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Sample records for inversion recovery stir

  1. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  2. Evaluation of an integrated continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor: Wastewater treatment, energy recovery and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Zhou, Xiangtong; Feng, Yujie

    2015-11-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER) was developed by integrating anaerobic digestion (AD) and microbial electrochemical system (MES). The system was capable of treating high strength artificial wastewater and simultaneously recovering electric and methane energy. Maximum power density of 583±9, 562±7, 533±10 and 572±6 mW m(-2) were obtained by each cell in a four-independent circuit mode operation at an OLR of 12 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). COD removal and energy recovery efficiency were 87.1% and 32.1%, which were 1.6 and 2.5 times higher than that of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Larger amount of Deltaproteobacteria (5.3%) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (47%) can account for the better performance of CSMER, since syntrophic associations among them provided more degradation pathways compared to the CSTR. Results demonstrate the CSMER holds great promise for efficient wastewater treatment and energy recovery.

  3. Inverse problem analysis of pluripotent stem cell aggregation dynamics in stirred-suspension cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Mahboubeh Rahmati; Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of stem cells as aggregates in scalable bioreactor cultures is an appealing modality for the large-scale manufacturing of stem cell products. Aggregation phenomena are central to such bioprocesses affecting the viability, proliferation and differentiation trajectory of stem cells but a quantitative framework is currently lacking. A population balance equation (PBE) model was used to describe the temporal evolution of the embryonic stem cell (ESC) cluster size distribution by considering collision-induced aggregation and cell proliferation in a stirred-suspension vessel. For ESC cultures at different agitation rates, the aggregation kernel representing the aggregation dynamics was successfully recovered as a solution of the inverse problem. The rate of change of the average aggregate size was greater at the intermediate rate tested suggesting a trade-off between increased collisions and agitation-induced shear. Results from forward simulation with obtained aggregation kernels were in agreement with transient aggregate size data from experiments. We conclude that the framework presented here can complement mechanistic studies offering insights into relevant stem cell clustering processes. More importantly from a process development standpoint, this strategy can be employed in the design and control of bioreactors for the generation of stem cell derivatives for drug screening, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:26036699

  4. Inverse problem analysis of pluripotent stem cell aggregation dynamics in stirred-suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Mahboubeh Rahmati; Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S

    2015-08-20

    The cultivation of stem cells as aggregates in scalable bioreactor cultures is an appealing modality for the large-scale manufacturing of stem cell products. Aggregation phenomena are central to such bioprocesses affecting the viability, proliferation and differentiation trajectory of stem cells but a quantitative framework is currently lacking. A population balance equation (PBE) model was used to describe the temporal evolution of the embryonic stem cell (ESC) cluster size distribution by considering collision-induced aggregation and cell proliferation in a stirred-suspension vessel. For ESC cultures at different agitation rates, the aggregation kernel representing the aggregation dynamics was successfully recovered as a solution of the inverse problem. The rate of change of the average aggregate size was greater at the intermediate rate tested suggesting a trade-off between increased collisions and agitation-induced shear. Results from forward simulation with obtained aggregation kernels were in agreement with transient aggregate size data from experiments. We conclude that the framework presented here can complement mechanistic studies offering insights into relevant stem cell clustering processes. More importantly from a process development standpoint, this strategy can be employed in the design and control of bioreactors for the generation of stem cell derivatives for drug screening, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  5. Evaluation of an integrated continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor: Wastewater treatment, energy recovery and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Zhou, Xiangtong; Feng, Yujie

    2015-11-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER) was developed by integrating anaerobic digestion (AD) and microbial electrochemical system (MES). The system was capable of treating high strength artificial wastewater and simultaneously recovering electric and methane energy. Maximum power density of 583±9, 562±7, 533±10 and 572±6 mW m(-2) were obtained by each cell in a four-independent circuit mode operation at an OLR of 12 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). COD removal and energy recovery efficiency were 87.1% and 32.1%, which were 1.6 and 2.5 times higher than that of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Larger amount of Deltaproteobacteria (5.3%) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (47%) can account for the better performance of CSMER, since syntrophic associations among them provided more degradation pathways compared to the CSTR. Results demonstrate the CSMER holds great promise for efficient wastewater treatment and energy recovery. PMID:26094049

  6. Utility of Double Inversion Recovery Sequences in MRI.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Maura E

    2016-04-01

    Investigators from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minnesota investigated the utility of three-dimensional (3D) double inversion recovery (DIR) sequences in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in children and young adults with epilepsy. PMID:27617491

  7. The value of the short tau inversion recovery sequence in magnetic resonance imaging of thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Laitt, R D; Hoh, B; Wakeley, C; Kabala, J; Harrad, R; Potts, M; Goddard, P

    1994-03-01

    22 patients with thyroid eye disease were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the results compared with 10 controls. Imaging was performed on a 1.0 T scanner using a head coil. All patients were examined using both T1W and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. The relative signal intensity (SI) of individual extraocular muscles were quantified by comparison with SI from the adjacent temporalis muscle to give a signal intensity ratio (SIR). The results were compared with clinical disease activity assessed by the Werner grading system. Visual evaluation of muscle size and calculated SIRs showed an increase when compared to normals in 15 of the 22 patients. This difference was significant in patients with high grade (4-6) clinical disease. The known histological changes in this disease suggest that this increase in signal is caused by oedema secondary to acute inflammation. STIR sequences suppress the retro-orbital fat and thus enhance these changes both in the muscles and in the fat itself. The MR findings suggest that the STIR sequence can be used to predict those patients that will respond to anti-inflammatory treatment.

  8. Multislice and multicoil phase-sensitive inversion-recovery imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingfei

    2005-04-01

    Phase-sensitive inversion-recovery (PSIR) imaging may provide enhanced T(1) contrast. However, clinical implementation of PSIR imaging is hindered because image reconstruction with this method often lacks robustness and requires manual intervention, particularly for data acquired in multiple slices and with phased-array coils. In this paper, a new algorithm suitable for automatic PSIR image reconstruction of multislice and multicoil data is presented. This algorithm phase corrects by region-growing, employing both the magnitude and the phase information of image pixels. Specifically, phase gradients of the original complex image are first calculated and then used to determine the sequence of the region-growing. The signal direction relating to the phase error for each pixel is then determined during the region-growing using both the magnitude and the phase of the previously determined pixels that are located within a boxcar neighborhood of the pixel. Finally, the intrinsic intercoil and interslice correlation is exploited to ensure consistency in the global polarity of all of the PSIR images. The results are demonstrated with in vivo human brain images acquired at 3 Tesla with an eight-channel phased-array coil.

  9. Phase-sensitive inversion recovery for myocardial T1 mapping with motion correction and parametric fitting.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Greiser, Andreas; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Guehring, Jens; Arai, Andrew E; Kellman, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The assessment of myocardial fibrosis and extracellular volume requires accurate estimation of myocardial T1 s. While image acquisition using the modified Look-Locker inversion recovery technique is clinically feasible for myocardial T1 mapping, respiratory motion can limit its applicability. Moreover, the conventional T1 fitting approach using the magnitude inversion recovery images can lead to less stable T1 estimates and increased computational cost. In this article, we propose a novel T1 mapping scheme that is based on phase-sensitive image reconstruction and the restoration of polarity of the MR signal after inversion. The motion correction is achieved by registering the reconstructed images after background phase removal. The restored signal polarity of the inversion recovery signal helps the T1 fitting resulting in improved quality of the T1 map and reducing the computational cost. Quantitative validation on a data cohort of 45 patients proves the robustness of the proposed method against varying image contrast. Compared to the magnitude T1 fitting, the proposed phase-sensitive method leads to less fluctuation in T1 estimates.

  10. Optimized Inversion Recovery Sequences for Quantitative T1 and Magnetization Transfer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Zu, Zhongliang; Xu, Junzhong; Janve, Vaibhav A.; Gore, John C.; Does, Mark D.; Gochberg, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    Inversion recovery sequences that vary the inversion time (ti) have been employed to determine T1 and, more recently, quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) parameters. Specifically, in previous work, the inversion recovery pulse sequences varied ti only, while maintaining a constant delay (td) between repetitions. T1 values were determined by fitting to an exponential function, and qMT parameters were then determined by fitting to a bi-exponential function with an approximate solution. In the current study, new protocols are employed, which vary both ti and td and fit the data with minimal approximations. Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLB) are calculated to search for acquisition schemes that will maximize the precision efficiencies of T1 and qMT parameters. This approach is supported by Monte Carlo simulations. Measurements on MnCl2 samples verified the optimal T1 schemes. The optimal qMT schemes are confirmed by measurements on a series of cross linked bovine serum albumin (BSA) phantoms of varying concentrations. The effects of varying the number of sampling data points are also explored, and a rapid acquisition scheme is demonstrated in vivo. These new optimized quantitative imaging methods provide an improved means for determining T1 and MT parameter values compared to previous inversion recovery based methods. PMID:20665793

  11. [Development of an Optimizing Program of Scanning Parameters for Double Inversion Recovery MRI].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Norio; Yarita, Kazuma; Sakata, Kozue; Motegi, Shunichi; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Ujita, Kouichi; Ogura, Akio; Ogura, Toshihiro; Shimada, Takehiro; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an optimizing program of scanning parameters for double inversion recovery (DIR) MRI. The optimization algorithm consists of the following steps: (1) obtaining the initial parameters (TR, TE, and T1 values of the two attenuated tissues); (2) iterative calculation for minimization of errors; and (3) determination of the optimized TI(1st) and TI(2nd). To evaluate the developed algorithm, we performed the phantom and simulation studies using the phantoms which were imitated T1 values of white and gray matters and cerebrospinal fluid. In addition, white matter attenuated inversion recovery (WAIR) and gray matter attenuated inversion recovery (GAIR) images were obtained by optimized scan parameters in one volunteer. The developed algorithm could calculate the optimized TI(1st) and TI(2nd) values at once. Results of summation of signal intensity (SI) of two attenuated tissues shows that the SI of the two tissues were well-attenuated using the theoretical values which were calculated using the developed algorithm. The correlation coefficient of the SI of the phantom of the gray matter between actual and simulation measurements was r=0.997. The SI obtained by actual measurements well correlated with the SI obtained by the simulation measurements. The WAIR and GAIR images in the volunteer were well enhanced gray or white matters. We thus conclude that it is possible to calculate the optimized parameters for the DIR-MRI using the developed algorithm.

  12. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  13. TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MODELING & INVERSION OF CO2 SATURATION FOR SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Meadows

    2006-03-31

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into subsurface aquifers for geologic storage/sequestration, and into subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery, has become an important topic to the nation because of growing concerns related to global warming and energy security. In this project we developed new ways to predict and quantify the effects of CO2 on seismic data recorded over porous reservoir/aquifer rock systems. This effort involved the research and development of new technology to: (1) Quantitatively model the rock physics effects of CO2 injection in porous saline and oil/brine reservoirs (both miscible and immiscible). (2) Quantitatively model the seismic response to CO2 injection (both miscible and immiscible) from well logs (1D). (3) Perform quantitative inversions of time-lapse 4D seismic data to estimate injected CO2 distributions within subsurface reservoirs and aquifers. This work has resulted in an improved ability to remotely monitor the injected CO2 for safe storage and enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, predict the effects of CO2 on time-lapse seismic data, and estimate injected CO2 saturation distributions in subsurface aquifers/reservoirs. We applied our inversion methodology to a 3D time-lapse seismic dataset from the Sleipner CO2 sequestration project, Norwegian North Sea. We measured changes in the seismic amplitude and traveltime at the top of the Sleipner sandstone reservoir and used these time-lapse seismic attributes in the inversion. Maps of CO2 thickness and its standard deviation were generated for the topmost layer. From this information, we estimated that 7.4% of the total CO2 injected over a five-year period had reached the top of the reservoir. This inversion approach could also be applied to the remaining levels within the anomalous zone to obtain an estimate of the total CO2 injected.

  14. Robust phase sensitive inversion recovery imaging using a Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Garach, Ravindra M; Ji, Jim X; Ying, Lei; Ma, Jingfei

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) imaging for improved T/sub 1/ contrast. This method models the phase of the complex magnetic resonance image using a statistical model based on Markov random fields. A computationally efficient optimization method is developed. Computer simulations and in-vivo brain imaging experiments show that the proposed method can produce PSIR images with enhanced T/sub 1/ contrast and it is robust against high levels of data noise even when rapid phase variations are presented.

  15. Phase-Sensitive Inversion-Recovery MRI Improves Longitudinal Cortical Lesion Detection in Progressive MS

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Colleen; Fabian, Michelle; Howard, Jonathan; Riley, Claire; Miller, Aaron; Lublin, Fred; Inglese, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies comparing phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) to double inversion recovery (DIR) have demonstrated that use of PSIR improves cross-sectional in vivo detection of cortical lesions (CL) in multiple sclerosis. We studied the utility of PSIR in detection/characterization of accrual of CL over time in a 1-year longitudinal study in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) compared to DIR. PSIR and DIR images were acquired with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 25 patients with PPMS and 19 healthy controls at baseline, and after 1 year in 20 patients with PPMS. CL were classified as intracortical, leucocortical or juxtacortical. Lesion counts and volumes were calculated for both time points from both sequences and compared. Correlations with measures of physical and cognitive disability were determined as well as new CL counts and volumes. Compared to DIR, PSIR led to detection of a higher number of CL involving a larger proportion of patients with PPMS both cross-sectionally (p = 0.006, 88%) and longitudinally (p = 0.007, 95%), and led to the reclassification of a third of CL seen on DIR at each time point. Interestingly, PSIR was more sensitive to new CL accumulation over time compared to DIR. PSIR is a promising technique to monitor cortical damage and disease progression in patients with PPMS over a short-term follow-up. PMID:27002529

  16. Phase-Sensitive Inversion-Recovery MRI Improves Longitudinal Cortical Lesion Detection in Progressive MS.

    PubMed

    Harel, Asaff; Ceccarelli, Antonia; Farrell, Colleen; Fabian, Michelle; Howard, Jonathan; Riley, Claire; Miller, Aaron; Lublin, Fred; Inglese, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies comparing phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) to double inversion recovery (DIR) have demonstrated that use of PSIR improves cross-sectional in vivo detection of cortical lesions (CL) in multiple sclerosis. We studied the utility of PSIR in detection/characterization of accrual of CL over time in a 1-year longitudinal study in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) compared to DIR. PSIR and DIR images were acquired with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 25 patients with PPMS and 19 healthy controls at baseline, and after 1 year in 20 patients with PPMS. CL were classified as intracortical, leucocortical or juxtacortical. Lesion counts and volumes were calculated for both time points from both sequences and compared. Correlations with measures of physical and cognitive disability were determined as well as new CL counts and volumes. Compared to DIR, PSIR led to detection of a higher number of CL involving a larger proportion of patients with PPMS both cross-sectionally (p = 0.006, 88%) and longitudinally (p = 0.007, 95%), and led to the reclassification of a third of CL seen on DIR at each time point. Interestingly, PSIR was more sensitive to new CL accumulation over time compared to DIR. PSIR is a promising technique to monitor cortical damage and disease progression in patients with PPMS over a short-term follow-up.

  17. Optimization of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for perfusion functional MRI of rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Lee, Eugene L Q; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2012-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI provides a noninvasive method to image perfusion, and has been applied to map neural activation in the brain. Although pulsed labeling methods have been widely used in humans, continuous ASL with a dedicated neck labeling coil is still the preferred method in rodent brain functional MRI (fMRI) to maximize the sensitivity and allow multislice acquisition. However, the additional hardware is not readily available and hence its application is limited. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) pulsed ASL was optimized for fMRI of rat brain. A practical challenge of FAIR is the suboptimal global inversion by the transmit coil of limited dimensions, which results in low effective labeling. By using a large volume transmit coil and proper positioning to optimize the body coverage, the perfusion signal was increased by 38.3% compared with positioning the brain at the isocenter. An additional 53.3% gain in signal was achieved using optimized repetition and inversion times compared with a long TR. Under electrical stimulation to the forepaws, a perfusion activation signal change of 63.7 ± 6.3% can be reliably detected in the primary somatosensory cortices using single slice or multislice echo planar imaging at 9.4 T. This demonstrates the potential of using pulsed ASL for multislice perfusion fMRI in functional and pharmacological applications in rat brain.

  18. Sodium inversion recovery MRI on the knee joint at 7 T with an optimal control pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Xia, Ding; Madelin, Guillaume; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2016-01-01

    In the field of sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), inversion recovery (IR) is a convenient and popular method to select sodium in different environments. For the knee joint, IR has been used to suppress the signal from synovial fluids, which improves the correlation between the sodium signal and the concentration of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in cartilage tissues. For the better inversion of the magnetization vector under the spatial variations of the B0 and B1 fields, the IR sequence usually employ adiabatic pulses as the inversion pulse. On the other hand, it has been shown that RF shapes robust against the variations of the B0 and B1 fields can be generated by numerical optimization based on optimal control theory. In this work, we compare the performance of fluid-suppressed sodium MRI on the knee joint in vivo, between one implemented with an adiabatic pulse in the IR sequence and the other with the adiabatic pulse replaced by an optimal-control shaped pulse. While the optimal-control pulse reduces the RF power deposited to the body by 58%, the quality of fluid suppression and the signal level of sodium within cartilage are similar between two implementations.

  19. Solvent-assisted stir bar sorptive extraction by using swollen polydimethylsiloxane for enhanced recovery of polar solutes in aqueous samples: Application to aroma compounds in beer and pesticides in wine.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; David, Frank; Sandra, Pat

    2016-07-15

    A novel solvent-assisted stir bar sorptive extraction (SA-SBSE) technique was developed for enhanced recovery of polar solutes in aqueous samples. A conventional PDMS stir bar was swollen in several solvents with log Kow ranging from 1.0 to 3.5 while stirring for 30min prior to extraction. After extraction, thermal desorption - gas chromatography - (tandem) mass spectrometry (TD-GC-(MS/)MS) or liquid desorption - large volume injection (LD-LVI)-GC-MS were performed. An initial study involved investigation of potential solvents for SA-SBSE by weighing of the residual solvent in the swollen PDMS stir bar before and after extraction. Compared to conventional SBSE, SA-SBSE using diethyl ether, methyl isobutyl ketone, dichloromethane, diisopropyl ether and toluene provided higher recoveries from water samples for test solutes with log Kow<2.5. For SA-SBSE using dichloromethane, recoveries were improved by factors of 1.4-4.1, while maintaining or even improving the recoveries for test solutes with log Kow>2.5. The performance of the SA-SBSE method using dichloromethane, diisopropyl ether, and cyclohexane is illustrated with analyses of aroma compounds in beer and of pesticides in wine. PMID:27289502

  20. Sodium inversion recovery MRI of the knee joint in vivo at 7T.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Inati, Souheil; Jerschow, Alexej; Regatte, Ravinder R

    2010-11-01

    The loss of proteoglycans (PG) in the articular cartilage is an early signature of osteoarthritis (OA). The ensuing changes in the fixed charge density in the cartilage can be directly linked to sodium concentration via charge balance. Sodium ions in the knee joint appear in two pools: in the synovial fluids or joint effusion where the ions are in free motion and bound within the cartilage tissue where the Na(+) ions have a restricted motion. The ions in these two compartments have therefore different T₁ and T₂ relaxation times. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a fluid-suppressed 3D ultrashort TE radial sodium sequence by implementing an inversion recovery (IR) preparation of the magnetization at 7T. This method could allow a more accurate and more sensitive quantification of loss of PG in patients with OA. It is shown that adiabatic pulses offer significantly improved performance in terms of robustness to B₁ and B₀ inhomogeneities when compared to the hard pulse sequence. Power deposition considerations further pose a limit to the RF inversion power, and we demonstrate in simulations and experiments how a practical compromise can be struck between clean suppression of fluid signals and power deposition levels. Two IR sequences with different types of inversion pulses (a rectangular pulse and an adiabatic pulse) were tested on a liquid phantom, ex vivo on a human knee cadaver and then in vivo on five healthy volunteers, with a (Nyquist) resolution of ∼3.6 mm and a signal-to-noise ratio of ∼30 in cartilage without IR and ∼20 with IR. Due to specific absorption rate limitations, the total acquisition time was ∼17 min for the 3D radial sequence without inversion or with the rectangular IR, and 24:30 min for the adiabatic IR sequence. It is shown that the adiabatic IR sequence generates a more uniform fluid suppression over the whole sample than the rectangular IR sequence.

  1. Geoid Recovery Using Geophysical Inverse Theory Applied to Satellite to Satellite Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a new method for determination of the geopotential, or the equivalent geoid. It is based on Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) of two co-orbiting low earth satellites separated by a few hundred kilometers. The analysis is aimed at the GRACE Mission, though it is generally applicable to any SST data. It is proposed that the SST be viewed as a mapping mission. That is, the result will be maps of the geoid or gravity, as contrasted with determination of spherical harmonics or Fourier coefficients. A method has been developed, based on Geophysical Inverse Theory (GIT), that can provide maps at a prescribed (desired) resolution and the corresponding error map from the SST data. This computation can be done area by area avoiding simultaneous recovery of all the geopotential information. The necessary elements of potential theory, celestial mechanics, and Geophysical Inverse Theory are described, a computation architecture is described, and the results of several simulations presented. Centimeter accuracy geoids with 50 to 100 km resolution can be recovered with a 30 to 60 day mission.

  2. [An Examination for Uterine Dynamic Study with Phase-sensitive Inversion-recovery].

    PubMed

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Motegi, Shunichi; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yamamura, Kenichirou

    2016-01-01

    The depth of myometrial invasion in patients with endometrial carcinoma is recognized as an important factor that closely correlates with prognosis. Preoperative assessment of myometrial invasion is essential for planning surgery. To enhance the contrast between myometrium and endometrium including myometrial invasion with endometrial carcinoma, we optimized the sequence parameter with phase-sensitive inversion-recovery (PSIR) in gadolinium dynamic study of uterine corpus. On a 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), images were acquired by three-dimensional (3D) T1 -turbo field echo (TFE) with PSIR sequence and gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid( Gd-DTPA) diluted phantom (0-5 mmol/L) and myometrium model (manganese chloride tetrahydrate+agar). We calculated the null point and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at multiple TFE inversion delay times, 200 ms-maximum in each combination; flip angles (FAs), 5-35 degrees; TFE factor, 20-40; and shot interval (SI), 500-1000 ms. We assumed that dynamic scanning time was 30 seconds when the sensitivity encoding factor was 2, namely, in this study, the scanning time was 1 minute with no sensitivity encoding. In addition, we compared CNR between optimized PSIR sequence ande-Thrive. We recognized a successful CNR of the 3D PSIR parameter was TFE inversion delay times, 335 ms; FA, 25 degrees; TFE factor, 20; and SI, 500 ms. In each gadolinium-DTPA diluted phantom, the average CNR of the optimized PSIR sequence was approximately 1.7 times (maximum: 3 times) higher than e-Thrive. Optimizing sequence parameter of PSIR is applicable in gadolinium dynamic study of uterine corpus.

  3. Sodium inversion recovery MRI of the knee joint in vivo at 7T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Inati, Souheil; Jerschow, Alexej; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2010-11-01

    The loss of proteoglycans (PG) in the articular cartilage is an early signature of osteoarthritis (OA). The ensuing changes in the fixed charge density in the cartilage can be directly linked to sodium concentration via charge balance. Sodium ions in the knee joint appear in two pools: in the synovial fluids or joint effusion where the ions are in free motion and bound within the cartilage tissue where the Na+ ions have a restricted motion. The ions in these two compartments have therefore different T1 and T2 relaxation times. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a fluid-suppressed 3D ultrashort TE radial sodium sequence by implementing an inversion recovery (IR) preparation of the magnetization at 7T. This method could allow a more accurate and more sensitive quantification of loss of PG in patients with OA. It is shown that adiabatic pulses offer significantly improved performance in terms of robustness to B1 and B0 inhomogeneities when compared to the hard pulse sequence. Power deposition considerations further pose a limit to the RF inversion power, and we demonstrate in simulations and experiments how a practical compromise can be struck between clean suppression of fluid signals and power deposition levels. Two IR sequences with different types of inversion pulses (a rectangular pulse and an adiabatic pulse) were tested on a liquid phantom, ex vivo on a human knee cadaver and then in vivo on five healthy volunteers, with a (Nyquist) resolution of ∼3.6 mm and a signal-to-noise ratio of ∼30 in cartilage without IR and ∼20 with IR. Due to specific absorption rate limitations, the total acquisition time was ∼17 min for the 3D radial sequence without inversion or with the rectangular IR, and 24:30 min for the adiabatic IR sequence. It is shown that the adiabatic IR sequence generates a more uniform fluid suppression over the whole sample than the rectangular IR sequence.

  4. Recovery of resources for advanced life support space applications: effect of retention time on biodegradation of two crop residues in a fed-batch, continuous stirred tank reactor.

    PubMed

    Strayer, R F; Finger, B W; Alazraki, M P; Cook, K; Garland, J L

    2002-09-01

    Bioreactor retention time is a key process variable that will influence costs that are relevant to long distance space travel or long duration space habitation. However. little is known about the effects of this parameter on the microbiological treatment options that are being proposed for Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems. Two bioreactor studies were designed to examine this variable. In the first one, six retention times ranging from 1.3 to 21.3 days--were run in duplicate, 81 working-volume continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) that were fed ALS wheat residues. Ash-free dry weight loss, carbon mineralization, soluble TOC reduction, changes in fiber content (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin), bacterial numbers, and mineral recoveries were monitored. At short retention times--1.33 days--biodegradation was poor (total: 16-20%, cellulose - 12%, hemicellulose - 28%) but soluble TOC was decreased by 75-80% and recovery of major crop inorganic nutrients was adequate, except for phosphorus. A high proportion of the total bacteria (ca. 83%) was actively respiring. At the longest retention time tested, 21.3 days, biodegradation was good (total: 55-60%, cellulose ca. 70%, hemicellulose - ca. 55%) and soluble TOC was decreased by 80%. Recovery of major nutrients, except phosphorus, remained adequate. A very low proportion of total bacteria was actively respiring (ca. 16%). The second bioreactor study used potato residue to determine if even shorter retention times could be used (range 0.25-2.0 days). Although overall biodegradation deteriorated, the degradation of soluble TOC continued to be ca. 75%. We conclude that if the goal of ALS bioprocessing is maximal degradation of crop residues, including cellulose, then retention times of 10 days or longer will be needed. If the goal is to provide inorganic nutrients with the smallest volume/weight bioreactor possible, then a retention time of 1 day (or less) is sufficient.

  5. Recovery of resources for advanced life support space applications: effect of retention time on biodegradation of two crop residues in a fed-batch, continuous stirred tank reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, R. F.; Finger, B. W.; Alazraki, M. P.; Cook, K.; Garland, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Bioreactor retention time is a key process variable that will influence costs that are relevant to long distance space travel or long duration space habitation. However. little is known about the effects of this parameter on the microbiological treatment options that are being proposed for Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems. Two bioreactor studies were designed to examine this variable. In the first one, six retention times ranging from 1.3 to 21.3 days--were run in duplicate, 81 working-volume continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) that were fed ALS wheat residues. Ash-free dry weight loss, carbon mineralization, soluble TOC reduction, changes in fiber content (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin), bacterial numbers, and mineral recoveries were monitored. At short retention times--1.33 days--biodegradation was poor (total: 16-20%, cellulose - 12%, hemicellulose - 28%) but soluble TOC was decreased by 75-80% and recovery of major crop inorganic nutrients was adequate, except for phosphorus. A high proportion of the total bacteria (ca. 83%) was actively respiring. At the longest retention time tested, 21.3 days, biodegradation was good (total: 55-60%, cellulose ca. 70%, hemicellulose - ca. 55%) and soluble TOC was decreased by 80%. Recovery of major nutrients, except phosphorus, remained adequate. A very low proportion of total bacteria was actively respiring (ca. 16%). The second bioreactor study used potato residue to determine if even shorter retention times could be used (range 0.25-2.0 days). Although overall biodegradation deteriorated, the degradation of soluble TOC continued to be ca. 75%. We conclude that if the goal of ALS bioprocessing is maximal degradation of crop residues, including cellulose, then retention times of 10 days or longer will be needed. If the goal is to provide inorganic nutrients with the smallest volume/weight bioreactor possible, then a retention time of 1 day (or less) is sufficient.

  6. [Improvement of MRI effectiveness in the detection of intracerebral hematoma. Double inversion recovery].

    PubMed

    Burenchev, D V; Skvortsova, V I; Guseva, O I; Shumm, B A; Fomenkov, S A; Prokhorov, A V; Khetchikov, G V; Barkova, L A

    2009-01-01

    A study aimed at developing the pulse consequence, the double inversion recovery (DIR), using low field magnetic tomography, and assessing its effectiveness in the detection of intracerebral hematoma. The research has been conducted at "Ellipse" MR tomograph. The new pulse sequence has been created by the modification of the regular FLAIR, its technical parameters were as follows: the first TI - 90 ms, the second TI - 1300 ms, TR - 4665 ms, echo - 3. Twenty-seven patients have been enrolled in the study. The tissue contrast coefficients on FLAIR and DIR images have been compared. It has been shown that the contrast coefficient of normal brain structures and brain lesions on the DIR images in regard to the white matter are significantly higher than on the FLAIR images. Results of the study revealed that the dynamics of MR symptoms of intracerebral hematoma is faster on the DIR images compared to the FLAIR ones. This finding can be used for detection of intracerebral hematoma in difficult clinical cases.

  7. Noncontrast-enhanced renal angiography using multiple inversion recovery and alternating TR balanced steady-state free precession.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hattie Z; Worters, Pauline W; Wu, Holden H; Ingle, R Reeve; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Nishimura, Dwight G

    2013-08-01

    Noncontrast-enhanced renal angiography techniques based on balanced steady-state free precession avoid external contrast agents, take advantage of high inherent blood signal from the T 2 / T 1 contrast mechanism, and have short steady-state free precession acquisition times. However, background suppression is limited; inflow times are inflexible; labeling region is difficult to define when tagging arterial flow; and scan times are long. To overcome these limitations, we propose the use of multiple inversion recovery preparatory pulses combined with alternating pulse repetition time balanced steady-state free precession to produce renal angiograms. Multiple inversion recovery uses selective spatial saturation followed by four nonselective inversion recovery pulses to concurrently null a wide range of background T 1 species while allowing for adjustable inflow times; alternating pulse repetition time steady-state free precession maintains vessel contrast and provides added fat suppression. The high level of suppression enables imaging in three-dimensional as well as projective two-dimensional formats, the latter of which has a scan time as short as one heartbeat. In vivo studies at 1.5 T demonstrate the superior vessel contrast of this technique.

  8. A research of 3D gravity inversion based on the recovery of sparse underdetermined linear equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhaohai, M.

    2014-12-01

    Because of the properties of gravity data, it is made difficult to solve the problem of multiple solutions. There are two main types of 3D gravity inversion methods:One of two methods is based on the improvement of the instability of the sensitive matrix, solving the problem of multiple solutions and instability in 3D gravity inversion. Another is to join weight function into the 3D gravity inversion iteration. Through constant iteration, it can renewal density values and weight function to achieve the purpose to solve the multiple solutions and instability of the 3D gravity data inversion. Thanks to the sparse nature of the solutions of 3D gravity data inversions, we can transform it into a sparse equation. Then, through solving the sparse equations, we can get perfect 3D gravity inversion results. The main principle is based on zero norm of sparse matrix solution of the equation. Zero norm is mainly to solve the nonzero solution of the sparse matrix. However, the method of this article adopted is same as the principle of zero norm. But the method is the opposite of zero norm to obtain zero value solution. Through the form of a Gaussian fitting solution of the zero norm, we can find the solution by using regularization principle. Moreover, this method has been proved that it had a certain resistance to random noise in the mathematics, and it was more suitable than zero norm for the solution of the geophysical data. 3D gravity which is adopted in this article can well identify abnormal body density distribution characteristics, and it can also recognize the space position of abnormal distribution very well. We can take advantage of the density of the upper and lower limit penalty function to make each rectangular residual density within a reasonable range. Finally, this 3D gravity inversion is applied to a variety of combination model test, such as a single straight three-dimensional model, the adjacent straight three-dimensional model and Y three

  9. TIME-LAPSE MODELING AND INVERSION OF CO2 SATURATION FOR SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Meadows

    2004-11-19

    In the fourth quarter of this DOE NETL project, they have developed an algorithm for generating time-lapse seismic anomalies from changes in fluid properties over time. This forward-modeling algorithm constitutes the first step in the inversion procedure of Phase III of the project. Examples were generated illustrating the flexibility of this approach. Additional activities in this reporting period included a trip by the Principal Investigator to the 7th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies (GHGT-7) in Vancouver, Canada, September 5-9, 2004. In the next quarter, they will work on the second step of the inversion procedure, namely, the inversion of the seismic time-lapse anomalies to obtain changes in fluid properties, and will continue investigating alternative methods for calculating properties of oil/brine/CO{sub 2} and brine/CO{sub 2} systems.

  10. Matched-field processing, geoacoustic inversion, and source signature recovery of blue whale vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Thode, A M; D'Spain, G L; Kuperman, W A

    2000-03-01

    Matched-field processing (MFP) and global inversion techniques have been applied to vocalizations from four whales recorded on a 48-element tilted vertical array off the Channel Islands in 1996. Global inversions from selected whale calls using as few as eight elements extracted information about the surrounding ocean bottom composition, array shape, and the animal's position. These inversion results were then used to conduct straightforward MFP on other calls. The sediment sound-speed inversion estimates are consistent with those derived from sediment samples collected in the area. In general, most animals swam from the east to west, but one animal remained within approximately 500 m of its original position over 45 min. All whales vocalized between 10 and 40 m depth. Three acoustic sequences are discussed in detail: the first illustrating a match between an acoustic track and visual sighting, the second tracking two whales to ranges out to 8 km, and the final sequence demonstrating high-resolution dive profiles from an animal that changed its course to avoid the research platform FLIP (floating instrument platform). This last whale displayed an unusual diversity of signals that include three strong frequency-modulated (FM) downsweeps which contain possible signs of an internal resonance. The arrival of this same whale coincided with a sudden change in oceanographic conditions.

  11. Influence of fat on liver T 1 measurements using modified Look–Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) methods at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Tunnicliffe, Elizabeth M.; Pavlides, Michael; Robson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the effect of fat on modified Look–Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) T 1 maps of the liver. The balanced steady‐state free precession (bSSFP) sequence causes water and fat signals to have opposite phase when repetition time (TR) = 2.3 msec at 3T. In voxels that contain both fat and water, the MOLLI T 1 measurement is influenced by the choice of TR. Materials and Methods MOLLI T 1 measurements of the liver were simulated using the Bloch equations while varying the hepatic lipid content (HLC). Phantom scans were performed on margarine phantoms, using both MOLLI and spin echo inversion recovery sequences. MOLLI T 1 at 3T and HLC were determined in patients (n = 8) before and after bariatric surgery. Results At 3T, with HLC in the 0–35% range, higher fat fraction values lead to longer MOLLI T 1 values when TR = 2.3 msec. Patients were found to have higher MOLLI T 1 at elevated HLC (T 1 = 929 ± 97 msec) than at low HLC (T 1 = 870 ± 44 msec). Conclusion At 3T, MOLLI T 1 values are affected by HLC, substantially changing MOLLI T 1 in a clinically relevant range of fat content. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:105–111. PMID:26762615

  12. Geoid Recovery using Geophysical Inverse Theory Applied to Satellite to Satellite Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a new method for determination of the geopotential. The analysis is aimed at the GRACE mission. This Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) mission is viewed as a mapping mission The result will be maps of the geoid. The elements of potential theory, celestial mechanics, and Geophysical Inverse Theory are integrated into a computation architecture, and the results of several simulations presented Centimeter accuracy geoids with 50 to 100 km resolution can be recovered with a 30 to 60 day mission.

  13. Importance of Contrast-Enhanced Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Various Intracranial Pathologic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Sungwon; Lee, Yong Seok

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial lesions may show contrast enhancement through various mechanisms that are closely associated with the disease process. The preferred magnetic resonance sequence in contrast imaging is T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) at most institutions. However, lesion enhancement is occasionally inconspicuous on T1WI. Although fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are commonly considered as T2-weighted imaging with dark cerebrospinal fluid, they also show mild T1-weighted contrast, which is responsible for the contrast enhancement. For several years, FLAIR imaging has been successfully incorporated as a routine sequence at our institution for contrast-enhanced (CE) brain imaging in detecting various intracranial diseases. In this pictorial essay, we describe and illustrate the diagnostic importance of CE-FLAIR imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions. PMID:26798225

  14. [Optimization of high flip angle for late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging by phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence].

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Satoshi; Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Harashina, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akira; Shimokawa, Kenichi; Matsumura, Yoshio

    2013-04-01

    This study focuses on optimization of the flip angle (FA) of phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) reconstruction (PSIR-FA) to achieve improved tissue contrast. Intensity normalization removes the larger variations in image intensity caused by falloff, thus improving the visualization of tissue contrast. We evaluated tissue contrast for images in healthy volunteers using the phantom influence of T1 relaxation and FA. T1 relaxation is improved due to the T1(*) effect and enables a high PSIR-FA to be set. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the PSIR-FA 20° image is good, since magnetization is almost fully restored to normal. The usefulness of PSIR-FA 20 images was proved statistically. PSIR-FA 20° shows improved tissue contrast as a result of the high accuracy of intensity normalization.

  15. Improved carotid intraplaque hemorrhage imaging using a slab-selective phase-sensitive inversion-recovery (SPI) sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinnan; Ferguson, Marina S; Balu, Niranjan; Yuan, Chun; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Börnert, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Intraplaque hemorrhage in atherosclerotic plaques has been associated with accelerated plaque growth as well as exacerbation of clinical symptoms. The identification of intraplaque hemorrhage using magnetic resonance imaging primarily relies on the detection of methemoglobin on T(1) weighted images. Current techniques are limited by insufficient intraplaque hemorrhage-wall contrast and poor blood suppression. In this study, a slab-selective phase-sensitive inversion-recovery (SPI) technique is proposed by combining a phase-sensitive reconstruction with a T(1) weighted sequence specifically designed to achieve improved intraplaque hemorrhage imaging. The SPI sequence was optimized and then used on ex vivo plaque specimens for histology based validation and intraplaque hemorrhage-wall contrast-to-noise ratio comparison with magnetization-prepared 3D rapid acquisition gradient echo MP-RAGE. SPI and MP-RAGE were also tested on a group of atherosclerosis patients to compare in vivo intraplaque hemorrhage-wall contrast-to-noise ratio and blood suppression effectiveness. On ex vivo specimens SPI had better intraplaque hemorrhage identification accuracy and a significantly higher intraplaque hemorrhage-wall contrast-to-noise ratio (P = 0.01) than MP-RAGE. Similar results were found in the in vivo test: Slab-selective phase-sensitive inversion-recovery provided a significantly improved intraplaque hemorrhage-wall contrast-to-noise ratio (P < 0.01) and blood suppression efficiency (P < 0.01). In conclusion, SPI is a novel technique optimized for intraplaque hemorrhage detection and validated against histology. It has demonstrated its capability for improved in vivo intraplaque hemorrhage identification and blood suppression in atherosclerosis patients.

  16. The STIR sequence MRI in the assessment of extraocular muscles in thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Hoh, H B; Laitt, R D; Wakeley, C; Kabala, J; Goddard, P; Potts, M J; Harrad, R A

    1994-01-01

    Nineteen patients with thyroid eye disease were examined with magnetic resonance imaging using the Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) sequence and compared with normal controls. The Signal Intensity Ratio (SIR) of each of the four recti was obtained by comparison with the signal intensity of the adjacent temporalis muscle. The SIR was compared with disease activity assessed using Werner's grading system, a clinical inflammatory score, and the range of extraocular movements. Results show that a high SIR is associated with a high index of disease activity. This technique is likely to prove useful in assessing disease activity and planning the management of thyroid eye disease, particularly with respect to immunosuppression.

  17. Segmentation of inversion recovery MR images using neural networks: a study on aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, John O.; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Yo, Virginia S.; Steen, R. G.

    1998-06-01

    Clinicians have long desired early detection of neurological abnormality for treatment of brain malignancies. In attempts to address this concern, there are numerous reports publishing normative databases of age-related changes of the brain in healthy controls, many using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, most of the method used to access tissue volumes were subject to observer variability. We developed a Kohonen self-organizing map to automatically segment MR images for reproducible and accurate identification of tissues. The developed method was applied to quantitatively assess subtle volume differences in normal controls due to maturational and degenerative changes. The volumes calculated in the test population of 73 controls agreed with current hypothesizes concerning age-related changes of the brain as determined by linear regression analysis of segmented tissue to age. Percent gray matter and percent white matter, as well as the ratio of gray matter to white matter were all found to be significantly correlated with age. Percent gray matter and the ratio of gray matter to white matter were inversely proportional to age while percent white matter was directly proportional to age. These results suggest the utility of the developed segmentation technique, as well as the clinical application it may hold.

  18. [Improved visualization of long-axis black-blood imaging of the carotid arteries using phase sensitive inversion recovery combined with 3D IR-T₁TFE].

    PubMed

    Horie, Tomohiko; Kawakata, Mami; Kajihara, Nao; Takano, Hayato; Honda, Masatoshi; Muro, Isao; Ogino, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the visualization of long-axis black-blood imaging of the carotid arteries. We experimented on phantom and in-vivo study of 3 dimension (3D) inversion recovery T(1) turbo field echo combined with phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR-3D IR-T(1)TFE) at 3.0 Tesla. As a result, the contrast has been improved by calculated images of PSIR-3D IR-T(1)TFE set to inversion time (TI) 350 ms that is shorter than null point of blood. This displays that the contrast between blood and tissues can be improved when the longitudinal magnetization of blood is a negative. Therefore, the visualization of long-axis black-blood imaging of the carotid arteries has been improved by the calculated images of PSIR-3D IR-T(1)TFE set to TI that is shorter than null point of blood.

  19. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  20. Importance of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging to detect paradoxical expansion of tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jin

    2014-07-01

    Tuberculosis is a significant public health problem that continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tuberculous meningoencephalitis (TM) is the most common extrapulmonary lesion in tuberculosis. A 41-year-old female was thought to have TM. Tests to confirm the TM diagnosis were initially negative, including tuberculosis PCR and adenosine deaminase level in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Anti-tuberculous medication and intravenous steroids were administered to her on the basis of brain imaging and lactate dehydrogenase electrophoresis in CSF, suggestive of the diagnosis of TM. Her neurological problems improved rapidly following treatment. Serologic and CSF markers were positive in PCR and culture after 60 days. Radiological findings are often nonspecific and TM is difficult to diagnose without an increased index of suspicion. The detection of paradoxical expansion of tuberculoma is very important in the maintenance of medication. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to detect paradoxical expansion of the tuberculoma using various methods, such as contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (CE-FLAIR) imaging. CE-FLAIR imaging conspicuously showed paradoxical expansion of the tuberculoma. If patients present with clear meningitis, without any identified pathogen, there is a need to constantly and scrupulously check for TM, including with the use of CE-FLAIR brain imaging.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in partial epilepsy: additional abnormalities shown with the fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Bergin, P S; Fish, D R; Shorvon, S D; Oatridge, A; deSouza, N M; Bydder, G M

    1995-01-01

    Thirty six patients with a history of partial epilepsy had MRI of the brain performed with conventional T1 and T2 weighted pulse sequences as well as the fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Abnormalities were found in 20 cases (56%), in whom there were 25 lesions or groups of lesions. Twenty four of these lesions were more conspicuous with the FLAIR sequence than with any of the conventional sequences. In 11 of these 20 cases, lesions thought to be of aetiological importance were only seen with the FLAIR sequence. In eight this was a solitary lesion. In the other three, an additional and apparently significant lesion (or lesions) was only seen with the FLAIR sequence when another lesion had been identified with both conventional and FLAIR sequences. The 11 additional lesions or groups of lesions were seen in the hippocampus, amygdala, cortex, or subcortical and periventricular regions. No lesion was found with any pulse sequence in 16 (44%) of the original group of 36 patients. In the eight cases where a lesion was seen only with the FLAIR sequence, localisation was concordant with the electroclinical features. Two of the eight patients with solitary lesions seen only on the FLAIR sequence underwent surgery, after which there was pathological confirmation of the abnormality identified with imaging. In one patient with a congenital cavernoma, the primary lesion was best seen with a contrast enhanced T1 weighted spin echo sequence. In this selected series, the FLAIR sequence increased the yield of MRI examinations of the brain by 30%. Images PMID:7738550

  2. Friction stir welding tool

    DOEpatents

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  3. An Inverse Problem Approach to Recovery of In Vivo Nanoparticle Concentrations from Thermal Image Monitoring of MR-Guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, D.; Elliott, A.; Weinberg, J. S.; Shetty, A.; Hazle, J. D.; Stafford, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of local variations in the optical properties of tumor tissue introduced by the presence of gold-silica nanoparticles (NP) presents significant opportunities in monitoring and control of NP-mediated laser induced thermal therapy (LITT) procedures. Finite element methods of inverse parameter recovery constrained by a Pennes bioheat transfer model were applied to estimate the optical parameters. Magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) acquired during a NP-mediated LITT of a canine transmissible venereal tumor in brain was used in the presented statistical inverse problem formulation. The maximum likelihood (ML) value of the optical parameters illustrated a marked change in the periphery of the tumor corresponding with the expected location of nanoparticles and area of selective heating observed on MRTI. Parameter recovery information became increasingly difficult to infer in distal regions of tissue where photon fluence had been significantly attenuated. Finite element temperature predictions using the ML parameter values obtained from the solution of the inverse problem are able to reproduce the nanoparticles selective heating within 5°C of measured MRTI estimations along selected temperature profiles. Results indicate the maximum likelihood solution found is able to sufficiently reproduce the selectivity of the NP mediated laser induced heating and therefore the ML solution is likely to return useful optical parameters within the region of significant laser fluence. PMID:22918665

  4. Recovery

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video discusses the recovery events that occur in high-power rocketry and the various devices used in safely recovering the rocket. The video includes a discussion of black powder and ejection...

  5. [Recovery].

    PubMed

    Estingoy, Pierrette; Gilliot, Élodie; Parisot, Clément

    2015-01-01

    The historical fatalism of the impossibility of recovering from psychosis eased from the 1970s with the shaping of the idea of a possible recovery. Recovery is today the objective for the patient and caregivers. The key to achieving this lies in the encounter with Others. A collective approach, on the level of the institution, must be established. The aim is to create opportunities for the patient to express their doubts and feelings. PMID:26363659

  6. Planar oscillatory stirring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for stirring materials using planar orthogonal axes oscillations. The apparatus has a movable slide plate sandwiched between two fixed parallel support plates. Pressurized air is supplied to the movable slide plate which employs a tri-arm air bearing vent structure which allows the slide plate to float and to translate between the parallel support plates. The container having a material to be stirred is secured to the upper surface of the slide plate through an aperture in the upper support plate. A motor driven eccentric shaft loosely extends into a center hole bearing of the slide plate to cause the horizontal oscillations. Novelty lies in the combination of elements which exploits the discovery that low frequency, orthogonal oscillations applied horizontally to a Bridgman crucible provides a very rigorous stirring action, comparable with and more effective by an order of magnitude than the accelerated crucible rotation technique.

  7. Multiple test tubes stirred mechanically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. J.; Strong, I. J.

    1965-01-01

    Mechanical device simultaneously stirs multiple test tubes under controlled laboratory conditions. The invention provides a variable stirring rate, minimal amount of contamination of tube contents, unattended and simple operation, and easy maintenance and cleaning.

  8. Computational issues of importance to the inverse recovery of epicardial potentials in a realistic heart-torso geometry.

    PubMed

    Messinger-Rapport, B J; Rudy, Y

    1989-11-01

    In vitro data from a realistic-geometry electrolytic tank were used to demonstrate the consequences of computational issues critical to the ill-posed inverse problem in electrocardiography. The boundary element method was used to discretize the relationship between the body surface potentials and epicardial cage potentials. Variants of Tikhonov regularization were used to stabilize the inversion of the body surface potentials in order to reconstruct the epicardial surface potentials. The computational issues investigated were (1) computation of the regularization parameter; (2) effects of inaccuracy in locating the position of the heart; and (3) incorporation of a priori information on the properties of epicardial potentials into the regularization methodology. Two methods were suggested by which a priori information could be incorporated into the regularization formulation: (1) use of an estimate of the epicardial potential distribution everywhere on the surface and (2) use of regional bounds on the excursion of the potential. Results indicate that the a posteriori technique called CRESO, developed by Colli Franzone and coworkers, most consistently derives the regularization parameter closest to the optimal parameter for this experimental situation. The sensitivity of the inverse computation in a realistic-geometry torso to inaccuracies in estimating heart position are consistent with results from the eccentric spheres model; errors of 1 cm are well tolerated, but errors of 2 cm or greater result in a loss of position and amplitude information. Finally, estimates and bounds based on accurate, known information successfully lower the relative error associated with the inverse and have the potential to significantly enhance the amplitude and feature position information obtainable from the inverse-reconstructed epicardial potential map.

  9. Friction Stir Weld Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  10. Friction stir weld tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  11. Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  12. Assessment of the evaluation of liver T1 mapping imaging applying virtual ECG gating on a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Seung-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Suk-Jun; Choe, Bo-Young

    2014-10-01

    A T1 mapping calculation error may occur in a physicochemical environment with large relaxivity. We evaluated through a simulated electrocardiogram (ECG) the administration of a contrast with high relaxivity and its effect on the heart rate by using a modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence. The agarose 2% phantom of high relaxivity environment was developed by diluting gadoxetic acid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1 contrast media. The gold standard T1 determination was based on coronal single section imaging with a 2D inversion-recovery turbo spin echo sequence (2D-IRTSE) in a 3T MR unit. Using the identical 3T MR scanner, we acquired T1 mapping for the MOLLI pulse sequence with various virtual heart rates. T1 mapping data of the two different pulse sequences ( i.e., 2D-IRTSE and MOLLI) were measured to investigate the accuracy and the specificity. An in vivo study was conducted in the same manner as the phantom experiments for liver T1 mapping imaging in three healthy volunteers. The MOLLI pulse sequence showed an error rate of less than 10% at a contrast agent concentration of 0.4 mmol/L, and significant error, compared with the reference value, was observed at 0.6 mmol/L or higher. The percentage error of the T1 value did not correlated with the RR ( i.e., the time between heart beats) change that was observed (P =.270). Based on the in-vivo liver test, T1 mapping imaging of an abdominal organ as the liver can be successfully achieved using the applied virtual ECG gating on the MOLLI sequence.

  13. DIALYSIS WITH STIRRING.

    PubMed

    Kunitz, M; Simms, H S

    1928-05-20

    Substances to be purified by dialysis are placed in collodion bags together with a toy "marble" or a bubble of air. The bags are stoppered and placed in glass tubes of a rocking machine. Distilled water of the desired temperature is circulated through the tubes (around the bags) at a rate of about 8 cc. per minute per bag while the machine is in motion. The rolling of the marbles or bubbles causes stirring which makes it possible to remove the salts from a protein solution in 24 to 48 hours.

  14. Mask pattern recovery by level set method based inverse inspection technology (IIT) and its application on defect auto disposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Hyung; Chung, Paul D. H.; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Cho, Han Ku; Pang, Linyong; Peng, Danping; Tolani, Vikram; Cecil, Tom; Kim, David; Baik, KiHo

    2009-10-01

    At the most advanced technology nodes, such as 32nm and 22nm, aggressive OPC and Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) are required. However, their use results in significantly increased mask complexity, making mask defect disposition more challenging than ever. This paper describes how mask patterns can first be recovered from the inspection images by applying patented algorithms using Level Set Methods. The mask pattern recovery step is then followed by aerial/wafer image simulation, the results of which can be plugged into an automated mask defect disposition system based on aerial/wafer image. The disposition criteria are primarily based on wafer-plane CD variance. The system also connects to a post-OPC lithography verification tool that can provide gauges and CD specs, thereby enabling them to be used in mask defect disposition as well. Results on both programmed defects and production defects collected at Samsung mask shop are presented to show the accuracy and consistency of using the Level Set Methods and aerial/wafer image based automated mask disposition.

  15. Effect of iron oxide nanoparticles coating type on the relationship between nanoparticles concentration and signal intensity in inversion recovery T1-weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gharehaghaji, Nahideh; Nazarpoor, Mahmood; Saharkhiz, Hodaiseh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are used as blood pool contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and perfusion imaging. Our aim in this study was to investigate the effect of the two coating types of iron oxide nanoparticles on the relationship between nanoparticles concentration and signal intensity (SI) in T1-weighted MR images. Methods: Different concentrations of the polyethylene glycol (PEG), and carboxydextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were imaged using inversion recovery Turbo-FLASH (Turbo fast low-angle shot) pulse sequence with inversion times (TIs) of 300-900 ms (interval of 100 ms). The maximum non-linear and linear relationship between the corrected SI (after non-uniformity correction) and the concentration of the two coated nanoparticles were calculated in T1-weighted images. Results: The maximum non-linear relationship between the corrected SI and the concentration of the PEG, and carboxydextran-coated nanoparticles were obtained at concentrations of 400 and 200 μmol Fe/L at a TI of 900 ms, respectively. In addition, the maximum linear relationship between the corrected SI and the concentration of the PEG, and carboxydextran-coated nanoparticles (R2=0.99) appeared at 228.184 and 205.654 μmolFe/L with a TI of 300 ms, respectively. Conclusion: The maximum non-linear corrected SI of the carboxydextran-coated nanoparticles was slightly higher than that of the PEG-coated nanoparticles at similar TIs. However, the PEG-coated nanoparticles were better than the carboxydextran-coated nanoparticles as a T1 contrast agent for perfusion measurements. PMID:26478869

  16. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Joosten, René; van de Water, Willem

    2015-12-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the largest eddies of the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a highly intermittent random flow with interesting but quite anomalous statistics.

  17. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Water, Willem; Ergun Cekli, Hakki; Joosten, Rene

    2011-11-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the large eddies in the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a flow with interesting statistics, but it is not turbulence.

  18. Flip angle profile correction for T₁ and T₂ quantification with look-locker inversion recovery 2D steady-state free precession imaging.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Mitchell A; Nguyen, Thanh D; Spincemaille, Pascal; Prince, Martin R; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Wang, Yi

    2012-11-01

    Fast methods using balanced steady-state free precession have been developed to reduce the scan time of T₁ and T₂ mapping. However, flip angle (FA) profiles created by the short radiofrequency pulses used in steady-state free precession deviate substantially from the ideal rectangular profile, causing T₁ and T₂ mapping errors. The purpose of this study was to develop a FA profile correction for T₁ and T₂ mapping with Look-Locker 2D inversion recovery steady-state free precession and to validate this method using 2D spin echo as a reference standard. Phantom studies showed consistent improvement in T₁ and T₂ accuracy using profile correction at multiple FAs. Over six human calves, profile correction provided muscle T₁ estimates with mean error ranging from excellent (-0.6%) at repetition time/FA = 18 ms/60° to acceptable (6.8%) at repetition time/FA = 4.9 ms/30°, while muscle T₂ estimates were less accurate with mean errors of 31.2% and 47.9%, respectively.

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Enhancement on Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images After Carotid Artery Stenting with Neuroprotective Balloon Occlusions: Hemodynamic Instability and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, Ryo Nakahara, Toshinori; Hamasaki, Osamu; Araki, Hayato; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: A rare complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS), prolonged reversible neurological symptoms with delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space enhancement on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We prospectively identified patients who showed CSF space enhancement on FLAIR images. Methods: Nineteen patients-5 acute-phase and 14 scheduled-underwent 21 CAS procedures. Balloon catheters were navigated across stenoses, angioplasty was performed using a neuroprotective balloon, and stents were placed with after dilation under distal balloon protection. CSF space hyperintensity or obscuration on FLAIR after versus before CAS indicated CSF space enhancement. Correlations with clinical factors were examined. Results: CSF space was enhanced on FLAIR in 12 (57.1%) cases. Postprocedural CSF space enhancement was significantly related to age, stenosis rate, acute-stage procedure, and total occlusion time. All acute-stage CAS patients showed delayed enhancement. Only age was associated with delayed CSF space enhancement in scheduled CAS patients. Conclusions: Ischemic intolerance for severe carotid artery stenosis and temporary neuroprotective balloon occlusion, causing reperfusion injury, seem to be the main factors that underlie BBB disruption with delayed CSF space enhancement shortly after CAS, rather than sudden poststenting hemodynamic change. Our results suggest that factors related to hemodynamic instability or ischemic intolerance seem to be associated with post-CAS BBB vulnerability. Patients at risk for hemodynamic instability or with ischemic intolerance, which decrease BBB integrity, require careful management to prevent intracranial hemorrhagic and other post-CAS complications.

  20. Lipid suppression via double inversion recovery with symmetric frequency sweep for robust 2D‐GRAPPA‐accelerated MRSI of the brain at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Hangel, Gilbert; Strasser, Bernhard; Považan, Michal; Gruber, Stephan; Chmelík, Marek; Gajdošík, Martin; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new approach for high‐resolution MRSI of the brain at 7 T in clinically feasible measurement times. Two major problems of MRSI are the long scan times for large matrix sizes and the possible spectral contamination by the transcranial lipid signal. We propose a combination of free induction decay (FID)‐MRSI with a short acquisition delay and acceleration via in‐plane two‐dimensional generalised autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (2D‐GRAPPA) with adiabatic double inversion recovery (IR)‐based lipid suppression to allow robust high‐resolution MRSI. We performed Bloch simulations to evaluate the magnetisation pathways of lipids and metabolites, and compared the results with phantom measurements. Acceleration factors in the range 2–25 were tested in a phantom. Five volunteers were scanned to verify the value of our MRSI method in vivo. GRAPPA artefacts that cause fold‐in of transcranial lipids were suppressed via double IR, with a non‐selective symmetric frequency sweep. The use of long, low‐power inversion pulses (100 ms) reduced specific absorption rate requirements. The symmetric frequency sweep over both pulses provided good lipid suppression (>90%), in addition to a reduced loss in metabolite signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR), compared with conventional IR suppression (52–70%). The metabolic mapping over the whole brain slice was not limited to a rectangular region of interest. 2D‐GRAPPA provided acceleration up to a factor of nine for in vivo FID‐MRSI without a substantial increase in g‐factors (<1.1). A 64 × 64 matrix can be acquired with a common repetition time of ~1.3 s in only 8 min without lipid artefacts caused by acceleration. Overall, we present a fast and robust MRSI method, using combined double IR fat suppression and 2D‐GRAPPA acceleration, which may be used in (pre)clinical studies of the brain at 7 T. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  1. Diffusion-weighted imaging–fluid-attenuated inversion recovery mismatch is associated with better neurologic response to intravenous thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Yeong; Han, Sang Kuk; Shin, Dong Hyuk; Na, Ji Ung; Lee, Hyun Jung; Choi, Pil Cho; Lee, Jeong Hun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate differences in the effect of intravenous (IV) thrombolysis regarding the mismatch of diffusion-weighted imaging–fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (DWI-FLAIR) among acute ischemic stroke patients who visited the emergency department (ED) within 3 hours from the onset of symptoms. Methods Among ED patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke between January 2011 and May 2013 at a tertiary hospital, those who underwent magnetic resonance imaging before IV thrombolytic therapy were included in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into DWI-FLAIR mismatch and match groups. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores obtained initially, 24 hours after thrombolytic therapy, and on discharge, and early neurologic improvement (ENI) and major neurologic improvement (MNI) were compared. Results During the study period, 50 of the 213 acute ischemic stroke patients who presented to the ED were included. The DWI-FLAIR mismatch group showed a statistically significantly greater reduction in NIHSS both at 24 hours after thrombolytic therapy and upon discharge than did the match group (5.5 vs. 1.2, P<0.001; 6.0 vs. 2.3, P<0.01, respectively). Moreover, ENI and MNI were significantly greater for the DWI-FLAIR mismatch group than for the match group (27/36 vs. 2/14, P<0.001; 12/36 vs. 0/14, P=0.012, respectively). Conclusion Among acute ischemic stroke patients who visited the ED within 3 hours from the onset of symptoms, patients who showed DWI-FLAIR mismatch showed a significantly better response to IV thrombolytic therapy than did the DWI-FLAIR match group in terms of neurologic outcome.

  2. Multicentre multiobserver study of diffusion-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a reliability and agreement study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Koji; Harada, Masafumi; Sasaki, Makoto; Yuasa, Tatsuhiko; Sakai, Kenji; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Sanjo, Nobuo; Shiga, Yusei; Satoh, Katsuya; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Shirabe, Susumu; Nagata, Ken; Maeda, Tetsuya; Murayama, Shigeo; Izumi, Yuishin; Kaji, Ryuji; Yamada, Masahito; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the utility of the display standardisation of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and to compare the effectiveness of DWI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Design A reliability and agreement study. Setting Thirteen MRI observers comprising eight neurologists and five radiologists at two universities in Japan. Participants Data of 1.5-Tesla DWI and FLAIR were obtained from 29 patients with sCJD and 13 controls. Outcome measures Standardisation of DWI display was performed utilising b0 imaging. The observers participated in standardised DWI, variable DWI (the display adjustment was observer dependent) and FLAIR sessions. The observers independently assessed each MRI for CJD-related lesions, that is, hyperintensity in the cerebral cortex or striatum, using a continuous rating scale. Performance was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC). Results The mean AUC values were 0.84 (95% CI 0.81 to 0.87) for standardised DWI, 0.85 (95% CI 0.82 to 0.88) for variable DWI and 0.68 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.72) for FLAIR, demonstrating the superiority of DWI (p<0.05). There was a trend for higher intraclass correlations of standardised DWI (0.74, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.83) and variable DWI (0.72, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.81) than that of FLAIR (0.63, 95% CI 0.53 to 0.74), although the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Standardised DWI is as reliable as variable DWI, and the two DWI displays are superior to FLAIR for the diagnosis of sCJD. The authors propose that hyperintensity in the cerebral cortex or striatum on 1.5-Tesla DWI but not FLAIR can be a reliable diagnostic marker for sCJD.

  3. Accuracy for detection of simulated lesions: comparison of fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery, proton density--weighted, and T2-weighted synthetic brain MR imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herskovits, E. H.; Itoh, R.; Melhem, E. R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to determine the effects of MR sequence (fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery [FLAIR], proton density--weighted, and T2-weighted) and of lesion location on sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We generated FLAIR, proton density-weighted, and T2-weighted brain images with 3-mm lesions using published parameters for acute multiple sclerosis plaques. Each image contained from zero to five lesions that were distributed among cortical-subcortical, periventricular, and deep white matter regions; on either side; and anterior or posterior in position. We presented images of 540 lesions, distributed among 2592 image regions, to six neuroradiologists. We constructed a contingency table for image regions with lesions and another for image regions without lesions (normal). Each table included the following: the reviewer's number (1--6); the MR sequence; the side, position, and region of the lesion; and the reviewer's response (lesion present or absent [normal]). We performed chi-square and log-linear analyses. RESULTS: The FLAIR sequence yielded the highest true-positive rates (p < 0.001) and the highest true-negative rates (p < 0.001). Regions also differed in reviewers' true-positive rates (p < 0.001) and true-negative rates (p = 0.002). The true-positive rate model generated by log-linear analysis contained an additional sequence-location interaction. The true-negative rate model generated by log-linear analysis confirmed these associations, but no higher order interactions were added. CONCLUSION: We developed software with which we can generate brain images of a wide range of pulse sequences and that allows us to specify the location, size, shape, and intrinsic characteristics of simulated lesions. We found that the use of FLAIR sequences increases detection accuracy for cortical-subcortical and periventricular lesions over that associated with proton density- and T2-weighted sequences.

  4. Multicentre multiobserver study of diffusion-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease: a reliability and agreement study

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Koji; Sasaki, Makoto; Yuasa, Tatsuhiko; Sakai, Kenji; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Sanjo, Nobuo; Shiga, Yusei; Satoh, Katsuya; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Shirabe, Susumu; Nagata, Ken; Maeda, Tetsuya; Murayama, Shigeo; Izumi, Yuishin; Kaji, Ryuji; Yamada, Masahito; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the utility of the display standardisation of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and to compare the effectiveness of DWI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (sCJD). Design A reliability and agreement study. Setting Thirteen MRI observers comprising eight neurologists and five radiologists at two universities in Japan. Participants Data of 1.5-Tesla DWI and FLAIR were obtained from 29 patients with sCJD and 13 controls. Outcome measures Standardisation of DWI display was performed utilising b0 imaging. The observers participated in standardised DWI, variable DWI (the display adjustment was observer dependent) and FLAIR sessions. The observers independently assessed each MRI for CJD-related lesions, that is, hyperintensity in the cerebral cortex or striatum, using a continuous rating scale. Performance was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC). Results The mean AUC values were 0.84 (95% CI 0.81 to 0.87) for standardised DWI, 0.85 (95% CI 0.82 to 0.88) for variable DWI and 0.68 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.72) for FLAIR, demonstrating the superiority of DWI (p<0.05). There was a trend for higher intraclass correlations of standardised DWI (0.74, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.83) and variable DWI (0.72, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.81) than that of FLAIR (0.63, 95% CI 0.53 to 0.74), although the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Standardised DWI is as reliable as variable DWI, and the two DWI displays are superior to FLAIR for the diagnosis of sCJD. The authors propose that hyperintensity in the cerebral cortex or striatum on 1.5-Tesla DWI but not FLAIR can be a reliable diagnostic marker for sCJD. PMID:22290397

  5. Assessment of left ventricular myocardial scar in infiltrative and non-ischemic cardiac diseases by free breathing three dimensional phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) TurboFLASH.

    PubMed

    Kino, Aya; Keeling, Aoife N; Farrelly, Cormac T; Sheehan, John J; Davarpanah, Amir H; Weele, Peter J; Zuehldorff, Sven; Carr, James C

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a navigator gated free breathing 3D Phase Sensitive Inversion Recovery (PSIR) TurboFLASH to an established 2D PSIR TurboFLASH method for detecting myocardial late gadolinium hyperenhanced lesions caused by infiltrative and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. Under an IRB approved protocol; patients with suspected non-ischemic infiltrative myocardial heart disease were examined on a 1.5T MR scanner for late enhancement after the administration of gadolinium using a segmented 2D PSIR TurboFLASH sequence followed by a navigator-gated 3D PSIR TurboFLASH sequence. Two independent readers analyzed image quality using a four point Likert scale for qualitative analysis (0 = poor, non diagnostic; 1 = fair, diagnostic may be impaired; 2 = good, some artifacts but not interfering in diagnostics, 3 = excellent, no artifacts) and also reported presence or absence of scar. Detected scars were classified based on area and location and also compared quantitatively in volume. Twenty-seven patients were scanned using both protocols. Image quality score did not differ significantly (p = 0.358, Wilcoxon signed rank test) for both technique. Scars were detected in 24 patients. Larger numbers of hyperenhanced scars were detected with 3D PSIR (200) compared to 2D PSIR (167) and scar volume were significant larger in 3D PSIR (p = 0.004). The mean scar volume over all cases was 49.95 cm(3) for 2D PSIR and 70.02 cm(3) for 3D PSIR. The navigator gated free breathing 3D PSIR approach is a suitable method for detecting myocardial late gadolinium hyperenhanced lesions caused by non-ischemic cardiomyopathy due to its complete isotropic coverage of the left ventricle, improving detection of scar lesions compared to 2D PSIR imaging.

  6. A comparison of inner ear imaging features at different time points of sudden sensorineural hearing loss with three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Honglei; Ou, Yongkang; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Ya; Xiong, Hao; Xu, Yaodong

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported that about half of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) show high signals in the affected inner ear on three-dimensional, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (3D-FLAIR MRI). These signals may reflect minor hemorrhage or an increased concentration of protein in the inner ear, which has passed through blood vessels with increased permeability. Our objective was to compare the positive ratio of the high signal in affected inner ears at different time points to determine the suitable imaging time point for 3D-FLAIR MRI in SSNHL. 3D-FLAIR MRI images were taken at three times, precontrast and approximately 10 min and 4 h after intravenous injection of a single dose of gadodiamide (Gd) (0.1 mmol/kg), in 46 patients with SNHL. We compared the positive findings of the high signals in the inner ear of patients with SNHL as well as the signal intensity ratio (SIR) between the affected cochleae and unaffected cochleae at three time points. The positive ratios of the high signals in the affected inner ear at the time points of precontrast and 10 min and 4 h after the intravenous Gd injection were 26.1, 32.6, and 41.3%, respectively. The high signal intensity ratios of affected inner ears at the three time points were 1.28, 1.31, and 1.48, respectively. The difference between the positive ratios precontrast and at 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection was statistically significant (P = 0.006); the differences between the positive ratios at 4 h after the intravenous Gd injection and precontrast and between the ratios at 4 h and 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection were not statistically significant. The time effects of the median value of SIR were not significant (P = 0.064). We do not recommend 4 h after intravenous Gd injection as a time point to image the inner ear in SNHL. We believe that imaging precontrast and at 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection are suitable time points.

  7. Feasibility of Coronary Artery Wall Thickening Assessment in Asymptomatic Coronary Artery Disease using Phase-Sensitive Dual Inversion Recovery MRI at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Ahmed M.; Zahiri, Homeira; Matta, Jatin; Pettigrew, Roderic I.; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to (1) investigate the image quality of phase-sensitive dual inversion recovery (PS-DIR) coronary wall imaging in healthy subjects and in subjects with known coronary artery disease (CAD) and to (2) investigate the utilization of PS-DIR at 3T in the assessment of coronary artery thickening in subjects with asymptomatic but variable degrees of CAD. Materials and Methods A total of 37 subjects participated in this Institutional Review Board approved and HIPAA-compliant study. These included 21 subjects with known CAD as identified on Multi-Detector CT angiography (MDCT). Sixteen healthy subjects without known history of CAD were included. All subjects were scanned using free-breathing PS-DIR MRI for the assessment of coronary wall thickness at 3T. Lumen-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise (SNR), and quantitative vessel parameters including lumen area and wall thickness were measured. Statistical analyses were performed. Results PS-DIR was successfully completed in 76% of patients and in 88% of the healthy subjects. Phase-sensitive signed magnitude reconstruction, compared to modulus magnitude images, significantly improved lumen-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in both healthy subjects (26.73±11.95 vs. 14.65±9.57, p<0.001) and in patients (21.45±7.61 vs. 16.65±5.85, p<0.001). There was no difference in image CNR and SNR between groups. In arterial segments free of plaques, coronary wall was thicker in patients in comparison to healthy subjects (1.74±0.27mm vs. 1.17±0.14mm, p<0.001) without a change in lumen area (4.51±2.42 mm2 vs. 5.71±3.11 mm2, p=0.25). Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the feasibility of successfully obtaining vessel wall images at 3T using PS-DIR in asymptomatic patients with known variable degrees of CAD as detected by MDCT. This was achieved with a fixed subject-invariant planning of blood signal nulling. With that limitation alleviated, PS-DIR coronary wall

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence signal reduction after endoscopic endonasal transcribiform total resection of olfactory groove meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Prevedello, Daniel M.; Ditzel Filho, Leo F. S.; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C.; Solari, Domenico; do Espírito Santo, Marcelo Prudente; Wehr, Allison M.; Carrau, Ricardo L.; Kassam, Amin B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Olfactory groove meningiomas grow insidiously and compress adjacent cerebral structures. Achieving complete removal without further damage to frontal lobes can be difficult. Microsurgical removal of large lesions is a challenging procedure and usually involves some brain retraction. The endoscopic endonasal approaches (EEAs) for tumors arising from the anterior fossa have been well described; however, their effect on the adjacent brain tissue has not. Herein, the authors utilized the magnetic resonance imaging fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence signal as a marker for edema and gliosis on pre- and post-operative images of olfactory groove meningiomas, thus presenting an objective parameter for brain injury after surgical manipulation. Methods: Imaging of 18 olfactory groove meningiomas removed through EEAs was reviewed. Tumor and pre/postoperative FLAIR signal volumes were assessed utilizing the DICOM image viewer OsiriX®. Inclusion criteria were: (1) No previous treatment; (2) EEA gross total removal; (3) no further treatment. Results: There were 14 females and 4 males; the average age was 53.8 years (±8.85 years). Average tumor volume was 24.75 cm3 (±23.26 cm3, range 2.8–75.7 cm3), average preoperative FLAIR volume 31.17 cm3 (±39.38 cm3, range 0–127.5 cm3) and average postoperative change volume, 4.16 cm3 (±6.18 cm3, range 0–22.2 cm3). Average time of postoperative scanning was 6 months (range 0.14–20 months). In all cases (100%) gross total tumor removal was achieved. Nine patients (50%) had no postoperative FLAIR changes. In 2 patients (9%) there was minimal increase of changes postoperatively (2.2 cm3 and 6 cm3 respectively); all others demonstrated image improvement. The most common complication was postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage (27.8%); 1 patient (5.5%) died due to systemic complications and pulmonary sepsis. Conclusions: FLAIR signal changes tend to resolve after endonasal tumor resection and do not seem

  9. Multi-vendor, multicentre comparison of contrast-enhanced SSFP and T2-STIR CMR for determining myocardium at risk in ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Nordlund, David; Klug, Gert; Heiberg, Einar; Koul, Sasha; Larsen, Terje H.; Hoffmann, Pavel; Metzler, Bernhard; Erlinge, David; Atar, Dan; Aletras, Anthony H.; Carlsson, Marcus; Engblom, Henrik; Arheden, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Aims Myocardial salvage, determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), is used as end point in cardioprotection trials. To calculate myocardial salvage, infarct size is related to myocardium at risk (MaR), which can be assessed by T2-short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) and contrast-enhanced steady-state free precession magnetic resonance imaging (CE-SSFP). We aimed to determine how T2-STIR and CE-SSFP perform in determining MaR when applied in multicentre, multi-vendor settings. Methods and results A total of 215 patients from 17 centres were included after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction. CMR was performed within 1–8 days. These patients participated in the MITOCARE or CHILL-MI cardioprotection trials. Additionally, 8 patients from a previous study, imaged 1 day post-CMR, were included. Late gadolinium enhancement, T2-STIR, and CE-SSFP images were acquired on 1.5T MR scanners (Philips, Siemens, or GE). In 65% of the patients, T2-STIR was of diagnostic quality compared with 97% for CE-SSFP. In diagnostic quality images, there was no difference in MaR by T2-STIR and CE-SSFP (bias: 0.02 ± 6%, P = 0.96, r2 = 0.71, P < 0.001), or between treatment and control arms. No change in size or quality of MaR nor ability to identify culprit artery was seen over the first week after the acute event (P = 0.44). Conclusion In diagnostic quality images, T2-STIR and CE-SSFP provide similar estimates of MaR, were constant over the first week, and were not affected by treatment. CE-SSFP had a higher degree of diagnostic quality images compared with T2 imaging for sequences from two out of three vendors. Therefore, CE-SSFP is currently more suitable for implementation in multicentre, multi-vendor clinical trials. PMID:27002140

  10. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  11. Novel extraction approach for liquid samples: stir cake sorptive extraction using monolith.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojia; Chen, Linli; Lin, Fuhua; Yuan, Dongxing

    2011-08-01

    In this study, a new extraction approach for liquid samples--stir cake sorptive extraction using monoliths as extractive medium was developed. The preparation procedure of stir cake is very simple. First, monolithic cake is synthesized according to the in situ polymerization of monolith; then, the cake is inserted in an original unit (holder), which is constructed from a syringe cartridge and allows the magnetic stirring of the cake during the extraction process. The effects of dimension of monolithic cake and unit design on the extraction performance were optimized in detail. To demonstrate the usability of this new extraction approach, poly(vinylimidazole-divinylbenzene) was prepared and acted as the extractive cake. The analysis of steroid hormones in milk samples by the combination of stir cake with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection, was selected as a paradigm for the practical evaluation of stir cake sorptive extraction. Under the optimized extraction conditions, low detection limits (S/N=3) and quantification limits (S/N=10) of the proposed method for the target analytes were achieved within the range between 0.33-0.69 and 1.08-2.28 μg/L, respectively. The method also showed good linearity, repeatability, high feasibility and acceptable recoveries. Because the monolithic cake does not contact with the vessel wall during stirring, there is no friction loss of extractive medium and the stir cake can be used for more than 1000 h.

  12. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  13. Friction Stir Process Mapping Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kooney, Alex; Bjorkman, Gerry; Russell, Carolyn; Smelser, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In FSW (friction stir welding), the weld process performance for a given weld joint configuration and tool setup is summarized on a 2-D plot of RPM vs. IPM. A process envelope is drawn within the map to identify the range of acceptable welds. The sweet spot is selected as the nominal weld schedule. The nominal weld schedule is characterized in the expected manufacturing environment. The nominal weld schedule in conjunction with process control ensures a consistent and predictable weld performance.

  14. Flexible Friction Stir Joining Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Lim, Yong Chae; Mahoney, Murray; Sanderson, Samuel; Larsen, Steve; Steel, Russel; Fleck, Dale; Fairchild, Doug P; Wasson, Andrew J; Babb, Jon; Higgins, Paul

    2015-07-23

    Reported herein is the final report on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) project with industry cost-share that was jointly carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (ExxonMobil), and MegaStir Technologies (MegaStir). The project was aimed to advance the state of the art of friction stir welding (FSW) technology, a highly energy-efficient solid-state joining process, for field deployable, on-site fabrications of large, complex and thick-sectioned structures of high-performance and high-temperature materials. The technology innovations developed herein attempted to address two fundamental shortcomings of FSW: 1) the inability for on-site welding and 2) the inability to weld thick section steels, both of which have impeded widespread use of FSW in manufacturing. Through this work, major advance has been made toward transforming FSW technology from a “specialty” process to a mainstream materials joining technology to realize its pervasive energy, environmental, and economic benefits across industry.

  15. Molecularly imprinted polymeric stir bar: Preparation and application for the determination of naftopidil in plasma and urine samples.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Xiao, Deli; He, Hua; Zhao, Hongyan; Wang, Cuixia; Shi, Tian; Shi, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, molecularly imprinting technology and stir bar absorption technology were combined to develop a microextraction approach based on a molecularly imprinted polymeric stir bar. The molecularly imprinted polymer stir bar has a high performance, is specific, economical, and simple to prepare. The obtained naftopidil-imprinted polymer-coated bars could simultaneously agitate and adsorb naftopidil in the sample solution. The ratio of template/monomer/cross-linker and conditions of template removal were optimized to prepare a stir bar with highly efficient adsorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, selectivity, and extraction capacity experiments showed that the molecularly imprinted polymer stir bar was prepared successfully. To utilize the molecularly imprinted polymer stir bar for the determination of naftopidil in complex body fluid matrices, the extraction time, stirring speed, eluent, and elution time were optimized. The limits of detection of naftopidil in plasma and urine sample were 7.5 and 4.0 ng/mL, respectively, and the recoveries were in the range of 90-112%. The within-run precision and between-run precision were acceptable (relative standard deviation <7%). These data demonstrated that the molecularly imprinted polymeric stir bar based microextraction with high-performance liquid chromatography was a convenient, rapid, efficient, and specific method for the precise determination of trace naftopidil in clinical analysis. PMID:26541792

  16. Stirring effect on kaolinite dissolution rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Volker; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were carried out measuring kaolinite dissolution rates using stirred and nonstirred flow-through reactors at pHs 2 to 4 and temperatures of 25°C, 50°C, and 70°C. The results show an increase of kaolinite dissolution rate with increasing stirring speed. The stirring effect is reversible, i.e., as the stirring slows down the dissolution rate decreases. The effect of stirring speed on kaolinite dissolution rate is higher at 25°C than at 50°C and 70°C and at pH 4 than at pHs 2 and 3. It is suggested that fine kaolinite particles are formed as a result of stirring-induced spalling or abrasion of kaolinite. These very fine particles have an increased ratio of reactive surface area to specific surface area, which results in enhancement of kaolinite dissolution rate. A balance between production and dissolution of the fine particles explains both the reversibility and the temperature and pH dependence of the stirring effect. Since the stirring effect on kaolinite dissolution rate varies with temperature and pH, measurement of kinetic parameters such as activation energy may be influenced by stirring. Therefore, standard use of nonagitated reaction vessels for kinetic experiments of mineral dissolution and precipitation is recommended, at least for slow reactions that are surface controlled.

  17. Turbo STIR magnetic resonance imaging as a whole-body screening tool for metastases in patients with breast carcinoma: preliminary clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Walker, R; Kessar, P; Blanchard, R; Dimasi, M; Harper, K; DeCarvalho, V; Yucel, E K; Patriquin, L; Eustace, S

    2000-04-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the utility of whole-body turbo short tau inversion recovery (STIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect metastases to liver, brain, and bone as a single examination in women with breast cancer. Seventeen patients with biopsy-proven breast cancer and suspected metastatic disease attending over a 12-month period referred for both conventional imaging and whole-body MRI were included in the study. Three patients were found to be free of metastases at both conventional and MR imaging. Appendicular or axial skeletal metastases were identified in 11 of 17 patients, with correlation between findings at whole-body MRI and scintigraphy in 15 of the 17 patients. Five patients had evidence of hepatic metastases on whole-body MRI, of which metastases were identified in only three patients at CT despite contrast enhancement. Four patients had brain abnormalities (metastases in three patients, meningioma in one patient) detected on both whole-body and dedicated brain MRI. Preliminary clinical experience suggests that turbo STIR whole-body MRI may represent a convenient and cost-effective method of total body screening for metastases in patients with breast carcinoma.

  18. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  19. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  20. Macrostructure of Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aloor, S.; Nowak, B.; Vargas, R.; McClure, J. C.; Murr, L. E.; Nunes, A. C.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper will discuss two of the well know large scale features of friction stir welds: the "onion rings" seen in transverse sections, and the striations on the surface of the work piece. It will be shown that the surface features (sometimes called "tool marks") are the result of irregularities on the rotating shoulder of the pin tool and disappear when the shoulder is polished. The "onion ring" structure seen in transverse cross sections is formed by parts of the "carousel", the zone of material adjacent to and rotating with the pin tool, that are shed off in each rotation. The relation between the carousel and the "ring vortex", a rotational flow extending both in and out of the carousel and resembling a smoke-ring with the hole centered on the pin tool, will be discussed.

  1. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  2. Marching-jury backward beam equation and quasi-reversibility methods for hydrologic inversion: Application to contaminant plume spatial distribution recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Atmadja, Juliana

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, a comparison between the marching-jury backward beam equation (MJBBE) and the quasi-reversibility (QR) methods to perform hydrologic inversion and, more specifically, to reconstruct conservative contaminant plume spatial distributions is presented. The MJBBE, developed by Atmadja and Bagtzoglou [2000, 2001a], was used to recover contaminant spatial distributions in heterogeneous porous media, while the QR method, first applied to groundwater contamination problems by Skaggs and Kabala [1995], was modified to incorporate heterogeneity and explicitly handle the advective term of the transport equation. Spatially uncorrelated and correlated, stationary and nonstationary, heterogeneous dispersion coefficient fields were generated using the Bayesian nearest neighbor method (BNNM). Homogeneous and deterministically heterogeneous cases are also presented for comparison. In addition, contaminant plume initial data with uncertainty were also analyzed using the MJBBE and QR methods. The MJBBE is found to be robust enough to handle highly heterogeneous parameters and is able to preserve the salient features of the initial input data. On the other hand, the QR method is superior in handling cases with homogeneous parameters and with initial data that are plagued by uncertainty but it performs very poorly in cases with heterogeneous media.

  3. [Carotid plaque assessment using inversion recovery T1 weighted-3 dimensions variable refocus flip angle turbo spin echo sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different angle evolutions black blood imaging].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuji; Yoneyama, Masami; Nakamura, Masanobu; Ozaki, Satoshi; Ito, Kenjiro; Hiura, Mikio

    2012-01-01

    Vulnerable plaque can be attributed to induction of ischemic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging of carotid artery is valuable to detect the plaque. Magnetization prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo (MPRAGE) method could detect hemorrhagic vulnerable plaque as high intensity signal; however, blood flow is not sufficiently masked by this method. The contrast for plaque in T1 weighted image (T1WI) could not be obtained sufficiently with black blood image (BBI) by sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different angle evolutions (SPACE) method as turbo spin echo (TSE). In addition, an appearance of artifact by slow flow is a problem. Considering these controversial situations in plaque imaging, we examined the modified BBI inversion recovery (IR)-SPACE in which IR was added for SPACE method so that the contrast for plaque in T1WI was optimized. We investigated the application of this method in plaque imaging. As a result of phantom imaging, the contrast for plaque in T1WI was definitely obtained by choosing an appropriate inversion time (TI) for the corresponding repetition time. In clinical cases, blood flow was sufficiently masked by IR-SPACE method and the plaque imaging was clearly obtained in clinical cases to the same extent as MPRAGE method. Since BBI with IR-SPACE method was derived from both IR pulse and flow void effect, this method could obtain the blood flow masking effect definitely. The present study suggested that SPACE method might be applicable to estimate properties of carotid artery plaque.

  4. Quantifying the effects of not stirring between repetitive chronoamperometric experiments.

    PubMed

    Feldberg, Stephen W; Ojha, Ruchika; Bond, Alan M

    2013-01-15

    Electroanalytical protocols executed under quiescent conditions generally require that the analyte medium be stirred (or agitated) between repetitions to ensure reestablishment of identical initial conditions in the vicinity of the electrode surface. The present work examines what happens when experimental conditions preclude stirring. We consider two general schemes: Scheme 1 where the potential is stepped from E(start) to E(step) to oxidize the initially present reduced redox moiety, A, to B under diffusion control (i.e., [A](x=0) = 0) for 0 ≤ t ≤ τ(1) followed by a second potential step from E(step) back to E(start) and continuing for τ(1) < t ≤ τ(2) during which time species B is reduced back to the initially present species A under diffusion control (i.e., [B](x=0) = 0) and Scheme 2 where the potential is again stepped from E(start) to E(step) to oxidize A to B under diffusion control for 0 ≤ t ≤ τ(1) followed by a second potential step from E(step) back to E(start) and continuing for τ(1) < t ≤ τ(2) during which there is no electron transfer; i.e., the electrochemical conversion of B to A (or vice versa) does not occur, and the electrode is effectively at open circuit for time τ(1) < t ≤ τ(2). We define a recovery parameter which specifies the concentration of A at distance (D(A)τ(1))(1/2) from the electrode as a function of the recovery-time ratio τ(2)/τ(1) and the operative Scheme (J). We show that for any given level of recovery τ(2)/τ(1) for Scheme 2 is much larger than for Scheme 1.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Tension Properties for Al-Cu Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints with GTN Damage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guo-Qin; Sun, Feng-Yang; Cao, Fang-Li; Chen, Shu-Jun; Barkey, Mark E.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical simulation of tensile fracture behavior on Al-Cu alloy friction stir-welded joint was performed with the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model. The parameters of the GTN model were studied in each region of the friction stir-welded joint by means of inverse identification. Based on the obtained parameters, the finite element model of the welded joint was built to predict the fracture behavior and tension properties. Good agreement can be found between the numerical and experimental results in the location of the tensile fracture and the mechanical properties.

  6. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  7. Nonequilibrium chemical instabilities in continuous flow stirred tank reactors: The effect of stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsthemke, W.; Hannon, L.

    1984-11-01

    We present a stochastic model for stirred chemical reactors. In the limiting case of practical interest, i.e., fast stirring, we solve for the characteristic function in steady state and derive expressions for the stationary moments through a perturbation expansion. Moments are explicitly calculated for a generic model of bistable behavior. We find that stirring decreases the area of the bistable region essentially by changing the point of transition from the high reaction rate state to the low reaction rate state. This is in remarkable agreement with the experimental findings of Roux, et al. Our results indicate that stirring should not be considered simply as an ``enhanced diffusion'' process and that nucleation plays only a minor role in transitions between multiple steady states in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR).

  8. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  9. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  10. Endolymphatic Hydrops Detected by 3-Dimensional Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery MRI following Intratympanic Injection of Gadolinium in the Asymptomatic Contralateral Ears of Patients with Unilateral Ménière’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yupeng; Jia, Huan; Shi, Jun; Zheng, Hui; Li, Yuhua; Yang, Jun; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of endolymphatic hydrops using 3-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the contralateral ear in patients with unilateral Ménière’s disease (MD). Material/Methods This was a prospective study. 3D-FLAIR MRI was performed with a 3 Tesla (3 T) unit 24 h after the intratympanic administration of gadolinium (Gd) in 30 unilateral MD patients with an asymptomatic contralateral ear. The incidence of contralateral involvement in unilateral MD patients and the potential correlations between the affected and contralateral ears were analyzed. Results Endolymphatic hydrops was observed in 7 of the 30 (23.3%) asymptomatic ears. The mean PTA of the asymptomatic ears in the contralateral hydrops patients (33.0±6.1 dB) was significantly higher compared with the non-hydrops patients (17.8±5.7 dB). The patients with observed contralateral hydrops exhibited a significantly longer duration of the disease compared with the non-hydrops patients (6.7±6.3 vs. 2.9±3.1 years, respectively). Furthermore, the patients with contralateral hydrops had a worse hearing level in the affected ears compared with the non-hydrops patients (70.3±7.4 vs. 52.5±3.8 dB, respectively). Conclusions Endolymphatic hydrops is closely related to hearing loss but does not necessarily result in Ménière’s symptoms. Patients with a long history of MD and severe hearing loss in the affected ear are more likely to exhibit endolymphatic hydrops in the asymptomatic contralateral ear. Adequate attention should focus on unilateral MD patients with contralateral ear hydrops because of the potential to develop bilateral MD. PMID:25742875

  11. School-Meals Makeover Stirs the Pot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2011-01-01

    Proposed new federal rules governing the meals served to school children across the country each weekday are causing a stir among food industry groups, cafeteria managers, parents, and students. The skirmish is over the U.S. Department of Agriculture's efforts, prompted by the recent passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, to rewrite the…

  12. Stirring the Ashes of Public Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinara, Martha

    Sylvia Plath's confessional poem, "Lady Lazarus" can be used to illustrate a connection between autobiography and social critique. "You poke and stir" among the institutions that form social relations--the educational system, the court system, the economic system--to find individuals whose lives, whose joys and pains, and struggles for survival…

  13. Determination of phthalate esters in polyvinyl chloride infusion bag by stir bar sorptive extraction combined with GC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Dai, Jinna; Wang, Xiaofan; Zhao, Xu; Bi, Kaishun; Chen, Xiaohui

    2012-12-01

    A novel, efficient, and sensitive stir bar sorptive extraction method coupled with GC for the detection of four kinds of phthalate esters in plasticized polyvinyl chloride infusion bag has been developed and validated. Some experimental parameters including stirring speed, stirring time, pH value, salt concentration, desorption mode, desorption solvents, and desorption time were investigated and optimized. Under optimum condition, the validated assay was found to be linear (r > 0.9945) and LODs were between 1.07 and 2.67 ng for the four analytes. The method exhibited excellent precision with RSD varied from 4.5 to 6.1% (n = 5). The recoveries of the four phthalate esters at two different concentrations ranged from 80.5 to 93.4%. The results showed that the validated method could meet the need of determination of targets and was successfully applied to the analysis of phthalate esters in real samples.

  14. Development of a carbon-nanoparticle-coated stirrer for stir bar sorptive extraction by a simple carbon deposition in flame.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juanjuan; Sun, Min; Bu, Yanan; Luo, Chuannan

    2016-03-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction is an environmentally friendly microextraction technique based on a stir bar with various sorbents. A commercial stirrer is a good support, but it has not been used in stir bar sorptive extraction due to difficult modification. A stirrer was modified with carbon nanoparticles by a simple carbon deposition process in flame and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. A three-dimensional porous coating was formed with carbon nanoparticles. In combination with high-performance liquid chromatography, the stir bar was evaluated using five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as model analytes. Conditions including extraction time and temperature, ionic strength, and desorption solvent were investigated by a factor-by-factor optimization method. The established method exhibited good linearity (0.01-10 μg/L) and low limits of quantification (0.01 μg/L). It was applied to detect model analytes in environmental water samples. No analyte was detected in river water, and five analytes were quantified in rain water. The recoveries of five analytes in two samples with spiked at 2 μg/L were in the range of 92.2-106% and 93.4-108%, respectively. The results indicated that the carbon nanoparticle-coated stirrer was an efficient stir bar for extraction analysis of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:26663510

  15. Transverse texture and microstructure gradients in friction-stir welded 2519 aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Bingert, J. F.; Fonda, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    Friction-stir welding produces severe thermomechanical transients that generate crystallographic texture evolution throughout the weld-affected microstructure . In this study, a friction stir weld in a coarse-grained 2519 aluminum plate was investigated in order to resolve the influence of these thermal and deformation effects on texture and microstructure development . Automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was applied to spatially resolve orientations in the base metal, weld nugget, and thermomechanical and heat-affected zones. Results show a gradient demarcated by an alteration in boundary character, texture, and precipitate distribution between the thermomechanical affected zone and the recrystallized weld nugget . EBSD scans and microstructural characterizations reveal substructure evolution from the base plate to the nugget indicative of dynamic recovery and recrystallization processes . Experimental results of texture evolution, however, did not directly follow from considerations of simplified deformation gradients and resultant simple shear textures resulting from restricted glide .

  16. Inverse Floatation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Anish; Chatterjee, Souvick; Ganguly, Ranjan; Sen, Swarnendu; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    We have observed that capillarity forces may cause floatation in a few non-intuitive configurations. These may be divided into 2 categories: i) floatation of heavier liquid droplets on lighter immiscible ones and ii) fully submerged floatation of lighter liquid droplets in a heavier immiscible medium. We call these counter-intuitive because of the inverse floatation configuration. For case (i) we have identified and studied in detail the several factors affecting the shape and maximum volume of the floating drop. We used water and vegetable oil combinations as test fluids and established the relation between Bond Number and maximum volume contained in a floating drop (in the order of μL). For case (ii), we injected vegetable oil drop-wise into a pool of water. The fully submerged configuration of the drop is not stable and a slight perturbation to the system causes the droplet to burst and float in partially submerged condition. Temporal variation of a characteristic length of the droplet is analyzed using MATLAB image processing. The constraint of small Bond Number establishes the assumption of lubrication regime in the thin gap. A brief theoretical formulation also shows the temporal variation of the gap thickness. Jadavpur University, Jagadis Bose Centre of Excellence, Virginia Tech.

  17. Friction Stir Processing Technology: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z. Y.

    2008-03-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP), developed based on the basic principles of friction stir welding (FSW), a solid-state joining process originally developed for aluminum alloys, is an emerging metalworking technique that can provide localized modification and control of microstructures in near-surface layers of processed metallic components. The FSP causes intense plastic deformation, material mixing, and thermal exposure, resulting in significant microstructural refinement, densification, and homogeneity of the processed zone. The FSP technique has been successfully used for producing the fine-grained structure and surface composite, modifying the microstructure of materials, and synthesizing the composite and intermetallic compound in situ. In this review article, the current state of the understanding and development of FSP is addressed.

  18. Friction stir processing on carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Sergei Yu.; Melnikov, Alexander G.; Rubtsov, Valery E.

    2014-11-14

    Friction stir processing of medium carbon steel samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. Samples have been machined from 40 and 40X steels. The tools have been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm and 3×3×1.5 mm tetrahedrons. The microstructure of stirred zone has been obtained using the smaller tool and consists of fine recrystallized 2-3 μm grains, whereas the larger tool has produced the 'onion-like' structures comprising hard quenched 'white' 500-600 MPa layers with 300-350 MPa interlayers of bainite needles. The mean values of wear intensity obtained after measuring the wear scar width were 0.02 mm/m and 0.001 mm/m for non-processed and processed samples, respectively.

  19. Ultrasonic stir welding process and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding device provides a method and apparatus for elevating the temperature of a work piece utilizing at least one ultrasonic heater. Instead of relying on a rotating shoulder to provide heat to a workpiece an ultrasonic heater is utilized to provide ultrasonic energy to the workpiece. A rotating pin driven by a motor assembly performs the weld on the workpiece. A handheld version can be constructed as well as a fixedly mounted embodiment.

  20. Flexible Hybrid Friction Stir Joining Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to advance the friction stir welding (FSW) process as a manufacturing technology that can be deployed for on-site construction of large, complex and typically thick-sectioned structures made of high performance and high-temperature materials. This would transform FSW from a specialty joining process into one with pervasive application potential across a number of industrial sectors where the payoff of energy reduction, environmental and economic benefits would be significant.

  1. Microstructure characterization of the stir zone of submerged friction stir processed aluminum alloy 2219

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiuli; Liu, Huijie; Lippold, John C.

    2013-08-15

    Aluminum alloy 2219-T6 was friction stir processed using a novel submerged processing technique to facilitate cooling. Processing was conducted at a constant tool traverse speed of 200 mm/min and spindle rotation speeds in the range from 600 to 800 rpm. The microstructural characteristics of the base metal and processed zone, including grain structure and precipitation behavior, were studied using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness maps were constructed on polished cross sections of as-processed samples. The effect of tool rotation speed on the microstructure and hardness of the stir zone was investigated. The average grain size of the stir zone was much smaller than that of the base metal, but the hardness was also lower due to the formation of equilibrium θ precipitates from the base metal θ′ precipitates. Stir zone hardness was found to decrease with increasing rotation speed (heat input). The effect of processing conditions on strength (hardness) was rationalized based on the competition between grain refinement strengthening and softening due to precipitate overaging. - Highlights: • SZ grain size (∼ 1 μm) is reduced by over one order of magnitude relative to the BM. • Hardness in the SZ is lower than that of the precipitation strengthened BM. • Metastable θ′ in the base metal transforms to equilibrium θ in the stir zone. • Softening in the SZ results from a decrease of precipitation strengthening.

  2. Novel combined stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with ultrasonic assisted extraction for the determination of brominated flame retardants in environmental samples using high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunhe; Hu, Bin

    2007-08-10

    A combined stir bar coated with poly (dimethysiloxane)-beta-cyclodextrin (PDMS-beta-CD) on single side has been prepared for the first time by sol-gel method and was coupled with ultrasonic assisted extraction (UAE) for the determination of some brominated flame-retardant compounds (BFRs) in soil and dust samples by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Four different kinds of coatings including PDMS-beta-CD, PDMS, carbowax (CW)-PDMS-poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and PDMS-PVA were evaluated for stir bar sorptive extraction of BFRs by orthogonal experiment design. The experimental results reveal that the PDMS-beta-CD combined stir bar exhibited the best extraction efficiency for the target analytes. The reproducibility for the preparation of PDMS-beta-CD combined stir bar ranged from 1.3% to 15.7% in one batch, and 7.2% to 15.1% among batches. Extraction time, desorption solvent, concentration of methanol and NaCl in the matrix, pH, temperature and stirring speed were optimized. The combined stir bar can avoid direct friction of the coating with the bottom of the vessel, and could be used for more than 100 times. Linearity (>0.993), repeatability (<10.5%), reproducibility (<16.5%), recovery (56-118%) and detection limits (2.9-4.2 microg L(-1)) were proper to determine the seven BFRs. The developed method was applied to the determination of BFRs in soil and dust with satisfactory results. PMID:17561025

  3. Development and application of novel clonazepam molecularly imprinted coatings for stir bar sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Mei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Lei; Shen, Xin; Zhu, Wanying; Hong, Junli; Zhou, Xuemin

    2016-04-15

    The molecularly imprinted magnetic stir bar coatings were created based on graft-functional Fe3O4 nanoparticles with magnetic field-induced self-assembly. The magnetic complex including clonazepam as template, the graft-functional Fe3O4 nanoparticles and methacrylic acid as monomers was pre-assembled through π-π interaction and hydrogen bonding, then was directionally adsorbed on the surface of magnetic stir bar under the magnetic induction. The molecularly imprinted coating with well-ordered structure was generated by one-step copolymerization based on the cross linking of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The molecularly imprinted coating with multiple recognition sites could be manufactured and applied in polar solvents, and showed superior selectivity and fast binding kinetics for benzodiazepines. The analytes in herbal health foods, treated by stir bar sorptive extraction, were determined by HPLC-UV. Good linearity was observed in the range of 0.01-2 μg mL(-1). The content of clonazepam in the herbal health foods was found to be 44 ng g(-1), and the average recoveries were 89.8-103.3% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) <6.5%, demonstrating the successful application in real sample analysis. PMID:26851451

  4. Friction-Stir-Welded and Spin-Formed End Domes for Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, S. J.; Tayon, W. A.; Domack, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing of single-piece end domes for cryogenic tanks employing spin forming of tailored, friction-stir-welded blanks of Al-Li alloy 2195 plate offers cost and reliability benefits. The introduction of plastic deformation into a friction stir weld is a unique feature of the proposed manufacturing route. This investigation addressed abnormal grain growth [AGG] within the friction stir weldments during postfabrication processing of a prototype dome. The phenomenon of AGG was observed during the solution heat treatment [SHT] phase of T8 tempering and is a major concern for meeting specifications. Such abrupt microstructural transitions can be detrimental to notch-sensitive mechanical properties, such as ductility and/or fracture toughness. If the issue of AGG cannot be resolved, then the acceptance of this approach as a viable manufacturing route may be in jeopardy. The innovative approach adopted in this investigation was the insertion of a stand-alone, Intermediate Annealing Treatment [IAT] between the spin forming and T8 processing operations. A simple, recovery annealing step was deemed to be the most readily-scalable solution when fabricating thin-walled, ellipsoidal domes. The research effort culminated in the development of an effective IAT, which resulted in a significant decrease in AGG following SHT. The processing philosophy adopted in designing the IAT is outlined and the microstructural reasons for success are discussed. The analytical results presented are consistent with promoting continuous grain growth during the IAT, thereby suppressing AGG during the SHT.

  5. Automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction using robust montmorillonite/epoxy-coated stir bars.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Milad; Saraji, Mohammad; Maya, Fernando; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-05-01

    Herein we present a simple, rapid and low cost strategy for the preparation of robust stir bar coatings based on the combination of montmorillonite with epoxy resin. The composite stir bar was implemented in a novel automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction system (MS-SBSE), and applied to the extraction of four chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol) as model compounds, followed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection. The different experimental parameters of the MS-SBSE, such as sample volume, selection of the desorption solvent, desorption volume, desorption time, sample solution pH, salt effect and extraction time were studied. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits were between 0.02 and 0.34μgL(-1). Relative standard deviations (RSD) of the method for the analytes at 10μgL(-1) concentration level ranged from 3.5% to 4.1% (as intra-day RSD) and from 3.9% to 4.3% (as inter-day RSD at 50μgL(-1) concentration level). Batch-to-batch reproducibility for three different stir bars was 4.6-5.1%. The enrichment factors were between 30 and 49. In order to investigate the capability of the developed technique for real sample analysis, well water, wastewater and leachates from a solid waste treatment plant were satisfactorily analyzed.

  6. Gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill

    DOEpatents

    Sadler, III, Leon Y.

    1997-01-01

    A gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill is provided for comminuting solid ticles. The mill includes a housing enclosing a porous fluidizing gas diffuser plate, a baffled rotor and stator, a hollow drive shaft with lateral vents, and baffled gas exhaust exit ports. In operation, fluidizing gas is forced through the mill, fluidizing the raw material and milling media. The rotating rotor, stator and milling media comminute the raw material to be ground. Small entrained particles may be carried from the mill by the gas through the exit ports when the particles reach a very fine size.

  7. Friction Stir Weld Modeling at MSFC: Kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A "merry-go-round" computation model makes it easier to visualize how tracer experiments of varied sorts (chemical, shot, wire) are consistent with a "moving plug model" of flow around the friction stir welding pin-tool. The moving plug model comprises a twofold flow: 1. a primary rotation of a plug of metal with the tool, which moves metal around the tool by wiping it on and off the plug, and 2. a secondary, relatively slow circulation induced by the threads on the tool resembling a circular vortex ring around the tool.

  8. Investigation of ractopamine molecularly imprinted stir bar sorptive extraction and its application for trace analysis of beta2-agonists in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhigang; Hu, Yufei; Hu, Yuling; Li, Gongke

    2010-05-28

    In this paper, a novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) coated stir bar with ractopamine as template by glass capillary filling with magnetic core as substrate was prepared reproducibly. The ractopamine MIP coating was homogeneous and porous with the average thickness of 20.6 microm. The extraction apparatus for the stir bar was improved to avoid coating loss. The MIP-coated stir bar showed better extraction capacity and good selectivity than that of non-imprinted polymer (NIP) coated stir bar to ractopamine and its analogues. The extraction capacities of ractopamine, isoxsuprine, clenbuterol and fenoterol for MIP-coated stir bar were 3.3, 3.1, 2.8 and 2.4 times as much as that of the NIP coated stir bar, respectively. The MIP-coated stir bars could be used at least 40 times without apparent damage and kept in dried air for 8 months without reduce of extraction ability. A method for the determination of beta(2)-agonists in complex samples by MIP-coated stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed. The linear ranges were 0.5-40 microg/L for ractopamine and 1.0-40 microg/L for isoxsuprine and clenbuterol. The detection limits were within the range of 0.10-0.21 microg/L. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of beta(2)-agonists in spiked pork, liver and feed samples with the recoveries of 83.7-92.3%, 80.5-90.2% and 73.6-86.2%, respectively. The RSDs was within 2.9-8.1%. The method is very suitable for the determination of trace beta(2)-agonists in pork, liver and feed samples.

  9. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  10. Recent developments in stir bar sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2014-03-01

    As a crucial step in qualitative and quantitative analysis, sample pretreatment is commonly used to isolate the target analytes, concentrate them, or convert them into the forms tailored to the instrumental analysis. In recent years, there has been a trend for sample pretreatment techniques to become more miniaturized and more environmentally friendly. Stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), which was developed in 1999, is such an environmentally friendly microextraction technique. Compared with other microextraction techniques, including solid phase microextraction and liquid phase microextraction, SBSE provides a higher extraction efficiency and better reproducibility owing to the much greater amount of the extraction phase, and no special skills are required. However, there are some problems associated with SBSE, such as the limited applicable coatings, coating abrasion of the laboratory-made stir bar, and the difficulty in automation, which restrict the further improvement and application of SBSE. This review focuses on the development of SBSE in the past decade, in terms of coating preparation, automated systems, novel extraction modes, its use with various instruments, and applications in food, environmental, and biological samples.

  11. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur; McClure, John; Avila, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Torque and plunge force during the initial plunge phase in Friction Stir Welding were measured for a 0.5 inch diameter pin entering a 2219 aluminum alloy plate. Weld structures were preserved for metallographic observation by making emergency stops at various plunge depths. The plunging pin tool is seen to be surrounded by a very fine grained layer of recrystallized metal extending substantially below the bottom of the pin, implying a shear interface in the metal below and not at the tool-metal interface. Torque and plunge force during the initial plunge phase in Friction Stir Welding are calculated from a straight forward model based on a concept to plastic flow in the vicinity of the plunging tool compatible with structural observations. The concept: a disk of weld metal seized to and rotating with the bottom of the pin is squeezed out laterally by the plunge force and extruded upwards in a hollow cylinder around the tool. As the shear surface separating rotating disk from stationary weld metal engulfs fresh metal, the fresh metal is subjected to severe shear deformation, which results in its recrystallization. Encouraging agreement between computations and measured torque and plunge force is obtained.

  12. Friction Stir Welding at MSFC: Kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    In 1991 The Welding Institute of the United Kingdom patented the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process. In FSW a rotating pin-tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the faying surfaces together as it moves up the seam. By April 2000 the American Welding Society International Welding and Fabricating Exposition featured several exhibits of commercial FSW processes and the 81st Annual Convention devoted a technical session to the process. The FSW process is of interest to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as a means of avoiding hot-cracking problems presented by the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy, which is the primary constituent of the Lightweight Space Shuttle External Tank. The process has been under development at MSFC for External Tank applications since the early 1990's. Early development of the FSW process proceeded by cut-and-try empirical methods. A substantial and complex body of data resulted. A theoretical model was wanted to deal with the complexity and reduce the data to concepts serviceable for process diagnostics, optimization, parameter selection, etc. A first step in understanding the FSW process is to determine the kinematics, i.e., the flow field in the metal in the vicinity of the pin-tool. Given the kinematics, the dynamics, i.e., the forces, can be targeted. Given a completed model of the FSW process, attempts at rational design of tools and selection of process parameters can be made.

  13. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  14. Friction stir method for forming structures and materials

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Frederick, David Alan

    2011-11-22

    Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

  15. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  16. A Rotating Plug Model of Friction Stir Welding Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghulapadu J. K.; Peddieson, J.; Buchanan, G. R.; Nunes, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    A simplified rotating plug model is employed to study the heat transfer phenomena associated with the fiction stir welding process. An approximate analytical solution is obtained based on this idealized model and used both to demonstrate the qualitative influence of process parameters on predictions and to estimate temperatures produced in typical fiction stir welding situations.

  17. Friction Stir Welding of Lightweight Vehicle Structures: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sanella, M L

    2008-08-31

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, LLC and Ford Motor Company was to establish friction stir welding (FSW) and friction stir processing as viable options for use in construction of lightweight substructures for trucks and cars, including engine cradles, suspension sub frames, instrument panel supports, and intake manifolds.

  18. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This method is a solid-state weld process capable of joining metallic alloys without melting. The weld workpieces to be joined by thermal stir welding (TSW) are drawn, by heavy forces, between containment plates past the TSW stir tool that then causes joining of the weld workpiece. TSW is similar to friction stir welding (FSW) in that material is heated into a plastic state (not melted) and stirred using a stir rod. The FSW pin tool is an integrated geometrical structure consisting of a large-diameter shoulder, and a smaller-diameter stir pin protruding from the shoulder. When the pin is plunged into a weld workpiece, the shoulder spins on the surface of the weld workpiece, thus inducing frictional heat into the part. The pin stirs the fraying surfaces of the weld joint, thus joining the weld workpiece into one structure. The shoulder and stir pin of the FSW pin tool must rotate together at a desired rotational speed. The induced frictional energy control and stir pin control of the pin tool cannot be de-coupled. The two work as one integrated unit. TSW, on the other hand, de-couples the heating and stirring of FSW, and allows for independent control of each process element. A uniquely designed induction coil heats the weld workpiece to a desired temperature, and once heated, the part moves into a stir rod whose RPM is also independently controlled. As the weld workpiece moves into the stir rod, the piece is positioned, or sandwiched, between upper and lower containment plates. The plate squeezes together, thus compressing the upper and lower surfaces of the weld workpiece. This compressive force, also called consolidation force, consolidates the plastic material within the weld nugget material as it is being stirred by the stir rod. The stir rod is positioned through the center of the top containment plate and protrudes midway through the opposite lower containment plate where it is mechanically captured. The upper and lower containment plates are separated by a

  19. Laser Peening Effects on Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a welding technique that uses frictional heating combined with forging pressure to produce high strength bonds. It is attractive for aerospace applications. Although residual stresses in FSW are generally lower when compared to conventional fusion welds, recent work has shown that significant tensile residual stresses can be present in the weld after fabrication. Therefore, laser shock peening was investigated as a means of moderating the tensile residual stresses produced during welding. This slide presentation reviews the effect of Laser Peening on the weld, in tensile strength, strain, surface roughness, microhardness, surface wear/friction, and fatigue crack growth rates. The study concluded that the laser peening process can result in considerable improvement to crack initiaion, propagation and mechanical properties in FSW.

  20. Metal Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The plastic deformation field in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is compared to that in metal cutting. A shear surface around the FSW tool analogous to the metal cutting shear plane is identified and comprises the basis of the "rotating plug" flow field model and the "wiping" model of tool interaction with weld metal. Within the context of these models: The FSW shear rate is estimated to be comparable to metal cutting shear rates. The effect of tool geometry on the FSW shear surface is discussed and related to published torque measurements. Various FS W structural features are explained, including a difference in structure of bimetallic welds when alloys on the advancing and retreating sides of the weld seam are exchanged. The joining mechanism and critical parameters of the FSW process are made clear.

  1. Tool Forces Developed During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendez, M.; Tang, W.; Schmidt, C.; McClure, J. C.; Nunes, A. C.; Murr, L. E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper will describe a technique for measuring the various forces and the torque that exist on the Friction Stir Welding pin tool. Results for various plunge depths, weld speeds, rotational speed, and tool configurations will be presented. Welds made on 6061 aluminum with typical welding conditions require a downward force of 2800 lbs. (12.5 kN) a longitudinal force in the direction of motion of 300 lbs (1.33 kN), a transverse force in the omega x v direction of 30 lbs (135 N). Aluminum 2195 under typical weld conditions requires a downward force of 3100 lbs. (1.38 kN), a longitudinal force of 920 lbs. (4.1 kN), and a transverse force of 45 lbs. (200 N) in the omega x v direction.

  2. Ultrasonically-assisted Thermal Stir Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A welding head assembly has a work piece disposed between its containment plates' opposing surfaces with the work piece being maintained in a plastic state thereof at least in a vicinity of the welding head assembly's stir rod as the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The welding head assembly and the work piece experience relative movement there between in a direction perpendicular to the rod's longitudinal axis as the work piece is subjected to a compressive force applied by the containment plates. A first source coupled to the first containment plate applies a first ultrasonic wave thereto such that the first ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement. A second source coupled to the second containment plate applies a second ultrasonic wave thereto such that the second ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.

  3. In-process discontinuity detection during friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Amber

    The objective of this work is to develop a method for detecting the creation of discontinuities (e.g., voids) during friction stir welding. Friction stir welding is inherently cost-effective, however, the need for significant weld inspection can make the process cost-prohibitive. A new approach to weld inspection is required -- where an in-situ characterization of weld quality can be obtained, reducing the need for post-process inspection. Friction stir welds with discontinuity and without discontinuity were created. In this work, discontinuities are generated by reducing the friction stir tool rotation frequency and increasing the tool traverse speed in order to create "colder" welds. During the welds, forces are measured. Discontinuity sizes for welds are measured by computerized tomography. The relationship between the force transients and the discontinuity sizes indicate that the force measurement during friction stir welding can be effectively used for detecting discontinuities in friction stir welds. The normalized force transient data and normalized discontinuity size are correlated to develop a criterion for discontinuity detection. Additional welds are performed to validate the discontinuity detection method. The discontinuity sizes estimated by the force measurement based method are in good agreement with the discontinuity sizes measured by computerized tomography. These results show that the force measurement based discontinuity detection model method can be effectively used to detect discontinuities during friction stir welding.

  4. Inverse anticipating chaos synchronization.

    PubMed

    Shahverdiev, E M; Sivaprakasam, S; Shore, K A

    2002-07-01

    We derive conditions for achieving inverse anticipating synchronization where a driven time-delay chaotic system synchronizes to the inverse future state of the driver. The significance of inverse anticipating chaos in delineating synchronization regimes in time-delay systems is elucidated. The concept is extended to cascaded time-delay systems.

  5. Friction stir processing on high carbon steel U12

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, S. Yu. Rubtsov, V. E.; Melnikov, A. G.

    2015-10-27

    Friction stir processing (FSP) of high carbon steel (U12) samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. The FSP tool has been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm. The microstructural characterization of obtained stir zone and heat affected zone has been carried out. Microhardness at the level of 700 MPa has been obtained in the stir zone with microstructure consisting of large grains and cementitte network. This high-level of microhardness is explained by bainitic reaction developing from decarburization of austenitic grains during cementite network formation.

  6. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  7. Friction stir processing on high carbon steel U12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Melnikov, A. G.; Rubtsov, V. E.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) of high carbon steel (U12) samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. The FSP tool has been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm. The microstructural characterization of obtained stir zone and heat affected zone has been carried out. Microhardness at the level of 700 MPa has been obtained in the stir zone with microstructure consisting of large grains and cementitte network. This high-level of microhardness is explained by bainitic reaction developing from decarburization of austenitic grains during cementite network formation.

  8. Determination of hormones in milk by hollow fiber-based stirring extraction bar liquid-liquid microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Liang, Fanghui; Shi, Jiayuan; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Zhuang; Wu, Lijie; Song, Ying; Zhang, Hanqi; Wang, Ziming

    2013-08-01

    The hollow fiber-based stirring extraction bar liquid-liquid microextraction was applied to the extraction of hormones, including 17-α-ethinylestradiol, 17-α-estradiol, estriol, 17-β-estradiol, estrone, 17-α-hydroxyprogesterone, medroxyprogesterone, progesterone and norethisterone acetate, in milk. The present method has the advantages of both hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction and stirring bar sorptive extraction. The stirring extraction bar was used as both the stirring bar of microextraction, and extractor of the analytes, which can make extraction, clean-up and concentration be carried out in one step. When the extraction was completed, the stirring extraction bar was easy isolated from the extraction system with the magnet. Several experimental parameters, including the type of extraction solvent, the number of hollow stirring extraction bar, extraction time, stirring speed, ionic strength, and desorption conditions were investigated and optimized. The analytes in the extract were derived and determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Under optimal experimental conditions, good linearity was observed in the range of 0.20-20.00ng mL(-1). The limits of detection and quantification were in the range of 0.02-0.06ng mL(-1) and 0.07-0.19ng mL(-1), respectively. The present method was applied to the analysis of milk samples, and the recoveries of analytes were in the range of 93.6-104.6% with the relative standard deviations ranging from 1.6% to 6.2% (n=5). The results showed that the present method was a rapid and feasible method for the determination of hormones in milk samples.

  9. An improved hollow fiber solvent-stir bar microextraction for the preconcentration of anabolic steroids in biological matrix with determination by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Lan; Fan, Liangbiao; Lin, Zian; Cai, Yimin; Wei, Zhenyi; Chen, Guonan

    2012-04-13

    In this paper, a convenient and self-assembled hollow fiber solvent-stir bar microextraction (HF-SSBME) device was developed, which could stir by itself. In the extraction process, the proposed device made the solvent "bar" not floating at the sample solution and exposing to air while organic solvents outside hollow fiber always wrapped with donor phase solvent, which reduced the vaporization of organic solvents. This design could improve the precisions and recoveries of experiments. For evaluating the device, seven anabolic steroids (prasterone, 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol, methandriol, 19-norandrostenediol, androstenediol, methyltestosterone and methandienone) were used as model analytes and extraction conditions such as type and volume of organic solvents, agitation speed, extraction time, extraction temperature and salt addition were studied in detail. Under the optimum conditions (15 μL toluene, 40 °C, stirring at 750 rpm for 30 min with 1.5 g sodium chloride addition in 20.0 mL donor phase), the linear ranges of anabolic steroids were 0.25-200 ng mL(-1) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The limits of detection were lower than 0.10 ng mL(-1). The recoveries and precisions in spiked urine and hair samples were between 73.97-93.56% and 2.18-4.47% (n=5). HF-SSBME method combined the intrinsical merits of hollow fiber with the superiority of the proposed self-stirring device which can be developed to two-phase, three-phase and in situ derivatization modes with wide prospect of application. Besides, the pedestal of this proposed device can be converted to fix stir bar in stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) method.

  10. Whole-body turbo STIR MR imaging: controversies and avenues for development.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Eoin; Smith, Clare; Eustace, Stephen

    2003-09-01

    The idea of a non-ionizing high-resolution technique to screen the entire body for occult disease is immensely appealing. This article outlines an evolving technique, controversies and clinical application of whole-body scanning using MRI with turbo short tau inversion recovery tissue excitation.

  11. Reading Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joanna R., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the Arizona Reading Journal focuses on the theme "reading recovery" and includes the following articles: "Why Is an Inservice Programme for Reading Recovery Teachers Necessary?" (Marie M. Clay); "What Is Reading Recovery?" (Gay Su Pinnell); "Teaching a Hard To Teach Child" (Constance A. Compton); "Reading Recovery in Arizona--A…

  12. Evidence of induced chirality in stirred solutions of supramolecular nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Oriol; Canillas, Adolf; Purrello, Roberto; Ribó, Josep M

    2009-07-15

    Two-modulator generalized ellipsometry is used to determine the spectroscopic Mueller matrix of a solution of porphyrin supramolecular aggregates that have fibrous form. During the measurements the solutions were stirred in clockwise and anticlockwise directions. The pseudopolar decompostion is applied to the experimental Mueller matrices to unveil the birefringent and dichroics properties of the sample. The vortex flow in the stirred solution is found to modify the optical response of the aggregates to polarized light, and, in particular, its chiral signature is determined by the stirring direction in a totally reversible process. The data found show that chirality can be induced by stirring in solutions of supramolecular fibers and that a effective transfer of chirality from a macroscopic phenomenon to the supramolecular structures takes place. PMID:19823540

  13. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, Alan; Grant, Glenn J.; Dahl, Michael E.

    2009-09-15

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannneled DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1-10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rpm increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap-shear strengths exceeding 10.3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  14. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF WHAT APPEARS TO BE STIRRING FORK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF WHAT APPEARS TO BE STIRRING FORK THAT MIXED COFFEE BEANS AS THEY WERE HUSKED - Hacienda Cafetalera Santa Clara, Coffee Mill, KM 19, PR Route 372, Hacienda La Juanita, Yauco Municipio, PR

  15. Condensed-matter physics: History matters for a stirred superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Matthew J.; Helmerson, Kristian

    2014-02-01

    The observation of path dependence in the response of a superfluid to stirring promises potential applications in precision rotation sensing, and provides a test bed for microscopic theories of ultracold atomic gases. See Letter p.200

  16. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

    2012-01-31

    Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant

  17. Thermo-Mechanical Processing in Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    In Friction Stir Welding (FSW) a rotating pin-tool inserted into a weld seam literally stirs the edges of the seam together. In this study, two flow paths are proposed that define the FWS zone. Studies using a longitudinal tungsten wire (0.0025 dia.) were used to visualize and document the material flow. The material flow path is described using a mathematical model.

  18. Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, Richard; Bucher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism has been designed to apply the loads (the stirring and the resection forces and torques) in self-reacted friction stir welding. This mechanism differs somewhat from mechanisms used in conventional friction stir welding, as described below. The tooling needed to apply the large reaction loads in conventional friction stir welding can be complex. Self-reacted friction stir welding has become popular in the solid-state welding community as a means of reducing the complexity of tooling and to reduce costs. The main problems inherent in self-reacted friction stir welding originate in the high stresses encountered by the pin-and-shoulder assembly that produces the weld. The design of the present mechanism solves the problems. The mechanism includes a redesigned pin-and-shoulder assembly. The welding torque is transmitted into the welding pin by a square pin that fits into a square bushing with set-screws. The opposite or back shoulder is held in place by a Woodruff key and high-strength nut on a threaded shaft. The Woodruff key reacts the torque, while the nut reacts the tensile load on the shaft.

  19. Magnetic Properties of Friction Stir Processed Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-07-01

    Of the many existing inspection or monitoring systems, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. These systems are usually comprised of semi-remote sensors that frequently cause difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites, so that embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and periodically can be interrogated by a reading device. The "reinforcement rich" processed areas can then be used to record properties such as strain, temperature, and stress state, to name a few, depending on the reinforcement material. Friction stir processing was used to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum matrix. The aim was to develop a composite that produces strain in response to a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. A simple and cost-effective setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and the processing route was modified to improve the magnetic response.

  20. Nondestructive Ultrasonic Inspection of Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaeipour, M.; Hettler, J.; Delrue, S.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state welding procedure developed at The Welding Institute (TWI-UK) and the technique is widely employed for welding aluminum alloys in various applications. In order to examine the quality of the welds and to detect a variety of welding flaws such as wormholes and root-flaws, it is required to develop a methodical inspection technique that can be used for the identification and localization of such defects. The most prevalent and risky defect in this type of welding is the barely visible root flaw with a length varying from 100-700 μm. Due to the extreme characteristics of the flaw, off-the-shelf ultrasonic weld inspection methods are not always able to readily detect this type of minute defect feature. Here, we propose a novel approach to characterize root flaws using an oblique incident ultrasonic C-scan backscattering analysis. The implementation consists of an immersion ultrasonic testing method in pulse echo (i.e. backscatter) mode with a 3.5 MHz transducer, and makes use of an empirical procedure to engender of a shear wave dominated excitation at the root surface, and to properly gate the received signal for root flaw examination. By scanning the surface above the welded component, a C-scan image displaying the backscatter response from the root surface of the nugget zone can be obtained which allows a simple interpretation of the root flaw status of the weld.

  1. Inspecting Friction Stir Welding using Electromagnetic Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinchen, David G.

    2004-01-01

    A report describes the use of advanced electromagnetic probes to measure the dimensions, the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity, and related other properties of friction stir welds (FSWs) between parts made of the same or different aluminum alloy(s). The probes are of the type described in in another Tech Brief. To recapitulate: A probe of this type is essentially an eddy-current probe that includes a primary (driver) winding that meanders and multiple secondary (sensing) windings that meander along the primary winding. Electrical conductivity is commonly used as a measure of heat treatment and tempering of aluminum alloys, but prior to the development of these probes, the inadequate sensitivity and limited accuracy of electrical-conductivity probes precluded such use on FSWs between different aluminum alloys, and the resolution of those probes was inadequate for measurement of FSW dimensions with positions and metallurgical properties. In contrast, the present probes afford adequate accuracy and spatial resolution for the purposes of measuring the dimensions of FSW welds and correlating spatially varying electrical conductivities with metallurgical properties, including surface defects.

  2. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The many advantages of Friction Stir Welding have led to a relatively rapid acceptance in the often conservative welding community. Because the process is so different from traditional fusion welding, with which most investigators are most familiar, there remain many aspects of FSW for which there is no clear consensus. For example, the well known onion rings seen in transverse sections have been variously interpreted as grain size variations, variation in density of second phase particles and parts of the carousel of material rotating with the pin that have been shed from the carousel. Using Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Schneider has recently noted that the onion rings have a different orientation (and hence etch differently) than the surrounding material, and this orientation is consistent with slip plane orientations at the edge of the carousel. Likewise, the forces and torque exerted by the FSW tool on the work piece largely remain unaccounted for. Although these forces are routinely measured by investigators with commercial instrumented welders, they are rarely reported or even qualitatively analyzed. This paper will introduce a model based on a carousel or disk of material that rotates with the tool to estimate the torque and plunge force required to plunge a tool into the work piece. A stationary tool is modeled rather than the moving tool because effects such as thermal transients and metallurgical changes in the sample (primarily aging in aluminum) can be more easily accounted for. It is believed, however, that with some modifications the model should be applicable to a moving tool also.

  3. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  4. Seismic Inversion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiewicz, Jason

    2009-09-01

    With the rapid advances in sophisticated solar modeling and the abundance of high-quality solar pulsation data, efficient and robust inversion techniques are crucial for seismic studies. We present some aspects of an efficient Fourier Optimally Localized Averaging (OLA) inversion method with an example applied to time-distance helioseismology.

  5. Seismic Inversion Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason

    2009-09-16

    With the rapid advances in sophisticated solar modeling and the abundance of high-quality solar pulsation data, efficient and robust inversion techniques are crucial for seismic studies. We present some aspects of an efficient Fourier Optimally Localized Averaging (OLA) inversion method with an example applied to time-distance helioseismology.

  6. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  7. Cyromazine imprinted polymers for selective stir bar sorptive extraction of melamine in animal feed and milk samples.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenying; Gao, Mingqi; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-06-21

    In this work, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) coated stir bar was prepared using a self-designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mold and in situ polymerization, with cyromazine as the dummy template for the target melamine. The prepared MIP coated stir bar presented a uniform and porous surface as well as good chemical stability and selectivity for melamine. Based on it, a method of MIP coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) combined with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) was developed for the quantification of melamine in food samples. Significant factors affecting the extraction efficiency of melamine by MIP-SBSE, such as the extraction solvent and time, stirring rate, desorption solvent and time, were investigated thoroughly. Under the optimal conditions, the analytical performance of this method was evaluated. The detection limit of the developed method was 0.54 μg L(-1) for melamine with an enrichment factor of 42-fold and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6.1% (c = 5 μg L(-1), n = 7), and the linear range was 2-200 μg L(-1). The established method was applied for the determination of melamine in a variety of real samples including cat food, dog food, chicken feed A, chicken feed B and milk powder, and the recoveries for melamine in the spiked samples were in the range of 76.2-98.2%, 80.0-85.5%, 89.5-113%, 85.0-95.5% and 65.0-111%, respectively. The proposed method presented a good specific recognition ability and matrix interference resistance, and was demonstrated to be effective and sensitive for the analysis of melamine in animal food and milk samples.

  8. Nanoscale magnetic stirring bars for heterogeneous catalysis in microscopic systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuliang; Cao, Changyan; Sun, Yongbin; Huang, Peipei; Wei, Fangfang; Song, Weiguo

    2015-02-23

    Nanometer-sized magnetic stirring bars containing Pd nanoparticles (denoted as Fe3 O4 -NC-PZS-Pd) for heterogeneous catalysis in microscopic system were prepared through a facile two-step process. In the hydrogenation of styrene, Fe3 O4 -NC-PZS-Pd showed an activity similar to that of the commercial Pd/C catalyst, but much better stability. In microscopic catalytic systems, Fe3 O4 -NC-PZS-Pd can effectively stir the reaction solution within microdrops to accelerate mass transfer, and displays far better catalytic activity than the commercial Pd/C for the hydrogenation of methylene blue in an array of microdroplets. These results suggested that the Fe3 O4 -NC-PZS-Pd could be used as nanoscale stirring bars in nanoreactors.

  9. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  10. Prediction of inclusion body solubilization from shaken to stirred reactors.

    PubMed

    Walther, Cornelia; Mayer, Sabrina; Trefilov, Alexandru; Sekot, Gerhard; Hahn, Rainer; Jungbauer, Alois; Dürauer, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) were solubilized in a µ-scale system using shaking microtiter plates or a stirred tank reactor in a laboratory setting. Characteristic dimensionless numbers for mixing, the Phase number Ph and Reynolds number Re did not correlate with the kinetics and equilibrium of protein solubilization. The solubilization kinetics was independent of the mixing system, stirring or shaking rate, shaking diameter, and energy input. Good agreement was observed between the solubilization kinetics and yield on the µ-scale and laboratory setting. We show that the IB solubilization process is controlled predominantly by pore diffusion. Thus, for the process it is sufficient to keep the IBs homogeneously suspended, and additional power input will not improve the process. The high-throughput system developed on the µ-scale can predict solubilization in stirred reactors up to a factor of 500 and can therefore be used to determine optimal solubilization conditions on laboratory and industrial scale.

  11. Wet gringing of zeolite in stirred media mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucsi, G.; Bohács, K.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study the results of systematic experimental series are presented with the specific goal of optimizing the zeolite nanoparticles' production using a wet stirred media mill. The diameter of the grinding media as well as the rotor velocity were varied in the experiments. Particle size distribution and "outer" specific surface area of the ground samples were measured by a laser particle size analyser. Additionally, BET, XRD and FT-IR analyses were performed for the characterization of the "total" specific surface area as well as the crystalline and material structure, respectively. Based on the results of the laboratory experiments it was found that wet stirred media milling provided significant reductions in the particle size of zeolite. Furthermore, the crystallinity of the samples also decreased, so not only the physical but the mineralogical characteristics of zeolite can be controlled by stirred media milling.

  12. Stirring system for radioactive waste water storage tank

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, Yoshimune; Nishizawa, Kunihide . Radioisotope Research Center)

    1999-07-01

    A stirring system for 100-m[sup 3] radioactive liquid waste tanks was constructed to unify radioactive concentrations in the tank. The stirring system is effective in certifying that the radioactive concentrations in the tanks are less than the legal limits before they are drained away as waste liquid. This system is composed of discharge units, pipe lines, and a controller. The performance of the system was assessed by comparing the calculated red ink and [sup 32]P concentrations with those monitored at six locations in the tanks. The concentration reached equilibrium after stirring 60 o 120 min with discharge units equipped with six fixed openings configured in differing directions. Residual chlorine in city water used for dilution occasionally bleached the red ink and reduced its concentration. The adsorption of [sup 32]P by slime on the walls of the tanks storing actual waste water lowered the equilibrium concentration.

  13. Prediction of inclusion body solubilization from shaken to stirred reactors.

    PubMed

    Walther, Cornelia; Mayer, Sabrina; Trefilov, Alexandru; Sekot, Gerhard; Hahn, Rainer; Jungbauer, Alois; Dürauer, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) were solubilized in a µ-scale system using shaking microtiter plates or a stirred tank reactor in a laboratory setting. Characteristic dimensionless numbers for mixing, the Phase number Ph and Reynolds number Re did not correlate with the kinetics and equilibrium of protein solubilization. The solubilization kinetics was independent of the mixing system, stirring or shaking rate, shaking diameter, and energy input. Good agreement was observed between the solubilization kinetics and yield on the µ-scale and laboratory setting. We show that the IB solubilization process is controlled predominantly by pore diffusion. Thus, for the process it is sufficient to keep the IBs homogeneously suspended, and additional power input will not improve the process. The high-throughput system developed on the µ-scale can predict solubilization in stirred reactors up to a factor of 500 and can therefore be used to determine optimal solubilization conditions on laboratory and industrial scale. PMID:23860724

  14. Vortex excitation in a stirred toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimenko, A. I.; Isaieva, K. O.; Vilchinskii, S. I.; Ostrovskaya, E. A.

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [K. C. Wright et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 063633 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.063633], we investigate the microscopic mechanism for excitation of vortices and formation of a persistent current in an annular BEC stirred by a narrow blue-detuned optical beam. In the framework of a two-dimensional mean-field model, we study the dissipative dynamics of the condensate with parameters that reflect realistic experimental conditions. Vortex-antivortex pairs appear near the center of the stirrer in the bulk of the condensate for slow motion of the stirring beam. When the barrier angular velocity is above some critical value, an outer edge surface mode develops and breaks into the vortices entering the condensate annulus. We determine the conditions for creation of vortex excitations in the stirred toroidal condensate and compare our results with experimental observations.

  15. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  16. Heat Control via Torque Control in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, Richard; Colligan, Kevin; Knapp, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In a proposed advance in friction stir welding, the torque exerted on the workpiece by the friction stir pin would be measured and controlled in an effort to measure and control the total heat input to the workpiece. The total heat input to the workpiece is an important parameter of any welding process (fusion or friction stir welding). In fusion welding, measurement and control of heat input is a difficult problem. However, in friction stir welding, the basic principle of operation affords the potential of a straightforward solution: Neglecting thermal losses through the pin and the spindle that supports it, the rate of heat input to the workpiece is the product of the torque and the speed of rotation of the friction stir weld pin and, hence, of the spindle. Therefore, if one acquires and suitably processes data on torque and rotation and controls the torque, the rotation, or both, one should be able to control the heat input into the workpiece. In conventional practice in friction stir welding, one uses feedback control of the spindle motor to maintain a constant speed of rotation. According to the proposal, one would not maintain a constant speed of rotation: Instead, one would use feedback control to maintain a constant torque and would measure the speed of rotation while allowing it to vary. The torque exerted on the workpiece would be estimated as the product of (1) the torque-multiplication ratio of the spindle belt and/or gear drive, (2) the force measured by a load cell mechanically coupled to the spindle motor, and (3) the moment arm of the load cell. Hence, the output of the load cell would be used as a feedback signal for controlling the torque (see figure).

  17. Characterization of the Micro Textures in a Friction Stir Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. The Dynamically-Recrystallized-Zone (DXZ) of a polished and etched FSW cross-section exhibits contrasting bands (the "onion-ring" structure), the origins of which are unclear. An orientation image mapping (OIM) study suggests that the corresponding bands may correspond respectively to a "straight-through" current of metal bypassing the pin tool in a single rotation or less and a "maelstrom" current rotating a number of times around the pin tool.

  18. Friction stir weld tools having fine grain structure

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Glenn J.; Frye, John G.; Kim, Jin Yong; Lavender, Curt A.; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-03-15

    Tools for friction stir welding can be made with fewer process steps, lower cost techniques, and/or lower cost ingredients than other state-of-the-art processes by utilizing improved compositions and processes of fabrication. Furthermore, the tools resulting from the improved compositions and processes of fabrication can exhibit better distribution and homogeneity of chemical constituents, greater strength, and/or increased durability. In one example, a friction stir weld tool includes tungsten and rhenium and is characterized by carbide and oxide dispersoids, by carbide particulates, and by grains that comprise a solid solution of the tungsten and rhenium. The grains do not exceed 10 micrometers in diameter.

  19. Near Net Manufacturing Using Thin Gage Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Jennifer; Potter, David; Holquin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) and near net spin forming of FSW aluminumn blanks were investigated for large-scale pressure vessel applications. With a specific focus on very thin gage 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys, the program concentrated on the following: the criteria used for material selection, a potential manufacturing flow, and the effectiveness and associated risks of near net spin forming. Discussion will include the mechanical properties of the friction stir welds and the parent material from before and after the spin forming process. This effort was performed under a NASA Space Exploration initiative focused on increasing the affordability, reliability and performance of pressure vessels larger than 10 ft. diameter.

  20. Unraveling the Processing Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is translated along a weld seam, literally stirring the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path or paths is required. In this study, various markers are used to trace the flow paths of the metal. X-ray radiographs record the segmentation and position of the wire. Several variations in the trajectories can be differentiated within the weld zone.

  1. Solar inverse theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, D.

    1984-12-01

    Helioseismological inversion, as with the inversion of any other data, is divided into three phases. The first is the solution of the so-called forward problem: namely, the calculation of the eigenfrequencies of a theoretical equilibrium state. The second is an attempt to understand the results, either empirically by determining how those frequencies vary as chosen parameters defining the equilibrium model are varied, or analytically from asymptotic expansions in limiting cases of high order or degree. The third phase is to pose and solve an inverse problem, which seeks to find a plausible equilibrium model of the Sun whose eigenfrequencies are consistent with observation. The three phases are briefly discussed in this review, and the third, which is not yet widely used in helioseismology, is illustrated with some selected inversions of artificial solar data.

  2. Generalized emissivity inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Ming, DengMing; Wen, Tao; Dai, XianXi; Dai, JiXin; Evenson, William E

    2002-04-01

    Inverse problems have recently drawn considerable attention from the physics community due to of potential widespread applications [K. Chadan and P. C. Sabatier, Inverse Problems in Quantum Scattering Theory, 2nd ed. (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1989)]. An inverse emissivity problem that determines the emissivity g(nu) from measurements of only the total radiated power J(T) has recently been studied [Tao Wen, DengMing Ming, Xianxi Dai, Jixin Dai, and William E. Evenson, Phys. Rev. E 63, 045601(R) (2001)]. In this paper, a new type of generalized emissivity and transmissivity inverse (GETI) problem is proposed. The present problem differs from our previous work on inverse problems by allowing the unknown (emissivity) function g(nu) to be temperature dependent as well as frequency dependent. Based on published experimental information, we have developed an exact solution formula for this GETI problem. A universal function set suggested for numerical calculation is shown to be robust, making this inversion method practical and convenient for realistic calculations.

  3. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  4. Direct and indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, Jean; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Operto, Stéphane; Ribodetti, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    A bridge is highlighted between the direct inversion and the indirect inversion. They are based on fundamental different approaches: one is looking after a projection from the data space to the model space while the other one is reducing a misfit between observed data and synthetic data obtained from a given model. However, it is possible to obtain similar structures for model perturbation, and we shall focus on P-wave velocity reconstruction. This bridge is built up through the Born approximation linearizing the forward problem with respect to model perturbation and through asymptotic approximations of the Green functions of the wave propagation equation. We first describe the direct inversion and its ingredients and then we focus on a specific misfit function design leading to a indirect inversion. Finally, we shall compare this indirect inversion with more standard least-squares inversion as the FWI, enabling the focus on small weak velocity perturbations on one side and the speed-up of the velocity perturbation reconstruction on the other side. This bridge has been proposed by the group led by Raul Madariaga in the early nineties, emphasizing his leading role in efficient imaging workflows for seismic velocity reconstruction, a drastic requirement at that time.

  5. Evaluation of automated stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry for the analysis of PBDEs and PBBs in sheep and human serum.

    PubMed

    Loconto, Paul R

    2009-09-01

    Stir-bar sorptive extraction and automated thermal desorption/cryotrapping interfaced to capillary gas chromatography and electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry is shown to effectively isolate and recover polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polybrominated biphenyls from sheep and human serum. This paper describes the development of the method and demonstrates the feasibility of using Twister with spiked serum. Conditions for conducting stir-bar sorptive extraction and for automated thermal desorption that led to acceptable analyte recoveries were optimized. The approach to sample preparation introduced here significantly reduces tedious labor and solvent consumption associated with conventional liquid-liquid extraction. PMID:19772742

  6. Recovery Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Since the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) in 1935, programs offering opportunity for recovery from alcoholism and other addictions have undergone vast changes. The Internet has created nearly limitless opportunities for recovering people and those seeking recovery to find both meetings and places where they can gather virtually and discuss…

  7. Recent developments in Micro Friction Stir Welding: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithole, Keydon; Vasudeva Rao, Veeredhi

    2016-02-01

    The advent of friction stir welding (FSW) in 1991 has been evolutionary in the joining of metals and related materials. Friction stir welding has enabled the joining of metals that could not be joined by other welding processes. Research has shown that dissimilar materials with very different properties, plastics, composites and even wood can be joined by FSW. Recent activities in the application of FSW has seen the development of micro friction stir welding (μFSW), which is the FSW of very thin sections of thickness 1000 μm (1 mm) or less. Micro friction stir welding further extends the applications of FSW to areas such as copper electrical contacts, tailor-welded blanks, wood. Though μFSW is relatively new development significant work has been done to date with interesting research findings being reported. This paper aims to review developments in μFSW to date. The focus of the paper will be on problems peculiar to μFSW due to downscaling to the micro scale and other practical considerations.

  8. Stirring and mixing of liquids using acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Ostrovsky, Lev

    2009-06-01

    The possibility of using acoustic radiation force in standing waves for stirring and mixing small volumes of liquids is theoretically analyzed. The principle of stirring considered in this paper is based on moving the microparticles suspended in a standing acoustic wave by changing the frequency so that one standing wave mode is replaced by the other, with differently positioned minima of potential energy. The period-average transient dynamics of solid microparticles and gas microbubbles is considered, and simple analytical solutions are obtained for the case of standing waves of variable amplitude. It is shown that bubbles can be moved from one equilibrium position to another two to three orders of magnitude faster than solid particles. For example, radiation force in a standing acoustic wave field may induce movement of microbubbles with a speed of the order of a few m/s at a frequency of 1 MHz and ultrasound pressure amplitude of 100 kPa, whereas the speed of rigid particles does not exceed 1 cms under the same conditions. The stirring effect can be additionally enhanced due to the fact that the bubbles that are larger and smaller than the resonant bubbles move in opposite directions. Possible applications of the analyzed stirring mechanism, such as in microarrays, are discussed. PMID:19507936

  9. Laboratory Experiment for the Transient Response of a Stirred Vessel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, R. D.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Provides background information, apparatus needed, and procedures for an experiment to measure transient response of a stirred vessel. The inexpensive apparatus can be used for two different experiments, reducing cost per experiment. Both experiments use salt dilution as the method of demonstration. (Author/JN)

  10. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Carpenter, Joseph A.; Warren, C. D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2008-12-28

    Experiments are continuing to evaluate the feasibility of friction stir spot welding advanced high-strength steels including, DP780, martensitic hot-stamp boron steel, and TRIP steels. Spot weld lap-shear strengths can exceed those required by industry standards such as AWS D8.1.

  11. Lateral position detection and control for friction stir systems

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Paul; Lammlein, David; Cook, George E.; Wilkes, Don Mitchell; Strauss, Alvin M.; Delapp, David; Hartman, Daniel A.

    2010-12-14

    A friction stir system for processing at least a first workpiece includes a spindle actuator coupled to a rotary tool comprising a rotating member for contacting and processing the first workpiece. A detection system is provided for obtaining information related to a lateral alignment of the rotating member. The detection system comprises at least one sensor for measuring a force experienced by the rotary tool or a parameter related to the force experienced by the rotary tool during processing, wherein the sensor provides sensor signals. A signal processing system is coupled to receive and analyze the sensor signals and determine a lateral alignment of the rotating member relative to a selected lateral position, a selected path, or a direction to decrease a lateral distance relative to the selected lateral position or selected path. In one embodiment, the friction stir system can be embodied as a closed loop tracking system, such as a robot-based tracked friction stir welding (FSW) or friction stir processing (FSP) system.

  12. Defect Detectability Improvement for Conventional Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of defect detectability via phased array ultrasound technology in conventional friction stir welds by comparing conventionally prepped post weld surfaces to a machined surface finish. A machined surface is hypothesized to improve defect detectability and increase material strength.

  13. The Care Tradition: Beyond "Add Women and Stir."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noddings, Nel

    2001-01-01

    Examines problems of curricular inclusion, emphasizing ways of including the interests and contributions of women in social studies curricula. After describing the inadequacy of the "add women and stir" approach to inclusion, the paper discusses the tradition of care long identified with female life, then explores ways to preserve and extend this…

  14. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, David Alan; Grant, Glenn J; Dahl, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannealed DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1 to 10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rev min{sup -1} increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap shear strengths exceeding 10 {center_dot} 3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  15. Temporarily alloying titanium to facilitate friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri

    2009-05-01

    While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

  16. Stop Tobacco in Restaurants: Fifth Grade Students STIR City Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald Vaughan

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a campaign called STIR: Stop Tobacco in Restaurants, that was started by fourth and fifth grade students. The goal was to end smoking in public places, including restaurants, bowling alleys, sports bars, and pool halls. For two years they motivated their peers, coordinated an information campaign to urge kids and adults to…

  17. Friction-Stir Welding of Aluminum For the Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Clyde S.; Smelser, Jerry W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is developing and characterizing the friction stir welding process for the Space Shuttle and other space programs. This revolutionary process, invented and patented by The Weld Institute in England, offers tremendous advantages for joining aluminum for high performance applications. It is particularly suited for advanced aluminum-lithium alloys, such as 2195, the primary structural alloy used in the External Tank. The friction stir welding process joins metals with minimal heat input, resulting in high-strength joints with high ductility. It is a simple process to demonstrate using a common milling machine for sample parts, but relatively expensive to implement on large-scale hardware, due to the high cost of tooling needed to handle the high forging pressures characteristic of the process. Recent developments at the Marshall Space Flight Center have demonstrated friction stir welding on linear joints up to 5 meters (15 ft.), with material thickness ranging between 2.5 mm and 16.5 mm (0.100" to 0.650"). High efficiency weld joints have been produced in aluminum from the 2000, 5000, and 6000 series alloy systems. A "retractable pin tool" system was patented by MSFC that allows use of friction stir welding for joints with changing material thickness, and with less rigid tooling than previously considered. This presentation will describe the details of alloys welded to-date and technical advances under development at MSFC. These developments could have substantial benefit to industrial applications for welding aluminum.

  18. Auto-Adjustable Tool for Self-Reacting and Conventional Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A friction stir welding dcvice that is configured to perform convention friction stir welding as well as self-reacting friction stir welding is described. A pin passes hrough an upper shoulder and can selectively attach 10 and detach from a lower shoulder in a preferred embodiment. A controller maintains thc discrete position of, and/or force applied by, the upper and lower shoulders during self-reacting friction stir welding, or maintains the pin at a desired depth and/or applied force during conventional friction stir welding.

  19. Evaluation of plating conditions for the recovery of ²¹⁰Po on a Ag planchet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Mi; Hong, Gi Hoon; Baskaran, Mark; Kim, Suk Hyun; Kim, Young Ill

    2014-08-01

    The polonium-210 in the sea and its radiological consequences have been widely studied. Current processes for (210)Po recovery from seawater vary significantly. We compared selected processes to determine optimal conditions for recovery in modestly equipped laboratories. Plating (210)Po onto a Ag planchet with constant stirring for 15 h at room temperature after preconcentration from seawater samples with Mn was preferred, achieving more than 96% recovery with 3% or less precision. Possible contaminants were masked only by ascorbic acid treatment.

  20. Tides stir up deep Arctic heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Mattias; Rippeth, Tom; Lincoln, Ben; Lenn, Yueng; Bacon, Sheldon; Sundfjord, Arild

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic is warming at twice the rate of the rest of the planet. One of the largest sources of heat to the Arctic Ocean is the warm salty Atlantic water (AW) which enters through the Fram Strait and circulates at intermediate depth round the Arctic basin. The heat contained in the AW is sufficient to entirely melt the Arctic sea ice but is insulated from the surface by a layer of colder fresher water. Across much of the Arctic Ocean there is insufficient turbulence to drive vertical mixing, and so heat fluxes are a result of double diffusion (DD) and are consequently weak (< 0.1 W m-2). Here we present a new pan-Arctic series of direct measurements of TKE dissipation rate. The new measurements show enhanced turbulent mixing, and hence heat fluxes, over much of the continental slope around the Arctic boundary. The rate of TKE dissipation is found to increase with the bathymetric slope and vary longitudinally with the largest values to the north of Svalbard resulting in enhanced diapycnal heat fluxes over this region (20 W m-2). The observed 2-order of magnitude longitudinal variation in TKE dissipation rate correlates with the rate of dissipation of tidal energy, estimated from the local difference between the work done by the tide generating force and the tidal energy flux divergence from the TPXO8 inverse tidal solution. This correlation leads to the conclusion that the enhanced mixing observed over the continental shelf break north of Svalbard is a result of tidal processes.

  1. Nonchromatographic "stir and filter approach" (SAFA) for isolating Sc3N@C80 metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Steven; Harich, Kim; Yu, Hua; Stephen, Ryan R; Heaps, David; Coumbe, Curtis; Phillips, J Paige

    2006-07-12

    Separation difficulties have led to a paucity of purified metallic nitride fullerenes (MNFs). Fundamental research and application development has been hampered with limited sample availability. Separation techniques designed to remove contaminant empty-cage fullerenes (e.g., C(60), C(70)...C(2)(n)) and classical metallofullerenes (e.g., non-MNFs) traditionally require expensive and tedious chromatographic methods. Our motivation is an alternative purification approach to minimize dependence on HPLC. Herein we report the use of cyclopentadienyl (CPD) and amino functionalized silica to selectively bind contaminant fullerenes. This "Stir and Filter Approach" (SAFA) provides purified MNF samples at ambient and reflux conditions. Under reflux conditions, purified MNFs (80% recovery, 41 h) are obtained using CPD silica. However, at room temperature, there is an equilibrium established between fullerenes and CPD silica, and no purified MNF samples are obtained using SAFA. In contrast, purified MNF samples (99+%) are readily obtained at room temperature using amino, diamino, and triamino silica at recoveries of 93% (11 h), 76% (9 h), and 50% (6 h), respectively.

  2. Multifrequency inversion in magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Sebastian; Hirsch, Sebastian; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2012-04-21

    Time-harmonic shear wave elastography is capable of measuring viscoelastic parameters in living tissue. However, finite tissue boundaries and waveguide effects give rise to wave interferences which are not accounted for by standard elasticity reconstruction methods. Furthermore, the viscoelasticity of tissue causes dispersion of the complex shear modulus, rendering the recovered moduli frequency dependent. Therefore, we here propose the use of multifrequency wave data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for solving the inverse problem of viscoelasticity reconstruction by an algebraic least-squares solution based on the springpot model. Advantages of the method are twofold: (i) amplitude nulls appearing in single-frequency standing wave patterns are mitigated and (ii) the dispersion of storage and loss modulus with drive frequency is taken into account by the inversion procedure, thereby avoiding subsequent model fitting. As a result, multifrequency inversion produces fewer artifacts in the viscoelastic parameter map than standard single-frequency parameter recovery and may thus support image-based viscoelasticity measurement. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by simulated wave data and MRE experiments on a phantom and in vivo human brain. Implemented as a clinical method, multifrequency inversion may improve the diagnostic value of time-harmonic MRE in a large variety of applications.

  3. Multifrequency inversion in magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazoglou, Sebastian; Hirsch, Sebastian; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2012-04-01

    Time-harmonic shear wave elastography is capable of measuring viscoelastic parameters in living tissue. However, finite tissue boundaries and waveguide effects give rise to wave interferences which are not accounted for by standard elasticity reconstruction methods. Furthermore, the viscoelasticity of tissue causes dispersion of the complex shear modulus, rendering the recovered moduli frequency dependent. Therefore, we here propose the use of multifrequency wave data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for solving the inverse problem of viscoelasticity reconstruction by an algebraic least-squares solution based on the springpot model. Advantages of the method are twofold: (i) amplitude nulls appearing in single-frequency standing wave patterns are mitigated and (ii) the dispersion of storage and loss modulus with drive frequency is taken into account by the inversion procedure, thereby avoiding subsequent model fitting. As a result, multifrequency inversion produces fewer artifacts in the viscoelastic parameter map than standard single-frequency parameter recovery and may thus support image-based viscoelasticity measurement. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by simulated wave data and MRE experiments on a phantom and in vivo human brain. Implemented as a clinical method, multifrequency inversion may improve the diagnostic value of time-harmonic MRE in a large variety of applications.

  4. Applying a nonlinear, pitch-catch, ultrasonic technique for the detection of kissing bonds in friction stir welds.

    PubMed

    Delrue, Steven; Tabatabaeipour, Morteza; Hettler, Jan; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2016-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising technology for the joining of aluminum alloys and other metallic admixtures that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Although FSW generally provides better fatigue properties than traditional fusion welding methods, fatigue properties are still significantly lower than for the base material. Apart from voids, kissing bonds for instance, in the form of closed cracks propagating along the interface of the stirred and heat affected zone, are inherent features of the weld and can be considered as one of the main causes of a reduced fatigue life of FSW in comparison to the base material. The main problem with kissing bond defects in FSW, is that they currently are very difficult to detect using existing NDT methods. Besides, in most cases, the defects are not directly accessible from the exposed surface. Therefore, new techniques capable of detecting small kissing bond flaws need to be introduced. In the present paper, a novel and practical approach is introduced based on a nonlinear, single-sided, ultrasonic technique. The proposed inspection technique uses two single element transducers, with the first transducer transmitting an ultrasonic signal that focuses the ultrasonic waves at the bottom side of the sample where cracks are most likely to occur. The large amount of energy at the focus activates the kissing bond, resulting in the generation of nonlinear features in the wave propagation. These nonlinear features are then captured by the second transducer operating in pitch-catch mode, and are analyzed, using pulse inversion, to reveal the presence of a defect. The performance of the proposed nonlinear, pitch-catch technique, is first illustrated using a numerical study of an aluminum sample containing simple, vertically oriented, incipient cracks. Later, the proposed technique is also applied experimentally on a real-life friction stir welded butt joint containing a kissing bond flaw. PMID:26921559

  5. Applying a nonlinear, pitch-catch, ultrasonic technique for the detection of kissing bonds in friction stir welds.

    PubMed

    Delrue, Steven; Tabatabaeipour, Morteza; Hettler, Jan; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2016-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising technology for the joining of aluminum alloys and other metallic admixtures that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Although FSW generally provides better fatigue properties than traditional fusion welding methods, fatigue properties are still significantly lower than for the base material. Apart from voids, kissing bonds for instance, in the form of closed cracks propagating along the interface of the stirred and heat affected zone, are inherent features of the weld and can be considered as one of the main causes of a reduced fatigue life of FSW in comparison to the base material. The main problem with kissing bond defects in FSW, is that they currently are very difficult to detect using existing NDT methods. Besides, in most cases, the defects are not directly accessible from the exposed surface. Therefore, new techniques capable of detecting small kissing bond flaws need to be introduced. In the present paper, a novel and practical approach is introduced based on a nonlinear, single-sided, ultrasonic technique. The proposed inspection technique uses two single element transducers, with the first transducer transmitting an ultrasonic signal that focuses the ultrasonic waves at the bottom side of the sample where cracks are most likely to occur. The large amount of energy at the focus activates the kissing bond, resulting in the generation of nonlinear features in the wave propagation. These nonlinear features are then captured by the second transducer operating in pitch-catch mode, and are analyzed, using pulse inversion, to reveal the presence of a defect. The performance of the proposed nonlinear, pitch-catch technique, is first illustrated using a numerical study of an aluminum sample containing simple, vertically oriented, incipient cracks. Later, the proposed technique is also applied experimentally on a real-life friction stir welded butt joint containing a kissing bond flaw.

  6. Inversion of triton moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clare, R. B.; Levinger, J. S.

    1981-02-01

    We use the formalism of hyperspherical harmonics to calculate several moments for the triton photoeffect, for a Volkov spin-independent potential. First, we improve the accuracy of Maleki's calculations of the moments σ2 and σ3 by including more terms in the hyperspherical expansion. We also calculate moments σ0 and σ1 for a Serber mixture. We find reasonable agreement between our moments found by sum rules and those found from the cross sections calculated by Fang et al. and Levinger-Fitzgibbon. We then develop a technique of inversion of a finite number of moments by making the assumption that the cross section can be written as a sum of several Laguerre polynomials multiplied by a decreasing exponential. We test our inversion technique successfully on several model potentials. We then modify it and apply it to the five moments (σ-1 to σ3) for a force without exchange, and find fair agreement with Fang's values of the cross section. Finally, we apply the inversion technique to our three moments (σ-1,σ0,and σ1) for a Serber mixture, and find reasonable agreement with Gorbunov's measurements of the 3He photoeffect. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Triton photoeffects, hyperspherical harmonics, moments of photoeffect, inversion of moments.

  7. Analysis of preservatives with different polarities in beverage samples by dual-phase dual stir bar sorptive extraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2013-02-22

    A new concept of "dual-phase dual stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)" was proposed to simultaneously extract six preservatives with different polarities (logKo/w values of 1.27-3.41), namely, benzoic acid (BA), sorbic acid (SA), methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (MP), ethyl p-hydroxybenzoate (EP), propyl p-hydroxybenzoate (PP), and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (BP). The dual-phase dual SBSE apparatus was consisted of two differently coated stir bars, a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-hydroxy-terminated silicone oil (OH-TSO)-coated stir bar that was prepared by sol-gel technique and a C(18) silica (C(18))-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated stir bar that was prepared by adhesion. In dual-phase dual SBSE, the two stir bars with different coatings were placed in the same sample solution for the simultaneous extraction of the target analytes with different polarities, and then the bars were desorbed in the same desorption solvent. The extraction performance of the dual-phase dual SBSE for the six preservatives was evaluated by comparing with the conventional SBSE (individual stir bar) with different coatings, including commercial PDMS, homemade PDMS, C(18)-APTES-OH-TSO, APTES-OH-TSO, and C(18)-PDMS. The experimental results showed that the dual-phase dual SBSE had the highest extraction efficiency for the six target preservatives. Based on this fact, a novel method by combining the dual-phase dual SBSE which was consisted of the APTES-OH-TSO-coated and C(18)-PDMS-coated stir bars with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) was developed for the simultaneous analysis of six target beverage preservatives in beverages. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) for six target preservatives ranged from 0.6 to 2.7 μgL(-1) with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 4.6-9.2% (C(BA,SA)=5 μgL(-1),C(MP)=20 μgL(-1),C(EP,PP,BP)=10 μgL(-1), n=7). The enrichment factors (EFs) were approximately 16-42-fold (theoretical EF was 50-fold

  8. Polydimethylsiloxane/covalent triazine frameworks coated stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection for the determination of phenols in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cheng; He, Man; Liao, Huaping; Chen, Beibei; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    In this work, covalent triazine frameworks (CTFs) were introduced in stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and a novel polydimethylsiloxane(PDMS)/CTFs stir bar coating was prepared by sol-gel technique for the sorptive extraction of eight phenols (including phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, p-chloro-m-cresol and 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol) from environmental water samples followed by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection. The prepared PDMS/CTFs coated stir bar showed good preparation reproducibility with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 3.5 to 5.7% (n=7) in one batch, and from 3.7 to 9.3% (n=7) among different batches. Several parameters affecting SBSE of eight target phenols including extraction time, stirring rate, sample pH, ionic strength, desorption solvent and desorption time were investigated. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) were found to be in the range of 0.08-0.30 μg/L. The linear range was 0.25-500 μg/L for 2-nitrophenol, 0.5-500 μg/L for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol as well as 2,4-dimethylphenol, and 1-500 μg/L for p-chloro-m-cresol, 2,4-dichlorophenol as well as 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, respectively. The intra-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 4.3-9.4% (n=7, c=2 μg/L) and the enrichment factors ranged from 64.9 to 145.6 fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 200-fold). Compared with commercial PDMS coated stir bar (Gerstel) and PEG coated stir bar (Gerstel), the prepared PDMS/CTFs stir bar showed better extraction efficiency for target phenol compounds. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of phenols in environmental water samples and good relative recoveries were obtained with the spiking level at 2, 10, 50 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26961915

  9. Polydimethylsiloxane/covalent triazine frameworks coated stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection for the determination of phenols in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cheng; He, Man; Liao, Huaping; Chen, Beibei; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    In this work, covalent triazine frameworks (CTFs) were introduced in stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and a novel polydimethylsiloxane(PDMS)/CTFs stir bar coating was prepared by sol-gel technique for the sorptive extraction of eight phenols (including phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, p-chloro-m-cresol and 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol) from environmental water samples followed by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection. The prepared PDMS/CTFs coated stir bar showed good preparation reproducibility with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 3.5 to 5.7% (n=7) in one batch, and from 3.7 to 9.3% (n=7) among different batches. Several parameters affecting SBSE of eight target phenols including extraction time, stirring rate, sample pH, ionic strength, desorption solvent and desorption time were investigated. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) were found to be in the range of 0.08-0.30 μg/L. The linear range was 0.25-500 μg/L for 2-nitrophenol, 0.5-500 μg/L for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol as well as 2,4-dimethylphenol, and 1-500 μg/L for p-chloro-m-cresol, 2,4-dichlorophenol as well as 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, respectively. The intra-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 4.3-9.4% (n=7, c=2 μg/L) and the enrichment factors ranged from 64.9 to 145.6 fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 200-fold). Compared with commercial PDMS coated stir bar (Gerstel) and PEG coated stir bar (Gerstel), the prepared PDMS/CTFs stir bar showed better extraction efficiency for target phenol compounds. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of phenols in environmental water samples and good relative recoveries were obtained with the spiking level at 2, 10, 50 μg/L, respectively.

  10. Novel molecularly imprinted stir bar sorptive extraction based on an 8-electrode array for preconcentration of trace exogenous estrogens in meat.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Li; Gan, Ning; Wang, Jiayu; Gao, Huiju; Hu, Futao; Wang, Hongfei; Li, Tianhua

    2015-01-01

    A novel 8-electrode array as stir bar was designed for selective extraction of trace level exogenous estrogens from food samples, followed by liquid desorption and HPLC-photodiode array detection. The array consisted of 8 screen-printed electrodes and each electrode was modified with Fe3O4@meso-/macroporous TiO2 microspheres and molecularly imprinted film (m-TiMIF). The fabrication of the imprinted film coating was very simple without organic solvents and chemical grafting. Both bisphenol A (BPA) and diethylstilbestrol (DES) were employed as templates in m-TiMIF fabrication in order to enrich both targets simultaneously. Interestingly, the imprinted stir bar array showed higher extraction capacity and selectivity for BPA and DES than the non-imprinted counterpart. Meanwhile, it exhibited fast adsorption and desorption kinetics due to increased mass transport in the ultra-thin film. Importantly, the m-TiMIF coating was robust enough for at least 20 uses without obvious alteration in extraction performance. The main parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including stir speeding, sample pH, ionic strength, extraction time, desorption solvent and time, were optimized. Under optimal experimental conditions, the limits of detection (S/N=3) of the developed method were 0.28 and 0.47 μg L(-1) for BPA and DES respectively, with enrichment factors of 32.6 and 52.8-fold. The linear ranges were 3.0-1500 μg L(-1) and 4.0-1500 μg L(-1) for BPA and DES, respectively. The m-TiMIF-coating conferred better recovery and selectivity, compared with the commercial stir bar coating. The new method was successfully applied to assess BPA and DES in pork and chicken samples with satisfactory recovery. PMID:25467478

  11. Effect of friction stir welding parameters on defect formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Eliseev, A. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is a perspective method for manufacturing automotive parts, aviation and space technology. One of the major problems is the formation of welding defects and weld around the welding zone. The formation of defect is the main reason failure of the joint. A possible way to obtain defect-free welded joints is the selection of the correct welding parameters. Experimental results describing the effect of friction stir welding process parameters on the defects of welded joints on aluminum alloy AMg5M have been shown. The weld joint defects have been characterized using the non-destructive radioscopic and ultrasound phase array methods. It was shown how the type and size of defects determine the welded joint strength.

  12. FRICTION STIR LAP WELDING OF ALUMINUM - POLYMER USING SCRIBE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2015-02-16

    Friction Stir Scribe (FSS) technology is a relatively new variant of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) which enables lap joining of dissimilar material with very different melting points and different high temperature flow behaviors. The cutter scribe attached at the tip of FSW tool pin effectively cuts the high melting point material such that a mechanically interlocking feature is created between the dissimilar materials. The geometric shape of this interlocking feature determines the shear strength attained by the lap joint. This work presents first use of scribe technology in joining polymers to aluminum alloy. Details of the several runs of scribe welding performed in lap joining of ~3.175mm thick polymers including HDPE, filled and unfilled Nylon 66 to 2mm thick AA5182 are presented. The effect of scribe geometry and length on weld interlocking features is presented along with lap shear strength evaluations.

  13. Electromagnetic stirring with alternating current during electroslag remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Alec; Hernandez-Morales, Bernardo

    1990-08-01

    An alternating current (AC)-operated electromagnetic stirring (EMS) device, using line frequency, was designed and built to operate on a laboratory electroslag remelting (ESR) furnace for 150-mm-diameter ingots. Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted employing both 4340 alloy steel and INCONEL 718 alloy as electrode material. The initiation of stirring is accompanied by a thin strip of segregated material and favors the formation of spot segregation. Changes produced in the fluid flow conditions in the liquid pool ahead of the solidification front result in a transition from a highly directional columnar to an unoriented, branched structure. Except for small pockets of segregated liquid, the flow of molten metal does not penetrate into the mushy zone. Both electrode material and molten metal pool shape play an important role on the extent of promoting an equiaxed structure.

  14. AVO inversion based on inverse operator estimation in trust region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xing-Yao; Deng, Wei; Zong, Zhao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude variation with offset (AVO) inversion is widely utilized in exploration geophysics, especially for reservoir prediction and fluid identification. Inverse operator estimation in the trust region algorithm is applied for solving AVO inversion problems in which optimization and inversion directly are integrated. The L1 norm constraint is considered on the basis of reasonable initial model in order to improve effciency and stability during the AVO inversion process. In this study, high-order Zoeppritz approximation is utilized to establish the inversion objective function in which variation of {{v}\\text{p}}/{{v}\\text{s}} with time is taken into consideration. A model test indicates that the algorithm has a relatively higher stability and accuracy than the damp least-squares algorithm. Seismic data inversion is feasible and inversion values of three parameters ({{v}\\text{p}},{{v}\\text{s}},ρ ) maintain good consistency with logging curves.

  15. Heat Treatment of Friction-Stir-Welded 7050 Aluminum Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petter, George E.; Figert, John D.; Rybicki, Daniel J.; Burns, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    A method of heat treatment has been developed to reverse some of the deleterious effects of friction stir welding of plates of aluminum alloy 7050. This alloy is considered unweldable by arc and high-energy-density beam fusion welding processes. The alloy can be friction stir welded, but as-welded workpieces exhibit low ductility, low tensile and yield strengths, and low resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Heat treatment according to the present method increases tensile and yield strengths, and minimizes or eliminates stress corrosion cracking. It also increases ductility. This method of heat treatment is a superior alternative to a specification-required heat treatment that caused the formation of large columnar grains, which are undesired. Workpieces subjected to the prior heat treatment exhibited elongations <2 percent, and standard three-point bend specimens shattered. The development of the present heat treatment method was guided partly by the principles that (1) by minimizing grain sizes and relieving deformation stresses, one can minimize or eliminate stress corrosion cracking and (2) the key to maximizing strength and eliminating residual stresses is to perform post-weld solution heating for as long a time as possible while incurring little or no development of large columnar grains in friction stir weld nuggets. It is necessary to perform some of the solution heat treatment (to soften the alloy and improve machine welding parameters) before welding. The following is an example of thickness- dependent pre- and post-weld heat treatments according to the present method: For plates 0.270 in. (approx.6.86 mm) thick milled from plates 4.5 in. (114.3 mm) thick, perform pre-weld solution heating at 890 F (477 C) for 1 hour, then cool in air. After friction stir welding, perform solution heating for 10 minutes, quench, hold at room temperature for 96 hours, then age at 250 F (121 C) for 5 hours followed by 325 F (163 C) for 27 hours.

  16. Derivation of iPSCs in stirred suspension bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Shafa, Mehdi; Day, Brad; Yamashita, Akihiro; Meng, Guoliang; Liu, Shiying; Krawetz, Roman; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2012-04-08

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are typically derived in adherent culture. Here we report fast and efficient derivation of mouse iPSCs in stirred suspension bioreactors, with and without the use of c-Myc. Suspension-reprogrammed cells expressed pluripotency markers, showed multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to the germline in chimeric mice. Suspension reprogramming has the potential to accelerate and standardize iPSC research.

  17. Stirring rate regulates the proliferation and metabolism of microencapsulated recombinant CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Ying; Li, Na; Chen, Li; Zhang, Demeng; Sun, Dongsheng; Li, Shen; Guo, Xin; Ma, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Stirred tank bioreactors are the most widely used method for the large-scale culture of mammalian cells. However, the scale of stirred tank bioreactors is limited by insufficient oxygen/nutrient mixing and the accumulation of waste products in high cell density cultures. The most effective method to solve these problems is to increase the stirring rate; this usually leads to increased cell proliferation, but can decrease the utilization of nutrients for recombinant protein synthesis. To investigate the effects of stirring rate on the proliferation, metabolism, and recombinant protein yield of microencapsulated recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells, the cells were cultured under different stirring rates, and cell viability, metabolic activity, and protein yield were measured. Microencapsulation promoted Desmodus rotundus salivary plasminogen activator expression, and higher stirring rates promoted increases in microencapsulated cell density and metabolic activity. However, the maximum yield of recombinant protein was obtained at a moderate stirring rate, whereas protein yield was decreased at the highest tested stirring rate. The stirring rate had a significant impact on the growth and protein expression of microencapsulated rCHO cells, and a specific stirring rate was identified to maximize the yield of recombinant protein. PMID:25524589

  18. Inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlande, Helcio Rangel Barreto

    We present the solution of the following inverse problems: (1) Inverse Problem of Estimating Interface Conductance Between Periodically Contacting Surfaces; (2) Inverse Problem of Estimating Interface Conductance During Solidification via Conjugate Gradient Method; (3) Determination of the Reaction Function in a Reaction-Diffusion Parabolic Problem; and (4) Simultaneous Estimation of Thermal Diffusivity and Relaxation Time with Hyperbolic Heat Conduction Model. Also, we present the solution of a direct problem entitled: Transient Thermal Constriction Resistance in a Finite Heat Flux Tube. The Conjugate Gradient Method with Adjoint Equation was used in chapters 1-3. The more general function estimation approach was treated in these chapters. In chapter 1, we solve the inverse problem of estimating the timewise variation of the interface conductance between periodically contacting solids, under quasi-steady-state conditions. The present method is found to be more accurate than the B-Spline approach for situations involving small periods, which are the most difficult on which to perform the inverse analysis. In chapter 2, we estimate the timewise variation of the interface conductance between casting and mold during the solidification of aluminum. The experimental apparatus used in this study is described. In chapter 3, we present the estimation of the reaction function in a one dimensional parabolic problem. A comparison of the present function estimation approach with the parameter estimation technique, wing B-Splines to approximate the reaction function, revealed that the use of function estimation reduces the computer time requirements. In chapter 4 we present a finite difference solution for the transient constriction resistance in a cylinder of finite length with a circular contact surface. A numerical grid generation scheme was used to concentrate grid points in the regions of high temperature gradients in order to reduce discretization errors. In chapter 6, we

  19. Recent Developments in Friction Stir Welding of Al-alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çam, Gürel; Mistikoglu, Selcuk

    2014-06-01

    The diversity and never-ending desire for a better life standard result in a continuous development of the existing manufacturing technologies. In line with these developments in the existing production technologies the demand for more complex products increases, which also stimulates new approaches in production routes of such products, e.g., novel welding procedures. For instance, the friction stir welding (FSW) technology, developed for joining difficult-to-weld Al-alloys, has been implemented by industry in manufacturing of several products. There are also numerous attempts to apply this method to other materials beyond Al-alloys. However, the process has not yet been implemented by industry for joining these materials with the exception of some limited applications. The microstructures and mechanical properties of friction stir welded Al-alloys existing in the open literature will be discussed in detail in this review. The correlations between weld parameters used during FSW and the microstructures evolved in the weld region and thus mechanical properties of the joints produced will be highlighted. However, the modeling studies, material flow, texture formation and developments in tool design are out of the scope of this work as well as the other variants of this technology, such as friction stir spot welding (FSSW).

  20. Biodegradation of Fresh vs. Oven-Dried Inedible Crop Residue in a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Kamau; Strayer, Richard

    1998-01-01

    The degradation of soluble organics and mineral recovery from fresh and oven-dried biomass were compared in an Intermediate-Scale Aerobic Bioreactor (8 L working volume) to determine if drying crop residue improves performance in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The study was conducted in an Intermediate-Scale Aerobic Bioreactor (ISAB) CSTR with dimensions of 390 mm height x 204 mm diameter. The pH in the bioreactor was controlled at 6.0, temperature at 30 C, and aeration at 7.0 L/min. Gases monitored were CO2 evolution and dissolved oxygen. Homogeneously mixed wheat cultures, used either fresh or oven-dried biomass and were leached, then placed in the ISAB for a 4-day degradation period. Studies found that mineral recovery was greater for leached oven-dried crop residue. However, after activity by the mixed microbial communities in the ISAB CSTR, there were little notable differences in the measured mineral recovery and degradation of soluble organic compounds. Degradation of soluble organic compounds was also shown to improve for leached oven-dried crop residue, but after mixing in the CSTR the degradation of the fresh biomass seemed to be slightly greater. Time for the biomass to turn in the CSTR appeared to be one factor for the experimental differences between the fresh and oven-dried biomass. Other factors, although not as defined, were the differing physical structures in the cell walls and varying microbial components of the fresh and oven-dried treatments due to changes in chemical composition after drying of the biomass.

  1. Inverse Functions and their Derivatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snapper, Ernst

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a method of interchanging the x-axis and y-axis for viewing the graph of the inverse function. Discussed are the inverse function and the usual proofs that are used for the function. (KR)

  2. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  3. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  4. Numerical modelling of thermal phenomenon in friction stir welding of aluminum plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaira Vignesh, R.; Padmanaban, R.; Arivarasu, M.; Thirumalini, S.; Gokulachandran, J.; Sai Ram, Mutyala Sesha Satya

    2016-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential to join materials that are non weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. The study of heat transfer in FSW aids in the identification of defects like flash, inadequate heat input, poor material flow and mixing etc. In this paper, transient temperature distribution during FSW of aluminum alloy AA6061-T6 was simulated using finite element modelling. The model was used to predict the peak temperature and analyse the thermal history during FSW. The effect of process parameters namely tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed (welding speed), shoulder diameter and pin diameter of tool on the temperature distribution was investigated using two level factorial design. The model results were validated using the experimental results from the published literature. It was found that peak temperature was directly proportional to tool rotation speed and shoulder diameter and inversely proportional to tool traverse speed. The effect of pin diameter on peak temperature was found to be trivial.

  5. Spontaneous Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rescorla, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous recovery from extinction is one of the most basic phenomena of Pavlovian conditioning. Although it can be studied by using a variety of designs, some procedures are better than others for identifying the involvement of underlying learning processes. A wide range of different learning mechanisms has been suggested as being engaged by…

  6. Stirring-assisted assembly of nanowires at liquid-solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Ze; Wei, Wei; Chen, Jun-Yi; He, Ji-Xiang; Xue, Sheng-Nan; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Xia; Li, Xiang; Fu, Yu; Jiao, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Fuchun; Han, En-Hou

    2013-03-01

    The assembly of Ag nanowires on quartz substrates from suspensions of water and ethylene glycol under stirring has been investigated. The introduction of stirring makes a remarkable difference to the assembly morphology. Firstly, the surface coverage of Ag nanowires is increased by a factor of 4 (in water) and 8 (in ethylene glycol) with stirring. Secondly, the Ag nanowires assembled in the stirred ethylene glycol dispersion were highly aligned. The influence of the surface of substrates, solvents and profile of the nanowires on the alignment has been explored, which indicates that stirring is an efficient way to generate nanowire arrays. This study has revealed the great potential of the stirring-assisted assembly technique in producing structurally controlled nanoarchitectures, opening up new opportunities for manufacturing ordered nanomaterials.

  7. Investigation of the Microstructure of Joints of Aluminum Alloys Produced by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-02-01

    Special features of the microstructure of joints of aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-copper alloys produced by friction stir welding are analyzed. It is demonstrated that a layered structure with ultradisperse grains is produced by friction stir welding at the center of the weld joint. An analogy is drawn between the microstructures of joints produced by friction stir welding and surface layer produced by sliding friction.

  8. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Ambuchi, John J; He, Weihua; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m(-2). Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which process 79.1 ± 5.6% of soluble protein and 86.6 ± 2.2% of soluble carbohydrates were degraded by anaerobic digestion in the CMZ and short-chain volatile fatty acids were further decomposed and generated current in the MEZ. Co-existence of fermentative bacteria (Clostridium and Bacteroides, 19.7% and 5.0%), acetogenic bacteria (Syntrophobacter, 20.8%), methanogenic archaea (Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium, 40.3% and 38.4%) and exoelectrogens (Geobacter, 12.4%) as well as a clear spatial distribution and syntrophic interaction among them contributed to the cascade degradation process in CSMER. The CSMER shows great promise for practical wastewater treatment application due to high pre-hydrolysis and acidification rate, high energy recovery and low capital cost. PMID:27270788

  9. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Ambuchi, John J; He, Weihua; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2016-06-07

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m(-2). Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which process 79.1 ± 5.6% of soluble protein and 86.6 ± 2.2% of soluble carbohydrates were degraded by anaerobic digestion in the CMZ and short-chain volatile fatty acids were further decomposed and generated current in the MEZ. Co-existence of fermentative bacteria (Clostridium and Bacteroides, 19.7% and 5.0%), acetogenic bacteria (Syntrophobacter, 20.8%), methanogenic archaea (Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium, 40.3% and 38.4%) and exoelectrogens (Geobacter, 12.4%) as well as a clear spatial distribution and syntrophic interaction among them contributed to the cascade degradation process in CSMER. The CSMER shows great promise for practical wastewater treatment application due to high pre-hydrolysis and acidification rate, high energy recovery and low capital cost.

  10. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Ambuchi, John J.; He, Weihua; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m−2. Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which process 79.1 ± 5.6% of soluble protein and 86.6 ± 2.2% of soluble carbohydrates were degraded by anaerobic digestion in the CMZ and short-chain volatile fatty acids were further decomposed and generated current in the MEZ. Co-existence of fermentative bacteria (Clostridium and Bacteroides, 19.7% and 5.0%), acetogenic bacteria (Syntrophobacter, 20.8%), methanogenic archaea (Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium, 40.3% and 38.4%) and exoelectrogens (Geobacter, 12.4%) as well as a clear spatial distribution and syntrophic interaction among them contributed to the cascade degradation process in CSMER. The CSMER shows great promise for practical wastewater treatment application due to high pre-hydrolysis and acidification rate, high energy recovery and low capital cost. PMID:27270788

  11. Comparison between continuous stirred tank reactor extractor and soxhlet extractor for extraction of El-Lajjun oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Anabtawi, M.Z.

    1996-02-01

    Extraction on El-Lajjun oil shale in a continuous stirred tank reactor extractor (CSTRE) and a Soxhlet extractor was carried out using toluene and chloroform as solvents. Solvents were recovered using two distillation stages, a simple distillation followed by a fractional distillation. Gas chromotography was used to test for the existence of trapped solvent in the yield. It was found that extraction using a CSTRE gave a 12% increase in yield on average compared with the Soxhlet extractor, and an optimum shale size of 1.0mm offered a better yield and solvent recovery for both techniques. It was also found that an optimum ratio of solvent to oil shale of 2:1 gave the best oil yield. The Soxhlet extractor was found to offer an extraction rate of 1 hour to complete extraction compared with 4 hours in a CSTRE. The yield in a CSTRE was found to increase on increase of stirring. When extraction was carried out at the boiling point of the solvents in a CSTRE, the yield was found to increase by 30% on average compared to that of extraction when the solvent was at room temperature. When toluene was used for extraction, the average amount of bitumen extracted was 0.032 g/g of oil shale and 76.4% of the solvent recovered, compared with 0.037 g/g of oil shale and 84.1% of the solvent recovered using a Soxhlet extractor.

  12. Physical Simulation of a Duplex Stainless Steel Friction Stir Welding by the Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Hot Torsion Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Eduardo Bertoni; Santos, Tiago Felipe Abreu; Button, Sergio Tonini; Ramirez, Antonio Jose

    2016-09-01

    Physical simulation of friction stir welding (FSW) by means of hot torsion tests was performed on UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel. A thermomechanical simulator Gleeble 3800® with a custom-built liquid nitrogen cooling system was employed to reproduce the thermal cycle measured during FSW and carry out the torsion tests. Microstructures were compared by means of light optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. True strain and strain rate were calculated by numerical simulation of the torsion tests. Thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) was reproduced at peak temperature of 1303 K (1030 °C), rotational speeds of 52.4 rad s-1 (500 rpm) and 74.5 rad s-1 (750 rpm), and 0.5 to 0.75 revolutions, which represent strain rate between 10 and 16 s-1 and true strain between 0.5 and 0.8. Strong grain refinement, similar to the one observed in the stir zone (SZ), was attained at peak temperature of 1403 K (1130 °C), rotational speed of 74.5 rad s-1 (750 rpm), and 1.2 revolution, which represent strain rate of 19 s-1 and true strain of 1.3. Continuous dynamic recrystallization in ferrite and dynamic recrystallization in austenite were observed in the TMAZ simulation. At higher temperature, dynamic recovery of austenite was also observed.

  13. Bio-processing of copper from combined smelter dust and flotation concentrate: a comparative study on the stirred tank and airlift reactors.

    PubMed

    Vakylabad, Ali Behrad; Schaffie, Mahin; Ranjbar, Mohammad; Manafi, Zahra; Darezereshki, Esmaeel

    2012-11-30

    To scrutinize the influence of the design and type of the bioreactors on the bioleaching efficiency, the bioleaching were evaluated in a batch airlift and a batch stirred tank bioreactors with mixed mesophilic and mixed moderately thermophilic bacteria. According to the results, maximum copper recoveries were achieved using the cultures in the stirred tank bioreactors. It is worth noting that the main phase of the flotation concentrate was chalcopyrite (as a primary sulphide), but the smelter dust mainly contained secondary copper sulphides such as Cu(2)S, CuS, and Cu(5)FeS(4).Under optimum conditions, copper dissolution from the combined flotation concentrate and smelter dust (as an environmental hazard) reached 94.50% in the STR, and 88.02% in the airlift reactor with moderately thermophilic, after 23 days. Also, copper extractions calculated for the bioleaching using mesophilic bacteria were 48.73% and 37.19% in the STR (stirred tank reactor) and the airlift bioreactor, respectively. In addition, the SEM/EDS, XRD, chemical, and mineralogical analyses and studies confirmed the above results. PMID:23046698

  14. Bio-processing of copper from combined smelter dust and flotation concentrate: a comparative study on the stirred tank and airlift reactors.

    PubMed

    Vakylabad, Ali Behrad; Schaffie, Mahin; Ranjbar, Mohammad; Manafi, Zahra; Darezereshki, Esmaeel

    2012-11-30

    To scrutinize the influence of the design and type of the bioreactors on the bioleaching efficiency, the bioleaching were evaluated in a batch airlift and a batch stirred tank bioreactors with mixed mesophilic and mixed moderately thermophilic bacteria. According to the results, maximum copper recoveries were achieved using the cultures in the stirred tank bioreactors. It is worth noting that the main phase of the flotation concentrate was chalcopyrite (as a primary sulphide), but the smelter dust mainly contained secondary copper sulphides such as Cu(2)S, CuS, and Cu(5)FeS(4).Under optimum conditions, copper dissolution from the combined flotation concentrate and smelter dust (as an environmental hazard) reached 94.50% in the STR, and 88.02% in the airlift reactor with moderately thermophilic, after 23 days. Also, copper extractions calculated for the bioleaching using mesophilic bacteria were 48.73% and 37.19% in the STR (stirred tank reactor) and the airlift bioreactor, respectively. In addition, the SEM/EDS, XRD, chemical, and mineralogical analyses and studies confirmed the above results.

  15. Polydimethylsiloxane/metal-organic frameworks coated stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to gas chromatography-flame photometric detection for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zuowei; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2016-08-15

    In this work, the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MIL-101-Cr-NH2 was synthesized via a direct hydrothermal method, and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/MIL-101-Cr-NH2 coated stir bar was prepared by sol-gel technique. Good reproducibility was obtained for the preparation of PDMS/MIL-101-Cr-NH2 coated stir bar with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 3.7 to 5.2% (n=7) in one batch, and from 5.4 to 9.2% (n=7) among different batches. With the high surface area and rich benzene ring structure of MIL-101-Cr-NH2, the prepared PDMS/MIL-101-Cr-NH2 coated stir bar presented higher extraction efficiency for target organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs, including phorate, diazinon, malathion, fenthion, quinalphos and ethion) over PDMS coated stir bar. Based on it, a new method of PDMS/MIL-101-Cr-NH2 coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled to gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) was proposed for the determination of six OPPs in environmental water samples. The operation parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of SBSE, including extraction time, stirring rate, desorption time and ionic strength, were investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection (S/N=3) were found to be in the range of 0.043-0.085μgL(-1) for the six target OPPs, and the linear range was 0.5-100μgL(-1) for malathion and 0.2-100μgL(-1) for other five OPPs. The RSDs of the proposed method evaluated at 1µgL(-1) for each OPP were in the range of 5.9-8.7% (intra-day, n=7) and 6.1-10.7% (inter-day, n=5), respectively. The enrichment factors were varied from 110 to 151-fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 200-fold). The proposed method was applied to the analysis of OPPs in East Lake and pond water samples with recoveries in the range of 89.3-115% and 80.0-113% for the spiked East Lake and pond water samples, respectively. PMID:27260444

  16. Retractable Pin Tools for the Friction Stir Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Two companies have successfully commercialized a specialized welding tool developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Friction stir welding uses the high rotational speed of a tool and the resulting frictional heat created from contact to crush, 'stir' together, and forge a bond between two metal alloys. It has had a major drawback, reliance on a single-piece pin tool. The pin is slowly plunged into the joint between two materials to be welded and rotated as high speed. At the end of the weld, the single-piece pin tool is retracted and leaves a 'keyhole,' something which is unacceptable when welding cylindrical objects such as drums, pipes and storage tanks. Another drawback is the requirement for different-length pin tools when welding materials of varying thickness. An engineer at the MSFC helped design an automatic retractable pin tool that uses a computer-controlled motor to automatically retract the pin into the shoulder of the tool at the end of the weld, preventing keyholes. This design allows the pin angle and length to be adjusted for changes in material thickness and results in a smooth hole closure at the end of the weld. Benefits of friction stir welding, using the MSFC retractable pin tool technology, include the following: The ability to weld a wide range of alloys, including previously unweldable and composite materials; provision of twice the fatigue resistance of fusion welds and no keyholes; minimization of material distortion; no creation of hazards such as welding fumes, radiation, high voltage, liquid metals, or arcing; automatic retraction of the pin at the end of the weld; and maintaining full penetration of the pin.

  17. Controlling Force and Depth in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Glynn; Loftus, Zachary; McCormac, Nathan; Venable, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Feedback control of the penetration force applied to a pin tool in friction stir welding has been found to be a robust and reliable means for controlling the depth of penetration of the tool. This discovery has made it possible to simplify depth control and to weld with greater repeatability, even on workpieces with long weld joints. Prior to this discovery, depths of penetration in friction stir welding were controlled by hard-tooled roller assemblies or by depth actuators controlled by feedback from such external sensors as linear variable-differential transformers or laser-based devices. These means of control are limited: A hard-tooled roller assembly confines a pin tool to a preset depth that cannot be changed easily during the welding process. A measurement by an external sensor is only an indirect indicative of the depth of penetration, and computations to correlate such a measurement with a depth of penetration are vulnerable to error. The present force-feedback approach exploits the proportionality between the depth and the force of penetration Unlike a depth measurement taken by an external sensor, a force measurement can be direct because it can be taken by a sensor coupled directly to the pin tool. The reading can be processed through a modern electronic servo control system to control an actuator to keep the applied penetration force at the desired level. In comparison with the older depth-control methods described above, this method offers greater sensitivity to plasticizing of the workpiece metal and is less sensitive to process noise, resulting in a more consistent process. In an experiment, a tapered panel was friction stir welded while controlling the force of penetration according to this method. The figure is a plot of measurements taken during the experiment, showing that force was controlled with a variation of 200 lb (890 N), resulting in control of the depth of penetration with a variation of 0.004 in. (0.1 mm).

  18. Developing Friction Stir Welding Process Model for ICME Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    A framework for developing a product involving manufacturing processes was developed with integrated computational materials engineering approach. The key component in the framework is a process modeling tool which includes a thermal model, a microstructure model, a thermo-mechanical, and a property model. Using friction stir welding (FSW) process as an example, development of the process modeling tool was introduced in detail. The thermal model and the microstructure model of FSW of steels were validated with the experiment data. The model can predict reasonable temperature and hardness distributions as observed in the experiment. The model was applied to predict residual stress and joint strength of a pipe girth weld.

  19. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    DOEpatents

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  20. Fatigue Crack Growth in Peened Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Hatamleh, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding induces residual stresses that accelerates fatigue crack growth in the weld nugget. Shot peening over the weld had little effect on growth rate. Laser peening over the weld retarded the growth rate: Final crack growth rate was comparable to the base, un-welded material. Crack tunneling evident from residual compressive stresses. 2195-T8 fracture surfaces were highly textured. Texturing makes comparisons difficult as the material system is affecting the data as much as the processing. Material usage becoming more common in space applications requiring additional work to develop useful datasets for damage tolerance analyses.

  1. Production of verruculogen by Penicillium estinogenum in stirred fermenters.

    PubMed

    Day, J B; Mantle, P G; Shaw, B I

    1980-04-01

    A spectrofluorometric assay for the estimation of the tremorgenic mycotoxin verruculogen in crude mycelial extract has been devised and used to determine concentrations as low as 0.2 microgram ml-1. Verruculogen production by Penicillium estinogenum has been extended from surface culture to submerged culture in 60 1 stirred fermenters, in which the maximum cell-associated mycotoxin yield [5 mg (100 ml culture)-1] was obtained within 7 d. It was found necessary to supplement the medium (Czapek Dox broth plus 0.5% yeast extract) with calcium chloride (2%) to induce profuse sporulation (2 X 10(7) conidia ml-1). PMID:7420051

  2. A cellular automaton model for microstructural simulation of friction stir welded AZ91 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mostafa; Asadi, Parviz; Besharati Givi, MohammadKazem; Zolghadr, Parisa

    2016-03-01

    To predict the grain size and microstructure evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of AZ91 magnesium alloy, a finite element model (FEM) is developed based on the combination of a cellular automaton model and the Kocks  -  Mecking and Laasraoui-Jonas models. First, according to the flow stress curves and using the Kocks  -  Mecking model, the hardening and recovery parameters and the strain rate sensitivity were calculated. Next, an FEM model was established in Deform-3D software to simulate the FSW of AZ91 magnesium alloy. The results of the FEM model are used in microstructure evolution models to predict the grain size and microstructure of the weld zone. There is a good agreement between the simulated and experimental microstructures, and the proposed model can simulate the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process during FSW of AZ91 alloy. Moreover, microstructural properties of different points in the SZ as well as the effect of the w/v parameter on the grain size and microstructure are considered.

  3. Water compatible stir-bar devices imprinted with underivatised glyphosate for selective sample clean-up.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Caballero, Alberto; Diaz-Diaz, Goretti; Bengoetxea, Olatz; Quintela, Amaia; Unceta, Nora; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-06-17

    This paper reports the development of stir bars with a new MIP based coating, for the selective sorptive extraction of the herbicide glyphosate (GLYP). Molecular imprinting of the polymer has directly been carried out employing underivatised GLYP as the template molecule. Due to the poor solubility of the target compound in organic solvents, the MIP methodology has been optimised for rebinding in aqueous media, being the synthesis and the rebinding steps carried out in water:methanol mixtures and pure aqueous media. The coating has been developed by radical polymerisation initiated by UV energy, using N-allylthiourea and 2-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate as functional monomers and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. Mechanical stability of the coating has been improved using 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane in the polymerisation mixture. Under the optimised conditions, the MIP has demonstrated excellent selectivity for the target compound in the presence of structural analogues, including its major metabolites. The applicability of the proposed method to real matrices has also been assessed using river water and soil samples. Registered mean recoveries ranged from 90.6 to 97.3% and RSD values were below 5% in all cases, what confirmed the suitability of the described methodology for the selective extraction and quantification of GLYP.

  4. Water compatible stir-bar devices imprinted with underivatised glyphosate for selective sample clean-up.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Caballero, Alberto; Diaz-Diaz, Goretti; Bengoetxea, Olatz; Quintela, Amaia; Unceta, Nora; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-06-17

    This paper reports the development of stir bars with a new MIP based coating, for the selective sorptive extraction of the herbicide glyphosate (GLYP). Molecular imprinting of the polymer has directly been carried out employing underivatised GLYP as the template molecule. Due to the poor solubility of the target compound in organic solvents, the MIP methodology has been optimised for rebinding in aqueous media, being the synthesis and the rebinding steps carried out in water:methanol mixtures and pure aqueous media. The coating has been developed by radical polymerisation initiated by UV energy, using N-allylthiourea and 2-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate as functional monomers and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. Mechanical stability of the coating has been improved using 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane in the polymerisation mixture. Under the optimised conditions, the MIP has demonstrated excellent selectivity for the target compound in the presence of structural analogues, including its major metabolites. The applicability of the proposed method to real matrices has also been assessed using river water and soil samples. Registered mean recoveries ranged from 90.6 to 97.3% and RSD values were below 5% in all cases, what confirmed the suitability of the described methodology for the selective extraction and quantification of GLYP. PMID:27207580

  5. A Numerical Simulation for Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys Joined by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Carter; Kopyściański, Mateusz; Węglowska, Aleksandra; Dymek, Stanisław; Pietras, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Dissimilar aluminum alloy sheets of 2017A-T451 and 7075-T651 (6 mm thickness) were friction stir welded in a butt weld configuration. A numerical simulation of the joining process was developed to visualize the material flow patterns and temperature distribution and to correlate the microstructure to the hardness behavior. Due to the complementary downward flow of surface material into the workpiece thickness and upward flow of mid-plane and bottom-plane material, the weld nugget is composed of alternating layers of 7075 and 2017A. These layers have unique temperature histories depending on the material's initial location within the cross section; therefore, they also have distinctive precipitate distributions. Supersaturated surface material flows into the process zone and forms a core in which GP zones reprecipitate upon cooling. Mid-plane and bottom-plane material flow toward the workpiece surface and encompass the surface material core. Within this region, the weld temperatures overage the equilibrium θ phase in 2017A, decreasing the hardness, and at the same time, dissolve the equilibrium η/ T phase in the 7075, leading to reprecipitation of GP zones upon cooling and a hardness recovery.

  6. Multiresolution MR elastography using nonlinear inversion

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, M. D. J.; Van Houten, E. E. W.; Johnson, C. L.; Georgiadis, J. G.; Sutton, B. P.; Weaver, J. B.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Nonlinear inversion (NLI) in MR elastography requires discretization of the displacement field for a finite element (FE) solution of the “forward problem”, and discretization of the unknown mechanical property field for the iterative solution of the “inverse problem”. The resolution requirements for these two discretizations are different: the forward problem requires sufficient resolution of the displacement FE mesh to ensure convergence, whereas lowering the mechanical property resolution in the inverse problem stabilizes the mechanical property estimates in the presence of measurement noise. Previous NLI implementations use the same FE mesh to support the displacement and property fields, requiring a trade-off between the competing resolution requirements. Methods: This work implements and evaluates multiresolution FE meshes for NLI elastography, allowing independent discretizations of the displacements and each mechanical property parameter to be estimated. The displacement resolution can then be selected to ensure mesh convergence, and the resolution of the property meshes can be independently manipulated to control the stability of the inversion. Results: Phantom experiments indicate that eight nodes per wavelength (NPW) are sufficient for accurate mechanical property recovery, whereas mechanical property estimation from 50 Hz in vivo brain data stabilizes once the displacement resolution reaches 1.7 mm (approximately 19 NPW). Viscoelastic mechanical property estimates of in vivo brain tissue show that subsampling the loss modulus while holding the storage modulus resolution constant does not substantially alter the storage modulus images. Controlling the ratio of the number of measurements to unknown mechanical properties by subsampling the mechanical property distributions (relative to the data resolution) improves the repeatability of the property estimates, at a cost of modestly decreased spatial resolution. Conclusions: Multiresolution

  7. Polyaniline/cyclodextrin composite coated stir bar sorptive extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection for the analysis of trace polychlorinated biphenyls in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yun; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    A novel polyaniline/α-cyclodextrin (PANI/α-CD) composite coated stir bar was prepared by sol-gel process for the analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in this work. The preparation reproducibility of the PANI/α-CD-coated stir bar was good, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 2.3% to 3.7% (n=7) and 2.0% to 3.8% (n=7) for bar to bar and batch to batch, respectively. Based on it, a novel method of PANI/α-CD-coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) followed by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection was developed for the determination of trace PCBs in environmental waters. To obtain the best extraction performance for target PCBs, several parameters affecting SBSE, such as extraction time, stirring rate, and ionic strength were investigated. Under optimal experimental conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) of the proposed method for seven PCBs were in the range of 0.048-0.22 μg/L, and the RSDs were 5.3-9.8% (n=7, c=1 μg/L). Enrichment factors (EFs) ranging from 39.8 to 68.4-fold (theoretical EF, 83.3-fold) for target analytes were achieved. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of seven target PCBs in Yangtze River water and East Lake water, and the recoveries were in the range of 73.0-120% for the spiked East Lake water samples and 82.7-121% for the spiked Yangtze River water samples, respectively. PMID:26838413

  8. Microstructural Investigation of Friction-Stir-Welded 7005 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xuesong; Lu, Yan; Zheng, Feiyan; Chen, Bin

    2015-11-01

    This paper is aimed to investigate the microstructure of 7005 aluminum sheets joined by friction-stir welding as well as their mechanical properties. Specimens with ten different sets of welding parameters were studied. Tensile test and fracture analysis determined that the joint of the best quality was obtained at the rotation speed of 1000 rpm matching with the travel speed of 200 mm/min, and the travel speed has more impact on the ultimate tensile strength. Optical microscope observation was applied to this high-quality specimen and gave evidence to explaining the formation of the onion ring structure. Electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique was employed to characterize the textures and revealed the evolution of microstructures during friction stir processing. The EBSD results showed that the grains maintain their original orientations at relatively low deformation while the orientations rotate under increasing strain. Accumulated rotation will turn the textures into mixed shear components, which finally results in grain refinement and contributes to the high quality of the joint.

  9. Shear-induced flocculation of colloidal particles in stirred tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, C.J.; Yiacoumi, S.; Tsouris, C.

    1998-10-15

    Colloidal polystyrene and paramagnetic particles consisting of mixtures of polystyrene and magnetite are used to experimentally investigate flocculation kinetics in a stirred tank under turbulent shear flow. The effects of various parameters--agitation speed, solution pH, ionic strength, particle size, and particle concentration--on the flocculation rate are investigated. A trajectory model applicable for shear-flow systems is formulated to describe particle flocculation in stirred tanks. The collision efficiency of particles is obtained from the limiting trajectory of one particle moving toward another and is a function of interparticle forces and flow properties. The collision frequency is determined as a function of particle size and energy dissipation. The flocculation frequency is then determined by multiplying the collision frequency by the collision efficiency and is incorporated into a population balance model to predict the particle size evolution. Results suggest that the flocculation rate is enhanced by increasing the agitation speed, even though the collision efficiency is decreased at a higher agitation speed. It is also found that the collision rate increases and the collision efficiency decreases as the particle size ratio is increased. Results also suggest that the breakup rate of aggregates in a turbulent shear flow could be significant and may need to be included in the population balance modeling to correctly predict the evolution of particle size distribution.

  10. Friction Stir Weld Restart+Reweld Repair Allowables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A friction stir weld (FSW) repair method has been developed and successfully implemented on Al 2195 plate material for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank (ET). The method includes restarting the friction stir weld in the termination hole of the original weld followed by two reweld passes. Room temperature and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties exceeded minimum FSW design strength and compared well with the development data. Simulated service test results also compared closely to historical data for initial FSW, confirming no change to the critical flaw size or inspection requirements for the repaired weld. Testing of VPPA fusion/FSW intersection weld specimens exhibited acceptable strength and exceeded the minimum design value. Porosity, when present at the intersection was on the root side toe of the fusion weld, the "worst case" being 0.7 inch long. While such porosity may be removed by sanding, this "worst case" porosity condition was tested "as is" and demonstrated that porosity did not negatively affect the strength of the intersection weld. Large, 15-inch "wide panels" FSW repair welds were tested to demonstrate strength and evaluate residual stresses using photo stress analysis. All results exceeded design minimums, and photo stress analysis showed no significant stress gradients due to the presence of the restart and multi-pass FSW repair weld.

  11. High temperature deformation of friction stir processed 7075 aluminium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaliere, P. . E-mail: pasquale.cavaliere@unile.it; Squillace, A.

    2005-08-15

    The mechanical and microstructural properties of 7075 aluminium alloy resulting from Friction Stir Processing (FSP), into sheets of 7 mm thickness, were analysed in the present study. The sheets were processed perpendicularly to the rolling direction; the tensile mechanical properties were evaluated at room temperature in the transverse and longitudinal directions with respect to the processing one. Tensile tests were also performed at higher temperatures and different strain rates in the nugget zone, in order to analyse the superplastic properties of the recrystallized material and to observe the differences from the parent material as a function of the strong grain refinement due to the Friction Stir Process. The high temperature behaviour of the material was studied, in the parallel direction, by means of tensile tests in the temperature and strain rate ranges of 150-500 deg. C and 10{sup -} {sup 2}-10{sup -} {sup 4} s{sup -} {sup 1} respectively, electron microscopy (FEGSEM) observations were carried out to investigate more closely the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested at different temperatures and strain rates.

  12. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  13. 7 CFR 58.711 - Cheddar, colby, washed or soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... stirred curd cheese. 58.711 Section 58.711 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese. Cheese, used in the manufacture of pasteurized process cheese products should possess a pleasing and desirable taste and odor consistent with the age of...

  14. 7 CFR 58.711 - Cheddar, colby, washed or soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... stirred curd cheese. 58.711 Section 58.711 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese. Cheese, used in the manufacture of pasteurized process cheese products should possess a pleasing and desirable taste and odor consistent with the age of...

  15. 7 CFR 58.711 - Cheddar, colby, washed or soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... stirred curd cheese. 58.711 Section 58.711 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese. Cheese, used in the manufacture of pasteurized process cheese products should possess a pleasing and desirable taste and odor consistent with the age of...

  16. 7 CFR 58.711 - Cheddar, colby, washed or soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... stirred curd cheese. 58.711 Section 58.711 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese. Cheese, used in the manufacture of pasteurized process cheese products should possess a pleasing and desirable taste and odor consistent with the age of...

  17. 7 CFR 58.711 - Cheddar, colby, washed or soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... stirred curd cheese. 58.711 Section 58.711 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese. Cheese, used in the manufacture of pasteurized process cheese products should possess a pleasing and desirable taste and odor consistent with the age of...

  18. Combine Effects of Plate Motions and Small-Scale Convection on Mantle Stirring Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S.; Samuel, H.

    2012-04-01

    Convection in Earth's mantle generates large scale, vigorous motions often thought to be the primary mechanism of mantle stirring. However additional thermal instabilities may progressively develop below lithospheric plates, leading to smaller scale convective motions. While there is growing evidence supporting the presence of small-scale convection in Earth's mantle, little is known of its contribution to the mixing of mantle heterogeneities. We have thus investigated the influence of small-scale convection on mantle stirring efficiency using 2D numerical modeling of infinite Prandtl number convection with imposed surface plate motion and temperature and pressure dependent rheology. We measure stirring efficiency using Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) and we vary systematically the Peclet number, Pe, defined as the ratio of the advection time scale based on surface plate velocity to a characteristic diffusion time. Our computational domain has an aspect ratio of 1:3. For moderate Pe, small-scale convection is well developed, leading to efficient stirring. However large Pe numbers do not allow the development of small-scale convection and result in significantly lower stirring efficiency, although plate motions are faster. This indicates that (i) small-scale convection contributes significantly to mantle stirring efficiency, (ii) mantle stirring efficiency many spatially vary significantly due to the local magnitude of plate velocity and (iii) the relationship between mantle stirring efficiency and large-scale convective motions may be more complex than previously thought.

  19. Stirring and mixing effects on oscillations and inhomogeneities in the minimal bromate oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, A. K.; Menzinger, M.

    1999-04-01

    Stirring and mixing effects on the oscillations and inhomogeneities in the bromate-bromide-cerous system (minimal bromate oscillator) have been investigated in a continuously fed stirred tank reactor (CSTR). A movable microelectrode is used to monitor the inhomogeneities inside the CSTR in an oscillating phase. The results are explained in terms of the theory of imperfect mixing.

  20. Effects of Laser Peening, and Shot Peening, on Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Hackel, Lloyd; Rankin, Jon; Truong, Chanh; Walter, Matt

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the effects of laser peening and shot peening on friction stir welding is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Friction Stir Welding (FSW); 3) Microstructure; 4) Laser & Shot Peening; 5) Residual Stresses; 6) Tensile Behavior; 7) Fatigue Life & Surface Roughness; 8) Crack Growth; and 9) Benefits.

  1. Stress inversion assumptions review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejri, Mostfa; Maerten, Frantz; Maerten, Laurent; Joonnenkindt, Jean Pierre; Soliva, Roger

    2014-05-01

    Wallace (1951) and Bott (1959) were the first to introduce the idea that the slip on each fault surface has the same direction and sense as the maximum shear stress resolved on that surface. This hypothesis are based on the assumptions that (i) faults are planar, (ii) blocks are rigid, (iii) neither stress perturbations nor block rotations along fault surfaces occur and (iv), the applied stress state is uniform. However, this simplified hypothesis is questionable since complex fault geometries, heterogeneous fault slip directions, evidences of stress perturbations in microstructures and block rotations along fault surfaces were reported in the literature. Earlier numerical geomechanical models confirmed that the striation lines (slip vectors) are not necessarily parallel to the maximum shear stress vector but is consistent with local stress perturbations. This leads us to ask as to what extent the Wallace and Bott simplifications are reliable as a basis hypothesis for stress inversion. In this presentation, a geomechanical multi-parametric study using 3D boundary element method (BEM), covering (i) fault geometries such as intersected faults or corrugated fault surfaces, (ii) the full range of Andersonian state of stress, (iii) fault friction, (iv) half space effect and (v), rock properties, is performed in order to understand the effect of each parameter on the angular misfit between geomechanical slip vectors and the resolved shear stresses. It is shown that significant angular misfits can be found under specific configurations and therefore we conclude that stress inversions based on the Wallace-Bott hypothesis might sometime give results that should be interpreted with care. Major observations are that (i) applying optimum tectonic stress conditions on complex fault geometries can increase the angular misfit, (ii) elastic material properties, combined to half-space effect, can enhance this effect, and (iii) an increase of the sliding friction leads to a

  2. Inverse magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arco, L; López-López, M T; Zubarev, A Y; Gdula, K; Durán, J D G

    2014-09-01

    We report a new kind of field-responsive fluid consisting of suspensions of diamagnetic (DM) and ferromagnetic (FM) microparticles in ferrofluids. We designate them as inverse magnetorheological (IMR) fluids for analogy with inverse ferrofluids (IFFs). Observations on the particle self-assembly in IMR fluids upon magnetic field application showed that DM and FM microparticles were assembled into alternating chains oriented along the field direction. We explain such assembly on the basis of the dipolar interaction energy between particles. We also present results on the rheological properties of IMR fluids and, for comparison, those of IFFs and bidispersed magnetorheological (MR) fluids. Interestingly, we found that upon magnetic field application, the rheological properties of IMR fluids were enhanced with respect to bidispersed MR fluids with the same FM particle concentration, by an amount greater than the sum of the isolated contribution of DM particles. Furthermore, the field-induced yield stress was moderately increased when up to 30% of the total FM particle content was replaced with DM particles. Beyond this point, the dependence of the yield stress on the DM content was non-monotonic, as expected for FM concentrations decreasing to zero. We explain these synergistic results by two separate phenomena: the formation of exclusion areas for FM particles due to the perturbation of the magnetic field by DM particles and the dipole-dipole interaction between DM and FM particles, which enhances the field-induced structures. Based on the second phenomenon, we present a theoretical model for the yield stress that semi-quantitatively predicts the experimental results. PMID:25022363

  3. Wavelet Sparse Approximate Inverse Preconditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tang, W.-P.; Wan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using sparse approximate inverses as preconditioners for Krylov subspace iterative methods. Recent studies of Grote and Huckle and Chow and Saad also show that sparse approximate inverse preconditioner can be effective for a variety of matrices, e.g. Harwell-Boeing collections. Nonetheless a drawback is that it requires rapid decay of the inverse entries so that sparse approximate inverse is possible. However, for the class of matrices that, come from elliptic PDE problems, this assumption may not necessarily hold. Our main idea is to look for a basis, other than the standard one, such that a sparse representation of the inverse is feasible. A crucial observation is that the kind of matrices we are interested in typically have a piecewise smooth inverse. We exploit this fact, by applying wavelet techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse in the wavelet basis. We shall justify theoretically and numerically that our approach is effective for matrices with smooth inverse. We emphasize that in this paper we have only presented the idea of wavelet approximate inverses and demonstrated its potential but have not yet developed a highly refined and efficient algorithm.

  4. Inverse problem for Bremsstrahlung radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, K.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1991-10-01

    For certain predominantly one-dimensional distribution functions, an analytic inversion has been found which yields the velocity distribution of superthermal electrons given their Bremsstrahlung radiation. 5 refs.

  5. Protein crystallization in a 100 nl solution with new stirring equipment

    PubMed Central

    Maki, S.; Murai, R.; Yoshikawa, H. Y.; Kitatani, T.; Nakata, S.; Kawahara, H.; Hasenaka, H.; Kobayashi, A.; Okada, S.; Sugiyama, S.; Adachi, H.; Matsumura, H.; Takano, K.; Murakami, S.; Inoue, T.; Sasaki, T.; Mori, Y.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate quantitatively the effects of stirring on protein crystallization, a new stirring system which can agitate a protein solution, ∼100 nl, by providing Hagen–Poiseuille flow has been successfully developed. In addition, this new stirring system provides flow with a well defined pattern and velocity. Using this system, hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized in 100–200 nl solutions while being stirred. The optimum stirring conditions for lysozyme crystals have been explored by evaluating the Reynolds (Re) number and the crystals obtained. Intermittent flow, as well as a low Re number, was found to contribute significantly to the growth of a smaller number of larger crystals. PMID:18421156

  6. The Effect of Premixed Al-Cu Powder on the Stir Zone in Friction Stir Welding of AA3003-H18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abnar, B.; Kazeminezhad, M.; Kokabi, A. H.

    2015-02-01

    In this research, 3-mm-thick AA3003-H18 non-heat-treatable aluminum alloy plates were joined by friction stir welding (FSW). It was performed by adding pure Cu and premixed Cu-Al powders at various rotational speeds of 800, 1000, and 1200 rpm and constant traveling speeds of 100 mm/min. At first, the powder was filled into the gap (0.2 or 0.4 mm) between two aluminum alloy plates, and then the FSW process was performed in two passes. The microstructure, mechanical properties, and formation of intermetallic compounds were investigated in both cases of using pure Cu and premixed Al-Cu powders. The results of using pure Cu and premixed Al-Cu powders were compared in the stir zone at various rotational speeds. The copper particle distribution and formation of Al-Cu intermetallic compounds (Al2Cu and AlCu) in the stir zone were desirable using premixed Al-Cu powder into the gap. The hardness values were significantly increased by formation of Al-Cu intermetallic compounds in the stir zone and it was uniform throughout the stir zone when premixed Al-Cu powder was used. Also, longitudinal tensile strength from the stir zone was higher when premixed Al-Cu powder was used instead of pure Cu powder.

  7. In-syringe magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and silylation prior gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for ultraviolet filters determination in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Clavijo, Sabrina; Avivar, Jessica; Suárez, Ruth; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-04-22

    A novel online approach involving in-syringe magnetic stirring assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and derivatization coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed for the determination of seven UV filters extensively used in cosmetic products in environmental water samples. The effect of parameters such as the type and volume of extraction solvent, dispersive solvent and derivatization agent, pH, ionic strength and stirring time, was studied using multivariate experimental design. Extraction, derivatization and preconcentration were simultaneously performed using acetone as dispersive solvent, N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) as derivatization agent and trichloroethylene as extraction solvent. After stirring during 160s, the sedimented phase was transferred to a rotary micro-volume injection valve (3 μL) and introduced by an air stream into the injector of the GC through a stainless-steel tube used as interface. The detection limits were in the range of 0.023-0.16 μg L(-1) and good linearity was observed up to 500 μg L(-1) of the studied UV filters, with R(2) ranging between 0.9829 and 0.9963. The inter-day precision expressed as relative standard deviation (n=5) varied between 5.5 and 16.8%. Finally, the developed method was satisfactorily applied to assess the occurrence of the studied UV filters in seawater and pool water samples. Some of the studied UV filters were found in these samples and an add-recovery test was also successfully performed with recoveries between 82 and 111%.

  8. In-syringe magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and silylation prior gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for ultraviolet filters determination in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Clavijo, Sabrina; Avivar, Jessica; Suárez, Ruth; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-04-22

    A novel online approach involving in-syringe magnetic stirring assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and derivatization coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed for the determination of seven UV filters extensively used in cosmetic products in environmental water samples. The effect of parameters such as the type and volume of extraction solvent, dispersive solvent and derivatization agent, pH, ionic strength and stirring time, was studied using multivariate experimental design. Extraction, derivatization and preconcentration were simultaneously performed using acetone as dispersive solvent, N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) as derivatization agent and trichloroethylene as extraction solvent. After stirring during 160s, the sedimented phase was transferred to a rotary micro-volume injection valve (3 μL) and introduced by an air stream into the injector of the GC through a stainless-steel tube used as interface. The detection limits were in the range of 0.023-0.16 μg L(-1) and good linearity was observed up to 500 μg L(-1) of the studied UV filters, with R(2) ranging between 0.9829 and 0.9963. The inter-day precision expressed as relative standard deviation (n=5) varied between 5.5 and 16.8%. Finally, the developed method was satisfactorily applied to assess the occurrence of the studied UV filters in seawater and pool water samples. Some of the studied UV filters were found in these samples and an add-recovery test was also successfully performed with recoveries between 82 and 111%. PMID:27016119

  9. Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A tool that would be useable in both conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding (FSW) has been proposed. The tool would embody both a prior tooling concept for self-reacting FSW and an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability developed previously as an augmentation for conventional FSW. Some definitions of terms are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed tool. In conventional FSW, depicted in Figure 1, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a rotating pin that protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. The main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional FSW is augmented with an APT capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or force-control system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding (SR-FSW), there are two rotating shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft, back into the FSW machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. A tool for SRFSW embodying this concept was reported in "Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding" (MFS-31914), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 53. In its outward appearance, the proposed tool (see Figure 2) would fit the above description of an SR

  10. Modular theory of inverse systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between multivariable zeros and inverse systems was explored. A definition of zero module is given in such a way that it is basis independent. The existence of essential right and left inverses were established. The way in which the abstract zero module captured previous definitions of multivariable zeros is explained and examples are presented.

  11. Inversion exercises inspired by mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    An elementary calculus transform, inspired by the centroid and gyration radius, is introduced as a prelude to the study of more advanced transforms. Analysis of the transform, including its inversion, makes use of several key concepts from basic calculus and exercises in the application and inversion of the transform provide practice in the use of technology in calculus.

  12. Inverse Problems of Thermoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Luste, O. J.; Kuz, R. V.; Strutinsky, M. N.

    2011-05-01

    Classical thermoelectricity is based on the use of the Seebeck and Thomson effects that occur in the near-contact areas between n- and p-type materials. A conceptually different approach to thermoelectric power converter design that is based on the law of thermoelectric induction of currents is also known. The efficiency of this approach has already been demonstrated by its first applications. More than 10 basically new types of thermoelements were discovered with properties that cannot be achieved by thermocouple power converters. Therefore, further development of this concept is of practical interest. This paper provides a classification and theory for solving the inverse problems of thermoelectricity that form the basis for devising new thermoelement types. Computer methods for their solution for anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are elaborated. Regularities related to thermoelectric current excitation in anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are established. The possibility of obtaining eddy currents of a particular configuration through control of the temperature field and material parameters for the creation of new thermo- element types is demonstrated for three-dimensional (3D) models of anisotropic and inhomogeneous media.

  13. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  14. Polarization of inverse plasmon scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windsor, R. A.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The scattering of electrostatic plasma waves by a flux of ultrarelativistic electrons passing through a plasma gives rise to a radiation spectrum which is similar to a synchrotron radiation spectrum. This mechanism, first considered by Gailitis and Tsytovich, is analagous to inverse Compton scattering, and we have named it inverse plasmon scattering. For a power-law electron flux, both inverse plasmon scattering and synchrotron radiation have the same spectral index. In an attempt to distinguish between these mechanisms, we have calculated the polarization level expected from inverse plasmon scattering. The polarization level found is similar to that obtained from a synchrotron radiation source. This means that the radiation produced by two mechanisms, synchrotron radiation and inverse plasmon scattering, is indistinguishable; and this attempt to differentiate between them by polarization effects has been unsuccessful.

  15. Determination of off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, in salmon fillets using stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ruan, E D; Aalhus, J L; Summerfelt, S T; Davidson, J; Swift, B; Juárez, M

    2013-12-20

    A sensitive and solvent-less method for the determination of musty and earthy off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GSM), in salmon tissue was developed using stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SBSE-TD-GCMS). MIB and GSM were solid phase extracted using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated stir bars, analyzed by gas chromatography, and detected in full scan mode of mass selective detector (MSD). Using this method, the calibration curves of MIB and GSM were linear in the range of 0.3-100ng/L, with a correlation coefficient above 0.999 and RSDs less than 4% (n=4). The limit of detection (LOD, S/N=3, n=6) and limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N=10, n=6) of MIB and GSM were both ∼0.3 and 1ng/L, respectively. The recoveries of MIB and GSM were 22% and 29% by spike in 30ng/L standard compounds, 23% and 30% by spike-in 100ng/L standard compounds in salmon tissue samples with good precision (<8% of RSDs, n=6), respectively. The recoveries of MIB and GSM were better than reported methodologies using SPME fibres (<10%) in fish tissue samples. This method was successfully applied to monitor and characterize depurated salmon fillet samples (0, 3, 6 and 10 days).

  16. Determination of synthetic phenolic antioxidants in soft drinks by stir-bar sorptive extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic phenolic antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) were pre-concentrated by stir-bar sorptive extraction and thermally desorbed (SBSE-TD) before analysis by GC-MS. Several parameters affecting the derivatisation step and both SBSE extraction and thermal desorption were carefully optimised. When the analyses of BHA and TBHQ in their acetylated, silylated and underivatised forms were compared, the best results were obtained when the in-situ derivatisation procedure with acetic anhydride was employed. Quantification was carried out using carvacrol as the internal standard, providing quantification limits of between 0.11 and 0.15 ng ml(-1), depending on the compound. Recovery assays for samples spiked at two concentration levels, 1 and 5 ng ml(-1), provided recoveries in the 81-117% range. The proposed method was applied in the analysis canned soft drinks and the analytes were found in five of the 10 samples analysed.

  17. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  18. Interfacial Reaction during Friction Stir Welding of Al and Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevois, C.; Girard, M.; Huneau, B.; Sauvage, X.; Racineux, G.

    2011-08-01

    Commercially pure copper was joined to a 1050 aluminum alloy by friction stir welding. A specific configuration where the tool pin was fully located in the aluminum plate was chosen. In such a situation, there is no mechanical mixing between the two materials, but frictional heating gives rise to a significant thermally activated interdiffusion at the copper/aluminum interface. This gives rise to the formation of defect-free joints where the bonding is achieved by a very thin intermetallic layer at the Cu/Al interface. Nanoscaled grains within this bonding layer were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two phases were identified, namely, Al2Cu and Al4Cu9 phases. The nucleation and growth of these two phases are discussed and compared to the standard reactive interdiffusion reactions between Cu and Al.

  19. Metal cutting analogy for establishing Friction Stir Welding process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Sylvester Allen

    A friction stir weld (FSW) is a solid state joining operation whose processing parameters are currently determined by lengthy trial and error methods. To implement FSWing rapidly in various applications will require an approach for predicting process parameters based on the physics of the process. Based on hot working conditions for metals, a kinematic model has been proposed for calculating the shear strain and shear strain rates during the FSW process, validation of the proposed model with direct measuring is difficult however. Since the shear strain and shear strain rates predicted for the FSW process, are similar to those predicted in metal cutting, validation of the FSW algorithms with microstructural studies of metal chips may be possible leading to the ability to predict FSW processing parameters.

  20. A cubic autocatalytic reaction in a continuous stirred tank reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yakubu, Aisha Aliyu; Yatim, Yazariah Mohd

    2015-10-22

    In the present study, the dynamics of the cubic autocatalytic reaction model in a continuous stirred tank reactor with linear autocatalyst decay is studied. This model describes the behavior of two chemicals (reactant and autocatalyst) flowing into the tank reactor. The behavior of the model is studied analytically and numerically. The steady state solutions are obtained for two cases, i.e. with the presence of an autocatalyst and its absence in the inflow. In the case with an autocatalyst, the model has a stable steady state. While in the case without an autocatalyst, the model exhibits three steady states, where one of the steady state is stable, the second is a saddle point while the last is spiral node. The last steady state losses stability through Hopf bifurcation and the location is determined. The physical interpretations of the results are also presented.

  1. Tidal stirring and phytoplankton bloom dynamics in an estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    In South San Francisco Bay, estuarine phytoplankton biomass fluctuates at the time scale of days to weeks; much of this variability is associated with fluctuations in tidal energy. During the spring seasons of every year from 1980-1990, episodic blooms occurred in which phytoplankton biomass rose from a baseline of 2-4mg chlorophyll a m-3, peaked at 20-40 chlorophyll a m-3, then returned to baseline values, all within several weeks. Each episode of biomass increase occurred during neap tides, and each bloom decline coincided with spring tides. This suggests that daily variations in the rate of vertical mixing by tidal stirring might control phytoplankton bloom dynamics in some estuaries. Simulation experiments with a numerical model of phytoplankton population dynamics support this hypothesis. -from Author

  2. Prolegomena to the Study of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The literature contains many approaches toward modeling of the friction stir welding (FSW) process with varying treatments of the weld metal properties. It is worthwhile to consider certain fundamental features of the process before attempting to interpret FSW phenomena: Because of the unique character of metal deformation (as opposed to, say, viscous deformation) a velocity "discontinuity" or shear surface occurs in FSW and determines much of the character of the welding mechanism. A shear surface may not always produce a sound bond. Balancing mechanical power input against conduction and convection heat losses yields a relation, a "temperature index", between spindle speed and travel speed to maintain constant weld temperature. But many process features are only weakly dependent upon temperature. Thus, unlike modeling of metal forming processes, it may be that modeling the FSW process independently of the material conditions has some merit.

  3. Lateral position detection and control for friction stir systems

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Paul; Lammlein, David H.; Cook, George E.; Wilkes, Don Mitchell; Strauss, Alvin M.; Delapp, David R.; Hartman, Daniel A.

    2011-11-08

    Friction stir methods are disclosed for processing at least one workpiece using a rotary tool with rotating member for contacting and processing the workpiece. The methods include oscillating the rotary tool laterally with respect to a selected propagation path for the rotating member with respect to the workpiece to define an oscillation path for the rotating member. The methods further include obtaining force signals or parameters related to the force experienced by the rotary tool at least while the rotating member is disposed at the extremes of the oscillation. The force signals or parameters associated with the extremes can then be analyzed to determine a lateral position of the selected path with respect to a target path and a lateral offset value can be determined based on the lateral position. The lateral distance between the selected path and the target path can be decreased based on the lateral offset value.

  4. Pin Tool Geometry Effects in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querin, J. A.; Rubisoff, H. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW) there is significant evidence that material can take one of two different flow paths when being displaced from its original position in front of the pin tool to its final position in the wake of the weld. The geometry of the pin tool, along with the process parameters, plays an important role in dictating the path that the material takes. Each flow path will impart a different thermomechanical history on the material, consequently altering the material microstructure and subsequent weld properties. The intention of this research is to isolate the effect that different pin tool attributes have on the flow paths imparted on the FSWed material. Based on published weld tool geometries, a variety of weld tools were fabricated and used to join AA2219. Results from the tensile properties and microstructural characterization will be presented.

  5. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW onmore » grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.« less

  6. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  7. FRICTION-STIR-LAP-WELDS OF AA6111 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, Manasij; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2007-01-09

    Lap joints of 1 mm thick AA6111 aluminum sheets were made by friction stir welding, using robotic and conventional machines. Welds were made for advancing as well as retreating side loading. Thinning in welds was quantified. Lap shear test of welds was conducted in as-welded and paint-baked conditions. Conventional machine welds showed less thinning and better strength than robotic machine welds. Process forces in conventional machine welding were higher. Paint bake treatment improved the weld strength; but the improvement varied with process parameters. Advancing side loaded welds achieved higher strength than the retreating side loaded welds. Fracture location was found to occur on the loaded side of the weld and along the thinning defect.

  8. Incorporation of a two metre long PET scanner in STIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumpas, C.; Brain, C.; Dyke, T.; Gold, D.

    2015-09-01

    The Explorer project aims to investigate the potential benefits of a total-body 2 metre long PET scanner. The following investigation incorporates this scanner in STIR library and demonstrates the capabilities and weaknesses of existing reconstruction (FBP and OSEM) and single scatter simulation algorithms. It was found that sensible images are reconstructed but at the expense of high memory and processing time demands. FBP requires 4 hours on a core; OSEM: 2 hours per iteration if ran in parallel on 15-cores of a high performance computer. The single scatter simulation algorithm shows that on a short scale, up to a fifth of the scanner length, the assumption that the scatter between direct rings is similar to the scatter between the oblique rings is approximately valid. However, for more extreme cases this assumption is not longer valid, which illustrates that consideration of the oblique rings within the single scatter simulation will be necessary, if this scatter correction is the method of choice.

  9. Grain size reduction by electromagnetic stirring inside gold alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, R.; Mangelinck-Noël, N.; Hamburger, J.; Garnier, C.; Ramoni, P.

    2005-06-01

    The final properties of cast materials depend greatly on the solidification process undergone by the material. In this paper, we study gold alloys dedicated to the watch industry and jewellery in the framework of a research collaboration with the Metalor Company. The aim is to improve the concentration homogeneity of the ingots by controlling the solidification step. It can be achieved by reducing segregations by a decrease in the grain size. For this purpose, we set up a multiphase electromagnetic stirring of the melt to favour the growth of finer grains and improve the homogeneity of the composition. We first design an electromagnetic stirrer by numerical simulation. The stirrer is then implemented on a model experiment. Eventually, the alloys are characterised by metallography and etching to evidence the grain structure. As expected, we obtain a substantial reduction of the grain size although, some work remains to be done to attain the final goal of even finer grains.

  10. Auto-adjustable pin tool for friction stir welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor); Oelgoetz, Peter A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An auto-adjusting pin tool for friction stir welding is presented wherein the pin tool automatically adjusts for welding materials of varying thicknesses, and the pin can be incrementally withdrawn from the workpieces thus eliminating any crater or keyhole in the weld. The inventive apparatus is comprised of a welding head housing a motor connected to a controller instrument package and an arbor supported by bearings. The arbor forms an interior cylinder and is encircled by a stationary slip ring though which are ported hydraulic passageways into the interior cylinder of the arbor such that a piston housed therein may be moved axially. Coupled to the piston is a pin tool which is treaded on its lower end and which is moveably seated in, and extending through, a shoulder housing having concave lower face. When welding, the rotating treaded end of the pin enters and stirs the workpieces while the lower face of the shoulder housing compacts the workpieces. As the welding head traverses the shoulder housing the controller senses any rising pressure on the lower face of the shoulder housing and withdraws the arbor to keep the pressure constant. At the same time, the piston moves towards the workpieces thus extending the pin further from the shoulder. This keeps the pin at a proper depth in the workpieces regardless of their thicknesses. As the weld terminates this same operation can be used to incrementally withdraw the pin during the final part of the traverse, thus eliminating any keyhole or crater that would otherwise be created.

  11. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  12. Ethylene oxidation in a well-stirred reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.M.; Malte, P.C.

    1994-10-01

    The detailed ethylene oxidation data set of Thornton, obtained for a well-stirred reactor operated fuel-lean at atmospheric pressure and for temperatures of 1003K to 1253K, is used as a basis for the comparison of chemical kinetic mechanisms reported in the literature and for the development of a new ethylene oxidation mechanism. The mechanisms examined are those of Westbrook and Pitz and Dagaut et al. These mechanisms indicated that unusually large rates for the vinyl decomposition reaction are required to obtain agreement with the Thornton data set. A new ethylene oxidation mechanism is developed in order to overcome some of the drawbacks of the previous mechanisms. The new mechanism closely simulates the overall rate of loss of ethylene, and the concentation of CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} measured for the stirred reactor. Predictions by this mechanism are dependent on a new high temperature vinyl oxidation route, C{sub 2}H{sub 3} + O{sub 2} = CH{sub 2}CHO + O with a k{sub C2H3+O2=CH2CHO+O}/k{sub C2H3+O2=CH2O+HCO} branching ratio of 1.20 at 1053K to 2.05 at 1253K. The branching ratio values were dependent upon the extent of fall-off for the C{sub 2}H{sub 3} + O{sub 2} = CH{sub 2}O + HCO reaction.

  13. EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS OF TIDALLY STIRRED DISKY DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2011-09-20

    Using collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the tidal evolution of late-type, rotationally supported dwarfs inside Milky Way sized host galaxies. Our study focuses on a wide variety of dwarf orbital configurations and initial structures. During the evolution, the disky dwarfs undergo strong mass loss, the stellar disks are transformed into spheroids, and rotation is replaced by random motions of the stars. Thus, the late-type progenitors are transformed into early-type dwarfs as envisioned by the tidal stirring model for the formation of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies in the Local Group. We determine the photometric properties of the dwarfs, including the total visual magnitude, the half-light radius, and the central surface brightness as they would be measured by an observer near the galactic center. Special emphasis is also placed on studying their kinematics and shapes. We demonstrate that the measured values are biased by a number of observational effects including the increasing angle of the observation cone near the orbital pericenter, the fact that away from the pericenter the tidal tails are typically oriented along the line of sight, and the fact that for most of the evolution the stellar components of the dwarfs are triaxial ellipsoids whose major axis tumbles with respect to the line of sight. Finally, we compare the measured properties of the simulated dwarfs to those of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. The evolutionary tracks of the dwarfs in different parameter planes and the correlations between their different properties, especially the total magnitude and the surface brightness, strongly suggest that present-day dSph galaxies may have indeed formed from late-type progenitors as proposed by the tidal stirring scenario.

  14. Effects of cutting intensity and stirring speed on syneresis and curd losses during cheese manufacture.

    PubMed

    Everard, C D; O'Callaghan, D J; Mateo, M J; O'Donnell, C P; Castillo, M; Payne, F A

    2008-07-01

    Recombined whole milk was renneted under constant conditions of pH, temperature, and added calcium, and the gel was cut at a constant firmness. The effects of cutting and stirring on syneresis and curd losses to whey were investigated during cheese making using a factorial design with 3 cutting modes designed to provide 3 different cutting intensity levels (i.e., total cutting revolutions), 3 levels of stirring speed, and 3 replications. These cutting intensities and stirring speeds were selected to give a wide range of curd grain sizes and curd shattering, respectively. Both factors affected curd losses, and correct selection of these factors is important in the cheesemaking industry. Decreased cutting intensity and increased stirring speed significantly increased the losses of fines and fat from the curd to the whey. Cutting intensities and stirring speeds in this study did not show significant effects on curd moisture content over the course of syneresis. Levels of total solids, fines, and fat in whey were shown to change significantly during syneresis. It is believed that larger curd particles resulting from low cutting intensities coupled with faster stirring speeds resulted in a higher degree of curd shattering during stirring, which caused significant curd losses.

  15. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Yu, Xinghua; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductilemore » fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.« less

  16. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Yu, Xinghua; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductile fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.

  17. Earthquake source inversion of tsunami runup prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekar, Anusha

    Our goal is to study two inverse problems: using seismic data to invert for earthquake parameters and using tide gauge data to invert for earthquake parameters. We focus on the feasibility of using a combination of these inverse problems to improve tsunami runup prediction. A considerable part of the thesis is devoted to studying the seismic forward operator and its modeling using immersed interface methods. We develop an immersed interface method for solving the variable coefficient advection equation in one dimension with a propagating singularity and prove a convergence result for this method. We also prove a convergence result for the one-dimensional acoustic system of partial differential equations solved using immersed interface methods with internal boundary conditions. Such systems form the building blocks of the numerical model for the earthquake. For a simple earthquake-tsunami model, we observe a variety of possibilities in the recovery of the earthquake parameters and tsunami runup prediction. In some cases the data are insufficient either to invert for the earthquake parameters or to predict the runup. When more data are added, we are able to resolve the earthquake parameters with enough accuracy to predict the runup. We expect that this variety will be true in a real world three dimensional geometry as well.

  18. Time-Lapse Joint Inversion of Cross-Well DC Resistivity and Seismic Data: A Numerical Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time-lapse joint inversion of geophysical data is required to image the evolution of oil reservoirs during production and enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration, geothermal fields during production, and to monitor the evolution of contaminant plumes. Joint inversion schemes red...

  19. Stylolite stress inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Daniel; Toussaint, Renaud; Ebner, Marcus; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul; Rood, Daisy

    2014-05-01

    Stylolites are localized dissolution seams that can be found in a variety of rocks, and can form due to sediment compaction or tectonic forces. Dissolution of the host-rock next to the stylolite is a function of the applied stress on the stylolite plane. Stylolite teeth indicate the direction of the main compressive stress. Recent advances have shown that the stylolite roughness also shows a stress scaling relation that can be used to calculate magnitudes of stress. Elastic and surface energies produce a different roughness, and the transition between the two is stress dependent and can be quantified. In order to measure the roughness a two or three-dimensional section of a stylolite plane is taken and transferred to a one-dimensional function. The cross-over in the roughness is then picked with the help of an FFT plot. Using this method the burial depth of sedimentary stylolites can be determined. Moreover, tectonic stylolites can be used to determine the full three-dimensional stress tensor if the paleodepth of the tectonic stylolite is known. Stylolites can also be used to find fault offsets and to understand when these faults were active and how the paleotopography looked like at the time the stylolites grew. However, uncertainties remain since Youngs Modulus, Poisson Ratio and surface energy may vary in rocks. In addition, the stylolites record only a snapshot in time, probably the moment when they closed and stopped dissolving. We show examples of the use of stress inversion for stylolite formation conditions in different tectonic settings, and discuss the potential of the method.

  20. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. B.; Marshall, T. C.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM01 fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5πmm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM01 mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line.

  1. Reading Recovery. [Fact Sheets].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Recovery Council of North America, Columbus, OH.

    This set of 10 fact sheets (each 2 to 4 pages long) addresses aspects of Reading Recovery, a program that helps children to be proficient readers and writers by the end of the first grade. It discusses the basic facts of Reading Recovery; Reading Recovery for Spanish literacy; Reading Recovery lessons; Reading Recovery professional development;…

  2. Temperature inversion in China seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jiajia; Chen, Yongli; Wang, Fan

    2010-12-01

    Temperature inversion was reported as a common phenomenon in the areas near the southeastern Chinese coast (region A), west and south of the Korean Peninsula (region B), and north and east of the Shandong Peninsula (region C) during October-May in the present study, based on hydrographic data archived from 1930 through 2001 (319,029 profiles). The inversion was found to be remarkable with obvious temporal and spatial variabilities in both magnitude and coverage, with higher probabilities in region A (up to about 60%) and region C (40%-50%) than in region B (15%-20%). The analysis shows that seasonal variation of the net air-sea heat flux is closely related to the occurrence time of the inversion in the three areas, while the Yangtze and Yellow river freshwater plumes in the surface layer and ocean origin saline water in the subsurface layer maintain stable stratification. It seems that the evaporation/excessive precipitation flux makes little contribution to maintaining the stable inversion. Advection of surface fresh water by the wind-driven coastal currents results in the expansion of inversion in regions A and C. The inversion lasts for the longest period in region A (October-May) sustained by the Taiwan Warm Current carrying the subsurface saline water, while evolution of the inversion in region B is mainly controlled by the Yellow Sea Warm Current.

  3. Stability of Y–Ti–O precipitates in friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xinghua; Mazumder, B.; Miller, M. K.; David, S. A.; Feng, Z.

    2015-01-19

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys, which have complex microstructures which consist of ultrafine ferritic grains with a dispersion of stable oxide particles and nanoclusters, are promising materials for fuel cladding and structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactor. This paper evaluates microstructure of friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography techniques. Atom probe tomography results revealed that nanoclusters are coarsened and inhomogeneously distributed in the stir zone and thermomechanically affected zone. Three hypotheses on coarsening of nanoclusters are presented. Finally, the hardness difference in different regions of friction stir weld has been explained.

  4. Effect of cooling rate on microstructure of friction-stir welded AA1100 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, D.; Mironov, S.; Sato, Y. S.; Kokawa, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the microstructural changes occurring during cooling of friction-stir welded aluminum alloy AA1100 were evaluated. To this end, friction-stir welding (FSW) was performed in a wide range of cooling rates of 20-62 K/s and the evolved microstructures were studied by using electron backscatter diffraction. Below 0.6 Tm (Tm being the melting point), the stir zone material was found to experience no significant changes during cooling. At higher FSW temperatures, however, notable changes occurred in the welded material, including grain growth, sharpening of texture, reduction of the fraction of high-angle boundaries and material softening.

  5. Protein crystal growth with a two-liquid system and stirring solution.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2004-01-01

    We developed two novel methods for growing large, high-quality protein crystals. A two-liquid system enables the convenient extraction of protein crystals without causing mechanical damage due to growth at the interface between two liquids. Since this system does not require limitations on solution volume, it is also suitable for the seed technique, and for growing large crystals. Another new concept is the mild stirring of the solution using the Floating And Stirring Technique (FAST) and the Micro-stirring technique. When compared to conventional techniques, both techniques result in a reduced number of crystals, as well as the growth of large crystals.

  6. Ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding on V95AT1 (7075) aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. Ye.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Ivanov, A. N.; Fortuna, S. V.; Eliseev, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic-assisted friction stir butt welding on aluminum alloy V95AT1 (7075) has been carried out. Samples have been characterized using metallography, microhardness and XRD. As shown, ultrasonic treatment during welding provides extra plasticizing of metal and better stirring efficiency. The latter serves for elimination of defects, such as root flaw and grain refining in the stir zone. The stress state in the welded joint is characterized by tensile stress in the direction of the weld seam centerline and compression in the transversal direction. The ultrasonic treatment was shown to increase the compression stress and relieve the tensile one.

  7. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  8. Givental Graphs and Inversion Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunin-Barkowski, Petr; Shadrin, Sergey; Spitz, Loek

    2013-05-01

    Inversion symmetry is a very non-trivial discrete symmetry of Frobenius manifolds. It was obtained by Dubrovin from one of the elementary Schlesinger transformations of a special ODE associated to a Frobenius manifold. In this paper, we review the Givental group action on Frobenius manifolds in terms of Feynman graphs and obtain an interpretation of the inversion symmetry in terms of the action of the Givental group. We also consider the implication of this interpretation of the inversion symmetry for the Schlesinger transformations and for the Hamiltonians of the associated principle hierarchy.

  9. Source Inversion Validation: Quantifying Uncertainties in Earthquake Source Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, P. M.; Page, M. T.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake source inversions image the spatio-temporal rupture evolution on one or more fault planes using seismic and/or geodetic data. Source inversion methods thus represent an important research tool in seismology to unravel the complexity of earthquake ruptures. Subsequently, source-inversion results are used to study earthquake mechanics, to develop spontaneous dynamic rupture models, to build models for generating rupture realizations for ground-motion simulations, and to perform Coulomb-stress modeling. In all these applications, the underlying finite-source rupture models are treated as “data” (input information), but the uncertainties in these data (i.e. source models obtained from solving an inherently ill-posed inverse problem) are hardly known, and almost always neglected. The Source Inversion Validation (SIV) project attempts to better understand the intra-event variability of earthquake rupture models. We plan to build a long-standing and rigorous testing platform to examine the current state-of-the-art in earthquake source inversion that also facilitates to develop robust approaches to quantify rupture-model uncertainties. Our contribution reviews the current status of the SIV project, recent forward-modeling tests for point and extended sources in layered media, and discusses the strategy of the SIV-project for the coming years.

  10. [Application of Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction and Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer to the Phthalic Acid Esters Analysis in Seawater].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen-chen; Li, Feng-min; Lu, Lun; Sun, Yue

    2015-10-01

    For the determination of trace amounts of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in complex seawater matrix, a stir bar sorptive extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SBSE-GC-MS) method was established. Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), dibutyl phthalate (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) were selected as study objects. The effects of extraction time, amount of methanol, amount of sodium chloride, desorption time and desorption solvent were optimized. The method of SBSE-GC-MS was validated through recoveries and relative standard deviation. The optimal extraction time was 2 h. The optimal methanol content was 10%. The optimal sodium chloride content was 5% . The optimal desorption time was 50 min. The optimal desorption solvent was the mixture of methanol to acetonitrile (4:1, volume: volume). The linear relationship between the peak area and the concentration of PAEs was relevant. The correlation coefficients were greater than 0.997. The detection limits were between 0.25 and 174.42 ng x L(-1). The recoveries of different concentrations were between 56.97% and 124.22% . The relative standard deviations were between 0.41% and 14.39%. On the basis of the method, several estuaries water sample of Jiaozhou Bay were detected. DEP was detected in all samples, and the concentration of BBP, DEHP and DOP were much higher than the rest. PMID:26841630

  11. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Aug 24,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  12. Uterine Inversion; A case report.

    PubMed

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, Ma

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  13. Uterine Inversion; A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, MA

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  14. Testing earthquake source inversion methodologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, M.; Mai, P.M.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Source Inversion Validation Workshop; Palm Springs, California, 11-12 September 2010; Nowadays earthquake source inversions are routinely performed after large earthquakes and represent a key connection between recorded seismic and geodetic data and the complex rupture process at depth. The resulting earthquake source models quantify the spatiotemporal evolution of ruptures. They are also used to provide a rapid assessment of the severity of an earthquake and to estimate losses. However, because of uncertainties in the data, assumed fault geometry and velocity structure, and chosen rupture parameterization, it is not clear which features of these source models are robust. Improved understanding of the uncertainty and reliability of earthquake source inversions will allow the scientific community to use the robust features of kinematic inversions to more thoroughly investigate the complexity of the rupture process and to better constrain other earthquakerelated computations, such as ground motion simulations and static stress change calculations.

  15. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-21

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  16. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  17. Temperature Inversions Have Cold Bottoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.; Brown, Gail M.

    1982-01-01

    Uses discussion and illustrations of several demonstrations on air temperature differences and atmospheric stability to explain the phenomena of temperature inversions. Relates this to the smog in Los Angeles and discusses the implications. (DC)

  18. Donor states in inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  19. Moebius inversion formula and inverting lattice sums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millane, Rick P.

    2000-11-01

    The Mobius inversion formula is an interesting theorem from number theory that has application to a number inverse problems, particularly lattice problems. Specific inverse problems, however, often require related Mobius inversion formulae that can be derived from the fundamental formula. Derivation of such formulae is not easy for the non- specialist, however. Examples of the kinds of inversion formulae that can be derived and their application to inverse lattice problems are described.

  20. A boundary integral method for an inverse problem in thermal imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    An inverse problem in thermal imaging involving the recovery of a void in a material from its surface temperature response to external heating is examined. Uniqueness and continuous dependence results for the inverse problem are demonstrated, and a numerical method for its solution is developed. This method is based on an optimization approach, coupled with a boundary integral equation formulation of the forward heat conduction problem. Some convergence results for the method are proved, and several examples are presented using computationally generated data.

  1. Localized recovery of complex networks against failure

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yilun

    2016-01-01

    Resilience of complex networks to failure has been an important issue in network research for decades, and recent studies have begun to focus on the inverse recovery of network functionality through strategically healing missing nodes or edges. However, the effect of network recovery is far from fully understood, and a general theory is still missing. Here we propose and study a general model of localized recovery, where a group of neighboring nodes are restored in an invasive way from a seed node. We develop a theoretical framework to compare the effect of random recovery (RR) and localized recovery (LR) in complex networks including Erdős-Rényi networks, random regular networks, and scale-free networks. We find detailed phase diagrams for the subnetwork of occupied nodes and the “complement network” of failed nodes under RR and LR. By identifying the two competitive forces behind LR, we present an analytical and numerical approach to guide us in choosing the appropriate recovery strategy and provide estimation on its effect by using the degree distribution of the original network as the only input. Our work therefore provides insight for quantitatively understanding recovery process and its implications in infrastructure protection in various complex systems. PMID:27456202

  2. Localized recovery of complex networks against failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yilun

    2016-07-01

    Resilience of complex networks to failure has been an important issue in network research for decades, and recent studies have begun to focus on the inverse recovery of network functionality through strategically healing missing nodes or edges. However, the effect of network recovery is far from fully understood, and a general theory is still missing. Here we propose and study a general model of localized recovery, where a group of neighboring nodes are restored in an invasive way from a seed node. We develop a theoretical framework to compare the effect of random recovery (RR) and localized recovery (LR) in complex networks including Erdős-Rényi networks, random regular networks, and scale-free networks. We find detailed phase diagrams for the subnetwork of occupied nodes and the “complement network” of failed nodes under RR and LR. By identifying the two competitive forces behind LR, we present an analytical and numerical approach to guide us in choosing the appropriate recovery strategy and provide estimation on its effect by using the degree distribution of the original network as the only input. Our work therefore provides insight for quantitatively understanding recovery process and its implications in infrastructure protection in various complex systems.

  3. Localized recovery of complex networks against failure.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yilun

    2016-01-01

    Resilience of complex networks to failure has been an important issue in network research for decades, and recent studies have begun to focus on the inverse recovery of network functionality through strategically healing missing nodes or edges. However, the effect of network recovery is far from fully understood, and a general theory is still missing. Here we propose and study a general model of localized recovery, where a group of neighboring nodes are restored in an invasive way from a seed node. We develop a theoretical framework to compare the effect of random recovery (RR) and localized recovery (LR) in complex networks including Erdős-Rényi networks, random regular networks, and scale-free networks. We find detailed phase diagrams for the subnetwork of occupied nodes and the "complement network" of failed nodes under RR and LR. By identifying the two competitive forces behind LR, we present an analytical and numerical approach to guide us in choosing the appropriate recovery strategy and provide estimation on its effect by using the degree distribution of the original network as the only input. Our work therefore provides insight for quantitatively understanding recovery process and its implications in infrastructure protection in various complex systems. PMID:27456202

  4. Counterrotating-Shoulder Mechanism for Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A counterrotating-shoulder mechanism has been proposed as an alternative to the mechanism and fixtures used in conventional friction stir welding. The mechanism would internally react most or all of the forces and torques exerted on the workpiece, making it unnecessary to react the forces and torques through massive external fixtures. In conventional friction stir welding, a rotating pin tool is inserted into, and moved along, a weld seam. As the pin tool moves, it stirs together material from the opposite sides of the seam to form the weld. A large axial plunge force must be exerted upon the workpiece through and by the pin tool and a shoulder attached above the pin tool in order to maintain the pressure necessary for the process. The workpiece is secured on top of an anvil, which supports the workpiece against the axial plunge force and against the torque exerted by the pin tool and shoulder. The anvil and associated fixtures must be made heavy (and, therefore, are expensive) to keep the workpiece stationary. In addition, workpiece geometries must be limited to those that can be accommodated by the fixtures. The predecessor of the proposed counterrotating-shoulder mechanism is a second-generation, self-reacting tool, resembling a bobbin, that makes it possible to dispense with the heavy anvil. This tool consists essentially of a rotating pin tool with opposing shoulders. Although the opposing shoulders maintain the necessary pressure without need to externally apply or react a large plunge force, the torque exerted on the workpiece remains unreacted in the absence of a substantial external fixture. Depending on the RPM and the thickness of the workpiece, the torque can be large. The proposed mechanism (see figure) would include a spindle attached to a pin tool with a lower shoulder. The spindle would be coupled via splines to the upper one of three bevel gears in a differential drive. The middle bevel gear would be the power-input gear and would be coupled to the

  5. Investigation of the L-Glutamic acid polymorphism: Comparison between stirred and stagnant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahri, Yousra; Gagnière, Emilie; Chabanon, Elodie; Bounahmidi, Tijani; Mangin, Denis

    2016-02-01

    This work highlights the effect of the stirring, the temperature and the supersaturation on the cooling crystallization of L-Glutamic acid (LGlu) polymorphs. First, solubility measurements of the metastable polymorph α and the stable polymorph β were performed. Then, crystallization experiments were carried out in stirred vessel and in stagnant cell. All these experiments were monitored by in situ devices. The effect of the temperature on the LGlu polymorphs was found to be more relevant than the supersaturation in the stirred crystallizer. In the stagnant cell, only the stable form β crystallized regardless of the operating conditions. Moreover, an unexpected and new habit of the β form was discovered and confirmed. These results suggest that the temperature and the stirring can strongly affect the nucleation and the growth kinetics of polymorphic forms.

  6. Low-Temperature Friction-Stir Welding of 2024 Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, S.; Li, Y.; Murr, L. E.; Brown, D.; McClure, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Solid state friction-stir welding (FSW) has been demonstrated to involve dynamic recrystallization producing ultra-fine, equiaxed grain structures to facilitate superplastic deformation as the welding or joining mechanism. However, the average residual, equiaxed, grain size in the weld zone has ranged from roughly 0.5 micron to slightly more than 10 micron, and the larger weld zone grain sizes have been characterized as residual or static grain growth as a consequence of the temperatures in the weld zone (where center-line temperatures in the FSW of 6061 Al have been shown to be as high as 480C or -0.8 T(sub M) where T(sub M) is the absolute melting temperature)). In addition, the average residual weld zone grain size has been observed to increase near the top of the weld, and to decrease with distance on either side of the weld-zone centerline, an d this corresponds roughly to temperature variations within the weld zone. The residual grain size also generally decreases with decreasing FSW tool rotation speed. These observations are consistent with the general rules for recrystallization where the recrystallized grain size decreases with increasing strain (or deformation) at constant strain rate, or with increasing strain-rate, or with increasing strain rate at constant strain; especially at lower ambient temperatures, (or annealing temperatures). Since the recrystallization temperature also decreases with increasing strain rate, the FSW process is somewhat complicated because the ambient temperature, the frictional heating fraction, and the adiabatic heating fraction )proportional to the product of strain and strain-rate) will all influence both the recrystallization and growth within the FSW zone. Significantly reducing the ambient temperature of the base metal or work pieces to be welded would be expected to reduce the residual weld-zone grain size. The practical consequences of this temperature reduction would be the achievement of low temperature welding. This

  7. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion.

    PubMed

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion. PMID:27209370

  8. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion.

  9. Finite-temperature effects in stirred ring Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, N.; Lanier, C.; Edwards, M.; Wang, Y.-H.; Clark, C. W.

    2014-05-01

    A ring Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with zero circulation (m = 0) stirred by a barrier will eventually jump to an m = 1 state when stirred faster than a certain critical speed, Ωc+. A ring BEC with m = 1 will drop to m = 0 when stirred at a critical speed, Ωc-, which is lower than Ωc+. The loop areas, Ωc+ -Ωc- , of this hysteretic response of the BEC to stirring predicted by zero-temperature Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) disagreed significantly with the results of a recent experiment. In the work reported here, we simulated this experiment with the phenomenologically damped GPE, [S. Choi, S. A. Morgan, and K. Burnett, Phys. Rev. A 57, 4057 (1999)], and with the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin (ZNG) theory. The ZNG theory can account for finite-T, non-equilibrium dynamics. We compare the results of these simulations with the experimental data. The simulations show that a vortex/antivortex pair forms in the barrier region during the stirring and that this drives the hysteresis. We also show how the presence of an interacting, thermal cloud affects the dynamics of these pairs. We also simulate a ring condensate stirred by two barriers and find that the GPE matches the data much more closely. Supported in part by NSF grant #1068761 and ARO Atomtronics MURI.

  10. Friction stir welding of F82H steel for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Kimura, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was employed to join F82H steels and develop a potential joining technique for a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. The microstructures and mechanical properties on the joint region were investigated to evaluate the applicability of friction stir welding. F82H steel sheets were successfully butt-joined with various welding parameters. In welding conditions, 100 rpm and 100 mm/min, the stirred zone represented a comparable hardness distribution with a base metal. Stirred zone induced by 100 rpm reserved uniformly distributed precipitates and very fine ferritic grains, whereas the base metal showed a typical tempered martensite with precipitates on the prior austenite grain boundary and lath boundary. Although the tensile strength was decreased at 550 °C, the stirred zone treated at 100 rpm showed comparable tensile behavior with base metal up to 500 °C. Therefore, friction stir welding is considered a potential welding method to preserve the precipitates of F82H steel.

  11. Evaluation of plating conditions for the recovery of ²¹⁰Po on a Ag planchet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Mi; Hong, Gi Hoon; Baskaran, Mark; Kim, Suk Hyun; Kim, Young Ill

    2014-08-01

    The polonium-210 in the sea and its radiological consequences have been widely studied. Current processes for (210)Po recovery from seawater vary significantly. We compared selected processes to determine optimal conditions for recovery in modestly equipped laboratories. Plating (210)Po onto a Ag planchet with constant stirring for 15 h at room temperature after preconcentration from seawater samples with Mn was preferred, achieving more than 96% recovery with 3% or less precision. Possible contaminants were masked only by ascorbic acid treatment. PMID:24751351

  12. Stirred batch crystallization of a therapeutic antibody fragment.

    PubMed

    Hebel, Dirk; Huber, Sabine; Stanislawski, Bernd; Hekmat, Dariusch

    2013-07-20

    Technical-scale crystallization of therapeutic proteins may not only allow for a significant cost-reduction in downstream processing, but also enable new applications, e.g., the use of crystal suspensions for subcutaneous drug delivery. In this work, the crystallization of the antigen-binding fragment FabC225 was studied. First, vapor diffusion crystallization conditions from the literature were transferred to 10μL-scale microbatch experiments. A phase diagram was developed in order to identify the crystallization window. The conditions obtained from the microbatch experiments were subsequently transferred to parallelized 5mL-scale stirred-tank crystallizers. This scalable and reproducible agitated crystallization system allowed for an optimization of the crystallization process based on quantitative measurements. The optimized crystallization process resulted in an excellent yield of 99% in less than 2h by increasing the concentration of the crystallization agent ammonium sulfate during the process. The successful scalability of the Fab fragment crystallization process to 100mL-scale crystallizers based on geometric similarity was demonstrated. A favorable crystal size distribution was obtained. Furthermore, a wash step was introduced in order to remove unfavorable low-molecular substances from the crystals.

  13. Kinetics of propionate conversion in anaerobic continuously stirred tank reactors.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, H B; Mladenovska, Z; Ahring, B K

    2008-02-01

    The kinetic parameters of anaerobic propionate degradation by biomass from 7 continuously stirred tank reactors differing in temperature, hydraulic retention time and substrate composition were investigated. In substrate-depletion experiments (batch) the maximum propionate degradation rate, Amax, and the half saturation constant, Km, were initially estimated by applying the integrated Michaelis-Menten equation. Amax was in the range from 22.8 to 29.1 micromol gVS(-1) h(-1) while Km was in the range from 0.46-0.95 mM. In general, Amax gave a good reflection of the reactor performances. Secondly, the accuracy of the applied method was evaluated by use of radiotracer methodology. Amax was found to be 14-15% lower in the substrate-depletion experiment than in the radioisotope experiment due to endogenous propionate production. By including the endogenous propionate production, a 42-49% lower Km was estimated. The results demonstrate that the rate of endogenous substrate (propionate) production should be taken into account when estimating kinetic parameters in biomass from manure-based anaerobic reactors.

  14. Use of Stirred Suspension Bioreactors for Male Germ Cell Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Sakib, Sadman; Dores, Camila; Rancourt, Derrick; Dobrinski, Ina

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a stem cell based system. Both therapeutic and biomedical research applications of spermatogonial stem cells require a large number of cells. However, there are only few germ line stem cells in the testis, contained in the fraction of undifferentiated spermatogonia. The lack of specific markers makes it difficult to isolate these cells. The long term maintenance and proliferation of nonrodent germ cells in culture has so far been met with limited success, partially due to the lack of highly enriched starting populations. Differential plating, which depends on the differential adhesion properties of testicular somatic and germ cells to tissue culture dishes, has been the method of choice for germ cell enrichment, especially for nonrodent germ cells. However, for large animals, this process becomes labor intensive and increases variability due to the need for extensive handling. Here, we describe the use of stirred suspension bioreactors, as a novel system for enriching undifferentiated germ cells from 1-week-old pigs. This method capitalizes on the adherent properties of somatic cells within a controlled environment, thus promoting the enrichment of progenitor cells with minimal handling and variability.

  15. Isolated thermocouple amplifier system for stirred fixed-bed gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1992-01-01

    A sensing system is provided for determining the bed temperature profile of the bed of a stirred, fixed-bed gasifier including a plurality of temperature sensors for sensing the bed temperature at different levels, a transmitter for transmitting data based on the outputs of the sensors to a remote operator's station, and a battery-based power supply. The system includes an isolation amplifier system comprising a plurality of isolation amplifier circuits for amplifying the outputs of the individual sensors. The isolation amplifier circuits each comprise an isolation operational amplifier connected to a sensor; a first "flying capacitor" circuit for, in operation, controlling the application of power from the power supply to the isolation amplifier; an output sample and hold circuit connected to the transmitter; a second "flying capacitor" circuit for, in operation, controlling the transfer of the output of the isolation amplifier to the sample and hold circuit; and a timing and control circuit for activating the first and second capacitor circuits in a predetermined timed sequence.

  16. NDE of Friction Stir Welds in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinchen, David G.; Aldahir, Esma

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process, which utilizes a cylindrical, shouldered pin tool with a radiused tip that is rotated and plunged into the weld joint. Frictional heating beneath the shoulder, and surrounding the pin tip causes the material to plasticize, intermix and consolidate into a weldment without melting the parent material. FSW in aluminum alloys has many advantages such as low distortion and shrinkage, excellent mechanical properties, and no porosity. However, the propensity of the FSW process to create detrimental defects does exist, and is dependent on FSW parameter limits and controls. Inspection processes for FSW must also be selected and implemented concurrent with the new weld process. This paper describes the efforts by Lockheed Martin and NASA to find proper NDE techniques for detecting and characterizing the anomalies that may be caused by operating outside the envelope of optimized FSW parameters. Potential defects are identified and the results of the exploration of numerous NDE techniques including visual, liquid penetrant, multiple ultrasonic methods, eddy current and conductivity are discussed.

  17. Manual adjustable probe tool for friction stir welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oelgoetz, Peter A. (Inventor); Ding, Jeff (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A friction stir welding tool is provided generally comprising three parts: a rotatable welding tool body (22) that has an outer threaded surface (32) and a probe (24) extending from a distal end of the body, a shoulder (26), which has a threaded inner surface (40) and a bore (36) at a distal end of the shoulder, and a jam nut (28), which has a threaded inner surface (42). The shoulder is threaded onto the tool body such that the probe extends from the shoulder through the bore by a preferred length. The jam nut is then threaded onto the tool body to secure the shoulder. The tool is operatively connected to a drive motor for rotating the tool body. The shoulder may include a knife edge projecting from the distal end (38) thereof adjacent the bore. The knife edge inhibits the weld material from migrating along the probe to intrude inside the shoulder, where it may prevent separation of the tool body and the shoulder when readjustment of the tool is necessary.

  18. Global inversion for anisotropy during full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debens, H. A.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful tool for quantitative estimation of high-resolution high-fidelity models of subsurface seismic parameters, typically P-wave velocity. The solution to FWI's posed nonlinear inverse problem is obtained via an iterative series of linearized local updates to a start model, assuming this model lies within the basin of attraction to the global minimum. Thanks to many successful published applications to three-dimensional (3D) field datasets, its advance has been rapid and driven in large-part by the oil and gas industry. The consideration of seismic anisotropy during FWI is of vital importance, as it holds influence over both the kinematics and dynamics of seismic waveforms. If not appropriately taken into account then inadequacies in the anisotropy model are likely to manifest as significant error in the recovered velocity model. Conventionally, anisotropic FWI employs either an a priori anisotropy model, held fixed during FWI, or it uses a multi-parameter local inversion scheme to recover the anisotropy as part of the FWI; both of these methods can be problematic. Constructing an anisotropy model prior to FWI often involves intensive (and hence expensive) iterative procedures, such as travel-time tomography or moveout velocity analysis. On the other hand, introducing multiple parameters to FWI itself increases the complexity of what is already an underdetermined inverse problem. We propose that global rather than local FWI can be used to recover the long-wavelength acoustic anisotropy model, and that this can then be followed by more-conventional local FWI to recover the detailed model. We validate this approach using a full 3D field dataset, demonstrating that it avoids problems associated to crosstalk that can bedevil local inversion schemes, and reconciles well with in situ borehole measurements. Although our approach includes a global inversion for anisotropy, it is nonetheless affordable and practical for 3D field data.

  19. A novel miniaturized zinc oxide/hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a stir-brush microextractor device for carbamate pesticides analysis.

    PubMed

    Makkliang, Fonthip; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Thavarungkul, Panote; Thammakhet, Chongdee

    2016-04-21

    A novel miniaturized "stir-brush microextractor" was prepared using a zinc oxide/hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (ZnO/MWCNTs-OH) coated stainless steel brush connected to a small dc motor. The synthesized zinc oxide on each strand of stainless steel had a flower-like nanostructure when observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). This structure produced a large surface area before it was coated with the hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes sorbent. Under optimal conditions, the developed device provided a good linearity for the extraction of carbofuran and carbaryl, in the range of 25-500 ng mL(-1) and 50-500 ng mL(-1), respectively, with low limits of detection of 17.5 ± 2.0 ng mL(-1) and 13.0 ± 1.8 ng mL(-1). It also provided a good stir-brush-to-stir-brush reproducibility (% relative standard deviation < 5.6%, n = 6). The device was applied for the extraction and preconcentration of carbamate pesticides in fruit and vegetable samples prior to analysis with a gas chromatograph coupled with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Carbofuran was found at 9.24 ± 0.93 ng g(-1) and carbaryl was detected at 7.05 ± 0.61 ng g(-1) with good recoveries in the range of 73.7 ± 10.0% to 108.4 ± 2.6% for carbofuran and 75.7 ± 10.0% to 111.7 ± 5.7% for carbaryl. PMID:27026597

  20. Inversion by P4: polarization-picture post-processing.

    PubMed

    Schechner, Yoav Y

    2011-03-12

    Polarization may be sensed by imaging modules. This is done in various engineering systems as well as in biological systems, specifically by insects and some marine species. However, polarization per pixel is usually not the direct variable of interest. Rather, polarization-related data serve as a cue for recovering task-specific scene information. How should polarization-picture post-processing (P(4)) be done for the best scene understanding? Answering this question is not only helpful for advanced engineering (computer vision), but also to prompt hypotheses as to the processing occurring within biological systems. In various important cases, the answer is found by a principled expression of scene recovery as an inverse problem. Such an expression relies directly on a physics-based model of effects in the scene. The model includes analysis that depends on the different polarization components, thus facilitating the use of these components during the inversion, in a proper, even if non-trivial, manner. We describe several examples for this approach. These include automatic removal of path radiance in haze or underwater, overcoming partial semireflections and visual reverberations; three-dimensional recovery and distance-adaptive denoising. The resulting inversion algorithms rely on signal-processing methods, such as independent component analysis, deconvolution and optimization.

  1. Competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline on two acid soils: Stirred flow chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, Maria J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work was to study the competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) on two acid soils. We used the stirred flow chamber technique to obtain experimental data on rapid kinetic processes affecting the retention/release of the antibiotics. Both adsorption and desorption were higher on soil 1 (which showed the highest carbon, clay and Al and Fe oxides content) than on soil 2. Moreover, hysteresis affected the adsorption/desorption processes. Experimental data were fitted to a pseudo-first order equation, resulting qamax (adsorption maximum) values that were higher for soil 1 than for soil 2, and indicating that CTC competed with TC more intensely than OTC in soil 1. Regarding soil 2, the values corresponding to the adsorption kinetics constants (ka) and desorption kinetics constants for fast sites (kd1), followed a trend inverse to qamax and qdmax respectively. In conclusion, competition affected adsorption/desorption kinetics for the three antibiotics assayed, and thus retention/release and subsequent transport processes in soil and water environments.

  2. Inversion strategies for visco-acoustic waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamei, R.; Pratt, R. G.

    2013-08-01

    Visco-acoustic waveform inversion can potentially yield quantitative images of the distribution of both velocity and the attenuation parameters from seismic data. Intrinsic P-wave attenuation has been of particular interest, but has also proven challenging. Frequency-domain inversion allows attenuation and velocity relations to be easily incorporated, and allows a natural multiscale approach. The Laplace-Fourier approach extends this to allow the natural damping of waveforms to enhance early arrivals. Nevertheless, simultaneous inversion of velocity and attenuation leads to significant `cross-talk' between the resulting images, reflecting a lack of parameter resolution and indicating the need for pre-conditioning and regularization of the inverse problem. We analyse the cross-talk issue by partitioning the inversion parameters into two classes; the velocity parameter class, and the attenuation parameter class. Both parameters are defined at a reference frequency, and a dispersion relation is assumed that describes these parameters at any other frequency. We formulate the model gradients at a forward modelling frequency, and convert them to the reference frequency by employing the Jacobian of the coordinate change represented by the dispersion relation. We show that at a given modelling frequency, the Fréchet derivatives corresponding to these two parameter classes differ only by a 90° phase shift, meaning that the magnitudes of resulting model updates will be unscaled, and will not reflect the expected magnitudes in realistic (Q-1 ≪ 1) media. Due to the lack of scaling, cross-talk will be enhanced by poor subsurface illumination, by errors in kinematics, and by data noise. To solve these issues, we introduce an attenuation scaling term (the inverse of a penalty term) that is used to pre-condition the gradient by controlling the magnitudes of the updates to the attenuation parameters. Initial results from a suite of synthetic cross-hole tests using a three

  3. CFD simulation of an unbaffled stirred tank reactor driven by a magnetic rod: assessment of turbulence models.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajia; Deng, Baoqing; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Xiuzhong; Kim, Chang Nyung

    2015-01-01

    A simulation of an unbaffled stirred tank reactor driven by a magnetic stirring rod was carried out in a moving reference frame. The free surface of unbaffled stirred tank was captured by Euler-Euler model coupled with the volume of fluid (VOF) method. The re-normalization group (RNG) k-ɛ model, large eddy simulation (LES) model and detached eddy simulation (DES) model were evaluated for simulating the flow field in the stirred tank. All turbulence models can reproduce the tangential velocity in an unbaffled stirred tank with a rotational speed of 150 rpm, 250 rpm and 400 rpm, respectively. Radial velocity is underpredicted by the three models. LES model and RNG k-ɛ model predict the better tangential velocity and axial velocity, respectively. RNG k-ɛ model is recommended for the simulation of the flow in an unbaffled stirred tank with magnetic rod due to its computational effort.

  4. Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge ash through an electrodialytic process.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Paula; Couto, Nazaré; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2014-05-01

    The electrodialytic separation process (ED) was applied to sewage sludge ash (SSA) aiming at phosphorus (P) recovery. As the SSA may have high heavy metals contents, their removal was also assessed. Two SSA were sampled, one immediately after incineration (SA) and the other from an open deposit (SB). Both samples were ED treated as stirred suspensions in sulphuric acid for 3, 7 and 14 days. After 14 days, phosphorus was mainly mobilized towards the anode end (approx. 60% in the SA and 70% in the SB), whereas heavy metals mainly electromigrated towards the cathode end. The anolyte presented a composition of 98% of P, mainly as orthophosphate, and 2% of heavy metals. The highest heavy metal removal was achieved for Cu (ca. 80%) and the lowest for Pb and Fe (between 4% and 6%). The ED showed to be a viable method for phosphorus recovery from SSA, as it promotes the separation of P from the heavy metals.

  5. Thermoelectric properties of inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.; Poilvert, N.; Crespi, V. H.

    2016-02-01

    Rayleigh's method [Philos. Mag. Ser. 5 34, 481 (1892)] is used to solve for the classical thermoelectric equations in inverse opals. His theory predicts that in an inverse opal, with periodic holes, the Seebeck coefficient and the figure of merit are identical to that of the bulk material. We also provide a major revision to Rayleigh's method, in using the electrochemical potential as an important variable, instead of the electrostatic potential. We also show that in some cases, the thermal boundary resistance is important in the effective thermal conductivity.

  6. Darwin's "strange inversion of reasoning".

    PubMed

    Dennett, Daniel

    2009-06-16

    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection unifies the world of physics with the world of meaning and purpose by proposing a deeply counterintuitive "inversion of reasoning" (according to a 19th century critic): "to make a perfect and beautiful machine, it is not requisite to know how to make it" [MacKenzie RB (1868) (Nisbet & Co., London)]. Turing proposed a similar inversion: to be a perfect and beautiful computing machine, it is not requisite to know what arithmetic is. Together, these ideas help to explain how we human intelligences came to be able to discern the reasons for all of the adaptations of life, including our own.

  7. Population inversion by chirped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Tianshi

    2011-09-15

    In this paper, we analyze the condition for complete population inversion by a chirped pulse over a finite duration. The nonadiabatic transition probability is mapped in the two-dimensional parameter space of coupling strength and detuning amplitude. Asymptotic forms of the probability are derived by the interference of nonadiabatic transitions for sinusoidal and triangular pulses. The qualitative difference between the maps for the two types of pulses is accounted for. The map is used for the design of stable inversion pulses under specific accuracy thresholds.

  8. Multiphase inverse modeling: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.

    1998-03-01

    Inverse modeling is a technique to derive model-related parameters from a variety of observations made on hydrogeologic systems, from small-scale laboratory experiments to field tests to long-term geothermal reservoir responses. If properly chosen, these observations contain information about the system behavior that is relevant to the performance of a geothermal field. Estimating model-related parameters and reducing their uncertainty is an important step in model development, because errors in the parameters constitute a major source of prediction errors. This paper contains an overview of inverse modeling applications using the ITOUGH2 code, demonstrating the possibilities and limitations of a formalized approach to the parameter estimation problem.

  9. Stirring-induced bifurcation driven by the chaotic regime in the Belousov—Zhabotinsky reaction in a CSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strizhak, Peter E.

    1995-09-01

    The stirring-induced bifurcation at low stirring rate S 0 = 23 rpm of the reaction volume has been observed for the chaotic regime in the Belousov—Zhabotinsky oscillating chemical reaction (malonic acidbromatecerium(III)sulfuric acid) in a continuously stirred tank reactor in premixing mode. This bifurcation is characterized by a stepwise growth of the macroscopic spatial concentration gradients that is shown by the use of the time dependencies of the potential difference between two platinum electrodes.

  10. Optimization of a phase separation based magnetic-stirring salt-induced liquid-liquid microextraction method for determination of fluoroquinolones in food.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Wang, Huili; Ma, Meiping; Zhang, Yuna; Yin, Xiaohan; Dahlgren, Randy A; Du, Dongli; Wang, Xuedong

    2015-05-15

    Herein, we developed a novel integrated apparatus to perform phase separation based on magnetic-stirring, salt-induced, liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of five fluoroquinolones in animal-based foods by HPLC analysis. The novel integrated apparatus consisted of three simple HDPE (high density polyethylene) parts that were used to separate the solvent from the aqueous solution prior to retrieving the extractant. The extraction parameters were optimized using the response surface method based on central composite design: 791 μL of acetone solvent, 2.5 g of Na2SO4, pH 1.7, 3.0 min of stir time, and 5.5 min centrifugation. The limits of detection were 0.07-0.53 μg kg(-1) and recoveries were 91.6-105.0% for the five fluoroquinolones from milk, eggs and honey. This method is easily constructed from inexpensive materials, extraction efficiency is high, and the approach is compatible with HPLC analysis. Thus, it has excellent prospects for sample pre-treatment and analysis of fluoroquinolones in animal-based foods. PMID:25577068

  11. Determination of fluoroquinolones in environmental water and milk samples treated with stir cake sorptive extraction based on a boron-rich monolith.

    PubMed

    Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a new stir cake sorptive extraction using a boron-rich monolith as the adsorbent was prepared by the in situ copolymerization of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene. The effect of preparation parameters, including the ratio of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene, monomer mixture, and porogen solvent, on extraction performance was investigated thoroughly. The physicochemical properties of the adsorbent were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Several conditions affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, a convenient and sensitive method for the determination of trace fluoroquinolones residues in water and milk samples was established by coupling stir cake sorptive extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection. The limits of detection for the target compounds were 0.10-0.26 and 0.11-0.22 μg/L for water and milk samples, respectively. In addition, the developed method showed good linearity, repeatability, and precision. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the detection of trace fluoroquinolones residues in environmental water and milk samples. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained for the determination of fluoroquinolones in spiking samples that ranged from 68.8 to 120%, with relative standard deviations below 10% in all cases. PMID:26990593

  12. Combining stir-bar sorptive extraction and large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of benzotriazole UV stabilizers in wastewater matrices.

    PubMed

    Carpinteiro, Inma; Ramil, Maria; Rodríguez, Isaac; Nogueira, José Manuel F

    2012-02-01

    Stir-bar sorptive extraction and liquid desorption followed by large volume injection-gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry under selected ion monitoring mode acquisition (SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) was applied for the determination of six benzotriazole UV stabilizers (Tinuvin P, Allyl-bzt, Tinuvin 320, Tinuvin 326, Tinuvin 327 and Tinuvin 328) in wastewater matrices. Parameters affecting the performance of extraction and desorption steps were thoroughly evaluated using uni- and multivariate optimization strategies, based on the use of experimental factorial designs. Assays performed with stir bars, coated with 24 μL of polydimethylsiloxane, on 25 mL of ultra-pure water samples spiked at the 0.5 ng/mL level, yielded recoveries ranging from 47.9±1.4% (Tinuvin P) to 103.1±3.6% (Tinuvin 326), under optimized experimental conditions. When applied to complex matrices (e.g. wastewater), the methodology showed also excellent linear dynamic ranges (0.02-10.00 ng/mL) for the six benzotriazole UV stabilizers studied with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9970, limits of quantification in between 0.004 and 0.015 ng/mL, suitable repeatability (RSD<12.7%) and reproducibility (RSD<4.5%). The application of the proposed methodology to urban sewage waters from Spain and Portugal wastewater plants revealed the presence of low contents of some benzotriazole UV stabilizers.

  13. Determination of fluoroquinolones in environmental water and milk samples treated with stir cake sorptive extraction based on a boron-rich monolith.

    PubMed

    Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a new stir cake sorptive extraction using a boron-rich monolith as the adsorbent was prepared by the in situ copolymerization of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene. The effect of preparation parameters, including the ratio of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene, monomer mixture, and porogen solvent, on extraction performance was investigated thoroughly. The physicochemical properties of the adsorbent were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Several conditions affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, a convenient and sensitive method for the determination of trace fluoroquinolones residues in water and milk samples was established by coupling stir cake sorptive extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection. The limits of detection for the target compounds were 0.10-0.26 and 0.11-0.22 μg/L for water and milk samples, respectively. In addition, the developed method showed good linearity, repeatability, and precision. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the detection of trace fluoroquinolones residues in environmental water and milk samples. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained for the determination of fluoroquinolones in spiking samples that ranged from 68.8 to 120%, with relative standard deviations below 10% in all cases.

  14. Determination of trace amounts of off-flavor compounds in drinking water by stir bar sorptive extraction and thermal desorption GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, N; Sasamoto, K; Takino, M; Yamashita, S; Daishima, S; Heiden, A; Hoffman, A

    2001-10-01

    A method for the determination of trace amounts of off-flavor compounds including 2-methylisoborneol, geosmin and 2,4,6-trichloroanisole in drinking water was developed using the stir bar sorptive extraction technique followed by thermal desorption-GC-MS analysis. The extraction conditions such as extraction mode, salt addition, extraction temperature, sample volume and extraction time were examined. Water samples (20, 40 and 60 ml) were extracted for 60-240 min at room temperature (25 degrees C) using stir bars with a length of 10 mm and coated with a 500 microm layer of polydimethylsiloxane. The extract was analyzed by thermal desorption-GC-MS in the selected ion monitoring mode. The method showed good linearity over the concentration range from 0.1 or 0.2 or 0.5 to 100 ng l(-1) for all the target analytes, and the correlation coefficients were greater than 0.9987. The detection limits ranged from 0.022 to 0.16 ng l(-1). The recoveries (89-109%) and precision (RSD: 0.80-3.7%) of the method were examined by analyzing raw water and tap water samples fortified at the 1 ng l(-1) level. The method was successfully applied to low-level samples (raw water and tap water).

  15. Optimization of a phase separation based magnetic-stirring salt-induced liquid-liquid microextraction method for determination of fluoroquinolones in food.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Wang, Huili; Ma, Meiping; Zhang, Yuna; Yin, Xiaohan; Dahlgren, Randy A; Du, Dongli; Wang, Xuedong

    2015-05-15

    Herein, we developed a novel integrated apparatus to perform phase separation based on magnetic-stirring, salt-induced, liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of five fluoroquinolones in animal-based foods by HPLC analysis. The novel integrated apparatus consisted of three simple HDPE (high density polyethylene) parts that were used to separate the solvent from the aqueous solution prior to retrieving the extractant. The extraction parameters were optimized using the response surface method based on central composite design: 791 μL of acetone solvent, 2.5 g of Na2SO4, pH 1.7, 3.0 min of stir time, and 5.5 min centrifugation. The limits of detection were 0.07-0.53 μg kg(-1) and recoveries were 91.6-105.0% for the five fluoroquinolones from milk, eggs and honey. This method is easily constructed from inexpensive materials, extraction efficiency is high, and the approach is compatible with HPLC analysis. Thus, it has excellent prospects for sample pre-treatment and analysis of fluoroquinolones in animal-based foods.

  16. Sensitive determination of estrogens in environmental waters treated with polymeric ionic liquid-based stir cake sorptive extraction and liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia; Yuan, Dongxing

    2016-05-15

    A simple, sensitive and environmentally friendly method using polymeric ionic liquid-based stir cake sorptive extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC/DAD) has been developed for efficient quantification of six selected estrogens in environmental waters. To extract trace estrogens effectively, a poly (1-ally-3-vinylimidazolium chloride-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic cake was prepared and used as the sorbent of stir cake sorptive extraction (SCSE). The effects of preparation conditions of sorbent and extraction parameters of SCSE for estrogens were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the developed method showed satisfactory analytical performance for targeted analytes. Low limits of detection (S/N=3) and quantification limits (S/N=10) were achieved within the range of 0.024-0.057 µg/L and 0.08-0.19 µg/L, respectively. Good linearity of method was obtained for analytes with the correlation coefficients (R(2)) above 0.99. At the same time, satisfactory method repeatability and reproducibility was achieved in terms of intra- and inter-day precisions, respectively. Finally, the established SCSE-HPLC/DAD method was successfully applied for the determination of estrogens in different environmental water samples. Recoveries obtained for the determination of estrogens in spiked samples ranged from 71.2% to 108%, with RSDs below 10% in all cases.

  17. Determination of parabens in house dust by pressurised hot water extraction followed by stir bar sorptive extraction and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Borrull, Francesc

    2011-09-16

    This study describes the development of a new method for determining p-hydroxybenzoic esters (parabens) in house dust. This optimised method was based on the pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE) of house dust, followed by the acetylation of the extracted parabens, stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) with a polydimethylsiloxane stir bar, and finally analysis using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). The combination of SBSE and PHWE allows the analytes to be preconcentrated and extracted from the aqueous extract in a single step with minimal manipulation of the sample. Furthermore the in situ acetylation of parabens prior to SBSE improved their extraction efficiency and their GC-MS signal. The method showed recoveries of between 40 and 80%, good linearity, repeatability and reproducibility (<10% RSD, at 100 ng g(-1), n=5), low limits of detection (from 1.0 ng g(-1) for propyl paraben to 2.1 ng g(-1) for methyl paraben) and quantification (from 3.3 ng g(-1) for propyl paraben to 8.5 ng g(-1) for methyl paraben). The proposed method was applied to the analysis of house dust samples. All the target parabens were found in the samples. Methyl and propyl parabens were the most abundant, with concentrations up to 2440 ng g(-1) and 910 ng g(-1), respectively. The high levels of parabens found in the samples confirm the importance of determining organic contaminants in indoor environments.

  18. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  19. Stir Friction Welding Used in Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts the preparation and placement of a confidence ring for friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The aluminum panels are manufactured and subjected to confidence tests during which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  20. Stir Friction Welding Used in Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The panels are subjected to confidence tests in which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  1. Stir Friction Welding Used in Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The aluminum panels are subjected to confidence panel tests during which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  2. Ethylene oxidation chemistry in a well-stirred reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.; Malte, P.

    1994-09-01

    Ethylene is an important intermediate in the combustion of methane, larger aliphatic hydrocarbons, and aromatics. Detailed fuel-lean C{sub 2}H{sub 4}H{sub 2}O/air well-stirred reactor data by Thornton were used to analyze reported combustion chemistry mechanisms and the development of this study`s ethylene oxidation mechanism. The data set had been obtained for the temperature range 1,003 to 1,253 K and ethylene-oxygen equivalence ratio range 0.086 to 0.103, at atmospheric pressure. Mechanisms were derived from reaction sets of Westbrook and Pitz, and Dagaut, Cathonnet and Boettner. Examination of each reported mechanism indicated unusually large kinetic rates for the vinyl decomposition reaction were used in order to obtain agreement with the Thornton data set. An ethylene oxidation model was developed in order to address the mechanistic problems of the previous models. This study`s mechanism well simulated the overall rate of ethylene oxidation and concentration profiles of CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Successful predictions by the model were dependent on a new high temperature vinyl oxidation reaction route, C{sub 2}H{sub 3} + O{sub 2} = CH{sub 2}CHO + O with a branching ratio of 1.19--1.21 at 1,053 K to 1.63--2.47 at 1,253 K. The branching ratio values were dependent upon the extent of fall-off for the C{sub 2}H{sub 3} + O{sub 2} = CH{sub 2}O + HCO reaction. 132 refs.

  3. Inversions. Popular Lectures in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakel'man, I. Ya

    Inversions are transformations of geometric figures, under which straight lines may be mapped to circles, and conversely. The use of such mapping allows development of a unified method of solution for many of the problems of elementary geometry, especially those concerning constructions and "pencils" of curves. This book discusses the inversion…

  4. Action Understanding as Inverse Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Chris L.; Saxe, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2009-01-01

    Humans are adept at inferring the mental states underlying other agents' actions, such as goals, beliefs, desires, emotions and other thoughts. We propose a computational framework based on Bayesian inverse planning for modeling human action understanding. The framework represents an intuitive theory of intentional agents' behavior based on the…

  5. Seismic inversion with generalized Radon transform based on local second-order approximation of scattered field in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Xuelei; Li, Wuqun

    2014-08-01

    Sound velocity inversion problem based on scattering theory is formulated in terms of a nonlinear integral equation associated with scattered field. Because of its nonlinearity, in practice, linearization algorisms (Born/single scattering approximation) are widely used to obtain an approximate inversion solution. However, the linearized strategy is not congruent with seismic wave propagation mechanics in strong perturbation (heterogeneous) medium. In order to partially dispense with the weak perturbation assumption of the Born approximation, we present a new approach from the following two steps: firstly, to handle the forward scattering by taking into account the second-order Born approximation, which is related to generalized Radon transform (GRT) about quadratic scattering potential; then to derive a nonlinear quadratic inversion formula by resorting to inverse GRT. In our formulation, there is a significant quadratic term regarding scattering potential, and it can provide an amplitude correction for inversion results beyond standard linear inversion. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the linear single scattering inversion is only good in amplitude for relative velocity perturbation () of background media up to 10 %, and its inversion errors are unacceptable for the perturbation beyond 10 %. In contrast, the quadratic inversion can give more accurate amplitude-preserved recovery for the perturbation up to 40 %. Our inversion scheme is able to manage double scattering effects by estimating a transmission factor from an integral over a small area, and therefore, only a small portion of computational time is added to the original linear migration/inversion process.

  6. Vanillin-molecularly targeted extraction of stir bar based on magnetic field induced self-assembly of multifunctional Fe3O4@Polyaniline nanoparticles for detection of vanilla-flavor enhancers in infant milk powders.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhua; Yang, Zaiyue; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Wanying; Hong, Junli; Huang, Changgao; Zhou, Xuemin

    2015-03-15

    A molecularly imprinted stir bar was constructed based on Fe3O4@Polyaniline nanoparticles with magnetic field-induced self-assembly process. The monomer, methacrylic acid, was pre-assembled into the pre-polymers with vanillin as template by the formation of hydrogen bonds. After that, the magnetic complexes were generated by the hydrogen bonding, the hydrophobic and π-π interaction between the pre-polymers and Fe3O4@Polyaniline. The complexes were adsorbed on the surface of magnetic stir bar under the magnetic induction, and the coating of vanillin-molecularly imprinted polymers was generated by the one-step copolymerization basing on the cross linking of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The molecular imprinting stir bar showed superior selectivity and fast binding kinetics for vanillin, and was used for the enrichment of vanilla-flavor enhancers (vanillin, ethyl maltol and methyl vanillin) in infant milk powders. The results measured by HPLC-UV exhibited good linear ranges of 0.01-100, 0.02-100 and 0.03-100μgmL(-1) with the limit of detection of 2.5-10.0ngmL(-1), and the recoveries were 94.7-98.9%, 82.1-96.7% and 84.5-93.2% with RSD<7.2% for the three enhancers, respectively. PMID:25514645

  7. Vanillin-molecularly targeted extraction of stir bar based on magnetic field induced self-assembly of multifunctional Fe3O4@Polyaniline nanoparticles for detection of vanilla-flavor enhancers in infant milk powders.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhua; Yang, Zaiyue; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Wanying; Hong, Junli; Huang, Changgao; Zhou, Xuemin

    2015-03-15

    A molecularly imprinted stir bar was constructed based on Fe3O4@Polyaniline nanoparticles with magnetic field-induced self-assembly process. The monomer, methacrylic acid, was pre-assembled into the pre-polymers with vanillin as template by the formation of hydrogen bonds. After that, the magnetic complexes were generated by the hydrogen bonding, the hydrophobic and π-π interaction between the pre-polymers and Fe3O4@Polyaniline. The complexes were adsorbed on the surface of magnetic stir bar under the magnetic induction, and the coating of vanillin-molecularly imprinted polymers was generated by the one-step copolymerization basing on the cross linking of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The molecular imprinting stir bar showed superior selectivity and fast binding kinetics for vanillin, and was used for the enrichment of vanilla-flavor enhancers (vanillin, ethyl maltol and methyl vanillin) in infant milk powders. The results measured by HPLC-UV exhibited good linear ranges of 0.01-100, 0.02-100 and 0.03-100μgmL(-1) with the limit of detection of 2.5-10.0ngmL(-1), and the recoveries were 94.7-98.9%, 82.1-96.7% and 84.5-93.2% with RSD<7.2% for the three enhancers, respectively.

  8. Applications of inverse pattern projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wansong; Bothe, Thorsten; Kalms, Michael K.; von Kopylow, Christoph; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2003-05-01

    Fast and robust 3D quality control as well as fast deformation measurement is of particular importance for industrial inspection. Additionally a direct response about measured properties is desired. Therefore, robust optical techniques are needed which use as few images as possible for measurement and visualize results in an efficient way. One promising technique for this aim is the inverse pattern projection which has the following advantages: The technique codes the information of a preceding measurement into the projected inverse pattern. Thus, it is possible to do differential measurements using only one camera frame for each state. Additionally, the results are optimized straight fringes for sampling which are independent of the object curvature. The hardware needs are low as just a programmable projector and a standard camera are necessary. The basic idea of inverse pattern projection, necessary algorithms and found optimizations are demonstrated, roughly. Evaluation techniques were found to preserve a high quality phase measurement under imperfect conditions. The different application fields can be sorted out by the type of pattern used for inverse projection. We select two main topics for presentation. One is the incremental (one image per state) deformation measurement which is a promising technique for high speed deformation measurements. A video series of a wavering flag with projected inverse pattern was evaluated to show the complete deformation series. The other application is the optical feature marking (augmented reality) that allows to map any measured result directly onto the object under investigation. Any properties can be visualized directly on the object"s surface which makes inspections easier than with use of a separated indicating device. The general ability to straighten any kind of information on 3D surfaces is shown while preserving an exact mapping of camera image and object parts. In many cases this supersedes an additional monitor to

  9. Oil filaments produced by an impeller in a water stirred tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjuan-Galindo, Rene; Soto, Enrique; Ascanio, Gabriel; Zenit, Roberto

    2010-11-01

    Oil dispersions in aqueous media produced in stirred tanks are part of many industrial processes. The oil drops size and dispersion stability are determined by the impeller geometry, stirring velocity and the physicochemical properties of the mixture. A critical parameter is the total interfacial area which is increased as the drop size is decreased. The mechanism that disperses the oil and generates the drops has not been completely explained. In the present work, castor oil (1% v/v, viscosity 500mPa) and water are stirred with a Scaba impeller in a flat bottom cylindrical tank. The process was recorded with high-speed video and the Reynolds number was fixed to 24,000. Before the stirring, the oil is added at the air water interface. At the beginning of the stirring, the oil is suctioned at the impeller shaft and incorporated into the flow ejected by the impeller. In this region, the flow is turbulent and exhibits velocity gradients that elongate the oil phase. Viscous thin filaments are generated and expelled from the impeller. Thereafter, the filaments are elongated and break to form drops. This process is repeated in all the oil phase and drops are incorporated into the dispersion. Two main zones can be identified in the tank: the impeller discharge characterized by high turbulence and the rest of the flow where low velocity gradients appear. In this region surface forces dominate the inertial ones, and drops became spheroidal.

  10. Mitigating Abnormal Grain Growth for Friction Stir Welded Al-Li 2195 Spun Formed Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Russell, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Formability and abnormal grain growth (AGG) are the two major issues that have been encountered for Al alloy spun formed dome development using friction stir welded blanks. Material properties that have significant influence on the formability include forming range and strain hardening exponent. In this study, tensile tests were performed for two 2195 friction stir weld parameter sets at 400 F to study the effects of post weld anneal on the forming range and strain hardening exponent. It was found that the formability can be enhanced by applying a newly developed post weld anneal to heat treat the friction stir welded panels. This new post weld anneal leads to a higher forming range and much improved strain hardening exponent. AGG in the weld nugget is known to cause a significant reduction of ductility and fracture toughness. This study also investigated how AGG may be influenced by the heating rate to the solution heat treatment temperature. After post-weld annealing, friction stir welds were strained to 15% and 39% by compression at 400 F before they were subjected to SHT at 950 F for 1 hour. Salt bath SHT is very effective in reducing the grain size as it helps arrest the onset of AGG and promote normal recrystallization and grain growth. However, heat treating a 18 ft dome using a salt bath is not practical. Efforts are continuing at Marshall Space Flight Center to identify the welding parameters and heat treating parameters that can help mitigate the AGG in the friction stir welds.

  11. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 and Hot-Stamp Boron Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Frederick, David Alan; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir spot welds were made in two high-strength steels: DP780, and a hot-stamp-boron steel with tensile strength of 1500 MPa. The spot welds were made at either 800 or 1600 rpm using either of two polycrystalline boron nitride tools. One stir tool, BN77, had the relatively common pin-tool shape. The second tool, BN46, had a convex rather than a concave shoulder profile and a much wider and shorter pin. The tools were plunged to preprogrammed depths either at a continuous rate (1-step schedule) or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate. In all cases, the welds were completed in 4s. The range of lap-shear values were compared to values required for resistance spot welds on the same steels. The minimum value of 10.3 kN was exceeded for friction stir spot welding of DP780 using a 2-step schedule and either the BN77- or the BN46-type stir tool. The respective minimum value of 12 kN was also exceeded for the HSB steel using the 2-step process and the BN46 stir tool.

  12. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 and Hot-Stamp Boron Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L.; Frederick, Alan; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2008-05-16

    Friction stir spot welds were made in two high-strength steels: DP780, and a hot-stamp-boron steel with tensile strength of 1500 MPa. The spot welds were made at either 800 or 1600 rpm using either of two polycrystalline boron nitride tools. One stir tool, BN77, had the relatively common pin-tool shape. The second tool, BN46, had a convex rather than a concave shoulder profile and a much wider and shorter pin. The tools were plunged to preprogrammed depths either at a continuous rate (1-step schedule) or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate. In all cases, the welds were completed in 4s. The range of lap-shear values were compared to values required for resistance spot welds on the same steels. The minimum value of 10.3 kN was exceeded for friction stir spot welding of DP780 using a 2-step schedule and either the BN77- or the BN46-type stir tool. The respective minimum value of 12 kN was also exceeded for the HSB steel using the 2-step process and the BN46 stir tool.

  13. Physical Simulation of Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Nickel-Base Alloys Using Hot Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, James R.; Lippold, John C.

    2013-08-01

    The Gleeble hot torsion test was utilized in an attempt to simulate the friction stir-processed microstructure of three Ni-base alloys: Hastelloy X, Alloy 625, and Alloy 718. The simulation temperatures were based on actual thermal cycles measured by embedded thermocouples during friction stir processing of these alloys. Peak process temperatures were determined to be approximately 1423 K (1150 °C) for Hastelloy X and Alloy 625 K and 1373 K (352 °C and 1100 °C) for Alloy 718. The peak temperature and cooling rates were programed into the Gleeble™ 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator to reproduce the stir zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) microstructures. The TMAZ was successfully simulated using this technique, but the stir zone microstructure could not be accurately reproduced, with hot torsion samples exhibiting larger grain size than actual friction stir processing trials. Shear stress and strain rates as a function of temperature were determined for each material using hot torsion simulation.

  14. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, Matt

    2016-07-12

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  15. Recovery Act Milestones

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  16. Stir bar sorptive extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for analysis of thyroxine in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenying; Mao, Xiangju; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2013-11-29

    tIn this work, polyethyleneglycol (PEG)/hydroxyl polydimethylsiloxane (OH-PDMS)/γ -mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (γ -MPTS) coated stir bar was prepared by sol–gel process and its extraction performance for the extraction of amphoteric thyroxines (3,3',5,5'-tetraiodothyronin, T(4); 3,3',5-triiodothyronine, T(3); reversed-3,3',5-triiodothyronine, rT(3)) and their metabolite (3,5-diiodothyronine,T2) was studied. The preparation reproducibility of PEG/OH-PDMS/γ -MPTS coated stir bar was investigated, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) in the same batch and among different batches were 3.3–14.3% (n = 5) and 7.7–16.6% (n = 3), respectively. The prepared PEG/OH-PDMS/γ -MPTS coated stir bar could be reused for more than 20 times. Based on this fact, a novel method of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ultraviolet (UV)and HPLC-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the analysis of target thyroxinesin human urine samples was developed. The influencing factors of SBSE, such as sample pH, extraction time, stirring rate, salt effect, desorption solution and desorption time, were studied in detail, and the analytical performance of the proposed method was evaluated under the optimized conditions. The enrichment factors (EFs) of the developed method for four target thyroxines were in the range of 14.9–70.4(theoretical enrichment factor was 100). The RSDs were ranging from 4.0% to 13.8% for SBSE-HPLC-UV (c = 25 μg/L, n = 6) and from 3.7% to 6.1% for SBSE-HPLC-ICP-MS (c = 0.5 μg/L, n = 5). The linear range obtained by SBSE-HPLC-UV was 2–500 μg/L for T(2)and 5–500 μg/L for rT3, T(3)and T(4), with correlation coefficients (r) ranging from 0.9957 to 0.9998, respectively, while the linear range obtained by SBSE-HPLC-ICP-MS was 0.05–500 μg/L for T(2) and rT(3), 0.10–200 μg/L for T(3) and 0.05–200 μg/L for T(4)with r ranging from 0.9979 to 0.9998, respectively. The

  17. Fundamental Study of Material Flow in Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Anthony P.

    1999-01-01

    The presented research project consists of two major parts. First, the material flow in solid-state, friction stir, butt-welds as been investigated using a marker insert technique. Changes in material flow due to welding parameter as well as tool geometry variations have been examined for different materials. The method provides a semi-quantitative, three-dimensional view of the material transport in the welded zone. Second, a FSW process model has been developed. The fully coupled model is based on fluid mechanics; the solid-state material transport during welding is treated as a laminar, viscous flow of a non-Newtonian fluid past a rotating circular cylinder. The heat necessary for the material softening is generated by deformation of the material. As a first step, a two-dimensional model, which contains only the pin of the FSW tool, has been created to test the suitability of the modeling approach and to perform parametric studies of the boundary conditions. The material flow visualization experiments agree very well with the predicted flow field. Accordingly, material within the pin diameter is transported only in the rotation direction around the pin. Due to the simplifying assumptions inherent in the 2-D model, other experimental data such as forces on the pin, torque, and weld energy cannot be directly used for validation. However, the 2-D model predicts the same trends as shown in the experiments. The model also predicts a deviation from the "normal" material flow at certain combinations of welding parameters, suggesting a possible mechanism for the occurrence of some typical FSW defects. The next step has been the development of a three-dimensional process model. The simplified FSW tool has been designed as a flat shoulder rotating on the top of the workpiece and a rotating, cylindrical pin, which extends throughout the total height of the flow domain. The thermal boundary conditions at the tool and at the contact area to the backing plate have been varied

  18. Seasonal and regional characterization of horizontal stirring in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HernáNdez-Carrasco, Ismael; López, Cristóbal; HernáNdez-GarcíA, Emilio; Turiel, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    Recent work on Lagrangian descriptors has shown that Lyapunov Exponents can be applied to observed or simulated data to characterize the horizontal stirring and transport properties of the oceanic flow. However, a more detailed analysis of regional dependence and seasonal variability was still lacking. In this paper, we analyze the near-surface velocity field obtained from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES) using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE). We have characterized regional and seasonal variability. Our results show that horizontal stirring, as measured by FSLEs, is seasonally-varying, with maximum values in Summer time. FSLEs also strongly vary depending on the region: we have first characterized the stirring properties of Northern and Southern Hemispheres, then the main oceanic basins and currents. We have finally studied the relation between averages of FSLE and some Eulerian descriptors such as Eddy Kinetic Energy (EKE) and vorticity (ω) over the different regions.

  19. New miniature stirred-tank bioreactors for parallel study of enzymatic biomass hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Riedlberger, Peter; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Many factors strongly influence the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass to fermentable sugars (feedstock composition, pretreatment, enzymes and enzyme loading). In order to optimize the reaction conditions for the hydrolysis of biomass, an accurate high-throughput bioprocess development tool is mandatory, which enables a parallelization and an easy scale-up. New S-shaped impellers were developed for magnetically inductive driven stirred-tank bioreactors at a 10mL-scale. An efficient and reproducible homogenization was shown at 20% w/w solids loading of microcrystalline cellulose and at, 4-10% with wheat straw in 48 parallel operated stirred-tank bioreactors. The scale-up was successfully validated for the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw suspensions and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures by application of a cellulase complex at a milliliter- and liter-scale. As an example, the parallel stirred-tank bioreactor system was applied for the evaluation of enzymatic batch hydrolyses of plant materials with varying pretreatments.

  20. Processing-Microstructure Relationships in Friction Stir Welding of MA956 Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Bradford W.; Menon, E. Sarath K.; McNelley, Terry R.; Brewer, Luke N.; El-Dasher, Bassem; Farmer, Joseph C.; Torres, Sharon G.; Mahoney, Murray W.; Sanderson, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive set of processing-microstructure relationships is presented for friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened MA956 steel. Eight rotational speed/traverse speed combinations were used to produce friction stir welds on MA956 plates using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool. Weld conditions with high thermal input produced defect-free, full-penetration welds. Electron backscatter diffraction results showed a significant increase in grain size, a persistent body centered cubic torsional texture in the stir zone, and a sharp transition in grain size across the thermo-mechanically affected zone sensitive to weld parameters. Micro-indentation showed an asymmetric reduction in hardness across a transverse section of the weld. This gradient in hardness was greatly increased with higher heat inputs. The decrease in hardness after welding correlates directly with the increase in grain size and may be explained with a Hall-Petch type relationship.

  1. Microstructural and Mechanical Characteristics of Aluminum Alloy AA5754 Friction Stir Spot Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, T. S.; Khalifa, T. A.

    2014-03-01

    In the present investigation, friction stir spot welding on annealed aluminum alloy AA5754 sheets was performed. The influences of the tool rotational speed and tool stirring (dwell) time on the weld structure and static strength of welds were evaluated. The results revealed that the width of the completely metallurgical-bonded region increases with the increasing tool rotational speed and/or the dwell time up to certain levels. Increasing such parameters beyond these levels slightly reduces the width of the bonding region. The stirred zone exhibited higher microhardness than that of the base material. The tensile-shear force was found to increase with the increasing tool rotational speed and/or dwell time up to a certain level (9s). Higher tool rotational speeds and/or prolonged dwell times slightly reduce(s) the tensile-shear force.

  2. The Role of Friction Stir Welding in Nuclear Fuel Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    D Burkes; P Medvedev; M Chapple; A Amritkar; P Wells; I Charit

    2009-02-01

    The friction bonding process combines desirable attributes of both friction stir welding and friction stir processing. The development of the process is spurred on by the need to fabricate thin, high density, reduced enrichment fuel plates for nuclear research reactors. The work seeks to convert research and test reactors currently operating on highly enriched uranium fuel to operate on low enriched uranium fuel without significant loss in reactor performance, safety characteristics, or significant increase in cost. In doing so, the threat of global nuclear material proliferation will be reduced. Feasibility studies performed on the process show that this is a viable option for mass production of plate-type nuclear fuel. Adapting the friction stir weld process for nuclear fuel fabrication has resulted in the development of several unique ideas and observations. Preliminary results of this adaptation and process model development are discussed.

  3. Two-sided friction stir riveting by extrusion: A process for joining dissimilar materials

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, William T.; Cox, Chase D.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Cook, George E.; Gibson, Brian T.

    2016-06-25

    Two-sided friction stir riveting (FSR) by extrusion is an innovative process developed to rapidly, efficiently, and securely join dissimilar materials. This process extends a previously developed one sided friction stir extrusion process to create a strong and robust joint by producing a continuous, rivet-like structure through a preformed hole in one of the materials with a simultaneous, two-sided friction stir spot weld. The two-sided FSR by extrusion process securely joins the dissimilar materials together and effectively locks them in place without the use of any separate materials or fasteners. Lastly, in this paper we demonstrate the process by joining aluminummore » to steel and illustrate its potential application to automotive and aerospace manufacturing processes.« less

  4. Temperature comparison of initial, middle and final point of polypropylene friction stir welded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusharjanta, Bambang; Raharjo, Wahyu P.; Triyono

    2016-03-01

    Friction Stir Welding is known as a new solid state joining process. This process is applied in thermoplastic polymers material recently. One of member thermoplastic polymer is polypropylene. Polypropylene sheet 6 mm thick was friction stir welded with a cone cut steel pin. Tool rotation, travelling speed, and plunge depth, as welding parameters were 620 rpm, 7.3 mm/minutes and 0.02 mm respectively. Temperature at the initial, middle, and final point of advance side working piece were measured and compared. Measurement were done by thermocouple and recorded by data acquisition. Based on this research, it is concluded that temperature at the initial, middle and final point of friction stir welding process are different. The highest temperature peak reach at the middle point on the advance side which affects face bending strength.

  5. Modelling of solids distribution in stirred tanks: analysis of simulation strategies and comparison with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montante, G.; Magelli, F.

    2005-03-01

    The predictive capabilities of CFD techniques as applied to solid liquid stirred vessels are investigated. The distribution of solid particles was simulated in three baffled stirred tanks agitated with single and multiple impellers. Suspensions of glass beads of different diameters and average concentration up to 6 vol. % in water were studied. The simulations of solid liquid suspensions in the stirred vessels were performed by using fully predictive approaches. Eulerian multiphase models were adopted for modelling the solid liquid flow, coupled with three different extensions of the standard k-ɛ model to the case of multiphase flows. The simulated particle axial concentration profiles are compared with experimental data and critically discussed. The most successful simulation strategy and one possible implementation are described.

  6. Effects of fluid and light dynamics on H2 production in a mechanically stirred photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen productions through biophotolysis by microalgae in photobioreactors (PBRs) were studied using a computational model integrated with fluid dynamics, particle tracking technique, light attenuation dynamics, biochemical kinetics, and mass transport. The trajectories of microalgae entrained in the flow fields within these PBRs were traced by the particle tracking technique and were used to determine the dynamics of light attenuation subjected by the cells, which were analyzed and compared with those obtained from the unstirred PBR under different incident light illuminations. The results show an improvement on the light penetration depth in the mechanically stirred cultures. The dynamics of light attenuation was incorporated into the kinetics equations for the analysis of the inhomogeneous biochemical process for hydrogen production by microalgae. Hydrogen production in the unstirred and the impeller-stirred PBRs were determined under different light illumination conditions and the results show an improvement on hydrogen production in the impeller-stirred PBRs. PMID:23911818

  7. Enhanced oil recovery update

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.V

    1989-03-01

    Technology continues to grow in the realm of enhanced oil recovery. Since 1950 several processes have proven economic for oil recovery. Others are still in their infancy and must be custom designed for each reservoir. This paper gives a general overview of these processes. The author focuses on the latest technology and the outlook for enhanced oil recovery operations.

  8. What Is "No Recovery?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Thanatologists, as Balk recently commented (Balk, 2004), have been saying that there is no recovery from bereavement, or that we should not speak of bereavement as leading to a recovery. The term recovery has a high level of plasticity and can be shaped to fit diverse meanings, including contradictory meanings. We will sort our way through some of…

  9. Youth in Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Miranda, John; Williams, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Young people are entering long-term recovery probably in greater numbers than ever before. A key word here is "probably" because we know precious little about the phenomenon of young people who recover from alcohol and drug addition. This article is a preliminary exploration of youth in recovery. It reviews several types of recovery support…

  10. Stir bar sorptive extraction approaches with a home-made portable electric stirrer for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangju; Hu, Bin; He, Man; Fan, Wenying

    2012-10-19

    In this study, novel off/on-site stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) approaches with a home-made portable electric stirrer have been developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). In these approaches, a miniature battery-operated electric stirrer was employed to provide agitation of sample solutions instead of the commonly used large size magnetic stirrer powered by alternating current in conventional SBSE process, which could extend the SBSE technique from the conventional off-site analysis to the on-site sampling. The applicability of the designed off/on-site SBSE sampling approaches was evaluated by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coating SBSE-high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) analysis of six target PAHs in environmental water. The home-made portable electric stirrer is simple, easy-to-operate, user friendly, low cost, easy-to-be-commercialized, and can be processed in direct immersion SBSE, headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) and continuous flow (CF)-SBSE modes. Since the stir bar was fixed onto the portable device by magnetic force, it is very convenient to install, remove and replace the stir bar, and the coating friction loss which occurred frequently in conventional SBSE process could be avoided. The parameters affecting the extraction of six target PAHs by the home-made portable SBSE sampling device with different sampling modes were studied. Under the optimum extraction conditions, good linearity was obtained by all of three SBSE extraction modes with correlation coefficient (R) higher than 0.9971. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) were 0.05-3.41 ng L(-1) for direct immersion SBSE, 0.03-2.23 ng L(-1) for HSSE and 0.09-3.75 ng L(-1) for CF-SBSE, respectively. The proposed portable PDMS-SBSE-HPLC-FLD method was applied for the analysis of six target PAHs in East Lake water, and the analytical results obtained by on-site SBSE sampling were in good agreement with that obtained by off

  11. Ultrahigh-intensity inverse bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Rax, J.-M.

    1999-01-01

    We study inverse bremsstrahlung in the ultrahigh intensity relativistic regime. The fully relativistic ultrahigh intensity absorption (emission) coefficient is derived for an arbitrary scattering potential and small-angle scattering. We find that in the Coulomb field case this absorption (emission) coefficient can be calculated as a function of the quiver energy, drift momentum, and impact parameter in two complementary regimes: (i) for remote collisions when the impact parameter is larger than the amplitude of the quiver motion, and (ii) for instantaneous collisions when the scattering time is shorter than the period of the wave. Both circular and linear polarizations are considered, and this study reveals that in this relativistic regime inverse bremsstrahlung absorption can be viewed as a harmonic Compton resonance heating of the laser-driven electron by the virtual photon of the ion Coulomb field. The relativistic modification of Marcuse's effect [Bell Syst. Tech. J. 41, 1557 (1962)] are also discussed, and relations with previous nonrelativistic results are elucidated.

  12. Momentum resolution in inverse photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Zumbülte, A.; Schmidt, A. B.; Donath, M.

    2015-01-15

    We present a method to determine the electron beam divergence, and thus the momentum resolution, of an inverse-photoemission setup directly from a series of spectra measured on Cu(111). Simulating these spectra with different beam divergences shows a distinct influence of the divergence on the appearance of the Shockley surface state. Upon crossing the Fermi level, its rise in intensity can be directly linked with the beam divergence. A comparison of measurement and simulation enables us to quantify the momentum resolution independent of surface quality, energy resolution, and experimental geometry. With spin resolution, a single spectrum taken around the Fermi momentum of a spin-split surface state, e.g., on Au(111), is sufficient to derive the momentum resolution of an inverse-photoemission setup.

  13. Momentum resolution in inverse photoemission.

    PubMed

    Zumbülte, A; Schmidt, A B; Donath, M

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to determine the electron beam divergence, and thus the momentum resolution, of an inverse-photoemission setup directly from a series of spectra measured on Cu(111). Simulating these spectra with different beam divergences shows a distinct influence of the divergence on the appearance of the Shockley surface state. Upon crossing the Fermi level, its rise in intensity can be directly linked with the beam divergence. A comparison of measurement and simulation enables us to quantify the momentum resolution independent of surface quality, energy resolution, and experimental geometry. With spin resolution, a single spectrum taken around the Fermi momentum of a spin-split surface state, e.g., on Au(111), is sufficient to derive the momentum resolution of an inverse-photoemission setup.

  14. Simplified, inverse, ejector design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechant, Lawrence J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple lumped parameter based inverse design tool has been developed which provides flow path geometry and entrainment estimates subject to operational, acoustic, and design constraints. These constraints are manifested through specification of primary mass flow rate or ejector thrust, fully-mixed exit velocity, and static pressure matching. Fundamentally, integral forms of the conservation equations coupled with the specified design constraints are combined to yield an easily invertible linear system in terms of the flow path cross-sectional areas. Entrainment is computed by back substitution. Initial comparison with experimental and analogous one-dimensional methods show good agreement. Thus, this simple inverse design code provides an analytically based, preliminary design tool with direct application to High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) design studies.

  15. Inverse psoriasis treated with ustekinumab.

    PubMed

    Campos, Manuel António; Varela, Paulo; Baptista, Armando; Moreira, Ana Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Inverse psoriasis is characterised by the involvement of flexural skin folds. This form of psoriasis has distinct clinical and therapeutic features. This report refers to the case of a 48-year-old Caucasian man who was observed in our department, with a clinically and biopsy proven diagnosis of inverse psoriasis. For 2 years, the patient was treated with different combinations of corticosteroids, vitamin D analogues and methotrexate, with no satisfactory response. Given the lack of a clinical response and comorbidities, latent tuberculosis was excluded, and we started treatment with ustekinumab. We chose this biological agent because the patient was a long-distance truck driver and refused the possibility of autoinjections. The patient underwent three ustekinumab injections, which resulted in significant improvement of pruritus, erythaematous lesions and quality of life. PMID:27222277

  16. Stochastic inversion by ray continuation

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, A.; Viallix

    1989-05-01

    The conventional tomographic inversion consists in minimizing residuals between measured and modelled traveltimes. The process tends to be unstable and some additional constraints are required to stabilize it. The stochastic formulation generalizes the technique and sets it on firmer theoretical bases. The Stochastic Inversion by Ray Continuation (SIRC) is a probabilistic approach, which takes a priori geological information into account and uses probability distributions to characterize data correlations and errors. It makes it possible to tie uncertainties to the results. The estimated parameters are interval velocities and B-spline coefficients used to represent smoothed interfaces. Ray tracing is done by a continuation technique between source and receives. The ray coordinates are computed from one path to the next by solving a linear system derived from Fermat's principle. The main advantages are fast computations, accurate traveltimes and derivatives. The seismic traces are gathered in CMPs. For a particular CMP, several reflecting elements are characterized by their time gradient measured on the stacked section, and related to a mean emergence direction. The program capabilities are tested on a synthetic example as well as on a field example. The strategy consists in inverting the parameters for one layer, then for the next one down. An inversion step is divided in two parts. First the parameters for the layer concerned are inverted, while the parameters for the upper layers remain fixed. Then all the parameters are reinverted. The velocity-depth section computed by the program together with the corresponding errors can be used directly for the interpretation, as an initial model for depth migration or for the complete inversion program under development.

  17. Inversions for axisymmetric galactic disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiotelis, N.; Patsis, P. A.

    1993-08-01

    We use two models for the distribution function to solve an inverse problem for axisymmetric disks. These systems may be considered - under certain assumptions - as galactic disks. In some cases the solutions of the resulting integral equations are simple, which allows the determination of the kinematic properties of self-consistent models for these systems. These properties for then = 1 Toomre disk are presented in this study.

  18. Pyramidal inversion domain boundaries revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Remmele, T.; Albrecht, M.; Irmscher, K.; Fornari, R.; Strassburg, M.

    2011-10-03

    The structure of pyramidal inversion domain boundaries in GaN:Mg was investigated by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. The analysis shows the upper (0001) boundary to consist of a single Mg layer inserted between polarity inverted GaN layers in an abcab stacking. The Mg bound in these defects is at least one order of magnitude lower than the chemical Mg concentration. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements show that up to 27% of the Mg acceptors is electrically compensated.

  19. Phenomenological description of phase inversion.

    PubMed

    Piela, K; Ooms, G; Sengers, J V

    2009-02-01

    We propose an extended Ginzburg-Landau model for a description of the ambivalence region associated with the phenomenon of phase inversion observed in dispersed water-oil flow through a pipe. In analogy to the classical mean-field theory of phase transitions, it is shown that a good quantitative representation of the ambivalence region is obtained by using the injected phase volume fraction and a friction factor as the appropriate physical parameters.

  20. A Combined Experimental and Analytical Modeling Approach to Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Stewart, Michael B.; Adams, Glynn P.; Romine, Peter

    1998-01-01

    In the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process a rotating pin tool joins the sides of a seam by stirring them together. This solid state welding process avoids problems with melting and hot-shortness presented by some difficult-to weld high-performance light alloys. The details of the plastic flow during the process are not well understood and are currently a subject of research. Two candidate models of the FSW process, the Mixed Zone (MZ) and the Single Slip Surface (S3) model are presented and their predictions compared to experimental data.

  1. Stochastic behavior and stirring rate effects in the chlorite-iodide reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagypál, István; Epstein, Irving R.

    1988-12-01

    The autocatalytic reaction between chlorite and iodide ions in a closed system is a clock reaction, showing a sudden appearance of brown I2 followed by a rapid disappearance of the color. Under certain conditions, the reaction time displays a striking irreproducibility. This stochastic behavior is studied potentiometrically and spectrophotometrically as a function of initial [I- ], stirring rate and solution volume. The results imply that the irreproducibility is an inherent feature of the reaction generated by fluctuations in the solution after it is ``well mixed.'' The key contributors to the stochasticity are local concentration inhomogeneities resulting from imperfect stirring and the ``supercatalytic'' reaction kinetics. A qualitative explanation is given that incorporates these aspects.

  2. Microstructural Evolution and Wear Resistance of Friction Stir-Processed AISI 52100 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seraj, R. A.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Hajian, M.; Kargar, F.; Soltanalizadeh, R.

    2016-07-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was successfully applied on AISI 52100 steel. The influence of process parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the material was evaluated. It was observed that the initial ferritic-pearlitic microstructure of the base metal is transformed to the martensitic microstructure with retained austenite in the stir zone. The results also showed that microhardness and wear resistance of the FSP samples are, respectively, at least 2 and 15 times higher than those of the base metal. The improvement of the mechanical properties of FSP samples was attributed to their microstructural characteristics. The mechanisms controlling the wear behavior of the base metal and FSP samples were also discussed.

  3. Spindle-shaped nanoscale yolk/shell magnetic stirring bars for heterogeneous catalysis in macro- and microscopic systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuliang; Cao, Changyan; Peng, Li; Huang, Peipei; Sun, Yongbin; Wei, Fang; Song, Weiguo

    2016-01-28

    A new type of spindle-shaped nanoscale yolk/shell magnetic stirring bar containing noble metal nanoparticles was prepared. The as-synthesized Pd-Fe@meso-SiO2 not only showed impressive activity and stability as a heterogeneous catalyst in a macroscopic flask system, but also acted as an efficient nanoscale magnetic stir bar in a microscopic droplet system.

  4. Battleground Energy Recovery Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, Daniel

    2011-12-31

    In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

  5. On the Magic Square and Inverse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elzaidi, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    In this note, we give a method for finding the inverse of a three by three magic square matrix without using the usual methods for finding the inverse of a matrix. Also we give a method for finding the inverse of a three by three magic square matrix whose entries are also matrices. By using these ideas, we can construct large matrices whose…

  6. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-09-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination.

  7. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-01-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination. PMID:10471710

  8. Formation of Oxides in the Interior of Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Chen, Po; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSWing) the actual solid state joining takes place between the faying surfaces which form the weld seam. Thus the seam trace is often investigated for clues when the strength of the weld is reduced. Aluminum and its alloys are known to form a native, protective oxide on the surface. If these native surface oxides are not sufficiently broken up during the FSW process, they are reported to remain in the FSW interior and weaken the bond strength. This type of weld defect has been referred to as a lazy "S", lazy "Z", joint line defect, kissing bond, or residual oxide defect. Usually these defects are mitigated by modification of the process parameters, such as increased tool rotation rate, which causes a finer breakup of the native oxide particles. This study proposes that there may be an alternative mechanism for formation of oxides found within the weld nugget. As the oxidation rate increases at elevated temperatures above 400ºC, it may be possible for enhanced oxidation to occur on the interior surfaces during the FSW process from entrained air entering the seam gap. Normally, FSWs of aluminum alloys are made without a purge gas and it is unknown how process parameters and initial fit up could affect a potential air path into the interior during the processing. In addition, variations in FSW parameters, such as the tool rotation, are known to have a strong influence on the FSW temperature which may affect the oxidation rate if internal surfaces are exposed to entrained air. A series of FSWs were made in 3 different thickness panels of AA2219 (0.95, 1.27 and 1.56 cm) at 2 different weld pitches. As the thickness of the panels increased, there was an increased tendency for a gap to form in advance of the weld tool. If sufficient air is able to enter the workpiece gap prior to consolidation, the weld temperature can increase the oxidation rate on the interior surfaces. These oxidation rates would also be accelerated in areas of localized

  9. Modeling and simulation of large scale stirred tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, John R.

    The purpose of this dissertation is to provide a written record of the evaluation performed on the DWPF mixing process by the construction of numerical models that resemble the geometry of this process. There were seven numerical models constructed to evaluate the DWPF mixing process and four pilot plants. The models were developed with Fluent software and the results from these models were used to evaluate the structure of the flow field and the power demand of the agitator. The results from the numerical models were compared with empirical data collected from these pilot plants that had been operated at an earlier date. Mixing is commonly used in a variety ways throughout industry to blend miscible liquids, disperse gas through liquid, form emulsions, promote heat transfer and, suspend solid particles. The DOE Sites at Hanford in Richland Washington, West Valley in New York, and Savannah River Site in Aiken South Carolina have developed a process that immobilizes highly radioactive liquid waste. The radioactive liquid waste at DWPF is an opaque sludge that is mixed in a stirred tank with glass frit particles and water to form slurry of specified proportions. The DWPF mixing process is composed of a flat bottom cylindrical mixing vessel with a centrally located helical coil, and agitator. The helical coil is used to heat and cool the contents of the tank and can improve flow circulation. The agitator shaft has two impellers; a radial blade and a hydrofoil blade. The hydrofoil is used to circulate the mixture between the top region and bottom region of the tank. The radial blade sweeps the bottom of the tank and pushes the fluid in the outward radial direction. The full scale vessel contains about 9500 gallons of slurry with flow behavior characterized as a Bingham Plastic. Particles in the mixture have an abrasive characteristic that cause excessive erosion to internal vessel components at higher impeller speeds. The desire for this mixing process is to ensure the

  10. Dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for mobile manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Joanna; Tchoń, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    By analogy to the definition of the dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for robotic manipulators, we have designed a dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for mobile manipulators built of a non-holonomic mobile platform and a holonomic on-board manipulator. The endogenous configuration space approach has been exploited as a source of conceptual guidelines. The new inverse guarantees a decoupling of the motion in the operational space from the forces exerted in the endogenous configuration space and annihilated by the dual Jacobian inverse. A performance study of the new Jacobian inverse as a tool for motion planning is presented.

  11. A survey of microwave inverse FEL and inverse cerenkov accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T. C.; Zhang, T. B.

    1997-02-01

    A Microwave Inverse FEL Accelerator (MIFELA) and a Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) are currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. MIFELA and MICA will share the same injector, a thermionic cathode rf gun that should furnish 5 psec, 6 MeV, 0.2 nC electron pulses spaced by 350 psec, using microwave power of many MW provided from a 2.85 GHz klystron. MIFELA is to operate with ˜4 Mw of 11.4 GHz microwave power in the TE11 mode, with beam injection into each fourth rf cycle; a variable pitch and field undulator together with a guide magnetic field are present as well. MICA will operate at 2.85 GHz using an alumina-lined waveguide driven in the TM01 mode; the phase velocity is just below c, with no guide field. MIFELA produces a beam of spiralling electrons, while MICA makes an axially-directed beam. This is a survey of the operating principles of these smooth-bore "tabletop" accelerators (˜15 MeV) as they are understood prior to operation.

  12. Characterization of Plastic flow and Resulting Micro-Textures in a Friction Stir Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanically affected zone of a friction stir weld (FSW) cross section exhibits two distinct microstructural regions, possibly the residues of two distinct currents of metal in the FSW flow process. In this study the respective textures of these microstructural regions are investigated using orientation image mapping (OIM).

  13. Vitrification of Cesium-Laden Organic Ion Exchange Resin in a Stirred Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero-Herman, C.A; Sargent, T.N.; Overcamp, T.J.; Bickford, D.F.

    1997-07-09

    The goal of this research was a feasibility study for vitrifying the organic ion exchange resin in a stirred-tank melter. Tests were conducted to determine the fate of cesium including the feed, exit glass, and offgas streams and to assess any impact of feeding the resin on the melter or its performance.

  14. A Colorful Mixing Experiment in a Stirred Tank Using Non-Newtonian Blue Maize Flour Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujilo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rojas-de Gante, Cecillia; García-Lara, Silverio; Ballesca´-Estrada, Adriana; Alvarez, Marion Moise´s

    2014-01-01

    A simple experiment designed to study mixing of a material of complex rheology in a stirred tank is described. Non-Newtonian suspensions of blue maize flour that naturally contain anthocyanins have been chosen as a model fluid. These anthocyanins act as a native, wide spectrum pH indicator exhibiting greenish colors in alkaline environments, blue…

  15. Production of xylanolytic enzymes by Aspergillus terricola in stirred tank and airlift tower loop bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Michelin, Michele; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes Teixeira de Moraes; Silva, Daniel Pereira da; Ruzene, Denise Santos; Vicente, António Augusto; Jorge, João Atílio; Terenzi, Héctor Francisco; Teixeira, José António

    2011-12-01

    Fungi producing high xylanase levels have attracted considerable attention because of their potential industrial applications. Batch cultivations of Aspergillus terricola fungus were evaluated in stirred tank and airlift bioreactors, by using wheat bran particles suspended in the cultivation medium as substrate for xylanase and β-xylosidase production. In the stirred tank bioreactor, in physical conditions of 30°C, 300 rpm, and aeration of 1 vvm (1 l min⁻¹), with direct inoculation of fungal spores, 7,475 U l⁻¹ xylanase was obtained after 36 h of operation, remaining constant after 24 h. In the absence of air injection in the stirred tank reactor, limited xylanase production was observed (final concentration 740 U l⁻¹). When the fermentation process was realized in the airlift bioreactor, xylanase production was higher than that observed in the stirred tank bioreactor, being 9,265 U l⁻¹ at 0.07 vvm (0.4 l min⁻¹) and 12,845 U l⁻¹ at 0.17 vvm (1 l min⁻¹) aeration rate.

  16. Metabolic status of pluripotent cells and exploitation for growth in stirred suspension bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Day, Brad; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are of great interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Recent studies have shown that they maintain a glycolytic metabolic status while pluripotent and wholesale changes to mitochondrial and metabolic profile occur during differentiation. This article reviews the process and how this may be exploited in a stirred suspension bioreactor for rapid growth while maintaining pluripotency.

  17. Microstructure of AA 2024 fixed joints formed by friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welded butt joints on 2024T3 alloy have been obtained using different process parameters. The microstructures of all the weld joint zones have been examined and such structural parameters as grain size, particle size and volume content of particles have been determined in order to find correlations with the microhardness of the corresponding zones of the weld.

  18. Deterministic Chaos in Open Well-stirred Bray-Liebhafsky Reaction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana; Vukojević, Vladana; Pejić, Nataša; Grozdić, Tomislav; Anić, Slobodan

    2004-12-01

    Dynamics of the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction is analyzed in a Continuously-fed well-Stirred Thank Reactor (CSTR). Deterministic chaos is found under different conditions, when temperature and acidity are chosen as control parameters. Dynamic patterns observed in real experiments are also numerically simulated.

  19. Stirring effects and bistability in the iodate-arsenous acid reaction: Premixed vs segregated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, L.; Horsthemke, W.

    1987-01-01

    Using a coalescence-dispersion model of the continuous flow-stirred tank reactor (CSTR), we study the effect of premixed vs nonpremixed reactant flows on chemical bistability. The region of bistability is smaller for segregated feed streams than for a fully premixed feed stream. The transition from flow branch to thermodynamic branch is particularly sensitive to the feed stream configuration.

  20. Chaotic behavior in the dynamical system of a continuous stirred tank reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retzloff, D. G.; Chan, P. C.-H.; Chicone, C.; Offin, D.; Mohamed, R.

    1987-03-01

    The dynamical system describing a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the reactions A→B→C and A→C, B→D is considered. A circulating attractor with accompanying circulating orbits is shown to exist when the critical point of the system is unique and unstable. The orbit structure has been numerically found to consist of periodic orbits and chaotic behavior.

  1. Structure and properties of fixed joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted friction-stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, S. V.; Ivanov, K. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Eliseev, A. A.; Ivanov, A. N.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with structure and properties of aluminum alloy 7475 and its joints obtained by friction stir welding including under ultrasonic action. Microhardness measurements show that ultrasonic action increases strength properties of the joints. Optical and transmission electron microscopy reveals that this effect is related to the precipitation of tertiary coherent S-and T-phase particles.

  2. Fatigue Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Joints Repaired by Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, C.; Infante, V.

    2014-04-01

    Fatigue is undoubtedly the most important design criterion in aeronautic structures. Although friction stir-welded joints are characterized by a high mechanical performance, they can enclose some defects, especially in their root. These defects along with the relatively low residual stresses of the friction stir-welding thermomechanical cycle can turn into primary sources of crack initiation. In this context, this article deals with the fatigue behavior of friction stir-welded joints subjected to surface smoothing by grinding improvement technique. The 4-mm-thick aluminum alloy 2024-T351 was used in this study. The fatigue strength of the base material, joints in the as-welded condition, and the sound and defective friction stir-welded joints improved by grinding were investigated in detail. The tests were carried out with a constant amplitude loading and with a stress ratio of R = 0. The fatigue results show that an improvement in fatigue behavior was obtained in the joints repaired by superficial grinding technique. The weld grinding technique is better especially for lower loads and increases the high cycle fatigue strength. The fatigue strength of the improved welded joints was higher than that of the base material.

  3. Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Zhili [Knoxville, TN; David, Stan A [Knoxville, TN; Frederick, David Alan [Harriman, TN

    2010-07-27

    Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

  4. Structure and properties of fixed joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted friction-stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuna, S. V. Ivanov, K. V. Eliseev, A. A.; Tarasov, S. Yu. Ivanov, A. N. Rubtsov, V. E. Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-27

    This paper deals with structure and properties of aluminum alloy 7475 and its joints obtained by friction stir welding including under ultrasonic action. Microhardness measurements show that ultrasonic action increases strength properties of the joints. Optical and transmission electron microscopy reveals that this effect is related to the precipitation of tertiary coherent S-and T-phase particles.

  5. LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF RESIDENCE TIME DISTRIBUTION OF FLUIDS IN LAMINAR FLOW STIRRED ANNULAR PHOTOREACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and Numerical Investigations of Residence Time Distribution of Fluids in Laminar Flow Stirred Annular Photoreactor

    E. Sahle-Demessie1, Siefu Bekele2, U. R. Pillai1

    1U.S. EPA, National Risk Management Research Laboratory
    Sustainable Technology Division,...

  6. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xuben; Li, Zhirong; Li, Qiong; Li, Zhengwen

    2009-06-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  7. Lightcurve Inversion for 65 Cybele

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Lorenzo; Pilcher, Frederick

    2015-07-01

    We present a shape and spin axis model for main-belt asteroid 65 Cybele. The model was obtained with lightcurve inversion process, using combined dense photometric data obtained during fifteen apparitions from 1977 to 2014 and sparse data from USNO Flagstaff. Analysis of the resulting data found a sidereal period P = 6.081434 ± 0.000005 hours and two possible pole solutions: (l = 208°, b = -7°) and (l = 27°, b = -14°) with an error of ±15 degrees.

  8. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended service. This

  9. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion in practice—the electrical conductivity structure of the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Kristina; Ritter, Oliver

    2013-10-01

    3-D inversion techniques have become a widely used tool in magnetotelluric (MT) data interpretation. However, with real data sets, many of the controlling factors for the outcome of 3-D inversion are little explored, such as alignment of the coordinate system, handling and influence of data errors and model regularization. Here we present 3-D inversion results of 169 MT sites from the central San Andreas Fault in California. Previous extensive 2-D inversion and 3-D forward modelling of the data set revealed significant along-strike variation of the electrical conductivity structure. 3-D inversion can recover these features but only if the inversion parameters are tuned in accordance with the particularities of the data set. Based on synthetic 3-D data we explore the model space and test the impacts of a wide range of inversion settings. The tests showed that the recovery of a pronounced regional 2-D structure in inversion of the complete impedance tensor depends on the coordinate system. As interdependencies between data components are not considered in standard 3-D MT inversion codes, 2-D subsurface structures can vanish if data are not aligned with the regional strike direction. A priori models and data weighting, that is, how strongly individual components of the impedance tensor and/or vertical magnetic field transfer functions dominate the solution, are crucial controls for the outcome of 3-D inversion. If deviations from a prior model are heavily penalized, regularization is prone to result in erroneous and misleading 3-D inversion models, particularly in the presence of strong conductivity contrasts. A `good' overall rms misfit is often meaningless or misleading as a huge range of 3-D inversion results exist, all with similarly `acceptable' misfits but producing significantly differing images of the conductivity structures. Reliable and meaningful 3-D inversion models can only be recovered if data misfit is assessed systematically in the frequency

  10. Intermediate water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckman, G.; Anderson, A. R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A water recovery system for collecting, storing, and processing urine, wash water, and humidity condensates from a crew of three aboard a spacecraft is described. The results of a 30-day test performed on a breadboard system are presented. The intermediate water recovery system produced clear, sterile, water with a 96.4 percent recovery rate from the processed urine. Recommendations for improving the system are included.

  11. Protein crystallization in stirred systems--scale-up via the maximum local energy dissipation.

    PubMed

    Smejkal, Benjamin; Helk, Bernhard; Rondeau, Jean-Michel; Anton, Sabine; Wilke, Angelika; Scheyerer, Peter; Fries, Jacqueline; Hekmat, Dariusch; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2013-07-01

    Macromolecular bioproducts like therapeutic proteins have usually been crystallized with µL-scale vapor diffusion experiments for structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Little systematic know-how exists for technical-scale protein crystallization in stirred vessels. In this study, the Fab-fragment of the therapeutic antibody Canakinumab was successfully crystallized in a stirred-tank reactor on a 6 mL-scale. A four times faster onset of crystallization of the Fab-fragment was observed compared to the non-agitated 10 µL-scale. Further studies on a liter-scale with lysozyme confirmed this effect. A 10 times faster onset of crystallization was observed in this case at an optimum stirrer speed. Commonly suggested scale-up criteria (i.e., minimum stirrer speed to keep the protein crystals in suspension or constant impeller tip speed) were shown not to be successful. Therefore, the criterion of constant maximum local energy dissipation was applied for scale-up of the stirred crystallization process for the first time. The maximum local energy dissipation was estimated by measuring the drop size distribution of an oil/surfactant/water emulsion in stirred-tank reactors on a 6 mL-, 100 mL-, and 1 L-scale. A comparable crystallization behavior was achieved in all stirred-tank reactors when the maximum local energy dissipation was kept constant for scale-up. A maximum local energy dissipation of 2.2 W kg(-1) was identified to be the optimum for lysozyme crystallization at all scales under study.

  12. Chemical characterization and antioxidant activities comparison in fresh, dried, stir-frying and carbonized ginger.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxin; Hong, Yan; Han, Yanquan; Wang, Yongzhong; Xia, Lunzhu

    2016-02-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) is a common dietary adjunct that contributes to the taste and flavor of foods, and is also an important Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Different processing methods can produce different processed gingers with dissimilar chemical constituents and pharmacological activities. In this study, an ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/QTOF-MS) was applied to identify the complicated components from fresh, dried, stir-frying and carbonized ginger extracts. All of the 27 compounds were identified from four kinds of ginger samples (fresh, dried, stir-frying and carbonized ginger). Five main constituents (zingerone, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 6-shogaol and 10-gingerol) in these four kinds of ginger sample extracts were simultaneously determined by UPLC-PDA. Meanwhile, the antioxidant effect of fresh, dried, stir-frying and carbonized gingers were evaluated by three assays (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazolinesulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)). The results demonstrated that antioxidant activity of dried ginger was the highest, for its phenolic contents are 5.2-, 1.1- and 2.4-fold higher than that of fresh, stir-frying and carbonized ginger, respectively, the antioxidant activities' results indicated a similar tendency with phenolic contents: dried ginger>stir-frying ginger>fresh ginger>carbonized ginger. The processing contributed to the decreased concentration of gingerols and the increased levels of shogaols, which reducing the antioxidant effects in pace with processing. This study elucidated the relationship of the heating process with the constituents and antioxidant activity, and provided a guide for choosing different kinds of ginger samples on clinical application.

  13. Apollo Recovery Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives include: a) Describe the organization of recovery force command and control and landing areas; b) Describe the function and timeline use of the Earth Landing System (ELS); c) Describe Stable 1 vs Stable 2 landing configurations and the function of the Command Module Uprighting System; d) Explain the activities of the helicopter and swimmer teams in egress and recovery of the crew; e)Explain the activities of the swimmer teams and primary recovery ship in recovery of the Command Module; and f) Describe several landing incidents that occurred during Apollo.

  14. Multi-Skip Tomographic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Bloom, Joost; Lorenz, Maarten

    2011-06-01

    Inspection of corrosion at pipe support locations is difficult because of accessibility limitations. Recently a screening technique has been developed called Multi-Skip ultrasonics. The method utilizes a pitch-catch set-up. Shear waves are transmitted that reflect multiple times in the pipe wall, from which integral wall thickness information is obtained. The method turns out to be very sensitive in detecting the presence of wall loss, but it turns out to be difficult to determine the extent of the wall loss. If the extent is not known, only a conservative estimate of depth can be derived from the Multi-Skip signals, because of the accumulative nature of the change in arrival time due to wall loss. Multi-Skip tomography appears to be a promising method in addition to Multi-Skip screening as a follow-up inspection technique. It uses full wave field inversion to determine a wall thickness profile at a particular location of the pipe on the support. As with the Multi-Skip screening method, Multi-Skip tomography is applied with the transmitter and receiver on both sides of the pipe support location and waves traveling in the axial pipe direction. The wave field inversion consists of a forward modeling step that predicts the measured wave field after which an iterative comparison process with the actually measured wave field results in an estimate of the wall thickness profile under the support.

  15. Monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid production by Uncaria tomentosa (Willd) D.C. cell suspension cultures in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Monroy, Mario; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-01-01

    Cell growth, monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid (MOA) production, and morphological properties of Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures in a 2-L stirred tank bioreactor were investigated. U. tomentosa (cell line green Uth-3) was able to grow in a stirred tank at an impeller tip speed of 95 cm/s (agitation speed of 400 rpm), showing a maximum biomass yield of 11.9 +/- 0.6 g DW/L and a specific growth rate of 0.102 d(-1). U. tomentosa cells growing in a stirred tank achieved maximum volumetric and specific MOA concentration (467.7 +/- 40.0 microg/L, 44.6 +/- 5.2 microg/g DW) at 16 days of culture. MOA chemical profile of cell suspension cultures growing in a stirred tank resembled that of the plant. Depending on culture time, from the total MOA produced, 37-100% was found in the medium in the bioreactor culture. MOA concentration achieved in a stirred tank was up to 10-fold higher than that obtained in Erlenmeyer flasks (agitated at 110 rpm). In a stirred tank, average area of the single cells of U. tomentosa increased up to 4-fold, and elliptical form factor increased from 1.40 to 2.55, indicating enlargement of U. tomentosa single cells. This work presents the first report of U. tomentosa green cell suspension cultures that grow and produce MOA in a stirred tank bioreactor.

  16. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds of 11Cr-Ferritic/Martensitic Steel to 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hiromichi T.; Yano, Yasuhide; Sekio, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Dissimilar joints between ferritic and austenitic steels are of interest for selected applications in next generation fast reactors. In this study, dissimilar friction-stir welding of an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel to a 316 austenitic stainless steel was attempted and the mechanical properties and microstructure of the resulting welds were examined. Friction-stir welding produces a stir zone without macroscopic weld-defects, but the two dissimilar steels are not intermixed. The two dissimilar steels are interleaved along a sharp zigzagging interface in the stir zone. During small-sized tensile testing of the stir zone, this sharp interface did not act as a fracture site. Furthermore, the microstructure of the stir zone was refined in both the ferritic/martensitic steel and the 316 stainless steel resulting in improved mechanical properties over the adjacent base material regions. This study demonstrates that friction-stir welding can produce welds between dissimilar steels that contain no macroscopic weld-defects and display suitable mechanical properties.

  17. Geophysical Inversion through Hierarchical Genetic Algorithm Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Alex; Huisman, Johan A.

    2010-05-01

    Geophysical investigation is a powerful tool that allows non-invasive and non-destructive mapping of subsurface states and properties. However, non-uniqueness associated with the inversion process halts these methods from becoming of more quantitative use. One major direction researchers are going is constraining the inverse problem by hydrological observations and models. An alternative to the commonly used direct inversion methods are global optimization schemes (such as genetic algorithms and Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods). However, the major limitation here is the desired high resolution of the tomographic image, which leads to a large number of parameters and an unreasonably high computational effort when using global optimization schemes. One way to overcome these problems is to combine the advantages of both direct and global inversion methods through hierarchical inversion. That is, starting the inversion with relatively coarse resolution of parameters, achieving good inversion using one of the two inversion schemes (global or direct), and then refining the resolution and applying a combination of global and direct inversion schemes for the whole domain or locally. In this work we explore through synthetic case studies the option of using a global optimization scheme for inversion of electrical resistivity tomography data through hierarchical refinement of the model resolution.

  18. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Z.L.; Wang, X.S.; Pang, Q.; Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L.

    2015-01-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming.

  19. Metals removal and recovery from municipal sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.L.; Scheybeler, B.J.; Smith, M.L.; Baird, R.; Lo, M.P.; Haug, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of metals removal from municipal sludges that may be disposed of on agricultural land was studied. Heavy metal accumulation in such vegetables as lettuce and heavy metal toxicity to such crops as oats, beans, corn, and radishes is of concern. The purpose of the study was to assess metal removal systems for sludges obtained from the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant, Carson, Calif. Primary sludge, waste activated sludge, and their anaerobically digested counterparts were dosed with sulfuric acid and the chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), to effect metal solubilization. Seven metals were examined for removal from sludge: Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn. Recovery of metals from the sludges was also examined. Using an acid dosage to effect pH decrease to pH 2 and a-stirring time of 24 hours, the removal efficiencies for Fe, Zn, Ni, and Cr were found to be upwards of 75%. Removal efficiencies for Pb and Cd were less, at about 30 to 70%. At less than 10%, Cu was hardly removed. Metal extraction using EDTA gave slightly higher removal efficiencies for Cd, Pb, and Cu. The recovery of solubilized metals from solution with lime was very successful at greater than 90% efficiencies. Examination of the dewaterability of the acid-treated sludge found no significant difference between treated and untreated. Preliminary estimates indicated that about 0.5 metric ton of acid would be required for each dry metric ton of sludge solids to effect significant metal removal of better than 50% of the cadmium and 33% of the lead. To precipitate the metals from the acid filtrate, 1 metric ton of lime per dry metric ton of sludge would be needed. Considering the chemical costs and metal removal efficiency by sludge acidification, it would seem that industrial source control would be a more practical approach, although its full economic impact on the industries has not been estimated.

  20. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  1. Gravity gradiometry and seismic interpretation integration using spatially guided fuzzy c-means clustering inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapstine, Thomas D.

    Gravity gradiometry has been used as a geophysical tool to image salt structure in hydrocarbon exploration. The knowledge of the location, orientation, and spatial extent of salt bodies helps characterize possible petroleum prospects. Imaging around and underneath salt bodies can be challenging given the petrophysical properties and complicated geometry of salt. Methods for imaging beneath salt using seismic data exist but are often iterative and expensive, requiring a refinement of a velocity model at each iteration. Fortunately, the relatively strong density contrast between salt and background density structure pro- vides the opportunity for gravity gradiometry to be useful in exploration, especially when integrated with other geophysical data such as seismic. Quantitatively integrating multiple geophysical data is not trivial, but can improve the recovery of salt body geometry and petrophysical composition using inversion. This thesis provides two options for quantitatively integrating seismic, AGG, and petrophysical data that may aid the imaging of salt bodies. Both methods leverage and expand upon previously developed deterministic inversion methods. The inversion methods leverage seismically derived information, such as horizon slope and salt body interpretation, to constrain the inversion of airborne gravity gradiometry data (AGG) to arrive at a density contrast model. The first method involves constraining a top of salt inversion using slope in a seismic image. The second method expands fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering inversion to include spatial control on clustering based on a seismically derived salt body interpretation. The effective- ness of the methods are illustrated on a 2D synthetic earth model derived from the SEAM Phase 1 salt model. Both methods show that constraining the inversion of AGG data using information derived from seismic images can improve the recovery of salt.

  2. Energy recovery injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V. M.; Atkinson, T.; Matveenko, A.

    2016-10-01

    This article presents a novel design for a superconducting rf electron injector that incorporates energy recovery. This concept relaxes the demands of high power input couplers, improves essential beam parameters and energy efficiency and reduces the overall cost of a compact energy recovery linac machine.

  3. Applications of matrix inversion tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warp, Richard J.; Godfrey, Devon J.; Dobbins, James T., III

    2000-04-01

    The improved image quality and characteristics of new flat- panel x-ray detectors have renewed interest in advanced algorithms such as tomosynthesis. Digital tomosynthesis is a method of acquiring and reconstructing a three-dimensional data set with limited-angle tube movement. Historically, conventional tomosynthesis reconstruction has suffered contamination of the planes of interest by blurred out-of- plane structures. This paper focuses on a Matrix Inversion Tomosynthesis (MITS) algorithm to remove unwanted blur from adjacent planes. The algorithm uses a set of coupled equations to solve for the blurring function in each reconstructed plane. This paper demonstrates the use of the MITS algorithm in three imaging applications: small animal microscopy, chest radiography, and orthopedics. The results of the MITS reconstruction process demonstrate an improved reduction of blur from out-of-plane structures when compared to conventional tomosynthesis. We conclude that the MITS algorithm holds potential in a variety of applications to improve three-dimensional image reconstruction.

  4. Action understanding as inverse planning.

    PubMed

    Baker, Chris L; Saxe, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Joshua B

    2009-12-01

    Humans are adept at inferring the mental states underlying other agents' actions, such as goals, beliefs, desires, emotions and other thoughts. We propose a computational framework based on Bayesian inverse planning for modeling human action understanding. The framework represents an intuitive theory of intentional agents' behavior based on the principle of rationality: the expectation that agents will plan approximately rationally to achieve their goals, given their beliefs about the world. The mental states that caused an agent's behavior are inferred by inverting this model of rational planning using Bayesian inference, integrating the likelihood of the observed actions with the prior over mental states. This approach formalizes in precise probabilistic terms the essence of previous qualitative approaches to action understanding based on an "intentional stance" [Dennett, D. C. (1987). The intentional stance. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press] or a "teleological stance" [Gergely, G., Nádasdy, Z., Csibra, G., & Biró, S. (1995). Taking the intentional stance at 12 months of age. Cognition, 56, 165-193]. In three psychophysical experiments using animated stimuli of agents moving in simple mazes, we assess how well different inverse planning models based on different goal priors can predict human goal inferences. The results provide quantitative evidence for an approximately rational inference mechanism in human goal inference within our simplified stimulus paradigm, and for the flexible nature of goal representations that human observers can adopt. We discuss the implications of our experimental results for human action understanding in real-world contexts, and suggest how our framework might be extended to capture other kinds of mental state inferences, such as inferences about beliefs, or inferring whether an entity is an intentional agent.

  5. In-syringe magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for automation and downscaling of methylene blue active substances assay.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ruth; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Cerdà, Victor

    2014-12-01

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of the methylene blue active substances assay based on in-syringe automation of magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was developed. The proposed method proved to be valid for the determination of anionic surfactant in waste, pond, well, tap, and drinking water samples. Sample mixing with reagents, extraction and phase separation were performed within the syringe of an automated syringe pump containing a magnetic stirring bar for homogenization and solvent dispersion. The syringe module was used upside-down to enable the use of chloroform as an extraction solvent of higher density than water. The calibration was found to be linear up to 0.3mg/L using only 200 µL of solvent and 4 mL of sample. The limits of detection (3σ) and quantification (10σ) were 7.0 µg/L and 22 µg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviation for 10 replicate determinations of 0.1mg/L SBDS was below 3%. Concentrations of anionic surfactants in natural water samples were in the range of 0.032-0.213 mg/L and no significant differences towards the standard method were found. Standard additions gave analyte recoveries between 95% and 106% proving the general applicability and adequateness of the system to MBSA index determination. Compared to the tedious standard method requiring up to 50 mL of chloroform, the entire procedure took only 345 s using 250-times less solvent.

  6. Stir bar sorptive-dispersive microextraction mediated by magnetic nanoparticles-nylon 6 composite for the extraction of hydrophilic organic compounds in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Benedé, Juan L; Chisvert, Alberto; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Salvador, Amparo

    2016-07-01

    A new and sensitive analytical method based on the recently developed approach termed stir bar-sorptive dispersive microextraction (SBSDME) using a magnetic CoFe2O4@SiO2-nylon 6 composite as sorbent material is presented for the extraction of hydrophilic organic compounds. The simultaneous determination of four hydrophilic UV filters in environmental water samples has been chosen as a model analytical application due to the increasing awareness regarding the occurrence of sunscreen residuals in natural waters. The developed SBSDME approach combines the principles and benefits of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and dispersive solid phase extraction (DSPE) but allows for lower extraction time and easier post-extraction treatment. Moreover, most importantly, it enables the use of new magnetic materials that affords higher versatility and can be tailored to the needs of the analysis. The main experimental parameters involved in the SBSDME process (i.e. composite amount, extraction time, pH, ionic strength, desorption solvent and desorption time) were evaluated to provide the best enrichment factors. Under the optimized conditions, the method was successfully validated showing good linearity, enrichment factors between 105 and 145 depending on the analyte, limits of detection and quantification in the low ng mL(-1) range (1.6-2.9 ng mL(-1) and 5.4-9.6 ng mL(-1), respectively) and good intra- and inter-day repeatability (RSD < 13%). The developed method was applied to the analysis of water samples of different origin (sea, river and swimming pool). Relative recovery values ranged between 90 and 115%, thus showing that the matrices under consideration do not affect the extraction process.

  7. Stir bar sorptive-dispersive microextraction mediated by magnetic nanoparticles-nylon 6 composite for the extraction of hydrophilic organic compounds in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Benedé, Juan L; Chisvert, Alberto; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Salvador, Amparo

    2016-07-01

    A new and sensitive analytical method based on the recently developed approach termed stir bar-sorptive dispersive microextraction (SBSDME) using a magnetic CoFe2O4@SiO2-nylon 6 composite as sorbent material is presented for the extraction of hydrophilic organic compounds. The simultaneous determination of four hydrophilic UV filters in environmental water samples has been chosen as a model analytical application due to the increasing awareness regarding the occurrence of sunscreen residuals in natural waters. The developed SBSDME approach combines the principles and benefits of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and dispersive solid phase extraction (DSPE) but allows for lower extraction time and easier post-extraction treatment. Moreover, most importantly, it enables the use of new magnetic materials that affords higher versatility and can be tailored to the needs of the analysis. The main experimental parameters involved in the SBSDME process (i.e. composite amount, extraction time, pH, ionic strength, desorption solvent and desorption time) were evaluated to provide the best enrichment factors. Under the optimized conditions, the method was successfully validated showing good linearity, enrichment factors between 105 and 145 depending on the analyte, limits of detection and quantification in the low ng mL(-1) range (1.6-2.9 ng mL(-1) and 5.4-9.6 ng mL(-1), respectively) and good intra- and inter-day repeatability (RSD < 13%). The developed method was applied to the analysis of water samples of different origin (sea, river and swimming pool). Relative recovery values ranged between 90 and 115%, thus showing that the matrices under consideration do not affect the extraction process. PMID:27216394

  8. Friction Stir Weld Application and Tooling Design for the Multi-purpose Crew Vehicle Stage Adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, John

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), commonly known as the Orion capsule, is planned to be the United States' next manned spacecraft for missions beyond low earth orbit. Following the cancellation of the Constellation program and creation of SLS (Space Launch System), the need arose for the MPCV to utilize the Delta IV Heavy rocket for a test launch scheduled for 2014 instead of the previously planned Ares I rocket. As a result, an adapter (MSA) must be used in conjunction with the MPCV to account for the variation in diameter of the launch vehicles; 5.5 meters down to 5.0 meters. Prior to ight article fabrication, a path nder (test article) will be fabricated to ne tune the associated manufacturing processes. The adapter will be comprised of an aluminum frustum (partial cone) that employs isogrid technology and circumferential rings on each end. The frustum will be fabricated by friction stir welding (FSW) three individual panels together on a Vertical Weld Tool (VWT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Subsequently, each circumferential ring will be friction stir welded to the frustum using a Robotic Weld Tool (RWT). The irregular geometry and large mass of the MSA require that extensive tooling preparation be put into support structures for the friction stir weld. The tooling on the VWT will be comprised of a set of conveyors mounted on pre-existing stanchions so that the MSA will have the ability to be rotated after each of the three friction stir welds. The tooling requirements to friction stir weld the rings with the RWT are somewhat more demanding. To support the mass of the MSA and resist the load of the weld tool, a system of mandrels will be mounted to stanchions and assembled in a circle. The goal of the paper will be to explain the design, fabrication, and assembly of the tooling, to explain the use of friction stir welding on the MSA path nder, and also to discuss the lessons learned and modi cations made in preparation for ight article fabrication

  9. New milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactors for the cultivation of mycelium forming microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hortsch, Ralf; Stratmann, Ansgar; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2010-06-15

    A novel milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor was developed for the cultivation of mycelium forming microorganisms on a 10 milliliter-scale. A newly designed one-sided paddle impeller is driven magnetically and rotates freely on an axis in an unbaffled reaction vessel made of polystyrene. A rotating lamella is formed which spreads out along the reactor wall. Thus an enhanced surface-to-volume ratio of the liquid phase is generated where oxygen is introduced via surface aeration. Volumetric oxygen transfer coefficients (k(L)a) > 0.15 s(-1) were measured. The fast moving liquid lamella efficiently prevents wall growth and foaming. Mean power consumption and maximum local energy dissipation were measured as function of operating conditions in the milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor (V = 10 mL) and compared to a standard laboratory-scale stirred tank bioreactor with six-bladed Rushton turbines (V = 2,000 mL). Mean power consumption increases with increasing impeller speed and shows the same characteristics and values on both scales. The maximum local energy dissipation of the milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor was reduced compared to the laboratory-scale at the same mean volumetric power input. Hence the milliliter impeller distributes power more uniformly in the reaction medium. Based on these data a reliable and robust scale-up of fermentation processes is possible. This was demonstrated with the cultivation of the actinomycete Streptomyces tendae on both scales. It was shown that the process performances were equivalent with regard to biomass concentration, mannitol consumption and production of the pharmaceutical relevant fungicide nikkomycin Z up to a process time of 120 h. A high parallel reproducibility was observed on the milliliter-scale (standard deviation < 8%) with up to 48 stirred tank bioreactors operated in a magnetic inductive drive. Rheological behavior of the culture broth was measured and showed a highly viscous shear-thinning non

  10. Constrained resistivity inversion using seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, J. H.; Herwanger, J. V.; Pain, C. C.; Worthington, M. H.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.

    2005-03-01

    In this paper we describe and apply a method for constraining structure in anisotropic electrical resistivity inversion. Structural constraints are routinely used to achieve improved model inversion. Here, a second-order (curvature-based) regularization tensor (model covariance) is used to build structure in the model. This structure could be obtained from other imaging methods such as seismic tomography, core samples or otherwise known structure in the model. Our method allows the incorporation of existing geophysical data into the inversion, in a general form that does not rely on any one-to-one correlation between data sets or material properties. Ambiguities in the resistivity distribution from electrical inversion, and in particular anisotropic inversion, may be reduced with this approach. To demonstrate the approach we invert a synthetic data set, showing the regularization tensor explicitly in different locations. We then apply the method to field data where we have some knowledge of the subsurface from seismic imaging. Our results show that it is possible to achieve a high level of convergence while using spatially varying structural constraints. Common problems associated with resistivity inversion such as source/receiver effects and false imaging of strongly resistive or conductive zones may also be reduced. As part of the inversion method we show how the magnitude of the constraints in the form of penalty parameters appropriate to an inversion may be estimated, reducing the computational expense of resistivity inversion.

  11. Human inversions and their functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Villatoro, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphic inversions are a type of structural variants that are difficult to analyze owing to their balanced nature and the location of breakpoints within complex repeated regions. So far, only a handful of inversions have been studied in detail in humans and current knowledge about their possible functional effects is still limited. However, inversions have been related to phenotypic changes and adaptation in multiple species. In this review, we summarize the evidences of the functional impact of inversions in the human genome. First, given that inversions have been shown to inhibit recombination in heterokaryotes, chromosomes displaying different orientation are expected to evolve independently and this may lead to distinct gene-expression patterns. Second, inversions have a role as disease-causing mutations both by directly affecting gene structure or regulation in different ways, and by predisposing to other secondary arrangements in the offspring of inversion carriers. Finally, several inversions show signals of being selected during human evolution. These findings illustrate the potential of inversions to have phenotypic consequences also in humans and emphasize the importance of their inclusion in genome-wide association studies. PMID:25998059

  12. Fast recovery, high voltage silicon diodes for AC motor controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balodis, V.; Berman, A. H.; Gaugh, C.

    1982-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of a high voltage, high current, fast recovery silicon diode for use in AC motor controllers, originally developed for NASA for use in avionics power supplies, is presented. The diode utilizes a positive bevel PIN mesa structure with glass passivation and has the following characteristics: peak inverse voltage - 1200 volts, forward voltage at 50 amperes - 1.5 volts, reverse recovery time of 200 nanoseconds. Characterization data for the diode, included in a table, show agreement with design concepts developed for power diodes. Circuit diagrams of the diode are also given.

  13. A Study of Friction Stir Welded 2195 Al-Li Alloy by the Scanning Reference Electrode Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donford, M. D.; Ding, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A study of the corrosion of friction stir welded 2195 Al-Li alloy has been carried out using the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET). The results are compared to those obtained from a study of heterogeneously welded samples.

  14. [UFLC/Q-TOF-MS based analysis on material base of atractylodis macrocephalae rhizoma stir-fried with wheat bran].

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao-Bing; Shan, Chen-Xiao; Wen, Hong-Mei; Li, Wei; Wu, Hao

    2013-06-01

    To establish a fingerprint spectrum for Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma stir-fried with wheat bran based on UFLC/Q-TOF-MS, and make a principal component analysis (PCA) with Markview software, in order to compare the changes of components between raw and processed Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma with raw wheat bran as the blank. The results showed that the changed in components raw Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma and Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma stir-fried with wheat bran were apparently observed by PCA. Six compounds were identified to have significant changes in mass fraction before and after being stir-fried, namely atractylenolide-I, atractylenolide-II, atractylenolide-III, atractylentrid, atractylon and an unknown compound. Among them, atractylenolide-I and atractylenolide-II generated from dehydration and dehydrogenation of atractylenolide-III may be the material base of Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma stir-fried with wheat bran for strengthening spleen. PMID:24066586

  15. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  16. Fabrication of thick multilayered steel structure using A516 Grade 70 by multipass friction stir welding †

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Y. C.; Sanderson, S.; Mahoney, M.; Wang, Y.; Chen, J.; David, S. A.; Feng, Z.

    2016-04-06

    Here, we fabricated a thick-sectioned multilayered steel structure by multipass friction stir welding on A516 Grade 70 steel. Tensile strength of the multilayered samples was comparable to that of the base metal. Failure was located in the base metal when a defect-free sample was tested. Charpy impact toughness was higher in the stir zone and heat affected zone than in the base metal. For higher microhardness values were found in the stir zone and heat affected zone than the base metal due to grain refinement and modification of the microstructures. As a result, improved mechanical properties compared to the basemore » metal were found in the weld zones of friction stir welded A516 Grade 70 steel.« less

  17. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steel MA956

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Luke N.; Bennett, Martin S.; Baker, B. W.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kolbus, Lindsay M.

    2015-09-08

    This article characterizes the residual stresses generated by friction stir welding of oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA956 over a series of welding conditions. A plate of MA956 steel was friction stir welded at three conditions: 500 rpm/25 millimeters per minute (mmpm), 400 rpm/50 mmpm and 400 rpm/100 mmpm. The residual stresses across these welds were measured using both x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Longitudinal residual stresses up to eighty percent of the yield strength were observed for the 400 rpm/100 mmpm condition. Increasing the traverse rate while holding the rotational speed fixed increased the residual stress levels in the stir zone and at the stir zone-thermomechanically affected zone interface. The stress profiles displayed the characteristic M shape, and the asymmetry between advancing and retreating stress peaks was limited, occurring mainly on the root side of the weld. The large magnitude of the stresses was maintained throughout the thickness of the plates.

  18. Laterally constrained inversion for CSAMT data interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruo; Yin, Changchun; Wang, Miaoyue; Di, Qingyun

    2015-10-01

    Laterally constrained inversion (LCI) has been successfully applied to the inversion of dc resistivity, TEM and airborne EM data. However, it hasn't been yet applied to the interpretation of controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data. In this paper, we apply the LCI method for CSAMT data inversion by preconditioning the Jacobian matrix. We apply a weighting matrix to Jacobian to balance the sensitivity of model parameters, so that the resolution with respect to different model parameters becomes more uniform. Numerical experiments confirm that this can improve the convergence of the inversion. We first invert a synthetic dataset with and without noise to investigate the effect of LCI applications to CSAMT data, for the noise free data, the results show that the LCI method can recover the true model better compared to the traditional single-station inversion; and for the noisy data, the true model is recovered even with a noise level of 8%, indicating that LCI inversions are to some extent noise insensitive. Then, we re-invert two CSAMT datasets collected respectively in a watershed and a coal mine area in Northern China and compare our results with those from previous inversions. The comparison with the previous inversion in a coal mine shows that LCI method delivers smoother layer interfaces that well correlate to seismic data, while comparison with a global searching algorithm of simulated annealing (SA) in a watershed shows that though both methods deliver very similar good results, however, LCI algorithm presented in this paper runs much faster. The inversion results for the coal mine CSAMT survey show that a conductive water-bearing zone that was not revealed by the previous inversions has been identified by the LCI. This further demonstrates that the method presented in this paper works for CSAMT data inversion.

  19. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  20. Thermal Management in Friction-Stir Welding of Precipitation-Hardening Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Reynolds, Anthony

    2015-05-25

    Process design and implementation in FSW is mostly dependent on empirical information gathered through experience. Basic science of friction stir welding and processing can only be complete when fundamental interrelationships between process control parameters and response variables and resulting weld microstructure and properties are established to a reasonable extent. It is known that primary process control parameters like tool rotation and translation rate and forge axis force have complicated and interactive relationships to the process response variables such as peak temperature, time at temperature etc. Of primary influence to the other process response parameters are temperature and its gradient at the deformation and heat affected zones. Through review of pertinent works in the literature and some experimental results from boundary condition work performed in precipitation hardening aluminum alloys this paper will partially elucidate the nature and effects of temperature transients caused by variation of thermal boundaries in Friction Stir Welding.

  1. A Micro-Electrochemical Study of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum 6061-T6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Calle, Luz M.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of friction stir welded Aluminum alloy 606 1-T6 was studied using a micro-electrochemical cell. The micro-electrochemical cell has a measurement area of about 0.25 square mm which allows for measurement of corrosion properties at a very small scale. The corrosion and breakdown potentials were measured at many points inside and outside the weld along lines perpendicular to the weld. The breakdown potential is approximately equal inside and outside the weld; however, it is lower in the narrow border between the weld and base material. The results of electrochemical measurements were correlated to micro-structural analysis. The corrosion behavior of the friction stir welded samples was compared to tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded samples of the same material.

  2. Structure and Hardness of 01570 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir Welds Processed Under Different Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yasov, R. R.; Avtokratova, E. V.; Markushev, M. V.; Predko, P. Yu.; Konkevich, V. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Structure and hardness of the 01570 aluminum alloy joints processed by friction stir welding at various speeds are investigated. It is shown that increasing the traverse tool speed lowers the probability of macrodefect formation in the nugget zone; however, this can lead to anomalous grain growth in the zone of contact with the tool shoulder. Typical "onion-like" structure of the weld consisting of rings that differ by optical contrast is formed for all examined welding regimes. It is demonstrated that this contrast is caused by the difference in the grain sizes in the rings rather than by their chemical or phase composition. Mechanisms of transformation of the alloy structure during friction stir welding are discussed.

  3. Control of Structure in Conventional Friction Stir Welds through a Kinematic Theory of Metal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubisoff, H.A.; Schneider, J.A.; Nunes, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating pin is translated along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. Metal is prevented from flowing up the pin, which would result in plowing/cutting instead of welding, by a shoulder on the pin. In conventional FSW, the weld metal rests on an "anvil", which supports the heavy "plunge" load on the tool. In this study, both embedded tungsten wires along and copper plating on the faying surfaces were used to trace the flow of AA2219 weld metal around the C-FSW tool. The effect of tool rotational speed, travel speed, plunge load, and pin thread pitch on the resulting weld metal flow was evaluated. Plan, longitudinal, and transverse section x-ray radiographs were examined to trace the metal flow paths. The results are interpreted in terms of a kinematic theory of metal flow in FSW.

  4. Microtiter plates versus stirred mini-bioreactors in biocatalysis: a scalable approach.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Mário A P; Fernandes, Pedro C B; Ribeiro, Maria H L

    2013-05-01

    To place the application of miniaturized vessels as microbioreactors on a firm footing, focus has been given to engineering characterization. Studies on this matter have mostly involved carrier-free biological systems, while support-based systems have been overlooked. The present work aims to contribute to fill in such gap. Thus, it intended to establish a robust scaled down approach to identify and optimize relevant operational conditions of naringin hydrolysis by naringinase in PVA lens-shaped particles. The influence of geometric and dynamic (viz. Reynolds number) parameters was evaluated. Naringin hydrolysis in round, flat bottom MTP proved more effective than in square, pyramidal bottom. The bioconversion at MTP and stirred tank reactors scales showed that, given the 12.5-fold scale difference was in agreement between the bioconversion rates. The external mass transfer resistances were negligible as deduced from Damkohler modulus ≤1. The bioconversion was effectively scaled-up 200-fold from shaken microtiter plates to stirred tank reactors.

  5. The Mechanical Behavior of Friction-Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Hande

    2014-09-01

    Aluminum and alloys are widely used in the automotive industry due to the light weight, good formability, and malleability. Spot welding is the most commonly used joining method of these materials, but the high current requirements and the inconsistent quality of the final welds make this process unsuitable. An alternative welding technique, the friction-stir spot welding process, can also be successfully used in joining of aluminum and alloys. In this study, 1-mm-thick AA5754 Al-alloy plates in the H-111 temper conditions were joined by friction-stir spot welding using two different weld parameters such as tool rotational speed and dwell time. Mechanical properties of the joints were obtained with extensive hardness measurements and tensile shear tests. The effect of these parameters on the failure modes of welded joints was also determined.

  6. Experimental Investigations on Formability of Aluminum Tailor Friction Stir Welded Blanks in Deep Drawing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesharwani, R. K.; Panda, S. K.; Pal, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, tailor friction stir welded blanks (TFSWBs) were fabricated successfully using 2.0-mm-thick AA5754-H22 and AA5052-H32 sheet metals with optimized tool design and process parameters. Taguchi L9 orthogonal array has been used to design the friction stir welding experiments, and the Grey relational analysis has been applied for the multi objective optimization in order to maximize the weld strength and total elongation reducing the surface roughness and energy consumption. The formability of the TFSWBs and parent materials was evaluated and compared in terms of limiting drawing ratio (LDR) using a conventional circular die. It was found that the formability of the TFSWBs was comparable with that of both the parent materials without failure in the weldment. A modified conical tractrix die (MCTD) was proposed to enhance the LDR of the TFSWBs. It was found that the formability was improved by 27% using the MCTD.

  7. Microstructures and electrochemical behaviors of the friction stir welding dissimilar weld.

    PubMed

    Shen, Changbin; Zhang, Jiayan; Ge, Jiping

    2011-06-01

    By using optical microscope, the microstructures of 5083/6082 friction stir welding (FSW) weld and parent materials were analyzed. Meanwhile, at ambient temperature and in 0.2 mol/L NaHS03 and 0.6 mol/L NaCl solutionby gravimetric test, potentiodynamic polarization curve test, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, the electrochemical behavior of 5083/6082 friction stir welding weld and parent materials were comparatively investigated by gravimetric test, potentiodynamic polarization curve test, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation. The results indicated that at given processing parameters, the anti-corrosion property of the dissimilar weld was superior to those of the 5083 and 6082 parent materials.

  8. Friction Stir Welding of a Thick Al-Zn-Mg Alloy Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchibabu, V.; Reddy, G. M.; Kulkarni, D.; De, A.

    2016-03-01

    Al-Zn-Mg alloys are widely used as structural materials due to high strength-to-weight ratio and impact toughness. As fusion welds in these alloys commonly face hot cracking and macro porosity, friction stir welding is increasingly becoming the preferred recourse. We report here a detailed experimental study on friction stir welding of a specific Al-Zn-Mg alloy with its chemical compositions close to AA7039. The effect of tool rotational speed and welding speed on the weld profile, joint microstructure, and mechanical properties is studied extensively. The results show sound weld profiles and joint properties within the selected range of process conditions. Within the selected range of welding conditions, the welds made at a tool rotational speed of 350 rpm and welding speed of 3 mm/s have showed joint structure, tensile, and impact toughness properties fairly close to that of the base material.

  9. Microstructure of friction stir welded joints of 2017A aluminium alloy sheets.

    PubMed

    Mroczka, K; Dutkiewicz, J; Pietras, A

    2010-03-01

    The present study examines a friction stir welded 2017A aluminium alloy. Transmission electron microscope investigations of the weld nugget revealed the average grain size of 5 microm, moderate density of dislocations as well as the presence of nanometric precipitates located mostly in grains interiors. Scanning electron microscope observations of fractures showed the presence of ductile fracture in the region of the weld nugget with brittle precipitates in the lower part. The microhardness analysis performed on the cross-section of the joints showed fairly small changes; however, after the artificial ageing process an increase in hardness was observed. The change of the joint hardness subject to the ageing process indicates partial supersaturation in the material during friction stir welding and higher precipitation hardening of the joint.

  10. The Mechanical Behavior of Friction-Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Hande

    2014-10-01

    Aluminum and alloys are widely used in the automotive industry due to the light weight, good formability, and malleability. Spot welding is the most commonly used joining method of these materials, but the high current requirements and the inconsistent quality of the final welds make this process unsuitable. An alternative welding technique, the friction-stir spot welding process, can also be successfully used in joining of aluminum and alloys. In this study, 1-mm-thick AA5754 Al-alloy plates in the H-111 temper conditions were joined by friction-stir spot welding using two different weld parameters such as tool rotational speed and dwell time. Mechanical properties of the joints were obtained with extensive hardness measurements and tensile shear tests. The effect of these parameters on the failure modes of welded joints was also determined.

  11. Mode-Stirred Method Implementation for HIRF Susceptibility Testing and Results Comparison with Anechoic Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Koppen, Sandra V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of mode-stirred method for susceptibility testing according to the current DO-160D standard. Test results on an Engine Data Processor using the implemented procedure and the comparisons with the standard anechoic test results are presented. The comparison experimentally shows that the susceptibility thresholds found in mode-stirred method are consistently higher than anechoic. This is consistent with the recent statistical analysis finding by NIST that the current calibration procedure overstates field strength by a fixed amount. Once the test results are adjusted for this value, the comparisons with the anechoic results are excellent. The results also show that test method has excellent chamber to chamber repeatability. Several areas for improvements to the current procedure are also identified and implemented.

  12. On the Critical Technological Issues of Friction Stir Welding T-Joints of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Scala, A.; Prisco, A.

    2012-08-01

    In this article, friction stir welded T-joints of innovative dissimilar aluminum alloys have been produced and tested with the aim to investigate the feasibility of using this joining technique, in this configuration, in the aerospace field with the final aim to save weight. The introduction of both this new welding technique and innovative alloys, such as AA 2198 and AA 6056, could allow making lighter and stronger structures. Some experiments, carried out previously, have shown that the fixturing device, the tool geometry, and the tilt angle play a significant role in the joint soundness. A wide experimental characterization has been carried out on FSW T-joints of AA 6056 T4 extrudes to AA 2198 T3 rolled plates. The results attained allow to put in evidence some critical issues on the investigated configuration and can be considered as a further acquired knowledge in the understanding and the design of friction stir processes.

  13. Texture Modification and Ductility Enhancement in Mg Alloy Through Friction Stir Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Choo, Hahn; Vogel, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between friction stir processing parameters, i.e., rotation and travel rates of the processing tool, the texture modification and ductility enhancement of an Mg alloy AZ31B was investigated. With the systematic changes in processing parameters as represented by a Zener-Hollomon parameter input, a transition of different crystallographic texture was observed through neutron diffraction measurement, which correlated well with the changes in deformation and recrystallization mechanism activated during the FSP. The variation in the texture leads to dramatic changes in the strength and ductility in the stir zone of the processed Mg plate. A maximum of three-fold increase in the ductility was achieved in the Mg alloy through FSP when the Zener-Hollomon parameter exceeds a critical value, which is associated with low rotation speed and high travel speed processing conditions.

  14. Microstructure and anisotropic mechanical behavior of friction stir welded AA2024 alloy sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhihan; Li, Wenya; Li, Jinglong; Chao, Y.J.; Vairis, A.

    2015-09-15

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSW) AA2024-T3 alloy joints were investigated based on the uniaxial tensile tests. The joint microstructure was examined by using electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Results show that the evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in the FSW joints. With the increase of loading angle from 0° to 90° the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the specimens consistently decrease, or at first decrease and then increase, depending on the FSW process parameters. The specimen cut from the weld direction, i.e. a loading angle of 0°, exhibits the highest strength and elongation. - Highlights: • Microstructure and anisotropy of friction stir welded joints were studied. • The evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in joints. • The lowest yield stress and UTS are at 45° and 60° loadings, respectively. • Rotation speed heavily impact on the anisotropy of joints.

  15. Lack of Penetration in Friction Stir Welds: Effects on Mechanical Properties and NDE Feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinchen, David G.; Adams, Glynn P.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews the issue of lack of penetration (LOP) in Friction Stir Welding and the feasibility of using non-destructive tests to detect . Friction Stir Welding takes place in the solid phase below the melting point of the materials to be joined. It thus gives the ability to join materials which are difficult to fusion weld, for example 2000 and 7000 aluminium alloys. This process though can result in a lack of penetration, due to an incomplete penetration of the DXZ. This is frequently referred to as a "kissing bond", which requires micro examination to detect. The presentation then discusses the surface crack tension tests. It then reviews the simulated service test and results. It then discusses the feasibility of using non-destructive examination to detect LOP, the forms of test which can be used, and the results the tests.

  16. A study on friction stir welding of 12mm thick aluminum alloy plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepati Anil; Biswas, Pankaj; Tikader, Sujoy; Mahapatra, M. M.; Mandal, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    Most of the investigations regarding friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminum alloy plates have been limited to about 5 to 6 mm thick plates. In prior work conducted the various aspects concerning the process parameters and the FSW tool geometry were studied utilizing friction stir welding of 12 mm thick commercial grade aluminum alloy. Two different simple-to-manufacture tool geometries were used. The effect of varying welding parameters and dwell time of FSW tool on mechanical properties and weld quality was examined. It was observed that in order to achieve a defect free welding on such thick aluminum alloy plates, tool having trapezoidal pin geometry was suitable. Adequate tensile strength and ductility can be achieved utilizing a combination of high tool rotational speed of about 2000 r/min and low speed of welding around 28 mm/min. At very low and high dwell time the ductility of welded joints are reduced significantly.

  17. EFFECT OF TOOL FEATURE ON THE JOINT STRENGTH OF DISSIMILAR FRICTION STIR LAP WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Mattlin, Karl F.

    2011-04-25

    Several variations of friction stir tools were used to investigate the effects on the joint strengths of dissimilar friction stir lap welds. In the present lap weld configuration the top sheet was a 2.32 mm thick Mg (AZ 31) alloy. The bottom sheet consisted of two different steels, a (i) 0.8 mm thick electro-galvanized (EG) mild steel, or a (ii) 1.5 mm thick hot dip galvanized (HDG) high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel. Initially the tool shape was modified to accommodate the material, at which point the tool geometry was fixed. With a fixed tool geometry an additional feature was added to the pin bottom on one of the tools by incorporating a short hard insert, which would act as a stronger bottom sheet cutter. The effects of such modification on the unguided lap shear strength, and associated microstructural changes are discussed in this study.

  18. Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welding: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; David, Stan A

    2011-01-01

    Significant amounts of residual stresses are often generated during welding and result in critical degradation of the structural integrity and performance of components. Neutron diffraction has become a well established technique for the determination of residual stresses in welds because of the unique deep penetration, three-dimensional mapping capability, and volume averaged bulk measurements characteristic of the scattering neutron beam. Friction stir welding has gained prominence in recent years. The authors reviewed a number of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welds and highlighted examples addressing how the microstructures and residual stresses are correlated with each other. An example of in situ neutron diffraction measurement result shows the evolution of the residual stresses during welding.

  19. TRENDS IN DWARF EARLY-TYPE KINEMATICS WITH CLUSTER-CENTRIC RADIUS DRIVEN BY TIDAL STIRRING

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, A. J.; Toloba, E.; Simon, J. D.; Mayer, L.; Guhathakurta, P.

    2015-02-01

    We model the dynamics of dwarf early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster when subject to a variety of environmental processes. We focus on how these processes imprint trends in the dynamical state (rotational versus pressure support as measured by the λ{sub Re/2}{sup ∗} statistic) with projected distance from the cluster center, and compare these results to observational estimates. We find a large scatter in the gradient of λ{sub Re/2}{sup ∗} with projected radius. A statistical analysis shows that models with no environmental effects produce gradients as steep as those observed in none of the 100 cluster realizations we consider, while in a model incorporating tidal stirring by the cluster potential 34% of realizations produce gradients as steep as that observed. Our results suggest that tidal stirring may be the cause of the observed radial dependence of dwarf early-type dynamics in galaxy clusters.

  20. A numerical investigation of grain shape and crystallographic texture effects on the plastic strain localization in friction stir weld zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, V.; Balokhonov, R.; Batukhtina, E.; Shakhidjanov, V.

    2015-10-01

    Crystal plasticity approaches were adopted to build models accounting for the microstructure and texture observed in different friction stir weld zones. To this end, a numerical investigation of crystallographic texture and grain shape effects on the plastic strain localization in a friction stir weld of an aluminum-base alloy was performed. The presence of texture was found to give rise to pronounced mesoscale plastic strain localization.

  1. Aquatic eddy correlation: quantifying the artificial flux caused by stirring-sensitive O2 sensors.

    PubMed

    Holtappels, Moritz; Noss, Christian; Hancke, Kasper; Cathalot, Cecile; McGinnis, Daniel F; Lorke, Andreas; Glud, Ronnie N

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the aquatic eddy correlation (EC) technique has proven to be a powerful approach for non-invasive measurements of oxygen fluxes across the sediment water interface. Fundamental to the EC approach is the correlation of turbulent velocity and oxygen concentration fluctuations measured with high frequencies in the same sampling volume. Oxygen concentrations are commonly measured with fast responding electrochemical microsensors. However, due to their own oxygen consumption, electrochemical microsensors are sensitive to changes of the diffusive boundary layer surrounding the probe and thus to changes in the ambient flow velocity. The so-called stirring sensitivity of microsensors constitutes an inherent correlation of flow velocity and oxygen sensing and thus an artificial flux which can confound the benthic flux determination. To assess the artificial flux we measured the correlation between the turbulent flow velocity and the signal of oxygen microsensors in a sealed annular flume without any oxygen sinks and sources. Experiments revealed significant correlations, even for sensors designed to have low stirring sensitivities of ~0.7%. The artificial fluxes depended on ambient flow conditions and, counter intuitively, increased at higher velocities because of the nonlinear contribution of turbulent velocity fluctuations. The measured artificial fluxes ranged from 2-70 mmol m(-2) d(-1) for weak and very strong turbulent flow, respectively. Further, the stirring sensitivity depended on the sensor orientation towards the flow. For a sensor orientation typically used in field studies, the artificial flux could be predicted using a simplified mathematical model. Optical microsensors (optodes) that should not exhibit a stirring sensitivity were tested in parallel and did not show any significant correlation between O2 signals and turbulent flow. In conclusion, EC data obtained with electrochemical sensors can be affected by artificial flux and we

  2. Phased Array Ultrasound: Initial Development of PAUT Inspection of Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairigh, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of Phased Array Ultrasound (PAUT) as a non-destructive examination method for Self Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). PAUT is the only NDE method which has been shown to detect detrimental levels of Residual Oxide Defect (ROD), which can result in significant decrease in weld strength. The presentation reviews the PAUT process, and shows the results in comparison with x-ray radiography.

  3. Expansion and long-term maintenance of induced pluripotent stem cells in stirred suspension bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Shafa, Mehdi; Sjonnesen, Kirsten; Yamashita, Akihiro; Liu, Shiying; Michalak, Marek; Kallos, Michael S; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2012-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can provide an important source of cells for the next-generation of cell therapies in regenerative medicine, in part due to their similarity to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Patient-specific iPSCs represent an opportunity for autologous cell therapies that are not restricted by immunological, ethical and technical obstacles. One of the technical hurdles that must be overcome before iPSCs can be clinically implemented is the scalable, reproducible production of iPSCs and their differentiated progeny. All of the iPSC lines established thus far have been generated and expanded with static tissue culture protocols, which are time-consuming and suffer from batch-to-batch variability. Alternatively, stirred suspension bioreactors propose several benefits and their homogeneous culture environment facilitates the large-scale expansion required for clinical studies at less cost. We have previously developed protocols for expanding murine and human ESCs as undifferentiated aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors. The resulting cells were karyotypically normal, expressed pluripotency markers and could be differentiated into all three germ lineages, both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that stirred suspension bioreactors yield 58-fold expansion of undifferentiated pluripotent iPSCs over 4 days. In vitro differentiation into cartilage, bone and cardiomyocytes lineages, in addition to in vivo teratoma formation, further confirmed the existence of fully functional and undifferentiated pluripotent iPSC aggregates following long-term passaging. Stirred suspension bioreactor culture represents an efficient process for the large-scale expansion and maintenance of iPSCs, which is an important first step in their clinical application.

  4. Modeling of the mechanical behavior of aluminum alloys with friction stir welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balokhonov, Ruslan R.; Romanova, Varvara A.; Batukhtina, Ekaterina E.

    2015-10-01

    The deformation and fracture of a macroscopic duralumin sample with a friction stir weld are investigated numerically under compressive loading applied to the sample surface. A boundary-value problem is solved using a dynamic plane strain approximation. The weld zone structure corresponds to that observed experimentally and is taken into account explicitly in calculations. The mechanisms of the plastic strain localization and crack propagation operating in different zones of the weld are examined.

  5. Bistability in an uncatalyzed bromate oscillator in a continuously fed stirred tank reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Arun K.; Müller, S. C.

    1996-01-01

    Uncatalyzed gallic acid oscillating system has been investigated in a continuously fed stirred tank reactor (CSTR). In the [Bromate]0-[Bromide]0 concentration space, a region has been located where a bistability is observed between an oscillatory branch and a flow branch. To our knowledge this is the first evidence of bistability in an uncatalyzed bromate oscillator. Some observations have been explained in terms of the skeleton mechanism proposed in the past.

  6. A theoretical study of the influence of technological friction stir welding parameters on weld structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurov, Sergey; Shilko, Evgeny; Kolubaev, Evgeny; Psakhie, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    Computer simulation by the movable cellular automaton method was performed to study the dynamics of friction stir welding of duralumin plates. It was shown that the ratio of the rotation rate to the translational velocity of the rotating tool has a great influence on the quality of the welded joint. A suitably chosen ratio of these parameters combined with an additional ultrasonic impact reduces considerably the porosity and the amount of microcracks in the weld.

  7. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiskumar, R.; Murugan, N.; Dinaharan, I.; Vijay, S.J.

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  8. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  9. Microliter-bioreactor array with buoyancy-driven stirring for human hematopoietic stem cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Luni, Camilla; Feldman, Hope C.; Pozzobon, Michela; De Coppi, Paolo; Meinhart, Carl D.; Elvassore, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the development of an array of bioreactors where finely controlled stirring is provided at the microliter scale (100–300 μl). The microliter-bioreactor array is useful for performing protocol optimization in up to 96 parallel experiments of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) cultures. Exploring a wide range of experimental conditions at the microliter scale minimizes cost and labor. Once the cell culture protocol is optimized, it can be applied to large-scale bioreactors for stem cell production at the clinical level. The controlled stirring inside the wells of a standard 96-well plate is provided by buoyancy-driven thermoconvection. The temperature and velocity fields within the culture volume are determined with numerical simulations. The numerical results are verified with experimental velocity measurements using microparticle image velocimetry (μPIV) and are used to define feasible experimental conditions for stem cell cultures. To test the bioreactor array’s functionality, human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells were cultured for 7 days at five different stirring conditions (0.24–0.58 μm∕s) in six repeated experiments. Cells were characterized in terms of proliferation, and flow cytometry measurements of viability and CD34 expression. The microliter-bioreactor array demonstrates its ability to support HSC cultures under stirred conditions without adversely affecting the cell behavior. Because of the highly controlled operative conditions, it can be used to explore culture conditions where the mass transport of endogenous and exogenous growth factors is selectively enhanced, and cell suspension provided. While the bioreactor array was developed for culturing HSCs, its application can be extended to other cell types. PMID:20824067

  10. Micrometer-scale mixing with Pickering emulsions: biphasic reactions without stirring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Fu, Luman; Yang, Hengquan

    2014-02-01

    A general strategy that avoids stirring for organic/aqueous reactions involving solid catalysts is reported. The strategy involves converting a conventional biphasic system into a Pickering emulsion phase with micrometer-scale droplets ensuring good mixing. In test reactions, nitrotoluene reduction and epoxidation of allylic alcohols, the reaction efficiency is comparable to conventional stirrer-driven biphasic catalysis reaction systems. Short diffusion distances, arising from the compartmentalization of densely packed droplets, play an important role in boosting the reaction efficiency.

  11. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Konovalenko, Igor S. Kolubaev, Evgeniy A.; Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2015-10-27

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  12. Shaken, not stirred: bioanalytical study of the antioxidant activities of martinis

    PubMed Central

    Trevithick, C C; Chartrand, M M; Wahlman, J; Rahman, F; Hirst, M; Trevithick, J R

    1999-01-01

    Background Moderate consumption of alcoholic drinks seems to reduce the risks of developing cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cataracts, perhaps through antioxidant actions of their alcohol, flavonoid, or polyphenol contents. “Shaken, not stirred” routinely identifies the way the famous secret agent James Bond requires his martinis. Objectives As Mr Bond is not afflicted by cataracts or cardiovascular disease, an investigation was conducted to determine whether the mode of preparing martinis has an influence on their antioxidant capacity. Design Stirred and shaken martinis were assayed for their ability to quench luminescence by a luminescent procedure in which hydrogen peroxide reacts with luminol bound to albumin. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. Results Shaken martinis were more effective in deactivating hydrogen peroxide than the stirred variety, and both were more effective than gin or vermouth alone (0.072% of peroxide control for shaken martini, 0.157% for stirred v 58.3% for gin and 1.90% for vermouth). The reason for this is not clear, but it may well not involve the facile oxidation of reactive martini components: control martinis through which either oxygen or nitrogen was bubbled did not differ in their ability to deactivate hydrogen peroxide (0.061% v 0.057%) and did not differ from the shaken martini. Moreover, preliminary experiments indicate that martinis are less well endowed with polyphenols than Sauvignon white wine or Scotch whisky (0.056 mmol/l (catechin equivalents) shaken, 0.060 mmol/l stirred v 0.592 mmol/l wine, 0.575 mmol/l whisky). Conclusions 007's profound state of health may be due, at least in part, to compliant bartenders. PMID:10600955

  13. Effects of Laser and Shot Peening on Fatigue Crack Growth in Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Forman, Royce; Lyons, Jed

    2006-01-01

    The effects of laser, and shot peening on the fatigue life of Friction Stir Welds (FSW) have been investigated. The surface roughness resulting from various peening techniques was assessed, and the fracture surfaces microstructure was characterized. Laser peening resulted in an increase in fatigue life approximately 60%, while shot peening resulted in 10% increase when compared to the unpeened material. The surface roughness of shot peening was significantly higher compared to the base material, while specimens processed with laser peening were relatively smooth.

  14. TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES: ENHANCED TRANSFORMATION INTO DWARF SPHEROIDALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Mayer, Lucio

    2013-02-20

    According to the tidal stirring model, late type, rotationally supported dwarfs resembling present day dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies can transform into dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) via interactions with Milky-Way-sized hosts. We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate for the first time how tidal stirring depends on the dark matter (DM) density distribution in the central stellar region of the progenitor disky dwarf. Specifically, we explore various asymptotic inner slopes {gamma} of the dwarf DM density profiles ({rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -{gamma}}). For a given orbit inside the primary galaxy, rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in DM halos with core-like distributions ({gamma} = 0.2) and mild density cusps ({gamma} = 0.6) demonstrate a substantially enhanced likelihood and efficiency of transformation into dSphs compared to their counterparts with steeper DM density profiles ({gamma} = 1). Such shallow DM distributions are akin to those of observed dIrrs highlighting tidal stirring as a plausible model for the Local Group (LG) morphology-density relation. When {gamma} < 1, a single pericentric passage can induce dSph formation and disky dwarfs on low-eccentricity or large-pericenter orbits are able to transform; these new results allow tidal stirring to explain virtually all known dSphs across a wide range of distances from their hosts. A subset of disky dwarfs initially embedded in DM halos with shallow density profiles are eventually disrupted by the primary; those that survive as dSphs are generally on orbits with lower eccentricities and/or larger pericenters compared to those of typical cold dark matter satellites. The latter could explain the peculiar orbits of several LG dSphs such as Fornax, Leo I, Tucana, and Cetus.

  15. Effects of Stirring and Fluid Perfusion on the In Vitro Degradation of Calcium Phosphate Cement/PLGA Composites.

    PubMed

    An, Jie; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Wolke, Joop G C; Jansen, John A

    2015-11-01

    In vitro degradation rates of calcium phosphate bioceramics are investigated using a large variation of soaking protocols that do not all match the dynamic conditions of the perfused physiological environment. Therefore, we studied the effect of stirring and fluid perfusion on the in vitro degradation rate of apatitic calcium phosphate cements (CPC) containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres. The composites were soaked in phosphate-buffered saline up to 6 weeks under unstirred, stirred, or perfused conditions followed by analysis of mass loss, compression strength, porosity, crystal phase composition, and morphology of the cement composites. The results showed that fluid perfusion reduced the decrease in pH and corresponding degradation rates, while nonperfused soaking conditions (i.e., stirred and unstirred conditions) resulted into more extensive acidification, the rate of which increased with stirring. After 2 weeks, the formation of a secondary brushite phase was observed for cement composites soaked under nonperfused (i.e., stirred and unstirred) conditions, whereas this phase was not detected in cements soaked under perfused conditions. The degradation rate of cement composites decreased in the order unstirred>stirred>perfused, as evidenced by quantification of mass loss, compression strength, and pore morphology. To summarize, we have demonstrated that soaking conditions strongly affected the in vitro degradation process of CPCs. As a consequence, it can be concluded that the experimental design of current in vitro degradation studies does not allow for correlation to (pre-)clinical studies.

  16. Calibration of a passive sampler based on stir bar sorptive extraction for the monitoring of hydrophobic organic pollutants in water.

    PubMed

    Vrana, Branislav; Komancová, Lucie; Sobotka, Jaromír

    2016-05-15

    A passive sampler based on stir bars coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was calibrated for the measurement of time-weighted average concentrations of hydrophobic micropollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides, in water. Stir bar/water partition coefficients were measured by equilibrating bars with sheets made of silicone rubber material for which partition coefficients had been reported previously. Kinetic parameters characterising the exchange of analytes between stir bars and water were determined under controlled exposure conditions using a passive dosing system. The dosing system consisted of silicone rubber sheets with a large surface area, spiked with analytes. During stir bar sampler exposure, analytes partitioned from dosing sheets to water in the exposure tank and maintained constant exposure concentrations. Reversible and isotropic exchange kinetics of analytes between sampler and water was confirmed by measuring the release of a range of performance reference compounds (PRCs) from stir bars. Application of a two-resistance model confirmed that, except for hexachlorocyclohexane isomers, uptake of the test compounds under the experimental conditions was controlled by diffusion in the water boundary layer. This permits the application of PRCs for in situ calibration of uptake kinetics of test compounds to stir bars. PMID:26992498

  17. Effect of Intermetallic Compound Phases on the Mechanical Properties of the Dissimilar Al/Cu Friction Stir Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodir, S. A.; Ahmed, M. M. Z.; Ahmed, Essam; Mohamed, Shaymaa M. R.; Abdel-Aleem, H.

    2016-09-01

    Types and distribution of intermetallic compound phases and their effects on the mechanical properties of dissimilar Al/Cu friction stir welded joints were investigated. Three different rotation speeds of 1000, 1200 and 1400 rpm were used with two welding speeds of 20 and 50 mm/min. The results show that the microstructures inside the stir zone were greatly affected by the rotation speed. Complex layered structures that containing intermetallic compound phases such as CuAl2, Al4Cu9 were formed in the stir zone. Their amount found to be increased with increasing rotation speed. However, the increasing of the rotation speed slightly lowered the hardness of the stir zone. Many sharp hardness peaks in the stir zones were found as a result of the intermetallic compounds formed, and the highest peaks of 420 Hv were observed at a rotation speed of 1400 rpm. The joints ultimate tensile strength reached a maximum value of 105 MPa at the rotation speed of 1200 rpm and travel speed of 20 mm/min with the joint efficiency ranged between 88 and 96% of the aluminum base metal. At the travel speed of 50 mm/min, the maximum value of the ultimate tensile strength was 96 MPa at rotation speed of 1400 rpm with the joint efficiency ranged between 79 and 90%. The fracture surfaces of tensile test specimens showed no evidence for the effect of the brittle intermetallic compounds in the stir zones on the tensile strength of the joints.

  18. Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of a bLS inverse-dispersion technique for measuring gas emissions from livestock operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) inverse-dispersion technique has been used to measure fugitive gas emissions from livestock operations. The accuracy of the bLS technique, as indicated by the percentages of gas recovery in various tracer-release experiments, has generally been within ± 10% o...

  19. An exact inverse method for subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daripa, Prabir

    1988-01-01

    A new inverse method for the aerodynamic design of airfoils is presented for subcritical flows. The pressure distribution in this method can be prescribed as a function of the arclength of the still unknown body. It is shown that this inverse problem is mathematically equivalent to solving only one nonlinear boundary value problem subject to known Dirichlet data on the boundary.

  20. Inversion in Mathematical Thinking and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Inversion is a fundamental relational building block both within mathematics as the study of structures and within people's physical and social experience, linked to many other key elements such as equilibrium, invariance, reversal, compensation, symmetry, and balance. Within purely formal arithmetic, the inverse relationships between addition and…

  1. Biotransformation of ferulic acid to vanillin in the packed bed-stirred fermentors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lei; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Shuang; Li, Suyue; Yan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Ningbo; Liang, Ning; Li, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    We performed the biotransformation of ferulic acid to vanillin using Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) in the stirring packed-bed reactors filled with carbon fiber textiles (CFT). Scanning electron microscope (SEM), HPLC, qRT-PCR and ATP assay indicated that vanillin biotransformation is tightly related to cell growth, cellar activity and the extent of biofilm formation. The biotransformation was affected by hydraulic retention time (HRT), temperature, initial pH, stirring speed and ferulic acid concentration, and the maximum vanillin production was obtained at 20 h, 35 °C, 9.0, 200 rpm, 1.5 g/L, respectively. Repeated batch biotransformation performed under this optimized condition showed that the maximum productivity (0.047 g/L/h) and molar yield (60.43%) achieved in immobilized cell system were 1.84 and 3.61 folds higher than those achieved in free cell system. Therefore, the stirring reactor packed with CFT carrier biofilm formed by B. subtilis represented a valid biocatalytic system for the production of vanillin. PMID:27708366

  2. Stirring a ring Bose-Einstein condensate: vortices and overall circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Noel; Edwards, Mark; Clark, Charles W.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the process whereby stirring a superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a ring-shaped potential leads to an overall circulation. We solved the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation under conditions chosen to match those of an experiment recently conducted at NIST. Briefly, 500,000 Na atoms where confined at the ring-shaped intersection of a red-detuned horizontal light sheet and a vertically propagating Laguerre-Gauss beam. Stirring was carried via a blue-detuned gaussian beam. We found that, at first, the stirring spawned a number of vortex-antivortex pairs and then stopped. These vortices displayed a complicated dynamical behavior which slowly reduced the number of vortices pairwise via annihilation and singly via diffusion into surface modes of the condensate. At the end of this dynamics, the set of vortices was replaced by an overall circulation of atoms around the ring. We present examples of this behavior, give a simple model of vortex motion and vortex-vortex interaction, and show how the production and annihilation of vortices gets turned into a overall circulation of the ring Bose-Einstein condensate. Support in part by NSF grant #1068761.

  3. Stirring a ring Bose-Einstein condensate: vortices and overall circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Noel; Edwards, Mark; Clark, Charles

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the process whereby stirring a superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a ring-shaped potential leads to an overall circulation. We solved the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation under conditions chosen to match those of an experiment recently conducted at NIST. Briefly, 500,000 Na atoms where confined at the ring-shaped intersection of a red-detuned horizontal light sheet and a vertically propagating Laguerre-Gauss beam. Stirring was carried via a blue-detuned gaussian beam. We found that, at first, the stirring spawned a number of vortex-antivortex pairs and then stopped. These vortices displayed a complicated dynamical behavior which slowly reduced the number of vortices pairwise via annihilation and singly via diffusion into surface modes of the condensate. At the end of this dynamics, the set of vortices was replaced by an overall circulation of atoms around the ring. We present examples of this behavior, give a simple model of vortex motion and vortex-vortex interaction, and show how the production and annihilation of vortices gets turned into a overall circulation of the ring Bose-Einstein condensate. Support in part by NSF grant #1068761.

  4. Closed-Loop Control System for Friction Stir Welding Retractable Pin Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Romine, Peter L.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA invention disclosure, NASA Case No. MFS-31413, entitled "System for Controlling the Stirring Pin of a Friction Stir Welding Apparatus", (Patent Pending) authored by Jeff Ding, Dr Peter Romine and Pete Oelgoetz, addresses the precision control of the friction stir welding process. The closed-loop control system automatically adjusts the spinning welding pin, real-time, to maintain a precise penetration ligament (i.e., distance between pin-tip and weld panel backside surface). A specific pin length can be maintained while welding constant thickness or tapered material thickness weld panels. The closed-loop control system provides operator data and information relative to the exact position of the welding pin inside the weld joint. This paper presents the closed-loop RPT control system that operates using the auto-feedback of force signals sensed by the tip and shoulder of the welding pin. Significance: The FSW process can be successfully used in a production environment only if there is a method or technique that informs the FSW operator the precise location of the welding pin inside the weld joint. This is essential for applications in aerospace, automotive, pressure vessel, commercial aircraft and other industries.

  5. Preparation of a polar monolithic coating for stir bar sorptive extraction of emerging contaminants from wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Gilart, Núria; Cormack, P A G; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Borrull, Francesc; Fontanals, Núria

    2013-06-21

    A new polar monolith based on poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate-co-pentaerythritol triacrylate) (poly(PEGMA-co-PETRA)) was first synthesised, after the optimisation of the polymerisation conditions, and applied as a coating for the stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) of a group of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) from environmental water samples. Several parameters affecting extraction and liquid desorption in SBSE were investigated to achieve the optimal sorption efficiencies for the studied analytes. Under the optimised experimental conditions, a rapid, simple and sensitive SBSE performance was provided by the in-house monolithic stir bar. Moreover, the in-house coating was able to extract and desorb most of the studied analytes more effectively and quickly, due to its polar behaviour and suitable mechanical and physical properties, in comparison with the recently commercialised polar stir bars (EG Silicone Twister(®) and Acrylate Twister(®)). The analytical methodology, including SBSE followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), was validated and successfully applied for the determination of a group of PPCPs in wastewater samples.

  6. Growth and production of microencapsulated recombinant CHO in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Ying; Li, Na; Chen, Li; Zhang, Demeng; Sun, Dongsheng; Lv, Guojun; Yu, Weiting; Guo, Xin; Ma, Xiaojun

    2015-07-01

    Microencapsulation supplies cells with a three-dimensional microenvironment enhancing the metabolic activity, cell density and recombinant protein expression in a stirred tank bioreactor which is used widely to culture mammalian cells in many biochemical processes. In this paper, we address the growth and Desmodus rotundus salivary plasminogen activator (DSPA) production of recombinant CHO (rCHO) in a stirred tank bioreactor. Cells were cultured using two different methods--in an unmicroencapsulated versus microencapsulated culture--and compared differences between them in terms of cell reproduction and DSPA protein productivity. Compared to the unmicroencapsulated rCHO, microencapsulated cells got higher cell density and prolonged the plateau phase. Microencapsulated rCHO promoted DSPA production, with a maximum rate that was 4.8 times higher than in unmicroencapsulated cells, and the accumulated production of DSPA was 3.3 higher than in unmicroencapsulated cells. Negative relationship was found between specific growth rate and DSPA production capacity of unit cells. These findings will facilitate the methods for higher DSPA production in stirred tank bioreactors.

  7. Biodiesel production from palm oil using combined mechanical stirred and ultrasonic reactor.

    PubMed

    Choedkiatsakul, I; Ngaosuwan, K; Cravotto, G; Assabumrungrat, S

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the production of biodiesel from palm oil using a combined mechanical stirred and ultrasonic reactor (MS-US). The incorporation of mechanical stirring into the ultrasonic reactor explored the further improvement the transesterification of palm oil. Initial reaction rate values were 54.1, 142.9 and 164.2 mmol/L min for the mechanical-stirred (MS), ultrasonic (US) and MS-US reactors, respectively. Suitable methanol to oil molar ratio and the catalyst loading values were found to be 6 and 1 of oil, respectively. The effect of ultrasonic operating parameters; i.e. frequency, location, and number of transducer, has been investigated. Based on the conversion yield at the reactor outlet after 1 h, the number of transducers showed a relevant role in the reaction rate. Frequency and transducer location would appear to have no significant effect. The properties of the obtained biodiesel (density, viscosity, pour point, and flash point) satisfy the ASTM standard. The combined MS-US reactors improved the reaction rate affording the methyl esters in higher yield. PMID:24418101

  8. Comparative analysis of the friction stir welded aluminum-magnesium alloy joint grain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikina, A. A.; Sizova, O. V.; Novitskaya, O. S.

    2015-10-01

    A comparative test of the friction stir welded aluminum-magnesium alloy joint microstructure for plates of a different thickness was carried out. Finding out the structuring regularities in the weld nugget zone, that is the strongest zone of the weld, the effects of temperature-deformational conditions on the promotion of a metal structure refinement mechanism under friction stir welding can be determined. In this research friction stir welded rolled plates of an AMg5M alloy; 5 and 8 mm thick were investigated. Material fine structure pictures of the nugget zone were used to identify and measure subgrain and to define a second phase location. By means of optical microscopy it was shown that the fine-grained structure developed in the nugget zone. The grain size was 5 flm despite the thickness of the plates. In the sample 5.0 mm thick grains were coaxial, while in the sample 8.0 mm thick grains were elongate at a certain angle to the tool travel direction.

  9. Laser-assisted friction stir welding of aluminum alloy lap joints: microstructural and microhardness characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Giuseppe; Campanelli, Sabina L.; Contuzzi, Nicola; Angelastro, Andrea; Ludovico, Antonio D.

    2014-02-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. The laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) combines a Friction Stir Welding machine and a laser system. Laser power is used to preheat and to plasticize the volume of the workpiece ahead of the rotating tool; the workpiece is then joined in the same way as in the conventional FSW process. In this work an Ytterbium fiber laser with maximum power of 4 kW and a commercial FSW machine were coupled. Both FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 3 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in lap joint configuration with a constant tool rotation rate and with different feed rates. The two processes were compared and evaluated in terms of differences in the microstructure and in the micro-hardness profile.

  10. Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Nickel-Aluminum Bronze (NAB) Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küçükömeroğlu, T.; Şentürk, E.; Kara, L.; İpekoğlu, G.; Çam, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the applicability of friction stir welding to cast NAB alloy (i.e., C95800) with a thickness of 9 mm has been investigated. The joint performance was determined by conducting optical microscopy, microhardness measurements, and mechanical testing (e.g., tensile and Charpy impact tests). The effect of stir intensity on joint performance was also determined. A grain refinement (equiaxed fine grain structure) as well as evolution of a Widmanstätten structure was achieved within the stir zone of all the joints produced. Thus, all of the joints produced exhibited higher proof stress (i.e., between 512 and 616 MPa) than that of the base material, i.e., 397 MPa. On the other hand, only half of the specimens exhibited higher tensile strength values than that of the base plate (i.e., 794 MPa), whereas the other specimens displayed lower tensile strength than the base plate due to the existence of weld defects, namely cold bonding and/or tunnel defect.

  11. Stirred flow bioreactor modulates chondrocyte growth and extracellular matrix biosynthesis in chitosan scaffolds.

    PubMed

    García Cruz, Dunia Mercedes; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel; Gómez-Ribelles, José Luis

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to show the favorable effect of simple dynamic culture conditions on chondrogenesis of previously expanded human chondrocytes seeded in a macroporous scaffold with week cell-pore walls adhesion. We obtained enhanced chondrogenesis by the combination of chitosan porous supports with a double micro- and macro-pore structure and cell culture in a stirring bioreactor. Cell-scaffold constructs were cultured under static or mechanically stimulated conditions using an intermittent stirred flow bioreactor during 28 days. In static culture, the chondrocytes were homogeneously distributed throughout the scaffold pores; cells adhered to the scaffold pore walls, showed extended morphology and were able to proliferate. Immunofluorescense and biochemical assays showed abundant type I collagen deposition at day 28. However, the behavior of chondrocytes submitted to mechanical stimuli in the bioreactor was completely different. Mechanical loading influenced cell morphology and extracellular matrix composition. Under dynamic conditions, chondrocytes kept their characteristic phenotype and tended to form cell aggregates surrounded by a layer of the main components of the hyaline cartilage extracellular matrix, type II collagen, and aggrecan. An enhanced aggrecan and collagen type II production was observed in engineered cartilage constructs cultured under stirred flow compared with those cultured under static conditions. PMID:22529045

  12. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the sizemore » of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.« less

  13. Comparison of two methods for designing calorimeters using stirred tank reactors.

    PubMed

    Regestein, Lars; Giese, Heiner; Zavrel, Michael; Büchs, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Calorimetry is a robust method for online monitoring and controlling bioprocesses in stirred tank reactors. Up to now, reactor calorimeters have not been optimally constructed for pilot scale applications. Thus, the objective of this paper is to compare two different ways for designing reactor calorimeters and validate them. The "heat capacity" method based on the mass flow of the cooling liquid in the jacket was compared with the "heat transfer" method based on the heat transfer coefficient continuously measured in the cultivation of Escherichia coli VH33 in a 50 L stirred tank reactor. It was found that the values of the "heat transfer" method agreed very well with the calculated values from the oxygen consumption. By contrast, the curve of the "heat capacity" method deviated from that of the oxygen consumption calculated with the oxycaloric equivalent. In conclusion, the "heat transfer" method has been proven to have a higher degree of validity than the "heat capacity" method. Thus, it is a better and more robust means to measure heat generation of fermentations in stirred tank bioreactors on a pilot scale.

  14. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  15. Ultrasonic Low-Friction Containment Plate for Thermal and Ultrasonic Stir Weld Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Karl; Short, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The thermal stir welding (TSW) process is finding applications in fabrication of space vehicles. In this process, workpieces to be joined by TSW are drawn, by heavy forces, between "containment plates," past the TSW tool that then causes joining of the separate plates. It is believed that the TSW process would be significantly improved by reducing the draw force, and that this could be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the workpieces and containment plates. Based on use of high-power ultrasonics in metal forming processes, where friction reduction in drawing dies has been achieved, it is believed that ultrasonic vibrations of the containment plates could achieve similar friction reduction in the TSW process. By applying ultrasonic vibrations to the containment plates in a longitudinal vibration mode, as well as by mounting and holding the containment plates in a specific manner such as to permit the plates to acoustically float, friction between the metal parts and the containment plates is greatly reduced, and so is the drawing force. The concept was to bring in the ultrasonics from the sides of the plates, permitting the ultrasonic hardware to be placed to the side, away from the equipment that contains the thermal stir tooling and that applies clamping forces to the plates. Tests demonstrated that one of the major objectives of applying ultrasonics to the thermal stir system, that of reducing draw force friction, should be achievable on a scaled-up system.

  16. Efficient production of nanoparticle-loaded orodispersible films by process integration in a stirred media mill.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Denise; Finke, Jan Henrik; Kwade, Arno

    2016-09-25

    Orodispersible films possess a great potential as a versatile platform for nanoparticle-loaded oral dosage forms. In this case, poorly water-soluble organic materials were ground in a stirred media mill and embedded into a polymer matrix. The aim of this study was the shortening of this manufacturing process by the integration of several process steps into a stirred media mill without facing disadvantages regarding the film quality. Furthermore, this process integration is time conserving due to the high stress intensities provided in the mill and applicable for high solids contents and high suspension viscosities. Two organic materials, the model compound Anthraquinone and the active pharmaceutical ingredient Naproxen were investigated in this study. Besides the impact of the film processing on the crystallinity of the particles in the orodispersible film, a particle load of up to 50% was investigated with the new developed processing route. Additionally, a disintegration test was developed, combining an appropriate amount of saliva substitute and a clear endpoint determination. In summary, high nanoparticle loads in orodispersible films with good particle size preservation after film redispersion in water as well as a manufacturing of the film casting mass within a few minutes in a stirred media mill was achieved.

  17. Efficient production of nanoparticle-loaded orodispersible films by process integration in a stirred media mill.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Denise; Finke, Jan Henrik; Kwade, Arno

    2016-09-25

    Orodispersible films possess a great potential as a versatile platform for nanoparticle-loaded oral dosage forms. In this case, poorly water-soluble organic materials were ground in a stirred media mill and embedded into a polymer matrix. The aim of this study was the shortening of this manufacturing process by the integration of several process steps into a stirred media mill without facing disadvantages regarding the film quality. Furthermore, this process integration is time conserving due to the high stress intensities provided in the mill and applicable for high solids contents and high suspension viscosities. Two organic materials, the model compound Anthraquinone and the active pharmaceutical ingredient Naproxen were investigated in this study. Besides the impact of the film processing on the crystallinity of the particles in the orodispersible film, a particle load of up to 50% was investigated with the new developed processing route. Additionally, a disintegration test was developed, combining an appropriate amount of saliva substitute and a clear endpoint determination. In summary, high nanoparticle loads in orodispersible films with good particle size preservation after film redispersion in water as well as a manufacturing of the film casting mass within a few minutes in a stirred media mill was achieved. PMID:27477101

  18. Numerical Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process Using Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordache, M.; Badulescu, C.; Iacomi, D.; Nitu, E.; Ciuca, C.

    2016-08-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process that relies on frictional heating and plastic deformation realized at the interaction between a non-consumable welding tool that rotates on the contact surfaces of the combined parts. The experiments are often time consuming and costly. To overcome these problems, numerical analysis has frequently been used in last years. Several simplified numerical models were designed to elucidate various aspects of the complex thermo-mechanical phenomena associated with FSW. This research investigates a thermo-mechanical finite element model based on Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method to simulate the friction stir welding of the AA 6082-T6 alloy. Abaqus/cae software is used in order to simulate the welding stage of the Friction Stir Welding process. This paper presents the steps of the numerical simulation using the finite elements method, in order to evaluate the boundary conditions of the model and the geometry of the tools by using the Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method.

  19. Characteristics of Fluid Flows in a Novel Self-Stirring Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zimu; Zhao, Qiuyue; Lv, Chao; Dou, Zhihe; Lv, Guozhi; Zhang, Dianhua; Zhang, Tingan

    2014-07-01

    Fluid flow characteristics in a novel self-stirring reactor have been studied by numerical simulation method and particle image velocity (PIV) in this article. The novel self-stirring reactor is furnished with a driving turbine that can make impellers agitate under high-pressure energy of fluid. It is found that areas of dead zone decrease with an increase of the liquid level in range of 60-200 mm for the driving turbine and impeller types used in this study. The dead zone almost disappears with the liquid level 200 mm. Some minor-cycle flows that appear in the axial direction promote the mixing and exchange of fluid, which is beneficial to the process of dissolution reaction. Free-fall of liquid becomes more distinct and more energy losses occur as the situation gets further from the inlet. The pressure energy of fluid is converted into kinetic energy, and the velocity near the driving turbine is greater. While rotation drag is smaller at liquid level of 180 mm, the effect of circulation is obvious. The flow field recorded by PIV is consistent with the result achieved by simulation. Agitation leads to the level fluctuation. The velocity direction is away from the stirring shaft and outward toward the wall of the reactor.

  20. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Miller, M. K.; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.