or the Pore Size Distribution (PSD) from low-frequency impedance spectra is a major goal in geophysics. The “Generalized RTD” generalizes parametric models like Cole-Cole and many others, but remains tricky to invert since this inverse problem is ill-posed. We propose to use generalized relaxation basis function (for instance by decomposing the spectra on basis of generalized Cole-Cole relaxation elements instead of the classical Debye basis) and to use the L-curve approach to optimize the damping parameter required to get smooth and realistic inverse solutions. We apply our algorithm to three examples, one synthetic and two real data sets, and the program includes the possibility of converting the RTD into GSD or PSD by choosing the value of the constant connecting the relaxation time to the characteristic polarization size of interest. A high frequencies (typically above 1 kHz), a dielectric term in taken into account in the model. The code is provided as an open Matlab source as a supplementary file associated with this paper.

  10. Using Punnett Squares to Facilitate Students' Understanding of Isotopic Distributions in Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sein, Lawrence T., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The isotopic distribution in mass spectroscopy is described for identifying pure compounds, being able to distinguish molecular fragments by masses. Punnett squares are familiar, easy to compute, and often graphical which makes helpful to students and the relative distribution of isotopic combination is easily generated for even isotopic…

  11. A Note on the Regularization of Linear Inversion for Estimating Quasi-Static Fault Slip Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardid Segura, A.; Ortega Culaciati, F. H.; Simons, M.

    2014-12-01

    During all the stages of the seismic cycle, earthquakes, aseismic slip, or even the onset of locking on the fault, may produce geodetically measurable deformation at the surface of the Earth. For instance, we can use space geodetic observations to measure crustal deformation associated to aseismic behavior of faults, which is essential to increase our level of understanding of the kinematics and physical processes controlling earthquake and tsunami occurrence. Estimating subsurface processes, such as distribution of fault slip, from surface observations at the Earth's crust is an inherently ill-posed problem. Therefore, the adopted inverse methodology to obtain such estimates plays a key role in this learning process. There are two general end member approaches to estimate the distribution of slip on a fault that deals with the inherent instability of the inverse problem: An unregularized, computationally expensive, fully Bayesian approach and a much more expedient but biased optimization approach using some form of regularized least squares. We focus our efforts in the latter approach. On the regularized inversion, the chosen form of regularization will introduce a priori information on fault slip estimates that needs to be well understood to be able to reach rigorous interpretation of the inversion results. We discuss the effects that the a priori information implied by commonly used regularization schemes has on slip estimates of fault behavior. Also we discuss the importance of using a regularization scheme that accounts for the spatial variability of the constraints provided by the observations (typically onland), in order to improve the stability and resolution of the inferred slip distributions of fault behavior. We present study cases in the Japan Trench and Central Andean subduction megathrusts. We also discuss the impact that off-shore geodetic monitoring has on our ability to provide insights on the mechanical behavior of the shallower portions of

  12. Galerkin approximation for inverse problems for nonautonomous nonlinear distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    An abstract framework and convergence theory is developed for Galerkin approximation for inverse problems involving the identification of nonautonomous nonlinear distributed parameter systems. A set of relatively easily verified conditions is provided which are sufficient to guarantee the existence of optimal solutions and their approximation by a sequence of solutions to a sequence of approximating finite dimensional identification problems. The approach is based on the theory of monotone operators in Banach spaces and is applicable to a reasonably broad class of nonlinear distributed systems. Operator theoretic and variational techniques are used to establish a fundamental convergence result. An example involving evolution systems with dynamics described by nonstationary quasilinear elliptic operators along with some applications are presented and discussed.

  13. Spin Axis Distribution of the Hungaria Asteroids via Lightcurve Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.

    2015-05-01

    In the past decade or so, the influence on small asteroids of the YORP (Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack) effect, which is the asymmetric thermal emission of received sunlight, has been firmly established. The two strongest pieces of evidence are the nearly flat distribution of rotation rates of small asteroids and the distribution of spin axes (poles). YORP theory says that the spin axes, barring outside influences, are eventually forced to low obliquities, i.e., the poles are located near the north or south ecliptic poles. This would seem natural for objects with low orbital inclinations. However, for objects with high orbital inclinations, such as the Hungarias, there are some questions if this would still be the case. The authors and other observers have accumulated dense lightcurves of the Hungaria asteroids for more than a decade. The combination of these dense lightcurves and sparse data from asteroid search surveys has allowed using lightcurve inversion techniques to determine the spin axes for almost 75 Hungaria asteroids. The results confirm earlier works that show an anisotropic distribution of spin axes that favors the ecliptic poles and, as predicted for the Hungarias, a preponderance of retrograde rotators.

  14. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  15. ON ASYMPTOTIC DISTRIBUTION AND ASYMPTOTIC EFFICIENCY OF LEAST SQUARES ESTIMATORS OF SPATIAL VARIOGRAM PARAMETERS. (R827257)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In this article, we consider the least-squares approach for estimating parameters of a spatial variogram and establish consistency and asymptotic normality of these estimators under general conditions. Large-sample distributions are also established under a sp...

  16. The probability distribution function for the sum of squares of independent random variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, Yury; Dmitriev, Dmitry; Tyapkin, Valery; Kremez, Nikolai; Shaidurov, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, the probability distribution function is derived for the sum of squares of random variables for nonzero expectations. This distribution function enables one to develop an efficient one-step algorithm for phase ambiguity resolution when determining the spatial orientation from signals of satellite radio-navigation systems. Threshold values for rejecting false solutions and statistical properties of the algorithm are obtained.

  17. Time-Series INSAR: An Integer Least-Squares Approach For Distributed Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiei-Esfahany, Sami; Hanssen, Ramon F.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research is to extend the geode- tic mathematical model which was developed for persistent scatterers to a model which can exploit distributed scatterers (DS). The main focus is on the integer least- squares framework, and the main challenge is to include the decorrelation effect in the mathematical model. In order to adapt the integer least-squares mathematical model for DS we altered the model from a single master to a multi-master configuration and introduced the decorrelation effect stochastically. This effect is described in our model by a full covariance matrix. We propose to de- rive this covariance matrix by numerical integration of the (joint) probability distribution function (PDF) of interferometric phases. This PDF is a function of coherence values and can be directly computed from radar data. We show that the use of this model can improve the performance of temporal phase unwrapping of distributed scatterers.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Isotope Distributions In Proteomic Mass Spectrometry Using Least-Squares Fourier Transform Convolution

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Edit; Bunner, Anne E.; Sykes, Michael T.; Williamson, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry involves comparison of the amplitudes of peaks resulting from different isotope labeling patterns, including fractional atomic labeling and fractional residue labeling. We have developed a general and flexible analytical treatment of the complex isotope distributions that arise in these experiments, using Fourier transform convolution to calculate labeled isotope distributions and least-squares for quantitative comparison with experimental peaks. The degree of fractional atomic and fractional residue labeling can be determined from experimental peaks at the same time as the integrated intensity of all of the isotopomers in the isotope distribution. The approach is illustrated using data with fractional 15N-labeling and fractional 13C-isoleucine labeling. The least-squares Fourier transform convolution approach can be applied to many types of quantitive proteomic data, including data from stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture and pulse labeling experiments. PMID:18522437

  19. Singular Value Decomposition of the Radial Distribution Function for Hard Sphere and Square Well Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Travis

    2013-01-01

    We compute the singular value decomposition of the radial distribution function for hard sphere, and square well solutions. We find that decomposes into a small set of basis vectors allowing for an extremely accurate representation at all interpolated densities and potential strengths. In addition, we find that the coefficient vectors describing the magnitude of each basis vector are well described by a low-order polynomial. We provide a program to calculate in this compact representation for the investigated parameter range. PMID:24143174

  20. A Bayesian inversion for slip distribution of 1 Apr 2007 Mw8.1 Solomon Islands Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Luo, H.

    2013-12-01

    On 1 Apr 2007 the megathrust Mw8.1 Solomon Islands earthquake occurred in the southeast pacific along the New Britain subduction zone. 102 vertical displacement measurements over the southeastern end of the rupture zone from two field surveys after this event provide a unique constraint for slip distribution inversion. In conventional inversion method (such as bounded variable least squares) the smoothing parameter that determines the relative weight placed on fitting the data versus smoothing the slip distribution is often subjectively selected at the bend of the trade-off curve. Here a fully probabilistic inversion method[Fukuda,2008] is applied to estimate distributed slip and smoothing parameter objectively. The joint posterior probability density function of distributed slip and the smoothing parameter is formulated under a Bayesian framework and sampled with Markov chain Monte Carlo method. We estimate the spatial distribution of dip slip associated with the 1 Apr 2007 Solomon Islands earthquake with this method. Early results show a shallower dip angle than previous study and highly variable dip slip both along-strike and down-dip.

  1. Expected distributions of root-mean-square positional deviations in proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitera, Jed W

    2014-06-19

    The atom positional root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) is a standard tool for comparing the similarity of two molecular structures. It is used to characterize the quality of biomolecular simulations, to cluster conformations, and as a reaction coordinate for conformational changes. This work presents an approximate analytic form for the expected distribution of RMSD values for a protein or polymer fluctuating about a stable native structure. The mean and maximum of the expected distribution are independent of chain length for long chains and linearly proportional to the average atom positional root-mean-square fluctuations (RMSF). To approximate the RMSD distribution for random-coil or unfolded ensembles, numerical distributions of RMSD were generated for ensembles of self-avoiding and non-self-avoiding random walks. In both cases, for all reference structures tested for chains more than three monomers long, the distributions have a maximum distant from the origin with a power-law dependence on chain length. The purely entropic nature of this result implies that care must be taken when interpreting stable high-RMSD regions of the free-energy landscape as "intermediates" or well-defined stable states. PMID:24655018

  2. Inverse dynamics: Simultaneous trajectory tracking and vibration reduction with distributed actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, Santosh; Bayo, Eduardo

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of inverse dynamics for articulated flexible structures with both lumped and distributed actuators. This problem arises, for example, in the combined vibration minimization and trajectory control of space robots and structures. A new inverse dynamics scheme for computing the nominal lumped and distributed inputs for tracking a prescribed trajectory is given.

  3. The determination of gravity anomalies from geoid heights using the inverse Stokes' formula, Fourier transforms, and least squares collocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, R.; Sjoeberg, L.; Rapp, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical method for the determination of gravity anomalies from geoid heights is described using the inverse Stokes formula. This discrete form of the inverse Stokes formula applies a numerical integration over the azimuth and an integration over a cubic interpolatory spline function which approximates the step function obtained from the numerical integration. The main disadvantage of the procedure is the lack of a reliable error measure. The method was applied on geoid heights derived from GEOS-3 altimeter measurements in the calibration area of the GEOS-3 satellite.

  4. Distribution of error in least-squares solution of an overdetermined system of linear simultaneous equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Probability density functions were derived for errors in the evaluation of unknowns by the least squares method in system of nonhomogeneous linear equations. Coefficients of the unknowns were assumed correct and computational precision were also assumed. A vector space was used, with number of dimensions equal to the number of equations. An error vector was defined and assumed to have uniform distribution of orientation throughout the vector space. The density functions are shown to be insensitive to the biasing effects of the source of the system of equations.

  5. Application of an iterative least-squares waveform inversion of strong-motion and teleseismic records to the 1978 Tabas, Iran, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Mendoza, C.

    1991-01-01

    An iterative least-squares technique is used to simultaneously invert the strong-motion records and teleseismic P waveforms for the 1978 Tabas, Iran, earthquake to deduce the rupture history. The effects of using different data sets and different parametrizations of the problem (linear versus nonlinear) are considered. A consensus of all the inversion runs indicates a complex, multiple source for the Tabas earthquake, with four main source regions over a fault length of 90 km and an average rupture velocity of 2.5 km/sec. -from Authors

  6. Comment on ``The two dimensional motion of a particle in an inverse square potential: Classical and quantum aspects'' [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis; Salgado, Marcelo

    2015-10-01

    We comment on a fatal flaw in the analysis contained in the work of Martínez-y-Romero et al., [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)], which concerns the motion of a point particle in an inverse square potential, and show that most conclusions reached there are wrong. In particular, the manifestly senseless claim that, in the attractive potential case, no bounded orbits exist for negative energies, is traced to a sign error. Several more mistakes, both in the classical and the quantum cases, are pointed out.

  7. Comment on “The two dimensional motion of a particle in an inverse square potential: Classical and quantum aspects” [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis Salgado, Marcelo

    2015-10-15

    We comment on a fatal flaw in the analysis contained in the work of Martínez-y-Romero et al., [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)], which concerns the motion of a point particle in an inverse square potential, and show that most conclusions reached there are wrong. In particular, the manifestly senseless claim that, in the attractive potential case, no bounded orbits exist for negative energies, is traced to a sign error. Several more mistakes, both in the classical and the quantum cases, are pointed out.

  8. Modeling and analysis of magnetic field distribution of square pane permanent magnet for intelligent ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liang; Hu, Penghao; Yang, Wenguo; Dang, Xueming; Zhang, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    The reasonable permanent magnetic field distribution has an important influence on improving the measuring accuracy in intelligent ball joint. In view of the defects on the ring permanent magnet in the previous experiment scheme, a new method on Square Pane Permanent Magnet (SPPM) is put forward. It possesses distinct advantages on orientation identification and model simplification. This paper proposes an optimized theory model of the magnetic field distribution of SPPM and gives the magnetic field theoretical expressions. The experiments have shown that the experimental data basically agreed with the theory value which is less than 4.3% error in full scale. This result verified the correctness of the analytic work and paves the way for improving the measurement accuracy in intelligent ball joint.

  9. The cumulative measure of a force: A unified kinetic theory for rigid-sphere and inverse-square force law interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yongbin; Viehland, Larry A.

    2011-09-01

    By introducing a cutoff on the cumulative measure of a force, a unified kinetic theory is developed for both rigid-sphere and inverse-square force laws. The difference between the two kinds of interactions is characterized by a parameter, γ, which is 1 for rigid-sphere interactions and -3 for inverse-square force law interactions. The quantities governed by γ include the specific reaction rates, kernels, collision frequencies, arbitrarily high orders of transition moments, arbitrarily high orders of Fokker-Planck expansion (also called Kramers-Moyal expansion) coefficients, and arbitrarily high orders of energy exchange rates. The cutoff constants are shown to be incomplete gamma functions of different orders. The widely used cutoff constant in plasma physics (usually known as Coulomb logarithm) is found to be exactly the zeroth order of the incomplete gamma function. The well known Arrhenius reaction rate formula comes from the first order of the incomplete gamma functions, while the negative first order can be used for fitting the fusion reaction rate between deuterium and tritium.

  10. Distributed weighted least-squares estimation with fast convergence for large-scale systems☆

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Damián Edgardo; Fu, Minyue

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a distributed weighted least-squares estimation problem for a large-scale system consisting of a network of interconnected sub-systems. Each sub-system is concerned with a subset of the unknown parameters and has a measurement linear in the unknown parameters with additive noise. The distributed estimation task is for each sub-system to compute the globally optimal estimate of its own parameters using its own measurement and information shared with the network through neighborhood communication. We first provide a fully distributed iterative algorithm to asymptotically compute the global optimal estimate. The convergence rate of the algorithm will be maximized using a scaling parameter and a preconditioning method. This algorithm works for a general network. For a network without loops, we also provide a different iterative algorithm to compute the global optimal estimate which converges in a finite number of steps. We include numerical experiments to illustrate the performances of the proposed methods. PMID:25641976

  11. An inverse method for computation of structural stiffness distributions of aeroelastically optimized wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An inverse method has been developed to compute the structural stiffness properties of wings given a specified wing loading and aeroelastic twist distribution. The method directly solves for the bending and torsional stiffness distribution of the wing using a modal representation of these properties. An aeroelastic design problem involving the use of a computational aerodynamics method to optimize the aeroelastic twist distribution of a tighter wing operating at maneuver flight conditions is used to demonstrate the application of the method. This exercise verifies the ability of the inverse scheme to accurately compute the structural stiffness distribution required to generate a specific aeroelastic twist under a specified aeroelastic load.

  12. An inverse method for computation of structural stiffness distributions of aeroelastically optimized wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1993-04-01

    An inverse method has been developed to compute the structural stiffness properties of wings given a specified wing loading and aeroelastic twist distribution. The method directly solves for the bending and torsional stiffness distribution of the wing using a modal representation of these properties. An aeroelastic design problem involving the use of a computational aerodynamics method to optimize the aeroelastic twist distribution of a tighter wing operating at maneuver flight conditions is used to demonstrate the application of the method. This exercise verifies the ability of the inverse scheme to accurately compute the structural stiffness distribution required to generate a specific aeroelastic twist under a specified aeroelastic load.

  13. Development of a 1D-displacement low-cost sensor prototype based on the inverse square law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, J.; Albajez, J. A.; Yagiie, J. A.; Aguilar, J. J.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper the design and development of a new prototype for measuring lineal displacements with micrometric resolution are presented. This device is based on the use of opto-electronic sensors (photodiodes) with a mechanical displacement system. This generates a more compact and lower cost solution than the commercial ones (LVDT, optical encoders, etc.) usually utilized for measuring in a range of 10 mm with a resolution of tenths of micrometers. The mechanic system for the displacement comes from a relative movement between a linear guide and its slide unit. The final goal of this prototype is the calibration of machine tools with less expensive self-centering probes than the nowadays available commercial ones. Firstly, the properties and behavior of the photodiodes have been analyzed in order to verify that they are adequate for this appliance. In the following tests carried out the fulfillment of the square law has been verified but the system repeatability has been severely affected by the temperature. As a solution for this problem several options have been proposed, either by a mathematical compensation or, in an indirect way, by using a double measuring system with another LED and photodiode as reference elements.

  14. Spin Axis Distribution of the Hungaria Asteroids via Lightcurve Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Stephens, Robert D.; Coley, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Since 2005, we have conducted a dedicated campaign to obtain dense lightcurves of members of the Hungaria asteroid population. As a result, the number of Hungarias in the asteroid lightcurve database (LCDB; Warner et al., 2009; Icarus 202, 134-146) with a statistically valid rotation rate rose from less than 50 to almost 300. The particular value of the Hungarias is that they are smallest and closest-to-sun main belt objects that can be studied with modest-sized telescopes. As such, they are more likely subject to YORP-altered spin states. We have previously verified highly-evolved rotation rates (Warner et al., 2009; Icarus 204, 172-182). This study takes the next step of tracing the evolution of spin orientations. We combined the dense lightcurves from our campaign with so-called “sparse data” from the NEA surveys to model the spin axis orientation using lightcurve inversion methods (see works by Kaasalainen, Torppa, Durech, and Hanus). Because high-dispersion sparse data are of little use for low amplitude objects, we limited the Hungarias to be modeled to those with a maximum amplitude of A ≥ 0.15 mag, an LCDB reliability code of U ≥ 2, the period in the LCDB summary was unambiguous, and the asteroid did not show signs of tumbling (non-principal axis rotation). The result as of mid-August 2014 was a list of 231 Hungaria candidates for modeling. Using a bank of five independent desktop computers and customized software, we first determined the likely sidereal period of the asteroid. That period was then used for a spin axis (pole) search involving 315 discrete longitude-latitude pairs. We report on the results of our searches, including weighting solutions when a unique solution was not found (often the case in lightcurve inversion), and how the results compare to similar studies using a more general asteroid population. BDW and AWH acknowledge funding from NASA NNX13AP56G and NSF grant AST-1210099. RDS acknowledges NASA grant NNX13AP56G and the

  15. Noncentral Chi-Square versus Normal Distributions in Describing the Likelihood Ratio Statistic: The Univariate Case and Its Multivariate Implication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2008-01-01

    In the literature of mean and covariance structure analysis, noncentral chi-square distribution is commonly used to describe the behavior of the likelihood ratio (LR) statistic under alternative hypothesis. Due to the inaccessibility of the rather technical literature for the distribution of the LR statistic, it is widely believed that the…

  16. Determination of the polar and total surface energy distributions of particulates by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Das, Shyamal C; Larson, Ian; Morton, David A V; Stewart, Peter J

    2011-01-18

    This Letter reports a technique of measuring polar surface energy distributions of lactose using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The significance of this study is that the total surface energy distributions can now be characterized by combining the already known dispersive surface energy distribution with polar surface energy distribution determined in this study. The polar surface energy was calculated from the specific free energies for surface interactions with a monopolar basic probe, ethyl acetate, and a monopolar acidic probe, dichloromethane. PMID:21174410

  17. Composite Weibull-Inverse Transformed Gamma distribution and its actuarial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Mastoureh; Bakar, Shaiful Anuar Abu; Hamzah, Nor Aishah

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces a new composite model, namely, composite Weibull-Inverse Transformed Gamma distribution which assumes Weibull distribution for the head up to a specified threshold and inverse transformed gamma distribution beyond it. The closed form of probability density function (pdf) as well as the estimation of parameters by maximum likelihood method is presented. The model is compared with several benchmark distributions and their performances are measured. A well-known data set, Danish fire loss data, is used for this purpose and it's Value at Risk (VaR) using the new model is computed. In comparison to several standard models, the composite Weibull- Inverse Transformed Gamma model proved to be a competitor candidate.

  18. Geodetic inversion for spatial distribution of slip under smoothness, discontinuity, and sparsity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Ryoko; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Okada, Masato; Hori, Takane

    2016-02-01

    In geodetic data inversion, insufficient observational data and smoothness constraints for model parameters make it difficult to clearly resolve small-scale heterogeneous structures with discontinuous boundaries. We therefore developed a novel regularization scheme for the inversion problem that uses discontinuity, sparsity, and smoothness constraints. In order to assess its usefulness and applicability, the proposed method was applied to synthetic displacements calculated by a ring-shaped and sharply varying afterslip distribution on a plate interface. The afterslip was obtained from reasonable numerical simulation of earthquake generation cycle with a rate- and state- dependent friction law and realistic three-dimensional plate geometry. The obtained afterslip distribution was heterogeneous, and the discontinuous boundary was sharper than that obtained by using smoothness constraint only. The same inversion test was conducted with a smoothly varying circular slip distribution with large slips inside the ring-shaped distribution. The method accurately reproduces the smooth distribution of the slip area as well as the ring-shaped distribution. Therefore, the method could be applied to any slip distribution, with both discontinuous and continuous boundaries. Adopting this method for measured data will make it possible to obtain detailed heterogeneous distributions of physical structures on fault planes. The proposed method is therefore applicable to various geophysical inversion problems that exhibit discontinuous heterogeneity.

  19. Probability weighted moments: definition and relation to parameters of several distributions expressable in inverse form.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, J.A.; Landwehr, J.M.; Matalas, N.C.; Wallis, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Distributions whose inverse forms are explicitly defined, such as Tukey's lambda, may present problems in deriving their parameters by more conventional means. Probability weighted moments are introduced and shown to be potentially useful in expressing the parameters of these distributions. -Authors

  20. Null controllability for a heat equation with a singular inverse-square potential involving the distance to the boundary function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biccari, Umberto; Zuazua, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    This article is devoted to the analysis of control properties for a heat equation with a singular potential μ /δ2, defined on a bounded C2 domain Ω ⊂RN, where δ is the distance to the boundary function. More precisely, we show that for any μ ≤ 1 / 4 the system is exactly null controllable using a distributed control located in any open subset of Ω, while for μ > 1 / 4 there is no way of preventing the solutions of the equation from blowing-up. The result is obtained applying a new Carleman estimate.

  1. Developing a Near Real-time System for Earthquake Slip Distribution Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li; Hsieh, Ming-Che; Luo, Yan; Ji, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Advances in observational and computational seismology in the past two decades have enabled completely automatic and real-time determinations of the focal mechanisms of earthquake point sources. However, seismic radiations from moderate and large earthquakes often exhibit strong finite-source directivity effect, which is critically important for accurate ground motion estimations and earthquake damage assessments. Therefore, an effective procedure to determine earthquake rupture processes in near real-time is in high demand for hazard mitigation and risk assessment purposes. In this study, we develop an efficient waveform inversion approach for the purpose of solving for finite-fault models in 3D structure. Full slip distribution inversions are carried out based on the identified fault planes in the point-source solutions. To ensure efficiency in calculating 3D synthetics during slip distribution inversions, a database of strain Green tensors (SGT) is established for 3D structural model with realistic surface topography. The SGT database enables rapid calculations of accurate synthetic seismograms for waveform inversion on a regular desktop or even a laptop PC. We demonstrate our source inversion approach using two moderate earthquakes (Mw~6.0) in Taiwan and in mainland China. Our results show that 3D velocity model provides better waveform fitting with more spatially concentrated slip distributions. Our source inversion technique based on the SGT database is effective for semi-automatic, near real-time determinations of finite-source solutions for seismic hazard mitigation purposes.

  2. Crustal Thickness and Oceanic Lithosphere Distribution in the Eastern Mediterranean from Satellite Gravity Anomaly Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, L.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2010-12-01

    The distribution of oceanic and continental lithosphere in the eastern Mediterranean is not well understood. Gravity inversion, incorporating a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction, has been used to map Moho depth, crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor for the eastern Mediterranean in order to determine the distribution of oceanic and continental lithosphere and the ocean-continent transition location. Data used in the gravity inversion are bathymetry, free-air gravity and sediment thickness data from Smith and Sandwell (1997), Sandwell and Smith (2009) and Laske and Masters (1997) respectively. Moho depths from the gravity inversion are dependent on the age of oceanic lithosphere and continental breakup because of the lithosphere thermal gravity correction; however, these ages are uncertain for the eastern Mediterranean. Gravity inversion sensitivities to break-up ages of 225Ma (late Triassic) and 100Ma (early Cretaceous) have been examined. Gravity inversion results show thin crust (5 - 10km thickness) for the Ionian Sea and the Herodotus Basin of the eastern Mediterranean consistent with these basins being underlain by oceanic or highly thinned continental crust. Predicted Moho depths from the gravity inversion are in agreement with published Ionian Sea ESP results (Voogd et al, 1992) and suggest a gravity inversion reference Moho depth increasing to the north, which we attribute to subduction dynamic subsidence. Calibration of gravity inversion Moho against ESP results show a trade-off between break-up age and reference Moho depth; a Cretaceous age ocean requires a larger Moho reference depth than a Triassic age ocean. Lithosphere thinning factor maps from gravity inversion for Africa do not show continuity between the Cretaceous African rift system (Benue Trough, Chad, CASZ and Sudan basins) and eastern Mediterranean basins. If the Ionian Sea is of Cretaceous age then it more probably links to Cretaceous rifting and sea

  3. On the appropriateness of applying chi-square distribution based confidence intervals to spectral estimates of helicopter flyover data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Charles K.

    1988-01-01

    The validity of applying chi-square based confidence intervals to far-field acoustic flyover spectral estimates was investigated. Simulated data, using a Kendall series and experimental acoustic data from the NASA/McDonnell Douglas 500E acoustics test, were analyzed. Statistical significance tests to determine the equality of distributions of the simulated and experimental data relative to theoretical chi-square distributions were performed. Bias and uncertainty errors associated with the spectral estimates were easily identified from the data sets. A model relating the uncertainty and bias errors to the estimates resulted, which aided in determining the appropriateness of the chi-square distribution based confidence intervals. Such confidence intervals were appropriate for nontonally associated frequencies of the experimental data but were inappropriate for tonally associated estimate distributions. The appropriateness at the tonally associated frequencies was indicated by the presence of bias error and noncomformity of the distributions to the theoretical chi-square distribution. A technique for determining appropriate confidence intervals at the tonally associated frequencies was suggested.

  4. Inverse problem for shape control of flexible space reflectors using distributed solar pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borggräfe, A.; Heiligers, J.; Ceriotti, M.; McInnes, C. R.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates controlled elastic deflection of thin circular space reflectors using an inverse problem approach to non-linear thin membrane theory. When changing the surface reflectivity across the membrane, the distributed loads due to ambient solar radiation pressure can be manipulated optically, thus controlling the surface shape without using mechanical or piezo-electric systems. The surface reflectivity can in principle be modulated using uniformly distributed thin-film electro-chromic coatings. We present an analytic solution to the inverse problem of finding the necessary reflectivity distribution that creates a specific membrane deflection, for example that of a parabolic reflector. Importantly, the reflectivity distribution across the surface is found to be independent of membrane size, thickness and solar distance, enabling engineering of the reflectivity distribution directly during the manufacture of the membrane.

  5. Three-dimensional rail-current distribution near the armature of simple, square-bore, two-rail railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Beno, J.H. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper vector potential is solved as a three dimensional, boundary value problem for a conductor geometry consisting of square-bore railgun rails and a stationary armature. Conductors are infinitely conducting and perfect contact is assumed between rails and the armature. From the vector potential solution, surface current distribution is inferred.

  6. A distribution-free alternative to least-squares regression and its application to Rb/Sr isochron calculations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vugrinovich, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    A distribution-free estimator of the slope of a regression line is introduced. This estimator is designated Sm and is given by the median of the set of n(n - 1)/2 slope estimators, which may be calculated by inserting pairs of points (Xi, Yi)and (Xj, Yj)into the slope formula Si = (Yi - Yj)/(Xi - Xj), 1 ??? i k (median {|Ri - Rm|}). If no outliers are found, the Y-intercept is given by Rm. Confidence limits on Rm and Sm can be found from the sets of Ri and Si, respectively. The distribution-free estimators are compared with the least-squares estimators now in use by utilizing published data. Differences between the least-squares and distribution-free estimates are discussed, as are the drawbacks of the distribution-free techniques. ?? 1981 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  7. Functional possibilities for forming different inverse population distributions in diode-side-pumped laser heads

    SciTech Connect

    Grechin, S G; Nikolaev, P P; Sharandin, E A

    2014-10-31

    The functional possibilities of diode-side-pumped laser heads of solid-state lasers for forming inverse population distributions of different types are analysed. The invariants determining the relationship between the laser head parameters upon scaling are found. The results of comparative experimental studies are presented. (lasers)

  8. Coseismic and Postseismic slip distribution of the 2007 Solomon Islands Earthquake deduced from A Bayesian Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Gong, X.

    2011-12-01

    In inversion of geodetic data for distribution of fault slip minimizing the first or second order derivatives of slip across fault plane is generally employed to smooth slips of neighboring patches.Smoothing parameter is subjective selected to determine the relative weight placed on fitting data versus smoothing the slip distribution.We use the Fully Bayesian Inversion method(Fukuda,2008)to simultaneously estimate the slip distribution and smoothing parameter objectively in a Bayesian framework. The distributed slips,the posterior probability density function and the smoothing parameter is formulated with Bayes' theorem and sampled with a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Here We will apply this method to Coseismic and Postseismic displacement data from the 2007 Solomon Islands Earthquake and compare the results of this method with generally favored method.

  9. On the Inversion for Mass (Re)Distribution from Global (Time-Variable) Gravity Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    The well-known non-uniqueness of the gravitational inverse problem states the following: The external gravity field, even if completely and exactly known, cannot Uniquely determine the density distribution of the body that produces the gravity field. This is an intrinsic property of a field that obeys the Laplace equation, as already treated in mathematical as well as geophysical literature. In this paper we provide conceptual insight by examining the problem in terms of spherical harmonic expansion of the global gravity field. By comparing the multipoles and the moments of the density function, we show that in 3-S the degree of knowledge deficiency in trying to inversely recover the density distribution from external gravity field is (n+l)(n+2)/2 - (2n+l) = n(n-1)/2 for each harmonic degree n. On the other hand, on a 2-D spherical shell we show via a simple relationship that the inverse solution of the surface density distribution is unique. The latter applies quite readily in the inversion of time-variable gravity signals (such as those observed by the GRACE space mission) where the sources over a wide range of the scales largely come from the Earth's Surface.

  10. Universal inverse power-law distribution for temperature and rainfall in the UK region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, A. M.

    2014-06-01

    Meteorological parameters, such as temperature, rainfall, pressure, etc., exhibit selfsimilar space-time fractal fluctuations generic to dynamical systems in nature such as fluid flows, spread of forest fires, earthquakes, etc. The power spectra of fractal fluctuations display inverse power-law form signifying long-range correlations. A general systems theory model predicts universal inverse power-law form incorporating the golden mean for the fractal fluctuations. The model predicted distribution was compared with observed distribution of fractal fluctuations of all size scales (small, large and extreme values) in the historic month-wise temperature (maximum and minimum) and total rainfall for the four stations Oxford, Armagh, Durham and Stornoway in the UK region, for data periods ranging from 92 years to 160 years. For each parameter, the two cumulative probability distributions, namely cmax and cmin starting from respectively maximum and minimum data value were used. The results of the study show that (i) temperature distributions (maximum and minimum) follow model predicted distribution except for Stornowy, minimum temperature cmin. (ii) Rainfall distribution for cmin follow model predicted distribution for all the four stations. (iii) Rainfall distribution for cmax follows model predicted distribution for the two stations Armagh and Stornoway. The present study suggests that fractal fluctuations result from the superimposition of eddy continuum fluctuations.

  11. A new stochastic algorithm for inversion of dust aerosol size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Li, Feng; Yang, Ma-ying

    2015-08-01

    Dust aerosol size distribution is an important source of information about atmospheric aerosols, and it can be determined from multiwavelength extinction measurements. This paper describes a stochastic inverse technique based on artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to invert the dust aerosol size distribution by light extinction method. The direct problems for the size distribution of water drop and dust particle, which are the main elements of atmospheric aerosols, are solved by the Mie theory and the Lambert-Beer Law in multispectral region. And then, the parameters of three widely used functions, i.e. the log normal distribution (L-N), the Junge distribution (J-J), and the normal distribution (N-N), which can provide the most useful representation of aerosol size distributions, are inversed by the ABC algorithm in the dependent model. Numerical results show that the ABC algorithm can be successfully applied to recover the aerosol size distribution with high feasibility and reliability even in the presence of random noise.

  12. A Study on Grid-Square Statistics Based Estimation of Regional Electricity Demand and Regional Potential Capacity of Distributed Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takeyoshi; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Suzuoki, Yasuo

    We established a procedure for estimating regional electricity demand and regional potential capacity of distributed generators (DGs) by using a grid square statistics data set. A photovoltaic power system (PV system) for residential use and a co-generation system (CGS) for both residential and commercial use were taken into account. As an example, the result regarding Aichi prefecture was presented in this paper. The statistical data of the number of households by family-type and the number of employees by business category for about 4000 grid-square with 1km × 1km area was used to estimate the floor space or the electricity demand distribution. The rooftop area available for installing PV systems was also estimated with the grid-square statistics data set. Considering the relation between a capacity of existing CGS and a scale-index of building where CGS is installed, the potential capacity of CGS was estimated for three business categories, i.e. hotel, hospital, store. In some regions, the potential capacity of PV systems was estimated to be about 10,000kW/km2, which corresponds to the density of the existing area with intensive installation of PV systems. Finally, we discussed the ratio of regional potential capacity of DGs to regional maximum electricity demand for deducing the appropriate capacity of DGs in the model of future electricity distribution system.

  13. Determination of transit time distribution and Rabi frequency by applying regularized inverse on Ramsey spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Young-Ho; Lee, Soo Heyong; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Ho Seong; Kwon, Taeg Yong

    2007-04-23

    The authors report on a method to determine the Rabi frequency and transit time distribution of atoms that are essential for proper operation of atomic beam frequency standards. Their method, which employs alternative regularized inverse on two Ramsey spectra measured at different microwave powers, can be used for the frequency standards with short Ramsey cavity as well as long ones. The authors demonstrate that uncertainty in Rabi frequency obtained from their method is 0.02%.

  14. Direct Measurement of the Pion Valence-Quark Momentum Distribution, the Pion Light-Cone Wave Function Squared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Deval, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gerzon, S.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    2001-05-01

    We present the first direct measurements of the pion valence-quark momentum distribution which is related to the square of the pion light-cone wave function. The measurements were carried out using data on diffractive dissociation of 500 GeV/c π- into dijets from a platinum target at Fermilab experiment E791. The results show that the \\|qq¯> light-cone asymptotic wave function describes the data well for Q2~10 \\(GeV/c\\)2 or more. We also measured the transverse momentum distribution of the diffractive dijets.

  15. Evaluating the effect of network density and geometric distribution on kinematic source inversion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youbing; Song, Seok Goo; Dalguer, Luis; Clinton, John

    2013-04-01

    An essential element of understanding earthquake source processes is obtaining a reliable source model via geophysical data inversion. The most common procedure to determine the kinematic source parameters (final slip, peak slip velocity, rise time and rupture time) is to invert observed ground motions recorded at a number of different stations (typically strong motion accelerometers). Few studies have been dedicated to evaluate the effect of the number of stations and their geometrical distribution on earthquake source parameters. In this paper we investigate these effects by inverting ground motions from synthetic dynamic earthquake rupture models with heterogeneous stress distribution governed by the slip weakening friction law. Our first target model is a buried strike-slip event (Mw 6.5) in a layered half space. The Compsyn code (Spudich and Xu, 2002) was used in the inversion procedure to generate forward synthetic waveforms, and an Evolutionary Algorithm was used to search for the source parameters: peak slip velocity (PSV), rupture time, and rise time at low frequency (up to 1Hz). The regularized Yoffe function was applied as a single window slip velocity function, which is a flexible slip velocity function defined by three independent parameters: the final slip, the slip duration and the duration of the positive slip acceleration, Tacc (Tinti, et al. 2005). The same velocity structure was used for both the foward and inversion modeling and no noise was added to the synthetic ground motions before inversion. We applied the Tikhonov regularization to smooth the final slip on fault, which is controlled by PSV and rise time. Our preliminary results show that: First, we can capture large slip patches of the dynamic models with good ground velocity waveform fitting, using the regularized Yoffe function, which is consistent with the overall properties of dynamic rupture models. Second, the geometry of station distribution is important for finite kinematic source

  16. Narrowly size-distributed cobalt salt containing poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) particles by inverse miniemulsion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhihai; Wang, Zhuo; Herrmann, Christine; Ziener, Ulrich; Landfester, Katharina

    2010-05-18

    Cobalt-containing hybrid particles have been prepared through the encapsulation of cobalt tetrafluoroborate hexahydrate (CoTFB) via inverse miniemulsion polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). We systematically varied the amount and type of cosolvent (water, methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol), apolar continuous phase (cyclohexane, isooctane, isopar M, hexadecane), amount of cobalt salt, and molecular weight of the polymeric surfactant. The influence of those parameters on the particle size, size distribution, and particle morphology were investigated. Narrowly size-distributed hybrid particles with good colloidal stability could be obtained in a wide range of cobalt content between 5.7 and 22.6 wt % salt relative to the monomer. The addition of a cosolvent such as water not only promotes the loading of metal salt but also has a positive influence on narrowing the particle size distribution. We assume that generally narrowly size-distributed particles can be obtained for a large variety of combinations of polar/apolar phase by adjusting the balance between osmotic and Laplace pressure via the solubility of the metal salt in the continuous phase and lowering the interfacial tension by adjusting the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) value of the surfactant. The results show a significant advantage of the inverse miniemulsion over the direct system with respect to the variability and total amount of metal salt without losing the narrow particle size distribution and colloidal stability. PMID:20112941

  17. A Novel Square-Root Cubature Information Weighted Consensus Filter Algorithm for Multi-Target Tracking in Distributed Camera Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanming; Zhao, Qingjie

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of multi-target tracking in a distributed camera network using the square-root cubature information filter (SCIF). SCIF is an efficient and robust nonlinear filter for multi-sensor data fusion. In camera networks, multiple cameras are arranged in a dispersed manner to cover a large area, and the target may appear in the blind area due to the limited field of view (FOV). Besides, each camera might receive noisy measurements. To overcome these problems, this paper proposes a novel multi-target square-root cubature information weighted consensus filter (MTSCF), which reduces the effect of clutter or spurious measurements using joint probabilistic data association (JPDA) and proper weights on the information matrix and information vector. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently track multiple targets in camera networks and is obviously better in terms of accuracy and stability than conventional multi-target tracking algorithms. PMID:25951338

  18. A novel square-root cubature information weighted consensus filter algorithm for multi-target tracking in distributed camera networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanming; Zhao, Qingjie

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of multi-target tracking in a distributed camera network using the square-root cubature information filter (SCIF). SCIF is an efficient and robust nonlinear filter for multi-sensor data fusion. In camera networks, multiple cameras are arranged in a dispersed manner to cover a large area, and the target may appear in the blind area due to the limited field of view (FOV). Besides, each camera might receive noisy measurements. To overcome these problems, this paper proposes a novel multi-target square-root cubature information weighted consensus filter (MTSCF), which reduces the effect of clutter or spurious measurements using joint probabilistic data association (JPDA) and proper weights on the information matrix and information vector. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently track multiple targets in camera networks and is obviously better in terms of accuracy and stability than conventional multi-target tracking algorithms. PMID:25951338

  19. Arctic Crustal Thickness and Oceanic Lithosphere Distribution from Gravity Inversion: Constraining Plate Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, N. J.; Alvey, A.; Roberts, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping crustal thickness, continental lithosphere thinning and oceanic lithosphere distribution represents a substantial challenge for the Polar Regions. Using gravity anomaly inversion, we have produced the first comprehensive maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for the Arctic. The Arctic region formed as a series of small distinct ocean basins leading to a complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust, possible micro-continents and rifted continental margins. Mapping of continental lithosphere thinning factor and crustal thickness from gravity inversion provide predictions of ocean-continent transition structure and magmatic type and continent ocean boundary location independent of magnetic isochrons. Restoration of crustal thickness and continent-ocean boundary location from gravity inversion may be used to test plate tectonic reconstructions. Using crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor maps with superimposed shaded-relief free-air gravity anomaly, we improve the determination of pre-breakup rifted margin conjugacy and sea-floor spreading trajectory within the Arctic basins. By restoring crustal thickness & continental lithosphere thinning maps of the Eurasia Basin & NE Atlantic to their initial post-breakup configuration we show the geometry and segmentation of the rifted continental margins at their time of breakup, together with the location of highly-stretched failed breakup basins and rifted micro-continents. Our gravity inversion predicts thin crust and high continental lithosphere thinning factors in the Makarov, Podvodnikov, Nautilus and Canada Basins consistent with these basins being underlain by oceanic or highly thinned continental crust. Larger crustal thicknesses, in the range 20 - 30 km, are predicted for the Lomonosov, Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges. Moho depths predicted compare well with seismic estimates. Predicted very thin continental or oceanic crust under the North Chuchki

  20. Local heat/mass transfer distribution around sharp 180 deg turn in a smooth square channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. C.; Chandra, P. R.; Lau, S. C.

    The naphthalene sublimation technique is used to determine the heat transfer characteristics of turbulent flow in a three-pass square channel whose segments are connected by two sharp 180-deg turns resembling the internal cooling passages of gas turbine blades and vanes. The results obtained show that spanwise-averaged heat transfer initially decreased with increasing distance from the channel entrance, and then sharply increased upon entering the 180-deg turn; the maximum value is attained toward the turn's end. There exist both a low heat transfer region near the inner wall and a region of high heat transfer near the outer wall. For the three Reynolds numbers investigated, local heat transfer coefficients at the 180-deg turn were 2-3 times higher than the fully developed values.

  1. Inverse analysis of non-uniform temperature distributions using multispectral pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tairan; Duan, Minghao; Tian, Jibin; Shi, Congling

    2016-05-01

    Optical diagnostics can be used to obtain sub-pixel temperature information in remote sensing. A multispectral pyrometry method was developed using multiple spectral radiation intensities to deduce the temperature area distribution in the measurement region. The method transforms a spot multispectral pyrometer with a fixed field of view into a pyrometer with enhanced spatial resolution that can give sub-pixel temperature information from a "one pixel" measurement region. A temperature area fraction function was defined to represent the spatial temperature distribution in the measurement region. The method is illustrated by simulations of a multispectral pyrometer with a spectral range of 8.0-13.0 μm measuring a non-isothermal region with a temperature range of 500-800 K in the spot pyrometer field of view. The inverse algorithm for the sub-pixel temperature distribution (temperature area fractions) in the "one pixel" verifies this multispectral pyrometry method. The results show that an improved Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is effective for this ill-posed inverse problem with relative errors in the temperature area fractions of (-3%, 3%) for most of the temperatures. The analysis provides a valuable reference for the use of spot multispectral pyrometers for sub-pixel temperature distributions in remote sensing measurements.

  2. Squares of different sizes: effect of geographical projection on model parameter estimates in species distribution modeling.

    PubMed

    Budic, Lara; Didenko, Gregor; Dormann, Carsten F

    2016-01-01

    In species distribution analyses, environmental predictors and distribution data for large spatial extents are often available in long-lat format, such as degree raster grids. Long-lat projections suffer from unequal cell sizes, as a degree of longitude decreases in length from approximately 110 km at the equator to 0 km at the poles. Here we investigate whether long-lat and equal-area projections yield similar model parameter estimates, or result in a consistent bias. We analyzed the environmental effects on the distribution of 12 ungulate species with a northern distribution, as models for these species should display the strongest effect of projectional distortion. Additionally we choose four species with entirely continental distributions to investigate the effect of incomplete cell coverage at the coast. We expected that including model weights proportional to the actual cell area should compensate for the observed bias in model coefficients, and similarly that using land coverage of a cell should decrease bias in species with coastal distribution. As anticipated, model coefficients were different between long-lat and equal-area projections. Having progressively smaller and a higher number of cells with increasing latitude influenced the importance of parameters in models, increased the sample size for the northernmost parts of species ranges, and reduced the subcell variability of those areas. However, this bias could be largely removed by weighting long-lat cells by the area they cover, and marginally by correcting for land coverage. Overall we found little effect of using long-lat rather than equal-area projections in our analysis. The fitted relationship between environmental parameters and occurrence probability differed only very little between the two projection types. We still recommend using equal-area projections to avoid possible bias. More importantly, our results suggest that the cell area and the proportion of a cell covered by land should be

  3. Bessel integrals in epsilon expansion: Squared spherical Bessel functions averaged with Gaussian power-law distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2013-12-01

    Bessel integrals of type {int_0^infty {k^{μ+2}{e}^{-ak2-(b+{i} ω)k}j_l^{2} (pk)dk}} are studied, where the squared spherical Bessel function j {/l 2} is averaged with a modulated Gaussian power-law density. These integrals define the multipole moments of Gaussian random fields on the unit sphere, arising in multipole fits of temperature and polarization power spectra of the cosmic microwave background. The averages can be calculated in closed form as finite Hankel series, which allow high-precision evaluation. In the case of integer power-law exponents μ, singularities emerge in the series coefficients, which requires ɛ expansion. The pole extraction and regularization of singular Hankel series is performed, for integer Gaussian power-law densities as well as for the special case of Kummer averages (a = 0 in the exponential of the integrand). The singular ɛ residuals are used to derive combinatorial identities (sum rules) for the rational Hankel coefficients, which serve as consistency checks in precision calculations of the integrals. Numerical examples are given, and the Hankel evaluation of Gaussian and Kummer averages is compared with their high-index Airy approximation over a wide range of integer Bessel indices l.

  4. Arctic and N Atlantic Crustal Thickness and Oceanic Lithosphere Distribution from Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, Nick; Alvey, Andy

    2014-05-01

    The ocean basins of the Arctic and N. Atlantic formed during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic as a series of distinct ocean basins, both small and large, leading to a complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust and rifted continental margins. The plate tectonic framework of this region was demonstrated by the pioneering work of Peter Ziegler in AAPG Memoir 43 " Evolution of the Arctic-North Atlantic and the Western Tethys" published in 1988. The spatial evolution of Arctic Ocean and N Atlantic ocean basin geometry and bathymetry are critical not only for hydrocarbon exploration but also for understanding regional palaeo-oceanography and ocean gateway connectivity, and its influence on global climate. Mapping crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution represents a substantial challenge for the Polar Regions. Using gravity anomaly inversion we have produced comprehensive maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for the Arctic and N Atlantic region, We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Chappell & Kusznir 2008). Gravity anomaly and bathymetry data used in the gravity inversion are from the NGA (U) Arctic Gravity Project and IBCAO respectively; sediment thickness is from a new regional compilation. The resulting maps of crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor are used to determine continent-ocean boundary location and the distribution of oceanic lithosphere. Crustal cross-sections using Moho depth from the gravity inversion allow continent-ocean transition structure to be determined and magmatic type (magma poor, "normal" or magma rich). Our gravity inversion predicts thin crust and high continental lithosphere thinning factors in the Eurasia, Canada, Makarov, Podvodnikov and Baffin Basins

  5. USING PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES REGRESSION TO OBTAIN COTTON FIBER LENGTH DISTRIBUTIONS FROM THE BEARD TESTING METHOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beard testing method for measuring cotton fiber length is based on the fibrogram theory. However, in the instrumental implementations, the engineering complexity alters the original fiber length distribution observed by the instrument. This causes challenges in obtaining the entire original le...

  6. Evaluating the effect of network density and geometric distribution on kinematic source inversion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youbing; Dalguer, Luis A.; Song, Seok Goo; Clinton, John; Giardini, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The effect of network density and geometric distribution on kinematic non-linear source inversion is investigated by inverting synthetic ground motions from a buried strike-slip fault (Mw 6.5), that have been generated by dynamic spontaneous rupture modelling. For the inversion, we use a physics-based regularized Yoffe function as slip velocity function. We test three different cases of station network geometry: (i) single station, varying azimuth and epicentral distance; (ii) multistation circular configurations, that is stations at similar distances from the fault, and regularly spaced around the fault; (iii) irregular multistation configurations using different numbers of stations. Our results show: (1) single station tests suggest that it may be possible to obtain a relatively good source model even using a single station. The best source model using a single station is obtained with stations at which amplitude ratios between three components are not large. We infer that both azimuthal angle and source-to-station distance play an important role in the design of optimal seismic network for source inversion. (2) Multistation tests show that the quality of the inverted source systematically correlates neither with the number of stations, nor with waveform misfit. (3) Waveform misfit has a direct correlation with the number of stations, resulting in overfitting the observed data without any systematic improvement of the source. It suggests that the best source model is not necessarily derived from the model with minimum waveform misfit. (4) A seismic network with a small number of well-spaced stations around the fault may be sufficient to obtain acceptable source inversion.

  7. Properties of the probability density function of the non-central chi-squared distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    András, Szilárd; Baricz, Árpád

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we consider the probability density function (pdf) of a non-central [chi]2 distribution with arbitrary number of degrees of freedom. For this function we prove that can be represented as a finite sum and we deduce a partial derivative formula. Moreover, we show that the pdf is log-concave when the degrees of freedom is greater or equal than 2. At the end of this paper we present some Turán-type inequalities for this function and an elegant application of the monotone form of l'Hospital's rule in probability theory is given.

  8. Inversion of Slip Distribution For The Athensearthquakeof 7 September 1999 From Regional Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, O.; Plicka, V.; Zahradnik, J.

    The space-time dependence of slip on a fault was modelled for the strong Athens earthquake of 7 September 1999, Mw=5.9. Seismograms from regional broadband seismic stations JAN, KZN, APE, RDO (National Observatory of Athens) and SER (Charles University and Patras University) were used in the modelling. The epicentral distances ranged between about 150 and 380 km. The problem was solved in the frequency domain using an approach similar to that of Cotton and Campillo (1995). The fault plane orientation, given by strike=123°, dip=55° and rake=-84° (USGS), was in a good agreement with aftershock distribution (Tselentis and Zahradnik, 2000) . Therefore, we kept these values fixed during the inversion. The fault plane (16 x 13 km) was subdivided into 144 subfaults, and each subfault was approximated by a point source. Green function spectra for the point sources were computed by discrete wave-number method. A revised model of the crustal structure was employed in these computations (Novotny et al., 2000). Three unknown parameters, namely the final slip, rupture time and rise time, were sought for each subfault. To determine the unknown parameters, two different inversion procedures were applied, in particular a generalised method of conjugate gradients and a modification of the single parameter variation. Synthetic experiments were performed to study the stability of the inversion with respect to the individual subfault parameters. The slip distributions obtained for the Athens earthquake data are compared with other solutions, especially with the recent solution of Baumont et al., who used empirical Green functions.

  9. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang

    2015-08-01

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes' rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle these challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.

  10. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang

    2015-03-21

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes’ rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle these challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.

  11. Inversion for slip distribution using teleseismic P waveforms: North Palm Springs, Borah Peak, and Michoacan earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendoza, C.; Hartzell, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    We have inverted the teleseismic P waveforms recorded by stations of the Global Digital Seismograph Network for the 8 July 1986 North Palm Springs, California, the 28 October 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho, and the 19 September 1985 Michoacan, Mexico, earthquakes to recover the distribution of slip on each of the faults using a point-by-point inversion method with smoothing and positivity constraints. Results of the inversion indicate that the Global digital Seismograph Network data are useful for deriving fault dislocation models for moderate to large events. However, a wide range of frequencies is necessary to infer the distribution of slip on the earthquake fault. Although the long-period waveforms define the size (dimensions and seismic moment) of the earthquake, data at shorter period provide additional constraints on the variation of slip on the fault. Dislocation models obtained for all three earthquakes are consistent with a heterogeneous rupture process where failure is controlled largely by the size and location of high-strength asperity regions. -from Authors

  12. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang

    2015-03-21

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes’ rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle thesemore » challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.« less

  13. Elastic scattering and inversion for the spatially heterogeneous distribution of compliance of a single fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, S.; Ghose, R.

    2013-12-01

    The elastdynamic response of a fracture is often modeled using the linear-slip model (LSM) for the fracture compliance. In earlier theoretical and laboratory studies, the distribution of compliance along the plane of a fracture has generally been assumed to be homogeneous. However, naturally occurring fractures are spatially heterogeneous, with the microscale properties varying along the fracture plane. The spatial heterogeneity of the microscale parameters along the fracture plane, e.g., roughness, contact area and distribution of fluid filled aperture, controls significantly the mechanical and hydraulic response of a fracture. When the fracture compliance is spatially heterogeneous, an incident elastic wavefield will be scattered at the fracture plane. This scattered wavefield contains information of the spatial heterogeneity of fracture compliance. In this study, we show through numerical modeling that the scattered elastic wavefield is sensitive to the spatial heterogeneity in compliance distribution. We find that the back-scattered elastic wavefield from a spatially heterogeneous fracture appears as the coda of the specular reflection, with amplitude differing from that for a homogenous fracture compliance. An analysis of the scattered wavefield does reveal the spatial heterogeneity along the fracture plane. In order to estimate the spatially heterogeneous compliance distribution, we have developed an inversion scheme. The scheme has the following two steps: (1) extrapolating the recorded back-scattered elastic wavefield and estimating the stress field at the fracture plane, and (2) solving the boundary condition of LSM using the estimated stress field. We illustrate this new method through numerical examples mimicking laboratory-scale measurements (Figure). In the low frequency, the estimated compliance distribution is smooth and inaccurate because of the presence of the evanescent waves. However, at the peak frequency, the compliance distribution can be

  14. Investigation of the nuclear matter distribution of 56Ni by elastic proton scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schmid, M.; Bagchi, S.; Bönig, S.; Csatlós, M.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Egelhof, P.; Eremin, V.; Furuno, T.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hartig, A.-L.; Ilieva, S.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiselev, O.; Kollmus, H.; Kozhuharov, C.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kröll, T.; Kuilman, M.; Litvinov, S.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Mutterer, M.; Nagae, D.; Najafi, M. A.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Popp, U.; Rigollet, C.; Roy, S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Steck, M.; Streicher, B.; Stuhl, L.; Thürauf, M.; Uesaka, T.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Winters, D.; Woods, P. J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yue, K.; Zamora, J. C.; Zenihiro, J.; the EXL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the nuclear-matter distribution of the doubly-magic N = Z nucleus 56Ni by investigating elastic proton scattering in inverse kinematics. The radioactive beam of 56Ni was injected and stored in the experimental storage ring (ESR, GSI) and interacted with an internal hydrogen gas-jet target. The high revolution frequency of the ions in the ring enabled a high luminosity, despite the low density of the target being used. This way, measurements at very low momentum transfers became possible. By measuring the energy and the scattering angle of the recoiling protons, we were able to separate the elastic reaction channel from inelastic scattering to the first excited {2}+ state of 56Ni and deduced the differential cross section of 56Ni {(p,p)}56 Ni. The data were analyzed within the framework of the Glauber multiple-scattering theory in order to extract the nuclear-matter radius and radial matter distribution of 56Ni. Parameterizing the matter distribution with the phenomenological Symmetrized Fermi distribution, a preliminary value of 3.5 fm for the rms matter radius was deduced. This experiment was part of an EXL (EXotic nuclei studied in Light-ion induced reactions at storage rings) campaign at GSI in 2012 and was the first successful investigation of nuclear reactions with a stored radioactive beam ever.

  15. Data-resolution matrix and model-resolution matrix for Rayleigh-wave inversion using a damped least-squares method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Inversion of multimode surface-wave data is of increasing interest in the near-surface geophysics community. For a given near-surface geophysical problem, it is essential to understand how well the data, calculated according to a layered-earth model, might match the observed data. A data-resolution matrix is a function of the data kernel (determined by a geophysical model and a priori information applied to the problem), not the data. A data-resolution matrix of high-frequency (>2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave phase velocities, therefore, offers a quantitative tool for designing field surveys and predicting the match between calculated and observed data. We employed a data-resolution matrix to select data that would be well predicted and we find that there are advantages of incorporating higher modes in inversion. The resulting discussion using the data-resolution matrix provides insight into the process of inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocities with higher-mode data to estimate S-wave velocity structure. Discussion also suggested that each near-surface geophysical target can only be resolved using Rayleigh-wave phase velocities within specific frequency ranges, and higher-mode data are normally more accurately predicted than fundamental-mode data because of restrictions on the data kernel for the inversion system. We used synthetic and real-world examples to demonstrate that selected data with the data-resolution matrix can provide better inversion results and to explain with the data-resolution matrix why incorporating higher-mode data in inversion can provide better results. We also calculated model-resolution matrices in these examples to show the potential of increasing model resolution with selected surface-wave data. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

  16. Layer 1 VPN services in distributed next-generation SONET/SDH networks with inverse multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, N.; Muthalaly, M. V.; Benhaddou, D.; Alanqar, W.

    2006-05-01

    Advances in next-generation SONET/SDH along with GMPLS control architectures have enabled many new service provisioning capabilities. In particular, a key services paradigm is the emergent Layer 1 virtual private network (L1 VPN) framework, which allows multiple clients to utilize a common physical infrastructure and provision their own 'virtualized' circuit-switched networks. This precludes expensive infrastructure builds and increases resource utilization for carriers. Along these lines, a novel L1 VPN services resource management scheme for next-generation SONET/SDH networks is proposed that fully leverages advanced virtual concatenation and inverse multiplexing features. Additionally, both centralized and distributed GMPLS-based implementations are also tabled to support the proposed L1 VPN services model. Detailed performance analysis results are presented along with avenues for future research.

  17. Quantum-mechanical calculation of carrier distribution in MOS accumulation and strong inversion layers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chien-Wei; Hwu, Jenn-Gwo

    2013-10-15

    We derive a statistical physics model of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and propose an accurate approximation method for calculating the quantum-mechanical effects of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure in accumulation and strong inversion regions. We use an exponential surface potential approximation in solving the quantization energy levels and derive the function of density of states in 2D to 3D transition region by applying uncertainty principle and Schrödinger equation in k-space. The simulation results show that our approximation method and theory of density of states solve the two major problems of previous researches: the non-negligible error caused by the linear potential approximation and the inconsistency of density of states and carrier distribution in 2D to 3D transition region.

  18. Distributed Least-Squares Estimation of a Remote Chemical Source via Convex Combination in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Meng-Li; Meng, Qing-Hao; Zeng, Ming; Sun, Biao; Li, Wei; Ding, Cheng-Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of locating a continuous chemical source using the concentration measurements provided by a wireless sensor network (WSN). Such a problem exists in various applications: eliminating explosives or drugs, detecting the leakage of noxious chemicals, etc. The limited power and bandwidth of WSNs have motivated collaborative in-network processing which is the focus of this paper. We propose a novel distributed least-squares estimation (DLSE) method to solve the chemical source localization (CSL) problem using a WSN. The DLSE method is realized by iteratively conducting convex combination of the locally estimated chemical source locations in a distributed manner. Performance assessments of our method are conducted using both simulations and real experiments. In the experiments, we propose a fitting method to identify both the release rate and the eddy diffusivity. The results show that the proposed DLSE method can overcome the negative interference of local minima and saddle points of the objective function, which would hinder the convergence of local search methods, especially in the case of locating a remote chemical source. PMID:24977387

  19. Distribution water quality anomaly detection from UV optical sensor monitoring data by integrating principal component analysis with chi-square distribution.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dibo; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Zheling; Liu, Shu; Huang, Pingjie; Zhang, Guangxin

    2015-06-29

    The issue of distribution water quality security ensuring is recently attracting global attention due to the potential threat from harmful contaminants. The real-time monitoring based on ultraviolet optical sensors is a promising technique. This method is of reagent-free, low maintenance cost, rapid analysis and wide cover range. However, the ultraviolet absorption spectra are of large size and easily interfered. While within the on-site application, there is almost no prior knowledge like spectral characteristics of potential contaminants before determined. Meanwhile, the concept of normal water quality is also varying due to the operating condition. In this paper, a procedure based on multivariate statistical analysis is proposed to detect distribution water quality anomaly based on ultraviolet optical sensors. Firstly, the principal component analysis is employed to capture the main variety features from the spectral matrix and reduce the dimensionality. A new statistical variable is then constructed and used for evaluating the local outlying degree according to the chi-square distribution in the principal component subspace. The possibility of anomaly of the latest observation is calculated by the accumulation of the outlying degrees from the adjacent previous observations. To develop a more reliable anomaly detection procedure, several key parameters are discussed. By utilizing the proposed methods, the distribution water quality anomalies and the optical abnormal changes can be detected. The contaminants intrusion experiment is conducted in a pilot-scale distribution system by injecting phenol solution. The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is finally testified using the experimental spectral data. PMID:26191757

  20. Local heat transfer distribution in a square channel with 90 continuous, 90 saw tooth profiled and 60 broken ribs

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Abhishek; SriHarsha, V.; Prabhu, S.V.; Vedula, R.P.

    2008-02-15

    Internal channel cooling is employed in advanced gas turbines blade to allow high inlet temperatures so as to achieve high thrust/weight ratios and low specific fuel consumption. The objective of the present study is to measure the local heat transfer distributions in a double wall ribbed square channel with 90 continuous, 90 saw tooth profiled and 60 V-broken ribs. Comparison is made between the 90 continuous ribs (P/e = 7 and 10 for a e/D = 0.15) and 90 saw tooth profiled rib configurations (P/e = 7 for an e/D = 0.15) for the same rib height to the hydraulic diameter ratio (e/D). The effect of pitch to rib height ratio (P/e = 7.5,10 and 12) of 60 V-broken ribbed channel with a constant rib height to hydraulic diameter ratio (e/D) of 0.0625 on the local heat transfer distribution is studied. The Reynolds number based on duct hydraulic diameter is ranging from 10,000 to 30,000. A thin stainless steel foil of 0.05 mm thickness is used as heater and infrared thermography technique is used to obtain the local temperature distribution on the surface. The images are captured in the periodically fully developed region of the channel. It is observed that the heat transfer augmentations in the channel with 90 saw tooth profiled ribs are comparable with those of 90 continuous ribs. The enhancements caused by 60 V-broken ribs are higher than those of 90 continuous ribs. The effect of pitch to the rib height ratio (P/e) is not significant for channel with 60 V-broken ribs for a given rib height to hydraulic diameter ratio (e/D = 0.0625). (author)

  1. Inverse Method for Estimating the Spatial Variability of Soil Particle Size Distribution from Observed Soil Moisture

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feifei; Peters-lidard, Christa D.; King, Anthony Wayne

    2010-11-01

    Soil particle size distribution (PSD) (i.e., clay, silt, sand, and rock contents) information is one of critical factors for understanding water cycle since it affects almost all of water cycle processes, e.g., drainage, runoff, soil moisture, evaporation, and evapotranspiration. With information about soil PSD, we can estimate almost all soil hydraulic properties (e.g., saturated soil moisture, field capacity, wilting point, residual soil moisture, saturated hydraulic conductivity, pore-size distribution index, and bubbling capillary pressure) based on published empirical relationships. Therefore, a regional or global soil PSD database is essential for studying water cycle regionally or globally. At the present stage, three soil geographic databases are commonly used, i.e., the Soil Survey Geographic database, the State Soil Geographic database, and the National Soil Geographic database. Those soil data are map unit based and associated with great uncertainty. Ground soil surveys are a way to reduce this uncertainty. However, ground surveys are time consuming and labor intensive. In this study, an inverse method for estimating mean and standard deviation of soil PSD from observed soil moisture is proposed and applied to Throughfall Displacement Experiment sites in Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. This method is based on the relationship between spatial mean and standard deviation of soil moisture. The results indicate that the suggested method is feasible and has potential for retrieving soil PSD information globally from remotely sensed soil moisture data.

  2. Quantum mechanical calculations of vibrational population inversion in chemical reactions - Numerically exact L-squared-amplitude-density study of the H2Br reactive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, J. Z. H.; Kouri, D. J.; Haug, K.; Schwenke, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    Numerically exact, fully three-dimensional quantum mechanicl reactive scattering calculations are reported for the H2Br system. Both the exchange (H + H-prime Br to H-prime + HBr) and abstraction (H + HBR to H2 + Br) reaction channels are included in the calculations. The present results are the first completely converged three-dimensional quantum calculations for a system involving a highly exoergic reaction channel (the abstraction process). It is found that the production of vibrationally hot H2 in the abstraction reaction, and hence the extent of population inversion in the products, is a sensitive function of initial HBr rotational state and collision energy.

  3. Geographical distribution and anisotropy of the inverse kinetic energy cascade, and its role in the eddy equilibrium processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihong; Liu, Zhiliang; Pang, Chongguang

    2015-07-01

    The geographic character of the inverse cascade is analyzed based on the spectral kinetic energy flux calculated in the global ocean, using sea surface height (SSH) data from satellites, reanalysis data, and model outputs. It is shown that the strongest inverse cascade occurs mostly in high-energy eastward-flowing currents, such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), the Kuroshio Extension, and the Gulf Stream, which matches the global distribution pattern of the eddy kinetic energy (EKE). Hence, the eddy scales predicted by the local linear baroclinic instability Lbci and from the altimeter observation Leddy are mapped out and compared with the energy injection scale Linj and the arrest-start scale Larrest-start of the inverse cascade, respectively. Generally, Lbci agrees well with Linj in the midlatitude and high-latitude oceans, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. Leddy falls within the arrest ranges of the inverse cascade and is quite close to Larrest-start. Finally, the depth dependence and the anisotropy of the inverse kinetic energy cascade are also diagnosed in the global ocean. We have found that the strength of the inverse cascades decreases with increasing depth, but the global pattern of the strength is nearly invariable. Meanwhile, the variations in depth hardly affect the Linj and Larrest-start. After considering the anisotropy in the spectral flux calculation, a possible inertial range for the zonal spectral kinetic energy flux is expected, where the cascade magnitude will keep a nearly constant negative value associated with the oceanic zonal jets.

  4. Slip distribution of the 2014 Iquique earthquake in northern Chile derived from tsunami waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, T.; Takagawa, T.; Tsushima, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Tomita, T.; Gómez, C.; Catalan, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    A major earthquake occurred on the plate boundary between the Nazca plate and the South American plate on April 1, 2014 in northern Chile associated with a tsunami that was recorded at the offshore DART buoys and the coastal tide gauges. The epicenter was located in a seismic gap called "Iquique gap", but the moment magnitude was estimated to be 8.2 from the seismic wave analysis which was much smaller than the size of seismic gap. It is important to reveal the slip distribution of this earthquake in order to assess remaining tsunami risk in the region. We therefore carried out a tsunami inversion analysis for this earthquake. We used tsunami waveform data recorded at both of the offshore and coastal gauges, and 30 arc-sec interval bathymetric grid complied by the Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service of the Chilean Navy. We also examined effect of tsunami governing equations used in creating Green's functions. One solution was obtained with the linear long-wave equations; the other was obtained with the linear dispersive equations. The effect of dispersive equations was found in tsunami waveforms in the open ocean. But that was not apparent in near-field records and the estimated slip distribution itself. The observed tsunami waveforms were retrieved well in the analysis except at Tocopilla where a large delay of tsunami arrival of about 10 minutes was seen in the observed data. Features of the estimated slip are 1) the slip extent was approximately 120km x 80km, 2) the major slip area was located to the south of the epicenter, a region off between Pisagua and Iquique, 3) the maximum slip was about 5m, 4) the seismic moment was calculated to be 1.28x10^21Nm (Mw 8.0).

  5. Inversion structure and winter ozone distribution in the Uintah Basin, Utah, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, Seth; Tran, Trang

    2015-12-01

    The Uintah Basin in Utah, U.S.A. experiences high concentrations of ozone during some winters due to strong, multi-day temperature inversions that facilitate the buildup of pollution from local sources, including the oil and gas industry. Together, elevation of monitoring sites and proximity to oil and gas wells explain as much as 90% of spatial variability in surface ozone concentrations during inversion episodes (i.e., R2 = 0.90). Inversion conditions start earlier and last longer at lower elevations, at least in part because lower elevations are more insulated from winds aloft that degrade inversion conditions and dilute produced ozone. Surface air transport under inversions is dominated by light, diurnal upslope-downslope flow that limits net transport distances. Thus, different areas of the Basin are relatively isolated from each other, allowing spatial factors like elevation and proximity to sources to strongly influence ozone concentrations at individual sites.

  6. Distribution of attenuation in the Kaoiki, Hawaii, source volume estimated by inversion of P wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbaum, Frank; Wyss, Max

    1990-08-01

    A new method to simultaneously invert for Q structure and source parameters was used on a set of 635 microearthquakes (0.9 < M < 2.0) in the Kaoiki area of southern Hawaii. Approximately 2800 signals were analyzed which had been recorded by 6 short period vertical seismographs at epicentral distances of a few to 10 km. The hypocentral depths ranged from O to 14 km, with the bulk of the sources in the 7.5-10.5 km range. The hypothesis to be tested was that the source volume of the M = 6.6 Kaoiki main shock of November 16, 1983, may be heterogeneous in attenuation distribution. We assumed that the observed P wave displacement spectra could be modelled by a source spectrum with an ω-2 high-frequency decay, a single-layer resonance filler to account for local site resonances and whole path attenuation along the ray path. In a next step the attenuation factor Q was constrained by tomographically reconstructing the three-dimensional Q structure for the source region and using it as starting model for a nonlinear inversion of the corner frequency, the seismic moment M0, and a new Q value. This process was iterated until the results changed less than 0.1% and were accepted as final. The average Q was approximately constant and very low (105

  7. Square dielectric THz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Aflakian, N; Yang, N; LaFave, T; Henderson, R M; O, K K; MacFarlane, D L

    2016-06-27

    A holey cladding dielectric waveguide with square cross section is designed, simulated, fabricated and characterized. The TOPAS waveguide is designed to be single mode across the broad frequency range of 180 GHz to 360 GHz as shown by finite-difference time domain simulation and to robustly support simultaneous TE and TM mode propagation. The square fiber geometry is realized by pulling through a heat distribution made square by appropriate furnace design. The transmitted mode profile is imaged using a vector network analyzer with a pinhole at the receiver module. Good agreement between the measured mode distribution and the calculated mode distribution is demonstrated. PMID:27410645

  8. Solution of multifrequency lidar inverse problem for a pre-set marine aerosol size-distribution formula

    SciTech Connect

    Piskozub, J.

    1994-12-31

    The multifrequency lidar inverse problem discussed consists of calculating the size distribution of sol particles from backscattered lidar data. Sea-water (marine) aerosol is particularly well suited for this kind of study as its scattering characteristics can be accurately represented by Mie theory as its particles are almost spherical and their complex index of refraction is well known. Here, a solution of the inverse problem concerning finding aerosol size distribution for a multifrequency lidar system working on a small number of wavelengths is proposed. The solution involves a best-fit method of finding parameters in a pre-set formula of particle size distribution. A comparison of results calculated with the algorithm from experimental lidar profiles with PMS data collected in Baltic Sea coastal zone is given.

  9. An inversion approach for determining distribution of production and temperature sensitivity of soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, Robyn N. C.; Risk, David A.

    2016-04-01

    Physical soil properties create lags between temperature change and corresponding soil responses, which obscure true Q10 (temperature sensitivity) values and other biophysical parameters such as depth of production. This study examines an inversion approach for estimating Q10 and e-folding depth of CO2 production (Zp) using physically based soil models, constrained by observed high-frequency surface fluxes and/or concentrations. Our inversion strategy uses a one-dimensional (1-D) multi-layered soil model that simulates realistic temperature and gas diffusion. We tested inversion scenarios on synthetic data using a range of constraining parameters, time-averaging techniques, mechanisms to improve computational efficiency, and various methods of incorporating real data into the model. Overall, we have found that with carefully constrained data, inversion was possible. While inversions using exclusively surface-flux measurements could succeed, constraining the inversion using multiple shallow subsurface CO2 measurements proved to be most successful. Inversions constrained by these shallow measurements returned Q10 and Zp values with average errors of 1.85 and 0.16 % respectively. This work is a first step toward building a reliable framework for removing physical effects from high-frequency soil CO2 data. Ultimately, we hope that this process will lead to better estimates of biophysical soil parameters and their variability on short timescales.

  10. Effect of Unequal Variances in Proficiency Distributions on Type-I Error of the Mantel-Haenszel Chi-Square Test for Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Patrick O.; Ankenmann, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    Empirical studies demonstrated Type-I error (TIE) inflation (especially for highly discriminating easy items) of the Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test for differential item functioning (DIF), when data conformed to item response theory (IRT) models more complex than Rasch, and when IRT proficiency distributions differed only in means. However, no…

  11. Square Root +

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, John G.

    1969-01-01

    A rational presentation of the so-called long division method for extracting the square root of a number. Diagrams are used to show relationship of this technique to the binomial theorem. Presentation exposes student to many facets of mathematics in addition to the mechanics of funding square root and cube root. Geometry, algebraic statements,…

  12. The Distribution and Most Recent Common Ancestor of the 17q21 Inversion in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Michael P.; Paschou, Peristera; Grigorenko, Elena; Gurwitz, David; Mehdi, Syed Qasim; Kajuna, Sylvester L.B.; Barta, Csaba; Kungulilo, Selemani; Karoma, N.J.; Lu, Ru-Band; Zhukova, Olga V.; Kim, Jong-Jin; Comas, David; Siniscalco, Marcello; New, Maria; Li, Peining; Li, Hui; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G.; Speed, William C.; Rajeevan, Haseena; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Kidd, Judith R.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2010-01-01

    The polymorphic inversion on 17q21, sometimes called the microtubular associated protein tau (MAPT) inversion, is an ∼900 kb inversion found primarily in Europeans and Southwest Asians. We have identified 21 SNPs that act as markers of the inverted, i.e., H2, haplotype. The inversion is found at the highest frequencies in Southwest Asia and Southern Europe (frequencies of ∼30%); elsewhere in Europe, frequencies vary from < 5%, in Finns, to 28%, in Orcadians. The H2 inversion haplotype also occurs at low frequencies in Africa, Central Asia, East Asia, and the Americas, though the East Asian and Amerindian alleles may be due to recent gene flow from Europe. Molecular evolution analyses indicate that the H2 haplotype originally arose in Africa or Southwest Asia. Though the H2 inversion has many fixed differences across the ∼900 kb, short tandem repeat polymorphism data indicate a very recent date for the most recent common ancestor, with dates ranging from 13,600 to 108,400 years, depending on assumptions and estimation methods. This estimate range is much more recent than the 3 million year age estimated by Stefansson et al. in 2005.1 PMID:20116045

  13. Using Squares to Sum Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeTemple, Duane

    2010-01-01

    Purely combinatorial proofs are given for the sum of squares formula, 1[superscript 2] + 2[superscript 2] + ... + n[superscript 2] = n(n + 1) (2n + 1) / 6, and the sum of sums of squares formula, 1[superscript 2] + (1[superscript 2] + 2[superscript 2]) + ... + (1[superscript 2] + 2[superscript 2] + ... + n[superscript 2]) = n(n + 1)[superscript 2]…

  14. Dynamic Squares.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the role of the square in art and explains that students can study modern art. Includes background information and artwork by four artists: (1) Richard Anuszkiewicz; (2) Victor Vasarely; (3) Frank Stella; and (4) Bridget Riley. (CMK)

  15. Modeling of long-range memory processes with inverse cubic distributions by the nonlinear stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaulakys, B.; Alaburda, M.; Ruseckas, J.

    2016-05-01

    A well-known fact in the financial markets is the so-called ‘inverse cubic law’ of the cumulative distributions of the long-range memory fluctuations of market indicators such as a number of events of trades, trading volume and the logarithmic price change. We propose the nonlinear stochastic differential equation (SDE) giving both the power-law behavior of the power spectral density and the long-range dependent inverse cubic law of the cumulative distribution. This is achieved using the suggestion that when the market evolves from calm to violent behavior there is a decrease of the delay time of multiplicative feedback of the system in comparison to the driving noise correlation time. This results in a transition from the Itô to the Stratonovich sense of the SDE and yields a long-range memory process.

  16. Rolling Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Derek; Knights, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Here, we investigate what loci are produced when a square of side-length one is allowed to rotate around a square of side-length n, where n is a whole number. We find that if i = 1, 2, 3 or 4 (mod 4), the loci obtained for n [congruent to] i (mod 4) all have the same symmetry and we show how the perimeter of each class can be determined. We also…

  17. Temporal and spatial PM10 concentration distribution using an inverse distance weighted method in Klang Valley, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarmizi, S. N. M.; Asmat, A.; Sumari, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    PM10 is one of the air contaminants that can be harmful to human health. Meteorological factors and changes of monsoon season may affect the distribution of these particles. The objective of this study is to determine the temporal and spatial particulate matter (PM10) concentration distribution in Klang Valley, Malaysia by using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) method at different monsoon season and meteorological conditions. PM10 and meteorological data were obtained from the Malaysian Department of Environment (DOE). Particles distribution data were added to the geographic database on a seasonal basis. Temporal and spatial patterns of PM10 concentration distribution were determined by using ArcGIS 9.3. The higher PM10 concentrations are observed during Southwest monsoon season. The values are lower during the Northeast monsoon season. Different monsoon seasons show different meteorological conditions that effect PM10 distribution.

  18. Simulation and inversion of borehole temperature profiles in surrogate climates: Spatial distribution and surface coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rouco, J. F.; Beltrami, H.; Zorita, E.; von Storch, H.

    2006-01-01

    A heat-conduction forward model driven by ground surface temperature from three 1000-year climate simulations with the state-of-the-art ECHO-g model has been used to simulate underground temperature perturbation profiles. An inversion approach has been applied to reconstruct ground surface temperature histories from the simulated profiles and to compare them with the climate model temperatures. Results support the skill of borehole inversion methods to retrieve long-term temperature trends, and the robustness of using the present-day borehole network for reconstructing SAT variations.

  19. Punnett's square.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A W F

    2012-03-01

    The origin and development of Punnett's Square for the enumeration and display of genotypes arising in a cross in Mendelian genetics is described. Due to R. C. Punnett, the idea evolved through the work of the 'Cambridge geneticists', including Punnett's colleagues William Bateson, E. R. Saunders and R. H. Lock, soon after the rediscovery of Mendel's paper in 1900. These geneticists were thoroughly familiar with Mendel's paper, which itself contained a similar square diagram. A previously-unpublished three-factor diagram by Sir Francis Galton existing in the Bateson correspondence in Cambridge University Library is then described. Finally the connection between Punnett's Square and Venn Diagrams is emphasized, and it is pointed out that Punnett, Lock and John Venn overlapped as Fellows of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. Copious illustrations are given. PMID:22326091

  20. Creating Magic Squares.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Betty Clayton

    1990-01-01

    One method of making magic squares using a prolongated square is illustrated. Discussed are third-order magic squares, fractional magic squares, fifth-order magic squares, decimal magic squares, and even magic squares. (CW)

  1. Atmospheric inversion of the surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distributions of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, Tristram O.

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous USA, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with consideration of the spatial information of crop production and consumption. Spatially distributed 5 county-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous USA are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO₂ observations at 210 stations to infer CO₂ fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon 10 fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 Pg C yr⁻¹ to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr⁻¹, whereas the large sink in the US Southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41±0.12 Pg C yr⁻¹ 15 to 0.29 ±0.12 Pg C yr⁻¹. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the West region from 0.066 ± 0.04 Pg C yr⁻¹ to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr⁻1 because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increase in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop 20 products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides an atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance of a region.

  2. Inverse estimation of the spheroidal particle size distribution using Ant Colony Optimization algorithms in multispectral extinction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Wang, Yuqing; Ruan, Liming

    2014-10-01

    Four improved Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithms, i.e. the probability density function based ACO (PDF-ACO) algorithm, the Region ACO (RACO) algorithm, Stochastic ACO (SACO) algorithm and Homogeneous ACO (HACO) algorithm, are employed to estimate the particle size distribution (PSD) of the spheroidal particles. The direct problems are solved by the extended Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA) and the Lambert-Beer law. Three commonly used monomodal distribution functions i.e. the Rosin-Rammer (R-R) distribution function, the normal (N-N) distribution function, and the logarithmic normal (L-N) distribution function are estimated under dependent model. The influence of random measurement errors on the inverse results is also investigated. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm is more accurate than the other three ACO algorithms and can be used as an effective technique to investigate the PSD of the spheroidal particles. Furthermore, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution functions to retrieve the PSD of spheroidal particles using PDF-ACO algorithm. The investigation shows a reasonable agreement between the original distribution function and the general distribution function when only considering the variety of the length of the rotational semi-axis.

  3. Distribution of poles in a series expansion of the asymmetric directed-bond percolation probability on the square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    1998-12-01

    We investigate numerically the percolation probability of the asymmetric directed-bond percolation on the square lattice with two parameters p and q based on Guttmann and Enting's procedure (1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 344). A series in the form of 0305-4470/31/48/001/img1 is derived by using the finite transfer-matrix method. The denominator of 0305-4470/31/48/001/img2 is directly calculated from the determinant of the transfer matrix and it leads to a proof that poles all lies on the unit circle in the complex q plane. The solvability of the bond directed percolation is also discussed.

  4. Imaging geochemical heterogeneities using inverse reactive transport modeling: An example relevant for characterizing arsenic mobilization and distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhreddine, Sarah; Lee, Jonghyun; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Fendorf, Scott; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    The spatial distribution of reactive minerals in the subsurface is often a primary factor controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in groundwater systems. However, direct measurement and estimation of heterogeneously distributed minerals are often costly and difficult to obtain. While previous studies have shown the utility of using hydrologic measurements combined with inverse modeling techniques for tomography of physical properties including hydraulic conductivity, these methods have seldom been used to image reactive geochemical heterogeneities. In this study, we focus on As-bearing reactive minerals as aquifer contaminants. We use synthetic applications to demonstrate the ability of inverse modeling techniques combined with mechanistic reactive transport models to image reactive mineral lenses in the subsurface and quantify estimation error using indirect, commonly measured groundwater parameters. Specifically, we simulate the mobilization of arsenic via kinetic oxidative dissolution of As-bearing pyrite due to dissolved oxygen in the ambient groundwater, which is an important mechanism for arsenic release in groundwater both under natural conditions and engineering applications such as managed aquifer recharge and recovery operations. The modeling investigation is carried out at various scales and considers different flow-through domains including (i) a 1D lab-scale column (80 cm), (ii) a 2D lab-scale setup (60 cm × 30 cm) and (iii) a 2D field-scale domain (20 m × 4 m). In these setups, synthetic dissolved oxygen data and forward reactive transport simulations are used to image the spatial distribution of As-bearing pyrite using the Principal Component Geostatistical Approach (PCGA) for inverse modeling.

  5. DERIVATION OF THE ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J1713.7-3946 VIA A SPECTRAL INVERSION METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hui; Chen Yang; Liu Siming

    2011-11-20

    We show that the radio, X-ray, and {gamma}-ray spectrum of the supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946 can be accounted for with the simplest emission model, where all of these emissions are attributed to a population of relativistic electrons interacting with the cosmic microwave background radiation, IR interstellar photons, and a background magnetic field. Using a spectral inversion method, the parent electron distribution and its uncertainties are derived from the observed photon spectrum. These results are independent of the model of particle acceleration and strongly support the leptonic scenario for the TeV emission.

  6. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-19

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO₂ observations at 210 stations to infer CO₂ fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr⁻¹, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 ± 0.12 to 0.29 ± 0.12 Pg C yr⁻¹. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 ± 0.04 to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr⁻¹ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.

  7. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-19

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO₂ observations at 210 stations to infer CO₂ fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated usingmore » a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr⁻¹, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 ± 0.12 to 0.29 ± 0.12 Pg C yr⁻¹. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 ± 0.04 to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr⁻¹ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.« less

  8. Percolation of randomly distributed growing clusters: Finite-size scaling and critical exponents for the square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakiris, N.; Maragakis, M.; Kosmidis, K.; Argyrakis, P.

    2010-10-01

    We study the percolation properties of the growing clusters model on a 2D square lattice. In this model, a number of seeds placed on random locations on the lattice are allowed to grow with a constant velocity to form clusters. When two or more clusters eventually touch each other they immediately stop their growth. The model exhibits a discontinuous transition for very low values of the seed concentration p and a second, nontrivial continuous phase transition for intermediate p values. Here we study in detail this continuous transition that separates a phase of finite clusters from a phase characterized by the presence of a giant component. Using finite size scaling and large scale Monte Carlo simulations we determine the value of the percolation threshold where the giant component first appears, and the critical exponents that characterize the transition. We find that the transition belongs to a different universality class from the standard percolation transition.

  9. Grain-size distribution and heavy metal contamination of road dusts in urban parks and squares in Changchun, China.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Liu; Yang, Wang; Jingshuang, Liu; Quanying, Wang; Mingying, Zou

    2015-02-01

    Due to rapid urbanization and the scarcity of land, most of the urban parks and squares in cities are built close to major roads or industrial areas, where they are subject to many potential pollution sources, including vehicle exhaust and industrial emissions. The aims of this study were to determine the concentrations of selected metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Cd) in road dusts collected in urban parks and squares in Changchun, China, on June 1, 2013 (International Children's Day) and to estimate the pollution sources. The mean Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Cd contents (70.89, 60.30, 43.56, 23.16, 170.80, and 0.3111 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively) in urban dusts were higher than their corresponding natural background values, particularly Pb, Cu, Zn, and Cd, which had about 2.5, 1.4, 1.9, and 2.6-fold higher levels, respectively. The results of principal component analysis indicated that Cr and Ni concentrations were mainly of natural origin, while Pb, Cu and Zn were derived from anthropogenic activities, and Cd tended to be from both sources. The geoaccumulation index (I geo) of these metals in the urban dusts under study indicates that they are uncontaminated with Cr and Ni; uncontaminated to moderately contaminated with Cu and Zn; and moderately contaminated with Pb and Cd. In addition, five particle sizes were analyzed separately for heavy metal concentrations. In all studied areas, there are large differences in the metal-loading percentage of different particle-size fractions among the samples, and the particles in 250-2,000-μm fraction are dominant in the total metal loading. PMID:25049053

  10. Parameters inversing of polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function model for target rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Zhan, Yong-hong; Yang, Di; Zeng, Chang-e.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we try to find a model that can apply to predict the polarization characteristics of the targets on the ground correctly. In the first place, we give an introduction to several kinds of existing models which are divided into three categories: Empirical models are precise but occupy too much source of computer; Physical-based models can predict the phenomenon of reflection exactly but hardly get the final results; Semi-empirical models have both advantages mentioned above and avoid their disadvantages effectively. Then we make an analysis of the Priest-Germer (PG) pBRDF model, one of semi-empirical models, which is suitable for our study. The methods of parameters inversing and testing are proposed based on this model and the test system from which we can get enough data to verify the accuracy of the model is designed independently. At last, we make a simulation of the whole process of the parameters inversing based on PG pBRDF model. From the analysis of the simulation curves, we briefly know the direction we go in the following work to make an amendment.

  11. Spin-axis distribution of the Hungaria asteroids via lightcurve inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, B.; Harris, A.; Stephens, R.; Coley, D.

    2014-07-01

    Since 2005, we have conducted a dedicated campaign to obtain dense lightcurves of members of the Hungaria asteroid population. As a result, the number of Hungarias in the asteroid lightcurve database (LCDB; Warner et al. [1]) with a statistically valid rotation rate rose from less than 50 to almost 300. The particular value of the Hungarias is that they are smallest and closest-to-sun main belt objects that can be studied with modest-sized telescopes. As such, they are more likely subject to YORP-altered spin states. We have previously verified highly-evolved rotation rates within the Hungarias (Warner et al. [2]). This study takes the next step of tracing the evolution of spin orientations. We combined the dense lightcurves from our campaign with so-called "sparse data" from the NEA surveys to model the spin axis orientation using lightcurve inversion methods (see works by Kaasalainen, Torppa, Durech, and Hanus). Because high-dispersion sparse data are of little use for low amplitude objects, we limited the Hungarias to be modeled to those with a maximum amplitude of A >= 0.15 mag, an LCDB reliability code of U >= 2, the period in the LCDB summary was unambiguous, and the asteroid did not show signs of tumbling (non-principal axis rotation). The result as of early February 2014 was a list of 227 of Hungaria candidates for modeling. Using a bank of five independent desktop computers and customized software, we first determined the likely sidereal period of the asteroid. That period was then used for spin axis (pole) search involving 315 discrete longitude-latitude pairs. The result of one such search is shown in the figure. We report on the results of our searches, including weighting solutions when a unique solution was not found (often the case in lightcurve inversion), and how the results compare to similar studies using a more general asteroid population.

  12. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions at square root of (sNN)=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-03-19

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons, and antiprotons are reported for square root of [sNN]=200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heary Ion Collider (RHIC). Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies. PMID:15089125

  13. Station distribution and quality control for real-time moment tensor inversion at regional distances for the southwestern Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convers, Jaime; Custodio, Susana

    2016-04-01

    Rapid assessment of seismological parameters pertinent to the nucleation and rupture of earthquakes are now routinely calculated by local and regional seismic networks. With the increasing number of stations, fast data transmission, and advanced computer power, we can now go beyond accurate magnitude and epicentral locations, to rapid estimations of other higher-order earthquake parameters such as seismic moment tensor. Although an increased number of stations can minimize azimuthal gaps, it also increases computation time, and potentially introduces poor quality data that often leads to a lower the stability of automated inversions. In this presentation, we focus on moment tensor calculations for earthquakes occurring offshore the southwestern Iberian peninsula. The available regional seismic data in this region has a significant azimuthal gap that results from the geographical setting. In this case, increasing the number of data from stations spanning a small area (and at a small azimuthal angle) increases the calculation time without necessarily improving the accuracy of the inversion. Additionally, limited regional data coverage makes it imperative to exclude poor-quality data, as their negative effect on moment tensor inversions is often significant. In our work, we analyze methods to minimize the effects of large azimuthal gaps in a regional station coverage, of potential bias by uneven station distribution, and of poor data quality in moment tensor inversions obtained for earthquakes offshore the southwestern Iberian peninsula. We calculate moment tensors using the KIWI tools, and we implement different configurations of station-weighing, and cross-correlation of neighboring stations, with the aim of automatically estimating and selecting high-quality data, improving the accuracy of results, and reducing the computation time of moment tensor inversions. As the available recent intermediate-size events offshore the Iberian peninsula is limited due to the long

  14. Geodetic Inversion Analysis Method of Coseismic Slip Distribution Using a Three-dimensional Finite Element High-fidelity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agata, R.; Ichimura, T.; Hirahara, K.; Hori, T.; Hyodo, M.; Hori, M.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have focused on geodetic inversion analysis method of coseismic slip distribution with combination of observation data of coseismic crustal deformation on the ground and simplified crustal models such like analytical solution in elastic half-space (Okada, 1985). On the other hand, displacements on the seafloor or near trench axes due to actual earthquakes has been observed by seafloor observatories (e.g. the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake (Tohoku Earthquake) (Sato et. al. 2011) (Kido et. al. 2011)). Also, some studies on tsunamis due to the Tohoku Earthquake indicate that large fault slips near the trench axis may have occurred. Those facts suggest that crustal models considering complex geometry and heterogeneity of the material property near the trench axis should be used for geodetic inversion analysis. Therefore, our group has developed a mesh generation method for finite element models of the Japanese Islands of higher fidelity and a fast crustal deformation analysis method for the models. Degree-of-freedom of the models generated by this method is about 150 million. In this research, the method is extended for inversion analyses of coseismic slip distribution. Since inversion analyses need computation of hundreds of slip response functions due to a unit fault slip assigned for respective divided cells on the fault, parallel computing environment is used. Plural crustal deformation analyses are simultaneously run in a Message Passing Interface (MPI) job. In the job, dynamic load balancing is implemented so that a better parallel efficiency is obtained. Submitting the necessary number of serial job of our previous method is also possible, but the proposed method needs less computation time, places less stress on file systems, and allows simpler job management. A method for considering the fault slip right near the trench axis is also developed. As the displacement distribution of unit fault slip for computing response function, 3rd order B

  15. Inversion of photometric He+ (30.4 nm) intensities to obtain He+ distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Dante E.; Smith, Roger W.; Marsh, C. A.; Christensen, Andrew B.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    1993-07-01

    Radiation at He(superscript +) at 30.4 nm, which is emitted close to the Earth, comes from three distinct regions; the ionosphere, the plasmasphere and the polar cap. Published observational data on He(superscript +) 30.4 nm have shown that the intensities from polar regions are relatively smaller than the other regions. Polar emissions are believed to be due to resonant scattering of ion outflow in sunlight. A 1982 rocket flight from Poker Flat, Alaska has shown that line-of-sight 30.4 nm emission rates are relatively strong in the direction of the pole. Since the roll of the rocket afforded many different observing directions, we have used the variety of viewing geometries to extract ionospheric source densities from the photometric intensity data. We have assumed that the He(superscript +) densities vary with distance along dipole field lines according to a particular functional form, and then we proceeded to extract the source densities by a matrix inversion method. The results give density variations over a range of latitudes including samples from each of the regions mentioned above. The method obtains good fits of the observed profiles of intensity versus observation angle.

  16. Role of structural heritage and global tectonics events in evolution of Algerian Triassic basin: Tectonic inversion and reservoir distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Boudjema, A.; Tremolieres, P.

    1988-01-01

    Fieldwork and subsurface studies (350 bore holes and more than 100 seismic profiles) show the structural evolution of the Triassic Saharian basin. This evolution is controlled by the successive motions of ancient faults of the Paleozoic basement during the different compressional and distensional tectonic phases. These movements led to some tectonic inversions. Depending on the strike of the faults, the present results correspond to normal throw or reverse throw at the level of hydrocarbon reservoirs. These tectonic phases clearly result from relative motions between African, American, and European lithospheric plates. The Triassic basin, a mobile zone between two rigid shields, constitutes a very good indication of the successive motions. The distribution and the nature of hydrocarbon fields are clearly related to the proximity of the faults, the post-tectonic erosion of a part of the source rocks, the burial and maturation of the organic matter, and the age of structural traps.

  17. Electromagnetic Response Inversion for a 3D Distribution of Conductivity/Dielect

    2001-10-24

    NLCGCS inverts electromagnetic responses for a 3D distribution of electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity within the earth for geophysical applications using single processor computers. The software comes bundled with a graphical user interface to aid in model construction and analysis and viewing of earth images. The solution employs both dipole and finite size source configurations for harmonic oscillatory sources. A new nonlinear preconditioner is included in the solution to speed up solution convergence.

  18. An effective inversion algorithm for retrieving bimodal aerosol particle size distribution from spectral extinction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Yao, Yuchen; Ruan, Liming

    2014-12-01

    The Ant Colony Optimization algorithm based on the probability density function (PDF-ACO) is applied to estimate the bimodal aerosol particle size distribution (PSD). The direct problem is solved by the modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA, as an approximation for optically large and soft spheres, i.e., χ≫1 and |m-1|≪1) and the Beer-Lambert law. First, a popular bimodal aerosol PSD and three other bimodal PSDs are retrieved in the dependent model by the multi-wavelength extinction technique. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm can be used as an effective technique to investigate the bimodal PSD. Then, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution function to retrieve the bimodal PSDs under the independent model. Finally, the J-SB and M-β functions are applied to recover actual measurement aerosol PSDs over Beijing and Shanghai obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that these two general functions, especially the J-SB function, can be used as a versatile distribution function to retrieve the bimodal aerosol PSD when no priori information about the PSD is available.

  19. Age-distribution estimation for karst groundwater: Issues of parameterization and complexity in inverse modeling by convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Andrew J.; Putnam, Larry D.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryConvolution modeling is useful for investigating the temporal distribution of groundwater age based on environmental tracers. The framework of a quasi-transient convolution model that is applicable to two-domain flow in karst aquifers is presented. The model was designed to provide an acceptable level of statistical confidence in parameter estimates when only chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and tritium ( 3H) data are available. We show how inverse modeling and uncertainty assessment can be used to constrain model parameterization to a level warranted by available data while allowing major aspects of the flow system to be examined. As an example, the model was applied to water from a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in central USA with input functions of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and 3H, and was calibrated to several samples collected during a 16-year period. A bimodal age distribution was modeled to represent quick and slow flow less than 50 years old. The effects of pumping and hydraulic head on the relative volumetric fractions of these domains were found to be influential factors for transient flow. Quick flow and slow flow were estimated to be distributed mainly within the age ranges of 0-2 and 26-41 years, respectively. The fraction of long-term flow (>50 years) was estimated but was not dateable. The different tracers had different degrees of influence on parameter estimation and uncertainty assessments, where 3H was the most critical, and CFC-113 was least influential.

  20. Age-distribution estimation for karst groundwater: Issues of parameterization and complexity in inverse modeling by convolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Putnam, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    Convolution modeling is useful for investigating the temporal distribution of groundwater age based on environmental tracers. The framework of a quasi-transient convolution model that is applicable to two-domain flow in karst aquifers is presented. The model was designed to provide an acceptable level of statistical confidence in parameter estimates when only chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and tritium (3H) data are available. We show how inverse modeling and uncertainty assessment can be used to constrain model parameterization to a level warranted by available data while allowing major aspects of the flow system to be examined. As an example, the model was applied to water from a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in central USA with input functions of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and 3H, and was calibrated to several samples collected during a 16-year period. A bimodal age distribution was modeled to represent quick and slow flow less than 50 years old. The effects of pumping and hydraulic head on the relative volumetric fractions of these domains were found to be influential factors for transient flow. Quick flow and slow flow were estimated to be distributed mainly within the age ranges of 0-2 and 26-41 years, respectively. The fraction of long-term flow (>50 years) was estimated but was not dateable. The different tracers had different degrees of influence on parameter estimation and uncertainty assessments, where 3H was the most critical, and CFC-113 was least influential.

  1. A unified framework for approximation in inverse problems for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Ito, K.

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical framework is presented that can be used to treat approximation techniques for very general classes of parameter estimation problems involving distributed systems that are either first or second order in time. Using the approach developed, one can obtain both convergence and stability (continuous dependence of parameter estimates with respect to the observations) under very weak regularity and compactness assumptions on the set of admissible parameters. This unified theory can be used for many problems found in the recent literature and in many cases offers significant improvements to existing results.

  2. Anisotropic electron-distribution function in inverse-bremsstrahlung-heated plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bendib, A; Bendib-Kalache, K; Cros, B; Maynard, G

    2016-04-01

    The electron-distribution function in homogeneous plasmas heated by a high-frequency laser field is calculated in velocity space from the Vlasov-Landau equation. The kinetic model is valid for moderate laser intensity defined by the relevant parameter α=v_{0}^{2}/v_{t}^{2}<0.5 where v_{0} and v_{t} are the peak velocity of oscillation in the high-frequency electric field and the thermal velocity, respectively. The results obtained constitute an improvement of the results reported in the literature devoted to weak electric field intensities. The electron-distribution function is calculated solving the kinetic equation with the use of the Legendre polynomial expansion within the laser field dipole approximation. It results in an infinite set of equations for the isotropic component f_{0}(v) and the anisotropic components f_{n≥1}(v) that we have solved numerically with appropriate truncation. For the second anisotropy f_{2}(v), we found that its maximum increases from the weak electric field intensity (α<0.01) to a moderate one (α=0.5) by a factor f_{2max}(α=0.5)/f_{2max}(α=0.01)≈48. Applications to the radiation pressure, electromagnetic instabilities, and photoabsorption are also considered. PMID:27176419

  3. Anisotropic electron-distribution function in inverse-bremsstrahlung-heated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendib, A.; Bendib-Kalache, K.; Cros, B.; Maynard, G.

    2016-04-01

    The electron-distribution function in homogeneous plasmas heated by a high-frequency laser field is calculated in velocity space from the Vlasov-Landau equation. The kinetic model is valid for moderate laser intensity defined by the relevant parameter α =v02/vt2<0.5 where v0 and vt are the peak velocity of oscillation in the high-frequency electric field and the thermal velocity, respectively. The results obtained constitute an improvement of the results reported in the literature devoted to weak electric field intensities. The electron-distribution function is calculated solving the kinetic equation with the use of the Legendre polynomial expansion within the laser field dipole approximation. It results in an infinite set of equations for the isotropic component f0(v ) and the anisotropic components fn ≥1(v ) that we have solved numerically with appropriate truncation. For the second anisotropy f2(v ) , we found that its maximum increases from the weak electric field intensity (α <0.01 ) to a moderate one (α =0.5 ) by a factor f2 max(α =0.5 ) / f2 max(α =0.01 ) ≈48 . Applications to the radiation pressure, electromagnetic instabilities, and photoabsorption are also considered.

  4. Transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions of charged hadrons in pp collisions at square root of s = 7 TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Benucci, L; Ceard, L; De Wolf, E A; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Devroede, O; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F; Dias, F A; Dias, M A F; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Marinho, F; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dyulendarova, M; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Yang, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Cabrera, A; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Mahmoud, M; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Elgammal, S; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Kalinowski, A; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Mikami, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Xiao, H; Roinishvili, V; Anagnostou, G; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Mohr, N; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Actis, O; Ata, M; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Magass, C; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Heydhausen, D; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Thomas, M; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrenhoff, W; Behrens, U; Bergholz, M; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H

    2010-07-01

    Charged-hadron transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions in proton-proton collisions at square root of s = 7  TeV are measured with the inner tracking system of the CMS detector at the LHC. The charged-hadron yield is obtained by counting the number of reconstructed hits, hit pairs, and fully reconstructed charged-particle tracks. The combination of the three methods gives a charged-particle multiplicity per unit of pseudorapidity dN(ch)/dη|(|η|<0.5) = 5.78 ± 0.01(stat) ± 0.23(syst) for non-single-diffractive events, higher than predicted by commonly used models. The relative increase in charged-particle multiplicity from square root of s = 0.9 to 7 TeV is [66.1 ± 1.0(stat) ± 4.2(syst)]%. The mean transverse momentum is measured to be 0.545 ± 0.005(stat) ± 0.015(syst)  GeV/c. The results are compared with similar measurements at lower energies. PMID:20867699

  5. Typical reconstruction performance for distributed compressed sensing based on ℓ2,1-norm regularized least square and Bayesian optimal reconstruction: influences of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, Yoshifumi; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    A signal model called joint sparse model 2 (JSM-2) or the multiple measurement vector problem, in which all sparse signals share their support, is important for dealing with practical signal processing problems. In this paper, we investigate the typical reconstruction performance of noisy measurement JSM-2 problems for {{\\ell}2,1} -norm regularized least square reconstruction and the Bayesian optimal reconstruction scheme in terms of mean square error. Employing the replica method, we show that these schemes, which exploit the knowledge of the sharing of the signal support, can recover the signals more precisely as the number of channels increases. In addition, we compare the reconstruction performance of two different ensembles of observation matrices: one is composed of independent and identically distributed random Gaussian entries and the other is designed so that row vectors are orthogonal to one another. As reported for the single-channel case in earlier studies, our analysis indicates that the latter ensemble offers better performance than the former ones for the noisy JSM-2 problem. The results of numerical experiments with a computationally feasible approximation algorithm we developed for this study agree with the theoretical estimation.

  6. A Simple Parameterization of 3 x 3 Magic Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, Gotz; Schmidt, Karsten; Trenkler, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    In this article a new parameterization of magic squares of order three is presented. This parameterization permits an easy computation of their inverses, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and adjoints. Some attention is paid to the Luoshu, one of the oldest magic squares.

  7. Surface current density distribution measurements of an electrically exploded foil via B-dot probe array data inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruden, E. L.; Amdahl, D. J.; Cooksey, R. H.; Robinson, P. R.; Analla, F. T.; Brown, D. J.; Kostora, M. R.; Camacho, J. F.

    2014-10-01

    Measurements are presented of the current per unit length as a function of the transverse distance from the center of a water-tamped 80 μm Al foil that narrows to a central width of 15.2 cm as it explodes into warm dense matter by Ohmic heating. Current is delivered by the discharge of a 36 μF capacitor bank charged to 30 kV and discharged to a peak current of 342 kA in 2.0 μs. The distribution is calculated by the linear regularized inversion of signals from an array of B-dot probes distributed along the foil's central half-width. The probes are far enough away from the foil (1 cm) be noninvasive and mechanically undisturbed during the time of interest. These results are compared to 3-D MHD ALEGRA simulations of the geometry driven by an external coupled two-loop lumped circuit model which accurately represents the driver. The goal of the effort is to test, in conjunction with other diagnostics, ab initio models of the equation of state and electrical conductivity of matter under conditions encountered in single-shot pulsed power devices (1 - 10 eV and 0.1 - 1 × solid density). This work was supported by AFOSR LRIR 11RD02COR.

  8. Determination of temperature and thermal stresses distribution in power boiler elements with use inverse heat conduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grądziel, sławomir

    2011-12-01

    The following paper presents the method for solving one-dimensional inverse boundary heat conduction problems. The method is used to estimate the unknown thermal boundary condition on inner surface of a thick-walled Y-branch. Solution is based on measured temperature transients at two points inside the element's wall thickness. Y-branch is installed in a fresh steam pipeline in a power plant in Poland. Determination of an unknown boundary condition allows for the calculation of transient temperature distribution in the whole element. Next, stresses caused by non-uniform transient temperature distribution and by steam pressure inside a Y-branch are calculated using the finite element method. The proposed algorithm can be used for thermal-strength state monitoring in similar elements, when it is not possible to determine a 3-D thermal boundary condition. The calculated temperature and stress transients can be used for the calculation of element durability. More accurate temperature and stress monitoring will contribute to a substantial decrease of maximal stresses that occur during transient start-up and shut-down processes.

  9. Nonlinear least squares and regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1996-04-01

    A problem frequently encountered in the earth sciences requires deducing physical parameters of the system of interest from measurements of some other (hopefully) closely related physical quantity. The obvious example in seismology (either surface reflection seismology or crosswell seismic tomography) is the use of measurements of sound wave traveltime to deduce wavespeed distribution in the earth and then subsequently to infer the values of other physical quantities of interest such as porosity, water or oil saturation, permeability, etc. The author presents and discusses some general ideas about iterative nonlinear output least-squares methods. The main result is that, if it is possible to do forward modeling on a physical problem in a way that permits the output (i.e., the predicted values of some physical parameter that could be measured) and the first derivative of the same output with respect to the model parameters (whatever they may be) to be calculated numerically, then it is possible (at least in principle) to solve the inverse problem using the method described. The main trick learned in this analysis comes from the realization that the steps in the model updates may have to be quite small in some cases for the implied guarantees of convergence to be realized.

  10. Analysis for nonlinear inversion technique developed to estimate depth-distribution of absorption by spatially resolved backscattering measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kazuhiro; Namita, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi

    2015-03-01

    We have proposed a new nonlinear inversion technique to estimate the spatial distribution of the absorption coefficient (μa) in the depth direction of a turbid medium by spatially resolved backscattering measurement. With this technique, we can obtain cross-sectional image of μa as deep as the backscattered light traveled even when the transmitted light through the medium cannot be detected. In this technique, the depth distribution of absorption coefficient is determined by iterative calculation using the spatial path-length distribution (SPD) of traveled photons as a function of source-detector distance. In this calculation, the variance of path-length of many photons in each layer is also required. The SPD and the variance of path-length are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using a known reduced scattering coefficient (μs'). Therefore, we need to know the μs' of the turbid medium beforehand. We have shown in computer simulation that this technique works well when the μs' is the typical values of mammalian body tissue, or 1.0 /mm. In this study, the accuracy of the μa estimation was analyzed and its dependence on the μs' was clarified quantitatively in various situations expected in practice. 10% deviations in μs' resulted in about 30% error in μa estimation, in average. This suggested that the measurement or the appropriate estimation of μs' is required to utilize the proposed technique effectively. Through this analysis, the effectiveness and the limitation of the newly proposed technique were clarified, and the problems to be solved were identified.

  11. Optically pumped distributed feedback dye lasing with slide-coated TiO₂ inverse-opal slab as Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Lim, Jongchul; Shin, Jinsub; Lee, Sung-Min; Park, Taiho; Yoon, Jongseung; Woo, Kyoungja; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2014-08-15

    We demonstrate an optical amplification of organic dye within a TiO2 inverse-opal (IO) distributed feedback (DFB) reflector prepared by a slide-coating method. Highly reflective TiO2 IO film was fabricated by slide coating the binary aqueous dispersions of polystyrene microspheres and charge-stabilized TiO2 nanoparticles on a glass slide and subsequently removing the polymer-opal template. TiO2 IO film was infiltrated, in turn, with the solutions of DCM, a fluorescent dye in various solvents with different indices of refraction. Optical pumping by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser resulted in amplified spontaneous emission in each dye solution. In accordance with the semi-empirical simulation by the FDTD method, DCM in ethanol showed the best emission/stopband matching for the TiO2 IO film used in this study. Therefore, photo excitation of a DCM/ethanol cavity showed a single-mode DFB lasing at 640 nm wavelength at moderate pump energy. PMID:25121863

  12. Numerical simulations of heat transfer distribution of a two-pass square channel with V-rib turbulator and bleed holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sourabh; Amano, R. S.; Lucci, Jose Martinez

    2013-08-01

    The blade tip region in gas turbine encounters high thermal loads due to temperature difference and hence efforts for high durability and safe operations are essential. Improved and robust methods of cooling are required to downgrade heat transfer rate to turbine blades. The blade tip regions, which are exposed to high gas flow, suffers high local thermal load which are due to external tip leakage. Jet impingement, pin cooling etc. are techniques used for cooling blades. A more usual way is to use serpentine passage with 180-degree turn. In this study, numerical simulation of heat transfer distribution of a two-pass square channel with rib turbulators and bleed holes were done. Periodical rib turbulators and bleed holes were used in the channel. The ribs arrangement were 60 degree V rib, 60 degree inverted V ribs, combination of 60 degree V rib at inlet and 60 inverted V rib at outlet section and combination of Inverted V at inlet and V rib at the outlet. The results were numerically computed using Fluent with Reynolds number of 12,500 and 28,500. Turbulence models used for computations were k-ω-SST and RSM. Temperature based and shear stress based techniques were used for heat transfer distribution prediction. The results for 60 degree V rib, 60 degree inverted V ribs were compared with the experimental results for validation of the results obtained. Detailed distribution shows distinctive peaks in heat transfer around bleed holes and rib turbulator. Comparisons of the overall performance of the models with different orientation of rib turbulator are presented. It is found that due to the combination of 60 degree inverted V rib in inlet and 60 V rib in outlet with bleed holes provides better heat treatment. It is suggested that the use of rib turbulator with bleed holes provides suitable for augmenting blade cooling to achieve an optimal balance between thermal and mechanical design requirements.

  13. Inverse problem for Bremsstrahlung radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, K.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1991-10-01

    For certain predominantly one-dimensional distribution functions, an analytic inversion has been found which yields the velocity distribution of superthermal electrons given their Bremsstrahlung radiation. 5 refs.

  14. Coseismic Dip Slip Distribution of the 1 Apr 2007 Solomon Islands Mw8.1 Earthquake from a Fully Bayesian Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.

    2009-12-01

    102 uplift and subsidence measurements over the southeastern end of the rupture zone from two field surveys shortly after 1 Apr 2007 Solomon Islands Earthquake provide a unique geodetic constraint in the following inversion of distributed slip. In the conventional inversion of geodetic data for spatial distribution of fault slip the solution is maintained by minimizing the second-order spatial derivative of slip and the smoothing parameter is often selected subjectively at the bend of the trade-off curve of misfit as a function of slip roughness. A fully Bayesian slip inversion method[Fukuda et al.,2008] is used to overcome the deficiency of selecting the smoothing parameter subjectively. The smoothing parameter is estimated with the distributed slip at the same time under a unified theoretical Bayesian framework. The joint posterior probability density function of distributed slip and smoothing parameter is formulated using Bayes’ theorem and sampled with Markov chain Monte Carlo method. I will apply this method to coseismic slip distribution associated with the 2007 Mw8.1 Solomon Islands earthquake and compare the results of this method with conventional method and the coseismic finite fault model of Furlong et al.[2009].

  15. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test for non-identically distributed random variables: with application to empirical Bayes

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, W.J.; Cox, D.D.; Martz, H.F.

    1997-12-01

    When using parametric empirical Bayes estimation methods for estimating the binomial or Poisson parameter, the validity of the assumed beta or gamma conjugate prior distribution is an important diagnostic consideration. Chi-square goodness-of-fit tests of the beta or gamma prior hypothesis are developed for use when the binomial sample sizes or Poisson exposure times vary. Nine examples illustrate the application of the methods, using real data from such diverse applications as the loss of feedwater flow rates in nuclear power plants, the probability of failure to run on demand and the failure rates of the high pressure coolant injection systems at US commercial boiling water reactors, the probability of failure to run on demand of emergency diesel generators in US commercial nuclear power plants, the rate of failure of aircraft air conditioners, baseball batting averages, the probability of testing positive for toxoplasmosis, and the probability of tumors in rats. The tests are easily applied in practice by means of corresponding Mathematica{reg_sign} computer programs which are provided.

  16. All Square Chiliagonal Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A?iru, Muniru A.

    2016-01-01

    A square chiliagonal number is a number which is simultaneously a chiliagonal number and a perfect square (just as the well-known square triangular number is both triangular and square). In this work, we determine which of the chiliagonal numbers are perfect squares and provide the indices of the corresponding chiliagonal numbers and square…

  17. AVO inversion based on inverse operator estimation in trust region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xing-Yao; Deng, Wei; Zong, Zhao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude variation with offset (AVO) inversion is widely utilized in exploration geophysics, especially for reservoir prediction and fluid identification. Inverse operator estimation in the trust region algorithm is applied for solving AVO inversion problems in which optimization and inversion directly are integrated. The L1 norm constraint is considered on the basis of reasonable initial model in order to improve effciency and stability during the AVO inversion process. In this study, high-order Zoeppritz approximation is utilized to establish the inversion objective function in which variation of {{v}\\text{p}}/{{v}\\text{s}} with time is taken into consideration. A model test indicates that the algorithm has a relatively higher stability and accuracy than the damp least-squares algorithm. Seismic data inversion is feasible and inversion values of three parameters ({{v}\\text{p}},{{v}\\text{s}},ρ ) maintain good consistency with logging curves.

  18. Spatial distribution of the contemporary stress field in the Kurile Wadati-Benioff zone by inversion of earthquake focal mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christova, C. V.

    2015-01-01

    The study addresses the spatial distribution of the contemporary stress field and stress regime in the Kurile Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) based on homogeneous data of earthquake focal mechanism solutions (FMS) and the inverse technique by Gephart and Forsyth (1984). The data set used consists of 829 Centroid Moment Tensor solutions (time period 1977-2010) and 38 FMS listed in previous studies for intermediate-depth and deep events that occurred prior to 1977. The detailed analysis of the spatial distribution of orientation of P (compression) and T (tension) axes of the individual FMS relative to the local geometry of the subducting slab allowed the outlining of 19 WBZ subvolumes along and across the arc for which the stress field parameters and stress regime (based on the orientations of the principal stresses in a slab's reference frame and the value of R) were evaluated. The stress inversion results show that the shallow portion of the slab (5 WBZ subvolumes), is characterized by sub-horizontal and close to strike-normal maximum compression σ1 and down-dipping minimum compression σ3, the stress regime is of general tension. A two-planar stress pattern with slab-parallel or in-slab σ1 and σ3 in the upper and lower planes, respectively, is observed at intermediate depth all along the arc. An exception of this pattern is found for the slab segment beneath Iturup island where the upper plane is 'missing' and the orientations of principal stresses in the depth range 61-140 km are similar to these for the lower plane in the slab segment located to the south. Five sub-volumes have been outlined within the Kurile slab at depth greater than 220 km, each with their own characteristic focal mechanisms and stress distribution. The subvolume V1 (depth range 225-380 km), stretching along the entire arc, is characterized by σ1 and σ3 of SW and ENE orientation, respectively, the stress regime being compressional. The results obtained for the deep portion of the slab indicate

  19. Weighted conditional least-squares estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    A two-stage estimation procedure is proposed that generalizes the concept of conditional least squares. The method is instead based upon the minimization of a weighted sum of squares, where the weights are inverses of estimated conditional variance terms. Some general conditions are given under which the estimators are consistent and jointly asymptotically normal. More specific details are given for ergodic Markov processes with stationary transition probabilities. A comparison is made with the ordinary conditional least-squares estimators for two simple branching processes with immigration. The relationship between weighted conditional least squares and other, more well-known, estimators is also investigated. In particular, it is shown that in many cases estimated generalized least-squares estimators can be obtained using the weighted conditional least-squares approach. Applications to stochastic compartmental models, and linear models with nested error structures are considered.

  20. Inversion of synthetic geodetic data for dip-slip faults: clues to the effects of lateral heterogeneities and data distribution in geological environments typical of the Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoruso, A.; Barba, S.; Crescentini, L.; Megna, A.

    2013-02-01

    The inversion of geodetic data to obtain earthquake parameters is often performed by assuming that the medium is isotropic, elastic and either homogeneous or layered. The layered medium often offers the best estimate of the structure of the crust; however, predicted displacements and observed data may differ beyond the measurement errors. The slip distribution on the fault plane is usually obtained by dividing the best uniform slipping fault into an arbitrarily large number of subfaults and minimizing a cost function that includes a smoothness (Laplacian) term and a data misfit term. The smoothing factor controls the trade-off between the smoothness and the goodness-of-fit. The main focus of this work is the determination and effect of the smoothing parameter. We conducted several inversion tests of noiseless synthetic surface displacement due to faults embedded in media with properties consistent with the geology of the Central Apennines (Italy), where the 2009 April 6, L'Aquila earthquake occurred. We used the following three-step procedure: (i) global optimization with no smoothness constraint for a fault divided into a small number of equally sized equal-rake subfaults; (ii) selection of the best fault parameters using information criteria and (iii) evaluation of the slip amplitude distribution on an expanded fault after choosing the smoothing factor from trade-off curves or from cross-validation for different numbers of subfaults. We show that all of the fault features obtained by the inversion procedure, including the slip distribution, agree with those (`true') used in the forward modelling when the data cover the majority of the displacement field. Notable departures from the true slip distribution occur when a suboptimal smoothing factor (obtained from the trade-off curves or cross-validation) is used. If different crustal stratifications are used in the inversions, the best results are obtained for the stratification that is the closest to the true

  1. Inflammatory Acne in the Asian Skin Type III Treated with a Square Pulse, Time Resolved Spectral Distribution IPL System: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims: Acne remains a severe problem for both patients and clinicians. Various approaches using photosurgery and phototherapy have been reported with varying degrees of success and robustness of results. An improved intense pulsed light (IPL) system has become available with interesting beam characteristic which might improve IPL treatment of inflammatory acne in the Asian skin, Fitzpatrick type III/IV. Subjects and Methods: The 18 study subjects comprised 15 females and 3 males with active mild to moderately severe inflammatory acne (mean age 25.3 ± 7.70 yr, range 17–47 yr, Burton scale 1-4, all Fitzpatrick type III Asian skin). They were treated once (8 subjects) or twice (10 subjects) with an IPL system offering both square pulse and time resolved spectral distribution technologies (420 nm cut-off filter, 30 ms pulse, 8 – 12 J/cm2, 2–3 passes). Clinical photography was taken at baseline and at 4 weeks after the final treatment. Percentage of acne clearance was assessed by an independent dermatological panel and graded from zero to 5, 5 being total clearance. Results: All subjects completed the study. Post-treatment side effects were mild and transient, with virtually no downtime or postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) experienced by any subject. All subjects had some improvement and no exacerbation was seen in any subject. Clearance was evaluated by the panel as grade 4 in 5 subjects, grade 3 in 8, grade 2 in 4 and grade 1 in 1, so that 14 of 18 subjects (78%) had clearance of at least 60%. Patient evaluation was in general slightly better than that of the panel. Conclusions: The special beam characteristics of the IPL system used in the present preliminary study achieved good to very good results in the treatment of acne in the Fitzpatrick type III Asian skin without PIH induction. The results suggested that acne treatment in the Asian skin using this system is both safe and effective, and merits larger population studies to further

  2. The Versatile Magic Square.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Gale A.

    2003-01-01

    Demonstrates the transformations that are possible to construct a variety of magic squares, including modifications to challenge students from elementary grades through algebra. Presents an example of using magic squares with students who have special needs. (YDS)

  3. Factor Analysis by Generalized Least Squares.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joreskog, Karl G.; Goldberger, Arthur S.

    Aitkin's generalized least squares (GLS) principle, with the inverse of the observed variance-covariance matrix as a weight matrix, is applied to estimate the factor analysis model in the exploratory (unrestricted) case. It is shown that the GLS estimates are scale free and asymptotically efficient. The estimates are computed by a rapidly…

  4. Latin and Magic Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emanouilidis, Emanuel

    2005-01-01

    Latin squares have existed for hundreds of years but it wasn't until rather recently that Latin squares were used in other areas such as statistics, graph theory, coding theory and the generation of random numbers as well as in the design and analysis of experiments. This note describes Latin and diagonal Latin squares, a method of constructing…

  5. Direct and indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, Jean; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Operto, Stéphane; Ribodetti, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    A bridge is highlighted between the direct inversion and the indirect inversion. They are based on fundamental different approaches: one is looking after a projection from the data space to the model space while the other one is reducing a misfit between observed data and synthetic data obtained from a given model. However, it is possible to obtain similar structures for model perturbation, and we shall focus on P-wave velocity reconstruction. This bridge is built up through the Born approximation linearizing the forward problem with respect to model perturbation and through asymptotic approximations of the Green functions of the wave propagation equation. We first describe the direct inversion and its ingredients and then we focus on a specific misfit function design leading to a indirect inversion. Finally, we shall compare this indirect inversion with more standard least-squares inversion as the FWI, enabling the focus on small weak velocity perturbations on one side and the speed-up of the velocity perturbation reconstruction on the other side. This bridge has been proposed by the group led by Raul Madariaga in the early nineties, emphasizing his leading role in efficient imaging workflows for seismic velocity reconstruction, a drastic requirement at that time.

  6. Joint inversion of receiver functions and surface waves with enhanced preconditioning on densely distributed CNDSN stations: Crustal and upper mantle structure beneath China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youlin; Niu, Fenglin

    2016-02-01

    We present shear wave velocity structure beneath China by joint modeling of teleseismic receiver function and Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion data observed at +1000 permanent broadband seismic stations in the Chinese National Digital Seismic Network (CNDSN). A ray-parameter-based stacking method is employed to minimize artifacts in stacking receiver functions from different sources. The Rayleigh wave dispersion curve is extracted from group velocity tomographic models at all applicable periods. Enhanced preconditions are applied on the linearized iterative inversion to regularize and balance multiple types of data. The velocity profile inversion at each station starts from an initial model derived from sediments, crustal thickness, Vp/Vs ratio and Pn/Sn models. This multistep approach not only reduces uncertainty and nonuniqueness of the velocity inversion but also efficiently fills information gap in each data set. We then generate a 3-D S velocity model by combining and smoothing all the 1-D models. The obtained 3-D model reveals crustal and upper mantle velocity structures that are well correlated with tectonic features of China, for example, our model shows a clear east-west bimodal distribution at 35 km deep, low velocity in the crust beneath central and eastern Tibetan plateau, and sedimentary structure in major cratons and basins. Our model is consistent with existing tomographic models in large scale but provides more structural details in regional and local scales.

  7. Modeling 3-D density distribution in the upper mantle beneath the Yellowstone from inversion of geoid anomaly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Chaves, C. M.; Ussami, N.

    2011-12-01

    We developed a simple three-dimensional scheme to invert geoid anomalies, aiming to map density variations in the lower crust and the upper mantle. Using a flat-Earth approximation, the model space is represented by a finite set of rectangular prisms. The linear inversion algorithm is based on Tikhonov regularization and the convergence of the solution is controlled by the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Our linear inversion algorithm does not require an initial density model, allowing it to be used where geological constraints on density are not available. To analyze the quality of the model density obtained by the inversion algorithm, we used the resolution and the covariance matrices. In order to study the thermal and the composition state beneath the Yellowstone and to test our algorithm inversion, geoid anomalies were inverted and modeled. Yellowstone exhibits a high geoid anomaly (~13 m), with a topographic swell of about 500 km wide. Residual geoid anomalies were obtained using the EGM2008 [Pavlis et al., 2008] geopotential model expanded up to degree 2160 after removing the long-wavelength component (degree 10). Lower crust and mantle-related geoid anomalies with -80 m amplitude were obtained after removing crustal effects (topographic masses, sediments and crustal thickness variations). The center of the negative geoid anomaly coincides geographically with the low velocity body (Yuan and Dueker [2005] and Waite et al. [2006]) in the upper mantle and with a depression of 12 km of the 410 km discontinuity detected by Fee and Dueker [2004]. Our results show that the lower crust and the upper mantle of the Yellowstone have a predominantly negative density contrast (-10 to -75 kg/m3) relative to the surrounding mantle. The mass deficiency mapped beneath the Yellowstone suggests the mantle to be hotter (-200 to -300 °C) and buoyant to isostatically sustain the high topography of this province (> 3000 m above sea level). The density model shows that the negative

  8. Least Squares Best Fit Method for the Three Parameter Weibull Distribution: Analysis of Tensile and Bend Specimens with Volume or Surface Flaw Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Bernard

    1996-01-01

    Material characterization parameters obtained from naturally flawed specimens are necessary for reliability evaluation of non-deterministic advanced ceramic structural components. The least squares best fit method is applied to the three parameter uniaxial Weibull model to obtain the material parameters from experimental tests on volume or surface flawed specimens subjected to pure tension, pure bending, four point or three point loading. Several illustrative example problems are provided.

  9. Constraints on Methane and Methane Hydrate Distribution at a Gulf of Mexico Seep Using Waveform Inversion of Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, W.; Knapp, C. C.; Knapp, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The seafloor mound at the Gulf of Mexico lease block MC (Mississippi Canyon) 118 is a known active seep lying directly above a salt dome. The site lies at 850-900 m water depth - within the methane hydrate stability zone, but there is no obvious BSR or other indicator of large quantities of gas or gas hydrate. Air-gun seismic data acquired with a 4180 cu in source and 7200 m, 288-channel hydrophone array, exhibit several bright, but laterally-limited reflections in the ~500 m sediment column above the salt. The bright spots are largely conformable with the strata, and there is no apparent pull-up or push-down associated with the bright spots, suggesting they are thin. There are also no significant frequency changes below the bright spots. We interpret the bright spots to be caused by gas, gas hydrate, or carbonate, or combinations of the three. The long offsets used to acquire these data allow for the analysis of refracted arrivals that not only provide accurate P-wave velocities, but also provide a background velocity profile for full waveform inversion. Preliminary results from the waveform inversion confirm at least some of the bright spots are free gas, constraining the position of the gas hydrate stability zone, but very thin (sub-wavelength) layers of carbonate and hydrate may also be present. Knowing the exact composition of the material responsible for the bright spots will better constrain the linkage between the salt tectonics (with implied fault activity) and seep activity, as well as the longevity of the hydrate system at MC 118.

  10. Joint inversion of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.-H.; Xia, J.-H.; Liu, J.-P.; Liu, Q.-S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the characteristics of the phase velocity of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waves in a six-layer earth model. The results show that fundamental mode is more sensitive to the shear velocities of shallow layers (< 7 m) and concentrated in a very narrow band (around 18 Hz) while higher modes are more sensitive to the parameters of relatively deeper layers and distributed over a wider frequency band. These properties provide a foundation of using a multi-mode joint inversion to define S-wave velocity. Inversion results of both synthetic data and a real-world example demonstrate that joint inversion with the damped least squares method and the SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) technique to invert Rayleigh waves of fundamental and higher modes can effectively reduce the ambiguity and improve the accuracy of inverted S-wave velocities.

  11. Measurement of the midrapidity transverse energy distribution from square root of [(s)NN] = 130 GeV Au + Au collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, D; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2001-07-30

    The first measurement of energy produced transverse to the beam direction at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory is presented. The midrapidity transverse energy density per participating nucleon rises steadily with the number of participants, closely paralleling the rise in charged-particle density, such that / remains relatively constant as a function of centrality. The energy density calculated via Bjorken's prescription for the 2% most central Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV is at least epsilon(Bj) = 4.6 GeV/fm(3), which is a factor of 1.6 larger than found at sqrt[s(NN)] = 17.2 GeV ( Pb+Pb at CERN). PMID:11497762

  12. Localization Accuracy of Distributed Inverse Solutions for Electric and Magnetic Source Imaging of Interictal Epileptic Discharges in Patients with Focal Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Heers, Marcel; Chowdhury, Rasheda A; Hedrich, Tanguy; Dubeau, François; Hall, Jeffery A; Lina, Jean-Marc; Grova, Christophe; Kobayashi, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Distributed inverse solutions aim to realistically reconstruct the origin of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) from noninvasively recorded electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. Our aim was to compare the performance of different distributed inverse solutions in localizing IEDs: coherent maximum entropy on the mean (cMEM), hierarchical Bayesian implementations of independent identically distributed sources (IID, minimum norm prior) and spatially coherent sources (COH, spatial smoothness prior). Source maxima (i.e., the vertex with the maximum source amplitude) of IEDs in 14 EEG and 19 MEG studies from 15 patients with focal epilepsy were analyzed. We visually compared their concordance with intracranial EEG (iEEG) based on 17 cortical regions of interest and their spatial dispersion around source maxima. Magnetic source imaging (MSI) maxima from cMEM were most often confirmed by iEEG (cMEM: 14/19, COH: 9/19, IID: 8/19 studies). COH electric source imaging (ESI) maxima co-localized best with iEEG (cMEM: 8/14, COH: 11/14, IID: 10/14 studies). In addition, cMEM was less spatially spread than COH and IID for ESI and MSI (p < 0.001 Bonferroni-corrected post hoc t test). Highest positive predictive values for cortical regions with IEDs in iEEG could be obtained with cMEM for MSI and with COH for ESI. Additional realistic EEG/MEG simulations confirmed our findings. Accurate spatially extended sources, as found in cMEM (ESI and MSI) and COH (ESI) are desirable for source imaging of IEDs because this might influence surgical decision. Our simulations suggest that COH and IID overestimate the spatial extent of the generators compared to cMEM. PMID:25609211

  13. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeros, William D.; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-08-01

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability.

  14. Mechanical Circle-Squaring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagon, Stan; Cox, Barry

    2009-01-01

    A technique discovered in 1939 can be used to build a device that is driven by standard circular motion (as in a drill press) and drills exact square holes. This device is quite different from the classic design by Watts, which uses a Reuleaux triangle and drills a hole that is almost, but not exactly, square. We describe the device in detail,…

  15. Irrational Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  16. Squaring to the Rap!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an approach to teaching square dance that is advantageous for both the teacher and students. Lessons in dance become more meaningful to students when the music and vocabulary is consistent with experiences in their own lives. When students create their own squaring to the rap, lessons become more student-centered,…

  17. SQUARE WAVE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Leavitt, M.A.; Lutz, I.C.

    1958-08-01

    An amplifier circuit is described for amplifying sigmals having an alternating current component superimposed upon a direct current component, without loss of any segnnent of the alternating current component. The general circuit arrangement includes a vibrator, two square wave amplifiers, and recombination means. The amplifier input is connected to the vibrating element of the vibrator and is thereby alternately applied to the input of each square wave amplifier. The detailed circuitry of the recombination means constitutes the novelty of the annplifier and consists of a separate, dual triode amplifier coupled to the output of each square wave amplifier with a recombination connection from the plate of one amplifier section to a grid of one section of the other amplifier. The recombination circuit has provisions for correcting distortion caused by overlapping of the two square wave voltages from the square wave amplifiers.

  18. Inversion of magnetotelluric data in a sparse model domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittinger, Christian G.; Becken, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The inversion of magnetotelluric data into subsurface electrical conductivity poses an ill-posed problem. Smoothing constraints are widely employed to estimate a regularized solution. Here, we present an alternative inversion scheme that estimates a sparse representation of the model in a wavelet basis. The objective of the inversion is to determine the few non-zero wavelet coefficients which are required to fit the data. This approach falls into the class of sparsity constrained inversion schemes and minimizes the combination of the data misfit in a least-squares ℓ2 sense and of a model coefficient norm in an ℓ1 sense (ℓ2-ℓ1 minimization). The ℓ1 coefficient norm renders the solution sparse in a suitable representation such as the multiresolution wavelet basis, but does not impose explicit structural penalties on the model as it is the case for ℓ2 regularization. The presented numerical algorithm solves the mixed ℓ2-ℓ1 norm minimization problem for the nonlinear magnetotelluric inverse problem. We demonstrate the feasibility of our algorithm on synthetic 2-D MT data as well as on a real data example. We found that sparse models can be estimated by inversion and that the spatial distribution of non-vanishing coefficients indicates regions in the model which are resolved.

  19. Inversion of magnetotelluric data in a sparse model domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittinger, Christian G.; Becken, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The inversion of magnetotelluric data into subsurface electrical conductivity poses an ill-posed problem. Smoothing constraints are widely employed to estimate a regularized solution. Here, we present an alternative inversion scheme that estimates a sparse representation of the model in a wavelet basis. The objective of the inversion is to determine the few non-zero wavelet coefficients which are required to fit the data. This approach falls into the class of sparsity constrained inversion schemes and minimizes the combination of the data misfit in a least squares ℓ2 sense and of a model coefficient norm in a ℓ1 sense (ℓ2-ℓ1 minimization). The ℓ1 coefficient norm renders the solution sparse in a suitable representation such as the multi-resolution wavelet basis, but does not impose explicit structural penalties on the model as it is the case for ℓ2 regularization. The presented numerical algorithm solves the mixed ℓ2-ℓ1 norm minimization problem for the non-linear magnetotelluric inverse problem. We demonstrate the feasibility of our algorithm on synthetic 2-D MT data as well as on a real data example. We found that sparse models can be estimated by inversion and that the spatial distribution of non-vanishing coefficients indicates regions in the model which are resolved.

  20. Extraction of Gamow-Teller strength distributions from 56Ni and 55Co via the (p,n) reaction in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, M.; Perdikakis, G.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Austin, Sam M.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Caesar, C.; Cole, A. L.; Deaven, J. M.; Ferrante, N.; Guess, C. J.; Hitt, G. W.; Honma, M.; Meharchand, R.; Montes, F.; Palardy, J.; Prinke, A.; Riley, L. A.; Sakai, H.; Scott, M.; Stolz, A.; Suzuki, T.; Valdez, L.; Yako, K.

    2012-09-01

    Background: Gamow-Teller (GT) transition strength distributions in stable and unstable pf-shell isotopes are key inputs for estimating electron-capture rates important for stellar evolution. Charge-exchange experiments at intermediate beam energies have long been used to test theoretical predictions for GT strengths, but previous experiments were largely restricted to stable nuclei. Since a large fraction of the nuclei relevant for astrophysical applications (including key nuclei such as 56Ni) are unstable, new methods are needed to perform charge-exchange experiments in inverse kinematics with unstable isotopes.Purpose: The 56Ni(p,n) and 55Co(p,n) reactions were measured in inverse kinematics in order to extract GT strengths for transitions to 56Cu and 55Ni, respectively. The extracted strength distributions were compared with shell-model predictions in the pf shell using the KB3G and GXPF1J interactions. By invoking isospin symmetry, these strength distributions are relevant for electron captures on the ground states of 56Ni and 55Ni to final states in 56Co and 55Co, respectively.Method: Differential cross sections and excitation energy spectra for the 56Ni(p,n) and 55Co(p,n) reactions were determined by measuring neutrons recoiling from a liquid hydrogen target into the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array. GT contributions to the spectra were extracted by using a multipole decomposition analysis and were converted to strengths by employing the proportionality between GT strength and differential cross section at zero linear momentum transfer.Results: GT strengths from 56Ni and 55Co were extracted up to excitation energies of 8 and 15 MeV, respectively. Shell-model calculations performed in the pf shell with the GXPF1J interaction reproduced the experimental GT strength distributions better than calculations with the KB3G interaction.Conclusions: A new technique for measuring (p,n) charge-exchange reactions on unstable nuclei was successfully developed. It can be

  1. Knudsen and inverse Knudsen layer effect on tail ion distribution and fusion reactivity in inertial confinement fusion targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, C. J.; Tang, X.-Z.; Guo, Z.; Berk, H. L.

    2014-10-01

    A series of reduced models are used to study the fast ion tail in the vicinity of a transition layer between plasmas at disparate temperatures and densities, which is typical of the gas-pusher interface in inertial confinement fusion targets. Emphasis is placed on utilizing progressively more comprehensive models in order to identify the essential physics for computing the fast ion tail at energies comparable to the Gamow peak. The resulting fast ion tail distribution is subsequently used to compute the fusion reactivity as a function of collisionality and temperature. It is found that while the fast ion distribution can be significantly depleted in the hot spot, leading to a reduction of the fusion reactivity in this region, a surplus of fast ions is present in the neighboring cold region. The presence of this fast ion surplus in the neighboring cold region is shown to lead to a partial recovery of the fusion yield lost in the hot spot.

  2. Measurements of polystyrene bead trajectories and spatial distributions in a turbulent water flow, square duct using high-speed digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hout, Rene; Rabencov, Boris; Arca, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Near neutrally buoyant, polystyrene beads (583 micrometers) were tracked in a square (50 × 50 mm2), closed-loop, turbulent water duct at a bulk flow Reynolds number of 10,602 (friction velocity 0.0208 m/s) using single view, inline digital holographic cinematography (at 1 kHz). The volume of interest (50 × 17.4 × 17.4 mm3) was positioned at the bottom part of the channel. The mean bead diameter normalized by inner wall coordinates was d+ = 14.2, with Stokes numbers of 8.5. In-house developed algorithms, fine-tuned to tracking single and overlapping beads were developed. Bead in-focus positions were determined by maximum intensity gradient method. Results showed that in agreement with literature publications, ascending beads lagged the mean streamwise water velocity while descending ones had similar velocities. Average streamwise bead velocities and number densities collapsed onto wall-normal-streamwise and spanwise-streamwise planes, indicated preferential segregation of ascending and descending beads up to a height of 100 wall units. Spanwise ``lane'' separation distances ranged between 150-200 wall units, larger but of the same order as the spanwise extent of coherent near-wall turbulence structures. Duct corners were nearly devoid of beads likely caused by secondary flows. Israel Science Foundation Grant 915/10 and COST Actions MP0806 and FP1005.

  3. Identified baryon and meson distributions at large transverse momenta from Au + Au collisions at square root sNN=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, N S; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Subba, N L; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-10-13

    Transverse momentum spectra of pi+/-, p, and p up to 12 GeV/c at midrapidity in centrality selected Au + Au collisions at square root sNN=200 GeV are presented. In central Au + Au collisions, both pi +/- and p(p) show significant suppression with respect to binary scaling at pT approximately >4 GeV/c. Protons and antiprotons are less suppressed than pi+/-, in the range 1.5 approximately < pT approximately < 6 GeV/c. The pi-/pi+ and p/p ratios show at most a weak pT dependence and no significant centrality dependence. The p/pi ratios in central Au + Au collisions approach the values in p + p and d + Au collisions at pT approximately >5 GeV/c. The results at high pT indicate that the partonic sources of pi+/-, p, and p have similar energy loss when traversing the nuclear medium. PMID:17155321

  4. Using Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, William Wynne

    1976-01-01

    This article describes techniques which enable the user of a comparatively simple calculator to perform calculations of cube roots, nth roots, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions, logarithms, and exponentials. (DT)

  5. Town Square for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Dan

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Dawson Elementary School (Corpus Chriti, Texas) where an atmosphere of an old town square and the feeling of community have been created. Photos and a floor plan are provided. (GR)

  6. NICOLE: NLTE Stokes Synthesis/Inversion Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socas-Navarro, H.

    2015-08-01

    NICOLE, written in Fortran 90, seeks the model atmosphere that provides the best fit to the Stokes profiles (in a least-squares sense) of an arbitrary number of simultaneously-observes spectral lines from solar/stellar atmospheres. The inversion core used for the development of NICOLE is the LORIEN engine (the Lovely Reusable Inversion ENgine), which combines the SVD technique with the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization method to solve the inverse problem.

  7. The inverse-square law and quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Goldman, T.; Hughes, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    A program is described which measures the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons. This idea was approached from a particle physics point of view. That point of view is examined starting with some history of physics over the last 200 years.

  8. Shedding Light on the Inverse-Square Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uthe, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Many students in introductory science courses at both the secondary and tertiary levels learn science as a miscellaneous collection of facts, concepts, and equations that must be memorized to pass examinations. One way to show students that they actually can "do" science is to have them use an observable event to generate a relationship that can…

  9. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  10. Inverse temperature in Superstatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loguercio, Humberto; Davis, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    In this work, it is shown that there are (at least) three alternative definitions of the inverse temperature for a non-canonical ensemble. These definitions coincide in expectation but, in general, not in their higher moments. We explore in detail the application to the recent formalism of Superstatistics (C. Beck, 2003), and, in particular, to the configurational probability distribution in the microcanonical ensemble.

  11. Determination of pore size distributions in capillary-channeled polymer fiber stationary phases by inverse size-exclusion chromatography and implications for fast protein separations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengxin; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2014-07-18

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers have been utilized as liquid chromatography stationary phases, primarily for biomacromolecule separations on the analytical and preparative scales. The collinear packing of the eight-channeled C-CP fibers provides for very efficient flow, allowing operation at high linear velocity (u>100mm s(-1)) and low backpressure (<2000psi) in analytical-scale separations. To take advantage of these fluid transport properties, there must not be mass transfer limitations as would be imposed by having an appreciably porous phase, wherein solute diffusion limits the overall mass transport rates. To better understand the physical nano-/micro- structure of C-CP fibers, inverse size exclusion chromatography (iSEC) has been employed to determine the pore size distribution (PSD) within C-CP fibers. A diversity of test species (from metal ions to large proteins) was used as probes under non-retaining conditions to obtain a response curve reflecting the apparent partition coefficient (Kd) versus hydrodynamic radii (rm). A mean pore radius (rp) of 4.2nm with standard deviation (sp) of ±1.1nm was calculated by fitting the Kd versus rm data to model equations with a Gaussian pore size distribution, and a pore radius of 4.0±0.1nm was calculated based on a log-normal distribution. The derived mean pore radius is much smaller than traditional support materials, with the standard deviation showing a relatively uniform pore distribution. van Deemter plots were analyzed to provide practical confirmation of the structural implications. Large molecules (e.g., proteins) that are fully excluded from pores have no significant C-terms in the van Deemter plots whereas small molecules that can access the pore volumes display appreciable C-terms, as expected. Fitting of retention data to the Knox equation suggests that the columns operate with a characteristic particle diameter (dp) of ∼53μm. PMID:24877979

  12. Aftershock relocation and frequency-size distribution, stress inversion and seismotectonic setting of the 7 August 2013 M = 5.4 earthquake in Kallidromon Mountain, central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganas, Athanassios; Karastathis, Vassilios; Moshou, Alexandra; Valkaniotis, Sotirios; Mouzakiotis, Evangelos; Papathanassiou, George

    2014-03-01

    On August 7, 2013 a moderate earthquake (NOA ML = 5.1, NOA Mw = 5.4) occurred in central Kallidromon Mountain, in the Pthiotis region of central Greece. 2270 aftershocks were relocated using a modified 1-D velocity model for this area. The b-value of the aftershock sequence was b = 0.85 for a completeness magnitude of Mc = 1.7. The rate of aftershock decay was determined at p = 0.63. The spatial distribution of the aftershock sequence points towards the reactivation of a N70° ± 10°E striking normal fault at crustal depths between 8 and 13 km. A NNW-SSE cross-section imaged the activation of a steep, south dipping normal fault. A stress inversion analysis of 12 focal mechanisms showed that the minimum horizontal stress is extensional at N173°E. No primary surface ruptures were observed in the field; however, the earthquake caused severe damage in the villages of the Kallidromon area. The imaged fault strike and the orientation of the long-axis of the aftershock sequence distribution are both at a high-angle to the strike of known active faults in this area of central Greece. We interpret the Kallidromon seismic sequence as release of extensional seismic strain on secondary, steep faults inside the Fokida-Viotia crustal block.

  13. Inversion of radial distribution functions to pair forces by solving the Yvon-Born-Green equation iteratively.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyung Min; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2009-10-01

    We develop a new method to invert the target profiles of radial distribution functions (RDFs) to the pair forces between particles. The target profiles of RDFs can be obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations or experiments and the inverted pair forces can be used in molecular simulations at a coarse-grained (CG) scale. Our method is based on a variational principle that determines the mean forces between CG sites after integrating out the unwanted degrees of freedom. The solution of this variational principle has been shown to correspond to the Yvon-Born-Green (YBG) equation [Noid et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 111, 4116 (2007)]. To invert RDFs, we solve the YBG equation iteratively by running a CG MD simulation at each step of iteration. A novelty of the iterative-YBG method is that during iteration, CG forces are updated according to the YBG equation without imposing any approximation as is required by other methods. As a result, only three to ten iterations are required to achieve convergence for all cases tested in this work. Furthermore, we show that not only are the target RDFs reproduced by the iterative solution; the profiles of the three-body correlation function in the YBG equation computed from all-atom and CG simulations also have a better agreement. The iterative-YBG method is applied to compute the CG forces of four molecular liquids to illustrate its efficiency and robustness: water, ethane, ethanol, and a water/methanol mixture. Using the resulting CG forces, all of the target RDFs observed in all-atom MD simulations are reproduced. We also show that the iterative-YBG method can be applied with a virial constraint to expand the representability of a CG force field. The iterative-YBG method thus provides a general and robust framework for computing CG forces from RDFs and could be systematically generalized to go beyond pairwise forces and to include higher-body interactions in a CG force field by applying the aforementioned variational

  14. Quantifying Subsurface Water and Heat Distribution and its Linkage with Landscape Properties in Terrestrial Environment using Hydro-Thermal-Geophysical Monitoring and Coupled Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafflon, B.; Tran, A. P.; Wainwright, H. M.; Hubbard, S. S.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying water and heat fluxes in the subsurface is crucial for managing water resources and for understanding the terrestrial ecosystem where hydrological properties drive a variety of biogeochemical processes across a large range of spatial and temporal scales. Here, we present the development of an advanced monitoring strategy where hydro-thermal-geophysical datasets are continuously acquired and further involved in a novel inverse modeling framework to estimate the hydraulic and thermal parameter that control heat and water dynamics in the subsurface and further influence surface processes such as evapotranspiration and vegetation growth. The measured and estimated soil properties are also used to investigate co-interaction between subsurface and surface dynamics by using above-ground aerial imaging. The value of this approach is demonstrated at two different sites, one in the polygonal shaped Arctic tundra where water and heat dynamics have a strong impact on freeze-thaw processes, vegetation and biogeochemical processes, and one in a floodplain along the Colorado River where hydrological fluxes between compartments of the system (surface, vadose zone and groundwater) drive biogeochemical transformations. Results show that the developed strategy using geophysical, point-scale and aerial measurements is successful to delineate the spatial distribution of hydrostratigraphic units having distinct physicochemical properties, to monitor and quantify in high resolution water and heat distribution and its linkage with vegetation, geomorphology and weather conditions, and to estimate hydraulic and thermal parameters for enhanced predictions of water and heat fluxes as well as evapotranspiration. Further, in the Colorado floodplain, results document the potential presence of only periodic infiltration pulses as a key hot moment controlling soil hydro and biogeochemical functioning. In the arctic, results show the strong linkage between soil water content, thermal

  15. An optimal constrained linear inverse method for magnetic source imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hughett, P.

    1993-09-01

    Magnetic source imaging is the reconstruction of the current distribution inside an inaccessible volume from magnetic field measurements made outside the volume. If the unknown current distribution is expressed as a linear combination of elementary current distributions in fixed positions, then the magnetic field measurements are linear in the unknown source amplitudes and both the least square and minimum mean square reconstructions are linear problems. This offers several advantages: The problem is well understood theoretically and there is only a single, global minimum. Efficient and reliable software for numerical linear algebra is readily available. If the sources are localized and statistically uncorrelated, then a map of expected power dissipation is equivalent to the source covariance matrix. Prior geological or physiological knowledge can be used to determine such an expected power map and thus the source covariance matrix. The optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM) derived in this paper uses this prior knowledge to obtain a minimum mean square error estimate of the current distribution. OCLIM can be efficiently computed using the Cholesky decomposition, taking about a second on a workstation-class computer for a problem with 64 sources and 144 detectors. Any source and detector configuration is allowed as long as their positions are fixed a priori. Correlations among source and noise amplitudes are permitted. OCLIM reduces to the optimally weighted pseudoinverse method of Shim and Cho if the source amplitudes are independent and identically distributed and to the minimum-norm least squares estimate in the limit of no measurement noise or no prior knowledge of the source amplitudes. In the general case, OCLIM has better mean square error than either previous method. OCLIM appears well suited to magnetic imaging, since it exploits prior information, provides the minimum reconstruction error, and is inexpensive to compute.

  16. Squares on a Checkerboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulman, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article the author describes a problem posed to his class, "How many squares are there on a checkerboard?" The problem is deliberately vague so that the teacher can get the students to begin asking questions. The first goal is to come to an agreement about what the problem means (Identify the problem). The second goal is to get…

  17. Drilling Square Holes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Scott G.

    1993-01-01

    A Reuleaux triangle is constructed by drawing an arc connecting each pair of vertices of an equilateral triangle with radius equal to the side of the triangle. Investigates the application of drilling a square hole using a drill bit in the shape of a Reuleaux triangle. (MDH)

  18. Inversion of multicomponent seismic data and rock-physics intepretation for evaluating lithology, fracture and fluid distribution in heterogeneous anisotropic reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ilya Tsvankin; Kenneth L. Larner

    2004-11-17

    Within the framework of this collaborative project with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Stanford University, the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) group developed and implemented a new efficient approach to the inversion and processing of multicomponent, multiazimuth seismic data in anisotropic media. To avoid serious difficulties in the processing of mode-converted (PS) waves, we devised a methodology for transforming recorded PP- and PS-wavefields into the corresponding SS-wave reflection data that can be processed by velocity-analysis algorithms designed for pure (unconverted) modes. It should be emphasized that this procedure does not require knowledge of the velocity model and can be applied to data from arbitrarily anisotropic, heterogeneous media. The azimuthally varying reflection moveouts of the PP-waves and constructed SS-waves are then combined in anisotropic stacking-velocity tomography to estimate the velocity field in the depth domain. As illustrated by the case studies discussed in the report, migration of the multicomponent data with the obtained anisotropic velocity model yields a crisp image of the reservoir that is vastly superior to that produced by conventional methods. The scope of this research essentially amounts to building the foundation of 3D multicomponent, anisotropic seismology. We have also worked with the LLNL and Stanford groups on relating the anisotropic parameters obtained from seismic data to stress, lithology, and fluid distribution using a generalized theoretical treatment of fractured, poroelastic rocks.

  19. Application of principal component analysis (PCA) and improved joint probability distributions to the inverse first-order reliability method (I-FORM) for predicting extreme sea states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey C.; Sallaberry, Cédric J.; Dallman, Ann R.; Neary, Vincent S.

    2016-01-06

    Environmental contours describing extreme sea states are generated as the input for numerical or physical model simulations as a part of the standard current practice for designing marine structures to survive extreme sea states. These environmental contours are characterized by combinations of significant wave height (Hs) and either energy period (Te) or peak period (Tp) values calculated for a given recurrence interval using a set of data based on hindcast simulations or buoy observations over a sufficient period of record. The use of the inverse first-order reliability method (I-FORM) is a standard design practice for generating environmental contours. This papermore » develops enhanced methodologies for data analysis prior to the application of the I-FORM, including the use of principal component analysis (PCA) to create an uncorrelated representation of the variables under consideration as well as new distribution and parameter fitting techniques. As a result, these modifications better represent the measured data and, therefore, should contribute to the development of more realistic representations of environmental contours of extreme sea states for determining design loads for marine structures.« less

  20. The Community of Family Circles (CFC) algorithm: a new inversion approach to obtaining self-consitent 4D thermal histories from large, spatially distributed thermochronological data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, R.; Brown, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most significant advances in interpreting thermochronological data is arguably our ability to extract information about the rate and trajectory of cooling over a range of temperatures, rather than having to rely on the veracity of the simplification of assuming a single closure temperature specified by a rate of monotonic cooling. Modern thermochronometry data, such as apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He analysis, are particularly good examples of data amenable to this treatment as acceptably well calibrated kinetic models now exist for both systems. With ever larger data sets of this type being generated over ever larger areas the prospect of inverting very large amounts of such data distributed spatially over large areas offers new possibilities for constraining the thermal and erosional histories over length scales approximating whole orogens and sub-continents. The challenge though is in how to properly deal with joint inversion of multiple samples in a self-consistent manner while also utilising all the available information contained in the data. We describe a new approach to this problem, called the Community of Family Circles (CFC) algorithm, which extracts information from spatially distributed apatite fission track ages (AFT) and track length distributions (TLD). The method is based on the rationale that the 3D geothermal field of the crust varies smoothly through space and time because of the efficiency of thermal diffusion. Our approach consists of seeking groups of spatially adjacent samples, or families, within a given circular radius for which a common thermal history is appropriate. The temperature offsets between individual time-temperature paths are determined relative to a low-pass filtered topographic surface, whose shape is assumed to mimic the shape of the isotherms in the partial annealing zone. This enables a single common thermal history to be shared, or interpolated, between the family members while still honouring the

  1. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  2. Square Of Pegasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A conspicuous asterism of four bright stars forming a square of approximately 15° a side, notable for the absence of any but very faint stars within it. It is formed by the stars β, α and γ Pegasi (apparent magnitudes 2.44, 2.49 and 2.83 respectively) and α Andromedae (magnitude 2.07), and is prominent in the evening sky in autumn....

  3. Southern California Adjoint Source Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, J.; Kim, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Southern California Centroid-Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions with 9 components (6 moment tensor elements, latitude, longitude, and depth) are sought to minimize a misfit function computed from waveform differences. The gradient of a misfit function is obtained based upon two numerical simulations for each earthquake: one forward calculation for the southern California model, and an adjoint calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers. Conjugate gradient and square-root variable metric methods are used to iteratively improve the earthquake source model while reducing the misfit function. The square-root variable metric algorithm has the advantage of providing a direct approximation to the posterior covariance operator. We test the inversion procedure by perturbing each component of the CMT solution, and see how the algorithm converges. Finally, we demonstrate full inversion capabilities using data for real Southern California earthquakes.

  4. Nonlinear inversion of electrical resistivity imaging using pruning Bayesian neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei-Bo; Dai, Qian-Wei; Dong, Li

    2016-06-01

    Conventional artificial neural networks used to solve electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) inversion problem suffer from overfitting and local minima. To solve these problems, we propose to use a pruning Bayesian neural network (PBNN) nonlinear inversion method and a sample design method based on the K-medoids clustering algorithm. In the sample design method, the training samples of the neural network are designed according to the prior information provided by the K-medoids clustering results; thus, the training process of the neural network is well guided. The proposed PBNN, based on Bayesian regularization, is used to select the hidden layer structure by assessing the effect of each hidden neuron to the inversion results. Then, the hyperparameter α k , which is based on the generalized mean, is chosen to guide the pruning process according to the prior distribution of the training samples under the small-sample condition. The proposed algorithm is more efficient than other common adaptive regularization methods in geophysics. The inversion of synthetic data and field data suggests that the proposed method suppresses the noise in the neural network training stage and enhances the generalization. The inversion results with the proposed method are better than those of the BPNN, RBFNN, and RRBFNN inversion methods as well as the conventional least squares inversion.

  5. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  6. View of Corto Square Road from Corto Square. Buildings No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Corto Square Road from Corto Square. Buildings No. 27 at left, Building No. 25 at rear, and Building No. 26 at right. Parking areas on left and right, looking north - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  7. Bayesian least squares deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Petit, P.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: We develop a fully Bayesian least squares deconvolution (LSD) that can be applied to the reliable detection of magnetic signals in noise-limited stellar spectropolarimetric observations using multiline techniques. Methods: We consider LSD under the Bayesian framework and we introduce a flexible Gaussian process (GP) prior for the LSD profile. This prior allows the result to automatically adapt to the presence of signal. We exploit several linear algebra identities to accelerate the calculations. The final algorithm can deal with thousands of spectral lines in a few seconds. Results: We demonstrate the reliability of the method with synthetic experiments and we apply it to real spectropolarimetric observations of magnetic stars. We are able to recover the magnetic signals using a small number of spectral lines, together with the uncertainty at each velocity bin. This allows the user to consider if the detected signal is reliable. The code to compute the Bayesian LSD profile is freely available.

  8. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    SciTech Connect

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G.

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  9. The Inverse Problem for Confined Aquifer Flow: Identification and Estimation With Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiciga, Hugo A.; MariñO, Miguel A.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of this work are twofold. First, a methodology for estimating the elements of parameter matrices in the governing equation of flow in a confined aquifer is developed. The estimation techniques for the distributed-parameter inverse problem pertain to linear least squares and generalized least squares methods. The linear relationship among the known heads and unknown parameters of the flow equation provides the background for developing criteria for determining the identifiability status of unknown parameters. Under conditions of exact or overidentification it is possible to develop statistically consistent parameter estimators and their asymptotic distributions. The estimation techniques, namely, two-stage least squares and three stage least squares, are applied to a specific groundwater inverse problem and compared between themselves and with an ordinary least squares estimator. The three-stage estimator provides the closer approximation to the actual parameter values, but it also shows relatively large standard errors as compared to the ordinary and two-stage estimators. The estimation techniques provide the parameter matrices required to simulate the unsteady groundwater flow equation. Second, a nonlinear maximum likelihood estimation approach to the inverse problem is presented. The statistical properties of maximum likelihood estimators are derived, and a procedure to construct confidence intervals and do hypothesis testing is given. The relative merits of the linear and maximum likelihood estimators are analyzed. Other topics relevant to the identification and estimation methodologies, i.e., a continuous-time solution to the flow equation, coping with noise-corrupted head measurements, and extension of the developed theory to nonlinear cases are also discussed. A simulation study is used to evaluate the methods developed in this study.

  10. Latin square three dimensional gage master

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Lynn L.

    1982-01-01

    A gage master for coordinate measuring machines has an nxn array of objects distributed in the Z coordinate utilizing the concept of a Latin square experimental design. Using analysis of variance techniques, the invention may be used to identify sources of error in machine geometry and quantify machine accuracy.

  11. EXTERNAL INVERSE COMPTON SPECTRA FOR MONOENERGETIC AND BLACKBODY PHOTON FIELDS UPSCATTERED BY A POWER-LAW ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION WITH A FINITE ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S. E-mail: souichaoui@usthb.dz

    2011-08-20

    We have calculated the inverse Compton (IC) integrated spectral power within the Thomson limit for a monoenergetic isotropic photon field upscattered off highly relativistic electrons assuming an isotropic power-law distribution of the latter, N({gamma}) = C{gamma}{sup -p}, with Lorentz parameter values {gamma}{sub 1} < {gamma} < {gamma}{sub 2}. Our interest was essentially focused on the case of a finite energy range (finite {gamma}{sub 2}) possibly having realistic applications in high-energy astrophysical sites, mainly relativistic shock regions. To this end, we have defined and derived a dimensionless parametric function, F{sub p} (z{sub 1}, {eta}), with variables z{sub 1} = {epsilon}{sub 1}/4{gamma}{sup 2}{sub 1}{epsilon} and {eta} = {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub 1}. This result was used to derive the IC-integrated spectral power for an upscattered blackbody (BB) photon field using a dimensionless parametric function, W{sub p} ({xi}, {eta}), with variable {xi} = {epsilon}{sub 1}/4{gamma}{sup 2}{sub 1} kT. Asymptotic forms of this function have been derived for three energy ranges, i.e., {xi} << 1, 1 << {xi} << {eta}{sup 2}, and {xi} >> {eta}{sup 2}. Then, a characteristic value, {eta}{sub c}(p, {epsilon}) with {epsilon} << 1, of parameter {eta} was defined such that the middle range asymptotic form of W{sub p} ({xi}, {eta}) could be valid and good when {eta} {approx}> {eta}{sub c}(p, {epsilon}), by deriving an approximate expression of this particular value for {epsilon} = 10{sup -3}. The resulting spectra featured by a high-energy cutoff in the case of low values of the ratio {eta} can be discussed at least for a population of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), those best described by the cutoff power-law model with a low-energy spectral index, {alpha} {approx} 0. Furthermore, it is suggested that for GRB spectra with {alpha} < -1/2 pertaining to the prompt emission phase, the IC is a likely emission mechanism for both monoenergetic and BB photon fields if one

  12. Inverse Floatation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Anish; Chatterjee, Souvick; Ganguly, Ranjan; Sen, Swarnendu; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    We have observed that capillarity forces may cause floatation in a few non-intuitive configurations. These may be divided into 2 categories: i) floatation of heavier liquid droplets on lighter immiscible ones and ii) fully submerged floatation of lighter liquid droplets in a heavier immiscible medium. We call these counter-intuitive because of the inverse floatation configuration. For case (i) we have identified and studied in detail the several factors affecting the shape and maximum volume of the floating drop. We used water and vegetable oil combinations as test fluids and established the relation between Bond Number and maximum volume contained in a floating drop (in the order of μL). For case (ii), we injected vegetable oil drop-wise into a pool of water. The fully submerged configuration of the drop is not stable and a slight perturbation to the system causes the droplet to burst and float in partially submerged condition. Temporal variation of a characteristic length of the droplet is analyzed using MATLAB image processing. The constraint of small Bond Number establishes the assumption of lubrication regime in the thin gap. A brief theoretical formulation also shows the temporal variation of the gap thickness. Jadavpur University, Jagadis Bose Centre of Excellence, Virginia Tech.

  13. The Chi-square test of independence

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The Chi-square statistic is a non-parametric (distribution free) tool designed to analyze group differences when the dependent variable is measured at a nominal level. Like all non-parametric statistics, the Chi-square is robust with respect to the distribution of the data. Specifically, it does not require equality of variances among the study groups or homoscedasticity in the data. It permits evaluation of both dichotomous independent variables, and of multiple group studies. Unlike many other non-parametric and some parametric statistics, the calculations needed to compute the Chi-square provide considerable information about how each of the groups performed in the study. This richness of detail allows the researcher to understand the results and thus to derive more detailed information from this statistic than from many others. The Chi-square is a significance statistic, and should be followed with a strength statistic. The Cramer’s V is the most common strength test used to test the data when a significant Chi-square result has been obtained. Advantages of the Chi-square include its robustness with respect to distribution of the data, its ease of computation, the detailed information that can be derived from the test, its use in studies for which parametric assumptions cannot be met, and its flexibility in handling data from both two group and multiple group studies. Limitations include its sample size requirements, difficulty of interpretation when there are large numbers of categories (20 or more) in the independent or dependent variables, and tendency of the Cramer’s V to produce relative low correlation measures, even for highly significant results. PMID:23894860

  14. Constructing probabilistic models for realistic velocity distributions based on forward modeling and tomographic inversion: applications for active and passive source observation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    Seismic tomography is like a photography taken by a camera with deformed and blurred lenses. In the resulting tomograms, colors (amplitudes of anomalies) and shapes of objects are often strongly biased and are usually not representing the reality. We propose an approach which allows investigating properties of the "camera" and retrieving most probable shapes and amplitudes of anomalies in the real Earth. The main idea of this approach is to construct a synthetic model which, after performing forward modeling and tomographic inversion, reproduces the same amplitudes and shapes of patterns as after inversion of observed data. In this modeling, the conditions of the tomographic inversion (damping, grid spacing, source location parameters etc) should be absolutely identical to the case of the observed data processing. The a priori information, if available any, should be taken into account in this modeling to decrease the uncertainty related to fundamental non-uniqueness of the inversion problem. In the talk, several examples of applying this approach at various scales for different data schemes are presented: (1) regional scheme which uses the global data of the ISC catalogue (with examples of regional upper mantle models in Europe and central Asia); (2) local earthquake tomography scheme (illustrated with models in Toba caldera area and in Central Java); (3) seismic profiling which is based on active source refraction travel time data (with examples of several deep seismic sounding profiles in Central Pacific and subduction zones in Chile).

  15. Magnetization patterns of permalloy square frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Mei-Feng; Wei, Zung-Hang; Chang, Ching-Ray; Wu, J. C.; Hsieh, W. Z.; Usov, Nickolai A.; Lai, Jun-Yang; Yao, Y. D.

    2003-05-01

    Four different magnetization configurations of micron- and submicron-sized permalloy square frames are investigated by numerical simulations and experiments. Beside the pure conventional 90° Neel type wall with zero net magnetic pole, we also obtain numerically another high energy domain wall with positive or negative net magnetic poles in the corner. These three kinds of domain walls constitute four different patterns in square frames. We compare the magnetic pole density distributions derived from the spin configurations of simulation results with the images taken by magnetic force microscopy, and find reasonable agreement between them.

  16. Dielectric square resonator investigated with microwave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, S.; Bogomolny, E.; Dietz, B.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Richter, A.

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of the symmetry properties and the momentum space representation of the field distributions of a dielectric square resonator as well as the comparison with a semiclassical model. The experiments have been performed with a flat ceramic microwave resonator. Both the resonance spectra and the field distributions were measured. The momentum space representations of the latter evidenced that the resonant states are each related to a specific classical torus, leading to the regular structure of the spectrum. Furthermore, they allow for a precise determination of the refractive index. Measurements with different arrangements of the emitting and the receiving antennas were performed and their influence on the symmetry properties of the field distributions was investigated in detail, showing that resonances with specific symmetries can be selected purposefully. In addition, the length spectrum deduced from the measured resonance spectra and the trace formula for the dielectric square resonator are discussed in the framework of the semiclassical model.

  17. Dielectric square resonator investigated with microwave experiments.

    PubMed

    Bittner, S; Bogomolny, E; Dietz, B; Miski-Oglu, M; Richter, A

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of the symmetry properties and the momentum space representation of the field distributions of a dielectric square resonator as well as the comparison with a semiclassical model. The experiments have been performed with a flat ceramic microwave resonator. Both the resonance spectra and the field distributions were measured. The momentum space representations of the latter evidenced that the resonant states are each related to a specific classical torus, leading to the regular structure of the spectrum. Furthermore, they allow for a precise determination of the refractive index. Measurements with different arrangements of the emitting and the receiving antennas were performed and their influence on the symmetry properties of the field distributions was investigated in detail, showing that resonances with specific symmetries can be selected purposefully. In addition, the length spectrum deduced from the measured resonance spectra and the trace formula for the dielectric square resonator are discussed in the framework of the semiclassical model. PMID:25493860

  18. Orthogonalizing EM: A design-based least squares algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Shifeng; Dai, Bin; Huling, Jared; Qian, Peter Z. G.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an efficient iterative algorithm, intended for various least squares problems, based on a design of experiments perspective. The algorithm, called orthogonalizing EM (OEM), works for ordinary least squares and can be easily extended to penalized least squares. The main idea of the procedure is to orthogonalize a design matrix by adding new rows and then solve the original problem by embedding the augmented design in a missing data framework. We establish several attractive theoretical properties concerning OEM. For the ordinary least squares with a singular regression matrix, an OEM sequence converges to the Moore-Penrose generalized inverse-based least squares estimator. For ordinary and penalized least squares with various penalties, it converges to a point having grouping coherence for fully aliased regression matrices. Convergence and the convergence rate of the algorithm are examined. Finally, we demonstrate that OEM is highly efficient for large-scale least squares and penalized least squares problems, and is considerably faster than competing methods when n is much larger than p. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. PMID:27499558

  19. Square Source Type Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aso, N.; Ohta, K.; Ide, S.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation in a small volume of earth interior is expressed by a symmetric moment tensor located on a point source. The tensor contains information of characteristic directions, source amplitude, and source types such as isotropic, double-couple, or compensated-linear-vector-dipole (CLVD). Although we often assume a double couple as the source type of an earthquake, significant non-double-couple component including isotropic component is often reported for induced earthquakes and volcanic earthquakes. For discussions on source types including double-couple and non-double-couple components, it is helpful to display them using some visual diagrams. Since the information of source type has two degrees of freedom, it can be displayed onto a two-dimensional flat plane. Although the diagram developed by Hudson et al. [1989] is popular, the trace corresponding to the mechanism combined by two mechanisms is not always a smooth line. To overcome this problem, Chapman and Leaney [2012] developed a new diagram. This diagram has an advantage that a straight line passing through the center corresponds to the mechanism obtained by a combination of an arbitrary mechanism and a double-couple [Tape and Tape, 2012], but this diagram has some difficulties in use. First, it is slightly difficult to produce the diagram because of its curved shape. Second, it is also difficult to read out the ratios among isotropic, double-couple, and CLVD components, which we want to obtain from the estimated moment tensors, because they do not appear directly on the horizontal or vertical axes. In the present study, we developed another new square diagram that overcomes the difficulties of previous diagrams. This diagram is an orthogonal system of isotropic and deviatoric axes, so it is easy to get the ratios among isotropic, double-couple, and CLVD components. Our diagram has another advantage that the probability density is obtained simply from the area within the diagram if the probability density

  20. Techniques in Doppler gravity inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The types of Doppler gravity data available for local as opposed to planetwide geophysical modeling are reviewed. Those gravity fields that are determined dynamically in orbit determination programs yield a smoothed representation of the local gravity field that may be used for quantitative modeling. An estimate of the difference between smoothed and true fields can be considered as a noise limitation in generating local gravity models. A nonlinear inversion for the geometry, depth, and density of the Mare Serenitatis mascon using an ellipsoidal model yielded a global least squares minimum in horizontal dimensions, depth, and thickness-density contrast product. It was subsequently found, by using a linear model, that there were an infinite number of solutions corresponding to various combinations of depth and lateral inhomogeneity. Linear modeling was performed by means of generalized inverse theory.

  1. Weighted Least Squares Fitting Using Ordinary Least Squares Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.

    1997-01-01

    A general approach for fitting a model to a data matrix by weighted least squares (WLS) is studied. The approach consists of iteratively performing steps of existing algorithms for ordinary least squares fitting of the same model and is based on maximizing a function that majorizes WLS loss function. (Author/SLD)

  2. Teaching Tip: When a Matrix and Its Inverse Are Stochastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, J.; Rhee, N. H.

    2013-01-01

    A stochastic matrix is a square matrix with nonnegative entries and row sums 1. The simplest example is a permutation matrix, whose rows permute the rows of an identity matrix. A permutation matrix and its inverse are both stochastic. We prove the converse, that is, if a matrix and its inverse are both stochastic, then it is a permutation matrix.

  3. Non-linear Conjugate Gradient Time-Domain Controlled Inversion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory A.; Commer, Michael

    2006-11-16

    Software that simulates and inverts time-domain electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a step-wise source signal from either galvanic (grounded wires) or inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria. The software is an upgrade from the code TEM3D ver. 2.0. The upgrade includes the following components: (1) Improved (faster)memory access during gradient computation. (2) Data parellelization scheme: Multiple transmitters (sources) can be distributed accross several banks of processors (daa-planes). Similarly, the receivers of each source are also distributed accross the corresponding data-plane. (3) Improved data-IO.

  4. Non-linear Conjugate Gradient Time-Domain Controlled Inversion Source

    2006-11-16

    Software that simulates and inverts time-domain electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a step-wise source signal from either galvanic (grounded wires) or inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria.more » The software is an upgrade from the code TEM3D ver. 2.0. The upgrade includes the following components: (1) Improved (faster)memory access during gradient computation. (2) Data parellelization scheme: Multiple transmitters (sources) can be distributed accross several banks of processors (daa-planes). Similarly, the receivers of each source are also distributed accross the corresponding data-plane. (3) Improved data-IO.« less

  5. In Defense of the Chi-Square Continuity Correction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldman, Donald J.; McNemar, Quinn

    Published studies of the sampling distribution of chi-square with and without Yates' correction for continuity have been interpreted as discrediting the correction. Yates' correction actually produces a biased chi-square value which in turn yields a better estimate of the exact probability of the discrete event concerned when used in conjunction…

  6. Inversion methods for interpretation of asteroid lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko; Lamberg, L.; Lumme, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed methods of inversion that can be used in the determination of the three-dimensional shape or the albedo distribution of the surface of a body from disk-integrated photometry, assuming the shape to be strictly convex. In addition to the theory of inversion methods, we have studied the practical aspects of the inversion problem and applied our methods to lightcurve data of 39 Laetitia and 16 Psyche.

  7. Latin and Cross Latin Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emanouilidis, Emanuel

    2008-01-01

    Latin squares were first introduced and studied by the famous mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 1700s. Through the years, Latin squares have been used in areas such as statistics, graph theory, coding theory, the generation of random numbers as well as in the design and analysis of experiments. Recently, with the international popularity of…

  8. Algebraic Squares: Complete and Incomplete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardella, Francis J.

    2000-01-01

    Illustrates ways of using algebra tiles to give students a visual model of competing squares that appear in algebra as well as in higher mathematics. Such visual representations give substance to the symbolic manipulation and give students who do not learn symbolically a way of understanding the underlying concepts of completing the square. (KHR)

  9. From Square Dance to Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremer, Zoe

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author suggests a cross-curricular idea that can link with PE, dance, music and history. Teacher David Schmitz, a maths teacher in Illinois who was also a square dance caller, had developed a maths course that used the standard square dance syllabus to teach mathematical principles. He presents an intensive, two-week course…

  10. Determination of water-soluble and insoluble (dilute-HCl-extractable) fractions of Cd, Pb and Cu in Antarctic aerosol by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry: distribution and summer seasonal evolution at Terra Nova Bay (Victoria Land).

    PubMed

    Annibaldi, A; Truzzi, C; Illuminati, S; Bassotti, E; Scarponi, G

    2007-02-01

    Eight PM10 aerosol samples were collected in the vicinity of the "Mario Zucchelli" Italian Antarctic Station (formerly Terra Nova Bay Station) during the 2000-2001 austral summer using a high-volume sampler and precleaned cellulose filters. The aerosol mass was determined by differential weighing of filters carried out in a clean chemistry laboratory under controlled temperature and humidity. A two-step sequential extraction procedure was used to separate the water-soluble and the insoluble (dilute-HCl-extractable) fractions. Cd, Pb and Cu were determined in the two fractions using an ultrasensitive square wave anodic stripping voltammetric (SWASV) procedure set up for and applied to aerosol samples for the first time. Total extractable metals showed maxima at midsummer for Cd and Pb and a less clear trend for Cu. In particular, particulate metal concentrations ranged as follows: Cd 0.84-9.2 microg g(-1) (average 4.7 microg g(-1)), Pb 13.2-81 microg g(-1) (average 33 microg g(-1)), Cu 126-628 microg g(-1) (average 378 microg g(-1)). In terms of atmospheric concentration, the values were: Cd 0.55-6.3 pg m(-3) (average 3.4 pg m(-3)), Pb 8.7-48 pg m(-3) (average 24 pg m(-3)), Cu 75-365 pg m(-3) (average 266 pg m(-3)). At the beginning of the season the three metals appear widely distributed in the insoluble (HCl-extractable) fraction (higher proportions for Cd and Pb, 90-100%, and lower for Cu, 70-90%) with maxima in the second half of December. The soluble fraction then increases, and at the end of the season Cd and Pb are approximately equidistributed between the two fractions, while for Cu the soluble fraction reaches its maximum level of 36%. Practically negligible contributions are estimated for crustal and sea-spray sources. Low but significant volcanic contributions are estimated for Cd and Pb (approximately 10% and approximately 5%, respectively), while there is an evident although not quantified marine biogenic source, at least for Cd. The estimated natural

  11. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  12. Inverse modeling of hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Hou, Z.; Huang, M.; Tian, F.; Leung, L. R.

    2013-04-01

    This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) Bayesian inversion approaches, are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the least-square fitting provides little improvements in the model simulations but the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches are consistent - as more information comes in, the predictive intervals of the calibrated parameters become narrower and the misfits between the calculated and observed responses decrease. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

  13. Inverse Modeling of Hydrologic Parameters Using Surface Flux and Runoff Observations in the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yu; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Tian, Fuqiang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-12-10

    This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) - Bayesian inversion approaches, are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the least-square fitting provides little improvements in the model simulations but the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches are consistent - as more information comes in, the predictive intervals of the calibrated parameters become narrower and the misfits between the calculated and observed responses decrease. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to the different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

  14. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices.

    PubMed

    Piñeros, William D; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability. PMID:27497576

  15. Semi-supervised least squares support vector machine algorithm: application to offshore oil reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei-Ping; Li, Hong-Qi; Shi, Ning

    2016-06-01

    At the early stages of deep-water oil exploration and development, fewer and further apart wells are drilled than in onshore oilfields. Supervised least squares support vector machine algorithms are used to predict the reservoir parameters but the prediction accuracy is low. We combined the least squares support vector machine (LSSVM) algorithm with semi-supervised learning and established a semi-supervised regression model, which we call the semi-supervised least squares support vector machine (SLSSVM) model. The iterative matrix inversion is also introduced to improve the training ability and training time of the model. We use the UCI data to test the generalization of a semi-supervised and a supervised LSSVM models. The test results suggest that the generalization performance of the LSSVM model greatly improves and with decreasing training samples the generalization performance is better. Moreover, for small-sample models, the SLSSVM method has higher precision than the semi-supervised K-nearest neighbor (SKNN) method. The new semisupervised LSSVM algorithm was used to predict the distribution of porosity and sandstone in the Jingzhou study area.

  16. Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for the retrieval of vertical aerosol properties from combined lidar/radiometer data: development and distribution in EARLINET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Bril, Andrey; Goloub, Philippe; Tanré, Didier; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Wandinger, Ulla; Chaikovskaya, Ludmila; Denisov, Sergey; Grudo, Jan; Lopatin, Anton; Karol, Yana; Lapyonok, Tatsiana; Amiridis, Vassilis; Ansmann, Albert; Apituley, Arnoud; Allados-Arboledas, Lucas; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Boselli, Antonella; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Freudenthaler, Volker; Giles, David; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Nicolae, Doina; Oshchepkov, Sergey; Papayannis, Alex; Perrone, Maria Rita; Pietruczuk, Alexander; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sicard, Michaël; Slutsker, Ilya; Talianu, Camelia; De Tomasi, Ferdinando; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Wagner, Janet; Wang, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm for simultaneous processing of coincident lidar and radiometric (sun photometric) observations for the retrieval of the aerosol concentration vertical profiles. As the lidar/radiometric input data we use measurements from European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidars and collocated sun-photometers of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The LIRIC data processing provides sequential inversion of the combined lidar and radiometric data. The algorithm starts with the estimations of column-integrated aerosol parameters from radiometric measurements followed by the retrieval of height dependent concentrations of fine and coarse aerosols from lidar signals using integrated column characteristics of aerosol layer as a priori constraints. The use of polarized lidar observations allows us to discriminate between spherical and non-spherical particles of the coarse aerosol mode.The LIRIC software package was implemented and tested at a number of EARLINET stations. Intercomparison of the LIRIC-based aerosol retrievals was performed for the observations by seven EARLINET lidars in Leipzig, Germany on 25 May 2009. We found close agreement between the aerosol parameters derived from different lidars that supports high robustness of the LIRIC algorithm. The sensitivity of the retrieval results to the possible reduction of the available observation data is also discussed.

  17. An exact inverse method for subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daripa, Prabir

    1988-01-01

    A new inverse method for the aerodynamic design of airfoils is presented for subcritical flows. The pressure distribution in this method can be prescribed as a function of the arclength of the still unknown body. It is shown that this inverse problem is mathematically equivalent to solving only one nonlinear boundary value problem subject to known Dirichlet data on the boundary.

  18. Stochastic inverse consistency in medical image registration.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Sai Kit; Shi, Pengcheng

    2005-01-01

    An essential goal in medical image registration is, the forward and reverse mapping matrices should be inverse to each other, i.e., inverse consistency. Conventional approaches enforce consistency in deterministic fashions, through incorporation of sub-objective cost function to impose source-destination symmetric property during the registration process. Assuming that the initial forward and reverse matching matrices have been computed and used as the inputs to our system, this paper presents a stochastic framework which yields perfect inverse consistency with the simultaneous considerations of the errors underneath the registration matrices and the imperfectness of the consistent constraint. An iterative generalized total least square (GTLS) strategy has been developed such that the inverse consistency is optimally imposed. PMID:16685959

  19. Normal versus Noncentral Chi-Square Asymptotics of Misspecified Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, So Yeon; Shapiro, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The noncentral chi-square approximation of the distribution of the likelihood ratio (LR) test statistic is a critical part of the methodology in structural equation modeling. Recently, it was argued by some authors that in certain situations normal distributions may give a better approximation of the distribution of the LR test statistic. The main…

  20. Effects of Tape and Exercise on Dynamic Ankle Inversion

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Mark D.; Sherwood, Stephen M.; Schulthies, Shane S.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of tape, with and without prewrap, on dynamic ankle inversion before and after exercise. Design and Setting: Doubly multivariate analyses of variance were used to compare the taping and exercise conditions. Subjects were randomly assigned to a fixed treatment order as determined by a balanced latin square. The independent variables were tape application (no tape, tape with prewrap, tape to skin) and exercise (before and after). The dependent variables were average inversion velocity, total inversion, maximum inversion velocity, and time to maximum inversion. Subjects: Thirty college-age male and female students (17 males, 13 females; mean age = 24.9 ± 4.3 years, range, 19 to 39 years) were tested. Subjects were excluded from the study if they exhibited a painful gait or painful range of motion or had a past history of ankle surgery or an ankle sprain within the past 4 weeks. Measurements: We collected data using electronic goniometers while subjects balanced on the right leg on an inversion platform tilted about the medial-lateral axis to produce 15° of plantar flexion. Sudden ankle inversion was induced by pulling the inversion platform support, allowing the platform support base to rotate 37°. Ten satisfactory trials were recorded on the inversion platform before and after a prescribed exercise bout. We calculated total inversion, time to maximum inversion, average inversion velocity, and maximum inversion velocity after sudden inversion. Results: We found no significant differences between taping to the skin and taping over prewrap for any of the variables measured. There were significant differences between both taping conditions and no-tape postexercise for average inversion velocity, maximum inversion, maximum inversion velocity, and time to maximum inversion. The total inversion mean for no-tape postexercise was 38.8° ± 6.3°, whereas the means for tape and skin and for tape and prewrap were 28.3° ± 4.6° and 29.1°

  1. Counting Triangles to Sum Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMaio, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Counting complete subgraphs of three vertices in complete graphs, yields combinatorial arguments for identities for sums of squares of integers, odd integers, even integers and sums of the triangular numbers.

  2. Least squares restoration of multi-channel images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Roland T.; Galatsanos, Nikolas P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, a least squares filter for the restoration of multichannel imagery is presented. The restoration filter is based on a linear, space-invariant imaging model and makes use of an iterative matrix inversion algorithm. The restoration utilizes both within-channel (spatial) and cross-channel information as constraints. Experiments using color images (three-channel imagery with red, green, and blue components) were performed to evaluate the filter's performance and to compare it with other monochrome and multichannel filters.

  3. AKLSQF - LEAST SQUARES CURVE FITTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The Least Squares Curve Fitting program, AKLSQF, computes the polynomial which will least square fit uniformly spaced data easily and efficiently. The program allows the user to specify the tolerable least squares error in the fitting or allows the user to specify the polynomial degree. In both cases AKLSQF returns the polynomial and the actual least squares fit error incurred in the operation. The data may be supplied to the routine either by direct keyboard entry or via a file. AKLSQF produces the least squares polynomial in two steps. First, the data points are least squares fitted using the orthogonal factorial polynomials. The result is then reduced to a regular polynomial using Sterling numbers of the first kind. If an error tolerance is specified, the program starts with a polynomial of degree 1 and computes the least squares fit error. The degree of the polynomial used for fitting is then increased successively until the error criterion specified by the user is met. At every step the polynomial as well as the least squares fitting error is printed to the screen. In general, the program can produce a curve fitting up to a 100 degree polynomial. All computations in the program are carried out under Double Precision format for real numbers and under long integer format for integers to provide the maximum accuracy possible. AKLSQF was written for an IBM PC X/AT or compatible using Microsoft's Quick Basic compiler. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2.1 using 23K of RAM. AKLSQF was developed in 1989.

  4. Inverse sequential procedures for the monitoring of time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radok, Uwe; Brown, Timothy

    1993-01-01

    Climate changes traditionally have been detected from long series of observations and long after they happened. The 'inverse sequential' monitoring procedure is designed to detect changes as soon as they occur. Frequency distribution parameters are estimated both from the most recent existing set of observations and from the same set augmented by 1,2,...j new observations. Individual-value probability products ('likelihoods') are then calculated which yield probabilities for erroneously accepting the existing parameter(s) as valid for the augmented data set and vice versa. A parameter change is signaled when these probabilities (or a more convenient and robust compound 'no change' probability) show a progressive decrease. New parameters are then estimated from the new observations alone to restart the procedure. The detailed algebra is developed and tested for Gaussian means and variances, Poisson and chi-square means, and linear or exponential trends; a comprehensive and interactive Fortran program is provided in the appendix.

  5. 3D Electromagnetic inversion using conjugate gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.A.; Alumbaugh, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    In large scale 3D EM inverse problems it may not be possible to directly invert a full least-squares system matrix involving model sensitivity elements. Thus iterative methods must be employed. For the inverse problem, we favor either a linear or non-linear (NL) CG scheme, depending on the application. In a NL CG scheme, the gradient of the objective function is required at each relaxation step along with a univariate line search needed to determine the optimum model update. Solution examples based on both approaches will be presented.

  6. Inversion for coseismic slip distribution of the 2010 Mw 6.9 Yushu Earthquake from InSAR data using angular dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoyan; Xu, Caijun; Wen, Yangmao; Liu, Yang; Yin, Zhi; Wang, Jianjun

    2013-08-01

    We used interferometric SAR (InSAR) crustal deformation data sets to explore the fault slip involved in the 2010 April 14 (Mw = 6.9) Yushu earthquake modelled using angular dislocations. A refined rupture trace of the Yushu fault was extracted from two InSAR coseismic interferograms and field investigation results. We present a new method to discretize the fault geometry using triangular dislocation elements (TDEs), which are able to maintain consistency with the fault geometry modelled using rectangular dislocation elements (RDEs) and to avoid dislocation gaps and overlaps. Comprehensive comparisons between RDE and TDE models indicate that the classic Laplacian operator, which has not been carefully explored in many published studies, minimizes the slip on the boundary RDEs of the fault. A modification is proposed for the development of reasonable RDE models. The inversion shows that there were two larger concentrated slip zones during the Yushu earthquake. The largest was southeast of the hypocentre, near Luorongda, with a maximum slip of ˜1.6 m at the surface. The smaller slip patch was in the middle of the fault at a depth of ˜6 km, near the hypocentre. To improve the computational efficiency, we re-derived the analytic expressions for the strains associated with angular dislocations in an elastic half-space. The Coulomb stress changes increase at the northwestern and southeastern ends of the fault, and the small number of aftershocks in the southeast indicates that the seismic risk may be elevated in this area.

  7. Self-assembling RNA square

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; McLean, Jaime; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-12-22

    The three-dimensional structures of noncoding RNA molecules reveal recurring architectural motifs that have been exploited for the design of artificial RNA nanomaterials. Programmed assembly of RNA nanoobjects from autonomously folding tetraloop-receptor complexes as well as junction motifs has been achieved previously through sequence-directed hybridization of complex sets of long oligonucleotides. Due to size and complexity, structural characterization of artificial RNA nanoobjects has been limited to low-resolution microscopy studies. Here we present the design, construction, and crystal structure determination at 2.2 {angstrom} of the smallest yet square-shaped nanoobject made entirely of double-stranded RNA. The RNA square is comprised of 100 residues and self-assembles from four copies each of two oligonucleotides of 10 and 15 bases length. Despite the high symmetry on the level of secondary structure, the three-dimensional architecture of the square is asymmetric, with all four corners adopting distinct folding patterns. We demonstrate the programmed self-assembly of RNA squares from complex mixtures of corner units and establish a concept to exploit the RNA square as a combinatorial nanoscale platform.

  8. A Solution to Weighted Sums of Squares as a Square

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withers, Christopher S.; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2012-01-01

    For n = 1, 2, ... , we give a solution (x[subscript 1], ... , x[subscript n], N) to the Diophantine integer equation [image omitted]. Our solution has N of the form n!, in contrast to other solutions in the literature that are extensions of Euler's solution for N, a sum of squares. More generally, for given n and given integer weights m[subscript…

  9. Parallel implementation of inverse adding-doubling and Monte Carlo multi-layered programs for high performance computing systems with shared and distributed memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugunov, Svyatoslav; Li, Changying

    2015-09-01

    Parallel implementation of two numerical tools popular in optical studies of biological materials-Inverse Adding-Doubling (IAD) program and Monte Carlo Multi-Layered (MCML) program-was developed and tested in this study. The implementation was based on Message Passing Interface (MPI) and standard C-language. Parallel versions of IAD and MCML programs were compared to their sequential counterparts in validation and performance tests. Additionally, the portability of the programs was tested using a local high performance computing (HPC) cluster, Penguin-On-Demand HPC cluster, and Amazon EC2 cluster. Parallel IAD was tested with up to 150 parallel cores using 1223 input datasets. It demonstrated linear scalability and the speedup was proportional to the number of parallel cores (up to 150x). Parallel MCML was tested with up to 1001 parallel cores using problem sizes of 104-109 photon packets. It demonstrated classical performance curves featuring communication overhead and performance saturation point. Optimal performance curve was derived for parallel MCML as a function of problem size. Typical speedup achieved for parallel MCML (up to 326x) demonstrated linear increase with problem size. Precision of MCML results was estimated in a series of tests - problem size of 106 photon packets was found optimal for calculations of total optical response and 108 photon packets for spatially-resolved results. The presented parallel versions of MCML and IAD programs are portable on multiple computing platforms. The parallel programs could significantly speed up the simulation for scientists and be utilized to their full potential in computing systems that are readily available without additional costs.

  10. A cosmological redshift-distance square law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soneira, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper directly examines the claims of Segal (1976) that the (m,z) Hubble diagram is fitted best by a square law z = Kr-squared rather than by the traditional Hubble law z = Hr in the low-redshift range, z no more than about 0.01, corresponding to galaxies brighter than 14th mag. Segal attempts to fit a distance relation to the (m,z) scatter diagram in which each individual galaxy is plotted. The exact relation between the mean redshift for all galaxies in a small magnitude interval and the apparent magnitude is calculated. This relation is independent of luminosity function and peculiar velocity distribution about the general expansion, and is not affected by sample incompleteness as a function of apparent magnitude or the clustering of galaxies in the sample. Segal's method is affected by all of these and requires a highly sophisticated statistical analysis to deal with the non-Gaussian pointwise scatter. The present analysis favors the Hubble law and conclusively rules out the square law for the small redshift region.

  11. On the edge of an inverse cascade.

    PubMed

    Seshasayanan, Kannabiran; Benavides, Santiago Jose; Alexakis, Alexandros

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate that systems with a parameter-controlled inverse cascade can exhibit critical behavior for which at the critical value of the control parameter the inverse cascade stops. In the vicinity of such a critical point, standard phenomenological estimates for the energy balance will fail since the energy flux towards large length scales becomes zero. We demonstrate this using the computationally tractable model of two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamics in a periodic box. In the absence of any external magnetic forcing, the system reduces to hydrodynamic fluid turbulence with an inverse energy cascade. In the presence of strong magnetic forcing, the system behaves as 2D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with forward energy cascade. As the amplitude of the magnetic forcing is varied, a critical value is met for which the energy flux towards the large scales becomes zero. Close to this point, the energy flux scales as a power law with the departure from the critical point and the normalized amplitude of the fluctuations diverges. Similar behavior is observed for the flux of the square vector potential for which no inverse flux is observed for weak magnetic forcing, while a finite inverse flux is observed for magnetic forcing above the critical point. We conjecture that this behavior is generic for systems of variable inverse cascade. PMID:25493730

  12. Experimental observation of localized modes in a dielectric square resonator.

    PubMed

    Bittner, S; Bogomolny, E; Dietz, B; Miski-Oglu, M; Richter, A

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the frequency spectra and field distributions of a dielectric square resonator in a microwave experiment. Since such systems cannot be treated analytically, the experimental studies of their properties are indispensable. The momentum representation of the measured field distributions shows that all resonant modes are localized on specific classical tori of the square billiard. Based on these observations a semiclassical model was developed. It shows excellent agreement with all but a single class of measured field distributions that will be treated separately. PMID:24483530

  13. C[squared] = Creative Coordinates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Shelley R.

    2007-01-01

    "C[squared] = Creative Coordinates" is an engaging group of tasks that fosters the integration of mathematics and art to create meaningful understanding. The project lets students illustrate of find an image, then plot points to map their design on a grid. The project usually takes about a week to complete. When it is finished, students who are…

  14. A "voice inversion effect?".

    PubMed

    Bédard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-07-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an "auditory face" rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a "voice inversion effect," by analogy to the classical "face inversion effect," which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted of a gender identification task on two syllables pronounced by 90 speakers (boys, girls, men, and women). Experiment 2 consisted of a speaker discrimination task on pairs of syllables (8 men and 8 women). Experiment 3 consisted of an instrument discrimination task on pairs of melodies (8 string and 8 wind instruments). In all three experiments, stimuli were presented in 4 conditions: (1) no inversion; (2) temporal inversion (e.g., backwards speech); (3) frequency inversion centered around 4000 Hz; and (4) around 2500 Hz. Results indicated a significant decrease in performance caused by sound inversion, with a much stronger effect for frequency than for temporal inversion. Interestingly, although frequency inversion markedly affected timbre for both voices and instruments, subjects' performance was still above chance. However, performance at instrument discrimination was much higher than for voices, preventing comparison of inversion effects for voices vs. non-vocal stimuli. Additional experiments will be necessary to conclude on the existence of a possible "voice inversion effect." PMID:15177788

  15. Error handling strategies in multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Parameter estimation by inverse modeling involves the repeated evaluation of a function of residuals. These residuals represent both errors in the model and errors in the data. In practical applications of inverse modeling of multiphase flow and transport, the error structure of the final residuals often significantly deviates from the statistical assumptions that underlie standard maximum likelihood estimation using the least-squares method. Large random or systematic errors are likely to lead to convergence problems, biased parameter estimates, misleading uncertainty measures, or poor predictive capabilities of the calibrated model. The multiphase inverse modeling code iTOUGH2 supports strategies that identify and mitigate the impact of systematic or non-normal error structures. We discuss these approaches and provide an overview of the error handling features implemented in iTOUGH2.

  16. A new strategy for helioseismic inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eff-Darwich, A.; Perez Hernandez, F.

    1997-10-01

    Helioseismic inversion techniques have been revealed as powerful tools for inferring the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun. One of the most popular techniques is Regularized Least Squares. When it is used, it is necessary to define an inversion mesh and a penalty function, without an a priori knowledge of the behaviour of the solution. In addition, this penalty function is weighted by a trade-off parameter that must be fixed in order to obtain the solution. We present here a new technique, developed in order to find the optimal mesh and smoothing function by means of a deep analysis of the basis functions of the inversion problem. We have found that the method is suitable in particular for obtaining the sound speed and density profiles simultaneously, without any reference to the equation of state.

  17. Joint inversion of high-frequency surface waves with fundamental and higher modes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Liu, Q.; Xu, S.

    2007-01-01

    Joint inversion of multimode surface waves for estimating the shear (S)-wave velocity has received much attention in recent years. In this paper, we first analyze sensitivity of phase velocities of multimodes of surface waves for a six-layer earth model, and then we invert surface-wave dispersion curves of the theoretical model and a real-world example. Sensitivity analysis shows that fundamental mode data are more sensitive to the S-wave velocities of shallow layers and are concentrated on a very narrow frequency band, while higher mode data are more sensitive to the parameters of relatively deeper layers and are distributed over a wider frequency band. These properties provide a foundation of using a multimode joint inversion to define S-wave velocities. Inversion results of both synthetic data and a real-world example demonstrate that joint inversion with the damped least-square method and the singular-value decomposition technique to invert high-frequency surface waves with fundamental and higher mode data simultaneously can effectively reduce the ambiguity and improve the accuracy of S-wave velocities. ?? 2007.

  18. Joint inversion of high-frequency surface waves with fundamental and higher modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yinhe; Xia, Jianghai; Liu, Jiangping; Liu, Qingsheng; Xu, Shunfang

    2007-08-01

    Joint inversion of multimode surface waves for estimating the shear (S)-wave velocity has received much attention in recent years. In this paper, we first analyze sensitivity of phase velocities of multimodes of surface waves for a six-layer earth model, and then we invert surface-wave dispersion curves of the theoretical model and a real-world example. Sensitivity analysis shows that fundamental mode data are more sensitive to the S-wave velocities of shallow layers and are concentrated on a very narrow frequency band, while higher mode data are more sensitive to the parameters of relatively deeper layers and are distributed over a wider frequency band. These properties provide a foundation of using a multimode joint inversion to define S-wave velocities. Inversion results of both synthetic data and a real-world example demonstrate that joint inversion with the damped least-square method and the singular-value decomposition technique to invert high-frequency surface waves with fundamental and higher mode data simultaneously can effectively reduce the ambiguity and improve the accuracy of S-wave velocities.

  19. MOSES Inversions using Multiresolution SMART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Thomas; Fox, Lewis; Kankelborg, Charles; Courrier, Hans; Plovanic, Jacob

    2014-06-01

    We present improvements to the SMART inversion algorithm for the MOSES imaging spectrograph. MOSES, the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph, is a slitless extreme ultraviolet spectrograph designed to measure cotemporal narrowband spectra over a wide field of view via tomographic inversion of images taken at three orders of a concave diffraction grating. SMART, the Smooth Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, relies on a global chi squared goodness of fit criterion, which enables overfit and underfit regions to "balance out" when judging fit quality. "Good" reconstructions show poor fits at some positions and length scales. Here we take a multiresolution approach to SMART, applying corrections to the reconstruction at positions and scales where correction is warranted based on the noise. The result is improved fit residuals that more closely resemble the expected noise in the images. Within the multiresolution framework it is also easy to include a regularized deconvolution of the instrument point spread functions, which we do. Different point spread functions among MOSES spectral orders results in spurious doppler shifts in the reconstructions, most notable near bright compact emission. We estimate the point spread funtions from the data. Deconvolution is done using the Richardson-Lucy method, which is algorithmically similar to SMART. Regularization results from only correcting the reconstruction at positions and scales where correction is warranted based on the noise. We expect the point spread function deconvolution to increase signal to noise and reduce systematic error in MOSES reconstructions.

  20. A Higher Order Iterative Method for Computing the Drazin Inverse

    PubMed Central

    Soleymani, F.; Stanimirović, Predrag S.

    2013-01-01

    A method with high convergence rate for finding approximate inverses of nonsingular matrices is suggested and established analytically. An extension of the introduced computational scheme to general square matrices is defined. The extended method could be used for finding the Drazin inverse. The application of the scheme on large sparse test matrices alongside the use in preconditioning of linear system of equations will be presented to clarify the contribution of the paper. PMID:24222747

  1. Square ice in graphene nanocapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algara-Siller, G.; Lehtinen, O.; Wang, F. C.; Nair, R. R.; Kaiser, U.; Wu, H. A.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.

    2015-03-01

    Bulk water exists in many forms, including liquid, vapour and numerous crystalline and amorphous phases of ice, with hexagonal ice being responsible for the fascinating variety of snowflakes. Much less noticeable but equally ubiquitous is water adsorbed at interfaces and confined in microscopic pores. Such low-dimensional water determines aspects of various phenomena in materials science, geology, biology, tribology and nanotechnology. Theory suggests many possible phases for adsorbed and confined water, but it has proved challenging to assess its crystal structure experimentally. Here we report high-resolution electron microscopy imaging of water locked between two graphene sheets, an archetypal example of hydrophobic confinement. The observations show that the nanoconfined water at room temperature forms `square ice'--a phase having symmetry qualitatively different from the conventional tetrahedral geometry of hydrogen bonding between water molecules. Square ice has a high packing density with a lattice constant of 2.83 Å and can assemble in bilayer and trilayer crystallites. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that square ice should be present inside hydrophobic nanochannels independently of their exact atomic nature.

  2. Square ice in graphene nanocapillaries.

    PubMed

    Algara-Siller, G; Lehtinen, O; Wang, F C; Nair, R R; Kaiser, U; Wu, H A; Geim, A K; Grigorieva, I V

    2015-03-26

    Bulk water exists in many forms, including liquid, vapour and numerous crystalline and amorphous phases of ice, with hexagonal ice being responsible for the fascinating variety of snowflakes. Much less noticeable but equally ubiquitous is water adsorbed at interfaces and confined in microscopic pores. Such low-dimensional water determines aspects of various phenomena in materials science, geology, biology, tribology and nanotechnology. Theory suggests many possible phases for adsorbed and confined water, but it has proved challenging to assess its crystal structure experimentally. Here we report high-resolution electron microscopy imaging of water locked between two graphene sheets, an archetypal example of hydrophobic confinement. The observations show that the nanoconfined water at room temperature forms 'square ice'--a phase having symmetry qualitatively different from the conventional tetrahedral geometry of hydrogen bonding between water molecules. Square ice has a high packing density with a lattice constant of 2.83 Å and can assemble in bilayer and trilayer crystallites. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that square ice should be present inside hydrophobic nanochannels independently of their exact atomic nature. PMID:25810206

  3. A New Class of Pandiagonal Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loly, P. D.; Steeds, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    An interesting class of purely pandiagonal, i.e. non-magic, whole number (integer) squares of orders (row/column dimension) of the powers of two which are related to Gray codes and square Karnaugh maps has been identified. Treated as matrices these squares possess just two non-zero eigenvalues. The construction of these squares has been automated…

  4. A solution to weighted sums of squares as a square

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Christopher S.; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2012-12-01

    For n = 1, 2, … , we give a solution (x 1, … , x n , N) to the Diophantine integer equation ? . Our solution has N of the form n!, in contrast to other solutions in the literature that are extensions of Euler's solution for N, a sum of squares. More generally, for given n and given integer weights m 1, m 2, … , m n we give a solution to ? . The weights may be positive or negative and are subject to some restrictions. Choosing weights ±1 gives a solution to the problem of finding integer vectors of the same length.

  5. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  6. Seismic Inversion Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason

    2009-09-16

    With the rapid advances in sophisticated solar modeling and the abundance of high-quality solar pulsation data, efficient and robust inversion techniques are crucial for seismic studies. We present some aspects of an efficient Fourier Optimally Localized Averaging (OLA) inversion method with an example applied to time-distance helioseismology.

  7. Inverse structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Bruce R.; Water, Willem van de

    2005-03-01

    While the ordinary structure function in turbulence is concerned with the statistical moments of the velocity increment {delta}u measured over a distance r, the inverse structure function is related to the distance r where the turbulent velocity exits the interval {delta}u. We study inverse structure functions of wind-tunnel turbulence which covers a range of Reynolds numbers Re{sub {lambda}}=400-1100. We test a recently proposed relation between the scaling exponents of the ordinary structure functions and those of the inverse structure functions [S. Roux and M. H. Jensen, Phys. Rev. E 69, 16309 (2004)]. The relatively large range of Reynolds numbers in our experiment also enables us to address the scaling with Reynolds number that is expected to highlight the intermediate dissipative range. While we firmly establish the (relative) scaling of inverse structure functions, our experimental results fail both predictions. Therefore, the question of the significance of inverse structure functions remains open.

  8. Parametric Optimization of Simulated Extrusion of Square to Square Section Through Linear Converging Die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, S. K.; Maity, K. P.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of various process parameters for determining extrusion load has been studied for square to square extrusion of Al-6061 alloy, a most used aluminium alloy series in forming industries. Parameters like operating temperature, friction condition, ram velocity, extrusion ratio and die length have been chosen as an input variable for the above study. Twenty five combinations of parameters were set for the investigation by considering aforementioned five parameters in five levels. The simulations have been carried out by Deform-3D software for predicting maximum load requirement for the complete extrusion process. Effective stress and strain distribution across the billet has been checked. Operating temperature, extrusion ratio, friction factor, ram velocity and die length have the significant effect in decreasing order on the maximum load requirement.

  9. High-resolution moisture profiles from full-waveform probabilistic inversion of TDR signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laloy, Eric; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Jacques, Diederik

    2014-11-01

    This study presents an novel Bayesian inversion scheme for high-dimensional undetermined TDR waveform inversion. The methodology quantifies uncertainty in the moisture content distribution, using a Gaussian Markov random field (GMRF) prior as regularization operator. A spatial resolution of 1 cm along a 70-cm long TDR probe is considered for the inferred moisture content. Numerical testing shows that the proposed inversion approach works very well in case of a perfect model and Gaussian measurement errors. Real-world application results are generally satisfying. For a series of TDR measurements made during imbibition and evaporation from a laboratory soil column, the average root-mean-square error (RMSE) between maximum a posteriori (MAP) moisture distribution and reference TDR measurements is 0.04 cm3 cm-3. This RMSE value reduces to less than 0.02 cm3 cm-3 for a field application in a podzol soil. The observed model-data discrepancies are primarily due to model inadequacy, such as our simplified modeling of the bulk soil electrical conductivity profile. Among the important issues that should be addressed in future work are the explicit inference of the soil electrical conductivity profile along with the other sampled variables, the modeling of the temperature-dependence of the coaxial cable properties and the definition of an appropriate statistical model of the residual errors.

  10. Connectivity percolation in suspensions of attractive square-well spherocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Mohit; Meyer, Hugues; Schilling, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the connectivity percolation transition in suspensions of attractive square-well spherocylinders by means of Monte Carlo simulation and connectedness percolation theory. In the 1980s the percolation threshold of slender fibers has been predicted to scale as the fibers' inverse aspect ratio [Phys. Rev. B 30, 3933 (1984), 10.1103/PhysRevB.30.3933]. The main finding of our study is that the attractive spherocylinder system reaches this inverse scaling regime at much lower aspect ratios than found in suspensions of hard spherocylinders. We explain this difference by showing that third virial corrections of the pair connectedness functions, which are responsible for the deviation from the scaling regime, are less important for attractive potentials than for hard particles.

  11. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  12. Uncertainty quantification for ice sheet inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petra, N.; Ghattas, O.; Stadler, G.; Zhu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Modeling the dynamics of polar ice sheets is critical for projections of future sea level rise. Yet, there remain large uncertainties in the basal boundary conditions and in the non-Newtonian constitutive relations employed within ice sheet models. In this presentation, we consider the problem of estimating uncertainty in the solution of (large-scale) ice sheet inverse problems within the framework of Bayesian inference. Computing the general solution of the inverse problem-i.e., the posterior probability density-is intractable with current methods on today's computers, due to the expense of solving the forward model (3D full Stokes flow with nonlinear rheology) and the high dimensionality of the uncertain parameters (which are discretizations of the basal slipperiness field and the Glen's law exponent field). However, under the assumption of Gaussian noise and prior probability densities, and after linearizing the parameter-to-observable map, the posterior density becomes Gaussian, and can therefore be characterized by its mean and covariance. The mean is given by the solution of a nonlinear least squares optimization problem, which is equivalent to a deterministic inverse problem with appropriate interpretation and weighting of the data misfit and regularization terms. To obtain this mean, we solve a deterministic ice sheet inverse problem; here, we infer parameters arising from discretizations of basal slipperiness and rheological exponent fields. For this purpose, we minimize a regularized misfit functional between observed and modeled surface flow velocities. The resulting least squares minimization problem is solved using an adjoint-based inexact Newton method, which uses first and second derivative information. The posterior covariance matrix is given (in the linear-Gaussian case) by the inverse of the Hessian of the least squares cost functional of the deterministic inverse problem. Direct computation of the Hessian matrix is prohibitive, since it would

  13. [Mixed-Spectral Spatial Information Decomposition Model of Water Hyperspectral Inversion].

    PubMed

    Pan, Bang-long; Wang, Xian-hua; Zhu, Jin; Yi, Wei-ning; Fang, Ting-yong

    2015-03-01

    The effect of Mixed-hyperspectral in the water is difficult in quantitative remote sensing of water. Studies have shown that the only scalar spectrum information is difficult to solve the problem of complex mixed spectra of water. Besides the spectral information, spatial distribution of information is one of the obvious characteristics of the broad waters pollution, and can be used as a useful complement to the remote sensing information and facilitate water complex spectral unmixing. Taking Chaohu as an example, the paper applies the HJ-1A HSI hyperspectral data and the supplemental surface spectral measurement data to discuss the mixed spectra of lake water by spatial statistics and genetic algorithm theory. By using the spatial variogram of geostatistics to simulate the distribution difference of two adjacent pixels, the space-informational decomposition model of mixed spectral in lake water is established by co-kriging genetic algorithm, which is a improved algorithm applying the spatial variogram function of neighborhood pixel as the constraint of the objective function of the genetic algorithm. Finally, the model inversion results of suspended matter concentration are verified. Compared with the conventional spectral unmixing model, the results show the correlation coefficient of the predicted and measured value of suspended sediment concentration is 0.82, the root mean square error 9.25 mg x L(-1) by mixed spectral space information decomposition model, so the correlation coefficient is increased by 8.9%, the root mean square error reduced by 2.78 mg x L(-1), indicating that the model of suspended matter concentration has a strong predictive ability. Therefore, the effective combination of spatial and spectral information of water, can avoid inversion result distortion due to weak spectral signal of water color parameters, and large amount of calculation of information extraction because of the high spectral band numbers, and also provides an effective way

  14. [Shrinkage In the Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient and Unbiased Estimates of Treatment Effects Using Omega Squared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Starrett

    The amount of variance accounted for by treatment can be estimated with omega squared or with the squared multiple correlation coefficient. Monte Carlo methods were employed to compare omega squared, the squared multiple correlation coefficient, and the squared multiple correlation coefficient to which a shrinkage formula had been applied, in…

  15. Stochastic inversion by ray continuation

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, A.; Viallix

    1989-05-01

    The conventional tomographic inversion consists in minimizing residuals between measured and modelled traveltimes. The process tends to be unstable and some additional constraints are required to stabilize it. The stochastic formulation generalizes the technique and sets it on firmer theoretical bases. The Stochastic Inversion by Ray Continuation (SIRC) is a probabilistic approach, which takes a priori geological information into account and uses probability distributions to characterize data correlations and errors. It makes it possible to tie uncertainties to the results. The estimated parameters are interval velocities and B-spline coefficients used to represent smoothed interfaces. Ray tracing is done by a continuation technique between source and receives. The ray coordinates are computed from one path to the next by solving a linear system derived from Fermat's principle. The main advantages are fast computations, accurate traveltimes and derivatives. The seismic traces are gathered in CMPs. For a particular CMP, several reflecting elements are characterized by their time gradient measured on the stacked section, and related to a mean emergence direction. The program capabilities are tested on a synthetic example as well as on a field example. The strategy consists in inverting the parameters for one layer, then for the next one down. An inversion step is divided in two parts. First the parameters for the layer concerned are inverted, while the parameters for the upper layers remain fixed. Then all the parameters are reinverted. The velocity-depth section computed by the program together with the corresponding errors can be used directly for the interpretation, as an initial model for depth migration or for the complete inversion program under development.

  16. Analytic semigroups: Applications to inverse problems for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rebnord, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Convergence and stability results for least squares inverse problems involving systems described by analytic semigroups are presented. The practical importance of these results is demonstrated by application to several examples from problems of estimation of material parameters in flexible structures using accelerometer data.

  17. Generalized emissivity inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Ming, DengMing; Wen, Tao; Dai, XianXi; Dai, JiXin; Evenson, William E

    2002-04-01

    Inverse problems have recently drawn considerable attention from the physics community due to of potential widespread applications [K. Chadan and P. C. Sabatier, Inverse Problems in Quantum Scattering Theory, 2nd ed. (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1989)]. An inverse emissivity problem that determines the emissivity g(nu) from measurements of only the total radiated power J(T) has recently been studied [Tao Wen, DengMing Ming, Xianxi Dai, Jixin Dai, and William E. Evenson, Phys. Rev. E 63, 045601(R) (2001)]. In this paper, a new type of generalized emissivity and transmissivity inverse (GETI) problem is proposed. The present problem differs from our previous work on inverse problems by allowing the unknown (emissivity) function g(nu) to be temperature dependent as well as frequency dependent. Based on published experimental information, we have developed an exact solution formula for this GETI problem. A universal function set suggested for numerical calculation is shown to be robust, making this inversion method practical and convenient for realistic calculations. PMID:12005916

  18. Latin-square three-dimensional gage master

    DOEpatents

    Jones, L.

    1981-05-12

    A gage master for coordinate measuring machines has an nxn array of objects distributed in the Z coordinate utilizing the concept of a Latin square experimental design. Using analysis of variance techniques, the invention may be used to identify sources of error in machine geometry and quantify machine accuracy.

  19. Multi-ring performance of the Kendall square multiprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.H.

    1994-03-01

    Performance of the hierarchical shared-memory system of the Kendall Square Research multiprocessor is measured and characterized. The performance of prefetch is measured. Latency, bandwidth, and contention are analyzed on a 4-ring, 128 processor system. Scalability comparisons are made with other shared-memory and distributed-memory multiprocessors.

  20. Measurement of the shape of the boson-transverse momentum distribution in pp --> Z/gamma* --> e+e- + X events produced at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-03-14

    We present a measurement of the shape of the Z/gamma* boson transverse momentum (q(T)) distribution in pp --> Z/gamma* --> e(+)e(-) + X events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using 0.98 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data are found to be consistent with the resummation prediction at low q(T), but above the perturbative QCD calculation in the region of q(T)>30 GeV/c. Using events with q(T)<30 GeV/c, we extract the value of g(2), one of the nonperturbative parameters for the resummation calculation. Data at large boson rapidity y are compared with the prediction of resummation and with alternative models that employ a resummed form factor with modifications in the small Bjorken x region of the proton wave function. PMID:18352175

  1. Using Least Squares for Error Propagation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The method of least-squares (LS) has a built-in procedure for estimating the standard errors (SEs) of the adjustable parameters in the fit model: They are the square roots of the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix. This means that one can use least-squares to obtain numerical values of propagated errors by defining the target quantities as…

  2. 36 CFR 910.67 - Square guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Square guidelines. 910.67... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT AREA Glossary of Terms § 910.67 Square guidelines. Square Guidelines establish the...

  3. 36 CFR 910.67 - Square guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Square guidelines. 910.67... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT AREA Glossary of Terms § 910.67 Square guidelines. Square Guidelines establish the...

  4. 36 CFR 910.67 - Square guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Square guidelines. 910.67... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT AREA Glossary of Terms § 910.67 Square guidelines. Square Guidelines establish the...

  5. 36 CFR 910.67 - Square guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Square guidelines. 910.67... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT AREA Glossary of Terms § 910.67 Square guidelines. Square Guidelines establish the...

  6. Iterative image restoration using approximate inverse preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Nagy, J G; Plemmons, R J; Torgersen, T C

    1996-01-01

    Removing a linear shift-invariant blur from a signal or image can be accomplished by inverse or Wiener filtering, or by an iterative least-squares deblurring procedure. Because of the ill-posed characteristics of the deconvolution problem, in the presence of noise, filtering methods often yield poor results. On the other hand, iterative methods often suffer from slow convergence at high spatial frequencies. This paper concerns solving deconvolution problems for atmospherically blurred images by the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm, where a new approximate inverse preconditioner is used to increase the rate of convergence. Theoretical results are established to show that fast convergence can be expected, and test results are reported for a ground-based astronomical imaging problem. PMID:18285203

  7. Support vector machines for geophysical inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, Heidi Anderson

    This thesis explores what it means to replace classical non-linear geophysical inversion with computer learning via Support Vector Machines. Geophysical inverse problems are almost always ill-posed which means that many different models (i.e. descriptions of the earth) can be found to explain a given noisy or incomplete data set. Regularization and constraints encourage inversions to find physically realistic models. The set of preferred models needs to be defined a priori using as much geologic knowledge as is available. In inversion, it is assumed that data and a forward modeling process is known. The goal is to solve for a model. In the SVM paradigm, a series of models and associated data are known. The goal is to solve for a reverse modeling process. Starting with a series of initial models assembled using all available geologic information, synthetic data is created using the most realistic forward modeling program available. With the synthetic data as inputs and the known models as outputs, a Support Vector Machine is trained to approximate a local inverse to the forward modeling program. The advantages of this approach are that it is honest about the need to establish, a priori, the kinds of models that are reasonable in a particular field situation. There is no need to adjust the forward process to accommodate inversion, because SVMs can be easily modified to capture complicated, non-linear relationships. SVMs are transparent and require very little programming. If an SVM is trained using model/data pairs that are drawn from the same probability distribution that is implicit in the regularization of an inversion, then it will get very similar results to the inversion. Because SVMs can interpret as much data as desired so long as the conditions of an experiment do not change, they can be used to perform otherwise computationally expensive procedures. The SVMs in this paper are trained to emulate linear and non-linear seismic Amplitude Variation with Offset

  8. Full waveform inversion with an auxiliary bump functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, Pawan; Mulder, Wim; Drijkoningen, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Least-squares inversion of seismic arrivals can provide remarkably detailed models of the Earth's subsurface. However, cycle skipping associated with these oscillatory arrivals is the main cause for local minima in the least-squares objective function. Therefore, it is often difficult for descent methods to converge to the solution without an accurate initial large-scale velocity estimate. The low frequencies in the arrivals, needed to update the large-scale components in the velocity model, are usually unreliable or absent. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a multi-objective inversion scheme that uses the conventional least-squares functional along with an auxiliary data-domain objective. As the auxiliary objective effectively replaces the seismic arrivals by bumps, we call it the bump functional. The bump functional minimization can be made far less sensitive to cycle skipping and can deal with multiple arrivals in the data. However, it can only be used as an auxiliary objective since it usually does not provide a unique model after minimization even when the regularized-least-squares functional has a unique global minimum and hence a unique solution. The role of the bump functional during the multi-objective inversion is to guide the optimization towards the global minimum by pulling the trapped solution out of the local minima associated with the least-squares functional whenever necessary. The computational complexity of the bump functional is equivalent to that of the least-squares functional. In this paper, we describe various characteristics of the bump functional using simple and illustrative numerical examples. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed multi-objective inversion scheme by considering more realistic examples. These include synthetic and field data from a cross-well experiment, surface-seismic synthetic data with reflections and synthetic data with refracted arrivals at long offsets.

  9. Inversion of InSAR Data for the Aseismic Slip-Rate on the Hayward Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, D. A.; Bürgmann, R.; Nadeau, R.; D'Alessio, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Hayward fault is a major strand of the San Andreas fault system, and has received considerable attention because of the seismic hazard it poses to the San Francisco Bay Area. We perform a least-squares inversion of multiple geodetic and seismic data sets to determine the strike-slip distribution of the aseismic slip-rate on the fault. The analysis focuses on the northern 60 km of the fault where surface creep rates appear to be constant over the past several decades. InSAR data from 24 independent ERS interferograms are stacked to obtain range-change rates from 1992 to 2000. Surface displacement rates at 43 sites are observed using GPS from 1994 to 2002. Surface creep observations and estimates of deep slip rates determined from characteristic repeating earthquake sequences are also incorporated in the inversion. The densely spaced InSAR data require a non-planar fault surface to adequately model the near-fault data. The fault is discretized into 283 triangular dislocation elements that approximate the non-planar attributes of the fault surface. South of Hayward, a steeply, east-dipping fault geometry accommodates the divergence of the surface trace and the micro-seismicity at depth. Laplacian smoothing and a positivity constraint are included in the inversion. The InSAR data provide the greatest resolution on the shallow portion of the fault. The additional data sets help to complement the InSAR data and improve the model resolution. The inversion result suggests a heterogeneous distribution of aseismic slip-rate that is characterized by both locked and freely slipping patches. A seismic cluster beneath San Leandro coincides with a creeping patch as resolved by the geodetic data. A locked region at depth coincides with the source region of the 1868 earthquake (M 6.8) on the southern Hayward fault.

  10. Deming's General Least Square Fitting

    1992-02-18

    DEM4-26 is a generalized least square fitting program based on Deming''s method. Functions built into the program for fitting include linear, quadratic, cubic, power, Howard''s, exponential, and Gaussian; others can easily be added. The program has the following capabilities: (1) entry, editing, and saving of data; (2) fitting of any of the built-in functions or of a user-supplied function; (3) plotting the data and fitted function on the display screen, with error limits if requested,more » and with the option of copying the plot to the printer; (4) interpolation of x or y values from the fitted curve with error estimates based on error limits selected by the user; and (5) plotting the residuals between the y data values and the fitted curve, with the option of copying the plot to the printer. If the plot is to be copied to a printer, GRAPHICS should be called from the operating system disk before the BASIC interpreter is loaded.« less

  11. Property of slice square polycapillary x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Qi, Peng; Zhi-Guo, Liu; Tian-Xi, Sun; Kai, Wang; Long-Tao, Yi; Kui, Yang; Man, Chen; Jin-Bang, Wang

    2016-02-01

    A geometrical description of square polycapillary x-ray optics and the basic theory of the transmission of x-rays are presented. A method of numerical calculation is developed based on ray-tracing theory. The method simulates the intensity distribution of x-rays propagating through slice square polycapillary x-ray optics. The simulation results are compared with the experimental results. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 2012LZD07 and 2014kJJCA03) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375027 and 11075017).

  12. Inverse Bremsstrahlung in Shocked Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    2000-01-01

    There has recently been interest in the role of inverse bremsstrahlung, the emission of photons by fast suprathermal ions in collisions with ambient electrons possessing relatively low velocities, in tenuous plasmas in various astrophysical contexts. This follows a long hiatus in the application of suprathermal ion bremsstrahlung to astrophysical models since the early 1970s. The potential importance of inverse bremsstrahlung relative to normal bremsstrahlung, i.e. where ions are at rest, hinges upon the underlying velocity distributions of the interacting species. In this paper, we identify the conditions under which the inverse bremsstrahlung emissivity is significant relative to that for normal bremsstrahlung in shocked astrophysical plasmas. We determine that, since both observational and theoretical evidence favors electron temperatures almost comparable to, and certainly not very deficient relative to proton temperatures in shocked plasmas, these environments generally render inverse bremsstrahlung at best a minor contributor to the overall emission. Hence inverse bremsstrahlung can be safely neglected in most models invoking shock acceleration in discrete sources such as supernova remnants. However, on scales approximately > 100 pc distant from these sources, Coulomb collisional losses can deplete the cosmic ray electrons, rendering inverse bremsstrahlung, and perhaps bremsstrahlung from knock-on electrons, possibly detectable.

  13. Electromagnetic inverse scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bojarski, N. N.

    1972-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic inverse scattering identity, based on the physical optics approximation, is developed for the monostatic scattered far field cross section of perfect conductors. Uniqueness of this inverse identity is proven. This identity requires complete scattering information for all frequencies and aspect angles. A nonsingular integral equation is developed for the arbitrary case of incomplete frequence and/or aspect angle scattering information. A general closed-form solution to this integral equation is developed, which yields the shape of the scatterer from such incomplete information. A specific practical radar solution is presented. The resolution of this solution is developed, yielding short-pulse target resolution radar system parameter equations. The special cases of two- and one-dimensional inverse scattering and the special case of a priori knowledge of scatterer symmetry are treated in some detail. The merits of this solution over the conventional radar imaging technique are discussed.

  14. Recursive least-squares learning algorithms for neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.S. ); Hwang, Jenq-Neng . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a pair of recursive least squares (RLS) algorithms for online training of multilayer perceptrons, which are a class of feedforward artificial neural networks. These algorithms incorporate second order information about the training error surface in order to achieve faster learning rates than are possible using first order gradient descent algorithms such as the generalized delta rule. A least squares formulation is derived from a linearization of the training error function. Individual training pattern errors are linearized about the network parameters that were in effect when the pattern was presented. This permits the recursive solution of the least squares approximation, either via conventional RLS recursions or by recursive QR decomposition-based techniques. The computational complexity of the update is in the order of (N{sup 2}), where N is the number of network parameters. This is due to the estimation of the N {times} N inverse Hessian matrix. Less computationally intensive approximations of the RLS algorithms can be easily derived by using only block diagonal elements of this matrix, thereby partitioning the learning into independent sets. A simulation example is presented in which a neural network is trained to approximate a two dimensional Gaussian bump. In this example, RLS training required an order of magnitude fewer iterations on average (527) than did training with the generalized delta rule (6331). 14 refs., 3 figs.

  15. An inverse method with regularity condition for transonic airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Ziqiang; Xia, Zhixun; Wu, Liyi

    1991-01-01

    It is known from Lighthill's exact solution of the incompressible inverse problem that in the inverse design problem, the surface pressure distribution and the free stream speed cannot both be prescribed independently. This implies the existence of a constraint on the prescribed pressure distribution. The same constraint exists at compressible speeds. Presented here is an inverse design method for transonic airfoils. In this method, the target pressure distribution contains a free parameter that is adjusted during the computation to satisfy the regularity condition. Some design results are presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the method.

  16. Semiautomatic and Automatic Cooperative Inversion of Seismic and Magnetotelluric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Cuong V. A.; Harris, Brett D.; Pethick, Andrew M.; Takam Takougang, Eric M.; Howe, Brendan

    2016-09-01

    Natural source electromagnetic methods have the potential to recover rock property distributions from the surface to great depths. Unfortunately, results in complex 3D geo-electrical settings can be disappointing, especially where significant near-surface conductivity variations exist. In such settings, unconstrained inversion of magnetotelluric data is inexorably non-unique. We believe that: (1) correctly introduced information from seismic reflection can substantially improve MT inversion, (2) a cooperative inversion approach can be automated, and (3) massively parallel computing can make such a process viable. Nine inversion strategies including baseline unconstrained inversion and new automated/semiautomated cooperative inversion approaches are applied to industry-scale co-located 3D seismic and magnetotelluric data sets. These data sets were acquired in one of the Carlin gold deposit districts in north-central Nevada, USA. In our approach, seismic information feeds directly into the creation of sets of prior conductivity model and covariance coefficient distributions. We demonstrate how statistical analysis of the distribution of selected seismic attributes can be used to automatically extract subvolumes that form the framework for prior model 3D conductivity distribution. Our cooperative inversion strategies result in detailed subsurface conductivity distributions that are consistent with seismic, electrical logs and geochemical analysis of cores. Such 3D conductivity distributions would be expected to provide clues to 3D velocity structures that could feed back into full seismic inversion for an iterative practical and truly cooperative inversion process. We anticipate that, with the aid of parallel computing, cooperative inversion of seismic and magnetotelluric data can be fully automated, and we hold confidence that significant and practical advances in this direction have been accomplished.

  17. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  18. The Diophantine Equation x[squared]+ky[squared]=z[squared] and Integral Triangles with a Cosine Value of 1 over n

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelator, Konstantine

    2006-01-01

    We sometimes teach our students a method of finding all integral triples that satisfy the Pythagorean Theorem x[squared]+y[squared]=z[squared]. These are called Pythagorean triples. In this paper, we show how to solve the equation x[squared]+ky[squared]=z[squared], where again, all variables are integers.

  19. The Square Light Clock and Special Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, J. Ronald; Amiri, Farhang

    2012-01-01

    A thought experiment that includes a square light clock is similar to the traditional vertical light beam and mirror clock, except it is made up of four mirrors placed at a 45[degree] angle at each corner of a square of length L[subscript 0], shown in Fig. 1. Here we have shown the events as measured in the rest frame of the square light clock. By…

  20. Sets of Mutually Orthogonal Sudoku Latin Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vis, Timothy; Petersen, Ryan M.

    2009-01-01

    A Latin square of order "n" is an "n" x "n" array using n symbols, such that each symbol appears exactly once in each row and column. A set of Latin squares is c ordered pairs of symbols appearing in the cells of the array are distinct. The popular puzzle Sudoku involves Latin squares with n = 9, along with the added condition that each of the 9…

  1. New results on the resistivity structure of Merapi Volcano(Indonesia), derived from 3D restricted inversion of long-offsettransient electromagnetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Commer, Michael; Helwig, Stefan, L.; Hordt, Andreas; Scholl,Carsten; Tezkan, Bulent

    2006-06-14

    Three long-offset transient electromagnetic (LOTEM) surveyswerecarried out at the active volcano Merapi in Central Java (Indonesia)during the years 1998, 2000, and 2001. The measurements focused on thegeneral resistivity structure of the volcanic edifice at depths of 0.5-2km and the further investigation of a southside anomaly. The measurementswere insufficient for a full 3D inversion scheme, which could enable theimaging of finely discretized resistivity distributions. Therefore, astable, damped least-squares joint-inversion approach is used to optimize3D models with a limited number of parameters. The mode ls feature therealistic simulation of topography, a layered background structure, andadditional coarse 3D blocks representing conductivity anomalies.Twenty-eight LOTEM transients, comprising both horizontal and verticalcomponents of the magnetic induction time derivative, were analyzed. Inview of the few unknowns, we were able to achieve reasonable data fits.The inversion results indicate an upwelling conductor below the summit,suggesting hydrothermal activity in the central volcanic complex. Ashallow conductor due to a magma-filled chamber, at depths down to 1 kmbelow the summit, suggested by earlier seismic studies, is not indicatedby the inversion results. In conjunction with an anomalous-density model,derived from arecent gravity study, our inversion results provideinformation about the southern geological structure resulting from amajor sector collapse during the Middle Merapi period. The density modelallows to assess a porosity range andthus an estimated vertical salinityprofile to explain the high conductivities on a larger scale, extendingbeyond the foothills of Merapi.

  2. Neutron spectrum unfolding using artificial neural network and modified least square method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Abolfazl

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, neutron spectrum is reconstructed using the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Modified Least Square (MLSQR) methods. The detector's response (pulse height distribution) as a required data for unfolding of energy spectrum is calculated using the developed MCNPX-ESUT computational code (MCNPX-Energy engineering of Sharif University of Technology). Unlike the usual methods that apply inversion procedures to unfold the energy spectrum from the Fredholm integral equation, the MLSQR method uses the direct procedure. Since liquid organic scintillators like NE-213 are well suited and routinely used for spectrometry of neutron sources, the neutron pulse height distribution is simulated/measured in the NE-213 detector. The response matrix is calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code through the simulation of NE-213 detector's response to monoenergetic neutron sources. For known neutron pulse height distribution, the energy spectrum of the neutron source is unfolded using the MLSQR method. In the developed multilayer perception neural network for reconstruction of the energy spectrum of the neutron source, there is no need for formation of the response matrix. The multilayer perception neural network is developed based on logsig, tansig and purelin transfer functions. The developed artificial neural network consists of two hidden layers of type hyperbolic tangent sigmoid transfer function and a linear transfer function in the output layer. The motivation of applying the ANN method may be explained by the fact that no matrix inversion is needed for energy spectrum unfolding. The simulated neutron pulse height distributions in each light bin due to randomly generated neutron spectrum are considered as the input data of ANN. Also, the randomly generated energy spectra are considered as the output data of the ANN. Energy spectrum of the neutron source is identified with high accuracy using both MLSQR and ANN methods. The results obtained from

  3. Full waveform inversion with an auxiliary bump functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, Pawan; Mulder, Wim; Drijkoningen, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Least-squares inversion of seismic arrivals can provide remarkably detailed models of the Earth's subsurface. However, cycle skipping associated with these oscillatory arrivals is the main cause for local minima in the least-squares objective function. Therefore, it is often difficult for descent methods to converge to the solution without an accurate initial large-scale velocity estimate. The low frequencies in the arrivals, needed to update the large-scale components in the velocity model, are usually unreliable or absent. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a multi-objective inversion scheme that uses the conventional least-squares functional along with an auxiliary data-domain objective. As the auxiliary objective effectively replaces the seismic arrivals by bumps, we call it the bump functional. The bump functional minimization can be made far less sensitive to cycle skipping and can deal with multiple arrivals in the data. However, it can only be used as an auxiliary objective since it usually does not provide a unique model after minimization The role of the bump functional during the multi-objective inversion is to guide the optimization towards the global minimum by pulling the trapped solution out of the local minima associated with the least-squares functional whenever necessary. The computational complexity of the bump functional is equivalent to that of the least-squares functional. In this paper, we describe various characteristics of the bump functional using simple and illustrative numerical examples. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed multi-objective inversion scheme by considering more realistic examples. These include synthetic and field data from a cross-well experiment, surface-seismic synthetic data with reflections and synthetic data with refracted arrivals at long offsets.

  4. A Parallel Processing Algorithm for Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasheri, Neki; Bushati, Salvatore; Frasheri, Alfred

    2013-04-01

    The paper presents results of using MPI parallel processing for the 3D inversion of gravity anomalies. The work is done under the FP7 project HP-SEE (http://www.hp-see.eu/). The inversion of geophysical anomalies remains a challenge, and the use of parallel processing can be a tool to achieve better results, "compensating" the complexity of the ill-posed problem of inversion with the increase of volume of calculations. We considered the gravity as the simplest case of physical fields and experimented an algorithm based in the methodology known as CLEAN and developed by Högbom in 1974. The 3D geosection was discretized in finite cuboid elements and represented by a 3D array of nodes, while the ground surface where the anomaly is observed as a 2D array of points. Starting from a geosection with mass density zero in all nodes, iteratively the algorithm defines the 3D node that offers the best anomaly shape that approximates the observed anomaly minimizing the least squares error; the mass density in the best 3D node is modified with a prefixed density step and the related effect subtracted from the observed anomaly; the process continues until some criteria is fulfilled. Theoretical complexity of he algorithm was evaluated on the basis of iterations and run-time for a geosection discretized in different scales. We considered the average number N of nodes in one edge of the 3D array. The order of number of iterations was evaluated O(N^3); and the order of run-time was evaluated O(N^8). We used several different methods for the identification of the 3D node which effect offers the best least squares error in approximating the observed anomaly: unweighted least squares error for the whole 2D array of anomalous points; weighting least squares error by the inverted value of observed anomaly over each 3D node; and limiting the area of 2D anomalous points where least squares are calculated over shallow 3D nodes. By comparing results from the inversion of single body and two

  5. A comparison of direct and iterative finite element inversion techniques in dynamic elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarvar, M.; Rohling, R.; Salcudean, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    As part of tissue elasticity imaging or elastography, an inverse problem needs to be solved to find the elasticity distribution from the measured displacements. The finite element method (FEM) is a common method for solving the inverse problem in dynamic elastography. This problem has been solved with both direct and iterative FEM schemes. Each of these methods has its own advantages and disadvantages which are examined in this paper. Choosing the data resolution and the excitation frequency are critical for achieving the best estimation of the tissue elasticity in FEM methods. In this paper we investigate the performance of both direct and iterative FEMs for different ranges of excitation frequency. A new form of iterative method is suggested here which requires a lower mesh density compared to the original form. Also two forms of the direct method are compared in this paper: one using the exact fit for derivatives calculation and the other using the least squares fit. We also perform a study on the spatial resolution of these methods using simulations. The comparison is also validated using a phantom experiment. The results suggest that the direct method with least squares fit is more robust to noise compared to other methods but has slightly lower resolution results. For example, for the homogenous region with 20 dB noise added to the data, the RMS error for the direct method with least squares fit is approximately half of the iterative method. It was observed that the ratio of voxel size to the wavelength should be within a specific range for the results to be reliable. For example for the direct method with least squares fit, for the case of 20 dB noise level, this ratio should be between 0.1 to 0.2. On balance, considering the much higher computational cost of the iterative method, the dependency of the iterative method on the initial guess, and the greater robustness of the direct method to noise, we suggest using the direct method with least squares fit for

  6. Spherical earth gravity and magnetic anomaly analysis by equivalent point source inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Frese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation potential field data, analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat earth methods of potential field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical earth problem relates potential field anomalies to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformations of the equivalent source field lead to corresponding geoidal anomalies, pseudo-anomalies, vector anomaly components, spatial derivatives, continuations, and differential magnetic pole reductions. A number of examples using 1 deg-averaged surface free-air gravity anomalies of POGO satellite magnetometer data for the United States, Mexico, and Central America illustrate the capabilities of the method.

  7. Reservoir parameter inversion based on weighted statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Jin-Yong; Gao, Jian-Hu; Yong, Xue-Shan; Li, Sheng-Jun; Liu, Bin-Yang; Zhao, Wan-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Variation of reservoir physical properties can cause changes in its elastic parameters. However, this is not a simple linear relation. Furthermore, the lack of observations, data overlap, noise interference, and idealized models increases the uncertainties of the inversion result. Thus, we propose an inversion method that is different from traditional statistical rock physics modeling. First, we use deterministic and stochastic rock physics models considering the uncertainties of elastic parameters obtained by prestack seismic inversion and introduce weighting coefficients to establish a weighted statistical relation between reservoir and elastic parameters. Second, based on the weighted statistical relation, we use Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations to generate the random joint distribution space of reservoir and elastic parameters that serves as a sample solution space of an objective function. Finally, we propose a fast solution criterion to maximize the posterior probability density and obtain reservoir parameters. The method has high efficiency and application potential.

  8. A Bayesian method for microseismic source inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-05-01

    Earthquake source inversion is highly dependent on location determination and velocity models. Uncertainties in both the model parameters and the observations need to be rigorously incorporated into an inversion approach. Here, we show a probabilistic Bayesian method that allows formal inclusion of the uncertainties in the moment tensor inversion. This method allows the combination of different sets of far-field observations, such as P-wave and S-wave polarities and amplitude ratios, into one inversion. Additional observations can be included by deriving a suitable likelihood function from the uncertainties. This inversion produces samples from the source posterior probability distribution, including a best-fitting solution for the source mechanism and associated probability. The inversion can be constrained to the double-couple space or allowed to explore the gamut of moment tensor solutions, allowing volumetric and other non-double-couple components. The posterior probability of the double-couple and full moment tensor source models can be evaluated from the Bayesian evidence, using samples from the likelihood distributions for the two source models, producing an estimate of whether or not a source is double-couple. Such an approach is ideally suited to microseismic studies where there are many sources of uncertainty and it is often difficult to produce reliability estimates of the source mechanism, although this can be true of many other cases. Using full-waveform synthetic seismograms, we also show the effects of noise, location, network distribution and velocity model uncertainty on the source probability density function. The noise has the largest effect on the results, especially as it can affect other parts of the event processing. This uncertainty can lead to erroneous non-double-couple source probability distributions, even when no other uncertainties exist. Although including amplitude ratios can improve the constraint on the source probability

  9. A Bayesian method for microseismic source inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquake source inversion is highly dependent on location determination and velocity models. Uncertainties in both the model parameters and the observations need to be rigorously incorporated into an inversion approach. Here, we show a probabilistic Bayesian method that allows formal inclusion of the uncertainties in the moment tensor inversion. This method allows the combination of different sets of far-field observations, such as P-wave and S-wave polarities and amplitude ratios, into one inversion. Additional observations can be included by deriving a suitable likelihood function from the uncertainties. This inversion produces samples from the source posterior probability distribution, including a best-fitting solution for the source mechanism and associated probability. The inversion can be constrained to the double-couple space or allowed to explore the gamut of moment tensor solutions, allowing volumetric and other non-double-couple components. The posterior probability of the double-couple and full moment tensor source models can be evaluated from the Bayesian evidence, using samples from the likelihood distributions for the two source models, producing an estimate of whether or not a source is double-couple. Such an approach is ideally suited to microseismic studies where there are many sources of uncertainty and it is often difficult to produce reliability estimates of the source mechanism, although this can be true of many other cases. Using full-waveform synthetic seismograms, we also show the effects of noise, location, network distribution and velocity model uncertainty on the source probability density function. The noise has the largest effect on the results, especially as it can affect other parts of the event processing. This uncertainty can lead to erroneous non-double-couple source probability distributions, even when no other uncertainties exist. Although including amplitude ratios can improve the constraint on the source probability

  10. Geo-acoustic inversion with a vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenghua; Zhang, Renhe; Sun, Mei

    2012-11-01

    Geo-acoustic inversion has been paid much attention in the last several decades. Various geo-acoustic inversion methods based on hydrophone arrays have been developed. However, few studies on inverting the bottom parameters with a vector sensor array have been performed. In this paper, theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show that in comparison with pressure, the vertical particle velocity has different spatial distribution, which can provide more information for geo-acoustic inversion. Two geo-acoustic inversion methods, based on coherent and incoherent matched field processing with a vector sensor array, have been developed. To establish the validity of the proposed methods, a shallow water experiment was performed in 2009. The experimental data indicates that the uncertainty of the inversion results is decreased by the coherent inversion method with a vector sensor array in comparison with the results obtained by a hydrophone array only.

  11. Direct Inversion of Postseismic Deformation for 3D Lithosphere Viscosity Structure and Fault Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, T.; Hetland, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic measurements of postseismic deformation are rich signals with which the mechanical behavior of the lithosphere can be inferred, predominantly localized fault creep and distributed viscoelastic deformation. Numerous studies have used postseismic deformation to estimate the lithosphere's rheology but they are hindered by potentially computationally intensive forward problems with nonlinear relationships between surface deformation and the rheologic properties. As a result, most studies oversimplify the rheologic structure of the lithosphere and rely on forward estimation methods, such as grid or monte carlo searches. We present a novel method to simultaneously estimate patterns of fault slip and heterogeneous distribution of effective Maxwell viscoelasticity from postseismic deformation. Our method utilizes an approximation which linearizes the viscoelastic contribution to postseismic deformation with respect to the inverse relaxation time of discrete regions in the lithosphere, allowing the use of least squares techniques, akin to seismic tomographic methods. The validity of this approximation is inversely proportional to the time since the main rupture and holds for roughly as long as the lowest relaxation time in the lithosphere proximal to the coseismic rupture. Our estimation of both the slip history on a fault and the effective Maxwell relaxation times of the lithosphere takes a matter of minutes. We apply our method to postseismic deformation following the 2010 El Mayor earthquake, as well as the 1999 İzmit-Düzce earthquake sequence. We discuss the significance of both fault creep and three dimensional viscosity structure in describing postseismic deformation.

  12. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach. PMID:18025701

  13. Silk inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Mitropoulos, Alexander N.; Spitzberg, Joshua D.; Tao, Hu; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-12-01

    Periodic nanostructures provide the facility to control and manipulate the flow of light through their lattices. Three-dimensional photonic crystals enable the controlled design of structural colour, which can be varied by infiltrating the structure with different (typically liquid) fillers. Here, we report three-dimensional photonic crystals composed entirely of a purified natural protein (silk fibroin). The biocompatibility of this protein, as well as its favourable material properties and ease of biological functionalization, present opportunities for otherwise unattainable device applications such as bioresorbable integration of structural colour within living tissue or lattice functionalization by means of organic and inorganic material doping. We present a silk inverse opal that demonstrates a pseudo-photonic bandgap in the visible spectrum and show its associated structural colour beneath biological tissue. We also leverage silk's facile dopability to manufacture a gold nanoparticle silk inverse opal and demonstrate patterned heating mediated by enhancement of nanoparticle absorption at the band-edge frequency of the photonic crystal.

  14. Inverse radiation problem in axisymmetric cylindrical scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menguc, M. P.; Manickavasagam, S.

    1993-09-01

    A semianalytical technique has been developed to solve the inverse radiation problem in absorbing and scattering cylindrical media. The radiative properties in the medium are allowed to vary radially. Isotropic, linearly anisotropic, and Rayleigh scattering phase functions are considered, and both the first- and second-order scattering of radiation are accounted for in the analysis. The angular radiosity distribution obtained from the solution of the forward problem is employed as input to the inverse analysis. A numerical inversion scheme is followed to determine the profiles of extinction coefficient and the single-scattering albedo. For an anisotropically scattering medium, the asymmetry factor is also recovered. It is shown that the method is simple and accurate, even though the inversion is limited to three- or four-layer media. This inversion procedure can easily be used in experiments to determine the effective radiative property distributions in cylindrical systems.

  15. Kriging and its relation to least squares

    SciTech Connect

    Oden, N.

    1984-11-01

    Kriging is a technique for producing contour maps that, under certain conditions, are optimal in a mean squared error sense. The relation of Kriging to Least Squares is reviewed here. New methods for analyzing residuals are suggsted, ML estimators inspected, and an expression derived for calculating cross-validation error. An example using ground water data is provided.

  16. Collinearity in Least-Squares Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Levie, Robert

    2012-01-01

    How useful are the standard deviations per se, and how reliable are results derived from several least-squares coefficients and their associated standard deviations? When the output parameters obtained from a least-squares analysis are mutually independent, as is often assumed, they are reliable estimators of imprecision and so are the functions…

  17. Discovering the Magic of Magic Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semanisinova, Ingrid; Trenkler, Marian

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a collection of problems that allow students to investigate magic squares and Latin squares, formulate their own conjectures about these mathematical objects, look for arguments supporting or disproving their conjectures, and finally establish and prove mathematical assertions. Each problem is completed…

  18. Enhancing Students' Understanding of Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiesman, Jeff L.

    2015-01-01

    Students enrolled in a middle school prealgebra or algebra course often struggle to conceptualize and understand the meaning of radical notation when it is introduced. For example, although it is important for students to approximate the decimal value of a number such as [square root of] 30 and estimate the value of a square root in the form of…

  19. Recent Advances in Geostatistical Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanidis, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    large inverse problems. While the prevalent approach is to utilize quadratic norms or Gaussian distributions for prior information and noise terms, alternative formulations are better suited to address specific applications. One example is estimation of categorical variables, such as the determination of facies or the identification of high conductivity channels. One such approach utilizes the Laplace distribution, which is akin to using L1 and L0 norms and sparse signal reconstruction. This approach has the added advantage of relatively efficient methods for data assimilation and approximate uncertainty quantification.

  20. Analytic Differentiation of Barlat's 2D Criteria for Inverse Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Endelt, Benny; Nielsen, Karl Brian; Danckert, Joachim

    2005-08-05

    The demand for alternative identification schemes for identification of constitutive parameters is getting more pronounced as the complexity of the constitutive equations increases, i.e. the number of parameters subject to identification. A general framework for inverse identification of constitutive parameters associated with sheet metal forming is proposed in the article. The inverse problem is solved, through minimization of the least square error between an experimental punch force sampled from a deep drawing and a predicted punch force produced from a coherent finite element model.

  1. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  2. BIOMECHANICS. Why the seahorse tail is square.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael M; Adriaens, Dominique; Hatton, Ross L; Meyers, Marc A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    Whereas the predominant shapes of most animal tails are cylindrical, seahorse tails are square prisms. Seahorses use their tails as flexible grasping appendages, in spite of a rigid bony armor that fully encases their bodies. We explore the mechanics of two three-dimensional-printed models that mimic either the natural (square prism) or hypothetical (cylindrical) architecture of a seahorse tail to uncover whether or not the square geometry provides any functional advantages. Our results show that the square prism is more resilient when crushed and provides a mechanism for preserving articulatory organization upon extensive bending and twisting, as compared with its cylindrical counterpart. Thus, the square architecture is better than the circular one in the context of two integrated functions: grasping ability and crushing resistance. PMID:26138983

  3. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  4. Computational methods for inverse problems in geophysics: inversion of travel time observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereyra, V.; Keller, H.B.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1980-01-01

    General ways of solving various inverse problems are studied for given travel time observations between sources and receivers. These problems are separated into three components: (a) the representation of the unknown quantities appearing in the model; (b) the nonlinear least-squares problem; (c) the direct, two-point ray-tracing problem used to compute travel time once the model parameters are given. Novel software is described for (b) and (c), and some ideas given on (a). Numerical results obtained with artificial data and an implementation of the algorithm are also presented. ?? 1980.

  5. Inverse avalanches on Abelian sandpiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, H.F. Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801-3080 )

    1994-11-01

    A simple and computationally efficient way of finding inverse avalanches for Abelian sandpiles, called the inverse particle addition operator, is presented. In addition, the method is shown to be optimal in the sense that it requires the minimum amount of computation among methods of the same kind. The method is also conceptually succinct because avalanche and inverse avalanche are placed in the same footing.

  6. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Nimon, Kim F.; Zientek, Linda R.; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients. PMID:26217273

  7. A duct mapping method using least squares support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douvenot, RéMi; Fabbro, Vincent; Gerstoft, Peter; Bourlier, Christophe; Saillard, Joseph

    2008-12-01

    This paper introduces a "refractivity from clutter" (RFC) approach with an inversion method based on a pregenerated database. The RFC method exploits the information contained in the radar sea clutter return to estimate the refractive index profile. Whereas initial efforts are based on algorithms giving a good accuracy involving high computational needs, the present method is based on a learning machine algorithm in order to obtain a real-time system. This paper shows the feasibility of a RFC technique based on the least squares support vector machine inversion method by comparing it to a genetic algorithm on simulated and noise-free data, at 1 and 5 GHz. These data are simulated in the presence of ideal trilinear surface-based ducts. The learning machine is based on a pregenerated database computed using Latin hypercube sampling to improve the efficiency of the learning. The results show that little accuracy is lost compared to a genetic algorithm approach. The computational time of a genetic algorithm is very high, whereas the learning machine approach is real time. The advantage of a real-time RFC system is that it could work on several azimuths in near real time.

  8. Spacecraft inertia estimation via constrained least squares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keim, Jason A.; Acikmese, Behcet A.; Shields, Joel F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new formulation for spacecraft inertia estimation from test data. Specifically, the inertia estimation problem is formulated as a constrained least squares minimization problem with explicit bounds on the inertia matrix incorporated as LMIs [linear matrix inequalities). The resulting minimization problem is a semidefinite optimization that can be solved efficiently with guaranteed convergence to the global optimum by readily available algorithms. This method is applied to data collected from a robotic testbed consisting of a freely rotating body. The results show that the constrained least squares approach produces more accurate estimates of the inertia matrix than standard unconstrained least squares estimation methods.

  9. Development of fully Bayesian multiple-time-window source inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Hisahiko; Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Aoi, Shin

    2016-03-01

    In the estimation of spatiotemporal slip models, kinematic source inversions using Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) and the multiple-time-window method have often been used. However, there are cases in which conventional ABIC-based source inversions do not work well in the determination of hyperparameters when a non-negative slip constraint is used. In order to overcome this problem, a new source inversion method was developed in this study. The new method introduces a fully Bayesian method into the kinematic multiple-time-window source inversion. The multiple-time-window method is one common way of parametrizing a source time function and is highly flexible in terms of the shape of the source time function. The probability distributions of model parameters and hyperparameters can be directly obtained by using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. These probability distributions are useful for simply evaluating the uniqueness and reliability of the derived model, which is another advantage of a fully Bayesian method. This newly developed source inversion method was applied to the 2011 Ibaraki-oki, Japan, earthquake (Mw 7.9) to demonstrate its usefulness. It was demonstrated that the problem with using the conventional ABIC-based source inversion method for hyperparameter determination appeared in the spatiotemporal source inversion of this event and that the newly developed source inversion could overcome this problem.

  10. Multiscale full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Trampert, Jeannot; Cupillard, Paul; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay; Capdeville, Yann; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We develop and apply a full waveform inversion method that incorporates seismic data on a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, thereby constraining the details of both crustal and upper-mantle structure. This is intended to further our understanding of crust-mantle interactions that shape the nature of plate tectonics, and to be a step towards improved tomographic models of strongly scale-dependent earth properties, such as attenuation and anisotropy. The inversion for detailed regional earth structure consistently embedded within a large-scale model requires locally refined numerical meshes that allow us to (1) model regional wave propagation at high frequencies, and (2) capture the inferred fine-scale heterogeneities. The smallest local grid spacing sets the upper bound of the largest possible time step used to iteratively advance the seismic wave field. This limitation leads to extreme computational costs in the presence of fine-scale structure, and it inhibits the construction of full waveform tomographic models that describe earth structure on multiple scales. To reduce computational requirements to a feasible level, we design a multigrid approach based on the decomposition of a multiscale earth model with widely varying grid spacings into a family of single-scale models where the grid spacing is approximately uniform. Each of the single-scale models contains a tractable number of grid points, which ensures computational efficiency. The multi-to-single-scale decomposition is the foundation of iterative, gradient-based optimization schemes that simultaneously and consistently invert data on all scales for one multi-scale model. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in a full waveform inversion for Eurasia, with a special focus on Anatolia where coverage is particularly dense. Continental-scale structure is constrained by complete seismic waveforms in the 30-200 s period range. In addition to the well-known structural elements of the Eurasian mantle

  11. Bayesian inversion for optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayasso, H.; Duchêne, B.; Mohammad-Djafari, A.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, optical diffraction tomography is considered as a non-linear inverse scattering problem and tackled within the Bayesian estimation framework. The object under test is a man-made object known to be composed of compact regions made of a finite number of different homogeneous materials. This a priori knowledge is appropriately translated by a Gauss-Markov-Potts prior. Hence, a Gauss-Markov random field is used to model the contrast distribution whereas a hidden Potts-Markov field accounts for the compactness of the regions. First, we express the a posteriori distributions of all the unknowns and then a Gibbs sampling algorithm is used to generate samples and estimate the posterior mean of the unknowns. Some preliminary results, obtained by applying the inversion algorithm to laboratory controlled data, are presented.

  12. An efficient method for inverse problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daripa, Prabir

    1987-01-01

    A new inverse method for aerodynamic design of subcritical airfoils is presented. The pressure distribution in this method can be prescribed in a natural way, i.e. as a function of arclength of the as yet unknown body. This inverse problem is shown to be mathematically equivalent to solving a single nonlinear boundary value problem subject to known Dirichlet data on the boundary. The solution to this problem determines the airfoil, the free stream Mach number M(sub x) and the upstream flow direction theta(sub x). The existence of a solution for any given pressure distribution is discussed. The method is easy to implement and extremely efficient. We present a series of results for which comparisons are made with the known airfoils.

  13. Study of modular inversion in RNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajard, Jean Claude; Meloni, Nicolas; Plantard, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    Residue Numbers System have some features which are fine for some implementations of cryptographic protocols. The main property of RNS is the distribution of the evaluation on large values on its small residues, allowing parallelization. This last property implies that we can randomize the distribution of the bases elements. Hence, the obtained arithmetic is leak resistant, it is robust against side channel attacks. But one drawback of RNS is that modular inversion is not obvious. Thus, RNS is well suited for RSA but not really for ECC. We analyze in this paper the features of the modular inversion in RNS over GF(P). We propose a RNS Extended Euclidean Algorithm which uses a quotient approximation module.

  14. The Moore-Penrose Inverse of Block Magic Rectangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakopian, Y. R.; Eloyan, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    As is known, a semi-magic square is an "n x n" matrix having the sum of entries in each row and each column equal to a constant. This note generalizes this notion and introduce a special class of block matrices called "block magic rectangles." It is proved that the Moore-Penrose inverse of a block magic rectangle is also a block magic rectangle.

  15. Gravity inversion using wavelet-based compression on parallel hybrid CPU/GPU systems: application to southwest Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Monteiller, Vadim; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Perrouty, Stéphane; Jessell, Mark; Bonvalot, Sylvain; Lindsay, Mark

    2013-12-01

    We solve the 3-D gravity inverse problem using a massively parallel voxel (or finite element) implementation on a hybrid multi-CPU/multi-GPU (graphics processing units/GPUs) cluster. This allows us to obtain information on density distributions in heterogeneous media with an efficient computational time. In a new software package called TOMOFAST3D, the inversion is solved with an iterative least-square or a gradient technique, which minimizes a hybrid L1-/L2-norm-based misfit function. It is drastically accelerated using either Haar or fourth-order Daubechies wavelet compression operators, which are applied to the sensitivity matrix kernels involved in the misfit minimization. The compression process behaves like a pre-conditioning of the huge linear system to be solved and a reduction of two or three orders of magnitude of the computational time can be obtained for a given number of CPU processor cores. The memory storage required is also significantly reduced by a similar factor. Finally, we show how this CPU parallel inversion code can be accelerated further by a factor between 3.5 and 10 using GPU computing. Performance levels are given for an application to Ghana, and physical information obtained after 3-D inversion using a sensitivity matrix with around 5.37 trillion elements is discussed. Using compression the whole inversion process can last from a few minutes to less than an hour for a given number of processor cores instead of tens of hours for a similar number of processor cores when compression is not used.

  16. Trimming and procrastination as inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, George E.

    1996-12-01

    By examining the processes of truncating and approximating the model space (trimming it), and by committing to neither the objectivist nor the subjectivist interpretation of probability (procrastinating), we construct a formal scheme for solving linear and non-linear geophysical inverse problems. The necessary prior information about the correct model xE can be either a collection of inequalities or a probability measure describing where xE was likely to be in the model space X before the data vector y0 was measured. The results of the inversion are (1) a vector z0 that estimates some numerical properties zE of xE; (2) an estimate of the error δz = z0 - zE. As y0 is finite dimensional, so is z0, and hence in principle inversion cannot describe all of xE. The error δz is studied under successively more specialized assumptions about the inverse problem, culminating in a complete analysis of the linear inverse problem with a prior quadratic bound on xE. Our formalism appears to encompass and provide error estimates for many of the inversion schemes current in geomagnetism, and would be equally applicable in geodesy and seismology if adequate prior information were available there. As an idealized example we study the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary, using satellite measurements of field elements at sites assumed to be almost uniformly distributed on a single spherical surface. Magnetospheric currents are neglected and the crustal field is idealized as a random process with rotationally invariant statistics. We find that an appropriate data compression diagonalizes the variance matrix of the crustal signal and permits an analytic trimming of the idealized problem.

  17. Inverse Design of a Thick Supercritical Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pambagjo, Tjoetjoek Eko; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro; Obayashi, Shigeru

    In this paper, a study on designing a thick supercritical airfoil by utilizing Takanashi’s inverse design method is discussed. One of the problems to design a thick supercritical airfoil by Takanashi’s method is that an oscillation of the geometry may occur during the iteration process. To reduce the oscillation, an airfoil parameterization method is utilized as the smoothing procedure. A guideline to determine the target pressure distribution to realize the thick airfoil is also discussed.

  18. Pole EXpansion and Selected Inversion (PEXSI)

    2014-03-01

    The Pole EXpansion and Selected Inversion method (PEXSI) is a fast method for evaluating certain selected elements of a matrix function. PEXSI is highly scalable on distributed memory parallel machines. For sparse matrices, the PEXSI method can be more efficient than the widely used diagonalization method for evaluating matrix functions, especially when a relatively large number of eigenpairs are needed to be computed in the diagonalization methond

  19. Elmo bumpy square plasma confinement device

    DOEpatents

    Owen, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an Elmo bumpy type plasma confinement device having a polygonal configuration of closed magnet field lines for improved plasma confinement. In the preferred embodiment, the device is of a square configuration which is referred to as an Elmo bumpy square (EBS). The EBS is formed by four linear magnetic mirror sections each comprising a plurality of axisymmetric assemblies connected in series and linked by 90/sup 0/ sections of a high magnetic field toroidal solenoid type field generating coils. These coils provide corner confinement with a minimum of radial dispersion of the confined plasma to minimize the detrimental effects of the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field. Each corner is formed by a plurality of circular or elliptical coils aligned about the corner radius to provide maximum continuity in the closing of the magnetic field lines about the square configuration confining the plasma within a vacuum vessel located within the various coils forming the square configuration confinement geometry.

  20. The least square optimization in image mosaic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-dong; Yang, Yong-yue

    2015-02-01

    Image registration has been a hot research spot in the computer vision technology and image processing. Image registration is one of the key technologies in image mosaic. In order to improve the accuracy of matching feature points, this paper put forward the least square optimization in image mosaic based on the algorithm of matching similarity of matrices. The correlation coefficient method of matrix is used for matching the module points in the overlap region of images and calculating the error between matrices. The error of feature points can be further minimized by using the method of least square optimization. Finally, image mosaic can be achieved by the two pair of feature points with minimized residual sum of squares. The experimental results demonstrate that the least square optimization in image mosaic can mosaic images with overlap region and improve the accuracy of matching feature points.

  1. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are alsomore » satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.« less

  2. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are also satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.

  3. Analysis of electromyographic activities of the lumbar erector spinae caused by inversion traction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chung Yoo; Kang, Jong Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze changes in the electromyographic activities of the lumbar erector spinae caused by inversion traction in order to verify the relaxation effect. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included 60 healthy male adults who were equally and randomly assigned to a 30–30° group, a 30–60° group, and a 60–60° group. Inversion traction was performed for six minutes, and the electromyographic activities of the lumbar erector spinae (L2, L4) were measured before and after inversion traction. [Results] The root mean square values at the L2 and L4 levels on both sides were statistically significantly higher after inversion traction compared with before inversion traction. Before inversion traction, the root mean square values at the L2 and L4 levels on both sides in the 30–60° group and 60–60° group were significantly higher than those in the 30–30° group, while the root mean square values at the L2 and L4 levels on both sides showed no significant differences between the groups before inversion traction. [Conclusion] The findings of this study indicated that IT is more likely to elicits an increase in muscle tension and prevent relaxation of the lumbar erector spinae. PMID:27190459

  4. Inverse modeling of GPR signal for estimating soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambot, S.; van den Bosch, I.; Slob, E. C.; Stockbroeckx, B.; Scheers, B.; Vanclooster, M.

    2003-04-01

    For a large variety of environmental and agricultural applications, the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) for identifying soil water content is a matter of concern. However, the current state of technology still needs improvements and new developments. Research has focused on the development of an integrated inverse modeling approach including GPR design, GPR signal forward modeling, and GPR signal inversion to estimate simultaneously the depth dependent dielectric constant and electrical conductivity of the shallow subsurface. We propose to use as radar system a stepped frequency continuous wave radar with an ultrawide band dielectric filled TEM horn antenna used in monostatic mode. This configuration is appropriate for real time mapping and allows for a more realistic forward modeling of the radar-antenna-soil system. Forward modeling was based on the exact solution of Maxwell's equations and inversion was formulated by the classical least square problem. Given the inherent complex topography of the objective functions to optimize in electromagnetic inversion problems, we used for the inversion the recently developed global multilevel coordinate search algorithm that we combine sequentially with the local Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. We applied the method in laboratory conditions on tank filled with sand subject to different water content levels considering a homogeneous water profile. The inverse estimation of the soil dielectric constant was remarkably well in accordance with each water content level and the corresponding theoretical values of the dielectric constant for the sand. Comparison of GPR measurements with estimations from time domain reflectometry (TDR) were also well in close agreement.

  5. Neighborhood inverse consistency preprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Freuder, E.C.; Elfe, C.D.

    1996-12-31

    Constraint satisfaction consistency preprocessing methods are used to reduce search effort. Time and especially space costs limit the amount of preprocessing that will be cost effective. A new form of consistency preprocessing, neighborhood inverse consistency, can achieve more problem pruning than the usual arc consistency preprocessing in a cost effective manner. There are two basic ideas: (1) Common forms of consistency enforcement basically operate by identifying and remembering solutions to subproblems for which a consistent value cannot be found for some additional problem variable. The space required for this memory can quickly become prohibitive. Inverse consistency basically operates by removing values for variables that are not consistent with any solution to some subproblem involving additional variables. The space requirement is at worst linear. (2) Typically consistency preprocessing achieves some level of consistency uniformly throughout the problem. A subproblem solution will be tested against each additional variable that constrains any subproblem variable. Neighborhood consistency focuses attention on the subproblem formed by the variables that are all constrained by the value in question. By targeting highly relevant subproblems we hope to {open_quotes}skim the cream{close_quotes}, obtaining a high payoff for a limited cost.

  6. Applications of square-related theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2014-04-01

    The square centre of a given square is the point of intersection of its two diagonals. When two squares of different side lengths share the same square centre, there are in general four diagonals that go through the same square centre. The Two Squares Theorem developed in this paper summarizes some nice theoretical conclusions that can be obtained when two squares of different side lengths share the same square centre. These results provide the theoretical basis for two of the constructions given in the book of H.S. Hall and F.H. Stevens , 'A Shorter School Geometry, Part 1, Metric Edition'. In page 134 of this book, the authors present, in exercise 4, a practical construction which leads to a verification of the Pythagorean theorem. Subsequently in Theorems 29 and 30, the authors present the standard proofs of the Pythagorean theorem and its converse. In page 140, the authors present, in exercise 15, what amounts to a geometric construction, whose verification involves a simple algebraic identity. Both the constructions are of great importance and can be replicated by using the standard equipment provided in a 'geometry toolbox' carried by students in high schools. The author hopes that the results proved in this paper, in conjunction with the two constructions from the above-mentioned book, would provide high school students an appreciation of the celebrated theorem of Pythagoras. The diagrams that accompany this document are based on the free software GeoGebra. The author formally acknowledges his indebtedness to the creators of this free software at the end of this document.

  7. Structural information in the inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoulis, M.; Larson, T. H.; Ahmed, I.; Revil, A.; Thomason, J.

    2013-12-01

    Data integration in geophysics provides additional information to elucidate subsurface structure and reduce non-uniqueness of inverted models. There are several strategies for incorporating data integration into numerical models. A traditional approach is to use this information as a-priori knowledge, as an initial model or layer boundary specified on the mesh before the inversion. Although in some cases this approach has proven effective, the information is not directly incorporated into the inverse problem and might be lost in the final model. Another strategy is through joint inversion, where data and models are inverted simultaneous. The data integration comes from the joint operator as structural similarity or petrophysical equations. There are some limitations with this approach. In particular, structural similarity doesn't take into account different sensitivity patterns which differ for different geophysical methods, e.g. in a crosswell configuration electrical resistivity tomography is sensitive close to the borehole region while seismic waves are sensitive towards the center part. Moreover different methods have differing resolution. Therefore, a single joint operator might not be effective in all cases. In this work we demonstrate the use of image-guided inversion, where structural information is taken directly from a high resolution geophysical image (e.g. ground penetrating radar or seismic reflection) or from a geological cross-section. This structural information is introduced into the inverse problem through a weighted smoothing matrix, where it correlates and favors formations related to a specific structural feature and not just uniformly across the entire model. Both sharp and smooth features can be imaged and the recovered models can have a more realistic distribution of values. As an example of the method we use migrated seismic reflection images to extract the structural information and resistivity imaging to recover the resistivity

  8. Generalized multi-point inverse airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, Michael S.; Maughmer, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    In a rather general sense, inverse airfoil design can be taken to mean the problem of specifying a desired set of airfoil characteristics, such as the airfoil maximum thickness ratio, pitching moment, part of the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development, etc., then from this information determine the corresponding airfoil shape. This paper presents a method which approaches the design problem from this perspective. In particular, the airfoil is divided into segments along which, together with the design conditions, either the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development may be prescribed. In addition to these local desired distributions, single parameters like the airfoil thickness can be specified. The problem of finding the airfoil shape is determined by coupling an incompressible, inviscid, inverse airfoil design method with a direct integral boundary-layer analysis method and solving the resulting nonlinear equations via a multidimensional Newton iteration technique. The approach is fast and easily allows for interactive design. It is also flexible and could be adapted to solving compressible, inverse airfoil design problems.

  9. Least-squares framework for projection MRI reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor, Jens; Rannou, Fernando

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic resonance signals that have very short relaxation times are conveniently sampled in a spherical fashion. We derive a least squares framework for reconstructing three-dimensional source distribution images from such data. Using a finite-series approach, the image is represented as a weighted sum of translated Kaiser-Bessel window functions. The Radon transform thereof establishes the connection with the projection data that one can obtain from the radial sampling trajectories. The resulting linear system of equations is sparse, but quite large. To reduce the size of the problem, we introduce focus of attention. Based on the theory of support functions, this data-driven preprocessing scheme eliminates equations and unknowns that merely represent the background. The image reconstruction and the focus of attention both require a least squares solution to be computed. We describe a projected gradient approach that facilitates a non-negativity constrained version of the powerful LSQR algorithm. In order to ensure reasonable execution times, the least squares computation can be distributed across a network of PCs and/or workstations. We discuss how to effectively parallelize the NN-LSQR algorithm. We close by presenting results from experimental work that addresses both computational issues and image quality using a mathematical phantom.

  10. Investigation of the structure of light exotic nuclei by proton elastic scattering in inverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Dobrovolsky, A. V. Inglessi, A. G.; Korolev, G. A.; Khanzadeev, A. V.

    2015-05-15

    In order to study the spatial structure of exotic nuclei, it was proposed at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) to measure the differential cross section for small-angle proton elastic scattering in inverse kinematics. Several experiments in beams of 0.7-GeV/nucleon exotic nuclei were performed at the heavy-ion accelerator facility of GSI (Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany) by using the IKAR ionization spectrometer developed at PNPI. The IKAR ionization chamber filled with hydrogen at a pressure of 10 bar served simultaneously as a target and as a recoil-proton detector, which measured the recoil-proton energy. The beam-particle scattering angle was also measured. The results obtained for the cross sections in question were analyzed on the basis of the Glauber-Sitenko theory using phenomenological nuclear-density distributions with two free parameters. Nuclear-matter distributions and root-mean-square radii were found for the nuclei under investigation. The size of the halo in the {sup 6}He, {sup 8}He, {sup 11}Li, and {sup 14}Be nuclei was determined among other things. Information about neutron distributions in nuclei was deduced by combining the data obtained here with the known values of the radii of proton distributions. A sizable neutron skin was revealed in the {sup 8}Li, {sup 9}Li, and {sup 12}Be nuclei.

  11. Investigation of the structure of light exotic nuclei by proton elastic scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Dobrovolsky, A. V.; Inglessi, A. G.; Korolev, G. A.; Khanzadeev, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the spatial structure of exotic nuclei, it was proposed at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) to measure the differential cross section for small-angle proton elastic scattering in inverse kinematics. Several experiments in beams of 0.7-GeV/nucleon exotic nuclei were performed at the heavy-ion accelerator facility of GSI (Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany) by using the IKAR ionization spectrometer developed at PNPI. The IKAR ionization chamber filled with hydrogen at a pressure of 10 bar served simultaneously as a target and as a recoil-proton detector, which measured the recoil-proton energy. The beam-particle scattering angle was also measured. The results obtained for the cross sections in question were analyzed on the basis of the Glauber-Sitenko theory using phenomenological nuclear-density distributions with two free parameters. Nuclear-matter distributions and root-mean-square radii were found for the nuclei under investigation. The size of the halo in the 6He, 8He, 11Li, and 14Be nuclei was determined among other things. Information about neutron distributions in nuclei was deduced by combining the data obtained here with the known values of the radii of proton distributions. A sizable neutron skin was revealed in the 8Li, 9Li, and 12Be nuclei.

  12. Full-Waveform Inversion Method for Data Measured by the CONSERT Instrument aboard Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statz, C.; Plettemeier, D.; Herique, A.; Kofman, W. W.

    2014-12-01

    The primary scientific objective of the Comet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radiowave Transmission (CONSERT) aboard Rosetta is to perform a dielectric characterization of comet 67P/Chuyurmov-Gerasimenko's nucleus by means of a bi-static sounding between the lander Philae launched onto the comet's surface and the orbiter Rosetta. For the sounding the lander part of CONSERT will receive and process the radio signal emitted by the orbiter part of the instrument and transmit a signal to the orbiter to be received by CONSERT. With data measured during the first science phase, a three-dimensional model of the material distribution with regard to the complex dielectric permittivity of the comet's nucleus is to be reconstructed. In order to perform the 3D characterization of the nucleus we employ a full-waveform least-squares based inversion in time-domain. The reconstruction is performed on the envelope of the received signal. The direct problem of simulating the wave-propagation inside the comet's nucleus is modelled using a wideband nonstandard finite-differences in time-domain approach and a compensation method to account for the differences in free-space path-loss due to the removal of the carrier in the simulation. This approach will yield an approximation of the permittivity distribution including features large compared to the bandwith of the sounding signal. In order to account for restrictions on the measurement positions by the orbitography and limitations on the instrument dynamic range we employ a regularization technique where the permittivity distribution and the gradient with regard to the permittivity is projected in a domain defined by a viable model of the spatial material distribution. The least-squares optimization step of the reconstruction is performed in such domain on a reduced set of parameters. To demonstrate the viability of the proposed approaches we provide reconstruction results based on simulation data and scale-model laboratory

  13. Exploring optimal design of look-up table for PROSAIL model inversion with multi-angle MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Yang, Hua; Pan, Jingjing; Xu, Peipei

    2012-10-01

    Physical remote sensing model inversion based on look-up table (LUT) technique is promising for its good precision, high efficiency and easily-realization. However, scheme of the LUT is difficult to be well designed, as lacking a thorough investigation of its mechanism for different designs, for instance, the way the parameter space is sampled. To studying this problem, experiments on several LUT design schemes are performed and their effects on inversion results are analyzed in this paper. 1,000 groups of randomly generated parameters of PROSAIL model are taken to simulate multi-angle observations with the observation angles of MODIS sensor to be inversion data. The correlation coefficient (R2) and root mean square error (RMSE) of input LAIs for simulation and estimated LAIs were calculated. The results show that, LUT size is a key factor, and the RMSE is lower than 0.25 when the size reaches 100,000; Selecting no more than 0.1% cases of the LUT as the solution with a size of 100,000 is usually valid and the RMSE is usually increased with the increasing of the percentage of selected cases; Taking the median of the selected solutions as the final solution is better than the mean or the "best" whose cost function value is the least; Different parameter distributions have a certain impact on the inversion results, and the results get better when using a normal distribution. Finally, winter wheat LAI of one research area in Xinxiang City, Henan Province of China is estimated with MODIS daily reflectance data, the validate result shows it works well.

  14. Antarctic Crustal Thickness from Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, A. P.; Kusznir, N. J.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Using gravity anomaly inversion, we have produced the first comprehensive regional maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning (1-1/β) and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction. The continental lithosphere thinning distribution, used to define the initial thermal model temperature perturbation is derived from the gravity inversion and uses no a priori isochron information; as a consequence the gravity inversion method provides a prediction of ocean-continent transition location, which is independent of ocean isochron information. The gravity anomaly contribution from ice thickness is included in the gravity inversion, as is the contribution from sediments which assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. Data used in the gravity inversion are elevation and bathymetry, free-air gravity anomaly, the most recent Bedmap2 ice thickness and bedrock topography compilation south of 60 degrees south (Fretwell et al., 2013) and relatively sparse constraints on sediment thickness. Our gravity inversion study predicts thick crust (> 45 km) under interior East Antarctica penetrated by narrow continental rifts that feature relatively thinner crust. The East Antarctic Rift System (EARS) is a major Permian to Cretaceous age rift system that appears to extend from the continental margin at the Lambert Rift to the South Pole region, a distance of 2500 km. This is comparable in scale to the well-studied East African rift system. Intermediate crustal thickness with an inferred linear rift fabric is predicted under Coates Land. An extensive region of either thick oceanic crust or highly thinned continental crust is predicted offshore Oates Land and north Victoria Land, and also off West Antarctica

  15. Uncertainty estimations for seismic source inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duputel, Z.; Rivera, L. A.; Fukahata, Y.; Kanamori, H.

    2011-12-01

    Source inversion is a very widely used practice in seismology. Magnitudes, moment tensors, slip distributions are now routinely calculated and disseminated by several agencies and research groups whenever an earthquake occurs. The estimated source models can be used as inputs for various algorithms such as ShakeMap computation, tsunami modeling, stress transfer calculation or waveform modeling for tomography studies. Despite the importance of these applications, the source inversion algorithms often do not include proper error analyses, and the results are often given without any estimates of uncertainties. In centroid moment tensor (CMT) inversion studies, we often estimate the uncertainty on the model parameters by using various resampling techniques such as bootstrap or jacknife. The strength of these computer-based methods lies in their simplicity. We can implement them considering the inversion procedure as a "black-box" without any knowledge about the model and data statistical properties. However, these methods can suffer from too simplistic assumptions (such as the independence of data samples) and provide the first order error estimates only without the possibility of improving the source model itself. We explore here an alternative approach by taking errors explicitly into account in source inversion problems. In this perspective we use the W-phase source inversion algorithm recently developed to provide fast and robust CMT estimations for moderate to large earthquakes. We assume that the initial probability densities can be modeled by Gaussian distributions. Formally, we can separate two sources of error which generally contribute to the model parameter uncertainties. On one side we consider the error induced by the more or less imperfect data. This information is carried by the covariance matrix for the data Cd. A key point which is practically always ignored is the possibility of having non-diagonal elements in Cd; such non-diagonal elements are due to

  16. A modified initial in-situ Stress Inversion Method based on FLAC3D with an engineering application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Guo, Yunhua; Zhu, Weishen; Li, Shucai; Zhou, Hao

    2015-12-01

    To improve the accuracy of an initial in-situ stress field determined by inversion, we describe a modi fied initial in-situ stress inversion method that uses partial least-squares regression based on FLAC3D. First, each stress component is regressed to improve the fitting accuracy of locally abnormal stress regions, and then the relationship between element stress and unbalanced node force is analyzed according to the computational principles of FLAC3D. The initial in-situ stresses obtained from these regression calculations are added to a numerical model, and the unbalanced node forces are recalculated. An external force equal to the recalculated unbalanced node force is then exerted on the node in the direction opposing the original unbalanced node force to satisfy the equilibrium condition. For the in-situ stresses of elements that do not satisfy the strength conditions, they are modi fied by assuming the average stress is constant and reducing the partial stress to satisfy the equilibrium and strength conditions, which also resolves the unreasonable distribution of the boundary nodal forces and results in good regression estimates. A three-dimensional hypersurface spline interpolation method is developed to calculate the in-situ stress tensor at arbitrary coordinates. Finally, we apply this method to an underground engineering project, and the results are shown to agree well with those obtained from field monitoring. Therefore, it is concluded that this modified in-situ stress inversion method could effectively improve the fitting accuracy of locally abnormal stress regions.

  17. An inverse problem by boundary element method

    SciTech Connect

    Tran-Cong, T.; Nguyen-Thien, T.; Graham, A.L.

    1996-02-01

    Boundary Element Methods (BEM) have been established as useful and powerful tools in a wide range of engineering applications, e.g. Brebbia et al. In this paper, we report a particular three dimensional implementation of a direct boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation and its application to numerical simulations of practical polymer processing operations. In particular, we will focus on the application of the present boundary element technology to simulate an inverse problem in plastics processing.by extrusion. The task is to design profile extrusion dies for plastics. The problem is highly non-linear due to material viscoelastic behaviours as well as unknown free surface conditions. As an example, the technique is shown to be effective in obtaining the die profiles corresponding to a square viscoelastic extrudate under different processing conditions. To further illustrate the capability of the method, examples of other non-trivial extrudate profiles and processing conditions are also given.

  18. Origin of emission from square-shaped organic microlasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, S.; Lafargue, C.; Gozhyk, I.; Djellali, N.; Milliet, L.; Hickox-Young, D. T.; Ulysse, C.; Bouche, D.; Dubertrand, R.; Bogomolny, E.; Zyss, J.; Lebental, M.

    2016-03-01

    The emission from open cavities with non-integrable features remains a challenging problem of practical as well as fundamental relevance. Square-shaped dielectric microcavities provide a favorable case study with generic implications for other polygonal resonators. We report on a joint experimental and theoretical study of square-shaped organic microlasers exhibiting a far-field emission that is strongly concentrated in the directions parallel to the side walls of the cavity. A semiclassical model for the far-field distributions is developed that is in agreement with even fine features of the experimental findings. Comparison of the model calculations with the experimental data allows the precise identification of the lasing modes and their emission mechanisms, providing strong support for a physically intuitive ray-dynamical interpretation. Special attention is paid to the role of diffraction and the finite side length.

  19. Uncertainty estimations for seismic source inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duputel, Zacharie; Rivera, Luis; Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Kanamori, Hiroo

    2012-08-01

    Source inversion is a widely used practice in seismology. Magnitudes, moment tensors, slip distributions are now routinely calculated and disseminated whenever an earthquake occurs. The accuracy of such models depends on many aspects like the event magnitude, the data coverage and the data quality (instrument response, isolation, timing, etc.). Here, like in any observational problem, the error estimation should be part of the solution. It is however very rare to find a source inversion algorithm which includes realistic error analyses, and the solutions are often given without any estimates of uncertainties. Our goal here is to stress the importance of such estimation and to explore different techniques aimed at achieving such analyses. In this perspective, we use the W phase source inversion algorithm recently developed to provide fast CMT estimations for large earthquakes. We focus in particular on the linear-inverse problem of estimating the moment tensor components at a given source location. We assume that the initial probability densities can be modelled by Gaussian distributions. Formally, we can separate two sources of error which generally contribute to the model parameter uncertainties. The first source of uncertainty is the error introduced by the more or less imperfect data. This is carried by the covariance matrix for the data (Cd). The second source of uncertainty, often overlooked, is associated with modelling error or mismodelling. This is represented by the covariance matrix on the theory, CT. Among the different sources of mismodelling, we focus here on the modelling error associated with the mislocation of the centroid position. Both Cd and CT describe probability densities in the data space and it is well known that it is in fact CD=Cd+CT that should be included into the error propagation process. In source inversion problems, like in many other fields of geophysics, the data covariance (CD) is often considered as diagonal or even proportional

  20. Inversion without Explicit Jacobian Calculations in Electrical Impedance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouchard, A.; Bonnet, S.; Hervé, L.; David, O.

    2014-10-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is the inverse problem of finding the internal conductivity distribution of a medium given boundary electrical measurements performed via an electrode array onto its surface. Conventional inversion schemes adopt Tikhonov regularized Newton-type methods. Following a transport back-transport approach, we develop in this work an adjoint approach which allows reducing computational burden in enabling inversion without explicit Jacobian calculation. Forward and back-projection operators are defined from potential gradients, along with their efficient implementation. These derivations allow the transparent use of inversion algorithms. We first check the implementation of operators. We then evaluate how reconstructions perform on simulated noisy data using a preconditioned conjugate gradient. We eventually practice our inversion framework on experimental data acquired in vitro from a saline phantom.

  1. The NYU inverse swept wing code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Garabedian, P.; Mcfadden, G.

    1983-01-01

    An inverse swept wing code is described that is based on the widely used transonic flow program FLO22. The new code incorporates a free boundary algorithm permitting the pressure distribution to be prescribed over a portion of the wing surface. A special routine is included to calculate the wave drag, which can be minimized in its dependence on the pressure distribution. An alternate formulation of the boundary condition at infinity was introduced to enhance the speed and accuracy of the code. A FORTRAN listing of the code and a listing of a sample run are presented. There is also a user's manual as well as glossaries of input and output parameters.

  2. Inverse optimal design of the radiant heating in materials processing and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, A.G.; Lee, K.H.; Viskanta, R.

    1998-12-01

    Combined convective, conductive, and radiative heat transfer is analyzed during heating of a continuously moving load in the industrial radiant oven. A transient, quasi-three-dimensional model of heat transfer between a continuous load of parts moving inside an oven on a conveyor belt at a constant speed and an array of radiant heaters/burners placed inside the furnace enclosure is developed. The model accounts for radiative exchange between the heaters and the load, the conduction in the load, and convective heat transfer between the moving load and oven environment. The thermal model developed has been used to construct a general framework for an inverse optimal design of an industrial oven as an example. In particular, the procedure based on the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear least squares optimization algorithm has been developed to obtain the optimal temperatures of the heaters/burners that need to be specified to achieve a prescribed temperature distribution of the surface of a load. The results of calculations for several sample cases are reported to illustrate the capabilities of the procedure developed for the optimal inverse design of an industrial radiant oven.

  3. Limited-memory BFGS based least-squares pre-stack Kirchhoff depth migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaojiang; Wang, Yibo; Zheng, Yikang; Chang, Xu

    2015-08-01

    Least-squares migration (LSM) is a linearized inversion technique for subsurface reflectivity estimation. Compared to conventional migration algorithms, it can improve spatial resolution significantly with a few iterative calculations. There are three key steps in LSM, (1) calculate data residuals between observed data and demigrated data using the inverted reflectivity model; (2) migrate data residuals to form reflectivity gradient and (3) update reflectivity model using optimization methods. In order to obtain an accurate and high-resolution inversion result, the good estimation of inverse Hessian matrix plays a crucial role. However, due to the large size of Hessian matrix, the inverse matrix calculation is always a tough task. The limited-memory BFGS (L-BFGS) method can evaluate the Hessian matrix indirectly using a limited amount of computer memory which only maintains a history of the past m gradients (often m < 10). We combine the L-BFGS method with least-squares pre-stack Kirchhoff depth migration. Then, we validate the introduced approach by the 2-D Marmousi synthetic data set and a 2-D marine data set. The results show that the introduced method can effectively obtain reflectivity model and has a faster convergence rate with two comparison gradient methods. It might be significant for general complex subsurface imaging.

  4. Inverse Compton for Compton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suortti, Pekka

    2016-04-01

    A novel concept for a high resolution Compton spectrometer is introduced. 88 keV radiation from an Inverse Compton Compact Source is focused using crossed cylindrically bent Laue-type Si perfect crystals, and dispersed on the sample with a constant energy gradient. Dispersion is compensated exactly at a Ge crystal analyzer, so that the same wavelength shift is observed for all wavelengths of the incident beam. The ThomX source is used as a concrete example. Detailed dimensions and flux estimates at successive locations of the spectrometer are given, and the performance is compared with the dispersion compensating spectrometer at ID15 of the ESRF. The momentum resolution is better than 0.1 atomic units in both cases. The intensity of scattering with the compact source is an order of magnitude smaller, but still adequate for high resolution Compton profile measurements.

  5. Inverse magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arco, L; López-López, M T; Zubarev, A Y; Gdula, K; Durán, J D G

    2014-09-01

    We report a new kind of field-responsive fluid consisting of suspensions of diamagnetic (DM) and ferromagnetic (FM) microparticles in ferrofluids. We designate them as inverse magnetorheological (IMR) fluids for analogy with inverse ferrofluids (IFFs). Observations on the particle self-assembly in IMR fluids upon magnetic field application showed that DM and FM microparticles were assembled into alternating chains oriented along the field direction. We explain such assembly on the basis of the dipolar interaction energy between particles. We also present results on the rheological properties of IMR fluids and, for comparison, those of IFFs and bidispersed magnetorheological (MR) fluids. Interestingly, we found that upon magnetic field application, the rheological properties of IMR fluids were enhanced with respect to bidispersed MR fluids with the same FM particle concentration, by an amount greater than the sum of the isolated contribution of DM particles. Furthermore, the field-induced yield stress was moderately increased when up to 30% of the total FM particle content was replaced with DM particles. Beyond this point, the dependence of the yield stress on the DM content was non-monotonic, as expected for FM concentrations decreasing to zero. We explain these synergistic results by two separate phenomena: the formation of exclusion areas for FM particles due to the perturbation of the magnetic field by DM particles and the dipole-dipole interaction between DM and FM particles, which enhances the field-induced structures. Based on the second phenomenon, we present a theoretical model for the yield stress that semi-quantitatively predicts the experimental results. PMID:25022363

  6. Comparing implementations of penalized weighted least-squares sinogram restoration

    PubMed Central

    Forthmann, Peter; Koehler, Thomas; Defrise, Michel; La Riviere, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A CT scanner measures the energy that is deposited in each channel of a detector array by x rays that have been partially absorbed on their way through the object. The measurement process is complex and quantitative measurements are always and inevitably associated with errors, so CT data must be preprocessed prior to reconstruction. In recent years, the authors have formulated CT sinogram preprocessing as a statistical restoration problem in which the goal is to obtain the best estimate of the line integrals needed for reconstruction from the set of noisy, degraded measurements. The authors have explored both penalized Poisson likelihood (PL) and penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) objective functions. At low doses, the authors found that the PL approach outperforms PWLS in terms of resolution-noise tradeoffs, but at standard doses they perform similarly. The PWLS objective function, being quadratic, is more amenable to computational acceleration than the PL objective. In this work, the authors develop and compare two different methods for implementing PWLS sinogram restoration with the hope of improving computational performance relative to PL in the standard-dose regime. Sinogram restoration is still significant in the standard-dose regime since it can still outperform standard approaches and it allows for correction of effects that are not usually modeled in standard CT preprocessing. Methods: The authors have explored and compared two implementation strategies for PWLS sinogram restoration: (1) A direct matrix-inversion strategy based on the closed-form solution to the PWLS optimization problem and (2) an iterative approach based on the conjugate-gradient algorithm. Obtaining optimal performance from each strategy required modifying the naive off-the-shelf implementations of the algorithms to exploit the particular symmetry and sparseness of the sinogram-restoration problem. For the closed-form approach, the authors subdivided the large matrix

  7. Comparing implementations of penalized weighted least-squares sinogram restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Forthmann, Peter; Koehler, Thomas; Defrise, Michel; La Riviere, Patrick

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: A CT scanner measures the energy that is deposited in each channel of a detector array by x rays that have been partially absorbed on their way through the object. The measurement process is complex and quantitative measurements are always and inevitably associated with errors, so CT data must be preprocessed prior to reconstruction. In recent years, the authors have formulated CT sinogram preprocessing as a statistical restoration problem in which the goal is to obtain the best estimate of the line integrals needed for reconstruction from the set of noisy, degraded measurements. The authors have explored both penalized Poisson likelihood (PL) and penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) objective functions. At low doses, the authors found that the PL approach outperforms PWLS in terms of resolution-noise tradeoffs, but at standard doses they perform similarly. The PWLS objective function, being quadratic, is more amenable to computational acceleration than the PL objective. In this work, the authors develop and compare two different methods for implementing PWLS sinogram restoration with the hope of improving computational performance relative to PL in the standard-dose regime. Sinogram restoration is still significant in the standard-dose regime since it can still outperform standard approaches and it allows for correction of effects that are not usually modeled in standard CT preprocessing. Methods: The authors have explored and compared two implementation strategies for PWLS sinogram restoration: (1) A direct matrix-inversion strategy based on the closed-form solution to the PWLS optimization problem and (2) an iterative approach based on the conjugate-gradient algorithm. Obtaining optimal performance from each strategy required modifying the naive off-the-shelf implementations of the algorithms to exploit the particular symmetry and sparseness of the sinogram-restoration problem. For the closed-form approach, the authors subdivided the large matrix

  8. Wavelet Sparse Approximate Inverse Preconditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tang, W.-P.; Wan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using sparse approximate inverses as preconditioners for Krylov subspace iterative methods. Recent studies of Grote and Huckle and Chow and Saad also show that sparse approximate inverse preconditioner can be effective for a variety of matrices, e.g. Harwell-Boeing collections. Nonetheless a drawback is that it requires rapid decay of the inverse entries so that sparse approximate inverse is possible. However, for the class of matrices that, come from elliptic PDE problems, this assumption may not necessarily hold. Our main idea is to look for a basis, other than the standard one, such that a sparse representation of the inverse is feasible. A crucial observation is that the kind of matrices we are interested in typically have a piecewise smooth inverse. We exploit this fact, by applying wavelet techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse in the wavelet basis. We shall justify theoretically and numerically that our approach is effective for matrices with smooth inverse. We emphasize that in this paper we have only presented the idea of wavelet approximate inverses and demonstrated its potential but have not yet developed a highly refined and efficient algorithm.

  9. Discrete Inverse and State Estimation Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    2006-06-01

    The problems of making inferences about the natural world from noisy observations and imperfect theories occur in almost all scientific disciplines. This book addresses these problems using examples taken from geophysical fluid dynamics. It focuses on discrete formulations, both static and time-varying, known variously as inverse, state estimation or data assimilation problems. Starting with fundamental algebraic and statistical ideas, the book guides the reader through a range of inference tools including the singular value decomposition, Gauss-Markov and minimum variance estimates, Kalman filters and related smoothers, and adjoint (Lagrange multiplier) methods. The final chapters discuss a variety of practical applications to geophysical flow problems. Discrete Inverse and State Estimation Problems is an ideal introduction to the topic for graduate students and researchers in oceanography, meteorology, climate dynamics, and geophysical fluid dynamics. It is also accessible to a wider scientific audience; the only prerequisite is an understanding of linear algebra. Provides a comprehensive introduction to discrete methods of inference from incomplete information Based upon 25 years of practical experience using real data and models Develops sequential and whole-domain analysis methods from simple least-squares Contains many examples and problems, and web-based support through MIT opencourseware

  10. Preparatiion of metal colloids in inverse micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.

    1990-11-23

    A method is provided for preparing catalytic elemental metal colloidal particles (e.g., gold, palladium, silver, rhodium, nickel, iron, platinum, molybdenum) or colloidal alloy particles (silver/iridium or platinum/gold). A homogenous inverse micelle solution of a metal salt is first formed in a metal-salt solvent comprised of a surfactant (e.g. a nonionic or cationic surfactant) and an organic solvent. The size and number of inverse micelles is controlled by the proportions of the surfactant and the solvent. Then, the metal salt is reduced (by chemical reduction or by a pulsed or continuous wave UV laser) to colloidal particles of elemental metal. After their formation, the colloidal metal particles can be stabilized by reaction with materials that permanently add surface stabilizing groups to the surface of the colloidal metal particles. The sizes of the colloidal elemental metal particles and their size distribution is determined by the size and number of the inverse micelles. A second salt can be added with further reduction to form the colloidal alloy particles. After the colloidal elemental metal particles are formed, the homogeneous solution distributes to two phases, one phase rich in colloidal elemental metal particles and the other phase rich in surfactant. The colloidal elemental metal particles from one phase can be dried to form a powder useful as a catalyst.

  11. Inverse problems biomechanical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-03-01

    It is now well recognized that a host of imaging modalities (a list that includes Ultrasound, MRI, Optical Coherence Tomography, and optical microscopy) can be used to "watch" tissue as it deforms in response to an internal or external excitation. The result is a detailed map of the deformation field in the interior of the tissue. This deformation field can be used in conjunction with a material mechanical response to determine the spatial distribution of material properties of the tissue by solving an inverse problem. Images of material properties thus obtained can be used to quantify the health of the tissue. Recently, they have been used to detect, diagnose and monitor cancerous lesions, detect vulnerable plaque in arteries, diagnose liver cirrhosis, and possibly detect the onset of Alzheimer's disease. In this talk I will describe the mathematical and computational aspects of solving this class of inverse problems, and their applications in biology and medicine. In particular, I will discuss the well-posedness of these problems and quantify the amount of displacement data necessary to obtain a unique property distribution. I will describe an efficient algorithm for solving the resulting inverse problem. I will also describe some recent developments based on Bayesian inference in estimating the variance in the estimates of material properties. I will conclude with the applications of these techniques in diagnosing breast cancer and in characterizing the mechanical properties of cells with sub-cellular resolution.

  12. Gravity as the Square of Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiermaier, M.

    The BCJ squaring relations provide a simple prescription for thecomputation of gravity amplitudes in terms of gauge theory ingredients. Unlike the KLT relations, the squaring relations are directly applicable both at tree and loop level. We review the derivation of these relations from on-shell recursion relations, and discuss an off-shell approach to these relations in which the interactions of the gravity Lagrangian arise as the square of the gauge-theory interactions. This article is based on work with Zvi Bern, Tristan Dennen and Yu-tin Huang [Z. Bern, T. Dennen, Y.-t. Huang and M. Kiermaier, Phys. Rev. D textbf{82} (2010), 065003, arXiv:1004.0693 (Ref. 1))] which was presented at String Field Theory and Related Aspects 2010.

  13. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Vansteenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e(-) beam and the 10(exp 11) Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a approximately 1.5 percent/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power CW CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  14. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e- beam and the 1011 Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ≊1.5%/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  15. Inverse boundary-layer technique for airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A description is presented of a technique for the optimization of airfoil pressure distributions using an interactive inverse boundary-layer program. This program allows the user to determine quickly a near-optimum subsonic pressure distribution which meets his requirements for lift, drag, and pitching moment at the desired flow conditions. The method employs an inverse turbulent boundary-layer scheme for definition of the turbulent recovery portion of the pressure distribution. Two levels of pressure-distribution architecture are used - a simple roof top for preliminary studies and a more complex four-region architecture for a more refined design. A technique is employed to avoid the specification of pressure distributions which result in unrealistic airfoils, that is, those with negative thickness. The program allows rapid evaluation of a designed pressure distribution off-design in Reynolds number, transition location, and angle of attack, and will compute an airfoil contour for the designed pressure distribution using linear theory.

  16. Finding A Minimally Informative Dirichlet Prior Using Least Squares

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Kelly

    2011-03-01

    In a Bayesian framework, the Dirichlet distribution is the conjugate distribution to the multinomial likelihood function, and so the analyst is required to develop a Dirichlet prior that incorporates available information. However, as it is a multiparameter distribution, choosing the Dirichlet parameters is less straightforward than choosing a prior distribution for a single parameter, such as p in the binomial distribution. In particular, one may wish to incorporate limited information into the prior, resulting in a minimally informative prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data. In the case of binomial p or Poisson \\lambda, the principle of maximum entropy can be employed to obtain a so-called constrained noninformative prior. However, even in the case of p, such a distribution cannot be written down in the form of a standard distribution (e.g., beta, gamma), and so a beta distribution is used as an approximation in the case of p. In the case of the multinomial model with parametric constraints, the approach of maximum entropy does not appear tractable. This paper presents an alternative approach, based on constrained minimization of a least-squares objective function, which leads to a minimally informative Dirichlet prior distribution. The alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, which is widely used in the United States, is the motivation for this approach, and is used to illustrate the method. In this approach to modeling common-cause failure, the alpha-factors, which are the parameters in the underlying multinomial model for common-cause failure, must be estimated from data that are often quite sparse, because common-cause failures tend to be rare, especially failures of more than two or three components, and so a prior distribution that is responsive to updates with sparse data is needed.

  17. Towards Adjoint Finite Source Inversion: Application to the 2011 M9 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somala, S.; Galvez, P.; Inbal, A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Lapusta, N.

    2011-12-01

    The recent 2011 M9 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake was recorded by thousands of sensors at near-fault distance, including broad band, strong motion and continuous GPS sensors. This event provides a unique opportunity to image the earthquake rupture process with high resolution. In order to enable the exploitation of the immense dataset available, orders of magnitude larger than in previous earthquakes, we are developing a scalable source inversion procedure based on time-reversal adjoint inversion. We adopt the linear least squares formulation of the source inversion problem, whose basic unknown is the spatio-temporal distribution of slip rate. We formulate an iterative conjugate gradient procedure to minimize the L2 norm of ground velocity residuals between data and synthetics. Each iteration involves one time-reversal (adjoint) and one forward simulation. Exploiting the time-reversal symmetry and the reciprocity principle of elastodynamics, the adjoint is computed by a wave propagation simulation in which time-reversed seismogram residuals are imposed as point forces at the stations simulated. The resulting fault tractions on a locked fault are the adjoint fields, related to the gradient of the misfit function with respect to the model. The simulations are performed with a recent extension of the SPECFEM3D spectral element code to dynamic and kinematic finite sources on unstructured meshes (Galvez et al, session S24 of this meeting). The non-planar geometry of the megathrust fault is accounted for in the spectral element mesh (generated with CUBIT). The subsurface structure is incorporated, on a coarse scale, using regional 3D velocity models, e.g. from the Japan Seismic Hazard Information Station (J-SHIS) website. We will report on the results of our initial efforts, focused on exploiting the continuous 1 Hz GPS signals recorded in Japan to understand the low frequency aspects of the rupture process of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake.

  18. Linear functional minimization for inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barajas-Solano, D. A.; Wohlberg, B. E.; Vesselinov, V. V.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel inverse modeling strategy to estimate spatially distributed parameters of nonlinear models. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimators of these parameters are based on a likelihood functional, which contains spatially discrete measurements of the system parameters and spatiotemporally discrete measurements of the transient system states. The piecewise continuity prior for the parameters is expressed via Total Variation (TV) regularization. The MAP estimator is computed by minimizing a nonquadratic objective equipped with the TV operator. We apply this inversion algorithm to estimate hydraulic conductivity of a synthetic confined aquifer from measurements of conductivity and hydraulic head. The synthetic conductivity field is composed of a low-conductivity heterogeneous intrusion into a high-conductivity heterogeneous medium. Our algorithm accurately reconstructs the location, orientation, and extent of the intrusion from the steady-state data only. Addition of transient measurements of hydraulic head improves the parameter estimation, accurately reconstructing the conductivity field in the vicinity of observation locations.

  19. Aquifer Structure Identification Using Stochastic Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Dylan R; Dai, Zhenxue; Wolfsberg, Andrew V; Vrugt, Jasper A

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a stochastic inverse method for aquifer structure identification using sparse geophysical and hydraulic response data. The method is based on updating structure parameters from a transition probability model to iteratively modify the aquifer structure and parameter zonation. The method is extended to the adaptive parameterization of facies hydraulic parameters by including these parameters as optimization variables. The stochastic nature of the statistical structure parameters leads to nonconvex objective functions. A multi-method genetically adaptive evolutionary approach (AMALGAM-SO) was selected to perform the inversion given its search capabilities. Results are obtained as a probabilistic assessment of facies distribution based on indicator cokriging simulation of the optimized structural parameters. The method is illustrated by estimating the structure and facies hydraulic parameters of a synthetic example with a transient hydraulic response.

  20. Optical properties of silicon inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hong

    Silicon inverse opals are artificial structures in which nearly monodisperse, close-packed air bubbles are embedded in a silicon matrix. If properly tailored, this structure can exhibit a photonic band gap (PBG) in the near infrared spectral region. The PBG can block light propagation in any direction, allowing the control of light flow in the material. Silicon inverse opals can be fabricated by infiltrating amorphous silicon into silica colloidal crystals and then etching away the silica. In this thesis, the structural defects of silica colloidal crystals and the optical properties of silicon inverse opals are studied. First, by using laser-scanning confocal microscopy, the concentration and distribution of stacking faults and vacancies were quantified in silica colloidal crystals. It's shown that silica colloidal crystals show strong tendency toward face-center-cubic structure with the vacancy density as small as 5 x 10-4. Second, by combining optical microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, the transmission and reflection spectra of silicon inverse opals along the [111] direction were measured. Combined with the calculation of transmission and reflection spectra by Transfer Matrix Methods, it is concluded that the strong light attenuation in silicon inverse opals is due to the enhanced absorption (>600%) in silicon materials. Third, by using optical pump-probe techniques, the photo-induced ultra-fast reflection changes in silicon inverse opals were examined. The pump-generated free carriers cause the reflection in the band gap region to change after ˜0.5 ps. For the first few ps, the main effect is a decrease in reflectivity due to nonlinear absorption. After ˜5 ps, this effect disappears and an unexpected blue spectral shift is seen in the photonic band gap. The refractive index decreases due to optically-induced strain born the thermal expansion mismatch between silicon and its native oxide. Finally, by infiltrating silicon inverse

  1. Clinical knowledge-based inverse treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2004-11-01

    Clinical IMRT treatment plans are currently made using dose-based optimization algorithms, which do not consider the nonlinear dose-volume effects for tumours and normal structures. The choice of structure specific importance factors represents an additional degree of freedom of the system and makes rigorous optimization intractable. The purpose of this work is to circumvent the two problems by developing a biologically more sensible yet clinically practical inverse planning framework. To implement this, the dose-volume status of a structure was characterized by using the effective volume in the voxel domain. A new objective function was constructed with the incorporation of the volumetric information of the system so that the figure of merit of a given IMRT plan depends not only on the dose deviation from the desired distribution but also the dose-volume status of the involved organs. The conventional importance factor of an organ was written into a product of two components: (i) a generic importance that parametrizes the relative importance of the organs in the ideal situation when the goals for all the organs are met; (ii) a dose-dependent factor that quantifies our level of clinical/dosimetric satisfaction for a given plan. The generic importance can be determined a priori, and in most circumstances, does not need adjustment, whereas the second one, which is responsible for the intractable behaviour of the trade-off seen in conventional inverse planning, was determined automatically. An inverse planning module based on the proposed formalism was implemented and applied to a prostate case and a head-neck case. A comparison with the conventional inverse planning technique indicated that, for the same target dose coverage, the critical structure sparing was substantially improved for both cases. The incorporation of clinical knowledge allows us to obtain better IMRT plans and makes it possible to auto-select the importance factors, greatly facilitating the inverse

  2. A new Joint Inversion Approach in Conjunction With Cluster Analysis to Improve the Reliability of Hydrogeophysical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, T.; Ruecker, C.

    2007-05-01

    Since the inversion of geophysical inversion usually suffers non-uniqueness we try to apply different physical fields to obtain a more reliable image of the subsurface. If the underlying parameters are connected by petrophysical laws or empirical relationships we are able construct a unique inversion scheme that considers all data. However, in many cases such a relationship does not exist. Nevertheless we expect structural similaries and want to allow for it without enforcement. That is basically the idea of our novel joint inversion: The structure of one parameter, i.e., the gradient of its distribution, is used to weight the other. For each boundary a weight is defined that determines one row of the derivative matrix. We use the techniques of robust modelling, the iteratively reweighted least squares method to determine the individual weights. The roughness vector of one parameter is the input for the weight of the other. Thus a large change in one parameter allows for easier change of the other and vice versa at the same position. Both inversion start and yield the first model iteration independently, then the coupling starts. By an example involving dc resistivity and refraction data we prove to yield more significant structures with structural coupling compared to inversion without coupling. Both images can be combined by means of cluster analysis determining a cluster value for each cell. By associating the cluster mean to the corresponding cells we obtain a very simple image of the subsurface. However the clustered model is not able to fit the data appropriately. Hence, we first try to optimize the values (post-iteration). As a second step we use a side-result of the fuzzy analysis, the cluster membership function, for model constraints in the next stage of inversion with the cluster model as reference. Basically the distance from the cluster center defines how much it may vary. Finally we end up in a very simple model combining two parameters that is able

  3. Scaling of Greenwood Peierls conductance on a diluted square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, William; Schmitz, Albert

    The modified rectangle lattice of Dhar is a bond-diluted square lattice. The structure is self-similar and finitely ramified, like a fractal. Nevertheless certain discrete Schrödinger equation Green functions for the modified rectangle are known in closed form in the infinite lattice limit and the spectrum is continuous. By standard transfer matrix renormalization methods we present a study scaling properties of the Greenwood Peierls conductance distribution across the lattice with one dimensional lead wires attached as a function of lattice size and of additional disorder of several types.

  4. Inverse Problems of Thermoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Luste, O. J.; Kuz, R. V.; Strutinsky, M. N.

    2011-05-01

    Classical thermoelectricity is based on the use of the Seebeck and Thomson effects that occur in the near-contact areas between n- and p-type materials. A conceptually different approach to thermoelectric power converter design that is based on the law of thermoelectric induction of currents is also known. The efficiency of this approach has already been demonstrated by its first applications. More than 10 basically new types of thermoelements were discovered with properties that cannot be achieved by thermocouple power converters. Therefore, further development of this concept is of practical interest. This paper provides a classification and theory for solving the inverse problems of thermoelectricity that form the basis for devising new thermoelement types. Computer methods for their solution for anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are elaborated. Regularities related to thermoelectric current excitation in anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are established. The possibility of obtaining eddy currents of a particular configuration through control of the temperature field and material parameters for the creation of new thermo- element types is demonstrated for three-dimensional (3D) models of anisotropic and inhomogeneous media.

  5. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  6. Nonhelical inverse transfer of a decaying turbulent magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kahniashvili, Tina; Tevzadze, Alexander G

    2015-02-20

    In the presence of magnetic helicity, inverse transfer from small to large scales is well known in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and has applications in astrophysics, cosmology, and fusion plasmas. Using high resolution direct numerical simulations of magnetically dominated self-similarly decaying MHD turbulence, we report a similar inverse transfer even in the absence of magnetic helicity. We compute for the first time spectral energy transfer rates to show that this inverse transfer is about half as strong as with helicity, but in both cases the magnetic gain at large scales results from velocity at similar scales interacting with smaller-scale magnetic fields. This suggests that both inverse transfers are a consequence of universal mechanisms for magnetically dominated turbulence. Possible explanations include inverse cascading of the mean squared vector potential associated with local near two dimensionality and the shallower k^{2} subinertial range spectrum of kinetic energy forcing the magnetic field with a k^{4} subinertial range to attain larger-scale coherence. The inertial range shows a clear k^{-2} spectrum and is the first example of fully isotropic magnetically dominated MHD turbulence exhibiting weak turbulence scaling. PMID:25763960

  7. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Dimethylbis(2-pyridyl)borate Nickel(II) Complexes: Unimolecular Square-Planar to Square-Planar Rotation around Nickel(II)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The syntheses of novel dimethylbis(2-pyridyl)borate nickel(II) complexes 4 and 6 are reported. These complexes were unambiguously characterized by X-ray analysis. In dichloromethane solvent, complex 4 undergoes a unique square-planar to square-planar rotation around the nickel(II) center, for which activation parameters of ΔH⧧ = 12.2(1) kcal mol–1 and ΔS⧧ = 0.8(5) eu were measured via NMR inversion recovery experiments. Complex 4 was also observed to isomerize via a relatively slow ring flip: ΔH⧧ = 15.0(2) kcal mol–1; and ΔS⧧ = −4.2(7) eu. DFT studies support the experimentally measured rotation activation energy (cf. calculated ΔH⧧ = 11.1 kcal mol–1) as well as the presence of a high-energy triplet intermediate (ΔH = 8.8 kcal mol–1). PMID:24882919

  9. Fully-coupled hydrogeophysical inversion of surface deformation measurements for the monitoring of geological CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, M. A.; Stadler, G.

    2011-12-01

    The In Salah project in Algeria has shown that CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers leads to measurable and transient deformation of the surface. Time-series measurements of surface deformation with PS-InSAR and GPS are a promising monitoring tool for geological CO2 storage. These measurements have to be integrated with other observations to extract quantitative information about the properties of the reservoir and to constrain the evolution of the pressure distribution in the subsurface. This data integration requires a fully-coupled hydrogeophysical inversion for the reservoir parameters, based on a geomechanical and hydrological process model. As a first step, we formulate a fully-coupled hydrogeophysical inverse problem to infer the permeability distribution in a quasi-static poroelastic model. In this approach, the misfit between model prediction and observed surface deformation and hydrological data is minimized under the constraint given by the poroelastic equations. The resulting least-squares optimization problem is solved using a Newton method, which uses derivatives computed efficiently through the adjoint poroelastic equations. Both state and adjoint equations are solved with a discretely consistent fully-coupled continuous Galerkin spatial discretization and implicit time integration. The state equation has been benchmarked against the analytic solution to the Mandel-Cryer problem and a modified Mandel-Cryer problem is used to test our inverse formulation. Finally, we discuss the ability of surface deformation measurements to constrain the permeability distribution in a CO2 storage reservoir. In a numerical study we analyze how well lateral permeability variations can be retrieved from a combination of surface deformation and hydrological data.

  10. 3D Inverse problem: Seawater intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steklova, K.; Haber, E.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of seawater intrusions (SWI) is challenging as it involves solving the governing equations for variable density flow, multiple time scales and varying boundary conditions. Due to the nonlinearity of the equations and the large aquifer domains, 3D computations are a costly process, particularly when solving the inverse SWI problem. In addition the heads and concentration measurements are difficult to obtain due to mixing, saline wedge location is sensitive to aquifer topography, and there is general uncertainty in initial and boundary conditions and parameters. Some of these complications can be overcome by using indirect geophysical data next to standard groundwater measurements, however, the inverse problem is usually simplified, e.g. by zonation for the parameters based on geological information, steady state substitution of the unknown initial conditions, decoupling the equations or reducing the amount of unknown parameters by covariance analysis. In our work we present a discretization of the flow and solute mass balance equations for variable groundwater (GW) flow. A finite difference scheme is to solve pressure equation and a Semi - Lagrangian method for solute transport equation. In this way we are able to choose an arbitrarily large time step without losing stability up to an accuracy requirement coming from the coupled character of the variable density flow equations. We derive analytical sensitivities of the GW model for parameters related to the porous media properties and also the initial solute distribution. Analytically derived sensitivities reduce the computational cost of inverse problem, but also give insight for maximizing information in collected data. If the geophysical data are available it also enables simultaneous calibration in a coupled hydrogeophysical framework. The 3D inverse problem was tested on artificial time dependent data for pressure and solute content coming from a GW forward model and/or geophysical forward model. Two

  11. Eta Squared and Partial Eta Squared as Measures of Effect Size in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John T. E.

    2011-01-01

    Eta squared measures the proportion of the total variance in a dependent variable that is associated with the membership of different groups defined by an independent variable. Partial eta squared is a similar measure in which the effects of other independent variables and interactions are partialled out. The development of these measures is…

  12. On Least Squares Fitting Nonlinear Submodels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechtel, Gordon G.

    Three simplifying conditions are given for obtaining least squares (LS) estimates for a nonlinear submodel of a linear model. If these are satisfied, and if the subset of nonlinear parameters may be LS fit to the corresponding LS estimates of the linear model, then one attains the desired LS estimates for the entire submodel. Two illustrative…

  13. Least squares estimation of avian molt rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    A straightforward least squares method of estimating the rate at which birds molt feathers is presented, suitable for birds captured more than once during the period of molt. The date of molt onset can also be estimated. The method is applied to male and female mourning doves.

  14. Kendall Square multiprocessor: Early experiences and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.H.

    1992-04-01

    Initial performance results and early experiences are reported for the Kendall Square Research multiprocessor. The basic architecture of the shared-memory multiprocessor is described, and computational and I/O performance is measured for both serial and parallel programs. Experiences in porting various applications are described.

  15. Squaring Matrices: Connecting Mathematics and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Robert M.; Wiegert, Elaine M.; Marshall, Jeff C.

    2008-01-01

    This article shows how a matrix can be used to represent a food chain and how the square of this matrix represents the indirect food sources for each animal in the chain. By exploring, through mathematics, the implications when the bottom of the food chain is destroyed, students will see an important connection between mathematics and science.…

  16. Partial least squares for dependent data

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Marco; Krivobokova, Tatyana; Munk, Axel; de Groot, Bert

    2016-01-01

    We consider the partial least squares algorithm for dependent data and study the consequences of ignoring the dependence both theoretically and numerically. Ignoring nonstationary dependence structures can lead to inconsistent estimation, but a simple modification yields consistent estimation. A protein dynamics example illustrates the superior predictive power of the proposed method. PMID:27279662

  17. Non-Circular Wheels: Reuleaux and Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Circular wheels are so familiar on vehicles of all types that it is seldom realized that alternatives do exist. This short non-mathematical article describes Reuleaux and square wheels that, rolling along appropriate tracks, can maintain a moving platform at a constant height. Easily made working models lend themselves to demonstrations at science…

  18. BLS: Box-fitting Least Squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, G.; Zucker, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2016-07-01

    BLS (Box-fitting Least Squares) is a box-fitting algorithm that analyzes stellar photometric time series to search for periodic transits of extrasolar planets. It searches for signals characterized by a periodic alternation between two discrete levels, with much less time spent at the lower level.

  19. Iterative methods for weighted least-squares

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrovnikova, E.Y.; Vavasis, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    A weighted least-squares problem with a very ill-conditioned weight matrix arises in many applications. Because of round-off errors, the standard conjugate gradient method for solving this system does not give the correct answer even after n iterations. In this paper we propose an iterative algorithm based on a new type of reorthogonalization that converges to the solution.

  20. Constrained eigenfunction method for the inversion of remote sensing data - Application to particle size determination from light scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Bill P.

    1989-04-01

    The Fredholm equation representing light scattering by an ensemble of uniform dielectric spheres is inverted to obtain the particle size distribution responsible for the scattering features. The method of deconvolution involves a constrained expansion of the solution in Schmidt-Hilbert eigenfunctions of the scattering kernels. That solution is obtained which minimizes the sum of the squared residual errors subject to a trial function constraint. The method is, thus, dualistic to the well-known Phillips-Twomey method of constrained linear inversion for the solution by matrix techniques of a Fredholm equation of the first kind in the presence of error. The method is implemented in doubly iterative fashion, and test deconvolutions containing various levels of error are presented.

  1. Source parameters for 11 earthquakes in the Tien Shan, central Asia, determined by P and SH waveform inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael R.; Mccaffrey, Robert; Molnar, Peter

    1987-01-01

    The style and the distribution of faulting occurring today in the Tien Shan region were studied, by digitizing long-period World-Wide Standard Seismograph Network P and SH waveforms of 11 of the largest Tien Shan earthquakes between 1965 and 1982 and then using a least squares inversion routine to constrain their fault plane solutions and depths. The results of the examination indicate that north-south shortening is presently occurring in the Tien Shan, with the formation of basement uplifts flanked by moderately dipping thrust faults. The present-day tectonics of the Tien Shan seem to be analogous to those of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah during the Laramide orogeny in Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary time.

  2. Mathematical Construction of Magic Squares Utilizing Base-N Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Thomas D.

    2006-01-01

    Magic squares have been of interest as a source of recreation for over 4,500 years. A magic square consists of a square array of n[squared] positive and distinct integers arranged so that the sum of any column, row, or main diagonal is the same. In particular, an array of consecutive integers from 1 to n[squared] forming an nxn magic square is…

  3. Deformation of square objects and boudins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Lan, Labao

    2004-08-01

    Some geological objects, such as clasts and boudins, may have had original shapes close to square, that have been modified by ductile deformation. We demonstrate through finite element models presented here and in earlier papers that square objects in a matrix with contrasting viscosity can deform to a variety of curved shapes. The maximum shape change is where the square edges are parallel to the principal bulk strains. Competent objects with viscosity ratio to matrix ( m) of 2-20 become barrel shaped, showing concave 'fish mouth' shortened edges. Incompetent objects ( m<1) show a narrower variety of shapes with m, all becoming smoothed to bone, dumb-bell or lobate shapes, and losing the original corners. We compare the results for square objects with linear and non-linear rheology (power law, stress exponent n=1, 3 or 10), and with previous modelling with different object-matrix proportions. Competent objects with higher n values deform slightly less, and more irregularly, than linearly viscous ( n=1) objects, but the distinctions between n=3 and 10 are only slight. The differences are even slighter (in the opposite sense) for incompetent objects. The proportion of object to matrix is as important, if not more, in controlling the deformation and shape of these objects. The results are compared via graphs of object strain and concavity versus bulk strain. The concavity graph for competent square objects with linear viscosity up to very high strain can be compared with examples of ductile boudins with barrel or fish mouth shapes. Subject to a number of assumptions, this provides a method of estimating boudin-matrix viscosity ratios and post-boudinage ductile strain, of potential use in highly deformed rocks lacking other strain markers. The approach may also be suitable for deformed porphyroblasts, but is more difficult to apply to single clasts in breccias and conglomerates.

  4. Creation of identical multiple focal spots with prescribed axial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yanzhong; Zhan, Qiwen

    2015-10-01

    We present a scheme for the construction of coaxially equidistant multiple focal spots with identical intensity profiles for each individual focus and a predetermined number and spacing. To achieve this, the radiation field from an antenna is reversed and then gathered by high numerical aperture objective lenses. Radiation patterns from three types of line sources, i.e., the electric current, magnetic current and electromagnetic current distributions, with cosine-squared taper are respectively employed to generate predominately longitudinally polarized bright spots, azimuthally polarized doughnuts, and focal spots with a perfect spherically symmetric intensity distribution. The required illuminations at the pupil plane of a 4Pi focusing configuration for the creation of these identical multiple focal spots can be easily derived by solving the inverse problem of the antenna radiation field. These unique focal field distributions may find potential applications in laser direct writing and optical microscopy, as well as multiple-particle trapping, alignment, and acceleration along the optical axis.

  5. Creation of identical multiple focal spots with prescribed axial distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yanzhong; Zhan, Qiwen

    2015-01-01

    We present a scheme for the construction of coaxially equidistant multiple focal spots with identical intensity profiles for each individual focus and a predetermined number and spacing. To achieve this, the radiation field from an antenna is reversed and then gathered by high numerical aperture objective lenses. Radiation patterns from three types of line sources, i.e., the electric current, magnetic current and electromagnetic current distributions, with cosine-squared taper are respectively employed to generate predominately longitudinally polarized bright spots, azimuthally polarized doughnuts, and focal spots with a perfect spherically symmetric intensity distribution. The required illuminations at the pupil plane of a 4Pi focusing configuration for the creation of these identical multiple focal spots can be easily derived by solving the inverse problem of the antenna radiation field. These unique focal field distributions may find potential applications in laser direct writing and optical microscopy, as well as multiple-particle trapping, alignment, and acceleration along the optical axis. PMID:26424051

  6. An analysis of the least-squares problem for the DSN systematic pointing error model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L. S.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic pointing error model is used to calibrate antennas in the Deep Space Network. The least squares problem is described and analyzed along with the solution methods used to determine the model's parameters. Specifically studied are the rank degeneracy problems resulting from beam pointing error measurement sets that incorporate inadequate sky coverage. A least squares parameter subset selection method is described and its applicability to the systematic error modeling process is demonstrated on Voyager 2 measurement distribution.

  7. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.B.; Marshall, T.C.; LaPointe, M.A.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM{sub 01} fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5{pi}mm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM{sub 01} mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Automated rapid finite fault inversion for megathrust earthquakes: Application to the Maule (2010), Iquique (2014) and Illapel (2015) great earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavente, Roberto; Cummins, Phil; Dettmer, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Rapid estimation of the spatial and temporal rupture characteristics of large megathrust earthquakes by finite fault inversion is important for disaster mitigation. For example, estimates of the spatio-temporal evolution of rupture can be used to evaluate population exposure to tsunami waves and ground shaking soon after the event by providing more accurate predictions than possible with point source approximations. In addition, rapid inversion results can reveal seismic source complexity to guide additional, more detailed subsequent studies. This work develops a method to rapidly estimate the slip distribution of megathrust events while reducing subjective parameter choices by automation. The method is simple yet robust and we show that it provides excellent preliminary rupture models as soon as 30 minutes for three great earthquakes in the South-American subduction zone. This may slightly change for other regions depending on seismic station coverage but method can be applied to any subduction region. The inversion is based on W-phase data since it is rapidly and widely available and of low amplitude which avoids clipping at close stations for large events. In addition, prior knowledge of the slab geometry (e.g. SLAB 1.0) is applied and rapid W-phase point source information (time delay and centroid location) is used to constrain the fault geometry and extent. Since the linearization by multiple time window (MTW) parametrization requires regularization, objective smoothing is achieved by the discrepancy principle in two fully automated steps. First, the residuals are estimated assuming unknown noise levels, and second, seeking a subsequent solution which fits the data to noise level. The MTW scheme is applied with positivity constraints and a solution is obtained by an efficient non-negative least squares solver. Systematic application of the algorithm to the Maule (2010), Iquique (2014) and Illapel (2015) events illustrates that rapid finite fault inversion with

  9. Square lattice honeycomb reactor for space power and propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouw, Reza; Anghaie, Samim

    2000-01-01

    The most recent nuclear design study at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI) is the Moderated Square-Lattice Honeycomb (M-SLHC) reactor design utilizing the solid solution of ternary carbide fuels. The reactor is fueled with solid solution of 93% enriched (U,Zr,Nb)C. The square-lattice honeycomb design provides high strength and is amenable to the processing complexities of these ultrahigh temperature fuels. The optimum core configuration requires a balance between high specific impulse and thrust level performance, and maintaining the temperature and strength limits of the fuel. The M-SLHC design is based on a cylindrical core that has critical radius and length of 37 cm and 50 cm, respectively. This design utilized zirconium hydrate to act as moderator. The fuel sub-assemblies are designed as cylindrical tubes with 12 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length. Five fuel subassemblies are stacked up axially to form one complete fuel assembly. These fuel assemblies are then arranged in the circular arrangement to form two fuel regions. The first fuel region consists of six fuel assemblies, and 18 fuel assemblies for the second fuel region. A 10-cm radial beryllium reflector in addition to 10-cm top axial beryllium reflector is used to reduce neutron leakage from the system. To perform nuclear design analysis of the M-SLHC design, a series of neutron transport and diffusion codes are used. To optimize the system design, five axial regions are specified. In each axial region, temperature and fuel density are varied. The axial and radial power distributions for the system are calculated, as well as the axial and radial flux distributions. Temperature coefficients of the system are also calculated. A water submersion accident scenario is also analyzed for these systems. Results of the nuclear design analysis indicate that a compact core can be designed based on ternary uranium carbide square-lattice honeycomb fuel, which provides a relatively

  10. Iterative reweighted least M-estimate AVO inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jiashu; Hu, Guangmin

    2015-04-01

    The l1 norm and its variants, such as the hybrid l1/l2 norm and the Huber norm, that are used to solve amplitude variation with offset (AVO) inversion optimisation problems, are mostly known to give a more robust solution than the classical least-squares (l2 norm) method by reducing the influence of outliers significantly, although never ignoring it. To deal with data having many outliers, biweight norm using iteratively reweighted least-squares (IRLS) as robust inversion method can improve robustness by ignoring outliers in computing the misfit measure. However, biweight norm uses a higher-order descending weighting on the measured data, which results in poor performance when dealing with the well measured data. Hampel's three-part redescending M-estimate function as robust measure could be considered as a three-part combination of the l2 norm and l1 norm with excluding outliers, which could perform better. This paper describes an iterative reweighted least M-estimate (IRLM) algorithm as a robust AVO inversion. The synthetic and field seismic data tests show that the IRLM algorithm gives far more robust model estimates than the conventional Huber norm and biweight norm.

  11. A generalized inversion method: Simultaneous source localization and environmental inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Knobles, David P.

    2002-05-01

    The problem of localizing and tracking a source in the shallow ocean is often complicated by uncertainty in the environmental parameters. Likewise, the estimates of environmental parameters in the shallow ocean obtained by inversion methods can be degraded by incorrect information about the source location. To overcome both these common obstacles-environmental mismatch in matched field processing and incorrect source location in geoacoustic inversions-a generalized inversion scheme is developed that includes both source and environmental parameters as unknowns in the inversion. The new technique called systematic decoupling using rotated coordinates (SDRC) expands the original idea of rotated coordinates [M. D. Collins and L. Fishman, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 1637-1644 (1995)] by using multiple sets of coherent broadband rotated coordinates, each corresponding to a different set of bounds, to systematically decouple the unknowns in a series of simulated annealing inversions. The results of applying the SDRC inversion method to data from the Area Characterization Test II experiment performed on the New Jersey continental shelf are presented. [Work supported by ONR.

  12. Inverse Statistics and Asset Allocation Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolgorian, Meysam

    In this paper using inverse statistics analysis, the effect of investment horizon on the efficiency of portfolio selection is examined. Inverse statistics analysis is a general tool also known as probability distribution of exit time that is used for detecting the distribution of the time in which a stochastic process exits from a zone. This analysis was used in Refs. 1 and 2 for studying the financial returns time series. This distribution provides an optimal investment horizon which determines the most likely horizon for gaining a specific return. Using samples of stocks from Tehran Stock Exchange (TSE) as an emerging market and S&P 500 as a developed market, effect of optimal investment horizon in asset allocation is assessed. It is found that taking into account the optimal investment horizon in TSE leads to more efficiency for large size portfolios while for stocks selected from S&P 500, regardless of portfolio size, this strategy does not only not produce more efficient portfolios, but also longer investment horizons provides more efficiency.

  13. Inverse sequential simulation: Performance and implementation details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Teng; Gómez-Hernández, J. Jaime

    2015-12-01

    For good groundwater flow and solute transport numerical modeling, it is important to characterize the formation properties. In this paper, we analyze the performance and important implementation details of a new approach for stochastic inverse modeling called inverse sequential simulation (iSS). This approach is capable of characterizing conductivity fields with heterogeneity patterns difficult to capture by standard multiGaussian-based inverse approaches. The method is based on the multivariate sequential simulation principle, but the covariances and cross-covariances used to compute the local conditional probability distributions are computed by simple co-kriging which are derived from an ensemble of conductivity and piezometric head fields, in a similar manner as the experimental covariances are computed in an ensemble Kalman filtering. A sensitivity analysis is performed on a synthetic aquifer regarding the number of members of the ensemble of realizations, the number of conditioning data, the number of piezometers at which piezometric heads are observed, and the number of nodes retained within the search neighborhood at the moment of computing the local conditional probabilities. The results show the importance of having a sufficiently large number of all of the mentioned parameters for the algorithm to characterize properly hydraulic conductivity fields with clear non-multiGaussian features.

  14. Gravity inversion in spherical coordinates using tesseroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2014-05-01

    Satellite observations of the gravity field have provided geophysicists with exceptionally dense and uniform coverage of data over vast areas. This enables regional or global scale high resolution geophysical investigations. Techniques like forward modeling and inversion of gravity anomalies are routinely used to investigate large geologic structures, such as large igneous provinces, suture zones, intracratonic basins, and the Moho. Accurately modeling such large structures requires taking the sphericity of the Earth into account. A reasonable approximation is to assume a spherical Earth and use spherical coordinates. In recent years, efforts have been made to advance forward modeling in spherical coordinates using tesseroids, particularly with respect to speed and accuracy. Conversely, traditional space domain inverse modeling methods have not yet been adapted to use spherical coordinates and tesseroids. In the literature there are a range of inversion methods that have been developed for Cartesian coordinates and right rectangular prisms. These include methods for estimating the relief of an interface, like the Moho or the basement of a sedimentary basin. Another category includes methods to estimate the density distribution in a medium. The latter apply many algorithms to solve the inverse problem, ranging from analytic solutions to random search methods as well as systematic search methods. We present an adaptation for tesseroids of the systematic search method of "planting anomalous densities". This method can be used to estimate the geometry of geologic structures. As prior information, it requires knowledge of the approximate densities and positions of the structures. The main advantage of this method is its computational efficiency, requiring little computer memory and processing time. We demonstrate the shortcomings and capabilities of this approach using applications to synthetic and field data. Performing the inversion of gravity and gravity gradient

  15. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e{sup {minus}} beam and the 10{sup 11} Watt CO{sub 2} laser beam of BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a {approximately} 1.5 %/cm tapered period configuration. The CO{sub 2} laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO{sub 2} laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  16. Simple shear of deformable square objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Lan, Labao

    2003-12-01

    Finite element models of square objects in a contrasting matrix in simple shear show that the objects deform to a variety of shapes. For a range of viscosity contrasts, we catalogue the changing shapes and orientations of objects in progressive simple shear. At moderate simple shear ( γ=1.5), the shapes are virtually indistinguishable from those in equivalent pure shear models with the same bulk strain ( RS=4), examined in a previous study. In theory, differences would be expected, especially for very stiff objects or at very large strain. In all our simple shear models, relatively competent square objects become asymmetric barrel shapes with concave shortened edges, similar to some types of boudin. Incompetent objects develop shapes surprisingly similar to mica fish described in mylonites.

  17. Skyrmions in square-lattice antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesman, Rick; Raaijmakers, Mark; Baerends, A. E.; Barkema, G. T.; Duine, R. A.

    2016-08-01

    The ground states of square-lattice two-dimensional antiferromagnets with anisotropy in an external magnetic field are determined using Monte Carlo simulations and compared to theoretical analysis. We find a phase in between the spin-flop and spiral phase that shows strong similarity to skyrmions in ferromagnetic thin films. We show that this phase arises as a result of the competition between Zeeman and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction energies of the magnetic system. Moreover, we find that isolated (anti-)skyrmions are stabilized in finite-sized systems, even at higher temperatures. The existence of thermodynamically stable skyrmions in square-lattice antiferromagnets provides an appealing alternative over skyrmions in ferromagnets as data carriers.

  18. Least squares restoration of multichannel images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galatsanos, Nikolas P.; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K.; Chin, Roland T.; Hillery, Allen D.

    1991-01-01

    Multichannel restoration using both within- and between-channel deterministic information is considered. A multichannel image is a set of image planes that exhibit cross-plane similarity. Existing optimal restoration filters for single-plane images yield suboptimal results when applied to multichannel images, since between-channel information is not utilized. Multichannel least squares restoration filters are developed using the set theoretic and the constrained optimization approaches. A geometric interpretation of the estimates of both filters is given. Color images (three-channel imagery with red, green, and blue components) are considered. Constraints that capture the within- and between-channel properties of color images are developed. Issues associated with the computation of the two estimates are addressed. A spatially adaptive, multichannel least squares filter that utilizes local within- and between-channel image properties is proposed. Experiments using color images are described.

  19. Square-loop cobalt/gold multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, R. J.; Ruf, R. R.

    1990-05-01

    Multilayers of Co and Au with perpendicular hysteresis loop squareness ratios of ˜1 have been prepared by e-beam evaporation. These films have perpendicular anisotropy in the as-deposited condition in contrast to other work in which Co/Au multilayers, prepared by ion beam sputtering, showed perpendicular anisotropy only after annealing at 300 °C. The Faraday rotation of these square-loop multilayers is about 9×105 deg/cm of Co or 1×105 deg/cm of total thickness at a wavelength of 633 nm. These values indicate an enhancement of the Faraday rotation of Co at this wavelength by about a factor of 2. This may be a plasma-edge enhancement effect similar to that reported by Katayama et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 1426 (1988)] in the Kerr effect of Fe/Au multilayers.

  20. Improving the gradient in least-squares reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiancheng

    2016-04-01

    Least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) is a linearized inversion technique used for estimating high-wavenumber reflectivity. However, due to the redundant overlay of the band-limited source wavelet, the gradient based on the cross-correlated imaging principle suffers from a loss of wavenumber information. We first prepare the residuals between observed and demigrated data by deconvolving with the amplitude spectrum of the source wavelet, and then migrate the preprocessed residuals by using the cross-correlation imaging principle. In this way, a gradient that preserves the spectral signature of data residuals is obtained. The computational cost of source-wavelet removal is negligible compared to that of wavefield simulation. The two-dimensional Marmousi model containing complex geology structures is considered to test our scheme. Numerical examples show that our improved gradient in LSRTM has a better convergence behavior and promises inverted results of higher resolution. Finally, we attempt to update the background velocity with our inverted velocity perturbations to approach the true velocity.

  1. Highlighting High Performance: Four Times Square

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2001-11-01

    4 Times Square is a 48-story environmentally responsible building in New York City. Developed by the Durst Organization, the building is the first project of its size to adopt standards for energy efficiency, indoor ecology, sustainable materials, and responsible construction, operations, and maintenance procedures. Designers used a whole-building approach--considering how the building's systems can work together most efficiently--and educated tenants on the benefits of the design.

  2. Natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novomestský, Marcel; Smatanová, Helena; Kapjor, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    This article is concerned with natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder mounted on a plane adiabatic base, the cylinders having an exposed cylinder surface according to different horizontal angle. The cylinder receives heat from a radiating heater which results in a buoyant flow. There are many industrial applications, including refrigeration, ventilation and the cooling of electrical components, for which the present study may be applicable

  3. SISYPHUS: A high performance seismic inversion factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhberg, Alexey; Simutė, Saulė; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    branches for the static process setup, inversion iterations, and solver runs, each branch specifying information at the event, station and channel levels. The workflow management framework is based on an embedded scripting engine that allows definition of various workflow scenarios using a high-level scripting language and provides access to all available inversion components represented as standard library functions. At present the SES3D wave propagation solver is integrated in the solution; the work is in progress for interfacing with SPECFEM3D. A separate framework is designed for interoperability with an optimization module; the workflow manager and optimization process run in parallel and cooperate by exchanging messages according to a specially designed protocol. A library of high-performance modules implementing signal pre-processing, misfit and adjoint computations according to established good practices is included. Monitoring is based on information stored in the inversion state database and at present implements a command line interface; design of a graphical user interface is in progress. The software design fits well into the common massively parallel system architecture featuring a large number of computational nodes running distributed applications under control of batch-oriented resource managers. The solution prototype has been implemented on the "Piz Daint" supercomputer provided by the Swiss Supercomputing Centre (CSCS).

  4. Temperature Inversions Have Cold Bottoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.; Brown, Gail M.

    1982-01-01

    Uses discussion and illustrations of several demonstrations on air temperature differences and atmospheric stability to explain the phenomena of temperature inversions. Relates this to the smog in Los Angeles and discusses the implications. (DC)

  5. Donor states in inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  6. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-21

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  7. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  8. Uterine Inversion; A case report.

    PubMed

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, Ma

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  9. Uterine Inversion; A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, MA

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  10. CUMPOIS- CUMULATIVE POISSON DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowerman, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    The Cumulative Poisson distribution program, CUMPOIS, is one of two programs which make calculations involving cumulative poisson distributions. Both programs, CUMPOIS (NPO-17714) and NEWTPOIS (NPO-17715), can be used independently of one another. CUMPOIS determines the approximate cumulative binomial distribution, evaluates the cumulative distribution function (cdf) for gamma distributions with integer shape parameters, and evaluates the cdf for chi-square distributions with even degrees of freedom. It can be used by statisticians and others concerned with probabilities of independent events occurring over specific units of time, area, or volume. CUMPOIS calculates the probability that n or less events (ie. cumulative) will occur within any unit when the expected number of events is given as lambda. Normally, this probability is calculated by a direct summation, from i=0 to n, of terms involving the exponential function, lambda, and inverse factorials. This approach, however, eventually fails due to underflow for sufficiently large values of n. Additionally, when the exponential term is moved outside of the summation for simplification purposes, there is a risk that the terms remaining within the summation, and the summation itself, will overflow for certain values of i and lambda. CUMPOIS eliminates these possibilities by multiplying an additional exponential factor into the summation terms and the partial sum whenever overflow/underflow situations threaten. The reciprocal of this term is then multiplied into the completed sum giving the cumulative probability. The CUMPOIS program is written in C. It was developed on an IBM AT with a numeric co-processor using Microsoft C 5.0. Because the source code is written using standard C structures and functions, it should compile correctly on most C compilers. The program format is interactive, accepting lambda and n as inputs. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2 and has a memory requirement of 26K. CUMPOIS was

  11. A Cautionary Note on Using G[squared](dif) to Assess Relative Model Fit in Categorical Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maydeu-Olivares, Albert; Cai, Li

    2006-01-01

    The likelihood ratio test statistic G[squared](dif) is widely used for comparing the fit of nested models in categorical data analysis. In large samples, this statistic is distributed as a chi-square with degrees of freedom equal to the difference in degrees of freedom between the tested models, but only if the least restrictive model is correctly…

  12. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-01-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to Tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed.

  13. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-10-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed.

  14. Building Generalized Inverses of Matrices Using Only Row and Column Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Most students complete their first and only course in linear algebra with the understanding that a real, square matrix "A" has an inverse if and only if "rref"("A"), the reduced row echelon form of "A", is the identity matrix I[subscript n]. That is, if they apply elementary row operations via the Gauss-Jordan algorithm to the partitioned matrix…

  15. XAFS study of copper(II) complexes with square planar and square pyramidal coordination geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, A.; Klysubun, W.; Nitin Nair, N.; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure of six Cu(II) complexes, Cu2(Clna)4 2H2O (1), Cu2(ac)4 2H2O (2), Cu2(phac)4 (pyz) (3), Cu2(bpy)2(na)2 H2O (ClO4) (4), Cu2(teen)4(OH)2(ClO4)2 (5) and Cu2(tmen)4(OH)2(ClO4)2 (6) (where ac, phac, pyz, bpy, na, teen, tmen = acetate, phenyl acetate, pyrazole, bipyridine, nicotinic acid, tetraethyethylenediamine, tetramethylethylenediamine, respectively), which were supposed to have square pyramidal and square planar coordination geometries have been investigated. The differences observed in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) features of the standard compounds having four, five and six coordination geometry points towards presence of square planar and square pyramidal geometry around Cu centre in the studied complexes. The presence of intense pre-edge feature in the spectra of four complexes, 1-4, indicates square pyramidal coordination. Another important XANES feature, present in complexes 5 and 6, is prominent shoulder in the rising part of edge whose intensity decreases in the presence of axial ligands and thus indicates four coordination in these complexes. Ab initio calculations were carried out for square planar and square pyramidal Cu centres to observe the variation of 4p density of states in the presence and absence of axial ligands. To determine the number and distance of scattering atoms around Cu centre in the complexes, EXAFS analysis has been done using the paths obtained from Cu(II) oxide model and an axial Cu-O path from model of a square pyramidal complex. The results obtained from EXAFS analysis have been reported which confirmed the inference drawn from XANES features. Thus, it has been shown that these paths from model of a standard compound can be used to determine the structural parameters for complexes having unknown structure.

  16. The face inversion effect in opponent-stimulus rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Persike, Malte; Meinhardt-Injac, Bozana; Meinhardt, Günter

    2014-01-01

    The face inversion effect is regarded as a hallmark of face-specific processing, and can be observed in a large variety of visual tasks. Face inversion effects are also reported in binocular rivalry. However, it is unclear whether these effects are face-specific, and distinct from the general tendency of visual awareness to privilege upright objects. We studied continuous rivalry across more than 600 dominance epochs for each observer, having faces and houses rival against their inverted counterparts, and letting faces rival against houses in both upright and inverted orientation. We found strong inversion effects for faces and houses in both the frequency of dominance epochs and their duration. Inversion effects for faces, however, were substantially larger, reaching a 70:30 distribution of dominance times for upright versus inverted faces, while a 60:40 distribution was obtained for upright versus inverted houses. Inversion effects for faces reached a Cohen's d of 0.85, compared to a value of 0.33 for houses. Dominance times for rivalry of faces against houses had a 60:40 distribution in favor of faces, independent of the orientation of the objects. These results confirm the general tendency of visual awareness to prefer upright objects, and demonstrate the outstanding role of faces. Since effect size measures clearly distinguish face stimuli in opponent-stimulus rivalry, the method is highly recommended for testing the effects of face manipulations against non-face reference objects. PMID:24860477

  17. Bayesian inversions of a dynamic vegetation model in four European grassland sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minet, J.; Laloy, E.; Tychon, B.; François, L.

    2015-01-01

    Eddy covariance data from four European grassland sites are used to probabilistically invert the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model (DVM) with ten unknown parameters, using the DREAM(ZS) Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampler. We compare model inversions considering both homoscedastic and heteroscedastic eddy covariance residual errors, with variances either fixed a~priori or jointly inferred with the model parameters. Agreements between measured and simulated data during calibration are comparable with previous studies, with root-mean-square error (RMSE) of simulated daily gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (RECO) and evapotranspiration (ET) ranging from 1.73 to 2.19 g C m-2 day-1, 1.04 to 1.56 g C m-2 day-1, and 0.50 to 1.28 mm day-1, respectively. In validation, mismatches between measured and simulated data are larger, but still with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency scores above 0.5 for three out of the four sites. Although measurement errors associated with eddy covariance data are known to be heteroscedastic, we showed that assuming a classical linear heteroscedastic model of the residual errors in the inversion do not fully remove heteroscedasticity. Since the employed heteroscedastic error model allows for larger deviations between simulated and measured data as the magnitude of the measured data increases, this error model expectedly lead to poorer data fitting compared to inversions considering a constant variance of the residual errors. Furthermore, sampling the residual error variances along with model parameters results in overall similar model parameter posterior distributions as those obtained by fixing these variances beforehand, while slightly improving model performance. Despite the fact that the calibrated model is generally capable of fitting the data within measurement errors, systematic bias in the model simulations are observed. These are likely due to model inadequacies such as shortcomings in the photosynthesis modelling

  18. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion.

    PubMed

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion. PMID:27209370

  19. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion.

  20. Inversion of Self Potential Anomalies with Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaftan, Ilknur; Sındırgı, Petek; Akdemir, Özer

    2014-08-01

    This study investigates the inverse solution on a buried and polarized sphere-shaped body using the self-potential method via multilayer perceptron neural networks (MLPNN). The polarization angle ( α), depth to the centre of sphere ( h), electrical dipole moment ( K) and the zero distance from the origin ( x 0) were estimated. For testing the success of the MLPNN for sphere model, parameters were also estimated by the traditional Damped Least Squares (Levenberg-Marquardt) inversion technique (DLS). The MLPNN was first tested on a synthetic example. The performance of method was also tested for two S/N ratios (5 % and 10 %) by adding noise to the same synthetic data, the estimated model parameters with MLPNN and DLS method are satisfactory. The MLPNN also applied for the field data example in İzmir, Urla district, Turkey, with two cross-section data evaluated by MLPNN and DLS, and the two methods showed good agreement.

  1. Improved speech inversion using general regression neural network.

    PubMed

    Najnin, Shamima; Banerjee, Bonny

    2015-09-01

    The problem of nonlinear acoustic to articulatory inversion mapping is investigated in the feature space using two models, the deep belief network (DBN) which is the state-of-the-art, and the general regression neural network (GRNN). The task is to estimate a set of articulatory features for improved speech recognition. Experiments with MOCHA-TIMIT and MNGU0 databases reveal that, for speech inversion, GRNN yields a lower root-mean-square error and a higher correlation than DBN. It is also shown that conjunction of acoustic and GRNN-estimated articulatory features yields state-of-the-art accuracy in broad class phonetic classification and phoneme recognition using less computational power. PMID:26428818

  2. A fast new algorithm for a robot neurocontroller using inverse QR decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, A.S.; Khemaissia, S.

    2000-01-01

    A new adaptive neural network controller for robots is presented. The controller is based on direct adaptive techniques. Unlike many neural network controllers in the literature, inverse dynamical model evaluation is not required. A numerically robust, computationally efficient processing scheme for neutral network weight estimation is described, namely, the inverse QR decomposition (INVQR). The inverse QR decomposition and a weighted recursive least-squares (WRLS) method for neural network weight estimation is derived using Cholesky factorization of the data matrix. The algorithm that performs the efficient INVQR of the underlying space-time data matrix may be implemented in parallel on a triangular array. Furthermore, its systolic architecture is well suited for VLSI implementation. Another important benefit is well suited for VLSI implementation. Another important benefit of the INVQR decomposition is that it solves directly for the time-recursive least-squares filter vector, while avoiding the sequential back-substitution step required by the QR decomposition approaches.

  3. Raney Distributions and Random Matrix Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Peter J.; Liu, Dang-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Recent works have shown that the family of probability distributions with moments given by the Fuss-Catalan numbers permit a simple parameterized form for their density. We extend this result to the Raney distribution which by definition has its moments given by a generalization of the Fuss-Catalan numbers. Such computations begin with an algebraic equation satisfied by the Stieltjes transform, which we show can be derived from the linear differential equation satisfied by the characteristic polynomial of random matrix realizations of the Raney distribution. For the Fuss-Catalan distribution, an equilibrium problem characterizing the density is identified. The Stieltjes transform for the limiting spectral density of the singular values squared of the matrix product formed from inverse standard Gaussian matrices, and standard Gaussian matrices, is shown to satisfy a variant of the algebraic equation relating to the Raney distribution. Supported on , we show that it too permits a simple functional form upon the introduction of an appropriate choice of parameterization. As an application, the leading asymptotic form of the density as the endpoints of the support are approached is computed, and is shown to have some universal features.

  4. Hybrid Adaptive Flight Control with Model Inversion Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates a hybrid adaptive flight control method as a design possibility for a flight control system that can enable an effective adaptation strategy to deal with off-nominal flight conditions. The hybrid adaptive control blends both direct and indirect adaptive control in a model inversion flight control architecture. The blending of both direct and indirect adaptive control provides a much more flexible and effective adaptive flight control architecture than that with either direct or indirect adaptive control alone. The indirect adaptive control is used to update the model inversion controller by an on-line parameter estimation of uncertain plant dynamics based on two methods. The first parameter estimation method is an indirect adaptive law based on the Lyapunov theory, and the second method is a recursive least-squares indirect adaptive law. The model inversion controller is therefore made to adapt to changes in the plant dynamics due to uncertainty. As a result, the modeling error is reduced that directly leads to a decrease in the tracking error. In conjunction with the indirect adaptive control that updates the model inversion controller, a direct adaptive control is implemented as an augmented command to further reduce any residual tracking error that is not entirely eliminated by the indirect adaptive control.

  5. Inversion of Airborne Contaminants in a Regional Model

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V.; Biros, G.; Draganescu, A.; Ghattas, O.; Hill, J.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.; /SLAC /Pennsylvania U. /Texas U. /Sandia

    2007-01-10

    We are interested in a DDDAS problem of localization of airborne contaminant releases in regional atmospheric transport models from sparse observations. Given measurements of the contaminant over an observation window at a small number of points in space, and a velocity field as predicted for example by a mesoscopic weather model, we seek an estimate of the state of the contaminant at the beginning of the observation interval that minimizes the least squares misfit between measured and predicted contaminant field, subject to the convection-diffusion equation for the contaminant. Once the ''initial'' conditions are estimated by solution of the inverse problem, we issue predictions of the evolution of the contaminant, the observation window is advanced in time, and the process repeated to issue a new prediction, in the style of 4D-Var. We design an appropriate numerical strategy that exploits the spectral structure of the inverse operator, and leads to efficient and accurate resolution of the inverse problem. Numerical experiments verify that high resolution inversion can be carried out rapidly for a well-resolved terrain model of the greater Los Angeles area.

  6. Image appraisal for 2D and 3D electromagnetic inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. The columns of the model resolution matrix are shown to yield empirical estimates of the horizontal and vertical resolution throughout the imaging region. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how the estimated data noise maps into parameter error. When the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion), an iterative method can be applied to statistically estimate the model covariance matrix, as well as a regularization covariance matrix. The latter estimates the error in the inverted results caused by small variations in the regularization parameter. A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on a synthetic cross well EM data set.

  7. Image reconstruction for an electrical capacitance tomography system based on a least-squares support vector machine and a self-adaptive particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xia; Hu, Hong-li; Liu, Fei; Gao, Xiang Xiang

    2011-10-01

    The task of image reconstruction for an electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system is to determine the permittivity distribution and hence the phase distribution in a pipeline by measuring the electrical capacitances between sets of electrodes placed around its periphery. In view of the nonlinear relationship between the permittivity distribution and capacitances and the limited number of independent capacitance measurements, image reconstruction for ECT is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem. To solve this problem, a new image reconstruction method for ECT based on a least-squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) combined with a self-adaptive particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented. Regarded as a special small sample theory, the SVM avoids the issues appearing in artificial neural network methods such as difficult determination of a network structure, over-learning and under-learning. However, the SVM performs differently with different parameters. As a relatively new population-based evolutionary optimization technique, PSO is adopted to realize parameters' effective selection with the advantages of global optimization and rapid convergence. This paper builds up a 12-electrode ECT system and a pneumatic conveying platform to verify this image reconstruction algorithm. Experimental results indicate that the algorithm has good generalization ability and high-image reconstruction quality.

  8. Numerical solution of a nonlinear least squares problem in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, G.; Loli Piccolomini, E.; Nagy, J. G.

    2015-11-01

    In digital tomosynthesis imaging, multiple projections of an object are obtained along a small range of different incident angles in order to reconstruct a pseudo-3D representation (i.e., a set of 2D slices) of the object. In this paper we describe some mathematical models for polyenergetic digital breast tomosynthesis image reconstruction that explicitly takes into account various materials composing the object and the polyenergetic nature of the x-ray beam. A polyenergetic model helps to reduce beam hardening artifacts, but the disadvantage is that it requires solving a large-scale nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem. We formulate the image reconstruction process (i.e., the method to solve the ill-posed inverse problem) in a nonlinear least squares framework, and use a Levenberg-Marquardt scheme to solve it. Some implementation details are discussed, and numerical experiments are provided to illustrate the performance of the methods.

  9. Global inversion for anisotropy during full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debens, H. A.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful tool for quantitative estimation of high-resolution high-fidelity models of subsurface seismic parameters, typically P-wave velocity. The solution to FWI's posed nonlinear inverse problem is obtained via an iterative series of linearized local updates to a start model, assuming this model lies within the basin of attraction to the global minimum. Thanks to many successful published applications to three-dimensional (3D) field datasets, its advance has been rapid and driven in large-part by the oil and gas industry. The consideration of seismic anisotropy during FWI is of vital importance, as it holds influence over both the kinematics and dynamics of seismic waveforms. If not appropriately taken into account then inadequacies in the anisotropy model are likely to manifest as significant error in the recovered velocity model. Conventionally, anisotropic FWI employs either an a priori anisotropy model, held fixed during FWI, or it uses a multi-parameter local inversion scheme to recover the anisotropy as part of the FWI; both of these methods can be problematic. Constructing an anisotropy model prior to FWI often involves intensive (and hence expensive) iterative procedures, such as travel-time tomography or moveout velocity analysis. On the other hand, introducing multiple parameters to FWI itself increases the complexity of what is already an underdetermined inverse problem. We propose that global rather than local FWI can be used to recover the long-wavelength acoustic anisotropy model, and that this can then be followed by more-conventional local FWI to recover the detailed model. We validate this approach using a full 3D field dataset, demonstrating that it avoids problems associated to crosstalk that can bedevil local inversion schemes, and reconciles well with in situ borehole measurements. Although our approach includes a global inversion for anisotropy, it is nonetheless affordable and practical for 3D field data.

  10. [Partial lease squares approach to functional analysis].

    PubMed

    Preda, C

    2006-01-01

    We extend the partial least squares (PLS) approach to functional data represented in our models by sample paths of stochastic process with continuous time. Due to the infinite dimension, when functional data are used as a predictor for linear regression and classification models, the estimation problem is an ill-posed one. In this context, PLS offers a simple and efficient alternative to the methods based on the principal components of the stochastic process. We compare the results given by the PLS approach and other linear models using several datasets from economy, industry and medical fields. PMID:17124795

  11. Uranyl peroxide closed clusters containing topological squares

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Burtner, Alicia; Pressprich, Laura; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Four self-assembling clusters of uranyl peroxide polyhedra have been formed in alkaline aqueous solutions and structurally characterized. These clusters consist of 28, 30, 36 and 44 uranyl polyhedra and exhibit complex new topologies. Each has a structure that contains topological squares, pentagons and hexagons. Analysis of possible topologies within boundary constraints indicates a tendency for adoption of higher symmetry topologies in these cases. Small angle X-ray scattering data demonstrated that crystals of one of these clusters can be dissolved in ultrapure water and that the clusters remain intact for at least several days.

  12. The Square-Shoulder-Asakura-Oosawa model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantoni, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    A new model for a colloidal size-asymmetric binary mixture is proposed: The Square-Shoulder-Asakura-Oosawa. This belongs to the larger class of non-additive hard-spheres models and has the property that its effective pair formulation is exact whenever the solvent particle fits inside the interstitial region of three touching solute particles. Therefore one can study its properties from the equivalent one-component effective problem. Some remarks on the phase diagram of this new model are also addressed.

  13. Support Vector Machines for Non-linear Geophysical Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, H. A.; Rector, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Classical non-linear geophysical inversion can be simulated using computer learning via Support Vector Machines. Geophysical inverse problems are almost always ill-posed which means that many different models (i.e. descriptions of the earth) can be found to explain a given noisy or incomplete data set. Regularization and constraints encourage inversions to find physically realistic models. The set of preferred models needs to be defined a priori using as much geologic knowledge as is available. In inversion, it is assumed that data and a forward modeling process is known. The goal is to solve for a model. In the SVM paradigm, a series of models and associated data are known. The goal is to solve for a reverse modeling process. Starting with a series of initial models assembled using all available geologic information, synthetic data is created using the most realistic forward modeling program available. With the synthetic data as inputs and the known models as outputs, a Support Vector Machine is trained to approximate a local inverse to the forward modeling program. The advantages of this approach are that it is honest about the need to establish, a priori, the kinds of models that are reasonable in a particular field situation. There is no need to adjust the forward process to accommodate inversion, because SVMs can be easily modified to capture complicated, non-linear relationships. SVMs are transparent and require very little programming. If an SVM is trained using model/data pairs that are drawn from the same probability distribution that is implicit in the regularization of an inversion, then it will get very similar results to the inversion. Because SVMs can interpret as much data as desired so long as the conditions of an experiment do not change, they can be used to perform otherwise computationally expensive procedures. Support Vector Machines are trained to emulate non-linear seismic Amplitude Variation with Offset (AVO) inversions, gravity inversions

  14. 3D stochastic geophysical inversion for contact surface geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin; Bijani, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Geologists' interpretations about the Earth typically involve distinct rock units with contacts (interfaces) between them. As such, 3D geological Earth models typically comprise wireframe contact surfaces of tessellated triangles or other polygonal planar facets. In contrast, standard minimum-structure geophysical inversions are performed on meshes of space-filling cells (typically prisms or tetrahedra) and recover smoothly varying physical property distributions that are inconsistent with typical geological interpretations. There are several approaches through which mesh-based geophysical inversion can help recover models with some of the desired characteristics. However, a more effective strategy is to consider a fundamentally different type of inversion that works directly with models that comprise surfaces representing contacts between rock units. We are researching such an approach, our goal being to perform geophysical forward and inverse modelling directly with 3D geological models of any complexity. Geological and geophysical models should be specified using the same parameterization such that they are, in essence, the same Earth model. We parameterize the wireframe contact surfaces in a 3D model as the coordinates of the nodes (facet vertices). The physical properties of each rock unit in a model remain fixed while the geophysical inversion controls the position of the contact surfaces via the control nodes, perturbing the surfaces as required to fit the geophysical data responses. This is essentially a "geometry inversion", which can be used to recover the unknown geometry of a target body or to investigate the viability of a proposed Earth model. We apply global optimization strategies to solve the inverse problem, including stochastic sampling to obtain statistical information regarding the likelihood of particular features in the model, helping to assess the viability of a proposed model. Jointly inverting multiple types of geophysical data is simple

  15. NA Nonlinear Equation-of-state Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, I.; Kennett, B. L.

    2008-12-01

    A fully non-linear inversion scheme is introduced for the determination of the parameters controlling the equation-of-state and elasticity of mineral phases using the thermodynamically consistent finite-strain formulation introduced by Stixrude & Lithgow-Bertelloni (2005). This inversion exploits a directed search in an eight-dimensional parameter space using the Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA) of Sambridge (1999) to search for the minimum of an objective function representing the misfit to multiple data sets that constrain different aspects of the mineral behaviour. No derivatives are employed and the progress towards the minimum builds on the accumulated information on the character of the parameter space acquired as the inversion progresses. When only a limited range of experimental information is available there is a strong possibility of multiple minima in the objective function, which can pose problems for conventional iterative least-squares or other gradient methods. The addition of many different styles of data tends to produce a better defined minimum. The influence of different data types can be readily assessed by allowing differential weighting. The new procedure is illustrated by application to MgO, for which extensive experimental data are available. These include the variation of relative volume V with temperature T and pressure P from both static and shock-compression experiments, acoustic measurements of compressional and shear (and hence bulk) moduli, and calorimetric determinations of entropy as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure. Preliminary NA modeling highlighted tensions between marginally incompatible subsets of data. We therefore excluded one-atmosphere V(T) data for T ≥ 1800 K for which the quasi-harmonic approximation is inadequate (Wu et al., 2008) along with elastic moduli derived from Brillouin spectroscopy under conditions (P ≥ 14 GPa) where significant departures from hydrostatic conditions are expected. With these

  16. Geophysical Inversion Through Hierarchical Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, A.; Huisman, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Geophysical investigation is a powerful tool that allows non-invasive and non-destructive mapping of subsurface states and properties. However, non-uniqueness associated with the inversion process prevents the quantitative use of these methods. One major direction researchers are going is constraining the inverse problem by hydrological observations and models. An alternative to the commonly used direct inversion methods are global optimization schemes (such as genetic algorithms and Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods). However, the major limitation here is the desired high resolution of the tomographic image, which leads to a large number of parameters and an unreasonably high computational effort when using global optimization schemes. Two innovative schemes are presented here. First, a hierarchical approach is used to reduce the computational effort for the global optimization. Solution is achieved for coarse spatial resolution, and this solution is used as the starting point for finer scheme. We show that the computational effort is reduced in this way dramatically. Second, we use a direct ERT inversion as the starting point for global optimization. In this case preliminary results show that the outcome is not necessarily beneficial, probably because of spatial mismatch between the results of the direct inversion and the true resistivity field.

  17. Noise suppression using preconditioned least-squares prestack time migration: application to the Mississippian limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shiguang; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Qing; Cabrales-Vargas, Alejandro; Marfurt, Kurt J.

    2016-08-01

    Conventional Kirchhoff migration often suffers from artifacts such as aliasing and acquisition footprint, which come from sub-optimal seismic acquisition. The footprint can mask faults and fractures, while aliased noise can focus into false coherent events which affect interpretation and contaminate amplitude variation with offset, amplitude variation with azimuth and elastic inversion. Preconditioned least-squares migration minimizes these artifacts. We implement least-squares migration by minimizing the difference between the original data and the modeled demigrated data using an iterative conjugate gradient scheme. Unpreconditioned least-squares migration better estimates the subsurface amplitude, but does not suppress aliasing. In this work, we precondition the results by applying a 3D prestack structure-oriented LUM (lower–upper–middle) filter to each common offset and common azimuth gather at each iteration. The preconditioning algorithm not only suppresses aliasing of both signal and noise, but also improves the convergence rate. We apply the new preconditioned least-squares migration to the Marmousi model and demonstrate how it can improve the seismic image compared with conventional migration, and then apply it to one survey acquired over a new resource play in the Mid-Continent, USA. The acquisition footprint from the targets is attenuated and the signal to noise ratio is enhanced. To demonstrate the impact on interpretation, we generate a suite of seismic attributes to image the Mississippian limestone, and show that the karst-enhanced fractures in the Mississippian limestone can be better illuminated.

  18. Revisiting the Least-squares Procedure for Gradient Reconstruction on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Thomas, James L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of the least-squares technique for gradient reconstruction on unstructured meshes is examined. While least-squares techniques produce accurate results on arbitrary isotropic unstructured meshes, serious difficulties exist for highly stretched meshes in the presence of surface curvature. In these situations, gradients are typically under-estimated by up to an order of magnitude. For vertex-based discretizations on triangular and quadrilateral meshes, and cell-centered discretizations on quadrilateral meshes, accuracy can be recovered using an inverse distance weighting in the least-squares construction. For cell-centered discretizations on triangles, both the unweighted and weighted least-squares constructions fail to provide suitable gradient estimates for highly stretched curved meshes. Good overall flow solution accuracy can be retained in spite of poor gradient estimates, due to the presence of flow alignment in exactly the same regions where the poor gradient accuracy is observed. However, the use of entropy fixes has the potential for generating large but subtle discretization errors.

  19. Application of linear mean-square estimation in ocean engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-ping; Chen, Bai-yu; Chen, Chao; Chen, Zheng-shou; Liu, Gui-lin

    2016-03-01

    The attempt to obtain long-term observed data around some sea areas we concern is usually very hard or even impossible in practical offshore and ocean engineering situations. In this paper, by means of linear mean-square estimation method, a new way to extend short-term data to long-term ones is developed. The long-term data about concerning sea areas can be constructed via a series of long-term data obtained from neighbor oceanographic stations, through relevance analysis of different data series. It is effective to cover the insufficiency of time series prediction method's overdependence upon the length of data series, as well as the limitation of variable numbers adopted in multiple linear regression model. The storm surge data collected from three oceanographic stations located in Shandong Peninsula are taken as examples to analyze the number-selection effect of reference oceanographic stations (adjacent to the concerning sea area) and the correlation coefficients between sea sites which are selected for reference and for engineering projects construction respectively. By comparing the N-year return-period values which are calculated from observed raw data and processed data which are extended from finite data series by means of the linear mean-square estimation method, one can draw a conclusion that this method can give considerably good estimation in practical ocean engineering, in spite of different extreme value distributions about raw and processed data.

  20. Electrical impedance tomography with an optimized calculable square sensor.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhang; Wang, Huaxiang; Xu, Lijun

    2008-10-01

    Electrical impedance tomography is a technique that reconstructs the medium distribution in a region of interest through electrical measurements on its boundary. In this paper, an optimized square sensor was designed for electrical impedance tomography in order to obtain maximum information over the cross section of interest, e.g., circulating fluidized beds, in the sense of Shannon information entropy. An analytical model of the sensor was obtained using the conformal transformation. The model indicates that the square sensor possesses calculable property, which allows the calculation of standard values of the sensor directly from a single dimensional measurement that can be made traceable to the SI unit of length. Based on the model, the sensitivity maps and electrical field lines can be calculated in less than a second. Two model based algorithms for image reconstruction, i.e., back projection algorithm based on electrical field lines and iterative Lavrentiev regularization algorithm based on the sensitivity map, were introduced. Simulated results and experimental results validate the feasibility of the algorithms. PMID:19044722